Science.gov

Sample records for evanescent cell sensors

  1. Temperature-independent polymer optical fiber evanescent wave sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Zhao, Mingfu; Huang, Yun; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Although the numerous advantages of polymer optical fibers have been exploited in the fields of sensors and telecommunications, such fibers still experience a critical problem: the temperature dependency. Therefore, we explored the temperature-independent operation of a polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor immersed in distilled water. We investigated variations in the surface morphology, deformation trajectory, refractive index, and weight of the fiber-sensing region with varying water temperature. We also examined the spectral transmission and transmitted light intensity of fibers subjected to a heating-cooling treatment. We observed that the light-transmission modes and sensitivity of the sensor were affected by changes in the surface morphology, diameter, and refractive index of the sensing region caused by changes in temperature. The transmitted light intensity of the sensor was maintained at a constant level after five cycles of the heating-cooling treatment, after which the fibers exhibited a smooth surface, low refractive index, and large fiber diameter. Consequently, we utilized the heating-cooling-treated fiber to realize a temperature-independent, U-shaped polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor. The temperature independence was evaluated using glucose solutions in the range of 10 to 70 °C. The fabricated sensor showed significant temperature independence and high degree of consistency in measuring solutions. PMID:26112908

  2. Evanescent field sensors and the implementation of waveguiding nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Boerner, Sandra; Orghici, Rozalia; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    Conventional fiber optic evanescent-field gas sensors are based on a high number of total reflections while the gas is passing the active bare core fiber and of course a suitable laser light source. The use of miniaturized laser sources for sensitive detection of CO2 in gaseous and water-dissolved phase for environmental monitoring are studied for signal enhancing purposes. Additionally, the fiber optic sensor, consisting of a coiled bare multimode fiber core, was sensitized by an active polymer coating for the detection of explosive TNT. The implementation of ZnO waveguiding nanowires is discussed for surface and sensitivity enhancing coating of waveguiding elements, considering computational and experimental results.

  3. Planar Optical Sensors and Evanescent Wave Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Conor S.; Stránik, Ondrej; McEvoy, Helen M.; MacCraith, Brian D.

    Recent developments in microsystems technology have led to the widespread application of microfabrication techniques for the production of sensor platforms. These techniques have had a major impact on the development of so-called "Lab-on-a-Chip" devices. The major application areas for theses devices are biomedical diagnostics, industrial process monitoring, environmental monitoring, drug discovery, and defence. In the context of biomedical diagnostic applications, for example, such devices are intended to provide quantitative chemical or biochemical information on samples such as blood, sweat and saliva while using minimal sample volume.

  4. Evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown glucose sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Kaya, Malik; Wang, Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown (EF-FLRD) is a relatively new hybrid sensing technique which combines a versatile sensing mechanism with a sensitivity-enhanced ringdown detection scheme. An array of low cost, fast response, and high sensitivity biosensors based on the EF-FLRD technique can be developed. In this work, new fiber loop ringdown glucose sensors using refractive index-difference evanescent field attenuation effect as a sensing mechanism are described. The sensor head consists of either a section of partially-etched bare single mode fiber or a section of the etched fiber with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on the etched fiber surface. Effects of the sensor head, with and without the immobilized GOD, on the sensor's performance are comparatively examined. The sensors' responses to standard glucose solutions and synthetic urines in different glucose concentrations ranging from 50 mg/dl to 10 g/dl are studied. The sensors, with or without the immobilized GOD, showed a linear response to glucose concentrations in the range of 100 mg/dl to 1 g/dl, but a nonlinear response in the higher glucose concentration ranging from 1 to 10 g/dl. The detection sensitivities of the sensors for the glucose solutions and artificial urine samples are 75 and 50 mg/dl respectively, and the sampling rate of the sensors is 10 to 100 Hz. Estimated theoretical detection sensitivity of the EF-FLRD glucose sensors is 10 mg/dl, which is approximately 17 times lower than the glucose renal threshold concentration.

  5. Melamine sensing based on evanescent field enhanced optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji; Yao, Jun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhuang, Xu-ye; Ma, Wen-ying; Lin, Qiao

    2013-08-01

    Melamine is an insalubrious chemical, and has been frequently added into milk products illegally, to make the products more protein-rich. However, it can cause some various diseases, such as kidney stones and bladder cancer. In this paper, a novel optical fiber sensor with high sensitivity based on absorption of the evanescent field for melamine detection is successfully proposed and developed. Different concentrations of melamine changing from 0 to 10mg/mL have been detected using the micro/nano-sensing fiber decorated with silver nanoparticles cluster layer. As the concentration increases, the sensing fiber's output intensity gradually deceases and the absorption of the analyte becomes large. The concentration changing of 1mg/ml can cause the absorbance varying 0.664 and the limit of the melamine detectable concentration is 1ug/mL. Besides, the coupling properties between silver nanoparticles have also been analyzed by the FDTD method. Overall, this evanescent field enhanced optical fiber sensor has potential to be used in oligo-analyte detection and will promote the development of biomolecular and chemical sensing applications.

  6. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  7. Mode-independent attenuation in evanescent-field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnewuch, Harald; Renner, Hagen

    1995-03-01

    Generally, the total power attenuation in multimode evanescent-field sensor waveguides is nonproportional to the bulk absorbance because the modal attenuation constants differ. Hence a direct measurement is difficult and is additionally aggravated because the waveguide absorbance is highly sensitive to the specific launching conditions at the waveguide input. A general asymptotic formula for the modal power attenuation in strongly asymmetric inhomogeneous planar waveguides with arbitrarily distributed weak absorption in the low-index superstrate is derived. Explicit expressions for typical refractive-index profiles are given. Except when very close to the cutoff, the predicted asymptotic attenuation behavior agrees well with exact calculations. The ratio of TM versus TE absorption has been derived to be (2 - n0 2/nf2 ) for arbitrary profiles. Waveguides with a linear refractive-index profile show mode-independent attenuation coefficients within each polarization. Further, the asymptotic sensitivity is independent of the wavelength, so that it should be possible to directly measure the spectral variation of the bulk absorption. The mode independence of the attenuation has been verified experimentally for a second-order polynomial profile, which is close to a linear refractive-index distribution. In contrast, the attenuation in the step-profile waveguide has been found to depend strongly on the mode number, as predicted by theory. A strong spread of the modal attenuation coefficients is also predicted for the parabolic-profile waveguide sensor.

  8. Theory of fiber-optic, evanescent-wave spectroscopy and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messica, A.; Greenstein, A.; Katzir, A.

    1996-05-01

    A general theory for fiber-optic, evanescent-wave spectroscopy and sensors is presented for straight, uncladded, step-index, multimode fibers. A three-dimensional model is formulated within the framework of geometric optics. The model includes various launching conditions, input and output end-face Fresnel transmission losses, multiple Fresnel reflections, bulk absorption, and evanescent-wave absorption. An evanescent-wave sensor response is analyzed as a function of externally controlled parameters such as coupling angle, f number, fiber length, and diameter. Conclusions are drawn for several experimental apparatuses.

  9. A microvolume molecularly imprinted polymer modified fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor for bisphenol A determination.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Ye, Zhongbin; Xu, Jing; Liu, Yucheng; Zhang, Hanyin

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor for bisphenol A (BPA) determination based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-modified fiber column was developed. MIP film immobilized with BPA was synthesized on the fiber column, and the sensor was then constructed by inserting the optical fiber prepared into a transparent capillary. A microchannel (about 2.0 μL) formed between the fiber and the capillary acted as a flow cell. BPA can be selectively adsorbed online by the MIP film and excited to produce fluorescence by the evanescent wave produced on the fiber core surface. The conditions for BPA enrichment, elution, and fluorescence detection are discussed in detail. The analytical measurements were made at 276 nm/306 nm (λ(ex)/λ(em)), and linearity of 3 × 10(-9)-5 × 10(-6) g mL(-1) BPA, a limit of detection of 1.7 × 10(-9) g mL(-1) BPA (3σ), and a relative standard deviation of 2.4% (n = 5) were obtained. The sensor selectivity and MIP binding measurement were also evaluated. The results indicated that the selectivity and sensitivity of the proposed fiber-optic sensor could be greatly improved by using MIP as a recognition and enrichment element. Further, by modification of the sensing and detection elements on the optical fiber, the proposed sensor showed the advantages of easy fabrication and low cost. The novel sensor configuration provided a platform for monitoring other species by simply changing the light source and sensing elements. The sensor presented has been successfully applied to determine BPA released from plastic products treated at different temperatures.

  10. Development of Sensors Using Evanescent Wave Interactions in Sapphire Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Renfro; Eric H. Jordan

    2006-12-31

    The development of tunable diode laser absorption sensors for measurements in industrial boilers, both through direct absorption and evanescent wave absorption have been performed in the work presented here. These sensors use both direct and indirect absorption through the use of evanescent interactions within a coal firing combustion environment. For the direct absorption sensor, wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection was implemented within a physical probe designed to be placed with the flue stack of a power plant. Measurements were taken of carbon dioxide and water vapor concentration during operation at a local industrial facility. The design of this sensor probe overcomes problems of beam steering and permits a reference gas measurement. Extracted concentration data and design elements from the direct absorption measurements are presented. In addition, development of a sapphire fiber-based sensor using evanescent wave absorption along the outside of the fiber is presented. Evanescent absorption allows for the laser transmission to be maintained in the fiber at all times and may alleviate problems of background emission, beam steering, and especially scattering of the laser beam from solid particles experienced through free path direct absorption measurements in particulated flows. Laboratory measurements using evanescent fiber detection are presented.

  11. Biochemical sensing application based on optical fiber evanescent wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaoyi; Mo, Jiaqing; Xu, Liang; Jia, Zhenhong

    2015-08-01

    We have designed a novel evanescent field fiber optic biosensors with porous silicon dioxide cladding. The pore size of porous silicon dioxide cladding is about 100 nm in diameter. Biological molecules were immobilized to the porous silicon dioxide cladding used APTES and glutaraldehyde. Refractive index of cladding used Bruggemann's effective medium theory. We carried out simulations of changing in light intensity in optical fiber before and after chemical coupling of biomolecules. This novel optical fiber evanescent wave biosensor has a great potential in clinical chemistry for rapid and convenient determination of biological molecule.

  12. Surface functionalisation of TiO2 evanescent waveguide sensor for E.coli monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purniawan, A.; Pandraud, G.; Vakalopoulos, K. A.; French, P. J.; Sarro, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the surface functionalisation of evanescent waveguide sensors to immobilise E. coli. In biosensors, the surface functionalisation is an important treatment to ensure that the sensor properly detects the cells of interest. In this paper, we study the thin film surface functionalisation of a TiO2 evanescent waveguide sensor and their effect on light transmission for the early detection of E. coli in post colon surgery. TiO2 deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used as waveguide material. Four layers are used in the functionalisation : the self-assembled monolayer (SAM), the protein, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) (EDC) and the antibodies. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) is used as SAM and reacts with -OH group (hydroxyl). The -OH group must be provided on substrate. In order to have the proper -OH group we deposited 10 nm SiO2 on the waveguides using PECVD and then treated the samples in oxygen plasma chamber for 2 minutes to create the groups. Afterward APTES is immediately applied on the surface after every layers of the functionalisation process. The second layer (Protein A) of the functionalisation is then put on APTES as interlayer. EDC is used as crosslink agent between APTES and antibodies. The light of Superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) (λ = 1.3 μm, 400 mA) is channelled using an optical fibre into the functionalised waveguides. The transmitted light is measured with a photodiode. The sensitivity of the sensor was evaluated using several different drain fluid concentrations in medium.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigation of evanescent-wave absorption sensors for extreme temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, Michael P.; Ohodnicki, Paul; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    Recently, significant developments in evanescent wave absorption sensors have been demonstrated for high temperature sensing applications based upon the optical responses of advanced thin film materials. We will demonstrate how such sensors can be utilized in a mode that allows for chemical or temperature sensing starting from basic theoretical considerations. We will also present experimental high temperature sensing results for fabricated sensors. Potential applications of the sensors to be discussed include a range of high temperature systems relevant for fossil energy and combustion monitoring such as industrial combustors or reaction vessels, solid oxide fuel cells, and gas turbines. In these applications, even a small increase in operating efficiency realized via careful observation of in-process parameters and implementation of real-time process controls can result in dramatic savings across the energy industry, illustrating the necessity of pursuing such techniques. It is hoped that sensors of the type described here will allow for unprecedented measurement-access to processes which present challenging high-temperature and chemically reactive environments.

  14. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  15. Evanescent-wave optical gas sensor with a porous thin-film coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicevic, N.; Maluckov, A.; Petrovic, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the analysis and numerical model of absorptive gas detection by an optical evanescent-wave sensor. We investigate the influence of sensor geometry and thin-film porosity on the attenuation of guided modes caused by their interaction with the gas. We show that film porosity is a critical parameter that should be carefully optimized for a chosen mode. These findings served as a basis for the design of an experimentally realizable sensor of carbon dioxide.

  16. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy & its application in cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    There are many powerful microscopy technologies available for the investigation of bulk materials as well as for thin film samples. Nevertheless, for imaging an interface, especially live cells on a substrate and ultra thin-films, only Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is available. This TIRF microscopy allows imaging without interference of the bulk. Various approaches are employed in fluorescence microscopy applications to restrict the excitation and detection of fluorophores to a thin region of the specimen. Elimination of background fluorescence from outside the focal plane can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and consequently, the spatial resolution of the features or events of interest. TIRF microscopy is an evanescent field based microscopy. In this method, fluorescent dyes are only excited within an evanescent field: roughly within 100 nm above a glass coverslip. This will allow imaging surface and interfacial issues of the glass coverslip and an adjacent material. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) microscopy is a new development for imaging cell-substrate interactions in real time and in vitro. It is an alternative to TIRF microscopy. In this method the light is coupled into a waveguide via an optical grating. The coupled light propagates as a waveguide mode and exhibits an evanescent field on top of the waveguide. This can be used as a surface-bound illumination source to excite fluorophores. This evanescent field serves as an extremely powerful tool for quality control of thin films, to study cell-substrate contacts, and investigating the effect of external agents and drugs on the cell-substrate interaction in real time and in vitro. This new method has been established and optimized to minimize non-uniformity, scattering and photo bleaching issues. Visualizing and quantifying of the cell-substrates and solid thin films have been carried out by WEFF microscopy. The images of the cell-substrate interface

  17. An Artificial Neural Network Approach for the Prediction of Absorption Measurements of an Evanescent Field Fiber Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Saracoglu, Ö. Galip

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes artificial neural network (ANN) based prediction of the response of a fiber optic sensor using evanescent field absorption (EFA). The sensing probe of the sensor is made up a bundle of five PCS fibers to maximize the interaction of evanescent field with the absorbing medium. Different backpropagation algorithms are used to train the multilayer perceptron ANN. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, as well as the other algorithms used in this work successfully predicts the sensor responses.

  18. Performance of a compact, hybrid optical evanescent-wave sensor for chemical and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmers, H.; Greco, Pierre; Benech, Pierre; Rustad, Rolf; Kherrat, Rochdi; Bouvier, Gérard

    1996-02-01

    We describe a hybrid evanescent-wave sensor component that we fabricated by using an integrated optical interferometer with a specially adapted photodetector array. The design of the interferometer is based on the use of tapered waveguides to obtain two intersecting collimated beams. Phase shifts can be measured with an angular precision of better than 10-3 rad, which corresponds to a superstrate index change inferior of 10-6 with our structure. The interest in the device as a chemical sensor is experimentally demonstrated. The same optical component could be used in a variety of other sensor applications, e.g., biological and immunological sensors.

  19. Design method for a distributed Bragg resonator based evanescent field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischof, David; Kehl, Florian; Michler, Markus

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytic design method for a distributed Bragg resonator based evanescent field sensor. Such sensors can, for example, be used to measure changing refractive indices of the cover medium of a waveguide, as well as molecule adsorption at the sensor surface. For given starting conditions, the presented design method allows the analytical calculation of optimized sensor parameters for quantitative simulation and fabrication. The design process is based on the Fabry-Pérot resonator and analytical solutions of coupled mode theory.

  20. Evanescent field sensing: cavity-coupled refractive index sensor (CRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Lading, Lars

    1998-03-01

    A new concept for the detection of very small changes in the refractive index of a small sample of transparent material is given. The concept is based on measuring the frequency difference between two modes of a laser (possibly a twin- laser), where the evanescent field of one mode is affected by small refractive index changes. Intracavity sensing allows for orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than with external sensing. The frequency difference is obtained by light beating of the two modes. An imbedded diffractive element ensures proper modematching for the light beating. The relative frequency change is equal to the relative change in refractive index properly averaged over the waveguide. The performance of the intracavity system is compared with a system based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The intracavity system may achieve a resolution that is 104 - 106 higher than the sensitivity of a system based on an external interferometer. The effect of thermal instability is investigated and it is discussed how the required very low thermal off-set can be maintained. Injection locking can be a problem. The problem may be solved by either introducing a fixed frequency off- set or by proper design of the cavity structure. An implementation based on III-V materials with a waveguide configuration and Bragg-mirrors is possible with existing technologies. A concept based on a polymer configuration is proposed.

  1. Sol-gel derived optical waveguide films: technological platform for development of planar evanescent wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasiński, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Plane evanescent wave sensors are being developed for over thirty years. However, their full development is somehow limited by the lack of relatively cheap and stable waveguide layers of high refractive index, low optical losses and at the same time resistance to the impact of chemical substances. The paper involves waveguide layers SiO2:TiO2 of high refractive index (˜1.81) satisfying these criteria, fabricated via sol-gel method and dip-coating technique. The parameters of the waveguide layers SiO2:TiO2 were determined using elipsometric and spectrophotometric methods. The presented waveguide layers have excellent optical properties and are suitable for the application in the planar evanescent wave sensors technology. For the best waveguide SiO2:TiO2 layers, the obtained level of optical loss was below 0.2 dB/cm.

  2. Evanescent field Sensors Based on Tantalum Pentoxide Waveguides – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Katrin; Oehse, Kerstin; Sulz, Gerd; Hoffmann, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Evanescent field sensors based on waveguide surfaces play an important role where high sensitivity is required. Particularly tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a suitable material for thin-film waveguides due to its high refractive index and low attenuation. Many label-free biosensor systems such as grating couplers and interferometric sensors as well as fluorescence-based systems benefit from this waveguide material leading to extremely high sensitivity. Some biosensor systems based on Ta2O5 waveguides already took the step into commercialization. This report reviews the various detection systems in terms of limit of detection, the applications, and the suitable surface chemistry.

  3. A Silver Nanoparticle-Modified Evanescent Field Optical Fiber Sensor for Methylene Blue Detection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ji; Yao, Jun; Lu, Yonggang; Ma, Wenying; Zhuang, Xuye

    2013-01-01

    A silver nanoparticle-modified evanescent field optical fiber sensor based on a MEMS microchannel chip has been successfully fabricated. Experimental results show that the sensor response decreases linearly with increasing concentration of analyte. Over a range of methylene blue concentrations from 0 to 0.4 μmol/mL, the sensor response is linear (R = 0.9496). A concentration variation of 0.1 μmol/mL can cause an absorbance change of 0.402 dB. Moreover, the optical responses of the same sensing fiber without decoration and modified with silver nanoparticles have also been compared. It can be observed that the output intensity of the Ag nanoparticle-modified sensor is enhanced and the sensitivity is higher. Meanwhile, the absorbance spectra are found to be more sensitive to concentration changes compared to the spectra of the peak wavelength. PMID:23519353

  4. Evanescent-wave Infrared Optical Fiber Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiding; Wang, Di; Zhong, Hong-Jie; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2000-03-01

    We propose the treatment of amblyopia using yellow-green laser diodes.There are amblyopia children in excess of fifty million in the world.Because the causative agent of amblyopia hasn't been well understood,only roughly considered to be concerned with visual sense cell,optic nerve network and function of nerve center,no appropriate treatment is found up to date.The vision of person is determined by the center hollow region of retina,where there are three kinds of cone cell.The corresponding peak wavelength in absorption spectrum locates 447nm(blue light),532nm (green light)and 565nm(yellow light), respectively.When stimulated by white light, excited degree of three kinds of cone cell are identical,or yellow-green light,to which person eye is most sensitive, will significantly takes effects.Therefore the yellow-green laser diode is suitable for treating amblyopia. The weak laser,namely laser power less than mW order of magnitude,shows curative by stimulating bion tissue.When stimulating light power density is less than 0.001W/cm,the compounding speed of nucleic acid DNA is significantly increased.The growth rate of cell,activity of enzyme,content of hemoglobin and the growth of blood vessel,are all increased.However,it's key to control the dose of light.When the dose transcend some value,a inhibition will occur.The little dose of weak laser treatment can be accumulated with a parabolic characteristics,that is the weak laser generate bion response stengthening gradually versus time.Then it will weaken gradually after the peak.When the treatment duration is longer than a certain time,a inhibition also takes place.A suggested theraphy is characterized by little dose and short treatment course. In a conclusion, the yellow-green laser diode should be used for the treatment of amblyopia.The little dose and short treatment couse are to be adopted.

  5. Evanescent wave absorption sensor based on tapered multimode fiber coated with monolayer graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Gao, Saisai; Chen, Peixi; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Huo, Yanyan; Yue, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    An evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor based on tapered multimode fiber (TMMF) coated with monolayer graphene film for the detection of double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) is investigated in this work. The TMMF is a silica multimode fiber (nominally at 62.5 μm), which was tapered to symmetric taper with waist diameters of ~30 μm and total length of ~3 mm. Monolayer graphene film was grown on a copper foil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology and transferred onto skinless tapered fiber core via dry transfer technology. All the components of the sensor are coupled together by fusion splicer in order to eliminate the external disturbance. DS-DNA is created by the assembly of two relatively complemented oligonucleotides. The measurements are obtained by using a spectrometer in the optical wavelength range of 400-900 nm. With the increase of DS-DNA concentration, the output light intensity (OPLI) arisen an obvious attenuation. Importantly, the absorbance (A) and the DS-DNA concentrations shown a reasonable linear variation in a wide range of 5-400 μM. Through a series of comparison, the accuracy of TMMF sensor with graphene (G-TMMF) is much better than that without graphene (TMMF), which can be attributed to the molecular enrichment of graphene by π-π stacking.

  6. Optical waveguides formed by silver ion exchange in Schott SG11 glass for waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy: evanescent images of HEK293 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Nitsche, Michael; Armstrong, Souzan; Nabavi, Noushin; Harrison, Rene; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Langbein, Uwe; Mittler, Silvia

    2010-05-01

    Planar glass waveguides with a specific number of modes were fabricated by Ag+-Na+ exchange in Schott SG11 glass. The effective refractive indices were determined using m-line spectroscopy in both s- and p-polarization. By using the reversed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, the index profiles were described by a nonlinear diffusion equation. The diffusion coefficients for Ag+ were established, as well as the penetration depth of the evanescent field in an aqueous environment for the different modes. The integrals of |E|2 fields for the evanescent-guided fields were investigated. These are important when evanescent fields are used for illumination in interface microscopy, an alternative method to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. The photoluminescent behavior of the waveguides was investigated as a function of ion exchange time and excitation wavelengths. Comparable images were obtained of fluorescently labeled HEK293 cells using TIRF microscopy and waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy. Imaging was performed using HEK293 cells, delivering similar images and information.

  7. Development of dithizone based fibre optic evanescent wave sensor for heavy metal ion detection in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, K.; Prabhu, R.; Pollard, P.

    2013-06-01

    Detection of highly toxic heavy metal ions requires rapid, simple, sensitive and selective detection methods in the environment. Optical fibre based sensing facilitates the remote, continuous and in-situ detection approaches in the environment. Herein, we report the development of a dithizone based fibre optic sensor with a simple procedure to detect heavy metal ions in the aqueous environment using an evanescent wave sensing approach. The chromogenic ligand dithizone and its spectral specificity with metal ions has been elaborated in this work.

  8. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy: Thin film fluorescence intensities and its application in cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Nitsche, Michael; Mittler, Silvia; Armstrong, Souzan; Dixon, Jeff; Langbein, Uwe

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate an inexpensive alternative to total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A method for imaging ultrathin films and living cells located on waveguides—illuminated with their evanescent fields—is introduced. An extensive analysis of ion-exchanged waveguides focusing on their application as microscopy substrates for studying interfacial phenomena is presented. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with the simulations. As an application osteoblasts (bone matrix forming cells) and ultrathin Langmuir-Blodgett films were imaged. The fluorescence intensity has been used to determine the cell attachment.

  9. A disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Ton, Xuan-Anh; Acha, Victor; Bonomi, Paolo; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Haupt, Karsten

    2015-02-15

    We have developed a disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor by coating a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescent signaling group on a 4-cm long polystyrene optical waveguide. The MIP is composed of a naphthalimide-based fluorescent monomer, which shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding with carboxyl-containing molecules. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and the mycotoxin citrinin were used as model analytes. The coating of the MIP was either performed ex-situ, by dip-coating the fiber with MIP particles synthesized beforehand, or in-situ by evanescent-wave photopolymerization on the fiber. The sensing element was interrogated with a fiber-coupled spectrofluorimeter. The fiber optic sensor detects targets in the low nM range and exhibits specific and selective recognition over structural analogs and non-related carboxyl-containing molecules. This technology can be extended to other carboxyl-containing analytes, and to a broader spectrum of targets using different fluorescent monomers.

  10. Disposable photonic integrated circuits for evanescent wave sensors by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll method.

    PubMed

    Aikio, Sanna; Hiltunen, Jussi; Hiitola-Keinänen, Johanna; Hiltunen, Marianne; Kontturi, Ville; Siitonen, Samuli; Puustinen, Jarkko; Karioja, Pentti

    2016-02-01

    Flexible photonic integrated circuit technology is an emerging field expanding the usage possibilities of photonics, particularly in sensor applications, by enabling the realization of conformable devices and introduction of new alternative production methods. Here, we demonstrate that disposable polymeric photonic integrated circuit devices can be produced in lengths of hundreds of meters by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll methods on a flexible carrier. Attenuation properties of hundreds of individual devices were measured confirming that waveguides with good and repeatable performance were fabricated. We also demonstrate the applicability of the devices for the evanescent wave sensing of ambient refractive index. The production of integrated photonic devices using ultra-high volume fabrication, in a similar manner as paper is produced, may inherently expand methods of manufacturing low-cost disposable photonic integrated circuits for a wide range of sensor applications.

  11. Disposable photonic integrated circuits for evanescent wave sensors by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll method.

    PubMed

    Aikio, Sanna; Hiltunen, Jussi; Hiitola-Keinänen, Johanna; Hiltunen, Marianne; Kontturi, Ville; Siitonen, Samuli; Puustinen, Jarkko; Karioja, Pentti

    2016-02-01

    Flexible photonic integrated circuit technology is an emerging field expanding the usage possibilities of photonics, particularly in sensor applications, by enabling the realization of conformable devices and introduction of new alternative production methods. Here, we demonstrate that disposable polymeric photonic integrated circuit devices can be produced in lengths of hundreds of meters by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll methods on a flexible carrier. Attenuation properties of hundreds of individual devices were measured confirming that waveguides with good and repeatable performance were fabricated. We also demonstrate the applicability of the devices for the evanescent wave sensing of ambient refractive index. The production of integrated photonic devices using ultra-high volume fabrication, in a similar manner as paper is produced, may inherently expand methods of manufacturing low-cost disposable photonic integrated circuits for a wide range of sensor applications. PMID:26906827

  12. Ultra-sensitive mid-infrared evanescent field sensors combining thin-film strip waveguides with quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Kim, Seong-Soo; Rossbach, Robert; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-05-21

    We demonstrate ultra-sensitive chemical sensing in the mid-infrared spectral regime with a combination of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with GaAs/Al(0.2)Ga(0.8)As strip waveguides fabricated via metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and reactive ion etching (RIE) using evanescent field absorption spectroscopy. These strip waveguides have been designed with a width of 200 μm, thereby facilitating 2-D confinement and mode-matched propagation of mid-infrared radiation emitted from a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL at a wavelength of 10.3 μm. Acetic anhydride was detected with a limit of detection (LOD) of 18 pL (19.4 ng) deposited at the waveguide surface by overlapping of the vibrational absorption of the methyl group with the emission frequency of the QCL. The obtained results indicate a remarkable enhancement in sensitivity by three orders of magnitude compared to previously reported multimode planar silver halide waveguides. Further reduction of the waveguide strip width to 50 μm resulted in an additional sensitivity enhancement yielding a calculated LOD of 0.05 pL for the exemplary analyte acetic anhydride, which is among the most sensitive evanescent field absorption measurements with a miniaturized mid-infrared sensor system reported to date.

  13. A terahertz plastic wire based evanescent field sensor for high sensitivity liquid detection.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long; Pan, Ci-Ling; Lu, Ja-Yu

    2009-11-01

    A highly sensitive detection method based on the evanescent wave of a terahertz subwavelength plastic wire was demonstrated for liquid sensing. Terahertz power spreading outside the wire core makes the waveguide dispersion sensitive to the cladding index variation, resulting in a considerable deviation of waveguide dispersion. Two liquids with transparent appearances, water and alcohol, are easily distinguished based on the waveguide dispersion, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. A melamine alcohol solution with various concentrations is identified successfully, and the detection limit is up to 20ppm, i.e. equivalent to the index variation on the order of 0.01.

  14. Optical fiber evanescent wave adsorption sensors for high-temperature gas sensing in advanced coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.; Ohodnicky, P.; Duy, J.

    2012-01-01

    Modern advanced energy systems such as coal-fired power plants, gasifiers, or similar infrastructure present some of the most challenging harsh environments for sensors. The power industry would benefit from new, ultra-high temperature devices capable of surviving in hot and corrosive environments for embedded sensing at the highest value locations. For these applications, we are currently exploring optical fiber evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy (EWAS) based sensors consisting of high temperature core materials integrated with novel high temperature gas sensitive cladding materials. Mathematical simulations can be used to assist in sensor development efforts, and we describe a simulation code that assumes a single thick cladding layer with gas sensitive optical constants. Recent work has demonstrated that Au nanoparticle-incorporated metal oxides show a potentially useful response for high temperature optical gas sensing applications through the sensitivity of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption peak to ambient atmospheric conditions. Hence, the simulation code has been applied to understand how such a response can be exploited in an optical fiber based EWAS sensor configuration. We demonstrate that interrogation can be used to optimize the sensing response in such materials.

  15. Sensitivity enhancement of evanescent waveguide optical sensor for detecting adulterant traces in petroleum products using SiON technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Aradhana; Deka, Bidyut; Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2013-11-01

    The development of an evanescent waveguide optical sensor incorporating planar waveguide geometry using silicon oxynitride as the core layer on silica-silicon wafer and its implementation for detection of adulterant traces in petroleum products is presented in this paper. This work focuses on enhancement of sensitivity and analyzed by using Simple Effective Index Method (SEIM), based on sinusoidal modes. The embedded waveguide of length ~ 10,000 μm and core width ~ 50 μm have been developed using SiON technology and applied for checking adulteration so as to ensure the purity of the fuel such that the engine will give the desired performance including low emissions yielding better accuracy and high sensitivity within a very short pulse. The thin cladding layer acts as the analytes (mixture of adulterated fuel) that supports the waveguiding film having a refractive index smaller than that of the core. The main aim of this present work is to encompass a speedy choice to the time-consuming existing methods for detecting adulterated fuels, which generally requires some time to give the consequence. The developed sensor allows spot determination of the percentage concentration of adulterant in pure petrol without involving any chemical analysis. The waveguide based sensor is polarization independent and the sensitivity of the waveguide sensor is ~10 times more than that of the existing planar waveguide sensors and also 5 times more than that of asymmetric waveguide structure. Advantages include high sensitivity, simple fabrication and easy interrogation without involving the use of solvents or toxic chemicals.

  16. Dye distance mapping using waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy and its application to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, Frederik; Morawitz, Michael; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Langbein, Uwe; Mittler, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have measured the distance between cells and the substratum at sites of adhesion via the emission of a fluorescent dye and waveguide methods. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to measure the position of fluorescent dyes above a waveguide surface in the 10-200 nm distance range throughout an entire area, yielding a 2D dye distance map or a 3D contour plot. The dye is located in a multilayered Langmuir Blodgett (LB) film or in the plasma membrane of a cell. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) images obtained using two different waveguide modes are employed allowing, with a simple mathematical approach, the calculation of dye distance maps. Ultra-thin steps made using LB technology, adhesion distances and the bending of the plasma membrane between focal adhesions of osteoblastic cells are shown as examples. The errors are discussed. False color representation of a dye distance map with four osteoblasts. The inset represents an overexposed WEFF image of the same field of view.

  17. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  18. Oxygen detection using evanescent fields

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Weenqing

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

  19. A high-sensitivity fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor with a three-layer structure composed of Canada balsam doped with GeO2.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Zhong, Lianchao; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Luo, Binbin; Li, Yishan

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we present a high-sensitivity polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave (FOEW) sensor with a three-layer structure that includes bottom, inter-, and surface layers in the sensing region. The bottom layer and inter-layer are POFs composed of standard cladding and the core of the plastic optical fiber, and the surface layer is made of dilute Canada balsam in xylene doped with GeO2. We examine the morphology of the doped GeO2, the refractive index and composition of the surface layer and the surface luminous properties of the sensing region. We investigate the effects of the content and morphology of the GeO2 particles on the sensitivity of the FOEW sensors by using glucose solutions. In addition, we examine the response of sensors incubated with staphylococcal protein A plus mouse IgG isotype to goat anti-mouse IgG solutions. Results indicate very good sensitivity of the three-layer FOEW sensor, which showed a 3.91-fold improvement in the detection of the target antibody relative to a conventional sensor with a core-cladding structure, and the novel sensor showed a lower limit of detection of 0.2ng/l and a response time around 320s. The application of this high-sensitivity FOEW sensor can be extended to biodefense, disease diagnosis, biomedical and biochemical analysis. PMID:27311112

  20. A high-sensitivity fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor with a three-layer structure composed of Canada balsam doped with GeO2.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Zhong, Lianchao; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Luo, Binbin; Li, Yishan

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we present a high-sensitivity polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave (FOEW) sensor with a three-layer structure that includes bottom, inter-, and surface layers in the sensing region. The bottom layer and inter-layer are POFs composed of standard cladding and the core of the plastic optical fiber, and the surface layer is made of dilute Canada balsam in xylene doped with GeO2. We examine the morphology of the doped GeO2, the refractive index and composition of the surface layer and the surface luminous properties of the sensing region. We investigate the effects of the content and morphology of the GeO2 particles on the sensitivity of the FOEW sensors by using glucose solutions. In addition, we examine the response of sensors incubated with staphylococcal protein A plus mouse IgG isotype to goat anti-mouse IgG solutions. Results indicate very good sensitivity of the three-layer FOEW sensor, which showed a 3.91-fold improvement in the detection of the target antibody relative to a conventional sensor with a core-cladding structure, and the novel sensor showed a lower limit of detection of 0.2ng/l and a response time around 320s. The application of this high-sensitivity FOEW sensor can be extended to biodefense, disease diagnosis, biomedical and biochemical analysis.

  1. Investigation on an evanescent wave fiber-optic absorption sensor based on fiber loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yaping; Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    An improved ring-down measurement principle for optical waveguides is presented. Fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy allows for measurement of minute optical losses in high-finesse fiber-optic cavities and immunity to the fluctuation of laser source. The evanescent wave absorption losses dependent on the absorption and the refractive index of ambient solution have been theoretically analyzed. The complex refractive index is introduced into our model and extinction coefficient can be calculated accurately through finite element analysis by setting the boundaries of the fiber and the ambient conditions. Using this method, the refractive index of environment can be taken into consideration. Our principle is validated by the highly-sensitive measurement of evanescent wave absorption loss. By chemically processing the surface of sensing segment along an extending ring-down cavity, the concentration of small volume Diethyl Sulphoxide solution where the etched fiber immersed into has been successfully measured and discussed.

  2. Visualization of the solubilization process of the plasma membrane of a living cell by waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Ma, Heun Kan; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Mittler, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy (WEFF) is a novel microscopy technology that allows imaging of a cell's plasma membrane in the vicinity of a glass substrate with high axial resolution, low background and little photobleaching. Time-lapse imaging can be performed to investigate changes in cell morphology in the presence or absence of chemical agents. WEFF microscopy provides a method to investigate plasma membranes of living cells and allows a comparison to simplified model membranes immobilized on planar substrates. The interaction of the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 with plasma membranes of osteoblasts in an aqueous environment was investigated. Solubilization of the membranes very close to the waveguide surface was visualized and related to the three-stage solubilisation model proposed for liposomes and supported lipid bilayers. Findings for the plasma membranes of cells are in excellent agreement with results reported for these artificial model systems.

  3. Fiber optic NIR evanescent wave absorption sensor systems for in-situ monitoring of hydrocarbon compounds in waste and ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerck, Jochen; Denter, P.; Mensch, M.; Kraemer, K.; Scholz, Michael

    1999-02-01

    In situ measurements with the prototype of a portable fiber- optic sensor system for the monitoring of nonpolar hydrocarbons (HC) in ground water or industrial waste water are presented. This sensor system can be used for quantitative in situ analysis of pollutants such as aromatic solvents, fuels, mineral oils or chlorinated HCs in a broad concentration range from around 200 (mu) g(DOT) L-1 up to a few 100 mg(DOT) L-1. The sensing principle is based on solid phase extraction of analyte molecules into a hydrophobic silicone cladding of a quartz glass optical fiber and the direct absorptiometric measurement of the extracted species in the polymer through the evanescent wave. The sensor can be connected via all-silica fibers with a length of up to 100 m to a filter photometer developed at the IFIA, thus allowing even remote analysis in monitoring wells. This instrument provides a sum concentration signal of the extracted organic compounds by measuring the integral absorption at the C-H overtone bands in the near-infrared spectral range. In situ measurements with the sensor system were performed in a ground water circulation well at the VEGAS research facility (Universitat Stuttgart). Here, the sensor proved to trace the HC sum concentration of xylene isomers in process water pumped from the well to a stripper column. In further experiments the sensor was combined with an oil sampling device and was tested with simulated waste waters of a commercial vehicle plant contaminated with different types of mineral oil. In this case the sensor system was able to detect the presence of mineral oil films floating on water or oil-in-water emulsions with concentrations greater than 20 ppm (v/v) within a few minutes.

  4. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  5. Applications of Microbial Cell Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of microbial cell sensors have been developed as analytical tools. The microbial cell sensor utilizes microbes as a sensing element and a transducer. The characteristics of microbial cell sensors as sensing devices are a complete contrast to those of enzyme sensors or immunosensors, which are highly specific for the substrates of interest, although the specificity of the microbial cell sensor has been improved by genetic modification of the microbe used as the sensing element. Microbial cell sensors have the advantages of tolerance to measuring conditions, a long lifetime, and good cost performance, and have the disadvantage of a long response time. In this review, applications of microbial cell sensors are summarized.

  6. Gondola-shaped tetra-rhenium metallacycles modified evanescent wave infrared chemical sensors for selective determination of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Genin Gary; Lee, Chung-Jay; Tsai, Bo-Chan; Yang, Jyisy; Sathiyendiran, Malaichamy; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2011-07-15

    Water-stable and cavity-contained rhenium metallacycles were synthesized, and their ability to selectively interact with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) systematically studied using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. Integrating the unique properties of rhenium metallacycles into optical sensing technologies significantly improves selectivity in detecting aromatic compounds. To explore the interaction of rhenium metallacycles with VOCs, the surface of ATR sensing elements was modified with the synthesized rhenium metallacycles and used to detect VOCs. The results indicate that rhenium metallacycles have crown ether-like recognition sites, which can selectively interact with aromatic compounds, especially those bearing polar functional groups. The IR absorption bands of rhenium metallacycles shift significantly upon adsorption of aromatic VOCs, revealing a strong interaction between the tetra-rhenium metallacycles and guest aromatic compounds. Optimizing the thickness of the metallacycles coated on the surface of the sensing element led to rapid response in detection. The dynamic range of response was generally up to 30 mg/L with detection limits ca. 30 μg/L. Further studies of the effect of interferences indicate that recovery can be higher than 95% for most of the compounds tested. The results on the flow-cell device indicated that the performances were similar to a static detection system but the detection of VOCs can be largely simplified.

  7. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen Andreas; Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Neutzler, Jay Kevin; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Weisbrod, Kirk

    1999-12-14

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  8. Fuel cell CO sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, S.A.; Meltser, M.A.; Gutowski, S.; Neutzler, J.K.; Borup, R.L.; Weisbrod, K.

    1999-12-14

    The CO concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  9. Change of the Topography of Ventral Cell Surface during Spreading of Fibroblasts as Revealed by Evanescent Wave-Excited Fluorescence Microscopy: Effect of Contractility and Microtubule Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Ohki, Kazuo; Miyata, Hidetake

    Evanescent wave-excited fluorescence microscopy, which selectively probes the ventral membranes of cells adhered to glass substrate, was utilized to observe the change in the topography of the ventral plasma membranes of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts during spreading. In the initial stage of the spreading (up to 2 hours after seeding), the ventral membrane was close (<100nm) to the substrate in the peripheral and the central regions. About 4 hrs after seeding, the ventral surface assumed a flat topography for a short period and then gradually became uneven, displaying streak pattern of cell-to-substrate contact (6-8 hours after seeding). By 24 hours after seeding, cells gained polygonal shape and most regions except for the focal adhesions were separated from the substrate. Within these well-spread cells actin stress fibers were found to emanate obliquely from the focal adhesions, as previously reported. When cells were grown in the presence of 2, 3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), an inhibitor of actomyosin-based contraction of stress fibers and the cell, the ventral membranes in majority of the cells displayed flat topography, and the tilt of the stress fibers decreased. Cells grown in the presence of colchicine, a microtubule-depolymerizing agent also possessed flat ventral membrane and less tilted stress fibers. These results suggest that the contraction of stress fibers and integrity of microtubules are important in the formation of the uneven topography of ventral membrane and the tilt of stress fibers.

  10. Pathogen detection using evanescent-wave fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Aldo P.; Werneck, Marcelo M.; Ribeiro, R. M.; Lins, U. G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a real time optical biosensor that utilizes the evanescent field technique for monitoring microorganisms in hospital environment. The biosensor monitors interactions between the analytic (bacteria) and the evanescent field of an optical fiber passing through the culture media where the bacteria grows. The objective is to monitor atmospheres in hospital areas for the Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results lead us the conclusion that this kind of sensor presents quick response, good performance, easy of construction and low cost. We expect that the sensor will be of great help in controlling the hospital environment.

  11. Evanescent Light-Scattering Microscopy for Label-Free Interfacial Imaging: From Single Sub-100 nm Vesicles to Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, Björn; Lundgren, Anders; Gunnarsson, Anders; Rabe, Michael; Kunze, Angelika; Mapar, Mokhtar; Simonsson, Lisa; Bally, Marta; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-12-22

    Advancement in the understanding of biomolecular interactions has benefited greatly from the development of surface-sensitive bioanalytical sensors. To further increase their broad impact, significant efforts are presently being made to enable label-free and specific biomolecule detection with high sensitivity, allowing for quantitative interpretation and general applicability at low cost. In this work, we have addressed this challenge by developing a waveguide chip consisting of a flat silica core embedded in a symmetric organic cladding with a refractive index matching that of water. This is shown to reduce stray light (background) scattering and thereby allow for label-free detection of faint objects, such as individual sub-20 nm gold nanoparticles as well as sub-100 nm lipid vesicles. Measurements and theoretical analysis revealed that light-scattering signals originating from single surface-bound lipid vesicles enable characterization of their sizes without employing fluorescent lipids as labels. The concept is also demonstrated for label-free measurements of protein binding to and enzymatic (phospholipase A2) digestion of individual lipid vesicles, enabling an analysis of the influence on the measured kinetics of the dye-labeling of lipids required in previous assays. Further, diffraction-limited imaging of cells (platelets) binding to a silica surface showed that distinct subcellular features could be visualized and temporally resolved during attachment, activation, and spreading. Taken together, these results underscore the versatility and general applicability of the method, which due to its simplicity and compatibility with conventional microscopy setups may reach a widespread in life science and beyond. PMID:26517791

  12. Evanescent waves and complex rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einziger, P. D.; Felsen, L. B.

    1982-07-01

    An approximate scheme for determining the configuration of phase paths in implementing evanescent wave theory is discussed. The evanescent wave tracking method is reviewed, the special canonical solution that generates confocal hyperbolic phase paths is generated, and it is shown that these correspond to the complex ray fields generated by a source point at a complex location. The local hyperbolic matching hypothesis is described and its deficiencies are noted. The asymptotic solution is obtained by complex ray tracing and is interpreted physically in terms of the previously described EWT. The limitations of complex ray theory and EWT, especially in regard to strongly evanescent fields, are established by consideration of the rigorously formulated Green's function. The problem of evanescent plane wave and Gaussian beam diffraction by a circular cylinder is reconsidered in the light of the results obtained.

  13. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  14. Observing secretory granules with a multiangle evanescent wave microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, A

    2000-01-01

    In total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorophores near a surface can be excited with evanescent waves, which decay exponentially with distance from the interface. Penetration depths of evanescent waves from 60 nm to 300 nm were generated by varying the angle of incidence of a laser beam. With a novel telecentric multiangle evanescent wave microscope, we monitored and investigated both single secretory granules and pools of granules in bovine chromaffin cells. By measuring the fluorescence intensity as a function of penetration depth, it is possible through a Laplace transform to obtain the fluorophore distribution as a function of axial position. We discuss the extent to which it is possible to determine distances and diameters of granules with this microscopy technique by modeling the fluorescent volumes of spheres in evanescent fields. The anisotropic near-field detection of fluorophores and the influence of the detection point-spread function are considered. The diameters of isolated granules between 70 nm and 300 nm have been reconstructed, which is clearly beyond the resolution limit of a confocal microscope. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates how evanescent waves propagate along surfaces and scatter at objects with a higher refractive index. TIRFM will have a limited applicability for quantitative measurements when the parameters used to define evanescent waves are not optimally selected. PMID:10777760

  15. Immunoassay demonstration using a local evanescent array coupled biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rongjin; Kingry, Luke C.; Slayden, Richard A.; Lear, Kevin L.

    2010-02-01

    A Label-free optical waveguide immunosensor is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The local evanescent array coupled (LEAC) biosensor is based on a local evanescent field shift mechanism, which differs from those of other evanescent waveguide sensors. Antigens specifically bound by immobilized antibodies on the waveguide surface increase the refractive index of the upper cladding of the waveguide, and hence shift the evanescent field distribution up. This local detection mechanism grants the LEAC sensor multi-analyte ability in a single optical path. Compared to traditional biosensors, including surface plasmon resonance and ring resonance biosensors, the nonresonant and temperature/wavelength insensitive properties of the LEAC biosensor relax its requirement on the optical source. It requires no accessory off-chip instruments such as spectrometers, making it a chip-scale biosensing platform. The on-chip detection is accomplished by integrating buried polysilicon detector arrays into silicon nitride waveguide in a commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Protein antigens and IgG producing biologically relevant antibody-antigen interactions were used to test the clinical utility of the LEAC biosensor platform. Advanced analysis beam propagation method (BPM) simulations and chips with different geometric parameters were used to study the relationship between the sensitivity and structure of LEAC biosensor.

  16. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  17. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  18. Galvanic cell type oxygen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Kudo, H.; Tanigawa, I.

    1985-01-22

    A galvanic cell type oxygen sensor comprising a galvanic cell comprised of a cathode made up of metal effective for the electrolytic reduction of oxygen, an anode made up of lead material and an electrolyte made up of an aqueous mixed solution of organic acid and organic acid salt, which has a long life and a high output voltage, is not at all affected by carbon dioxide and which can prevent the generation of hydrogen from the cathode, is disclosed.

  19. Optical immunoassay systems based upon evanescent wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas A.; Herron, James N.

    1996-04-01

    Immunoassays based upon evanescent wave interactions are finding increased biosensing application. In these devices, the evanescent tail associated with total internal reflection of an incident beam at the substrate/solution interface provides sensitivity for surface-bound protein over bulk molecules, allowing homogeneous assays and real-time measurement of binding dynamics. Among such systems are surface plasmon resonance sensors and a resonant mirror device. Several research groups are also developing fluorescent fiberoptic or planar waveguide sensors for biomedical applications. We describe a second-generation planar waveguide fluoroimmunoassay system being developed in our laboratory which uses a molded polystyrene sensor. The 633-nm beam from a laser diode is focused into the 500 micrometer- thick planar waveguide by an integral lens. Antibodies to the desired analyte (hCG) are immobilized on the waveguide surface and fluorescence from bound analyte/tracer antibodies in a sandwich format is imaged onto the detector. The geometry of the waveguide allows several zones to be detected, providing the capability for on-sensor calibration. This sensor has shown picomolar sensitivity for the detection of hCG.

  20. Conversion of evanescent Lamb waves into propagating waves via a narrow aperture edge.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a quantitative study of conversion of evanescent Lamb waves into propagating in isotropic plates. The conversion is substantiated by prescribing time-harmonic Lamb displacements/tractions through a narrow aperture at an edge of a semi-infinite plate. Complex-valued dispersion and group velocity curves are employed to characterize the conversion process. The amplitude coefficient of the propagating Lamb modes converted from evanescent is quantified based on the complex reciprocity theorem via a finite element analysis. The power flow generated into the plate can be separated into radiative and reactive parts made on the basis of propagating and evanescent Lamb waves, where propagating Lamb waves are theoretically proved to radiate pure real power flow, and evanescent Lamb waves carry reactive pure imaginary power flow. The propagating power conversion efficiency is then defined to quantitatively describe the conversion. The conversion efficiency is strongly frequency dependent and can be significant. With the converted propagating waves from evanescent, sensors at far-field can recapture some localized damage information that is generally possessed in evanescent waves and may have potential application in structural health monitoring.

  1. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  2. Improved fuel-cell-type hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudek, F. P.; Rutkowski, M. D.

    1968-01-01

    Modified hydrogen sensor replaces oxygen cathode with a cathode consisting of a sealed paste of gold hydroxide and a pure gold current collector. The net reaction which occurs during cell operation is the reduction of the gold hydroxide to gold and water, with a half-cell potential of 1.4 volts.

  3. A magnetic cell-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Hajimiri, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Cell-based sensing represents a new paradigm for performing direct and accurate detection of cell- or tissue-specific responses by incorporating living cells or tissues as an integral part of a sensor. Here we report a new magnetic cell-based sensing platform by combining magnetic sensors implemented in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated microelectronics process with cardiac progenitor cells that are differentiated directly on-chip. We show that the pulsatile movements of on-chip cardiac progenitor cells can be monitored in a real-time manner. Our work provides a new low-cost approach to enable high-throughput screening systems as used in drug development and hand-held devices for point-of-care (PoC) biomedical diagnostic applications.

  4. Near-membrane protein dynamics revealed by evanescent field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Clapham, David E.

    2004-05-01

    Evanescent Field (EF) microscopy is used to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of proteins in living cells. A genetically engineered ion channel fused to a fluorescent tag is expressed in cells and imaged with an objective-based EF microscope. Images are obtained from a CCD and analyzed to determine fluorescence and velocity of individual protein containing vesicles. An inverse correlation between fluorescent intensity and average motility provides a method for determination of membrane localization. Stimulation and subsequent decrease in ion channel activity is correlated with loss of protein from membrane as shown by EF microscopy and patch-clamp electrophysiology.

  5. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  6. Extraordinary momentum and spin in evanescent waves.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-06

    Momentum and spin represent fundamental dynamic properties of quantum particles and fields. In particular, propagating optical waves (photons) carry momentum and longitudinal spin determined by the wave vector and circular polarization, respectively. Here we show that exactly the opposite can be the case for evanescent optical waves. A single evanescent wave possesses a spin component, which is independent of the polarization and is orthogonal to the wave vector. Furthermore, such a wave carries a momentum component, which is determined by the circular polarization and is also orthogonal to the wave vector. We show that these extraordinary properties reveal a fundamental Belinfante's spin momentum, known in field theory and unobservable in propagating fields. We demonstrate that the transverse momentum and spin push and twist a probe Mie particle in an evanescent field. This allows the observation of 'impossible' properties of light and of a fundamental field-theory quantity, which was previously considered as 'virtual'.

  7. Superoscillatory field features with evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Fikioris, George

    2015-12-01

    We show how to obtain optical fields possessing superoscillatory features by superposing the evanescent tails of waves undergoing total internal reflection at a plane dielectric interface. In doing so, we essentially extend the definition of superoscillations to functions expressed as a continuum of slowly decaying exponentials, while not necessarily being bandlimited in the standard (Fourier) sense. We obtain such functions by complexifying the argument of standard bandlimited superoscillatory functions with a strictly positive spectrum. Combined with our recent method for superoscillations with arbitrary polynomial shape, the present approach offers flexibility for locally shaping the evanescent field near dielectric interfaces for applications such as particle or atom trapping.

  8. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Schultz, Peter G.; Wei, Tao

    2003-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  9. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen

    2001-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  10. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    PubMed Central

    Valadez, Angela M.; Lana, Carlos A.; Tu, Shu-I; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11) was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm) excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods. PMID:22346728

  11. Detection of recombinant growth hormone by evanescent cascaded waveguide coupler on silica-on-silicon.

    PubMed

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2013-05-01

    An evanescent wave based biosensor is developed on the silica-on-silicon (SOS) with a cascaded waveguide coupler for the detection of recombinant growth hormone. So far, U -bends and tapered waveguides are demonstrated for increasing the penetration depth and enhancing sensitivity of the evanescent wave sensor. In this work, a monolithically integrated sensor platform containing a cascaded waveguide coupler with optical power splitters and combiners designed with S -bends and tapper waveguides is demonstrated for an enhanced detection of recombinant growth hormone. In the cascaded waveguide coupler, a large surface area to bind the antibody with increased penetration depth of evanescent wave to excite the tagged-rbST is obtained by splitting the waveguide into multiple paths using Y splitters designed with s -bends and subsequently combining them back to a single waveguide through tapered waveguide and combiners. Hence a highly sensitive fluoroimmunoassay sensor is realized. Using the 2D FDTD (Finite-difference time-domain method) simulation of waveguide with a point source in Rsoft FullWAVE, the fluorescence coupling efficiency of straight and bend section of waveguide is analyzed. The sensor is demonstrated for the detection of fluorescently-tagged recombinant growth hormone with the detection limit as low as 25 ng/ml.

  12. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver.

  13. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver. PMID:16053108

  14. Evanescent optical fluorescence excitation: the role of photonic mode density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Bernhard; Sato, Akihiro; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we will discuss a few basic concepts concerning the use of evanescent optical fields for the excitation of fluorescent chromophores placed near the interface. The observation of enhanced fluorescence from chromophores excited by surface plasmon and waveguide modes will be presented and discussed. We attribute the enhancement to the near-field interaction between the chromophores and the increased photonic mode density by surface plasmon and waveguide modes. We determined limits of detection (LOD) of DNA hybridisation using the same sensor architecture by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy (OWFS). Both SPFS and OWFS techniques have the same detection principle using an enhanced electromagnetic field to excite fluorophores and make it possible to monitor DNA hybridisation in real-time with high sensitivity. The relative photonic mode density of each mode was calculated under the resonance condition, and these values are reflected in the LOD values.

  15. Application of time-correlated single photon counting and stroboscopic detection methods with an evanescent-wave fibre-optic sensor for fluorescence-lifetime-based pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Paul E.; Geissinger, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Quasi-distributed optical fibre sensor arrays containing luminescent sensor molecules can be read out spatially resolved utilizing optical time-of-flight detection (OTOFD) methods, which employ pulsed laser interrogation of the luminosensors and time-resolved detection of the sensor signals. In many cases, sensing is based on a change in sensor luminescence intensity; however, sensing based on luminescence lifetime changes is preferable because it reduces the need for field calibration. Because in OTOFD detection is time-resolved, luminescence-lifetime information is already available through the signal pulses, although in practise applications were restricted to sensors with long luminescence lifetimes (hundreds of ns). To implement lifetime-based sensing in crossed-optical-fibre-sensor arrays for sensor molecules with lifetimes less than 10 ns, two time-domain methods, time-correlated single photon counting and stroboscopic detection, were used to record the pH-dependent emission of a fluorescein derivative covalently attached to a highly-porous polymer. A two-term nonexponential decay function yielded both a good fit for experimental lifetime data during reconvolution and a pH response that matches Henderson-Hasselbalch behaviour, yielding a sensor accuracy of 0.02 pH units. Moreover, strong agreement was obtained for the two lifetime determination methods and with intensity-based measurements taken previously.

  16. Evanescent wave of a single photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongrui

    2013-07-01

    A photon model is proposed, and the parameter equations of the photon are obtained. This model can explain the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave, and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon. The evanescent waves of photons with different frequencies are refractively dispersed. The Goos-Hanchen shift is dependent on the difference between the two refractive indices of media, the incident angle, and the frequency of the photon. According to this model, an evanescent wave of light does not decay exponentially along the z direction and does not propagate along the x direction infinitely. The laws of refraction and reflection for a single photon can be derived. The refractive dispersion of light can be explained. According to this model, every photon is polarized. Polarization is the intrinsic nature of the photon. The motion of a single photon is either clockwise or counterclockwise. The so-called unpolarized light refers to light that consists of an equal number of photons with clockwise motion and counterclockwise motion. The trajectories of two photons with the same frequency but opposite spiral directions are mirror-image isomers. They cannot be superimposed upon each other.

  17. Further demonstration of a local evanescent field array coupled (LEAC) biosensor concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangwei; Pownall, R.; Stephens, M.; Dandy, D.; Chen, T.; Nikkel, P.; Lear, K.

    2007-03-01

    Low-cost, label-free immunoassay biosensors are needed for point-of-care clinical diagnostics, food safety, environmental monitoring, and biosecurity applications. A novel local, evanescent-field, array coupled (LEAC) photonic biosensor that can simultaneously sense multiple viruses, proteins, or DNA oligomers is being investigated. The sensing mechanism relies on the formation of a biological adlayer via specific binding of an analyte target to one of several localized patches of immobilized biological molecule probes (antibodies, ssDNA, aptamers). The attached analytes modify the waveguide cross-section and thus the optical field. A buried array of evanescently coupled photodetector elements along the length of the waveguide, each opposite a region of specific antibody type, locally sense the modification in the evanescent field due to adlayers of bound analytes. Proof-of-concept experiments have demonstrated strong optical modulation responses to artificial adlayers varying from 17 to ˜100 nm in thickness as observed by near-field scanning optical microscopy. LEAC sensors with electronic readout circuits are have been fabricated in a commercial 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Currently, research efforts are characterizing the effect of different polymer and organic molecules adlayers on the detected optical signal using these sensors.

  18. Biotoxin Detection Using Cell-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Pratik; Kintzios, Spyridon; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs) utilize the principles of cell-based assays (CBAs) by employing living cells for detection of different analytes from environment, food, clinical, or other sources. For toxin detection, CBBs are emerging as unique alternatives to other analytical methods. The main advantage of using CBBs for probing biotoxins and toxic agents is that CBBs respond to the toxic exposures in the manner related to actual physiologic responses of the vulnerable subjects. The results obtained from CBBs are based on the toxin-cell interactions, and therefore, reveal functional information (such as mode of action, toxic potency, bioavailability, target tissue or organ, etc.) about the toxin. CBBs incorporate both prokaryotic (bacteria) and eukaryotic (yeast, invertebrate and vertebrate) cells. To create CBB devices, living cells are directly integrated onto the biosensor platform. The sensors report the cellular responses upon exposures to toxins and the resulting cellular signals are transduced by secondary transducers generating optical or electrical signals outputs followed by appropriate read-outs. Examples of the layout and operation of cellular biosensors for detection of selected biotoxins are summarized. PMID:24335754

  19. Sensor apparatus using an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Mrinal

    2002-01-01

    A novel technology for sensing mechanical quantities such as force, stress, strain, pressure and acceleration has been invented. This technology is based on a change in the electrochemically generated voltage (electromotive force) with application of force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration. The change in the voltage is due to a change in the internal resistance of the electrochemical cell with a change in the relative position or orientation of the electrodes (anode and cathode) in the cell. The signal to be detected (e.g. force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration) is applied to one of the electrodes to cause a change in the relative position or orientation between the electrodes. Various materials, solid, semisolid, gel, paste or liquid can be utilized as the electrolyte. The electrolyte must be an ion conductor. The examples of solid electrolytes include specific polymer conductors, polymer composites, ion conducting glasses and ceramics. The electrodes are made of conductors such as metals with dissimilar electronegativities. Significantly enhanced sensitivities, up to three orders of magnitude higher than that of comparable commercial sensors, are obtained. The materials are substantially less expensive than commercially used materials for mechanical sensors.

  20. Sensor apparatus using an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Mrinal

    2003-07-01

    A method for sensing mechanical quantities such as force, stress, strain, pressure and acceleration is disclosed. This technology is based on a change in the electrochemically generated voltage (electromotive force) with application of force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration. The change in the voltage is due to a change in the internal resistance of the electrochemical cell with a change in the relative position or orientation of the electrodes (anode and cathode) in the cell. The signal to be detected (e.g. force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration) is applied to one of the electrodes to cause a change in the relative position or orientation between the electrodes. Various materials, solid, semisolid, gel, paste or liquid can be utilized as the electrolyte. The electrolyte must be an ion conductor. The examples of solid electrolytes include specific polymer conductors, polymer composites, ion conducting glasses and ceramics. The electrodes are made of conductors such as metals with dissimilar electro negativities. Significantly enhanced sensitivities, up to three orders of magnitude higher than that of comparable commercial sensors, are obtained. The materials are substantially less expensive than commercially used materials for mechanical sensors. An apparatus for sensing such mechanical quantities using materials such as doped 1,4 cis-polyisopropene and nafion. The 1,4 cis-polyisopropene may be doped with lithium perchlorate or iodine. The output voltage signal increases with an increase of the sensing area for a given stress. The device can be used as an intruder alarm, among other applications.

  1. Evanescent field absorption based photonic polymer waveguide biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiragi, Indrajit; Makkar, Roshan; Choudhury, Bikash Dev; Mukherji, Soumyo; Chalapathi, K.

    2011-08-01

    This paper details the design and fabrication of an integrated optical waveguide biosensor for antibody/antigen detection. SU-8 polymer is used as the core material to have a bi-conical tapered waveguide fabricated on a silicon substrate. PDMS is used as a buffer layer. The waist diameter of the biconical tapered waveguide has been optimized using Opti-BPM CAD software before fabrication. In addition, the fabrication technique employs simultaneous and single-step formation of the polymer waveguide structures for the guidance of light with V-grooves for low-cost passive alignment of glass optical fiber. The designed biosensor chip demonstrates sensing of FITC tagged goat anti human IgG (GaHIgG) and HIgG immobilized over the sensor surface was the bio receptor. The sensor uses the evanescent field that is present at the surface of the core for rapid and accurate sensing of antibody/antigen in the range of few micrograms per ml.

  2. Evanescent field absorption based photonic polymer waveguide biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiragi, Indrajit; Makkar, Roshan; Choudhury, Bikash Dev; Mukherji, Soumyo; Chalapathi, K.

    2010-12-01

    This paper details the design and fabrication of an integrated optical waveguide biosensor for antibody/antigen detection. SU-8 polymer is used as the core material to have a bi-conical tapered waveguide fabricated on a silicon substrate. PDMS is used as a buffer layer. The waist diameter of the biconical tapered waveguide has been optimized using Opti-BPM CAD software before fabrication. In addition, the fabrication technique employs simultaneous and single-step formation of the polymer waveguide structures for the guidance of light with V-grooves for low-cost passive alignment of glass optical fiber. The designed biosensor chip demonstrates sensing of FITC tagged goat anti human IgG (GaHIgG) and HIgG immobilized over the sensor surface was the bio receptor. The sensor uses the evanescent field that is present at the surface of the core for rapid and accurate sensing of antibody/antigen in the range of few micrograms per ml.

  3. A hybrid silicon evanescent quantum dot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bongyong; Tanabe, Katsuaki; Kako, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Hatori, Nobuaki; Noguchi, Masataka; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takemasa, Keizo; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of a hybrid silicon quantum dot (QD) laser, evanescently coupled to a silicon waveguide. InAs/GaAs QD laser structures with thin AlGaAs lower cladding layers were transferred by direct wafer bonding onto silicon waveguides defining cavities with adiabatic taper structures and distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser operates at temperatures up to 115 °C under pulsed current conditions, with a characteristic temperature T 0 of 303 K near room temperature. Furthermore, by reducing the width of the GaAs/AlGaAs mesa down to 8 µm, continuous-wave operation is realized at 25 °C.

  4. Evanescent photosynthesis: exciting cyanobacteria in a surface-confined light field.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Matthew D; Sieben, Vincent J; Pierobon, Scott C; Jung, Erica E; Kalontarov, Michael; Erickson, David; Sinton, David

    2012-04-14

    The conversion of solar energy to chemical energy useful for maintaining cellular function in photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria relies critically on light delivery to the microorganisms. Conventional direct irradiation of a bulk suspension leads to non-uniform light distribution within a strongly absorbing culture, and related inefficiencies. The study of small colonies of cells in controlled microenvironments would benefit from control over wavelength, intensity, and location of light energy on the scale of the microorganism. Here we demonstrate that the evanescent light field, confined near the surface of a waveguide, can be used to direct light into cyanobacteria and successfully drive photosynthesis. The method is enabled by the synergy between the penetration depth of the evanescent field and the size of the photosynthetic bacterium, both on the order of micrometres. Wild type Synechococcus elongatus (ATCC 33912) cells are exposed to evanescent light generated through total internal reflection of red (λ = 633 nm) light on a prism surface. Growth onset is consistently observed at intensity levels of 79 ± 10 W m(-2), as measured 1 μm from the surface, and 60 ± 8 W m(-2) as measured by a 5 μm depthwise average. These threshold values agree well with control experiments and literature values based on direct irradiation with daylight. In contrast, negligible growth is observed with evanescent light penetration depths less than the minor dimension of the rod-like bacterium (achieved at larger light incident angles). Collectively these results indicate that evanescent light waves can be used to tailor and direct light into cyanobacteria, driving photosynthesis.

  5. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  6. A simple approach for bioactive surface calibration using evanescent waves.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    When investigating the interaction of cells with surfaces, it is becoming increasingly important to perform quantitative measurements of surface protein density to understand reaction kinetics. Previously, to calibrate a surface for an experiment one would have to use a radiometric assay or strip the surface with acid and perform a mass quantification. Although both of these methodologies have been proven to be effective measurement techniques for surface quantification, they can be time consuming and require substantial amounts of material. The latter is particularly problematic when working with specialized molecules or constructs that may be expensive to produce and/or only available in small quantities. Here we present a simple method to measure the intensity and penetration depth of an evanescent wave, and use this information to quantify the density of surface molecules in a microscopic region of a transparent surface. PMID:27197088

  7. A simple approach for bioactive surface calibration using evanescent waves.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    When investigating the interaction of cells with surfaces, it is becoming increasingly important to perform quantitative measurements of surface protein density to understand reaction kinetics. Previously, to calibrate a surface for an experiment one would have to use a radiometric assay or strip the surface with acid and perform a mass quantification. Although both of these methodologies have been proven to be effective measurement techniques for surface quantification, they can be time consuming and require substantial amounts of material. The latter is particularly problematic when working with specialized molecules or constructs that may be expensive to produce and/or only available in small quantities. Here we present a simple method to measure the intensity and penetration depth of an evanescent wave, and use this information to quantify the density of surface molecules in a microscopic region of a transparent surface.

  8. IR fiber-optic evanescent wave spectroscopy (FEWS) for sensing applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We developed crystalline AgClBr fibers of diameters 0.7-0.9mm that are flexible, non-toxic, insoluble in water and highly transparent between 4-15µm. We used these fibers for various sensing applications. Highly sensitive absorption measurements in the mid-IR may be carried out by Fiber-optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS). A typical FEWS system is based on three mid-IR components: a tunable source, a detector and a AgClBr fiber sensor that is brought in contact with the samples. We used FTIR spectrometers or tunable gas lasers or quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as mid-IR sources. We used this FEWS system for measurements on gases, liquids and solids. In particular we used it for several biomedical applications. Measurements in vivo: (1) Early detection of skin diseases (e.g. melanoma). (2) Measurements on cells and bacteria. (3) Measurements on cornea. Measurements in vitro: (4) Characterization of urinary and biliary stones. (5) Blood measurements. The FEWS method is simple, inexpensive and does not require sample processing. It would be useful for diagnostic measurements on the outer part of the body of a patient, as well as for endoscopic measurements. It would also useful for measurements on tissue samples removed from the body. In addition we develop Scanning Near-field Infrared Microscope that will be used for spectral imaging with sub-wavelength resolution in the mid-IR. The various AgClBr fiber-optic sensors are expected to be important diagnostic tools at the hand of physicians in the future.

  9. Motion behavior of mammalian AT-SC under evanescent field illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer; Khor, Kang Nan; Buang, Fhataheya; M. Daud, M. Zulkali; Mahamd Adikan, Faisal Rafiq; Ahmad Hambali, Nor Azura Malini; Abd Wahid, Mohd Halim; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Reshak, Ali Hussain

    2015-08-01

    The motion behavior of mammalian adipose tissue derived stem cells (AT-SCs) on an integrated channel waveguide under the evanescent field illumination is demonstrated and analyzed. The AT-SCs, suspended to a concentration of 1 x 105 cells per ml, are deposited in a reservoir over a copper ion-exchanged channel waveguide. Light from a HeNe laser operating at 632.8nm was coupled into the waveguide, causing the cells under the illumination of evanescent field and moved in a skewed stochastic motion in accordance to the laser power. The trajectory angle of the motion of the cells towards the illuminated channel waveguide was investigated and analyzed to distinguish the factors that affect such behavior. The cells reach a position relative to the illuminated channel, which is dictated by the compounded effect of the convectional current and evanescent field. The observations deduced that motion due to the optical field exists and were more pronounced when considering the trajectory angle towards the output facet. However, the optical forces are not significantly large enough to counter the motion due to the convection current. The results are discussed in light of the potential application of optical channel waveguides for bioanalytical applications, namely in the identification, sorting and analysis of differently sized mammalian cells without recourse to fluorescence or antibody staining.

  10. Platform for a hydrocarbon exhaust gas sensor utilizing a pumping cell and a conductometric sensor.

    PubMed

    Biskupski, Diana; Geupel, Andrea; Wiesner, Kerstin; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga(2)O(3) or doped SrTiO(3) are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well. PMID:22423212

  11. Platform for a Hydrocarbon Exhaust Gas Sensor Utilizing a Pumping Cell and a Conductometric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Biskupski, Diana; Geupel, Andrea; Wiesner, Kerstin; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga2O3 or doped SrTiO3 are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well. PMID:22423212

  12. Magnetically-assisted transport evanescent field fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Amber D; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    The immunoassay, based on specific recognition of an antigen by its antibody, has garnered widespread use in clinical analysis as well as application in such areas as food industry and environmental monitoring. Fluoroimmunoassays (FIAs) are especially attractive due to the inherent sensitivity of fluorescence spectroscopy and the availability of a wide range of commercial antibodies and fluorescent labels. In current form, however, FIAs can be cumbersome, multistep procedures and often lack versatility when there is interest in measuring many different target antigens. This report is proof of a concept paper introducing a new FIA approach, Magnetically-Assisted Transport Evanescent Field Fluoroimmunoassays (MATEFFs), which seeks to preserve the advantages of current approaches to FIAs while attempting to address some of the drawbacks. MATEFFs utilize magnetic microspheres as solid supports for the fluoroimmunoassay with direct detection of bound analyte within the sample mixture effected by selectively driving the functionalized beads to a prism surface using an external magnet. An evanescent wave is generated by total internal reflection of a laser beam at the optical interface between the prism and sample and serves to excite the fluorescent species magnetically delivered into the localized field. This technique eliminates wash steps without compromising sensitivity, all the while minimizing interference from fluorescing species present in the sample matrix. Preliminary optimization studies assessing the impact of background interfering agents, incident angle, magnetic field direction, laser power density via focusing, and bead concentration on MATEFFs performance characteristics are discussed herein along with a detailed description of the experimental platform. Utilizing a model sandwich assay system with biotinylated anti-IgG as the capture antibody, rabbit IgG as the antigen, and anti-IgG-R-phycoerythrin as the reporter antibody, we demonstrate a linear

  13. The evanescent wavefield part of a cylindrical vector beam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The evanescent wave of the cylindrical vector field is analyzed using the vector angular spectrum of the electromagnetic beam. Comparison between the contributions of the TE and TM terms of both the propagating and the evanescent waves associated with the cylindrical vector field in free space is demonstrated. The physical pictures of the evanescent wave and the propagating wave are well illustrated from the vectorial structure, which provides a new approach to manipulating laser beams by choosing the states of polarization in the cross-section of the field. PMID:24104116

  14. Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, Harold R.; Breault, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

  15. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  16. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2009-06-23

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  17. Analytical scanning evanescent microwave microscope and control stage

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Duewer, Fred; Yang, Hai Tao; Lu, Yalin

    2013-01-22

    A scanning evanescent microwave microscope (SEMM) that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties is disclosed. The SEMM is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The SEMM has the ability to map dielectric constant, loss tangent, conductivity, electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. Such properties are then used to provide distance control over a wide range, from to microns to nanometers, over dielectric and conductive samples for a scanned evanescent microwave probe, which enable quantitative non-contact and submicron spatial resolution topographic and electrical impedance profiling of dielectric, nonlinear dielectric and conductive materials. The invention also allows quantitative estimation of microwave impedance using signals obtained by the scanned evanescent microwave probe and quasistatic approximation modeling. The SEMM can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  18. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-01

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  19. Cell Permeable Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensors for Imaging Phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Samsuzzoha; Rakshit, Ananya; Pal, Suranjana; Datta, Ankona

    2016-07-15

    Phosphoinositides are critical cell-signal mediators present on the plasma membrane. The dynamic change of phosphoinositide concentrations on the membrane including clustering and declustering mediates signal transduction. The importance of phosphoinositides is scored by the fact that they participate in almost all cell-signaling events, and a defect in phosphoinositide metabolism is linked to multiple diseases including cancer, bipolar disorder, and type-2 diabetes. Optical sensors for visualizing phosphoinositide distribution can provide information on phosphoinositide dynamics. This exercise will ultimately afford a handle into understanding and manipulating cell-signaling processes. The major requirement in phosphoinositide sensor development is a selective, cell permeable probe that can quantify phosphoinositides. To address this requirement, we have developed short peptide-based ratiometric fluorescent sensors for imaging phosphoinositides. The sensors afford a selective response toward two crucial signaling phosphoinositides, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P), over other anionic membrane phospholipids and soluble inositol phosphates. Dissociation constant values indicate up to 4 times higher probe affinity toward PI(4,5)P2 when compared to PI4P. Significantly, the sensors are readily cell-permeable and enter cells within 15 min of incubation as indicated by multiphoton excitation confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the sensors light up signaling phosphoinositides present both on the cell membrane and on organelle membranes near the perinuclear space, opening avenues for quantifying and monitoring phosphoinositide signaling.

  20. Environmental and Metabolic Sensors That Control T Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, George; Cantrell, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    The T lymphocyte response to pathogens is shaped by the microenvironment. Environmental sensors in T cells include the nutrient-sensing serine/threonine kinases, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1. Other environmental sensors are transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. The present review explores the molecular basis for the impact of environmental signals on the differentiation of conventional T cell receptor αβ T cells and how the T cell response to immune stimuli can coordinate the T cell response to environmental cues. PMID:25852681

  1. Fluorometer with a quartz-rod waveguide-integrating sphere configuration to measure evanescent-field luminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorometer was designed to measure evanescent-field luminescence. A quartz-rod waveguide (d = 2 mm) was installed coaxally inside a cylindrical flow-through cell (id = 2.3 mm, od = 6.3 mm, l = 116 mm). An excitation beam from a UV LED or a miniature xenon flashlamp was focused by a ball lens and ...

  2. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing units of biological olfactory or taste systems at the tissue level, cellular level, or molecular level. Specifically, at the cellular level, there are mainly two categories of cells have been employed for the development of biomimetic chemical sensors, which are natural cells and bioengineered cells, respectively. Natural cells are directly isolated from biological olfactory and taste systems, which are convenient to achieve. However, natural cells often suffer from the undefined sensing properties and limited amount of identical cells. On the other hand, bioengineered cells have shown decisive advantages to be applied in the development of biomimetic chemical sensors due to the powerful biotechnology for the reconstruction of the cell sensing properties. Here, we briefly summarized the most recent advances of biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells. The development challenges and future trends are discussed as well. PMID:25482234

  3. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Grist, Samantha M.; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications. PMID:22163408

  4. Tracking cancer cell proliferation on a CMOS capacitance sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Somashekar Bangalore; Abshire, Pamela

    2008-05-15

    We report a novel technique for assessing cell proliferation that employs integrated capacitance sensors for monitoring the growth of anchorage-dependent living cells. The sensors measure substrate coupling capacitances of cells cultured on-chip in a standard in vitro environment. The biophysical phenomenon underlying the capacitive behavior of cells is the counterionic polarization around the insulating cell bodies when exposed to weak, low frequency electric fields. The sensors employ charge sharing for mapping sensed capacitance values in the fF range to output voltage signals. The sensor chip has been fabricated in a commercially available 0.5microm, 2-poly 3-metal CMOS technology. We report experimental results demonstrating sensor response to the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed by their proliferation on the chip surface. On-chip capacitance sensing offers a non-invasive, label-free, easy-to-use, miniaturized technique with real-time monitoring capability for tracking cell proliferation in vitro. PMID:18281207

  5. A fiber-optic evanescent wave DNA biosensor based on novel molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Tan, W

    1999-11-15

    We have prepared a novel optical fiber evanescent wave DNA biosensor using a newly developed molecular beacon DNA probe. The molecular beacons (MB) are oligonucleotide probes that become fluorescent upon hybridization with target DNA/RNA molecules. Biotinylated MBs have been designed and immobilized on an optical fiber core surface via biotin-avidin or biotin-streptavidin interactions. The DNA sensor based on a MB does not need labeled analyte or intercalation reagents. It can be used to directly detect, in real-time, target DNA/RNA molecules without using competitive assays. The sensor is rapid, stable, highly selective, and reproducible. We have studied the hybridization kinetics of the immobilized MB by changing the ionic strength of the hybridization solution and target DNA concentration. Our result shows divalent cations play a more important role than monovalent cations in stabilizing the MB stem hybrids and in accelerating the hybridization reaction with target DNA/RNA molecules. The concentration detection limit of the MB evanescent wave biosensor is 1.1 nM. The MB DNA biosensor has been applied to the analysis of specific gamma-actin mRNA sequences amplified by polymerase chain reaction.

  6. Galvanic Cell Type Sensor for Soil Moisture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pramod; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2015-07-21

    Here we report the first potentiometric sensor for soil moisture analysis by bringing in the concept of Galvanic cells wherein the redox energies of Al and conducting polyaniline are exploited to design a battery type sensor. The sensor consists of only simple architectural components, and as such they are inexpensive and lightweight, making it suitable for on-site analysis. The sensing mechanism is proved to be identical to a battery type discharge reaction wherein polyaniline redox energy changes from the conducting to the nonconducting state with a resulting voltage shift in the presence of soil moisture. Unlike the state of the art soil moisture sensors, a signal derived from the proposed moisture sensor is probe size independent, as it is potentiometric in nature and, hence, can be fabricated in any shape or size and can provide a consistent output signal under the strong aberration conditions often encountered in soil moisture analysis. The sensor is regenerable by treating with 1 M HCl and can be used for multiple analysis with little read out hysteresis. Further, a portable sensor is fabricated which can provide warning signals to the end user when the moisture levels in the soil go below critically low levels, thereby functioning as a smart device. As the sensor is inexpensive, portable, and potentiometric, it opens up avenues for developing effective and energy efficient irrigation strategies, understanding the heat and water transfer at the atmosphere-land interface, understanding soil mechanics, forecasting the risk of natural calamities, and so on.

  7. Control of evanescent field using a dynamic waveguide composed of gelatin-coated few-layer fiber.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudip K; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy

    2016-07-01

    We report here the results of our studies on dynamic refractive-index (RI) profile few-layer fibers in view of controlling the mode-field profile, in particular the evanescent tails under varying structural configuration. We experimentally fabricate dynamic RI profile few-layer fibers using thin gelatin coating on selectively etched fibers and illustrate how the excitation of various modes and the evanescent field at the interface can be controlled with changing humidity parameter. As a technology outcome of this research, we demonstrate through an optimized structural configuration a well performing fiber-optic high (70%-98%) relative humidity (RH) sensor with sensitivity as high as -1.07  dBm/%RH.

  8. Hybrid silicon evanescent approach to optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Di; Fang, Alexander W.; Chen, Hui-Wen; Sysak, Matthew N.; Koch, Brian R.; Lively, Erica; Raday, Omri; Kuo, Ying-Hao; Jones, Richard; Bowers, John E.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the recently developed hybrid silicon evanescent platform (HSEP), and its application as a promising candidate for optical interconnects in silicon. A number of key discrete components and a wafer-scale integration process are reviewed. The motivation behind this work is to realize silicon-based photonic integrated circuits possessing unique advantages of III-V materials and silicon-on-insulator waveguides simultaneously through a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor fabrication process. Electrically pumped hybrid silicon distributed feedback and distributed Bragg reflector lasers with integrated hybrid silicon photodetectors are demonstrated coupled to SOI waveguides, serving as the reliable on-chip single-frequency light sources. For the external signal processing, Mach-Zehnder interferometer modulators are demonstrated, showing a resistance-capacitance-limited, 3 dB electrical bandwidth up to 8 GHz and a modulation efficiency of 1.5 V mm. The successful implementation of quantum well intermixing technique opens up the possibility to realize multiple III-V bandgaps in this platform. Sampled grating DBR devices integrated with electroabsorption modulators (EAM) are fabricated, where the bandgaps in gain, mirror, and EAM regions are 1520, 1440 and 1480 nm, respectively. The high-temperature operation characteristics of the HSEP are studied experimentally and theoretically. An overall characteristic temperature ( T 0) of 51°C, an above threshold characteristic temperature ( T 1) of 100°C, and a thermal impedance ( Z T ) of 41.8°C/W, which agrees with the theoretical prediction of 43.5°C/W, are extracted from the Fabry-Perot devices. Scaling this platform to larger dimensions is demonstrated up to 150 mm wafer diameter. A vertical outgassing channel design is developed to accomplish high-quality III-V epitaxial transfer to silicon in a timely and dimension-independent fashion.

  9. Fiberoptic evanescent wave infrared spectroscopy of gases in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunimovich, D.; Belotserkovsky, E.; Katzir, A.

    1995-04-01

    Silver halide optical fibers were used as attenuated total reflection elements for infrared evanescent wave spectroscopy of gases in liquids. The evanescent wave absorption spectra of chlorodifluoromethane (Freon-22) and carbon dioxide gases (CO2) in water were studied and the dependence on vapor pressure of the gas and temperature was investigated. Absorption peaks were easily traced and correlated well with those in the literature. The use of the infrared (IR) fibers in the fiberoptic evanescent wave spectroscopy system bypasses the difficulty of ordinary IR spectroscopy related to the strong IR absorption of most liquid solvents, and provides a flexible, easy, and inexpensive way of determining the presence and concentration of gases in liquids to within about 5% accuracy.

  10. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  11. Evanescent Wave-Assisted Symmetry Breaking of Gold Dipolar Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jhen-Hong; Chen, Kuo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking and scattering cancellation were observed in the dark-mode resonance of dipolar gold nanoantennas (NAs) on glass substrates coupled with oblique incidence and total internal reflection. With the assistance of evanescent waves, the coupling efficiency was twice as strong when the incidence angle was larger than the critical angle. The Hamiltonian equation and absorption spectra were used to analyze the hybridization model of symmetric dipolar gold NAs. The antibonding mode could be coupled successfully by both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarizations to NAs when the dimers orientation is parallel to the propagation direction of evanescent waves.

  12. Evanescent Wave-Assisted Symmetry Breaking of Gold Dipolar Nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jhen-Hong; Chen, Kuo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking and scattering cancellation were observed in the dark-mode resonance of dipolar gold nanoantennas (NAs) on glass substrates coupled with oblique incidence and total internal reflection. With the assistance of evanescent waves, the coupling efficiency was twice as strong when the incidence angle was larger than the critical angle. The Hamiltonian equation and absorption spectra were used to analyze the hybridization model of symmetric dipolar gold NAs. The antibonding mode could be coupled successfully by both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarizations to NAs when the dimers orientation is parallel to the propagation direction of evanescent waves. PMID:27581766

  13. Evanescent Wave-Assisted Symmetry Breaking of Gold Dipolar Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jhen-Hong; Chen, Kuo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking and scattering cancellation were observed in the dark-mode resonance of dipolar gold nanoantennas (NAs) on glass substrates coupled with oblique incidence and total internal reflection. With the assistance of evanescent waves, the coupling efficiency was twice as strong when the incidence angle was larger than the critical angle. The Hamiltonian equation and absorption spectra were used to analyze the hybridization model of symmetric dipolar gold NAs. The antibonding mode could be coupled successfully by both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarizations to NAs when the dimers orientation is parallel to the propagation direction of evanescent waves. PMID:27581766

  14. Spin-dependent diffraction of evanescent waves by subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-08-15

    We present a way to observe the spin-to-orbital conversion phenomenon. A spinning evanescent wave can be asymmetrically transformed into propagation waves through one certain diffraction order by a periodical subwavelength grating. By detecting diffraction field distribution behind the grating, we observed spin-dependent diffraction patterns. Furthermore, replacing the periodical grating by a Fibonacci grating, we can simultaneously observe multiple order diffractions of a spin evanescent wave. In this case, the multiple diffraction beams can interfere with each other behind the quasi-periodical grating to form asymmetric interference patterns. Our work provides another way toward the realization of spin-to-orbital conversion of light. PMID:26274640

  15. Evanescent Wave-Assisted Symmetry Breaking of Gold Dipolar Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jhen-Hong; Chen, Kuo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Symmetry-breaking and scattering cancellation were observed in the dark-mode resonance of dipolar gold nanoantennas (NAs) on glass substrates coupled with oblique incidence and total internal reflection. With the assistance of evanescent waves, the coupling efficiency was twice as strong when the incidence angle was larger than the critical angle. The Hamiltonian equation and absorption spectra were used to analyze the hybridization model of symmetric dipolar gold NAs. The antibonding mode could be coupled successfully by both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarizations to NAs when the dimers orientation is parallel to the propagation direction of evanescent waves.

  16. Fiber loop ringdown glucose sensors: initial tests in human diabetic urines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Malik; Wang, Chuji

    2014-06-01

    Fiber loop ringdown technique has shown promise in biomedical applications in recent studies. In the present work, fiber loop ringdown sensors using the evanescent field as the sensing mechanism have been fabricated and tested in actual human urines for the first time. In order to evaluate the sensors' performance, the sensors were comparatively tested in healthy human urines, synthetic urine solutions, and diabetic urines. Due to different features or chemical compositions of each urine sample, the sensors experience different optical losses, equivalently, different ringdown times. The comparative results show that evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown glucose sensors can discriminate the three different urine samples by displaying different ringdown times. The evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown glucose sensors had fast response, good reproducibility, and high sensitivity. The promising results imply that the evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown sensors have potential for near real-time detection of diabetic urines.

  17. Evanescent-wave scattering in near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, R; Quinten, M; Pack, A

    1999-01-01

    Extended Mie theory is used to investigate the scattering and extinction of evanescent waves by small spherical particles and aggregates of such particles. Metallic, dielectric and metal-coated dielectric particles are taken into consideration. In contrast to plane-wave excitation, p- and s-polarized spectra differ in the case of evanescent waves due to the inherent asymmetry of both polarizations. Furthermore, contributions from higher multipoles are strongly enhanced, compared with plane-wave excitation, and the enhancement factors are polarization dependent. The corresponding changes in the scattering and extinction spectra are most pronounced in cases where higher multipoles exhibit resonances in the spectral range considered. This applies, for example, to morphological resonances of dielectric particles with size parameters > 1. The effect of the surface, where the evanescent wave is generated by total internal reflection, on the scattering and extinction spectra is investigated via numerical field calculations employing the multiple multipole method. In an application to apertureless near-field optical microscopy, the variation of the scattered power is calculated when a silicon particle is scanned across a silver particle in the evanescent field.

  18. Development of a highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Ogino, H; Asakura, K

    1995-02-01

    A highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor was successfully developed for determining parts per billion of oxygen in high purity gases such as nitrogen, argon, etc. The response of this improved sensor was proportional in the range of oxygen concentrations from 10.0 ppm to the detection limit. The response speed in this study was improved to within 90 sec for a 90% response. The detection limit was tentatively found to be less than 0.4 ppb corresponding to S N = 2 .

  19. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A simple acoustofluidic chip for microscale manipulation using evanescent Scholte waves.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Vivian; Wunenburger, Régis; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Rabaud, David; Kleman, Jean-Philippe; Poulain, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Acoustofluidics is acknowledged as a powerful tool offering a contactless and label-free manipulation of fluids, micro-beads, and living cells. To date, most techniques rely on the use of propagating acoustic waves and take advantage of the associated acoustic radiation force in standing or progressive fields. Here, we present a new approach based on the generation of an evanescent acoustic field above a substrate. This field is obtained by means of subsonic interfacial waves giving rise to a well-defined standing wave pattern. By both imaging and probing the evanescent acoustic field, we show that these interfacial waves are guided waves known as quasi-Scholte acoustic waves. Scholte waves present very interesting features for applications in acoustofluidics. Namely, they confine the acoustic energy to the vicinity of the surface, they are nearly lossless and thus can propagate over long distances along the substrate, and finally they do not require any particular material for the substrate. With a very simple and low-cost device we show several examples of applications including patterning lines or arrays of cells, triggering spinning of living cells, and separating plasma from RBC in a whole blood microdroplet.

  1. A simple acoustofluidic chip for microscale manipulation using evanescent Scholte waves.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Vivian; Wunenburger, Régis; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Rabaud, David; Kleman, Jean-Philippe; Poulain, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Acoustofluidics is acknowledged as a powerful tool offering a contactless and label-free manipulation of fluids, micro-beads, and living cells. To date, most techniques rely on the use of propagating acoustic waves and take advantage of the associated acoustic radiation force in standing or progressive fields. Here, we present a new approach based on the generation of an evanescent acoustic field above a substrate. This field is obtained by means of subsonic interfacial waves giving rise to a well-defined standing wave pattern. By both imaging and probing the evanescent acoustic field, we show that these interfacial waves are guided waves known as quasi-Scholte acoustic waves. Scholte waves present very interesting features for applications in acoustofluidics. Namely, they confine the acoustic energy to the vicinity of the surface, they are nearly lossless and thus can propagate over long distances along the substrate, and finally they do not require any particular material for the substrate. With a very simple and low-cost device we show several examples of applications including patterning lines or arrays of cells, triggering spinning of living cells, and separating plasma from RBC in a whole blood microdroplet. PMID:27292590

  2. Evanescent-wave comb spectroscopy of liquids with strongly dispersive optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; Giorgini, A.; Salza, M.; Fabian, M.; Gagliardi, G.; De Natale, P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate evanescent-wave fiber cavity-enhanced spectroscopy in the liquid phase using a near-infrared frequency comb. Exploiting strong fiber-dispersion effects, we show that liquid absorption spectra can be recorded without any external dispersive element. The fiber cavity is used both as sensor and spectrometer. The resonance modes are frequency locked to the comb teeth while the cavity photon lifetime is measured over 155 nm, from 1515 nm to 1670 nm, where absorption bands of liquid polyamines are detected as a proof of concept. Our fiber spectrometer lends itself to in situ, real-time chemical analysis in environmental monitoring, biomedical assays, and micro-opto-fluidic systems.

  3. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Liu, Z; Gmachl, C; Sivco, D

    2005-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers and unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of liquid droplets. The laser wavelengths were chosen to be in the regions which offer the largest absorption contrast between constituents inside the mixture droplets. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. Using a 300microm diameter fiber with a 25 mm immersion length, the signal to noise ratios correspond to 1 vol.% for alpha-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in aqueous solution for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm-1 and 1363 cm-1, respectively.

  4. Architectures for evanescent frequency tuning of microring resonators in micro-opto-electro-mechanical SOI platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoman, Hossam; Dahlem, Marcus S.

    2015-02-01

    Microring resonators are important elements in a wide variety of optical systems, ranging from optical switches and tunable filterbanks to optical sensors. In these structures, the resonant frequencies are normally controlled by tuning the effective index of refraction. In optical switches and filters, this has traditionally been achieved through electro-optic or thermo-optic effects. In sensors, the effective refractive index is changed by the presence of the measurand. Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to these optical systems allows additional evanescent frequency tuning. In particular, the presence of a cantilever in the near-field of the optical mode can tune the effective refractive index. A specific cantilever displacement can therefore induce a desired resonant frequency shift. Alternatively, a measured shift in the resonant frequency can be associated with a cantilever displacement, and be used for pressure or acceleration sensing. In this paper, we explore a geometry that can be used for controlling the resonant frequency of a microring resonator through evanescent field perturbation, using a cantilever defined in the same silicon layer as the optical waveguides, in a silicon-on-insulator platform. The effects of the lateral gap size between the optical waveguide and the cantilever, and the cantilever vertical displacement, on both the resonant frequency and quality factor of the resonator, are evaluated through finite-difference timedomain computations for wavelengths centered at 1550 nm. The presence of the cantilever in the near-field of the optical mode changes the effective refractive index, resulting in frequency tuning, but also lowers the quality factor due to additional coupling into the membrane.

  5. Batteryless, wireless sensor powered by a sediment microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Conrad; Dewan, Alim; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2008-11-15

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are considered to be an alternative renewable power source for remote monitoring. There are two main challenges to using SMFCs as power sources: 1) a SMFC produces a low potential at which most sensor electronics do not operate, and 2) a SMFC cannot provide continuous power, so energy from the SMFC must be stored and then used to repower sensor electronics intermittently. In this study, we developed a SMFC and a power management system (PMS) to power a batteryless, wireless sensor. A SMFC operating with a microbial anode and cathode, located in the Palouse River, Pullman, Washington, U.S.A., was used to demonstrate the utility of the developed system. The designed PMS stored microbial energy and then started powering the wireless sensor when the SMFC potential reached 320 mV. It continued powering until the SMFC potential dropped below 52 mV. The system was repowered when the SMFC potential increased to 320 mV, and this repowering continued as long as microbial reactions continued. We demonstrated that a microbial fuel cell with a microbial anode and cathode can be used as an effective renewable power source for remote monitoring using custom-designed electronics.

  6. Cell adhesion and guidance by micropost-array chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Paul; Quah, Soo-Kim; Danowski, Kristine L.

    2002-06-01

    An array of ~50,000 individual polymeric micropost sensors was patterned across a glass coverslip by a photoimprint lithographic technique. Individual micropost sensors were ~3-micrometers tall and ~8-micrometers wide. The O2-sensitive micropost array sensors (MPASs) comprised a ruthenium complex encapsulated in a gas permeable photopolymerizable siloxane. The pH-sensitive MPASs comprised a fluorescein conjugate encapsulated in a photocrosslinkable poly(vinyl alcohol)-based polymer. PO2 and pH were quantitated by acquiring MPAS luminescence images with an epifluorescence microscope/charge coupled device imaging system. O2-sensitive MPASs displayed linear Stern-Volmer quenching behavior with a maximum Io/I of ~8.6. pH-sensitive MPASs displayed sigmoidal calibration curves with a pKa of ~5.8. The adhesion of undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells across these two polymeric surface types was investigated. The greatest PC12 cell proliferation and adhesion occurred across the poly(vinyl alcohol)-based micropost arrays relative to planar poly(vinyl alcohol)-based surfaces and both patterned and planar siloxane surfaces. An additional advantage of the patterned MPAS layers relative to planar sensing layers was the ability to direct the growth of biological cells. Preliminary data is presented whereby nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells grew neurite-like processes that extended along paths defined by the micropost architecture.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  8. Manipulation of metallic nanoparticle with evanescent vortex Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we propose a novel strategy to optically trap and manipulate metallic nanoparticles using evanescent vortex Bessel beam (EVBB). A versatile method is presented to generate evanescent Bessel beam with tunable optical angular momentum by focusing a radially polarized vortex beam onto a one-dimensional photonics band gap structure. The behavior of a metallic nanoparticle in the EVBB is numerically studied. We show that such particle can be stably trapped near the surface. The orbital angular momentum drives the metallic nanoparticle to orbit around the beam axis, and the direction of the orbital motion is controlled by the handedness of the helical phase front. The technique demonstrated in this work may open up new avenues for optical manipulation, and the non-contact tunable orbiting dynamics of the trapped particle may find important applications in higher resolution imaging techniques. PMID:26480086

  9. Optical observation of evanescent surface magnons in thin magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Emtage, P.R.; Booth, J.G.; Patton, C.E.

    1988-04-15

    A new type of nonpropagating surface-wave-like magnon has been detected in yttrium iron garnet films (YIG) in a magnetostatic wave (MSW) device structure using Brillouin light scattering. The measurements were carried out on a YIG film stripline device operated at 2--4 GHz. With an applied magnetic field parallel to the stripline, magnon signals were observed at fields above the surface wave band edge. Theory shows that highly localized, evanescent surface modes can exist at such fields, but only when a ground plane is present; the bandwidth in field or frequency is inversely proportional to the separation between the film and the ground plane. The observed evanescent wave band limits are in good agreement with the theoretical values.

  10. Interactions between Josephson Junction Metamaterials and Evanescent Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura; Anlage, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Amplification of evanescent waves is an exciting, yet controversial application of negative index of refraction metamaterials in pursuit of creating a ``perfect lens''. We will describe evanescent wave amplification experiments using lossless metamaterials, i.e. arrays of Josephson junctions (JJ). The effects of input power, temperature, and dc magnetic field on JJ arrays below the cutoff frequency of a waveguide have been investigated. At low temperatures a pronounced, tunable microwave resonance emerges in transmission. This resonance has been systematically studied in terms of its transmission and reflection coefficients. In the regime between -45 and -25 dBm, we observe a non-hysteretic emission of microwave photons that reverberate at the same frequency. Amplification of these photons (parametric amplification) will also be described. This work was supported by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship program.

  11. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  12. Acceleration of free electrons in a symmetric evanescent wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, B. R.; Glasgow, S. A.; Peatross, J. B.

    2006-09-01

    The possibility of accelerating free electrons in a vacuum gap between closely spaced dielectric materials is explored. Plane waves impinging symmetrically on the gap from either side at oblique incidence produce an evanescent wave with net electric field along the direction of propagation. Near the critical angle, the evanescent wave propagates at the vacuum speed of light. A theoretical development and numerical simulations show that free electrons in the gap can be accelerated and accumulate energy indefinitely. This approach lies outside the purview of the Lawson-Woodward theorem, which does not apply in the vicinity of a medium. Damage thresholds of materials restrict the light intensity to far below that achievable by current high-power lasers. This limits the particle energy that might be achieved from an accelerator based on this approach.

  13. Manipulation of metallic nanoparticle with evanescent vortex Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we propose a novel strategy to optically trap and manipulate metallic nanoparticles using evanescent vortex Bessel beam (EVBB). A versatile method is presented to generate evanescent Bessel beam with tunable optical angular momentum by focusing a radially polarized vortex beam onto a one-dimensional photonics band gap structure. The behavior of a metallic nanoparticle in the EVBB is numerically studied. We show that such particle can be stably trapped near the surface. The orbital angular momentum drives the metallic nanoparticle to orbit around the beam axis, and the direction of the orbital motion is controlled by the handedness of the helical phase front. The technique demonstrated in this work may open up new avenues for optical manipulation, and the non-contact tunable orbiting dynamics of the trapped particle may find important applications in higher resolution imaging techniques.

  14. Field comparison of optical and clark cell dissolved-oxygen sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.; Garcia, L.

    2005-01-01

    Three multi-parameter water-quality monitors equipped with either Clark cell type or optical type dissolved-oxygen sensors were deployed for 30 days in a brackish (salinity <10 parts per thousand) environment to determine the sensitivity of the sensors to biofouling. The dissolved-oxygen sensors compared periodically to a hand-held dissolved oxygen sensor, but were not serviced or cleaned during the deployment. One of the Clark cell sensors and the optical sensor performed similarly during the deployment. The remaining Clark cell sensor was not aged correctly prior to deployment and did not perform as well as the other sensors. All sensors experienced substantial biofouling that gradually degraded the accuracy of the dissolved-oxygen measurement during the last half of the deployment period. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  15. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K.

  16. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  17. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave

    PubMed Central

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  18. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L E Rickard; Smith, Glenn S

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  19. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, L. E. Rickard; Smith, Glenn S.

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  20. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally.

  1. Fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy for fast multicomponent analysis of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhi, Ronit; Gotshal, Yaron; Bunimovich, David; Katzir, Abraham; Sela, Ben-Ami

    1996-07-01

    A spectral analysis of human blood serum was undertaken by fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy (FEWS) by the use of a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer. A special cell for the FEWS measurements was designed and built that incorporates an IR-transmitting silver halide fiber and a means for introducing the blood-serum sample. Further improvements in analysis were obtained by the adoption of multivariate calibration techniques that are already used in clinical chemistry. The partial least-squares algorithm was used to calculate the concentrations of cholesterol, total protein, urea, and uric acid in human blood serum. The estimated prediction errors obtained (in percent from the average value) were 6% for total protein, 15% for cholesterol, 30% for urea, and 30% for uric acid. These results were compared with another independent prediction method that used a neural-network model. This model yielded estimated prediction errors of 8.8% for total protein, 25% for cholesterol, and 21% for uric acid. spectroscopy, fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, blood, multivariate calibration, neural networks.

  2. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liess, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S

  3. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    SciTech Connect

    Liess, Martin

    2014-03-24

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  4. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  5. Sensors based on galvanic cell generated electrochemiluminescence and its application.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lirong; Zhang, Zhujun

    2006-10-27

    In this paper, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging sensor array was developed for determination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which was based on Cu/Zn alloy galvanic cell generated ECL. In alkaline solution, Cu/Zn galvanic cell was formed because of corrosion effect, the galvanic cell could supply stable potential for ECL generation of luminol, and the weak ECL emission could be enhanced by H(2)O(2). The galvanic cell sensor array was designed by putting Cu/Zn alloy in 96-well microtiter plates separately. The relative ECL intensity was proportional with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 1.0 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) and the detection limit was 3.0 x 10(-7) mol l(-1) (3sigma), the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 11 parallel measurements of 1.0 x 10(-5)mol l(-1) H2O2 was 4.0%.

  6. Method and apparatus for enhanced evanescent fluorescence and color filtering using a high refractive index thin film coating

    DOEpatents

    Kao, Hung Pin; Schoeniger, Joseph; Yang, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    A technique for increasing the excitation and collection of evanescent fluorescence radiation emanating from a fiber optic sensor having a high refractive index (n.sub.r), dielectric thin film coating has been disclosed and described. The invention comprises a clad optical fiber core whose cladding is removed on a distal end, the distal end coated with a thin, non-porous, titanium dioxide sol-gel coating. It has been shown that such a fiber will exhibit increased fluorescence coupling due in part by 1) increasing the intensity of the evanescent field at the fiber core surface by a constructive interference effect on the propagating light, and 2) increasing the depth of penetration of the field in the sample. The interference effect created by the thin film imposes a wavelength dependence on the collection of the fluorescence and also suggests a novel application of thin films for color filtering as well as increasing collected fluorescence in fiber sensors. Collected fluorescence radiation increased by up to 6-fold over that of a bare fused silica fiber having a numerical aperture (N.A.) of O.6.

  7. Electrical and chemical sensors for biological cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edell, D. J.; McNeil, V. M.; Curley, M. G.; Wolfe, J. H.

    Electrical and chemical microsensors for biological cell research allow for the continuous study of biological systems under normal physiological conditions. Two sensor technologies which take most advantage of microfabrication technology are discussed. One is being developed for monitoring the environment of cancer cells during radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia treatment. Of current interest is the measurement of temperature and interstitial free oxygen concentration distributions in cancer tissues prior to and during various treatments. The second technology discussed is being developed for monitoring the extracellular ionic currents from electrogenic cells in culture. The ability to build integrated circuits over large areas of a silicon wafer which can impedance transform the signals and multiplex a large array of contacts is being used.

  8. Cell-tower deployment of counter-sniper sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Michael T.

    2004-09-01

    Cellular telephone antenna towers are evaluated as sites for rapid, effective & efficient deployment of counter-sniper sensors, especially in urban environments. They are expected to offer a suitable density, excellent LOS, and a generally limited variety of known or readily-characterized mechanical interfaces. Their precise locations are easily mapped in advance of deployment, are easily accessible by ground and air, and are easily spotted by deployment teams in real-time. We survey issues of EMI & RFI, susceptibility to denial & ambush in military scenarios, and the impact of trends in cell tower design & construction.

  9. Nanoparticle-GFP "chemical nose" sensor for cancer cell identification.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Daniel F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based sensor arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of bio-related molecules through pattern recognition. This "chemical nose" approach uses nanoparticles as receptors to selectively identify the analytes, while a transducer reports the binding through a readable signal (fluorescence). Here we describe a procedure that uses functionalized gold nanoparticles as receptors and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the transducer to identify and differentiate cell state (normal, cancerous, and metastatic), an important tool in early diagnosis and treatment of tumors.

  10. Development of a thermal sensor to probe cell viability and concentration in cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Dongsik

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel biothermal sensor to probe cell viability and concentration of a cell suspension. The sensing technique exploits the thermophysical properties of the suspension, so no labeling of suspended cells is required. When the sensor is periodically heated, the amplitude and phase of the thermal signal are dependent on the thermal properties of the cell suspension, particularly the thermal conductivity k. We measured k of HeLa, hepatocyte, and NIH-3T3 J2 cell suspensions with various concentrations and viabilities. The results demonstrate that the k of a cell suspension has a strong correlation with its concentration and viability. Accordingly, k can be employed as an index of cell concentration and viability. Furthermore, without data processing to obtain k, the electric signal that reflects the thermal response of the sensor can be used as a tool to probe viability of a cell suspension in real time. The proposed thermal sensing technique offers label-free, non-invasive, long-term, and real-time means to probe the viability and concentration of cells in a suspension.

  11. Effect of sensor systems for cow management on milk production, somatic cell count, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-06-01

    To improve management on dairy herds, sensor systems have been developed that can measure physiological, behavioral, and production indicators on individual cows. It is not known whether using sensor systems also improves measures of health and production in dairy herds. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of using sensor systems on measures of health and production in dairy herds. Data of 414 Dutch dairy farms with (n=152) and without (n=262) sensor systems were available. For these herds, information on milk production per cow, days to first service, first calving age, and somatic cell count (SCC) was provided for the years 2003 to 2013. Moreover, year of investment in sensor systems was available. For every farm year, we determined whether that year was before or after the year of investment in sensor systems on farms with an automatic milking system (AMS) or a conventional milking system (CMS), or whether it was a year on a farm that never invested in sensor systems. Separate statistical analyses were performed to determine the effect of sensor systems for mastitis detection (color, SCC, electrical conductivity, and lactate dehydrogenase sensors), estrus detection for dairy cows, estrus detection for young stock, and other sensor systems (weighing platform, rumination time sensor, fat and protein sensor, temperature sensor, milk temperature sensor, urea sensor, β-hydroxybutyrate sensor, and other sensor systems). The AMS farms had a higher average SCC (by 12,000 cells/mL) after sensor investment, and CMS farms with a mastitis detection system had a lower average SCC (by 10,000 cells/mL) in the years after sensor investment. Having sensor systems was associated with a higher average production per cow on AMS farms, and with a lower average production per cow on CMS farms in the years after investment. The most likely reason for this lower milk production after investment was that on 96% of CMS farms, the sensor system investment occurred

  12. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing.

  13. Hypersonic evanescent waves generated with a planar spiral coil.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-09-01

    A planar spiral coil has been used to induce hypersonic evanescent waves in a quartz substrate with the unique ability to focus the acoustic wave down onto the chemical recognition layer. These special sensing conditions were achieved by investigating the application of a radio frequency current to a coaxial waveguide and spiral coil, so that wideband repeating electrical resonance conditions could be established over the MHz to GHz frequency range. At a selected operating frequency of 1.09 GHz, the evanescent wave depth of a quartz crystal hypersonic resonance is reduced to 17 nm, minimising unwanted coupling to the bulk fluid. Verification of the validity of the hypersonic resonance was carried out by characterising the system electrically and acoustically: Impedance calculations of the combined coil and coaxial waveguide demonstrated an excellent fit to the measured data, although above 400 MHz a transition zone was identified where unwanted impedance is parasitic of the coil influence efficiency, so the signal-to-noise ratio is reduced from 3000 to 300. Acoustic quartz crystal resonances at intervals of precisely 13.2138 MHz spacing, from the 6.6 MHz ultrasonic range and onto the desired hypersonic range above 1 GHz, were incrementally detected. Q factor measurements demonstrated that reductions in energy lost from the resonator to the fluid interface were consistent with the anticipated shrinkage of the evanescent wave with increasing operating frequency. Amplitude and frequency reduction in contact with a glucose solution was demonstrated at 1.09 GHz. The complex physical conditions arising at the solid-liquid interface under hypersonic entrainment are discussed with respect to acceleration induced slippage, rupture, longitudinal and shear radiation and multiphase relaxation affects.

  14. Evanescent waves and deaf bands in sonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Sánchez-Pérez, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    The properties of sonic crystals (SC) are theoretically investigated in this work by solving the inverse problem k(ω) using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE). The solution of the resulting eigenvalue problem gives the complex band structure which takes into account both the propagating and the evanescent modes. In this work we show the complete mathematical formulation of the EPWE for SC and the supercell approximation for its use in both a complete SC and a SC with defects. As an example we show a novel interpretation of the deaf bands in a complete SC in good agreement with multiple scattering simulations.

  15. Quantitative measurement of sheet resistance by evanescent microwave probe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhengyu; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen Zhixun; Shao Lin; Chu, W.-K.; Edwards, Hal

    2005-04-11

    Quantitative measurement of microwave sheet resistance by a novel type of near-field microwave microscope -Evanescent Microwave Probe (EMP) - has been demonstrated. The data cover a wide range of sheet resistance from the metal limit to the insulator limit. Both finite element analysis (FEA) and a simple coaxial ring model have been shown to fit the data well. The demonstration of sheet resistance measurement with high spatial resolution in the GHz range shows the potential of EMP for semiconductor metrology applications. The data also reveal issues related to the large penetration depth, allowing substrate properties to affect the signal.

  16. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sladitschek, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level. PMID:27152616

  17. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level.

  18. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level. PMID:27152616

  19. Optical theorem for electromagnetic field scattering by dielectric structures and energy emission from the evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Gulyaev, Yu V; Barabanenkov, Yu N; Barabanenkov, M Yu; Nikitov, S A

    2005-08-01

    We present an optical theorem for evanescent (near field) electromagnetic wave scattering by a dielectric structure. The derivation is based on the formalism of angular spectrum wave amplitudes and block scattering matrix. The optical theorem shows that an energy flux is emitted in the direction of the evanescent wave decay upon scattering. The energy emission effect from an evanescent wave is illustrated in two examples of evanescent wave scattering, first, by the electrical dipole and, second, one-dimensional grating with line-like rulings. Within the latter example, we show that an emitted energy flux upon evanescent wave scattering can travel through a dielectric structure even if the structure has a forbidden gap in the transmission spectrum of incident propagating waves.

  20. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  1. Trapping colloidal dielectric microparticles with overlapping evanescent optical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakimov, R.; Shevchenko, A.; Havukainen, A.; Lindfors, K.; Kaivola, M.

    2012-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a stable surface trap for colloidal microparticles in a high-intensity evanescent optical field that is produced by total internal reflection of two counter-propagating and mutually incoherent laser beams. While the particles confined in the trap undergo fast Brownian motion, they never "stick" to the surface - not even at high optical powers - but rather levitate above the surface. If many particles are stored in the trap, they tend to form a well ordered self-organized array. We apply a numerical model based on the general energy-momentum tensor formalism to evaluate the overall optical force acting on a trapped particle. The optical-field parameters are calculated using the finite element method. The simulations show that for small particles a sharp repulsive potential at the surface - required for the levitation - can have neither optical nor light-induced thermal origin. Among the possible non-optical forces, electrostatic double-layer repulsion is often considered to be the origin of the levitation. We find, however, that the experimentally observed levitation of small particles in a high-intensity evanescent-wave trap cannot be explained by this effect.

  2. Optical pulling using evanescent mode in sub-wavelength channels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tongtong; Mahdy, M R C; Cao, Yongyin; Lv, Haiyi; Sun, Fangkui; Jiang, Zehui; Ding, Weiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Optical evanescent wave in total internal reflection has been widely used in efficient optical manipulation, where the object is trapped by the intrinsic intensity gradient of the evanescent wave while transported by the scattering force along the orthogonal direction. Here, we propose a distinct optical manipulation scheme using the attenuated modes in subwavelength optical channels, where both the trapping and transportation forces are along the channel direction. We create such a mode in a sub-wavelength photonic crystal waveguide and quantitatively obtain the net pushing and pulling forces, which can overcome the Brownian motion within a critical length. Due to the presence of the physical channel, subwavelength trapping on the transverse direction is natural, and manipulation along bend trajectories is also possible without the assistance of the self-acceleration beams provided a channel is adopted. This optical manipulation method can be extended to any other channels that support attenuation mode, and may provide an alternate way for flexible optical manipulation. PMID:27505807

  3. Evanescent wave-based particle tracking velocimetry for nanochannel flows.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Iseki, Keizo; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2013-11-19

    Understanding fluid flows in 10-1000 nm space, which we call extended nanospace, is important for novel nanofluidic devices in analytical chemistry. This study therefore developed a particle tracking velocimetry for measuring velocity distribution in nanochannel flows, by using the evanescent wave illumination. 64 nm fluorescent nanoparticles were used as flow tracer. The particle position was determined from fluorescent intensity by the evanescent wave field, with a spatial resolution smaller than light wavelengths. The time resolution of 260 μs was achieved to make error by the Brownian diffusion of the tracer small to be neglected. An image processing by multitime particle tracking was established to detect the tracer nanoparticles of weak fluorescent intensity. Though the measurement region was affected by nonuniform particle distribution with the electrostatic interactions, pressure-driven flows of water in a nanochannel of 50 μm width and 410 nm depth were successfully measured. The results of the velocity distribution in the depth-wise direction approximately showed agreement with the fluid dynamics with the bulk liquid properties from the macroscopic view, however, suggested slip velocities even in the hydrophilic channel. We suggest a possibility of appearance of molecular behavior in the fluid near the wall within 10 nm-order scale.

  4. Evanescent planar waveguide detection of biological warfare simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipe, David M.; Schoonmaker, Kenneth P.; Herron, James N.; Mostert, Michael J.

    2000-04-01

    An evanescent planar waveguide Mark 1.5 instrument was used to detect simulants of biological warfare agents; ovalbumin (OV), MS2 bacteriophage, BG, and Erwinia herbicola (EH). Polyclonal tracer antibodies were labeled with the fluorescent dye, Cy5. Discrete bands of polyclonal capture antibodies were immobilized to a polystyrene planar waveguide with molded integral lenses. An ST-6 CCD camera was used for detection. OV. MS2 and BG were detected in a simultaneous 3 by 3 array; with a total of nine measurements within 6 minutes. EH was analyzed in a separate array. Results were evaluate dat the US Army Joint Field Trials V, at the Dugway Proving Grounds. Over a 10 day period, 32 unknown samples were analyzed daily for each simulant. Detection limits: OV 10 ng/ml, MS2 107 pfu/ml, BG 105 cfu/ml. EH was detectable at 5 X 105 cfu/ml. Overall false positives were 3.0 percent. Therefore, the Mark 1.5 instrument, with a parallel array of detectors, evanescent flourescent excitation, and CCD imaging provides for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of biological warfare agent simulants.

  5. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903

  6. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation.

  7. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  8. Systematic Transfer of Prokaryotic Sensors and Circuits to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >105 members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics. PMID:25360681

  9. Systematic transfer of prokaryotic sensors and circuits to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Brynne C; Siciliano, Velia; Ghodasara, Amar; Wroblewska, Liliana; Clancy, Kevin; Trefzer, Axel C; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Weiss, Ron; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >10(5) members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics.

  10. Cell-bionics: tools for real-time sensor processing.

    PubMed

    Toumazou, Chris; Cass, Tony

    2007-08-29

    The accurate monitoring of the physiological status of cells, tissues and whole organisms demands a new generation of devices capable of providing accurate data in real time with minimal perturbation of the system being measured. To deliver on the promise of cell-bionics advances over the past decade in miniaturization, analogue signal processing, low-power electronics, materials science and protein engineering need to be brought together. In this paper we summarize recent advances in our research that is moving us in this direction. Two areas in particular are highlighted: the exploitation of the physical properties inherent in semiconductor devices to perform very low power on chip signal processing and the use of gene technology to tailor proteins for sensor applications. In the context of engineered tissues, cell-bionics could offer the ability to monitor the precise physiological state of the construct, both during 'manufacture' and post-implantation. Monitoring during manufacture, particularly by embedded devices, would offer quality assurance of the materials components and the fabrication process. Post-implantation monitoring would reveal changes in the underlying physiology as a result of the tissue construct adapting to its new environment.

  11. Electrochemical As(III) whole-cell based biochip sensor.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Beggah, Siham; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-09-15

    The development of a whole-cell based sensor for arsenite detection coupling biological engineering and electrochemical techniques is presented. This strategy takes advantage of the natural Escherichia coli resistance mechanism against toxic arsenic species, such as arsenite, which consists of the selective intracellular recognition of arsenite and its pumping out from the cell. A whole-cell based biosensor can be produced by coupling the intracellular recognition of arsenite to the generation of an electrochemical signal. Hereto, E. coli was equipped with a genetic circuit in which synthesis of beta-galactosidase is under control of the arsenite-derepressable arsR-promoter. The E. coli reporter strain was filled in a microchip containing 16 independent electrochemical cells (i.e. two-electrode cell), which was then employed for analysis of tap and groundwater samples. The developed arsenic-sensitive electrochemical biochip is easy to use and outperforms state-of-the-art bacterial bioreporters assays specifically in its simplicity and response time, while keeping a very good limit of detection in tap water, i.e. 0.8ppb. Additionally, a very good linear response in the ranges of concentration tested (0.94ppb to 3.75ppb, R(2)=0.9975 and 3.75 ppb to 30ppb, R(2)=0.9991) was obtained, complying perfectly with the acceptable arsenic concentration limits defined by the World Health Organization for drinking water samples (i.e. 10ppb). Therefore, the proposed assay provides a very good alternative for the portable quantification of As (III) in water as corroborated by the analysis of natural groundwater samples from Swiss mountains, which showed a very good agreement with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy. PMID:23584229

  12. U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic sensor for effective biofilm growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Li, Yishan

    2016-02-01

    To monitor biofilm growth on polydimethylsiloxane in a photobioreactor effectively, the biofilm cells and liquids were separated and measured using a sensor with two U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic probes (Sen. and Ref. probes). The probes' Au-coated hemispherical tips enabled double-pass evanescent field absorption. The Sen. probe sensed the cells and liquids inside the biofilm. The polyimide-silica hybrid-film-coated Ref. probe separated the liquids from the biofilm cells and analyzed the liquid concentration. The biofilm structure and active biomass were also examined to confirm the effectiveness of the measurement using a simulation model. The sensor was found to effectively respond to the biofilm growth in the adsorption through exponential phases at thicknesses of 0-536 μm.

  13. U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic sensor for effective biofilm growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Li, Yishan

    2016-02-01

    To monitor biofilm growth on polydimethylsiloxane in a photobioreactor effectively, the biofilm cells and liquids were separated and measured using a sensor with two U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic probes (Sen. and Ref. probes). The probes' Au-coated hemispherical tips enabled double-pass evanescent field absorption. The Sen. probe sensed the cells and liquids inside the biofilm. The polyimide-silica hybrid-film-coated Ref. probe separated the liquids from the biofilm cells and analyzed the liquid concentration. The biofilm structure and active biomass were also examined to confirm the effectiveness of the measurement using a simulation model. The sensor was found to effectively respond to the biofilm growth in the adsorption through exponential phases at thicknesses of 0-536 μm. PMID:26977344

  14. U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic sensor for effective biofilm growth monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Li, Yishan

    2016-01-01

    To monitor biofilm growth on polydimethylsiloxane in a photobioreactor effectively, the biofilm cells and liquids were separated and measured using a sensor with two U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic probes (Sen. and Ref. probes). The probes’ Au-coated hemispherical tips enabled double-pass evanescent field absorption. The Sen. probe sensed the cells and liquids inside the biofilm. The polyimide–silica hybrid-film-coated Ref. probe separated the liquids from the biofilm cells and analyzed the liquid concentration. The biofilm structure and active biomass were also examined to confirm the effectiveness of the measurement using a simulation model. The sensor was found to effectively respond to the biofilm growth in the adsorption through exponential phases at thicknesses of 0–536 μm. PMID:26977344

  15. [INVITED] Cell sensing with near-infrared plasmonic optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Malachovska, Viera; Ribaut, Clotilde; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-04-01

    Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensors are a miniaturized counterpart to the bulky prism configuration that offer remote operation in very small volumes of analyte. They have the potential to yield in situ (or even possibly in vivo) molecular detection. They usually result from a gold-coated fiber segment for which the core-guided light is brought into contact with the surrounding medium. Recently, SPR excitation was achieved with tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) photo-imprinted in the fiber core and surrounded by a thin gold layer. These gratings probe the surrounding medium with near-infrared narrowband (~100 pm linewidth) resonances, which enhances both the penetration depth of the evanescent field in the external medium and the wavelength resolution of the interrogation. They also constitute the unique configuration able to probe all the fiber cladding modes individually, with high Q-factors. We use these unique spectral features in this work to target and detect extracellular membrane receptors in native membranes of different human epithelial cell lines. A differential diagnosis has been demonstrated between two systems, a cell line with overexpressed membrane receptors (the positive control) and another cell line with a low number of these receptors (a negative control). Such results bring an important step towards the demonstration of in situ diagnosis.

  16. Development of living cell force sensors for the interrogation of cell surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Scott Chang

    The measurement of cell surface interactions, or cell interaction forces, are critical for the early diagnosis and prevention of disease, the design of targeted drug and gene delivery vehicles, the development of next-generation implant materials, and much more. However, the technologies and devices that are currently available are highly limited with respect to the dynamic force range over which they can measure cell-cell or cell-substratum interactions, and with their ability to adequately mimic biologically relevant systems. Consequently, research efforts that involve cell surface interactions have been limited. In this dissertation, existing tools for research at the nanoscale (i.e., atomic force microscopy microcantilevers) are modified to develop living cell force sensors that allow for the highly sensitive measurement of cell-mediated interactions over the entire range of forces expected in biotechnology (and nano-biotechnology) research (from a single to millions of receptor-ligand bonds). Several force sensor motifs have been developed that can be used to measure interactions using single adherent cells, single suspension culture cell, and cell monolayers (tissues) over a wide range of interaction conditions (e.g., approach velocity, shear rate, contact time) using a conventional atomic force microscope. This new tool has been applied to study the pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax and the interaction of cells with 14 man-made interfaces. Consequently, a new hypothesis of the interactions that manifest spontaneous pneumothorax has been developed. Additionally, these findings have the potential to lead to the development of tools for data mining materials and surfaces for unique cell interactions that could have an immense societal impact.

  17. Portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor for highly sensitive detection of Shigella.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui; Rong, Zhen; Long, Feng; Liu, Qiqi

    2014-11-11

    A portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor was developed to achieve the rapid and highly sensitive detection of Shigella. In this study, a DNA probe was covalently immobilized onto fiber-optic biosensors that can hybridize with a fluorescently labeled complementary DNA. The sensitivity of detection for synthesized oligonucleotides can reach 10(-10) M. The surface of the sensor can be regenerated with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution (pH 1.9) for over 30 times without significant deterioration of performance. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the time for measurement and surface regeneration, was less than 6 min. We employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared the results of both methods to investigate the actual Shigella DNA detection capability of the fiber-optic biosensor. The fiber-optic biosensor could detect as low as 10(2) colony-forming unit/mL Shigella. This finding was comparable with that by real-time PCR, which suggests that this method is a potential alternative to existing detection methods.

  18. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy for the study of diffusion in the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichlin, Yosef; Goldberg, I.; Brenner, Sarah; Shulzinger, Evgeny; Katzir, Abraham

    2002-03-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic systems make use of Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) elements for the study of skin in dermatology. FTIR - ATR allows real time and reagent-less analysis of several components, simultaneously. The potential for skin studies is increased by the development of the flexible fiber optic sensor made from infrared transparent polycrystalline silver halide. Segments of fibers can replace the ATR sensing elements inside an FTIR system. Moreover a Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) can also be used for real time in vivo measurement on skin, in situ. We used FEWS to study the diffusion of UV sunscreen lotions from the outer skin layer into the dermis and epidermis, and used the various absorption bands to differentiate between the behavior of the organic and the water molecules in the lotion. FEWS can be a powerful tool for studying the transport of drugs and cosmetic creams through the skin from the stratum corneum to the dermis and epidermis and for studying the lateral diffusion of various molecules into the skin, in vivo and in real time.

  19. Photonic crystal cavities for resonant evanescent field trapping of single bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leest, Thijs; Heldens, Jeroen; van der Gaag, Bram; Caro, Jaap

    2012-06-01

    In monitoring the quality of drinking water with respect to the presence of hazardous bacteria there is a strong need for on-line sensors that allow quick identification of bacterium species at low cost. In this respect, the combination of photonics and microfluidics is promising for lab-on-a-chip sensing of these contaminants. Photonic crystal slabs have proven to form a versatile platform for controlling the flow of light and creating resonant cavities on a wavelength scale. The goal of our research is to use photonic crystal cavities for optical trapping of microorganisms in water, exploiting the enhanced evanescent field of the cavity mode. We optimize the H0, H1 and L3 cavities for optical trapping of bacteria in water, by reducing out-of-plane losses and taking into account the trapping-induced resonance shift and the in-plane coupling with photonic crystal waveguides. The cavities are fabricated on silicon-on-insulator material, using e-beam lithography and dry etching. A fluidic channel is created on top of the photonic crystal using dry film resist techniques. Transmission measurements show clear resonances for the cavities in water. In the present state of our research, we demonstrate optical trapping of 1 μm diameter polystyrene beads for the three cavities, with estimated trapping forces on the order of 0.7 pN.

  20. Portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor for highly sensitive detection of Shigella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Rui; Rong, Zhen; Long, Feng; Liu, Qiqi

    2014-11-01

    A portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor was developed to achieve the rapid and highly sensitive detection of Shigella. In this study, a DNA probe was covalently immobilized onto fiber-optic biosensors that can hybridize with a fluorescently labeled complementary DNA. The sensitivity of detection for synthesized oligonucleotides can reach 10-10 M. The surface of the sensor can be regenerated with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution (pH 1.9) for over 30 times without significant deterioration of performance. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the time for measurement and surface regeneration, was less than 6 min. We employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared the results of both methods to investigate the actual Shigella DNA detection capability of the fiber-optic biosensor. The fiber-optic biosensor could detect as low as 102 colony-forming unit/mL Shigella. This finding was comparable with that by real-time PCR, which suggests that this method is a potential alternative to existing detection methods.

  1. Design and application of fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huijie; Zhai, Junhui; Zhao, Yongkai; Yang, Ruifu; Ren, Bingqiang; Cheng, Zhaogu; Du, Longlong; Lu, Dunwu

    2003-12-01

    A fiber-optic biosensor is developed based on the principle of evanescent wave while light propagates in optical fiber. The biosensor uses a red laser diode at 636.85 nm for exciting Cy5 fluorescent dye. Sensitivity limit of 0.01 nnmol/l is obtained from the detection of serial Cy5 solutions with various concentrations. In log-to-log plot, excellent linear response characteristic is seen in the Cy5 concentrations ranging from 0.01 nmlo/l to 100 nmol/l. And a good result of signal-to-noise ratio of 4.61 is obtained when the biosensor is used to measure Legionella pneumophila solution of 0.01 μmol/l. All the results are comparable with those that are obtained by a commercial biochip scanner GeneTAC 1000.

  2. Interplay between evanescence and disorder in deep subwavelength photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Herzig Sheinfux, Hanan; Kaminer, Ido; Genack, Azriel Z.; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Deep subwavelength features are expected to have minimal impact on wave transport. Here we show that in contrast to this common understanding, disorder can have a dramatic effect in a one-dimensional disordered optical system with spatial features a thousand times smaller than the wavelength. We examine a unique regime of Anderson localization where the localization length is shown to scale linearly with the wavelength instead of diverging, because of the role of evanescent waves. In addition, we demonstrate an unusual order of magnitude enhancement of transmission induced due to localization. These results are described for electromagnetic waves, but are directly relevant to other wave systems such as electrons in multi-quantum-well structures. PMID:27708260

  3. Controlling the directionality of spontaneous emission by evanescent wave coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue-Lun E-mail: gdhao2@hotmail.com; Hao, Guo-Dong E-mail: gdhao2@hotmail.com; Toda, Naoya

    2015-09-28

    We report an approach toward controlling the directionality of spontaneous emissions by employing the evanescent wave coupling effect in a subwavelength-sized ridge or truncated cone structure. An InGaAs/GaAs light-emitting diode in which a stripe-shaped InGaAs/GaAs quantum well with a stripe width of about 100 nm is embedded at the center of a subwavelength-sized GaAs ridge (of width ∼520 nm) is fabricated by micro processing and epitaxial regrowth techniques. Strong directionalities characterized by a half-intensity angle of 43° are observed in planes perpendicular to the ridge axis. The directionality is found to be almost independent of operating conditions.

  4. Interplay between evanescence and disorder in deep subwavelength photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig Sheinfux, Hanan; Kaminer, Ido; Genack, Azriel Z.; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-10-01

    Deep subwavelength features are expected to have minimal impact on wave transport. Here we show that in contrast to this common understanding, disorder can have a dramatic effect in a one-dimensional disordered optical system with spatial features a thousand times smaller than the wavelength. We examine a unique regime of Anderson localization where the localization length is shown to scale linearly with the wavelength instead of diverging, because of the role of evanescent waves. In addition, we demonstrate an unusual order of magnitude enhancement of transmission induced due to localization. These results are described for electromagnetic waves, but are directly relevant to other wave systems such as electrons in multi-quantum-well structures.

  5. Evanescent field trapping of nanoparticles using nanostructured ultrathin optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mark; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-06-27

    While conventional optical trapping techniques can trap objects with submicron dimensions, the underlying limits imposed by the diffraction of light generally restrict their use to larger or higher refractive index particles. As the index and diameter decrease, the trapping difficulty rapidly increases; hence, the power requirements for stable trapping become so large as to quickly denature the trapped objects in such diffraction-limited systems. Here, we present an evanescent field-based device capable of confining low index nanoscale particles using modest optical powers as low as 1.2 mW, with additional applications in the field of cold atom trapping. Our experiment uses a nanostructured optical micro-nanofiber to trap 200 nm, low index contrast, fluorescent particles within the structured region, thereby overcoming diffraction limitations. We analyze the trapping potential of this device both experimentally and theoretically, and show how strong optical traps are achieved with low input powers. PMID:27410600

  6. Current-Induced Transistor Sensorics with Electrogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Fromherz, Peter

    2016-04-25

    The concepts of transistor recording of electroactive cells are considered, when the response is determined by a current-induced voltage in the electrolyte due to cellular activity. The relationship to traditional transistor recording, with an interface-induced response due to interactions with the open gate oxide, is addressed. For the geometry of a cell-substrate junction, the theory of a planar core-coat conductor is described with a one-compartment approximation. The fast electrical relaxation of the junction and the slow change of ion concentrations are pointed out. On that basis, various recording situations are considered and documented by experiments. For voltage-gated ion channels under voltage clamp, the effects of a changing extracellular ion concentration and the enhancement/depletion of ion conductances in the adherent membrane are addressed. Inhomogeneous ion conductances are crucial for transistor recording of neuronal action potentials. For a propagating action potential, the effects of an axon-substrate junction and the surrounding volume conductor are distinguished. Finally, a receptor-transistor-sensor is described, where the inhomogeneity of a ligand-activated ion conductance is achieved by diffusion of the agonist and inactivation of the conductance. Problems with regard to a development of reliable biosensors are mentioned.

  7. Current-Induced Transistor Sensorics with Electrogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fromherz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of transistor recording of electroactive cells are considered, when the response is determined by a current-induced voltage in the electrolyte due to cellular activity. The relationship to traditional transistor recording, with an interface-induced response due to interactions with the open gate oxide, is addressed. For the geometry of a cell-substrate junction, the theory of a planar core-coat conductor is described with a one-compartment approximation. The fast electrical relaxation of the junction and the slow change of ion concentrations are pointed out. On that basis, various recording situations are considered and documented by experiments. For voltage-gated ion channels under voltage clamp, the effects of a changing extracellular ion concentration and the enhancement/depletion of ion conductances in the adherent membrane are addressed. Inhomogeneous ion conductances are crucial for transistor recording of neuronal action potentials. For a propagating action potential, the effects of an axon-substrate junction and the surrounding volume conductor are distinguished. Finally, a receptor-transistor-sensor is described, where the inhomogeneity of a ligand–activated ion conductance is achieved by diffusion of the agonist and inactivation of the conductance. Problems with regard to a development of reliable biosensors are mentioned. PMID:27120627

  8. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    PubMed

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  9. Cellulose antibody films for highly specific evanescent wave immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Bock, Daniel; Jaworek, Thomas; Kaul, Sepp; Schulze, Matthais; Tebbe, H.; Wegner, Gerhard; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    For the production of recognition elements for evanescent wave immunosensors optical waveguides have to be coated with ultrathin stable antibody films. In the present work non amphiphilic alkylated cellulose and copolyglutamate films are tested as monolayer matrices for the antibody immobilization using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. These films are transferred onto optical waveguides and serve as excellent matrices for the immobilization of antibodies in high density and specificity. In addition to the multi-step immobilization of immunoglobulin G(IgG) on photochemically crosslinked and oxidized polymer films, the direct one-step transfer of mixed antibody-polymer films is performed. Both planar waveguides and optical fibers are suitable substrates for the immobilization. The activity and specificity of immobilized antibodies is controlled by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. As a result reduced non-specific interactions between antigens and the substrate surface are observed if cinnamoylbutyether-cellulose is used as the film matrix for the antibody immobilization. Using the evanescent wave senor (EWS) technology immunosensor assays are performed in order to determine both the non-specific adsorption of different coated polymethylmethacrylat (PMMA) fibers and the long-term stability of the antibody films. Specificities of one-step transferred IgG-cellulose films are drastically enhanced compared to IgG-copolyglutamate films. Cellulose IgG films are used in enzymatic sandwich assays using mucine as a clinical relevant antigen that is recognized by the antibodies BM2 and BM7. A mucine calibration measurement is recorded. So far the observed detection limit for mucine is about 8 ng/ml.

  10. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. Z.; Liu, Z.; Gmachl, C. F.; Sivco, D. L.

    2005-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers and unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of liquid droplets. The laser wavelengths were chosen to be in the regions which offer the largest absorption contrast between constituents inside the mixture droplets. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. Using a 300μm diameter fiber with a 25 mm immersion length, the signal to noise ratios correspond to 1 vol.% for α-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in aqueous solution for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm-1 and 1363 cm-1, respectively.

  11. Gaussian beam scattering from a dielectric cylinder, including the evanescent region.

    PubMed

    Pawliuk, Peter; Yedlin, Matthew

    2009-12-01

    The scattering of a two-dimensional Gaussian beam from a homogeneous dielectric cylinder is analyzed using a plane-wave spectrum. Special attention is given to the computation of the evanescent field of the beam and its effect in the scattering. A comparison is made between the evanescent field in Cartesian coordinates and in cylindrical coordinates as a sum of cylindrical waves. The field given by the cylindrical wave equation is found to converge spatially as we include more Bessel modes. The evanescent field incident on the dielectric cylinder is found to cause radiating waves to form and propagate outward.

  12. Near-IR Two-Photon Fluorescent Sensor for K(+) Imaging in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D

    2015-08-19

    A new two-photon excited fluorescent K(+) sensor is reported. The sensor comprises three moieties, a highly selective K(+) chelator as the K(+) recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (>52-fold) in detecting K(+) over other physiological metal cations. Upon binding K(+), the sensor switches from nonfluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K(+) sensing in living cells. PMID:26258885

  13. Near-IR Two-Photon Fluorescent Sensor for K(+) Imaging in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D

    2015-08-19

    A new two-photon excited fluorescent K(+) sensor is reported. The sensor comprises three moieties, a highly selective K(+) chelator as the K(+) recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (>52-fold) in detecting K(+) over other physiological metal cations. Upon binding K(+), the sensor switches from nonfluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K(+) sensing in living cells.

  14. Multi-Sensor Arrays for Online Monitoring of Cell Dynamics in in vitro Studies with Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mestres-Ventura, Pedro; Morguet, Andrea; de las Heras, Soledad García Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Sensors and multi-sensor arrays are the basis of new technologies for the non-label monitoring of cell activity. In this paper we show that choroid plexus cells can be cultured on silicon chips and that sensors register in real time changes in their activity, constituting an interesting experimental paradigm for cell biology and medical research. To validate the signals recorded (metabolism = peri-cellular acidification, oxygen consumption = respiration; impedance = adhesion, cell shape and motility) we performed experiments with compounds that act in a well-known way on cells, influencing these parameters. Our in vitro model demonstrates the advantages of multi-sensor arrays in assessment and experimental characterization of dynamic cellular events—in this case in choroid plexus functions, however with applicability to other cell types as well. PMID:22438715

  15. Together we are strong--cell wall integrity sensors in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2010-08-01

    The integrity of the fungal cell wall is ensured by a signal transduction pathway, the so-called CWI pathway, which has best been studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this context, environmental stress and other perturbations at the cell surface are detected by a small set of plasma membrane-spanning sensors, viz. Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2 and Mtl1. This review covers the recent advances in sensor structure, sensor mechanics, their cellular distribution and their in vivo functions, obtained from genetic, biochemical, cell biological and biophysical investigations.

  16. Critical role of tissue mast cells in controlling long-term glucose sensor function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the specific cells, mediators and mechanisms involved in the loss of glucose sensor function (GSF) in vivo. Since mast cells (MC) are known to be key effector cells in inflammation and wound healing, we hypothesized that MC and their products are major contributors to the skin inflammation and wound healing that controls GSF at sites of sensor implantation. To test this hypothesis we utilized a murine model of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo in both normal C57BL/6 mice (mast cell sufficient), as well as mast cell deficient B6.Cg-Kit(W-sh)/HNihrJaeBsmJ (Sash) mice over a 28 day CGM period. As expected, both strains of mice displayed excellent CGM for the first 7 days post sensor implantation (PSI). CGM in the mast cell sufficient C57BL/6 mice was erratic over the remaining 21 days PSI. CGM in the mast cell deficient Sash mice displayed excellent sensor function for the entire 28 day of CGM. Histopathologic evaluation of implantation sites demonstrated that tissue reactions in Sash mice were dramatically less compared to the reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, mast cells were also seen to be consistently associated with the margins of sensor tissue reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Finally, direct injection of bone marrow derived mast cells at sites of sensor implantation induced an acute and dramatic loss of sensor function in both C57BL/6 and Sash mice. These results demonstrate the key role of mast cells in controlling glucose sensor function in vivo. PMID:20226521

  17. Contribution of evanescent waves to the far field: the atomic point of view.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, A; Bryant, G W

    2000-04-01

    Evanescent modes of the electromagnetic field are seldom invoked in conventional far-field optics, as their contribution far from the source (a few wavelengths) is negligible. Contradicting this fact, in recent theoretical works, based on a particular decomposition of the free-space Green tensor, it has been asserted that evanescent waves do indeed contribute to the far field, where they appear as an additional ~1/r component of the field. We provide an explicit demonstration that evanescent modes do not contribute to the power radiated to the far field by any dipolar source. First we derive an expression for the free-space field susceptibility in which contributions from evanescent and homogeneous modes are separated, and then we use linear response theory to compute the decay rate for an atomic dipole in vacuum.

  18. A hybrid AlGaInAs-silicon evanescent preamplifier and photodetector.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyundai; Kuo, Ying-Hao; Fang, Alexander W; Jones, Richard; Cohen, Oded; Paniccia, Mario J; Bowers, John E

    2007-10-17

    We report the integration of a hybrid silicon evanescent waveguide photodetector with a hybrid silicon evanescent optical amplifier. The device operates at 1550 nm with a responsivity of 5.7 A/W and a receiver sensitivity of -17.5 dBm at 2.5 Gb/s. The transition between the passive silicon waveguide and the hybrid waveguide of the amplifier is tapered to increase coupling efficiency and to minimize reflections. PMID:19550622

  19. Stretchable Electrochemical Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ling; Jin, Zi-He; Liu, Yan-Hong; Hu, Xue-Bo; Qin, Yu; Xu, Jia-Quan; Fan, Cui-Fang; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2016-03-24

    Stretchable electrochemical sensors are conceivably a powerful technique that provides important chemical information to unravel elastic and curvilinear living body. However, no breakthrough was made in stretchable electrochemical device for biological detection. Herein, we synthesized Au nanotubes (NTs) with large aspect ratio to construct an effective stretchable electrochemical sensor. Interlacing network of Au NTs endows the sensor with desirable stability against mechanical deformation, and Au nanostructure provides excellent electrochemical performance and biocompatibility. This allows for the first time, real-time electrochemical monitoring of mechanically sensitive cells on the sensor both in their stretching-free and stretching states as well as sensing of the inner lining of blood vessels. The results demonstrate the great potential of this sensor in electrochemical detection of living body, opening a new window for stretchable electrochemical sensor in biological exploration.

  20. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  1. Online Soft Sensor of Humidity in PEM Fuel Cell Based on Dynamic Partial Least Squares

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rong; Chen, Qihong; Zhang, Liyan; Ma, Longhua; Quan, Shuhai

    2013-01-01

    Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS) regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results. PMID:24453923

  2. Online soft sensor of humidity in PEM fuel cell based on dynamic partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Long, Rong; Chen, Qihong; Zhang, Liyan; Ma, Longhua; Quan, Shuhai

    2013-01-01

    Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS) regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results. PMID:24453923

  3. Online soft sensor of humidity in PEM fuel cell based on dynamic partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Long, Rong; Chen, Qihong; Zhang, Liyan; Ma, Longhua; Quan, Shuhai

    2013-01-01

    Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS) regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results.

  4. Evaluation of a Multi-Parameter Sensor for Automated, Continuous Cell Culture Monitoring in Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, D.; Jeevarajan, A.; Anderson, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Compact and automated sensors are desired for assessing the health of cell cultures in biotechnology experiments in microgravity. Measurement of cell culture medium allows for the optirn.jzation of culture conditions on orbit to maximize cell growth and minimize unnecessary exchange of medium. While several discrete sensors exist to measure culture health, a multi-parameter sensor would simplify the experimental apparatus. One such sensor, the Paratrend 7, consists of three optical fibers for measuring pH, dissolved oxygen (p02), dissolved carbon dioxide (pC02) , and a thermocouple to measure temperature. The sensor bundle was designed for intra-arterial placement in clinical patients, and potentially can be used in NASA's Space Shuttle and International Space Station biotechnology program bioreactors. Methods: A Paratrend 7 sensor was placed at the outlet of a rotating-wall perfused vessel bioreactor system inoculated with BHK-21 (baby hamster kidney) cells. Cell culture medium (GTSF-2, composed of 40% minimum essential medium, 60% L-15 Leibovitz medium) was manually measured using a bench top blood gas analyzer (BGA, Ciba-Corning). Results: A Paratrend 7 sensor was used over a long-term (>120 day) cell culture experiment. The sensor was able to track changes in cell medium pH, p02, and pC02 due to the consumption of nutrients by the BHK-21. When compared to manually obtained BGA measurements, the sensor had good agreement for pH, p02, and pC02 with bias [and precision] of 0.02 [0.15], 1 mm Hg [18 mm Hg], and -4.0 mm Hg [8.0 mm Hg] respectively. The Paratrend oxygen sensor was recalibrated (offset) periodically due to drift. The bias for the raw (no offset or recalibration) oxygen measurements was 42 mm Hg [38 mm Hg]. The measured response (rise) time of the sensor was 20 +/- 4s for pH, 81 +/- 53s for pC02, 51 +/- 20s for p02. For long-term cell culture measurements, these response times are more than adequate. Based on these findings , the Paratrend sensor could

  5. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  6. A Nanoparticle-based Sensor Platform for Cell Tracking and Status/Function Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, David; Wiraja, Christian; Chuah, Yon Jin; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly popular choices for labeling and tracking cells in biomedical applications such as cell therapy. However, all current types of nanoparticles fail to provide real-time, noninvasive monitoring of cell status and functions while often generating false positive signals. Herein, a nanosensor platform to track the real-time expression of specific biomarkers that correlate with cell status and functions is reported. Nanosensors are synthesized by encapsulating various sensor molecules within biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. Upon intracellular entry, nanosensors reside within the cell cytoplasm, serving as a depot to continuously release sensor molecules for up to 30 days. In the absence of the target biomarkers, the released sensor molecules remain ‘Off’. When the biomarker(s) is expressed, a detectable signal is generated (On). As a proof-of-concept, three nanosensor formulations were synthesized to monitor cell viability, secretion of nitric oxide, and β-actin mRNA expression. PMID:26440504

  7. A Nanoparticle-based Sensor Platform for Cell Tracking and Status/Function Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, David; Wiraja, Christian; Chuah, Yon Jin; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly popular choices for labeling and tracking cells in biomedical applications such as cell therapy. However, all current types of nanoparticles fail to provide real-time, noninvasive monitoring of cell status and functions while often generating false positive signals. Herein, a nanosensor platform to track the real-time expression of specific biomarkers that correlate with cell status and functions is reported. Nanosensors are synthesized by encapsulating various sensor molecules within biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. Upon intracellular entry, nanosensors reside within the cell cytoplasm, serving as a depot to continuously release sensor molecules for up to 30 days. In the absence of the target biomarkers, the released sensor molecules remain ‘Off’. When the biomarker(s) is expressed, a detectable signal is generated (On). As a proof-of-concept, three nanosensor formulations were synthesized to monitor cell viability, secretion of nitric oxide, and β-actin mRNA expression.

  8. Evanescent field: A potential light-tool for theranostics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polley, Nabarun; Singh, Soumendra; Giri, Anupam; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A noninvasive or minimally invasive optical approach for theranostics, which would reinforce diagnosis, treatment, and preferably guidance simultaneously, is considered to be major challenge in biomedical instrument design. In the present work, we have developed an evanescent field-based fiber optic strategy for the potential theranostics application in hyperbilirubinemia, an increased concentration of bilirubin in the blood and is a potential cause of permanent brain damage or even death in newborn babies. Potential problem of bilirubin deposition on the hydroxylated fiber surface at physiological pH (7.4), that masks the sensing efficacy and extraction of information of the pigment level, has also been addressed. Removal of bilirubin in a blood-phantom (hemoglobin and human serum albumin) solution from an enhanced level of 77 μM/l (human jaundice >50 μM/l) to ˜30 μM/l (normal level ˜25 μM/l in human) using our strategy has been successfully demonstrated. In a model experiment using chromatography paper as a mimic of biological membrane, we have shown efficient degradation of the bilirubin under continuous monitoring for guidance of immediate/future course of action.

  9. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-04-06

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach.

  10. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  11. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  12. Transponder-based sensor for monitoring electrical properties of biological cell solutions.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mirko C; Kensy, Frank; Büchs, Jochen; Mokwa, Wilfried; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2005-08-01

    An inductive passive remote sensor circuit for monitoring fermentation processes is presented. The sensor circuit consists of an interdigital capacitor and a planar coil structured on a glass laminated FR4-printed circuit board. This circuit resonates at frequencies between 2 and 4 MHz. After the resonant sensor circuit is immersed in a fermentation vessel with a cell solution, the resonant frequencies are detected by measuring the impedance of an external loop antenna. A new theory is presented to describe the behavior of the sensor circuit. In combination with a proposed equivalent circuit, the theory enables the calculation of the permittivity and conductivity of the cell solution under test by determining the resonant frequencies of the sensor without the need for any additional fitting functions. The influence of the relaxation behavior of living cells on the sensor signal with respect to the conductivity of the solution is discussed in detail. To prove the new theory, the determined permittivity is compared with the optical density of a cell solution, an indicator of cell concentration. The performed measurements show the expected correlation between the determined permittivity and optical density. The solution under test is a yeast culture in YPG medium.

  13. Transponder-based sensor for monitoring electrical properties of biological cell solutions.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mirko C; Kensy, Frank; Büchs, Jochen; Mokwa, Wilfried; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2005-08-01

    An inductive passive remote sensor circuit for monitoring fermentation processes is presented. The sensor circuit consists of an interdigital capacitor and a planar coil structured on a glass laminated FR4-printed circuit board. This circuit resonates at frequencies between 2 and 4 MHz. After the resonant sensor circuit is immersed in a fermentation vessel with a cell solution, the resonant frequencies are detected by measuring the impedance of an external loop antenna. A new theory is presented to describe the behavior of the sensor circuit. In combination with a proposed equivalent circuit, the theory enables the calculation of the permittivity and conductivity of the cell solution under test by determining the resonant frequencies of the sensor without the need for any additional fitting functions. The influence of the relaxation behavior of living cells on the sensor signal with respect to the conductivity of the solution is discussed in detail. To prove the new theory, the determined permittivity is compared with the optical density of a cell solution, an indicator of cell concentration. The performed measurements show the expected correlation between the determined permittivity and optical density. The solution under test is a yeast culture in YPG medium. PMID:16198260

  14. New insights into the nanometer-scaled cell-surface interspace by cell-sensor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Mirko . E-mail: mirko.lehmann@micronas.com; Baumann, Werner

    2005-05-01

    The culture of adherent cells on solid surfaces is an established in vitro method, and the adhesion process of a cell is considered as an important trigger for many cellular processes (e.g., polarity and tumor genesis). However, not all of the eliciting biochemical or biophysical reactions are yet understood. Interestingly, there are not much experimental data about the impact that the interspace between an adherent cell and the (solid) substrate has on the cell's behavior. This interspace is mainly built by the basolateral side of epithelial cells and the substrate. This paper gives some new results of non-invasive and non-optical measurements in the interspace. The measurements were made with silicon cell-sensor hybrids. Measurements of acidification, adhesion, and respiration are analyzed in view of the situation in the interspace. The results show that, in general, the release of an ion or molecule on the basolateral side can have much more influence on the biophysical situation than a release of an ion or molecule on the apical side. In particular, the apical acidification (i.e., amount of extruded protons) of, e.g., epithelial tumor cells is several orders of magnitude higher than the basolateral acidification. These experimental results are a simple consequence of the fact that the basolateral volume of the interspace is several orders of magnitudes smaller than the apical volume. These results have the following consequences for the cell adhesion:a)static situation: if a cell is already adhered to a solid substrate, the basolateral and apical release and uptake of molecules have to be considered in a very differentiated way; b)dynamic situation: if the cell is adhering to the substrate, the then built basolateral side changes in a much stronger way than the apical side. This effect is here discussed as a possible eliciting and general mechanism for essential intracellular changes.

  15. Cell-Based Odorant Sensor Array for Odor Discrimination Based on Insect Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Termtanasombat, Maneerat; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Misawa, Nobuo; Yamahira, Shinya; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2016-07-01

    The olfactory system of living organisms can accurately discriminate numerous odors by recognizing the pattern of activation of several odorant receptors (ORs). Thus, development of an odorant sensor array based on multiple ORs presents the possibility of mimicking biological odor discrimination mechanisms. Recently, we developed novel odorant sensor elements with high sensitivity and selectivity based on insect OR-expressing Sf21 cells that respond to target odorants by displaying increased fluorescence intensity. Here we introduce the development of an odorant sensor array composed of several Sf21 cell lines expressing different ORs. In this study, an array pattern of four cell lines expressing Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 was successfully created using a patterned polydimethylsiloxane film template and cell-immobilizing reagents, termed biocompatible anchor for membrane (BAM). We demonstrated that BAM could create a clear pattern of Sf21 sensor cells without impacting their odorant-sensing performance. Our sensor array showed odorant-specific response patterns toward both odorant mixtures and single odorant stimuli, allowing us to visualize the presence of 1-octen-3-ol, geosmin, bombykol, and bombykal as an increased fluorescence intensity in the region of Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 cell lines, respectively. Therefore, we successfully developed a new methodology for creating a cell-based odorant sensor array that enables us to discriminate multiple target odorants. Our method might be expanded into the development of an odorant sensor capable of detecting a large range of environmental odorants that might become a promising tool used in various applications including the study of insect semiochemicals and food contamination.

  16. DNA interaction probed by evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy via functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi-Ju; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-04-11

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) is employed to study interaction and binding kinetics of DNA strands by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as sensitive reporters. These Au NPs are connected to target DNA of study that hybridizes with the complementary DNA fixed on the silica surface. By the absorbance of Au NPs, the interaction between two DNA strands may be examined to yield an adsorption equilibrium constant of 2.2×10(10) M(-1) using Langmuir fit. The binding efficiency that is affected by ion concentration, buffer pH and temperature is also examined. This approach is then applied to the label-free detection of the DNA mutation diseases using the sandwich hybridization assay. For monitoring a gene associated with sickle-cell anemia, the detection limit and the adsorption equilibrium constant is determined to be 1.2 pM and (3.7±0.8)×10(10) M(-1), distinct difference from the perfectly matched DNA sequence that yields the corresponding 0.5 pM and (1.1±0.2)×10(11) M(-1). The EW-CRDS method appears to have great potential for the investigation of the kinetics of a wide range of biological reactions.

  17. A Multi-Modality CMOS Sensor Array for Cell-Based Assay and Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Taiyun; Park, Jong Seok; Butts, Jessica C; Hookway, Tracy A; Su, Amy; Zhu, Chengjie; Styczynski, Mark P; McDevitt, Todd C; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated multi-modality CMOS cellular sensor array with four sensing modalities to characterize different cell physiological responses, including extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance mapping, optical detection with shadow imaging and bioluminescence sensing, and thermal monitoring. The sensor array consists of nine parallel pixel groups and nine corresponding signal conditioning blocks. Each pixel group comprises one temperature sensor and 16 tri-modality sensor pixels, while each tri-modality sensor pixel can be independently configured for extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance measurement (voltage excitation/current sensing), and optical detection. This sensor array supports multi-modality cellular sensing at the pixel level, which enables holistic cell characterization and joint-modality physiological monitoring on the same cellular sample with a pixel resolution of 80 μm × 100 μm. Comprehensive biological experiments with different living cell samples demonstrate the functionality and benefit of the proposed multi-modality sensing in cell-based assay and drug screening.

  18. Wearable Sensor System Powered by a Biofuel Cell for Detection of Lactate Levels in Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S. O.; Ulyanova, Y. V.; Figueroa-Teran, R.; Bhatt, K. H.; Singhal, S.; Atanassov, P.

    2016-01-01

    An NAD+-dependent enzymatic sensor with biofuel cell power source system for non-invasive monitoring of lactate in sweat was designed, developed, and tested. The sensor component, based on lactate dehydrogenase, showed linear current response with increasing lactate concentrations with limits of detection from 5 to 100 mM lactate and sensitivity of 0.2 µA.mM−1 in the presence of target analyte. In addition to the sensor patch a power source was also designed, developed and tested. The power source was a biofuel cell designed to oxidize glucose via glucose oxidase. The biofuel cell showed excellent performance, achieving over 80 mA at 0.4 V (16 mW) in a footprint of 3.5 × 3.5 × 0.7 cm. Furthermore, in order to couple the sensor to the power source, system electronic components were designed and fabricated. These consisted of an energy harvester (EH) and a micropotentiostat (MP). The EH was employed for harvesting power provided by the biofuel cell as well as up-converting the voltage to 3.0 V needed for the operation of the MP. The sensor was attached to MP for chronoamperometric detection of lactate. The Sensor Patch System was demonstrated under laboratory conditions. PMID:27375962

  19. Contribution of aquaporins to cellular water transport observed by a microfluidic cell volume sensor.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinseok; Meng, Fanjie; Hua, Susan Z

    2008-09-15

    Here we demonstrate that an impedance-based microfluidic cell volume sensor can be used to study the roles of aquaporin (AQP) in cellular water permeability and screen AQP-specific drugs. Human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells were transiently transfected with AQP3- or AQP4-encoding genes to express AQPs in plasma membranes. The swelling of cells in response to hypotonic stimulation was traced in real time using the sensor. Two time constants were obtained by fitting the swelling curves with a two-exponential function, a fast time constant associated with osmotic water permeability of AQP-expressing cells and a slow phase time constant associated mainly with water diffusion through lipid bilayers in the nontransfected cells. The AQP-expressing cells showed at least 10x faster osmotic water transport than control cells. Using the volume sensor, we examined the effects of Hg (2+) and Ni (2+) on the water transport via AQPs. Hg (2+) inhibited the water flux in AQP3-expressing cells irreversibly, while Ni (2+) blocked the AQP3 channels reversibly. Neither of the two ions blocked the AQP4 channels. The microfluidic volume sensor can sense changes in cell volume in real time, which enables perfusion of various reagents sequentially. It provides a convenient tool for studying the effect of reagents on the function and regulation mechanism of AQPs.

  20. QCL-based TDLAS sensor for detection of NO toward emission measurements from ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhring, M.; Huang, S.; Jahjah, M.; Jiang, W.; Ren, W.; Willer, U.; Caneba, C.; Yang, L.; Nagrath, D.; Schade, W.; Tittel, F. K.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a sensitive sensor for detecting nitric oxide (NO) emissions from biological samples is reported. The sensor is based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled quantum cascade laser (QCL) and a 100-m astigmatic Herriot cell. A 2 f-wavelength modulation spectroscopy technique was used to obtain QCL-based TDLAS NO emission measurements with an optimum signal-to-noise ratio. An absorption line at 1,900.076 cm-1 was targeted to measure NO with a minimum detection limit of 124 ppt. Positive control measurements with the NO donor DETA NONOate were performed to determine and optimize the sensor performance for measurements of biological samples. Our measurements with NO donor show the potential suitability of the sensor for monitoring NO emission from cancer cells for biological investigations.

  1. Two-photon fluorescent sensor for K+ imaging in live cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to overstate the physiological importance of potassium for life as its indispensable roles in a variety of biological processes are widely known. As a result, efficient methods for determining physiological levels of potassium are of paramount importance. Despite this, relatively few K+ fluorescence sensors have been reported, with only one being commercially available. A new two-photon excited fluorescent K+ sensor is reported. The sensor is comprised of three moieties, a highly selective K+ chelator as the K+ recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (<52-fold) in detecting K+ over other physiological metal cations. Upon binding K+, the sensor switches from non-fluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K+ sensing in living cells.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of artificial hair cell sensor based on MWCNT-PDMS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chi Yeon; Lee, Hyun Sup; Cho, Yo Han; Joh, Cheeyoung; Choi, Pyung; Park, Seong Jin

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work is to design and fabricate a flow sensor using an artificial hair cell (AHC) inspired by biological hair cells of fish. The sensor consists of a single cilium structure with high aspect ratio and a mechanoreceptor using force sensitive resistor (FSR). The cilium structure is designed for capturing a drag force with direction due to flow field around the sensor and the mechanoreceptor is designed for sensing the drag force with direction from the cilium structure and converting it into an electric signal. The mechanoreceptor has a symmetric four electrodes to sense the drag force and its direction. To fabricate the single cilium structure with high aspect ratio, we have proposed a new design concept using a separated micro mold system (SMS) fabricated by the LIGA process. For a successful replication of the cilium structure, we used the hot embossing process with the help of a double-sided mold system. We used a composite of multiwall carbon nanotube and polydimethylsiloxane (MWCNT-PDMS). The performance of the mechanoreceptors was measured by a computer-controlled nanoindenter. We carried out several experiments with the sensor in the different flow rate and direction using the experimental test apparatus. To calibrate the sensor and calculate the velocity with direction based the signal from the sensor, we analyzed the coupled phenomena between flow field and the cilium structure to calculate the deflection of the cilium structure and the drag force applying to the cilium structure due to the flow field around sensor.

  3. Theoretical and experimental evidence of level repulsion states and evanescent modes in sonic crystal stubbed waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Vasseur, J. O.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Hladky-Hennion, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    The complex band structures calculated using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE) reveal the presence of evanescent modes in periodic systems, never predicted by the classical \\omega(\\vec {k}) methods, providing novel interpretations of several phenomena as well as a complete picture of the system. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally observe that in the ranges of frequencies where a deaf band is traditionally predicted, an evanescent mode with excitable symmetry appears, changing drastically the interpretation of the transmission properties. On the other hand, the simplicity of the sonic crystals in which only the longitudinal polarization can be excited is used to interpret, without loss of generality, the level repulsion between symmetric and antisymmetric bands in sonic crystals as the presence of an evanescent mode connecting both repelled bands. These evanescent modes, obtained using EPWE, explain both the attenuation produced in this range of frequencies and the transfer of symmetry from one band to the other in good agreement with both experimental results and multiple scattering predictions. Thus, the evanescent properties of the periodic system have been revealed to be necessary for the design of new acoustic and electromagnetic applications based on periodicity.

  4. Polymer optical fibre sensor to monitor skin moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, John; Woodyatt, Christopher; Scully, Patricia J.

    2007-07-01

    We present a polymer optical fibre sensor to sense skin moisture and droplet formation when sweating occurs. The sensor used evanescent field attenuation, by exploiting a moisture sensitive cladding with moisture indicator (fluorescein) contained within a porous cladding (HEMA). The sensor was designed to be comfortable to wear and unobtrusive, hygienic, with sterilised interchangeable sensing elements. It had maximum sensitivity between 98% and 100% humidity, and response time of 24 seconds.

  5. The Biological Sensor for Detection of Bacterial Cells in Liquid Phase Based on Plate Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Irina; Zaitsev, Boris; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Guliy, Olga; Ignatov, Oleg; Teplykh, Andrey

    The interactions "bacterial cells - bacteriophages", "bacterial cells - antibodies" and "bacterial cells - mini- antibodies" directly in liquid phase were experimentally investigated with a help of acoustic sensor. The acoustic sensor under study represents two-channel delay line based on the plate of Y-X lithium niobate. One channel of delay line was electrically shorted, the second channel was electrically open. The liquid container was glued on plate surface between transducers of delay line. The dependencies of the change in phase and insertion loss on concentration of bacteriophages, antibodies, and mini- antibodies were obtained for both channels of delay line.

  6. Ultrasensitive flow sensing of a single cell using graphene-based optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fei; Meng, Gui-Xian; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Lei-Ting; Wang, Peng; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Jiang, Wen-Shuai; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-06-11

    On the basis of the polarization-dependent absorption of graphene under total internal reflection, we designed a graphene-based optical refractive index sensor with high resolution of 1.7 × 10(-8) and sensitivity of 4.3 × 10(7) mV/RIU, as well as an extensive dynamic range. This highly sensitive graphene optical sensor enables label-free, live-cell, and highly accurate detection of a small quantity of cancer cells among normal cells at the single-cell level and the simultaneous detection and distinction of two cell lines without separation. It provides an accurate statistical distribution of normal and cancer cells with fewer cells. This facile and highly sensitive sensing refractive index may expand the practical applications of the biosensor.

  7. Rapid and specific electrochemical detection of prostate cancer cells using an aperture sensor array.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Mario; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-03-01

    A rapid, simple and specific cancer cell counting sensor would allow for early detection and better disease management. We have developed a novel cell counting device that can specifically count 125 prostate cancer cells in both complex media with serum and a mixed cell population containing non-target cells within 15 min. The microfabricated glass chip with exposed gold apertures utilizes the anti-EpCAM antibody to selectively count prostate cancer cells via differential pulse voltammetry. The newly developed sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and selectivity. The cells remain viable throughout the counting process and can be used for further analysis. This device could have utility for future applications in early stage cancer diagnosis.

  8. Cytosolic DNA Sensor Upregulation Accompanies DNA Electrotransfer in B16.F10 Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Znidar, Katarina; Bosnjak, Masa; Cemazar, Maja; Heller, Loree C

    2016-06-07

    In several preclinical tumor models, antitumor effects occur after intratumoral electroporation, also known as electrotransfer, of plasmid DNA devoid of a therapeutic gene. In mouse melanomas, these effects are preceded by significant elevation of several proinflammatory cytokines. These observations implicate the binding and activation of intracellular DNA-specific pattern recognition receptors or DNA sensors in response to DNA electrotransfer. In tumors, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels significantly increased. The mRNAs of several DNA sensors were detected, and DAI, DDX60, and p204 tended to be upregulated. These effects were accompanied with reduced tumor growth and increased tumor necrosis. In B16.F10 cells in culture, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels were significantly upregulated. The mRNAs for several DNA sensors were present in these cells; DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor (DAI), DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 60 (DDX60), and p204 were significantly upregulated while DDX60 protein levels were coordinately upregulated. Upregulation of DNA sensors in tumors could be masked by the lower transfection efficiency compared to in vitro or to dilution by other tumor cell types. Mirroring the observation of tumor necrosis, cells underwent a significant DNA concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation and survival. Taken together, these results indicate that DNA electrotransfer may cause the upregulation of several intracellular DNA sensors in B16.F10 cells, inducing effects in vitro and potentially in vivo.

  9. Cytosolic DNA Sensor Upregulation Accompanies DNA Electrotransfer in B16.F10 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Znidar, Katarina; Bosnjak, Masa; Cemazar, Maja; Heller, Loree C.

    2016-01-01

    In several preclinical tumor models, antitumor effects occur after intratumoral electroporation, also known as electrotransfer, of plasmid DNA devoid of a therapeutic gene. In mouse melanomas, these effects are preceded by significant elevation of several proinflammatory cytokines. These observations implicate the binding and activation of intracellular DNA-specific pattern recognition receptors or DNA sensors in response to DNA electrotransfer. In tumors, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels significantly increased. The mRNAs of several DNA sensors were detected, and DAI, DDX60, and p204 tended to be upregulated. These effects were accompanied with reduced tumor growth and increased tumor necrosis. In B16.F10 cells in culture, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels were significantly upregulated. The mRNAs for several DNA sensors were present in these cells; DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor (DAI), DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 60 (DDX60), and p204 were significantly upregulated while DDX60 protein levels were coordinately upregulated. Upregulation of DNA sensors in tumors could be masked by the lower transfection efficiency compared to in vitro or to dilution by other tumor cell types. Mirroring the observation of tumor necrosis, cells underwent a significant DNA concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation and survival. Taken together, these results indicate that DNA electrotransfer may cause the upregulation of several intracellular DNA sensors in B16.F10 cells, inducing effects in vitro and potentially in vivo. PMID:27271988

  10. Cell-surface sensors for real-time probing of cellular environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weian; Schafer, Sebastian; Choi, Jonghoon; Yamanaka, Yvonne J.; Lombardi, Maria L.; Bose, Suman; Carlson, Alicia L.; Phillips, Joseph A.; Teo, Weisuong; Droujinine, Ilia A.; Cui, Cheryl H.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Lammerding, Jan; Love, J. Christopher; Lin, Charles P.; Sarkar, Debanjan; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-08-01

    The ability to explore cell signalling and cell-to-cell communication is essential for understanding cell biology and developing effective therapeutics. However, it is not yet possible to monitor the interaction of cells with their environments in real time. Here, we show that a fluorescent sensor attached to a cell membrane can detect signalling molecules in the cellular environment. The sensor is an aptamer (a short length of single-stranded DNA) that binds to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and contains a pair of fluorescent dyes. When bound to PDGF, the aptamer changes conformation and the dyes come closer to each other, producing a signal. The sensor, which is covalently attached to the membranes of mesenchymal stem cells, can quantitatively detect with high spatial and temporal resolution PDGF that is added in cell culture medium or secreted by neighbouring cells. The engineered stem cells retain their ability to find their way to the bone marrow and can be monitored in vivo at the single-cell level using intravital microscopy.

  11. Cell-surface sensors for real-time probing of cellular environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weian; Schafer, Sebastian; Choi, Jonghoon; Yamanaka, Yvonne J.; Lombardi, Maria L.; Bose, Suman; Carlson, Alicia L.; Phillips, Joseph A.; Teo, Weisuong; Droujinine, Ilia A.; Cui, Cheryl H.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Lammerding, Jan; Love, J. Christopher; Lin, Charles P.; Sarkar, Debanjan; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to explore cell signalling and cell-to-cell communication is essential for understanding cell biology and developing effective therapeutics. However, it is not yet possible to monitor the interaction of cells with their environments in real time. Here, we show that a fluorescent sensor attached to a cell membrane can detect signalling molecules in the cellular environment. The sensor is an aptamer (a short length of single-stranded DNA) that binds to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and contains a pair of fluorescent dyes. When bound to PDGF, the aptamer changes conformation and the dyes come closer to each other, producing a signal. The sensor, which is covalently attached to the membranes of mesenchymal stem cells, can quantitatively detect with high spatial and temporal resolution PDGF that is added in cell culture medium or secreted by neighbouring cells. The engineered stem cells retain their ability to find their way to the bone marrow and can be monitored in vivo at the single-cell level using intravital microscopy. PMID:21765401

  12. Dye sensitized photovoltaic miniaturized solar cells, used as optical sensors for line of sight detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Cortes Torres Carlos; Sampei, Kota; Miho, Ogawa; Masataka, Ozawa; Norihisa, Miki

    2014-11-01

    Dye sensitized photovoltaic devices have been studied as transparent and low-cost solar cells. Our group have miniaturized the cells and used them as transparent optical sensors. This paper reports the design and fabrication of the cells and avoids the cross talk among cells, which was found recently and such effect provokes hardware instability. We use these optical sensors as an eye tracking device. The sensor array detects the difference in the intensity of light reflected from the pupil and the sclera and then determines the pupil position. Each sensor consists of two electrodes and electrolyte; hence our device conformed by only four semi-circular shaped sensors on eyeglasses can detect the view angle in both horizontal and vertical directions. Manufacturing process gives us freedom to easily re-arrange, add or remove sensors. In our prior work we had good performance in stand-alone configuration. We used specialized equipment from National Instruments for our measurements. However we found that: A cell is not 100% independent from the others, is affected by the absence or presence of light at the neighbour cells. When our device is connected to other electronic devices (for data processing), all cells have the same voltage among them; therefore, all cells behave the same way when any of them is affected by light. The root cause is, due to all sensors were interconnected via a micro channel and filled with electrolyte, due to its conductive properties, electrolyte does neither need electrodes nor physical paths to conduct electricity, so it creates a liquid wire between sensors, hence the gap between them become inexistent, consequently when our device is connected to other electronic devices, due to this unique channel and by sharing a common electronic ground, this connection provokes the voltage to be the same among all sensors in the array. Our device becomes four separate voltage lines in a parallel circuit. The device was also in short circuit provoked

  13. Flight Demonstration Of Low Overpressure N-Wave Sonic Booms And Evanescent Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Smolka, James W.; Murray, James E.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent flight demonstration of shaped sonic booms shows the potential for quiet overland supersonic flight, which could revolutionize air transport. To successfully design quiet supersonic aircraft, the upper limit of an acceptable noise level must be determined through quantitative recording and subjective human response measurements. Past efforts have concentrated on the use of sonic boom simulators to assess human response, but simulators often cannot reproduce a realistic sonic boom sound. Until now, molecular relaxation effects on low overpressure rise time had never been compared with flight data. Supersonic flight slower than the cutoff Mach number, which generates evanescent waves, also prevents loud sonic booms from impacting the ground. The loudness of these evanescent waves can be computed, but flight measurement validation is needed. A novel flight demonstration technique that generates low overpressure N-waves using conventional military aircraft is outlined, in addition to initial quantitative flight data. As part of this demonstration, evanescent waves also will be recorded.

  14. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    So, Jin-Kyu MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-05-19

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50 keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300 nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  15. Graphene enhanced evanescent field in microfiber multimode interferometer for highly sensitive gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Yao, B C; Wu, Y; Zhang, A Q; Rao, Y J; Wang, Z G; Cheng, Y; Gong, Y; Zhang, W L; Chen, Y F; Chiang, K S

    2014-11-17

    Graphene based new physics phenomena are leading to a variety of stimulating graphene-based photonic devices. In this study, the enhancement of surface evanescent field by graphene cylindrical cladding is observed, for the first time, by using a graphene-coated microfiber multi-mode interferometer (GMMI). It is found theoretically and experimentally that the light transmitting in the fiber core is efficiently dragged by the graphene, hence significantly enhancing the evanescent fields, and subsequently improving the sensitivity of the hybrid waveguide. The experimental results for gas sensing verified the theoretical prediction, and ultra-high sensitivities of ~0.1 ppm for NH(3) gas detection and ~0.2 ppm for H(2)O vapor detection are achieved, which could be used for trace analysis. The enhancement of surface evanescent field induced by graphene may pave a new way for developing novel graphene-based all-fiber devices with compactness, low cost, and temperature immunity.

  16. Direct measurement of standing evanescent waves with a photon-scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Meixner, A J; Bopp, M A; Tarrach, G

    1994-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a standing evanescent wave that is caused by total internal reflection of an Ar-ion laser beam on a glass prism and investigate the coupling to a subwavelength dielectric tip of a photon-scanning tunneling microscope that is raster scanned at a close distance over the prism surface. The intensity of the evanescent field is spatially modulated with a period of 239.2 nm. It decays exponentially with a constant of 103.9 nm with increasing distance from the prism surface. Precise measurements of the standing evanescent wave can be used to calibrate the scanner and permit one to determine the spatial resolution and the coupling efficiency of the tip.

  17. Striking properties of light transmitted by a double period nanoslit structure under evanescent incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Marcelo; Skigin, Diana C.

    2015-05-01

    The excitation of phase resonances in dual-period wire structures under evanescent incidence is investigated and numerically reported for the first time. The diffraction problem of a compound structure comprising subwavelength perfectly conducting wires and slits near a dielectric interface is solved by the modal method, which has been extended to consider evanescent incidence via illumination under the total internal reflection condition. We demonstrate evanescent-to-propagating conversion in the transmitted intensity via resonances of different types, such as Fabry-Perot and Rayleigh anomalies. The results exhibit points in common with those obtained for simple structures (single wire/slit per period), but, on the other hand, there are striking differences, mainly arising from the excitation of phase resonances in the structure. These features allow an angular and spectral control of the transmitted response, which opens up new degrees of freedom for the design of input/output couplers and other devices.

  18. Evanescent-field excitation and collection approach for waveguide based photonic luminescent biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigo, E.; Aparicio, F. J.; Vanacharla, M. R.; Larcheri, S.; Guider, R.; Han, B.; Pucker, G.; Pavesi, L.

    2014-03-01

    A silicon oxynitride channel waveguide based evanescent-field optical transducer is presented for lab-on-chip application. The optical biosensor detects luminescent bioanalytes infiltrated within a reactor well realized across the waveguide. As a main novelty, the sensing mechanism proposed makes use of the evanescent-field propagating in the waveguide to both excite and to collect the fluorescent signal. To understand the chip behavior, its design and collection efficiency were analyzed by finite-difference time-domain simulations in comparison with similar structures differing in the bioreactor thickness and therefore in the excitation and collection mechanisms. It is demonstrated that the best efficiency and performance are reached for the proposed dual evanescent field approach. Characterization of the optical losses and fluorescence measurements from a dye solution infiltrated in the bioreactor well validate the proposed working concept.

  19. Interference pattern generation in evanescent electromagnetic waves for nanoscale lithography using waveguide diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Bezus, E A; Doskolovich, L L; Kazanskii, N L

    2011-08-31

    The generation of interference patterns of evanescent electromagnetic waves with an essentially subwavelength period using dielectric waveguide diffraction gratings is considered. Using simulations within the framework of the electromagnetic theory, the possibility of obtaining high-quality interference patterns due to enhancement of evanescent diffraction orders under resonance conditions is demonstrated. The contrast of the interference patterns in the case of TE polarisation of the incident wave is close to unity. The field intensity in the near-field interference maxima exceeds the intensity of the incident wave by 25-100 times. The possibility of generation of the interference patterns of evanescent waves corresponding to higher diffraction orders is shown. The use of higher orders reduces the requirements to the fabrication technology and allows generation of interference patterns with a high spatial frequency, using diffraction gratings with a low spatial frequency. Examples of generating interference patters with periods six times smaller than those of the used diffraction gratings are presented. (nanolithography)

  20. Micro-patterning of Mammalian Cells on Suspended MEMS Resonant Sensors for Long-Term Growth Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Elise A.; Dorvel, Brian R.; Millet, Larry J.; King, William P.; Bashir, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    MEMS resonant mass sensors can measure the mass of individual cells, though long-term growth measurements are limited by the movement of cells off the sensor area. Micro-patterning techniques are a powerful approach to control the placement of individual cells in an arrayed format. In this work we present a method for micro-patterning cells on fully suspended resonant sensors through select functionalization and passivation of the chip surface. This method combines high-resolution photolithography with a blanket transfer technique for applying photoresist to avoid damaging the sensors. Cells are constrained to the patterned collagen area on the sensor by pluronic acting as a cell adhesion blocker. This micro-patterning method enables long-term growth measurements, which is demonstrated by a measurement of the change in mass of a human breast cancer cell over 18 h. PMID:24535001

  1. Bio-inspired piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor fabricated by powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Sae; Oh, Keun Ha; Moon, Won Kyu; Kim, Kyungseop; Joh, Cheeyoung; Seo, Hee Seon; Bollina, Ravi; Park, Seong Jin

    2015-12-01

    A piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor was fabricated by the powder injection molding process in order to make an acoustic vector hydrophone. The entire process of powder injection molding was developed and optimized for PMN-PZT ceramic powder. The artificial hair cell sensor, which consists of high aspect ratio hair cell and three rectangular mechanoreceptors, was precisely fabricated through the developed powder injection molding process. The density and the dielectric property of the fabricated sensor shows 98% of the theoretical density and 85% of reference dielectric property of PMN-PZT ceramic powder. With regard to homogeneity, three rectangular mechanoreceptors have the same dimensions, with 3 μm of tolerance with 8% of deviation of dielectric property. Packaged vector hydrophones measure the underwater acoustic signals from 500 to 800 Hz with -212 dB of sensitivity. Directivity of vector hydrophone was acquired at 600 Hz as analyzing phase differences of electric signals.

  2. THz-wave sensing via pump and signal wave detection interacted with evanescent THz waves.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Takuya; Kaneko, Naoya; Suizu, Koji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2013-09-15

    We report a novel sensing technique that uses an evanescent terahertz (THz) wave, without detecting the THz wave directly. When a THz wave generated by Cherenkov phase matching via difference frequency generation undergoes total internal reflection, the evanescent THz wave is subject to a phase change and an amplitude decrease. The reflected THz wave, under the influence of the sample, interferes with the propagating THz wave and the changing electric field of the THz wave interacts with the electric field of the pump waves. We demonstrate a sensing technique for detecting changes in the electric field of near-infrared light, transcribed from changes in the electric field of a THz wave.

  3. Surface Raman spectroscopy with and without reverse Kretschmann configuration: Effect of evanescent-wave-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Cheng, Jin; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Evanescent-wave-coupled emission has been used for reverse Kretschmann fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies with high collection efficiency. However, it has a negative effect on the common surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy without the reverse Kretschmann configuration because the coupling of a large fraction of light power into the substrate impairs the Raman signal backscattered in air. A rough core layer can significantly weaken evanescent-wave-coupled emission, which is conducive to enhancing the backscattered Raman signal. In this work, we theoretically investigate the surface-plasmon-coupled emission and its effects on surface Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Enhancement of magneto-optical effect via the evanescent wave and its figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibayashi, Kazuhiro; Yoneda, Hitoki; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Iwasaki, Yamato; Munekata, Hiro

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the enhancement of the magneto-optical (MO) effect via the evanescent wave in MO structures composed of GdFe thin layers and two dielectrics. The MO Kerr rotation and the figure of merit (FOM) among the Kretschmann, Otto and direct-irradiation configurations are compared. The data obtained by experiment and calculation both show that the standing evanescent wave in the metal layer realized in the former two configurations enhances the MO Kerr rotation and FOM. Furthermore, the Kretschmann configuration appears to be superior to the Otto configuration in terms of the efficiency of MO Kerr enhancement.

  5. In-line absorption sensor based on coiled optical microfiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, Roberto; Jung, Yongmin; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2011-04-01

    We fabricated and tested an evanescent-wave absorption sensor consisting of an optical microfiber coil resonator embedded in fluidic channel walls. Low concentrations of flowing analyte show optical losses in agreement with a modified Beer-Lambert law. Higher concentration causes a limit value of the measured optical losses arising from adsorption mechanisms.

  6. 3.0-3.7μm infrared sensor system for cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Witarski, Wojciech; Vellekoop, Michael J.

    2009-05-01

    In this contribution we present a novel LED-photodiode based infrared absorbance sensor in the wavelength range of 3.0 - 3.7 μm for cell analysis. Instead of using time consuming and expensive labelling and staining techniques to distinguish healthy from malignant cell types, this IR sensor system can perform faster, cheaper and without the need of additional chemicals. Depending on the used narrow bandpass filters, absorbance due to specific molecular vibration can be measured, such as the functional absorbance peaks at 3.38 μm (CH3-antisymmetric stretch), 3.42 μm (CH2- antisymmetric stretch), 3.48 μm (CH3-symmetric stretch) and 3.51 μm (CH2-symmetric stretch). For normalization and baseline correction the absorbance at wavelengths 3.33 and 3.57 μm are used. By recording the IR absorbance spectra of healthy and malignant epithelial kidney cell lines with an IR spectroscope, we found significant differences in the absorbance ratio 3.51 μm / 3.42 μm (CH2-symmetric/antisymmetric stretch). This result has led us to a sensor concept where only four wavelengths are being measured. In the 3.0 - 3.7 μm wavelength region a low cost LED-photodiode system can be used instead of a spectroscope. Yeast cells, which also contain the CH2 symmetric and antisymmetric stretch bands, are used to validate this sensor system and to make a first comparison of the system to spectroscopic recordings. Sensor experiments on dried spots of baker's yeast on calcium-fluoride slides yielded a comparable CH2 stretch ratio with the IR spectroscope measurement. This confirms the usability of the sensor to measure the CH2 stretch ratio and its potential for fast, label-free and low cost screening of cell samples.

  7. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  8. Sensor Needs and Requirements for Fuel Cells and CIDI/SIDI Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.

    2000-03-01

    To reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, improve urban air quality, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced vehicle technologies and fuels. Enabling technologies for fuel cell power systems and direct-injection engines are being developed by DOE through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry collaboration to produce vehicles having up to three times the fuel economy of conventional mid-size automobiles. Sensors have been identified as a research and development need for both fuel cell and direct-injection systems, because current sensor technologies do not adequately meet requirements. Sensors are needed for emission control, for passenger safety and comfort, to increase system lifetime, and for system performance enhancement through feedback and control. These proceedings document the results of a workshop to define sensor requirements for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and direct-injection engines for automotive applications. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies. The objectives of the workshop were to: define the requirements for sensors; establish R&D priorities; identify the technical targets and technical barriers; and facilitate collaborations among participants. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies.

  9. Cell suspension concentration monitoring by using a miniaturized serial high frequency SAWR sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Feng, Hailin; Fang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized cell suspension concentration monitoring method was investigated. The sensing unit was a carbon screen-printed electrode (CSPE) in serial with a 433MHz vacuum-packaged surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR). SAWR provided a stable and high operating frequency, which helps to keep the stability and sensitivity of the monitoring system. Living cells suspensions in different concentrations were prepared and dropcast on CSPE. Frequency responses of the sensor were recorded. Cell quantity variation within the same culture media volume changed the dielectric properties of CSPE and finally affected the SAWR frequency. SAWR frequency declined with the decrease of cell concentration. The proposed sensor provided high sensitivity and remarkable stability for the cell suspensions.

  10. Hybridization assay based on evanescent fluorescence excitation and collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, James J.; Mmerole, Robert U.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Yi, Hyunmin; Bentley, William E.; Gillespie, James B.

    2003-08-01

    There is a great need for high throughput and sensitive sensors for genetic analysis. These sensors can be used for varied purposes from monitoring gene expression in organims to speciation of possible pathogens. Consequently, an instrument capable of these tasks would be a great benefit for food and water safety, medical diagnostics and defense of military and civilian populations from biological threats. This work examines the development of a hybridization-based biosensor using a novel tapered fiber optic rpobe. The immobilization of single-stranded, synthetic ologinucleotides utilizing aminoproplytriethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde was implemented on the fiber optic sensor. Hybridization takes place with a complementary analyte sequence followed by a fluorescent, labeled signaling probe to form a sandwich assay. Following hybridization, the fiber is interrogated with a diode laser source and the resulting fluorescence signal is detected using a miniature spectrometer.

  11. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 μM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ∼300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 μM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings. PMID:24967604

  12. Multichannel series piezoelectric quartz crystal cell sensor for real time and quantitative monitoring of the living cell and assessment of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Feifei; Lian, Yan; Zhou, Huang; Shi, Xiaohong; He, Fengjiao

    2014-10-21

    A new multichannel series piezoelectric quartz crystal (MSPQC) cell sensor for real time monitoring of living cells in vitro was reported in this paper. The constructed sensor was used successfully to monitor adhesion, spreading, proliferation, and apoptosis of MG63 osteosarcoma cells and investigate the effects of different concentrations of cobalt chloride on MG63 cells. Quantitative real time and dynamic cell analyses data were conducted using the MSPQC cell sensor. Compared with methods such as fluorescence staining and morphology observation by microscopy, the MSPQC cell sensor is noninvasive, label free, simple, cheap, and capable of online monitoring. It can automatically record the growth status of cells and quantitatively evaluate cell proliferation and the apoptotic response to drugs. It will be a valuable detection and analysis tool for the acquisition of cellular level information and is anticipated to have application in the field of cell biology research or cytotoxicity testing in the future.

  13. Formation, encapsulation, and validation of membrane-based artificial hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Kevin L.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2012-04-01

    Hair cell structures are one of the most common forms of sensing elements found in nature. In nearly all vertebrates hair cells are used for auditory and vestibular sensing. In humans, approximately 16,000 auditory hair cells can be found in the cochlea of the ear. Each hair cell contains a stereocilia, which is the primary structure for sound transduction. This study looks to develop and characterize an artificial hair cell that resembles the stereocilia of the human ear. Recently our research group has shown that a single artificial hair cell can be formed in an open substrate using a single aqueous droplet and a hydrogel. In this study, air was blown across the hair and analyzed using spectral analysis. The results of this study provided the foundation for our current work toward an artificial hair cell that uses two aqueous droplets. In the current study a test fixture was created in order to consistently measure various properties of the encapsulated hair cell. The response of the hair cell was measured with an impulse input at various locations on the test fixture. A frequency response function was then created using the impulse input and the output of the sensor. It was found that the vibration of the hair was only detectable if the test fixture was struck at the correct location. By changing the physical parameters of the hair sensor, such as hair length, we were able to alter the response of the sensor. It was also found that the sensitivity of the sensor was reliant on the size of the lipid bilayer.

  14. Evanescent Microwave Probes Using Coplanar Waveguide and Stripline for Super-Resolution Imaging of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Akinwande, D.; Ciocan, R.; LeClair, S. R.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2000-01-01

    An evanescent field microwave imaging probe based on half-wavelength, microwave transmission line resonators is described. Optimization of the probe tip design, the coupling gap, and the data analysis has resulted in images of metal lines on semiconductor substrates with 2.6 microns spatial resolution and a minimum detectable line width of 0.4 microns at 1 GHz.

  15. Microbial fuel cells as power supply of a low-power temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Firas; Ondel, Olivier; Allard, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) show great promise as a concomitant process for water treatment and as renewable energy sources for environmental sensors. The small energy produced by MFCs and the low output voltage limit the applications of MFCs. Specific converter topologies are required to step-up the output voltage of a MFC. A Power Management Unit (PMU) is proposed for operation at low input voltage and at very low power in a completely autonomous way to capture energy from MFCs with the highest possible efficiency. The application of sensors for monitoring systems in remote locations is an important approach. MFCs could be an alternative energy source in this case. Powering a sensor with MFCs may prove the fact that wastewater may be partly turned into renewable energy for realistic applications. The Power Management Unit is demonstrated for 3.6 V output voltage at 1 mW continuous power, based on a low-cost 0.7-L MFC. A temperature sensor may operate continuously on 2-MFCs in continuous flow mode. A flyback converter under discontinuous conduction mode is also tested to power the sensor. One continuously fed MFC was able to efficiently and continuously power the sensor.

  16. Monitoring the spreading stage of lung cells by silicon nanowire electrical cell impedance sensor for cancer detection purposes.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Hamed; Abdolahad, Mohammad; Gharooni, Milad; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Azimi, Soheil; Hosseini, Mohammad; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2015-06-15

    We developed a silicon nanowire based electrical cell impedance sensor (SiNW-ECIS) as an instrument that detects cancerous cultured living lung cells by monitoring their spreading state at which the cells stretched and become extended on nanowires. Further current penetration into the extended membrane of malignant cells in respect to normal ones (In the first 6h after cells interaction with surface) are the key mechanism in our diagnosis procedure. The developed device applied to monitor the spreading-induced electrical differences between cancerous and normal lung cells in an integral fashion. Detection was performed so faster than the time required to complete cells mitosis. Morphology and architecture of doped Si nanowires covered microelectrodes observably enhance the contact area between cells and electrodes which support accurate signal recording from stretched cells as indicated by SEM and florescent images.

  17. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Micro(Bio)Sensor Array Chip for Multiple Parallel Measurements of Important Cell Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, Roy M.; Cox, Timothy; Tuffin, Rachel; Drago, Guido A.; Griffiths, John; Pittson, Robin; Johnson, Graham; Xu, Jinsheng; Sage, Ian C.; Davies, Rhodri; Jackson, Simon K.; Kenna, Gerry; Luxton, Richard; Hart, John P.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the design and development of an integrated electrochemical cell culture monitoring system, based on enzyme-biosensors and chemical sensors, for monitoring indicators of mammalian cell metabolic status. MEMS technology was used to fabricate a microwell-format silicon platform including a thermometer, onto which chemical sensors (pH, O2) and screen-printed biosensors (glucose, lactate), were grafted/deposited. Microwells were formed over the fabricated sensors to give 5-well sensor strips which were interfaced with a multipotentiostat via a bespoke connector box interface. The operation of each sensor/biosensor type was examined individually, and examples of operating devices in five microwells in parallel, in either potentiometric (pH sensing) or amperometric (glucose biosensing) mode are shown. The performance characteristics of the sensors/biosensors indicate that the system could readily be applied to cell culture/toxicity studies. PMID:25360580

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of a micro(bio)sensor array chip for multiple parallel measurements of important cell biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Roy M; Cox, Timothy; Tuffin, Rachel; Drago, Guido A; Griffiths, John; Pittson, Robin; Johnson, Graham; Xu, Jinsheng; Sage, Ian C; Davies, Rhodri; Jackson, Simon K; Kenna, Gerry; Luxton, Richard; Hart, John P

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the design and development of an integrated electrochemical cell culture monitoring system, based on enzyme-biosensors and chemical sensors, for monitoring indicators of mammalian cell metabolic status. MEMS technology was used to fabricate a microwell-format silicon platform including a thermometer, onto which chemical sensors (pH, O2) and screen-printed biosensors (glucose, lactate), were grafted/deposited. Microwells were formed over the fabricated sensors to give 5-well sensor strips which were interfaced with a multipotentiostat via a bespoke connector box interface. The operation of each sensor/biosensor type was examined individually, and examples of operating devices in five microwells in parallel, in either potentiometric (pH sensing) or amperometric (glucose biosensing) mode are shown. The performance characteristics of the sensors/biosensors indicate that the system could readily be applied to cell culture/toxicity studies. PMID:25360580

  19. Nanomechanical sensors for single microbial cell growth monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Niall; Lukacs, Gyongyi; Jensen, Jason; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    A nanomechanical technique for rapid real time detection and monitoring of microorganism growth will significantly reduce costs and diagnosis times in industrial and clinical settings. Owing to their label free detection mechanism and unprecedented sensitivity to the mass and elastic modulus of biological structures, dynamically operated cantilever arrays provide an opportunity to rapidly detect and track the evolution of microbial growth. Here we report the monitoring of the growth of single Aspergillus niger spores via the multimode response of microcantilevers. The fungal hyphal structure affects the cantilevers' nanomechanical properties as it propagates along the sensor. We demonstrate, for the first time, the mapping of cellular events with great accuracy using a cantilever frequency response. Imaging of growth conditions on the cantilever, which is performed in parallel, allows for verification of these results. Theoretical comparison and finite element modelling confirm experimental findings and allow for determination of the hyphal elastic modulus.A nanomechanical technique for rapid real time detection and monitoring of microorganism growth will significantly reduce costs and diagnosis times in industrial and clinical settings. Owing to their label free detection mechanism and unprecedented sensitivity to the mass and elastic modulus of biological structures, dynamically operated cantilever arrays provide an opportunity to rapidly detect and track the evolution of microbial growth. Here we report the monitoring of the growth of single Aspergillus niger spores via the multimode response of microcantilevers. The fungal hyphal structure affects the cantilevers' nanomechanical properties as it propagates along the sensor. We demonstrate, for the first time, the mapping of cellular events with great accuracy using a cantilever frequency response. Imaging of growth conditions on the cantilever, which is performed in parallel, allows for verification of these

  20. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip.

  1. DNA-Based Sensor Particles Enable Measuring Light Intensity in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mikutis, Gediminas; Mora, Carlos A; Puddu, Michela; Paunescu, Daniela; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2016-04-13

    "Lab on a particle" architecture is employed in designing a light nanosensor. Light-sensitive protecting groups are installed on DNA, which is encapsulated in silica particles, qualifying as a self-sufficient light sensor. The nanosensors allow measuring light intensity and duration in very small volumes, such as single cells, and store the irradiation information until readout.

  2. Novel BOD (biological oxygen demand) sensor using mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hong; Chang, In Seop; Gil, Geun Cheol; Park, Hyung Soo; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2003-04-01

    A microbial fuel cell type of biosensor was used to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of wastewater. The biosensor gave a good correlation between the BOD value and the coulomb produced. The BOD sensor has been operated for over 5 years in a stable manner without any servicing. This is much longer that that of previously reported BOD biosensors.

  3. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-10-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was required for application of the sensor for microbial activity measurement, while biofilm-colonized anode was needed for utilizing the sensor for BOD content measurement. The current density of SUMFC sensor equipped with a biofilm-colonized anode showed linear relationship with BOD content, to up to 250 mg/L (∼233 ± 1 mA/m(2)), with a response time of <0.67 h. This sensor could, however, not measure microbial activity, as indicated by the indifferent current produced at varying active microorganisms concentration, which was expressed as microbial adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) concentration. On the contrary, the current density (0.6 ± 0.1 to 12.4 ± 0.1 mA/m(2)) of the SUMFC sensor equipped with a fresh anode showed linear relationship, with active microorganism concentrations from 0 to 6.52 nmol-ATP/L, while no correlation between the current and BOD was observed. It was found that temperature, pH, conductivity, and inorganic solid content were significantly affecting the sensitivity of the sensor. Lastly, the sensor was tested with real contaminated groundwater, where the microbial activity and BOD content could be detected in <3.1 h. The microbial activity and BOD concentration measured by SUMFC sensor fitted well with the one measured by the standard methods, with deviations ranging from 15% to 22% and 6% to 16%, respectively. The SUMFC sensor provides a new way for in situ and quantitative monitoring contaminants content and biological activity during bioremediation process in variety of anoxic aquifers.

  4. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-10-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was required for application of the sensor for microbial activity measurement, while biofilm-colonized anode was needed for utilizing the sensor for BOD content measurement. The current density of SUMFC sensor equipped with a biofilm-colonized anode showed linear relationship with BOD content, to up to 250 mg/L (∼233 ± 1 mA/m(2)), with a response time of <0.67 h. This sensor could, however, not measure microbial activity, as indicated by the indifferent current produced at varying active microorganisms concentration, which was expressed as microbial adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) concentration. On the contrary, the current density (0.6 ± 0.1 to 12.4 ± 0.1 mA/m(2)) of the SUMFC sensor equipped with a fresh anode showed linear relationship, with active microorganism concentrations from 0 to 6.52 nmol-ATP/L, while no correlation between the current and BOD was observed. It was found that temperature, pH, conductivity, and inorganic solid content were significantly affecting the sensitivity of the sensor. Lastly, the sensor was tested with real contaminated groundwater, where the microbial activity and BOD content could be detected in <3.1 h. The microbial activity and BOD concentration measured by SUMFC sensor fitted well with the one measured by the standard methods, with deviations ranging from 15% to 22% and 6% to 16%, respectively. The SUMFC sensor provides a new way for in situ and quantitative monitoring contaminants content and biological activity during bioremediation process in variety of anoxic aquifers. PMID:21557205

  5. Modeling the motion and detection of particles in microcantilever sensor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, K. Y.; Butt, N. R.; Alodhayb, Abdullah; Saika-Voivod, I.; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-03-01

    Consideration of the dynamics of the liquid is often neglected in experiments carried out in flow-through microcantilever sensor cells. Thus, fluid dynamics simulations were performed showing that the geometry of the sensor cell and laminar nature of the flow may result in a highly uneven distribution of particulates throughout the cell, and hence an uneven detection rate at individual cantilevers in a multi-lever setup. Various strategies for diverting flow were tested in order to optimize particle capture rates. Additionally, DNA detection experiments were performed that validated our approximations in treating particle-cantilever interactions and provided a semi-quantitative relationship between simulated particle detection and actual cantilever deflections. The results point out the advantages of flow optimization, the need for calibration of individual cantilevers within a multi-lever cell, and the usefulness of simulation in achieving these goals.

  6. Construction, imaging, and analysis of FRET-based tension sensors in living cells.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Andrew S; Rothenberg, Katheryn E; Berginski, Matthew E; Urs, Aarti N; Hoffman, Brenton D

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increased appreciation for the importance of mechanical stimuli in many biological contexts, an interest in measuring the forces experienced by specific proteins in living cells has recently emerged. The development and use of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors has enabled these types of studies and led to important insights into the mechanisms those cells utilize to probe and respond to the mechanical nature of their surrounding environment. The process for creating and utilizing FRET-based tension sensors can be divided into three main parts: construction, imaging, and analysis. First we review several methods for the construction of genetically encoded FRET-based tension sensors, including restriction enzyme-based methods as well as the more recently developed overlap extension or Gibson Assembly protocols. Next, we discuss the intricacies associated with imaging tension sensors, including optimizing imaging parameters as well as common techniques for estimating artifacts within standard imaging systems. Then, we detail the analysis of such data and describe how to extract useful information from a FRET experiment. Finally, we provide a discussion on identifying and correcting common artifacts in the imaging of FRET-based tension sensors.

  7. Construction, imaging and analysis of FRET-based tension sensors in living cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrew S.; Rothenberg, Katheryn E.; Berginski, Matthew E.; Urs, Aarti N.; Hoffman, Brenton D.

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increased appreciation for the importance of mechanical stimuli in many biological contexts, an interest in measuring the forces experienced by specific proteins in living cells has recently emerged. The development and use of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors has enabled these types of studies and led to important insights into the mechanisms those cells utilize to probe and respond to the mechanical nature of their surrounding environment. The process for creating and utilizing FRET-based tension sensors can be divided into three main parts: construction, imaging, and analysis. First we review several methods for the construction of genetically encoded FRET-based tension sensors, including restriction enzyme-based methods as well as the more recently developed overlap extension or Gibson Assembly protocols. Next, we discuss the intricacies associated with imaging tension sensors, including optimizing imaging parameters as well as common techniques for estimating artifacts within standard imaging systems. Then, we detail the analysis of such data and describe how to extract useful information from a FRET experiment. Finally, we provide a discussion on identifying and correcting common artifacts in the imaging of FRET-based tension sensors. PMID:25640429

  8. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  9. Kramers-Kronig analysis of molecular evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained by multimode step-index optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, R A; Ruddy, V P; Hieftje, G M

    1996-07-20

    Spectral distortions that arise in evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained with multimode step-index optical fibers are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analysis is performed by the application of Kramers-Kronig relations to the real and the imaginary parts of the complex refractive index of an absorbing external medium. It is demonstrated that even when the extinction coefficient of the external medium is small, anomalous dispersion of that medium in the vicinity of an absorption band must be considered. Deviations from Beer's law, band distortions, and shifts in peak position are quantified theoretically as a function of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the external medium; the effect of bandwidth for both Lorentzian and Gaussian bands is also evaluated. Numerical simulations are performed for two types of sensing sections in commonly used plastic-clad silica optical fibers. These sensors include an unclad fiber in contact with a lower-index absorbing liquid and a fiber with the original cladding modified with an absorbing species. The numerical results compare favorably with those found experimentally with these types of sensing sections.

  10. Reusable Floating-Electrode Sensor for Real-Time Electrophysiological Monitoring of Nonadherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Ba, Viet Anh; Ta, Van-Thao; Park, Juhun; Park, Eun Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    We herein report the development of a reusable floating-electrode sensor (FES) based on aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes, which allowed quantitatively monitoring the electrophysiological responses from nonadherent cells. The FES was used to measure the real-time responses of normal lung cells and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells to the addition of nicotine. The SCLC cells exhibited rather large electrophysiological responses to nicotine compared to normal cells, which was attributed to the overexpressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the SCLC cells. Importantly, using only a single device could measure repeatedly the responses of multiple individual cells to various drugs, enabling statistically meaningful measurements without errors from the device-to-device variations of the sensor characteristics. As results, that the treatment with drugs such as genistin or daidzein reduced Ca2+ influx in SCLC cells was found. Moreover, tamoxifen, has been known as an anti-estrogen compound, was found to only partly block the binding of daidzein to nAChRs. Our FES can be a promising tool for various biomedical applications such as drug screening and therapy monitoring.

  11. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Durante, W.; Lancaster, D. G.; Klattenhoff, J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues.

  12. Motility voltage sensor of the outer hair cell resides within the lateral plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G; Santos-Sacchi, J

    1994-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) from the organ of Corti is believed to be responsible for the mammal's exquisite sense of hearing. A membrane-based motile response of this cell underlies the initial processing of acoustic energy. The voltage-dependent capacitance of the OHC, possibly reflecting charge movement of the motility voltage sensor, was measured in cells during intracellular dialysis of trypsin under whole cell voltage clamp. Within 10 min after dialysis, light and electron microscopic examination revealed that the subplasmalemmal structures, including the cytoskeletal framework and subsurface cisternae, were disrupted and/or detached from adjacent plasma membrane. Dialysis of heat-inactivated trypsin produced no changes in cell structure. Simultaneous measures of linear and nonlinear membrane capacitance revealed minimal changes, indicating that contributions by subsurface structures to the generation of the nonlinear capacitance are unlikely. This study strongly suggests that voltage-dependent charge movement in the OHC reflects properties of the force generator's voltage sensor and that the sensor/motor resides solely within the lateral plasma membrane. Images PMID:7991617

  13. Role of the array geometry in multi-bilayer hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a bio-inspired, synthetic membrane-based hair cell sensor was fabricated and characterized. This sensor generates current in response to mechanical stimuli, such as airflow or free vibration, which perturb the sensor's hair. Vibration transferred from the hair to a lipid membrane (lipid bilayer) causes a voltage-dependent time rate of change in electrical capacitance of the membrane, which produces measurable current. Studies to date have been performed on systems containing only two droplets and a single bilayer, even though an array of multiple bilayers can be formed with more than 2 droplets. Thus, it is yet to be determined how multiple lipid bilayers affect the sensing response of a membrane-based hair cell sensor. In this work, we assemble serial droplet arrays with more than 1 bilayer to experimentally study the current generated by each membrane in response to perturbation of a single hair element. Two serial array configurations are studied: The first consists of a serial array of 3 bilayers formed using 4 droplets with the hair positioned in an end droplet. The second configuration consists of 3 droplets and 2 bilayers in series with the hair positioned in the central droplet. In serial arrays of up to four droplets, we observe that mechanotransduction of the hair's motion into a capacitive current occurs at every membrane, with bilayers positioned adjacent to the droplet containing the hair generating the largest sensing current. The measured currents suggest the total current generated by all bilayers in a 4-droplet, 3-bilaye array is greater than the current produced by a single-membrane sensor and similar in magnitude to the sum of currents output by 3, single-bilayer sensors operated independently. Moreover, we learned that bilayers positioned on the same side of the hair produce sensing currents that are in-phase, whereas bilayers positioned on opposite sides of the droplet containing the hair generate out-of-phase responses.

  14. Membrane-electrode assembly enhances performance of a microbial fuel cell type biological oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mia; Hyun, Moon Sik; Gadd, Geoffrey M; Kim, Gwang Tae; Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2009-04-01

    A membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was applied to a microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biological oxygen demand (BOD) sensor and the performance of the sensor was assessed. To establish the optimal conditions for MEA fabrication, platinum-catalysed carbon cloth cathodic electrodes were assembled with cation exchange membranes under various temperatures and pressures. By analysing coulombs from the MFCs, it could be determined that the optimal hot-pressing conditions were 120 degrees C and 150 kg cm(-2) for 30 s. When the MEA fabricated under optimal conditions and an air cathode were utilized for the construction of the MFC type BOD sensor, coulombs increased to 4.65 C from 0.52 C and power increased to 69,080 mW m(-3) from 880 mW m(-3) (at a BOD concentration of 200 mg L(-1)), respectively, compared with the conventional MFC lacking a MEA. The increased power improved the performance of the MFC type BOD sensor: sensitivity increased from 1.2 x 10(-3) to 1.8 x 10(-2) C per mg L(-1) of BOD, with good linearity (r2 = 0.97) and over 97% repeatability. We conclude that the MEA can be successfully applied to MFCs to make them highly sensitive BOD sensors.

  15. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  16. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  17. Deposition of functionalized polymer layers in surface plasmon resonance immunosensors by in-situ polymerization in the evanescent wave field.

    PubMed

    Chegel, Vladimir; Whitcombe, Michael J; Turner, Nicholas W; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, the integration of sensing gel layers in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is achieved via "bulk" methods, such as precipitation, spin-coating or in-situ polymerization onto the total surface of the sensor chip, combined with covalent attachment of the antibody or receptor to the gel surface. This is wasteful in terms of materials as the sensing only occurs at the point of resonance interrogated by the laser. By isolating the sensing materials (antibodies, enzymes, aptamers, polymers, MIPs, etc.) to this exact spot a more efficient use of these recognition elements will be achieved. Here we present a method for the in-situ formation of polymers, using the energy of the evanescent wave field on the surface of an SPR device, specifically localized at the point of interrogation. Using the photo-initiator couple of methylene blue (sensitizing dye) and sodium p-toluenesulfinate (reducing agent) we polymerized a mixture of N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide and methacrylic acid in water at the focal point of SPR. No polymerization was seen in solution or at any other sites on the sensor surface. Varying parameters such as monomer concentration and exposure time allowed precise control over the polymer thickness (from 20-200 nm). Standard coupling with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide was used for the immobilization of protein G which was used to bind IgG in a typical biosensor format. This model system demonstrated the characteristic performance for this type of immunosensor, validating our deposition method. PMID:18789676

  18. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Shively, John E.; Li, Lin

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  19. Microfiber Optical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jingyi; Wang, Yipei; Tong, Limin

    2014-01-01

    With diameter close to or below the wavelength of guided light and high index contrast between the fiber core and the surrounding, an optical microfiber shows a variety of interesting waveguiding properties, including widely tailorable optical confinement, evanescent fields and waveguide dispersion. Among various microfiber applications, optical sensing has been attracting increasing research interest due to its possibilities of realizing miniaturized fiber optic sensors with small footprint, high sensitivity, fast response, high flexibility and low optical power consumption. Here we review recent progress in microfiber optical sensors regarding their fabrication, waveguide properties and sensing applications. Typical microfiber-based sensing structures, including biconical tapers, optical gratings, circular cavities, Mach-Zehnder interferometers and functionally coated/doped microfibers, are summarized. Categorized by sensing structures, microfiber optical sensors for refractive index, concentration, temperature, humidity, strain and current measurement in gas or liquid environments are reviewed. Finally, we conclude with an outlook for challenges and opportunities of microfiber optical sensors. PMID:24670720

  20. Cancer cell aggregate hypoxia visualized in vitro via biocompatible fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ruipeng; Nelson, M Tyler; Teixeira, Silvia A; Viapiano, Mariano S; Lannutti, John J

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand biological behavior in vitro often dictates that oxygen be reported at either a local or a cellular level. Oxygen sensors based on the luminescent quenching of a specific form of electrospun fiber were developed for measurement of both gaseous and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Electrospinning was used to fabricate "core-shell" fiber configurations in which oxygen-sensitive transition-metal porphyrin complexes are embedded in an optically clear, gas permeable polycarbonate polymer 'core' while polycaprolactone provided a protective yet biocompatible 'shell'. By taking advantage of the resulting high sensitivity and fast response of electrospun core-shell fiber sensors, we were able to locate and image hypoxic regions in contact with aggregates of glioblastoma cells. Nanoscale, biomimetic sensors containing oxygen-sensitive porphyrins are particularly well suited to biological applications. These 'smart' nanofiber based sensors do not consume oxygen, their mechanical and chemical characteristics can be finely tuned allowing tailoring of biocompatibility and microstructure. Core-shell nanofiber oxygen sensing fibers could provide real-time assessments of tumor cell response to pharmacological innovations designed to target hypoxic regions driving new knowledge and technological advancement. PMID:26524540

  1. A Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cell for Powering a Single-Hop Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daxing; Zhu, Yingmin; Pedrycz, Witold; Guo, Yongxian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are envisioned as one of the most promising alternative renewable energy sources because they can generate electric current continuously while treating waste. Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cells (TMFCs) can be inoculated and work on the use of soil, which further extends the application areas of MFCs. Energy supply, as a primary influential factor determining the lifetime of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) nodes, remains an open challenge in sensor networks. In theory, sensor nodes powered by MFCs have an eternal life. However, low power density and high internal resistance of MFCs are two pronounced problems in their operation. A single-hop WSN powered by a TMFC experimental setup was designed and experimented with. Power generation performance of the proposed TMFC, the relationships between the performance of the power generation and the environment temperature, the water content of the soil by weight were measured by experiments. Results show that the TMFC can achieve good power generation performance under special environmental conditions. Furthermore, the experiments with sensor data acquisition and wireless transmission of the TMFC powering WSN were carried out. We demonstrate that the obtained experimental results validate the feasibility of TMFCs powering WSNs. PMID:27213346

  2. A Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cell for Powering a Single-Hop Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daxing; Zhu, Yingmin; Pedrycz, Witold; Guo, Yongxian

    2016-05-18

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are envisioned as one of the most promising alternative renewable energy sources because they can generate electric current continuously while treating waste. Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cells (TMFCs) can be inoculated and work on the use of soil, which further extends the application areas of MFCs. Energy supply, as a primary influential factor determining the lifetime of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) nodes, remains an open challenge in sensor networks. In theory, sensor nodes powered by MFCs have an eternal life. However, low power density and high internal resistance of MFCs are two pronounced problems in their operation. A single-hop WSN powered by a TMFC experimental setup was designed and experimented with. Power generation performance of the proposed TMFC, the relationships between the performance of the power generation and the environment temperature, the water content of the soil by weight were measured by experiments. Results show that the TMFC can achieve good power generation performance under special environmental conditions. Furthermore, the experiments with sensor data acquisition and wireless transmission of the TMFC powering WSN were carried out. We demonstrate that the obtained experimental results validate the feasibility of TMFCs powering WSNs.

  3. A Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cell for Powering a Single-Hop Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daxing; Zhu, Yingmin; Pedrycz, Witold; Guo, Yongxian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are envisioned as one of the most promising alternative renewable energy sources because they can generate electric current continuously while treating waste. Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cells (TMFCs) can be inoculated and work on the use of soil, which further extends the application areas of MFCs. Energy supply, as a primary influential factor determining the lifetime of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) nodes, remains an open challenge in sensor networks. In theory, sensor nodes powered by MFCs have an eternal life. However, low power density and high internal resistance of MFCs are two pronounced problems in their operation. A single-hop WSN powered by a TMFC experimental setup was designed and experimented with. Power generation performance of the proposed TMFC, the relationships between the performance of the power generation and the environment temperature, the water content of the soil by weight were measured by experiments. Results show that the TMFC can achieve good power generation performance under special environmental conditions. Furthermore, the experiments with sensor data acquisition and wireless transmission of the TMFC powering WSN were carried out. We demonstrate that the obtained experimental results validate the feasibility of TMFCs powering WSNs. PMID:27213346

  4. Electrochemical K-562 cells sensor based on origami paper device for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shenguang; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Haiyun; Huang, Jiadong; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2015-12-01

    A low-cost, simple, portable and sensitive paper-based electrochemical sensor was established for the detection of K-562 cell in point-of-care testing. The hybrid material of 3D Au nanoparticles/graphene (3D Au NPs/GN) with high specific surface area and ionic liquid (IL) with widened electrochemical windows improved the good biocompatibility and high conductivity was modified on paper working electrode (PWE) by the classic assembly method and then employed as the sensing surface. IL could not only enhance the electron transfer ability but also provide sensing recognition interface for the conjugation of Con A with cells, with the cell capture efficiency and the sensitivity of biosensor strengthened simultaneously. Concanavalin A (Con A) immobilization matrix was used to capture cells. As proof-of-concept, the paper-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of K-562 cells was developed. With such sandwich-type assay format, K-562 cells as model cells were captured on the surface of Con A/IL/3D AuNPs@GN/PWE. Con A-labeled dendritic PdAg NPs were captured on the surface of K-562 cells. Such dendritic PdAg NPs worked as catalysts promoting the oxidation of thionine (TH) by H2O2 which was released from K-562 cells via the stimulation of phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Therefore, the current signal response was dependent on the amount of PdAg NPs and the concentration of H2O2, the latter of which corresponded with the releasing amount from cells. So, the detection method of K-562 cell was also developed. Under optimized experimental conditions, 1.5×10(-14) mol of H2O2 releasing from each cell was calculated. The linear range and the detection limit for K-562 cells were determined to be 1.0×10(3)-5.0×10(6) cells/mL and 200 cells/mL, respectively. Such as-prepared sensor showed excellent analytical performance with good fabrication reproducibility, acceptable precision and satisfied accuracy, providing a novel protocol in point-of-care testing of cells.

  5. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jarel K; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P; Yoder, Mervin C; Brey, Eric M

    2015-09-18

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  6. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jarel K.; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating. PMID:26393602

  7. Cell culture monitoring for drug screening and cancer research: a transparent, microfluidic, multi-sensor microsystem.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Andreas; Slotwinski, Kinga; Kieninger, Jochen; Moser, Isabella; Jobst, Gerhard; Wego, Marcus; Ehret, Ralf; Urban, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel, multiparametric microphysiometry system for the dynamic online monitoring of human cancer cell metabolism. The optically transparent, modular, hybrid microsystem is based on a glass chip and combines a cell cultivation chamber, microfluidics and metabolic monitoring with fully integrated chemo- and biosensors. pH and oxygen are measured in the cell culture area, and biosensors for lactate and glucose are connected downstream by microfluidics. The wafer-level fabrication features thin-film platinum and iridium oxide microelectrodes on a glass chip, microfluidics in an epoxy resist, a hybrid assembly and an on-chip reference electrode. The reliable analytical performance of the sensors in cell culture medium was demonstrated. The pH sensors exhibit a long-term stable, linear response. The oxygen sensors show a linear behaviour, which is also observed for low oxygen concentrations. Glucose and lactate measurements show a linear, long-term stable, selective and reversible behaviour in the desired range. T98G human brain cancer cells were cultivated and cell culture metabolism was measured on-chip. Stop/flow cycles were applied and extracellular acidification, respiration, glucose consumption and lactate production were quantified. Long-term metabolic rates were determined and all parameters could be measured in the outlet channel. A placement downstream of the cell cultivation area for biosensors was realised. A highly effective medium exchange and undiluted sampling from the cell culture chamber with low flow rates (2 μl min(-1)) and low volumes (15 μl per cycle) were achieved. The drug screening application was demonstrated by detecting alteration and recovery effects of cellular metabolism induced by the addition of substances to the medium. PMID:24217869

  8. High frequency fluidic and microfluidic sensors for contactless dielectric and in vitro cell culture measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacke, T.; Barthel, A.; Cahill, B. P.; Meister, M.; Zaikou, Y.

    2013-04-01

    There is a widespread need for highly-sensitive robust sensors that operate without direct contact to the fluid for analysis of fluids in bioprocess technology. Measuring the variation of dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity) in the microwave frequency band can be used as an approach to investigate biological and chemical matter and processes such as, cell growth, cell metabolism and the concentration of large aqueous based molecules. In comparison to measurement at lower frequencies, DC conductivity (σ) effects on material properties (permittivity ε) can be neglected with increasing of the frequency. This presentation describes a high frequency sensor, which combines detection in macro- or microfluidic networks with quick and precise analysis. It is composed of a fluidic channel placed contactless between a micro-strip line waveguide combined with resonant properties.

  9. Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Components Using Electromagnetic Model-Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberstein, Vladimir; Craven, Chris; Goldfine, Neil

    2004-12-28

    In this Phase I SBIR, the contractor demonstrated a number of capabilities of model-based sensors such as MWM sensors and MWM-Arrays. The key results include (1) porosity/microstructure characterization for anodes, (2) potential for cathode material characterization, (3) stress measurements in nickel and cobalt, and (4) potential for stress measurements in non-magnetic materials with a ferromagnetic layer. In addition, potential applications for manufacturing quality control of nonconductive layers using interdigitated electrode dielectrometers have been identified. The results indicate that JENTEK's MWM technology can be used to significantly reduce solid oxide fuel cell production and operating costs in a number of ways. Preliminary investigations of solid oxide fuel cell health monitoring and scale-up issues to address industry needs have also been performed.

  10. Photocatalytically Renewable Micro-electrochemical Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Quan; Liu, Yan-Ling; Wang, Qian; Duo, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Li, Yu-Tao; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-11-23

    Electrode fouling and passivation is a substantial and inevitable limitation in electrochemical biosensing, and it is a great challenge to efficiently remove the contaminant without changing the surface structure and electrochemical performance. Herein, we propose a versatile and efficient strategy based on photocatalytic cleaning to construct renewable electrochemical sensors for cell analysis. This kind of sensor was fabricated by controllable assembly of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and TiO2 to form a sandwiching RGO@TiO2 structure, followed by deposition of Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the RGO shell. The Au NPs-RGO composite shell provides high electrochemical performance. Meanwhile, the encapsulated TiO2 ensures an excellent photocatalytic cleaning property. Application of this renewable microsensor for detection of nitric oxide (NO) release from cells demonstrates the great potential of this strategy in electrode regeneration and biosensing.

  11. Method of detecting defects in ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells by chemochromic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Brooker, Robert Paul; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2016-01-05

    A method of detecting defects in membranes such as ion exchange membranes of electrochemical cells. The electrochemical cell includes an assembly having an anode side and a cathode side with the ion exchange membrane in between. In a configuration step a chemochromic sensor is placed above the cathode and flow isolation hardware lateral to the ion exchange membrane which prevents a flow of hydrogen (H.sub.2) between the cathode and anode side. The anode side is exposed to a first reactant fluid including hydrogen. The chemochromic sensor is examined after the exposing for a color change. A color change evidences the ion exchange membrane has at least one defect that permits H.sub.2 transmission therethrough.

  12. Calculation of reflection matrix elements of a grating for growing evanescent waves.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    Reflection matrix elements of a grating play an important role in the study of Smith-Purcell (SP) free-electron lasers (FELs). Especially, the matrix element R00, which couples the incident co-propagating evanescent wave to the reflected co-propagating evanescent wave, is important for evaluation of the gain of an SP-FEL system [1]. We present a calculation of R00for rectangular grating and study its frequency dependence for a given phase velocity of incident wave. For the numerical calculation, we use the modal expansion method and extend it to include waves having slowly varying amplitude. The singularity of R00is studied in some detail and we find that it is possible to get a simple formula for the location of the singularity if we choose the eigenmodes of the groove as a basis set as done by Andrews et al. [2].

  13. Partial spatial coherence and partial polarization in random evanescent fields on lossless interfaces.

    PubMed

    Norrman, Andreas; Setälä, Tero; Friberg, Ari T

    2011-03-01

    We consider partial spatial coherence and partial polarization of purely evanescent optical fields generated in total internal reflection at an interface of two dielectric (lossless) media. Making use of the electromagnetic degree of coherence, we show that, in such fields, the coherence length can be notably shorter than the light's vacuum wavelength, especially at a high-index-contrast interface. Physical explanation for this behavior, analogous to the generation of incoherent light in a multimode laser, is provided. We also analyze the degree of polarization by using a recent three-dimensional formulation and show that the field may be partially polarized at a subwavelength distance from the surface even though it is fully polarized farther away. The degree of polarization can assume values unattainable by beamlike fields, indicating that electromagnetic evanescent waves generally are genuine three-dimensional fields. The results can find applications in near-field optics and nanophotonics.

  14. A PbS quantum dots fiber amplifier excited by evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Pang, Fufei; Sun, Xiaolan; Guo, Hairun; Yan, Jiwen; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Xianglong; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2010-06-21

    A PbS quantum dots (QDs) fiber amplifier was fabricated and characterized by using a standard single mode fiber (SMF) coupler. The fiber amplifier was fabricated by coating PbS QDs doped sol-gel films onto the tapered SMF coupler. Through the evanescent wave, the PbS quantum dots were excited. With a 980 nm wavelength laser diode (LD) as the pump, the fiber amplifier exhibited a wide band optical gain at 1310 nm with the largest gain as high as 10 dB. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise is very low resulted from the amplifier configuration of evanescent wave exciting, which is critical to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore the proposed fiber amplifier will find great potential in the fiber-optic communication systems. PMID:20588534

  15. Sensitivity enhancement for evanescent-wave sensing using cavity-ring-down ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Stamataki, Katerina; Everest, Michael A; Papadakis, Vassilis; Stehle, Jean-Louis; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2013-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to increase the sensitivity of the s-p phase shift under total internal reflection (TIR) for optical sensing. This is achieved by the introduction of two simple dielectric layers to the TIR surface of a fused silica prism. The enhanced sensitivity is demonstrated using evanescent-wave cavity-ring-down-ellipsometry by measuring the refractive index of liquid mixtures and by studying the adsorption of polymers to the TIR surface of the fused silica prism.

  16. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals. PMID:25958335

  17. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals.

  18. Simultaneous Live Cell Imaging Using Dual FRET Sensors with a Single Excitation Light

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Yusuke; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility. PMID:19551140

  19. Bioanalytical and chemical sensors using living taste, olfactory, and neural cells and tissues: a short review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Lillehoj, Peter B; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Biosensors utilizing living tissues and cells have recently gained significant attention as functional devices for chemical sensing and biochemical analysis. These devices integrate biological components (i.e. single cells, cell networks, tissues) with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensors and transducers. Various types of cells and tissues derived from natural and bioengineered sources have been used as recognition and sensing elements, which are generally characterized by high sensitivity and specificity. This review summarizes the state of the art in tissue- and cell-based biosensing platforms with an emphasis on those using taste, olfactory, and neural cells and tissues. Many of these devices employ unique integration strategies and sensing schemes based on sensitive transducers including microelectrode arrays (MEAs), field effect transistors (FETs), and light-addressable potentiometric sensors (LAPSs). Several groups have coupled these hybrid biosensors with microfluidics which offers added benefits of small sample volumes and enhanced automation. While this technology is currently limited to lab settings due to the limited stability of living biological components, further research to enhance their robustness will enable these devices to be employed in field and clinical settings.

  20. Bioanalytical and chemical sensors using living taste, olfactory, and neural cells and tissues: a short review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Lillehoj, Peter B; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Biosensors utilizing living tissues and cells have recently gained significant attention as functional devices for chemical sensing and biochemical analysis. These devices integrate biological components (i.e. single cells, cell networks, tissues) with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensors and transducers. Various types of cells and tissues derived from natural and bioengineered sources have been used as recognition and sensing elements, which are generally characterized by high sensitivity and specificity. This review summarizes the state of the art in tissue- and cell-based biosensing platforms with an emphasis on those using taste, olfactory, and neural cells and tissues. Many of these devices employ unique integration strategies and sensing schemes based on sensitive transducers including microelectrode arrays (MEAs), field effect transistors (FETs), and light-addressable potentiometric sensors (LAPSs). Several groups have coupled these hybrid biosensors with microfluidics which offers added benefits of small sample volumes and enhanced automation. While this technology is currently limited to lab settings due to the limited stability of living biological components, further research to enhance their robustness will enable these devices to be employed in field and clinical settings. PMID:26308143

  1. New light sensor molecules of single-cell ciliates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Nengbing; Song, Pill-Soon

    1994-05-01

    The unicellular ciliate, Stentor coeruleus, exhibits sensitive light-avoiding behavior. The photosensor stentorin showed a (M - H)- at 591.1304, which is in accord with the formula C34H23O10. Acetylated stentorin, when FAB-desorbed as (M + H)+, shows a series of ions indicating the presence of eight hydroxyl groups. Additional confirmation is a collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) spectrum of the (M + H)+ of the octaacetate. The NMR spectrum of stentorin shows characteristic signals of isopropyl groups. Similar studies indicate that photosensor blepharismin from Blepharisma japonicum is structurally different from stentorin. Time-resolved fluorescence decays indicated that a primary event occurs within a few picoseconds. The stimulus light signal absorbed/perceived by Stentor and possibly by Blepharisma, is apparently amplified by a transient calcium influx into the cell. Preliminary studies suggest that signal transduction in both organisms utilizes G-protein(s) as an initial transducer and a cGMP-phosphodiesterase as the effector system, analogous to the visual system of higher animals.

  2. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-04-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional “pseudo-diffusive” charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~1010 cm‑2. Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene.

  3. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional “pseudo-diffusive” charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~1010 cm−2. Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene. PMID:27080733

  4. Evanescent Effects can Alter Ultraviolet Divergences in Quantum Gravity without Physical Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Zvi; Cheung, Clifford; Chi, Huan-Hang; Davies, Scott; Dixon, Lance; Nohle, Josh

    2015-11-01

    Evanescent operators such as the Gauss-Bonnet term have vanishing perturbative matrix elements in exactly D =4 dimensions. Similarly, evanescent fields do not propagate in D =4 ; a three-form field is in this class, since it is dual to a cosmological-constant contribution. In this Letter, we show that evanescent operators and fields modify the leading ultraviolet divergence in pure gravity. To analyze the divergence, we compute the two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude and determine the coefficient of the associated (nonevanescent) R3 counterterm studied long ago by Goroff and Sagnotti. We compare two pairs of theories that are dual in D =4 : gravity coupled to nothing or to three-form matter, and gravity coupled to zero-form or to two-form matter. Duff and van Nieuwenhuizen showed that, curiously, the one-loop trace anomaly—the coefficient of the Gauss-Bonnet operator—changes under p -form duality transformations. We concur and also find that the leading R3 divergence changes under duality transformations. Nevertheless, in both cases, the physical renormalized two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude can be chosen to respect duality. In particular, its renormalization-scale dependence is unaltered.

  5. Evanescent Effects can Alter Ultraviolet Divergences in Quantum Gravity without Physical Consequences.

    PubMed

    Bern, Zvi; Cheung, Clifford; Chi, Huan-Hang; Davies, Scott; Dixon, Lance; Nohle, Josh

    2015-11-20

    Evanescent operators such as the Gauss-Bonnet term have vanishing perturbative matrix elements in exactly D=4 dimensions. Similarly, evanescent fields do not propagate in D=4; a three-form field is in this class, since it is dual to a cosmological-constant contribution. In this Letter, we show that evanescent operators and fields modify the leading ultraviolet divergence in pure gravity. To analyze the divergence, we compute the two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude and determine the coefficient of the associated (nonevanescent) R^{3} counterterm studied long ago by Goroff and Sagnotti. We compare two pairs of theories that are dual in D=4: gravity coupled to nothing or to three-form matter, and gravity coupled to zero-form or to two-form matter. Duff and van Nieuwenhuizen showed that, curiously, the one-loop trace anomaly-the coefficient of the Gauss-Bonnet operator-changes under p-form duality transformations. We concur and also find that the leading R^{3} divergence changes under duality transformations. Nevertheless, in both cases, the physical renormalized two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude can be chosen to respect duality. In particular, its renormalization-scale dependence is unaltered. PMID:26636841

  6. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional "pseudo-diffusive" charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~10(10) cm(-2). Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene. PMID:27080733

  7. Evanescent Effects can Alter Ultraviolet Divergences in Quantum Gravity without Physical Consequences.

    PubMed

    Bern, Zvi; Cheung, Clifford; Chi, Huan-Hang; Davies, Scott; Dixon, Lance; Nohle, Josh

    2015-11-20

    Evanescent operators such as the Gauss-Bonnet term have vanishing perturbative matrix elements in exactly D=4 dimensions. Similarly, evanescent fields do not propagate in D=4; a three-form field is in this class, since it is dual to a cosmological-constant contribution. In this Letter, we show that evanescent operators and fields modify the leading ultraviolet divergence in pure gravity. To analyze the divergence, we compute the two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude and determine the coefficient of the associated (nonevanescent) R^{3} counterterm studied long ago by Goroff and Sagnotti. We compare two pairs of theories that are dual in D=4: gravity coupled to nothing or to three-form matter, and gravity coupled to zero-form or to two-form matter. Duff and van Nieuwenhuizen showed that, curiously, the one-loop trace anomaly-the coefficient of the Gauss-Bonnet operator-changes under p-form duality transformations. We concur and also find that the leading R^{3} divergence changes under duality transformations. Nevertheless, in both cases, the physical renormalized two-loop identical-helicity four-graviton amplitude can be chosen to respect duality. In particular, its renormalization-scale dependence is unaltered.

  8. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional "pseudo-diffusive" charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~10(10) cm(-2). Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene.

  9. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Yuri Karp, Jason Knobloch, Aaron Kapusta, Chris Lin, David

    2015-03-31

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  10. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri; Karp, Jason; Knobloch, Aaron; Kapusta, Chris; Lin, David

    2015-03-01

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  11. Microplates with integrated oxygen sensors for kinetic cell respiration measurement and cytotoxicity testing in primary and secondary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Rahul Ravi; Koch-Kirsch, Yvonne; Maas, Ruth; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a cytotoxicity and cell respiration assay that is nondestructive and kinetic. It makes use of 96-well microplates integrated with oxygen sensors. The oxygen signal monitored on-line gives an indication of the cell viability. We show its application for suspension cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary and HL60 cells) as well as adherent (Caco2 cells) and primary (rat hepatocytes) cells using well-known cytotoxic compounds (sodium azide, diclofenac, clozapine, sodium dodecyl sulfate, 2-thiouracil, tamoxifen, and tranylcypromine). The 50% lethality concentration (LC50) obtained from the assay is compared with the standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide end-point assay. The cells can be grown directly in the plates, and the assay requires no further reagents or processing. The cells can be harvested for further analysis, if required. The on-line dynamic measurement allows the calculation of LC50 as a function of exposure time. LC50 was shown to decrease with time in HL60 cells. The dynamics of this process was considerably different for the three compounds sodium dodecyl sulfate, tamoxifen, and diclofenac, indicating a large potential of application of this method for cell death studies. The assay system can be applied to almost any cell-based systems with little adaptation. The assay is robust, flexible, and applicable for medium- to high-throughput systems requiring only minimal handling and no additional agent.

  12. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  13. Thin-film spectroscopic sensor

    DOEpatents

    Burgess, Jr., Lloyd W.; Goldman, Don S.

    1992-01-01

    There is disclosed an integrated spectrometer for chemical analysis by evanescent electromagnetic radiation absorption in a reaction volume. The spectrometer comprises a noninteractive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device. There is further disclosed a chemical sensor to determine the pressure and concentration of a chemical species in a mixture comprising an interactive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device.

  14. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts.

  15. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts.

  16. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts. PMID:26201745

  17. Gas-cell measurements for evaluating longwave-infrared passive-sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Alan S.; Combs, Roger J.; Thomas, Mark J.; Curry, Timothy; Kroutil, Robert T.

    2006-10-01

    A longwave-infrared (LWIR) passive-spectrometer performance was evaluated with a short-pathlength gas cell. This cell was accurately positioned between the sensor and a NIST-traceable blackbody radiance source. Cell contents were varied over the Beer's Law absorbance range from the limit of detection to saturation for the gas analytes of sulfur hexafluoride and hexafluoroethane. The spectral impact of saturation on infrared absorbance was demonstrated for the passive sensor configuration. The gas-cell contents for all concentration-pathlength products was monitored with an active traditional-laboratory Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and was verified by comparison with the established PNNL/DOE vapor-phase infrared (IR) spectral database. For the passive FTIR measurements, the blackbody source employed a range of background temperatures from 5 °C to 50 °C. The passive measurements without the presence of a gas cell permitted a determination of the noise equivalent spectral noise (NESR) for each set of passive gas-cell measurements. In addition, the no-cell condition allowed the evaluation of the effect of gas cell window materials of low density poly(ethylene), potassium chloride, potassium bromide, and zinc selenide. The components of gas cell, different window materials, temperature differentials, and absorbances of target-analyte gases supplied the means of evaluating the LWIR performance of a passive FTIR spectrometer. The various LWIR-passive measurements were found to simulate those often encountered in open-air scenarios important to both industrial and environmental monitoring applications.

  18. p53 Requires the Stress Sensor USF1 to Direct Appropriate Cell Fate Decision

    PubMed Central

    Bouafia, Amine; Corre, Sébastien; Gilot, David; Mouchet, Nicolas; Prince, Sharon; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a major hallmark of cancer. To maintain genomic integrity, cells are equipped with dedicated sensors to monitor DNA repair or to force damaged cells into death programs. The tumor suppressor p53 is central in this process. Here, we report that the ubiquitous transcription factor Upstream Stimulatory factor 1 (USF1) coordinates p53 function in making proper cell fate decisions. USF1 stabilizes the p53 protein and promotes a transient cell cycle arrest, in the presence of DNA damage. Thus, cell proliferation is maintained inappropriately in Usf1 KO mice and in USF1-deficient melanoma cells challenged by genotoxic stress. We further demonstrate that the loss of USF1 compromises p53 stability by enhancing p53-MDM2 complex formation and MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. In USF1-deficient cells, the level of p53 can be restored by the re-expression of full-length USF1 protein similarly to what is observed using Nutlin-3, a specific inhibitor that prevents p53-MDM2 interaction. Consistent with a new function for USF1, a USF1 truncated protein lacking its DNA-binding and transactivation domains can also restore the induction and activity of p53. These findings establish that p53 function requires the ubiquitous stress sensor USF1 for appropriate cell fate decisions in response to DNA-damage. They underscore the new role of USF1 and give new clues of how p53 loss of function can occur in any cell type. Finally, these findings are of clinical relevance because they provide new therapeutic prospects in stabilizing and reactivating the p53 pathway. PMID:24831529

  19. Fabricated nano-fiber diameter as liquid concentration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyad, Radhi M.; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    Nanofiber is characterized by thin, long, and very soft silica. Taper fibers are made using an easy and low cost chemical method. Etching is conducted with a HF solution to remove cladding and then a low molarity HF solution to reduce the fiber core diameter. One approach to on-line monitoring of the etching process uses spectrophotometer with a white light source. In the aforementioned technique, this method aims to determine the diameter of the reduced core and show the evolution of the two different processes from the nanofiber regime to the fixed regime in which the mode was remote from the surrounding evanescent field, intensity can propagate outside the segment fiber when the core diameter is less than 500 nm. Manufacturing technologies of nano-fiber sensors offer a number of approved properties of optical fiber sensors utilized in various sensory applications. The nano-fiber sensor is utilized to sense the difference in the concentration of D-glucose in double-distilled deionized water and to measure the refractive index (RI) of a sugar solution. Our proposed method exhibited satisfactory capability based on bimolecular interactions in the biological system. The response of the nano-fiber sensors indicates a different kind of interaction among various groups of AAs. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and the structure making or breaking ability of solutes in the given solution. This study utilized spectra photonics to measure the transmission of light through different concentrations of sugar solution, employing cell cumber and nano-optical fibers as sensors.

  20. Differential microfluidic sensor on printed circuit board for biological cells analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongyuan; Guo, Jinhong; Chen, Liang; Xia, Chuncheng; Yu, Zhefeng; Ai, Ye; Li, Chang Ming; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    Coulter principal based resistive pulse sensor has been demonstrated as an important platform in biological cell detection and enumeration since several decades ago. Recently, the miniaturized micro-Coulter counter has attracted much attention due to its advantages in point of care diagnostics for on chip detection and enumeration of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells. In this paper, we present a microfluidic cytometer with differential amplifier based on Coulter principle on a SU-8 coated printed circuit board substrate. The electrical current changes induced by the blockage of the microparticles in the sensing aperture are calibrated by polystyrene particles of standard size. Finally, HeLa cells are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed device for enumeration of biological samples. The proposed cytometer is built upon the cheap and widely available printed circuit board substrate and shows its great potential as personalized healthcare monitor. PMID:25735615

  1. Use of genetically encoded sensors to monitor cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Andrei I; Rutter, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    ATP is not only recognized as the universal energy "currency" in most cells but also plays a less well-known role as an intracellular and extracellular messenger. Here, we review novel approaches for measuring free ATP (or ATP/ADP ratios) in living mammalian cells by using genetically encoded sensors. We also discuss the key technical aspects of routine real-time ATP/ADP monitoring using as a model one of the last-generation fluorescent probes, a fusion protein commonly known as "Perceval." Finally, we present detailed guidelines for the simultaneous measurement of cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios and Ca(2+) concentrations alongside electrical parameters in individual pancreatic β cells, in which energy metabolism is tightly linked to plasma membrane excitability to control the secretion of insulin. With appropriate variations, this approach can be adapted to the study of cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios and Ca(2+) concentrations in malignant cells, two important aspects of oncometabolism.

  2. Differential microfluidic sensor on printed circuit board for biological cells analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongyuan; Guo, Jinhong; Chen, Liang; Xia, Chuncheng; Yu, Zhefeng; Ai, Ye; Li, Chang Ming; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    Coulter principal based resistive pulse sensor has been demonstrated as an important platform in biological cell detection and enumeration since several decades ago. Recently, the miniaturized micro-Coulter counter has attracted much attention due to its advantages in point of care diagnostics for on chip detection and enumeration of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells. In this paper, we present a microfluidic cytometer with differential amplifier based on Coulter principle on a SU-8 coated printed circuit board substrate. The electrical current changes induced by the blockage of the microparticles in the sensing aperture are calibrated by polystyrene particles of standard size. Finally, HeLa cells are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed device for enumeration of biological samples. The proposed cytometer is built upon the cheap and widely available printed circuit board substrate and shows its great potential as personalized healthcare monitor.

  3. Improvement of a microbial fuel cell performance as a BOD sensor using respiratory inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chang, In Seop; Moon, Hyunsoo; Jang, Jae Kyung; Kim, Byung Hong

    2005-03-15

    Studies were made to improve the performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor. The signal from MFCs decreased in the presence of electron acceptors of higher redox potential such as nitrate and oxygen. The addition of azide and cyanide did not change the signal in the absence of the electron acceptors. The respiratory inhibitors eliminated the inhibitory effects of the electron acceptors on the current generation from MFCs. Similar results were obtained using oligotrophic MFCs fed with an environmental sample that contained nitrate. The use of the respiratory inhibitors is therefore recommended for the accurate BOD measurement of environmental samples containing nitrate and/or oxygen with an MFC-type BOD sensor.

  4. Studies of Hematopoietic Cell Differentiation with a Ratiometric and Reversible Sensor of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jankowska, Karolina; Pilgrim, Chelsea; Fraser, Stuart T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Chronic elevations in cellular redox state are known to result in the onset of various pathological conditions, but transient increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are necessary for signal transduction and various physiological functions. There is a distinct lack of reversible fluorescent tools that can aid in studying and unraveling the roles of ROS/RNS in physiology and pathology by monitoring the variations in cellular ROS levels over time. In this work, we report the development of ratiometric fluorescent sensors that reversibly respond to changes in mitochondrial redox state. Results: Photophysical studies of the developed flavin–rhodamine redox sensors, flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 1 (FRR1) and flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 2 (FRR2), confirmed the reversible response of the probes upon reduction and re-oxidation over more than five cycles. The ratiometric output of FRR1 and FRR2 remained unaltered in the presence of other possible cellular interferants (metals and pH). Microscopy studies indicated clear mitochondrial localization of both probes, and FRR2 was shown to report the time-dependent increase of mitochondrial ROS levels after lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages. Moreover, it was used to study the variations in mitochondrial redox state in mouse hematopoietic cells at different stages of embryonic development and maturation. Innovation: This study provides the first ratiometric and reversible probes for ROS, targeted to the mitochondria, which reveal variations in mitochondrial ROS levels at different stages of embryonic and adult blood cell production. Conclusions: Our results suggest that with their ratiometric and reversible outputs, FRR1 and FRR2 are valuable tools for the future study of oxidative stress and its implications in physiology and pathology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 667–679. PMID:26865422

  5. Spearhead Nanometric Field-Effect Transistor Sensors for Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Ainara López; Ali, Tayyibah; Shevchuk, Andrew; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Novak, Pavel; Edwards, Christopher; Lab, Max; Gopal, Sahana; Chiappini, Ciro; Anand, Uma; Magnani, Luca; Coombes, R. Charles; Gorelik, Julia; Matsue, Tomokazu; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Klenerman, David; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Korchev, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Nanometric field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors are made on the tip of spear-shaped dual carbon nanoelectrodes derived from carbon deposition inside double-barrel nanopipettes. The easy fabrication route allows deposition of semiconductors or conducting polymers to comprise the transistor channel. A channel from electrodeposited poly pyrrole (PPy) exhibits high sensitivity toward pH changes. This property is exploited by immobilizing hexokinase on PPy nano-FETs to give rise to a selective ATP biosensor. Extracellular pH and ATP gradients are key biochemical constituents in the microenvironment of living cells; we monitor their real-time changes in relation to cancer cells and cardiomyocytes. The highly localized detection is possible because of the high aspect ratio and the spear-like design of the nano-FET probes. The accurately positioned nano-FET sensors can detect concentration gradients in three-dimensional space, identify biochemical properties of a single living cell, and after cell membrane penetration perform intracellular measurements. PMID:26816294

  6. Spearhead Nanometric Field-Effect Transistor Sensors for Single-Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Clausmeyer, Jan; Babakinejad, Babak; López Córdoba, Ainara; Ali, Tayyibah; Shevchuk, Andrew; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Novak, Pavel; Edwards, Christopher; Lab, Max; Gopal, Sahana; Chiappini, Ciro; Anand, Uma; Magnani, Luca; Coombes, R Charles; Gorelik, Julia; Matsue, Tomokazu; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Klenerman, David; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Korchev, Yuri

    2016-03-22

    Nanometric field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors are made on the tip of spear-shaped dual carbon nanoelectrodes derived from carbon deposition inside double-barrel nanopipettes. The easy fabrication route allows deposition of semiconductors or conducting polymers to comprise the transistor channel. A channel from electrodeposited poly pyrrole (PPy) exhibits high sensitivity toward pH changes. This property is exploited by immobilizing hexokinase on PPy nano-FETs to give rise to a selective ATP biosensor. Extracellular pH and ATP gradients are key biochemical constituents in the microenvironment of living cells; we monitor their real-time changes in relation to cancer cells and cardiomyocytes. The highly localized detection is possible because of the high aspect ratio and the spear-like design of the nano-FET probes. The accurately positioned nano-FET sensors can detect concentration gradients in three-dimensional space, identify biochemical properties of a single living cell, and after cell membrane penetration perform intracellular measurements.

  7. On-chip integrated lensless fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy module for cell-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Knoll, Thorsten; Sossalla, Adam; Bueth, Heiko; Thielecke, Hagen

    2011-03-01

    The integration of a fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy module in cell-based lab-on-a-chip systems is of high interest for applications in cell-based diagnostics and substance evaluation in situ. We present an on-chip integrated lensless fluorescence imaging module applying the principle of contact/proximate optical lithography. The pixel resolution is comparable with a 4 x objective microscope. The module can be used for morphology and fluorescence imaging of mammalian cells (15 - 20 μm) as well as for testing the concentration of a fluorescent substance. The biological samples or solutions are sustained in disposable sterilized microfluidic chips with 1 μm thick silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes. These chips are assembled on the surface of a 5 megapixel colored CMOS image sensor array with 1.75 μm pixel size, which is coated with an additional interference filter. Each culturing chip consists of a MEMS cavity chip and a PDMS microfluidic interface. The surface of the CMOS image sensor is smoothened using SU-8 photoresist spin-coating for a commercial grade interference filter (optical density >= 5) coating by Plasma-Ion Assisted Deposition thereafter. The function is demonstrated by primary imaging results of the non-/fluorescent mammalian cells/microspheres as well as by differentiating different concentrations of FITC solutions.

  8. Contributions of mitochondria to animal physiology: from homeostatic sensor to calcium signalling and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    Over recent years, it has become clear that mitochondria play a central role in many key aspects of animal physiology and pathophysiology. Their central and ubiquitous task is clearly the production of ATP. Nevertheless, they also play subtle roles in glucose homeostasis, acting as the sensor for substrate supply in the transduction pathway that promotes insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cell and that modulates the excitability of the hypothalamic glucose-sensitive neurons involved in appetite control. Mitochondria may also act as sensors of availability of oxygen, the other major mitochondrial substrate, in the regulation of respiration. Mitochondria take up calcium, and the high capacity mitochondrial calcium uptake pathway provides a mechanism that couples energy demand to increased ATP production through the calcium-dependent upregulation of mitochondrial enzyme activity. Mitochondrial calcium accumulation may also have a substantial impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of cellular calcium signals, with subtle differences of detail in different cell types. Recent work has also revealed the centrality of mitochondrial dysfunction as an irreversible step in the pathway to both necrotic and apoptotic cell death. This review looks at recent developments in these rapidly evolving areas of cell physiology in an attempt to draw together disparate areas of research into a common theme. PMID:10066918

  9. Spearhead Nanometric Field-Effect Transistor Sensors for Single-Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Clausmeyer, Jan; Babakinejad, Babak; López Córdoba, Ainara; Ali, Tayyibah; Shevchuk, Andrew; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Novak, Pavel; Edwards, Christopher; Lab, Max; Gopal, Sahana; Chiappini, Ciro; Anand, Uma; Magnani, Luca; Coombes, R Charles; Gorelik, Julia; Matsue, Tomokazu; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Klenerman, David; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Korchev, Yuri

    2016-03-22

    Nanometric field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors are made on the tip of spear-shaped dual carbon nanoelectrodes derived from carbon deposition inside double-barrel nanopipettes. The easy fabrication route allows deposition of semiconductors or conducting polymers to comprise the transistor channel. A channel from electrodeposited poly pyrrole (PPy) exhibits high sensitivity toward pH changes. This property is exploited by immobilizing hexokinase on PPy nano-FETs to give rise to a selective ATP biosensor. Extracellular pH and ATP gradients are key biochemical constituents in the microenvironment of living cells; we monitor their real-time changes in relation to cancer cells and cardiomyocytes. The highly localized detection is possible because of the high aspect ratio and the spear-like design of the nano-FET probes. The accurately positioned nano-FET sensors can detect concentration gradients in three-dimensional space, identify biochemical properties of a single living cell, and after cell membrane penetration perform intracellular measurements. PMID:26816294

  10. Optical fiber tip-based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Ren, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We reported the development of an evanescent-wave quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor (EW-QEPAS) using a single-mode optical fiber tip for sensitive gas detection in the extended near-infrared region. It is a spectroscopic technique based on the combination of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy with fiber-optic evanescent-wave absorption to achieve low optical noise, easy optical alignment, and high compactness. Carbon monoxide (CO) detection at 2.3 μm using a fiber-coupled, continuous-wave, distributed-feedback laser was selected for the sensor demonstration. By tapering the optical fiber down to 2.5 μm diameter using the flame-brushing technique, an evanescent field of ~0.6 mW around the fiber tip was absorbed by CO molecules. Besides an excellent linear response ( R 2 = 0.9996) to CO concentrations, the EW-QEPAS sensor achieved a normalized noise-equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficient of 8.6 × 10-8 cm-1W/√Hz for an incident optical power of 1.8 mW and integration time of 1 s. The sensor detection sensitivity can be further improved by enhancing the evanescent-wave power on the fiber tip.

  11. Evaluation of the Paratrend Multi-Analyte Sensor for Potential Utilization in Long-Duration Automated Cell Culture Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Emma Y.; Pappas, Dimitri; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compact and automated sensors are desired for assessing the health of cell cultures in biotechnology experiments. While several single-analyte sensors exist to measure culture health, a multi-analyte sensor would simplify the cell culture system. One such multi-analyte sensor, the Paratrend 7 manufactured by Diametrics Medical, consists of three optical fibers for measuring pH, dissolved carbon dioxide (pCO(2)), dissolved oxygen (pO(2)), and a thermocouple to measure temperature. The sensor bundle was designed for intra-vascular measurements in clinical settings, and can be used in bioreactors operated both on the ground and in NASA's Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) experiments. METHODS: A Paratrend 7 sensor was placed at the outlet of a bioreactor inoculated with BHK-21 (baby hamster kidney) cells. The pH, pCO(2), pO(2), and temperature data were transferred continuously to an external computer. Cell culture medium, manually extracted from the bioreactor through a sampling port, was also assayed using a bench top blood gas analyzer (BGA). RESULTS: Two Paratrend 7 sensors were used over a single cell culture experiment (64 days). When compared to the manually obtained BGA samples, the sensor had good agreement for pH, pCO(2), and pO(2) with bias (and precision) 0.005(0.024), 8.0 mmHg (4.4 mmHg), and 11 mmHg (17 mmHg), respectively for the first two sensors. A third Paratrend sensor (operated for 141 days) had similar agreement (0.02+/-0.15 for pH, -4+/-8 mm Hg for pCO(2), and 24+/-18 mmHg for pO(2)). CONCLUSION: The resulting biases and precisions are com- parable to Paratrend sensor clinical results. Although the pO(2) differences may be acceptable for clinically relevant measurement ranges, the O(2) sensor in this bundle may not be reliable enough for the ranges of pO(2) in these cell culture studies without periodic calibration.

  12. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Grace, Karen M.; Grace, Wynne K.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  13. Ion channels and transporters involved in cell volume regulation and sensor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasunobu

    2004-01-01

    All animal cell types have an appropriate volume. Even under physiological conditions of constant extracellular osmolarity, cells must regulate their volume. Cell volume is subjected to alterations because of persistent physicochemical osmotic load resulting from Donnan-type colloid osmotic pressure and of cell activity-associated changes in intracellular osmolarity resulting from osmolyte transport and metabolism. The strategy adopted by animal cells for coping with volume regulation on osmotic perturbation is to activate transport pathways, including channels and transporters, mainly for inorganic osmolytes to drive water flow. Under normotonic conditions, cells undergo volume regulation by pump-mediated mechanisms. Under anisotonic conditions, volume regulation occurs by additional channel/transporter-mediated mechanisms. Cell volume regulation is also attained through adjustment of intracellular levels not only of inorganic but also of organic osmolytes with changing the expression of their transporters or regulation of metabolism. In cell volume regulation mechanism, several "volume sensors" are thought to be involved. A volume-sensitive Cl- channel has lately attracted considerable attention in this regard. PMID:15475611

  14. Thin gas cell with GRIN fiber lens for intra-cavity fiber laser gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Dai, Jing-min; Peng, Gang-ding

    2009-07-01

    Fiber laser gas sensors based on the intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy require the use of gas cells. We propose a simple and reliable gas cell using graded-index fiber lens (GFL) based all-fiber collimator. Conventional gas cells usually utilize direct fiber-to-fiber coupling without collimators or graded-index (GRIN) lens as collimators. Direct fiberto- fiber gas cell has simple configuration, but it suffers from high coupling loss and stray light interference. Gas cells applying fiber pigtailed GRIN lens are advantageous to achieve low coupling loss. However, fiber pigtailed GRIN lens requires accurate and complicated alignment and glue packaging which could compromise long term reliability and thermal stability. The proposed technique fabricates all-fiber collimators by simply splicing a short section of gradedindex fiber to single mode fiber which is both compact and durable. With that collimator, the gas cell can be fabricated very thin and are suitable for extreme environments with high temperature and vibration. In this paper, we have carried out experiment and analysis to evaluate the proposed technique. The coupling efficiency is studied versus different GFL gradient parameter profiles using ray matrix transformation of the complex beam parameter. Experiments are also done to prove the practical feasibility of the collimator. The analysis indicates that gas cell using GFLs can overcome the disadvantages of traditional design; it may replace the conventional gas cells in practical applications.

  15. Impact of Substrate Bias on Fixed-Pattern-Noise in Active Pixel Sensor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terauchi, Mamoru

    2007-11-01

    The effect of substrate (body) bias on fixed-pattern-noise (FPN) in active pixel sensor (APS) cells is studied. Through measuring test devices consisting of two metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) connected in series with each of the transistors located in the same well region, it has been revealed that substrate bias, which is inevitably applied in a normal circuit configuration in conventional APS cells, worsens the characteristics fluctuation in source-follower amplifiers in APS cells, leading to FPN that cannot be mitigated by conventional correction methods such as correlated double sampling. In addition it has been confirmed that the current-voltage characteristics of logarithmic converters, each of which is realized using a MOSFET with gate and drain terminals connected together, are also affected by substrate bias, resulting in increased characteristics fluctuation as compared with the case with no substrate bias.

  16. Naphthalene diimides as red fluorescent pH sensors for functional cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Doria, Filippo; Folini, Marco; Grande, Vincenzo; Cimino-Reale, Graziella; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Freccero, Mauro

    2015-01-14

    A small library of hydrosoluble naphthalene diimides (NDIs) was designed and synthesized, as cell permeable pH "turned-on" fluorescent sensors, for cellular applications. The NDIs exhibit a non-emitting twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state, which has been described by a DFT computational investigation. These NDIs do not emit as a free base, but they become strong emitters when protonated. Switching of the red emission was achieved in the pH window 2.5-6, tuning steric and electronic features of the amine moiety. The least acidic protonated NDI (pKa 5.1), was investigated in normal and cancer cells. Its selective redistribution in cancer cells from acidic vesicular organelles to the cytoplasm and the nucleus describes an effective application of these NDIs as a valuable functional tool. PMID:25380512

  17. Semi-Automated, Occupationally Safe Immunofluorescence Microtip Sensor for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium Cells in Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Soelberg, Scott D.; Weigel, Kris M.; Hiraiwa, Morgan; Cairns, Andrew; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Furlong, Clement E.; Oh, Kieseok; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Gao, Dayong; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    An occupationally safe (biosafe) sputum liquefaction protocol was developed for use with a semi-automated antibody-based microtip immunofluorescence sensor. The protocol effectively liquefied sputum and inactivated microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while preserving the antibody-binding activity of Mycobacterium cell surface antigens. Sputum was treated with a synergistic chemical-thermal protocol that included moderate concentrations of NaOH and detergent at 60°C for 5 to 10 min. Samples spiked with M. tuberculosis complex cells showed approximately 106-fold inactivation of the pathogen after treatment. Antibody binding was retained post-treatment, as determined by analysis with a microtip immunosensor. The sensor correctly distinguished between Mycobacterium species and other cell types naturally present in biosafe-treated sputum, with a detection limit of 100 CFU/mL for M. tuberculosis, in a 30-minute sample-to-result process. The microtip device was also semi-automated and shown to be compatible with low-cost, LED-powered fluorescence microscopy. The device and biosafe sputum liquefaction method opens the door to rapid detection of tuberculosis in settings with limited laboratory infrastructure. PMID:24465845

  18. Physiological Signal Monitoring Bed for Infants Based on Load-Cell Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kyu; Yoon, Heenam; Han, Chungmin; Joo, Kwang Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Ballistocardiographs (BCGs), which record the mechanical activity of the heart, have been a subject of interest for several years because of their advantages in providing unobtrusive physiological measurements. BCGs could also be useful for monitoring the biological signals of infants without the need for physical confinement. In this study, we describe a physiological signal monitoring bed based on load cells and assess an algorithm to extract the heart rate and breathing rate from the measured load-cell signals. Four infants participated in a total of 13 experiments. As a reference signal, electrocardiogram and respiration signals were simultaneously measured using a commercial device. The proposed automatic algorithm then selected the optimal sensor from which to estimate the heartbeat and respiration information. The results from the load-cell sensor signals were compared with those of the reference signals, and the heartbeat and respiration information were found to have average performance errors of 2.55% and 2.66%, respectively. The experimental results verify the positive feasibility of BCG-based measurements in infants. PMID:27007378

  19. Physiological Signal Monitoring Bed for Infants Based on Load-Cell Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyu; Yoon, Heenam; Han, Chungmin; Joo, Kwang Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Ballistocardiographs (BCGs), which record the mechanical activity of the heart, have been a subject of interest for several years because of their advantages in providing unobtrusive physiological measurements. BCGs could also be useful for monitoring the biological signals of infants without the need for physical confinement. In this study, we describe a physiological signal monitoring bed based on load cells and assess an algorithm to extract the heart rate and breathing rate from the measured load-cell signals. Four infants participated in a total of 13 experiments. As a reference signal, electrocardiogram and respiration signals were simultaneously measured using a commercial device. The proposed automatic algorithm then selected the optimal sensor from which to estimate the heartbeat and respiration information. The results from the load-cell sensor signals were compared with those of the reference signals, and the heartbeat and respiration information were found to have average performance errors of 2.55% and 2.66%, respectively. The experimental results verify the positive feasibility of BCG-based measurements in infants. PMID:27007378

  20. Semi-automated, occupationally safe immunofluorescence microtip sensor for rapid detection of Mycobacterium cells in sputum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Becker, Annie L; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Shu, Zhiquan; Soelberg, Scott D; Weigel, Kris M; Hiraiwa, Morgan; Cairns, Andrew; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Furlong, Clement E; Oh, Kieseok; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Gao, Dayong; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Cangelosi, Gerard A

    2014-01-01

    An occupationally safe (biosafe) sputum liquefaction protocol was developed for use with a semi-automated antibody-based microtip immunofluorescence sensor. The protocol effectively liquefied sputum and inactivated microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while preserving the antibody-binding activity of Mycobacterium cell surface antigens. Sputum was treated with a synergistic chemical-thermal protocol that included moderate concentrations of NaOH and detergent at 60°C for 5 to 10 min. Samples spiked with M. tuberculosis complex cells showed approximately 10(6)-fold inactivation of the pathogen after treatment. Antibody binding was retained post-treatment, as determined by analysis with a microtip immunosensor. The sensor correctly distinguished between Mycobacterium species and other cell types naturally present in biosafe-treated sputum, with a detection limit of 100 CFU/mL for M. tuberculosis, in a 30-minute sample-to-result process. The microtip device was also semi-automated and shown to be compatible with low-cost, LED-powered fluorescence microscopy. The device and biosafe sputum liquefaction method opens the door to rapid detection of tuberculosis in settings with limited laboratory infrastructure.

  1. Temperature and Humidity Sensor Powered by an Individual Microbial Fuel Cell in a Power Management System

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qi; Xiong, Lei; Mo, Bing; Lu, Weihong; Kim, Suki; Wang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are of increasing interest as bioelectrochemical systems for decomposing organic materials and converting chemical energy into electricity. The main challenge for this technology is that the low power and voltage of the devices restricts the use of MFCs in practical applications. In this paper, a power management system (PMS) is developed to store the energy and export an increased voltage. The designed PMS successfully increases the low voltage generated by an individual MFC to a high potential of 5 V, capable of driving a wireless temperature and humidity sensor based on nRF24L01 data transmission modules. With the PMS, MFCs can intermittently power the sensor for data transmission to a remote receiver. It is concluded that even an individual MFC can supply the energy required to power the sensor and telemetry system with the designed PMS. The presented PMS can be widely used for unmanned environmental monitoring such as wild rivers, lakes, and adjacent water areas, and offers promise for further advances in MFC technology. PMID:26378546

  2. Temperature and Humidity Sensor Powered by an Individual Microbial Fuel Cell in a Power Management System.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xiong, Lei; Mo, Bing; Lu, Weihong; Kim, Suki; Wang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are of increasing interest as bioelectrochemical systems for decomposing organic materials and converting chemical energy into electricity. The main challenge for this technology is that the low power and voltage of the devices restricts the use of MFCs in practical applications. In this paper, a power management system (PMS) is developed to store the energy and export an increased voltage. The designed PMS successfully increases the low voltage generated by an individual MFC to a high potential of 5 V, capable of driving a wireless temperature and humidity sensor based on nRF24L01 data transmission modules. With the PMS, MFCs can intermittently power the sensor for data transmission to a remote receiver. It is concluded that even an individual MFC can supply the energy required to power the sensor and telemetry system with the designed PMS. The presented PMS can be widely used for unmanned environmental monitoring such as wild rivers, lakes, and adjacent water areas, and offers promise for further advances in MFC technology. PMID:26378546

  3. Temperature and Humidity Sensor Powered by an Individual Microbial Fuel Cell in a Power Management System.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xiong, Lei; Mo, Bing; Lu, Weihong; Kim, Suki; Wang, Zhenyu

    2015-09-11

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are of increasing interest as bioelectrochemical systems for decomposing organic materials and converting chemical energy into electricity. The main challenge for this technology is that the low power and voltage of the devices restricts the use of MFCs in practical applications. In this paper, a power management system (PMS) is developed to store the energy and export an increased voltage. The designed PMS successfully increases the low voltage generated by an individual MFC to a high potential of 5 V, capable of driving a wireless temperature and humidity sensor based on nRF24L01 data transmission modules. With the PMS, MFCs can intermittently power the sensor for data transmission to a remote receiver. It is concluded that even an individual MFC can supply the energy required to power the sensor and telemetry system with the designed PMS. The presented PMS can be widely used for unmanned environmental monitoring such as wild rivers, lakes, and adjacent water areas, and offers promise for further advances in MFC technology.

  4. Construction of a cell-based sensor for the detection of autoinducer-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servinsky, Matthew D.; Allen, Patrick C.; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Byrd, Christopher M.; Sund, Christian J.; Bentley, William E.

    2012-05-01

    Microbially Induced Corrosion (MIC) occurs at metal surfaces and is associated with microorganisms and their metabolic activities. These microbes can coexist as biofilms, growing as synergistic communities (consortia) that are able to affect electrochemical processes, both cathodic and anodic, often through co-operative metabolism. Recent research has revealed the role of "quorum sensing" molecules in control of microbial activities such as biofilm formation. In this paper, we propose the detection of quorum sensing molecules as a means of detecting bacterial contamination prior to the onset on biofilm formation. Further we outline the development of an E. coli cell based sensor for detection of the quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2).

  5. Developing a cell-based sensor for the detection of Autoinducer-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servinsky, Matthew D.; Germane, Katherine; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Byrd, Christopher M.; Sund, Christian J.; Bentley, William E.

    2013-05-01

    Bacteria use an intricate set of communication systems for sensing and interpreting environmental cues that coordinate population-based behavior. Quorum sensing is one of these systems, and it involves the production, release, and detection of small chemical signaling molecules. Recent research has revealed the role of quorum sensing molecules in the control of microbial activities such as biofilm formation. In this presentation we outline the development of a recombinant E. coli cell-based sensor for detection of the quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), as well as engineering strategies to remove sugar and anoxic inhibition of the strain.

  6. YAP and TAZ in epithelial stem cells: A sensor for cell polarity, mechanical forces and tissue damage

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent‐Mistiaen, Zoé I.

    2016-01-01

    The YAP/TAZ family of transcriptional co‐activators drives cell proliferation in epithelial tissues and cancers. Yet, how YAP and TAZ are physiologically regulated remains unclear. Here we review recent reports that YAP and TAZ act primarily as sensors of epithelial cell polarity, being inhibited when cells differentiate an apical membrane domain, and being activated when cells contact the extracellular matrix via their basal membrane domain. Apical signalling occurs via the canonical Crumbs/CRB‐Hippo/MST‐Warts/LATS kinase cascade to phosphorylate and inhibit YAP/TAZ. Basal signalling occurs via Integrins and Src family kinases to phosphorylate and activate YAP/TAZ. Thus, YAP/TAZ is localised to the nucleus in basal stem/progenitor cells and cytoplasm in differentiated squamous cells or columnar cells. In addition, other signals such as mechanical forces, tissue damage and possibly receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can influence MST‐LATS or Src family kinase activity to modulate YAP/TAZ activity. PMID:27173018

  7. [Development of a low-cost single chamber microbial fuel cell type BOD sensor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Liu, Zhi; Zhou, Shun-gui; Wang, Yue-qiang; Huang, Sai-hua

    2009-10-15

    The 5-d biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) test is the most conventional method to determine the concentration of biodegradable organics in wastewater. However, this method is time-consuming and usually requires experience and skill to produce creditable results, which is also not suitable for on-line measurements. This study described a single-chamber mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC)-type BOD sensor as an alternative method to BOD5. In such MFC, MnO2 was used as the cathode catalyst instead of Pt and the expensive proton exchange membrane was replaced with the cation exchange membrane. The factors including the external resistance, pH of anolyte, the reaction time and rinse time on BOD sensor were explored, and the results were compared with the values determined by BOD5. The experimental results showed that the optimal conditions are: the external resistance of 12 k omega, pH of 7.0, and the reaction period of 2 h and the rinse time of 2-10 min. The low detection limit is 0.2 mg/L and the precision is 0.33%. This study indicates that MFC-type sensor can be used as a reliable method to determine BOD in wastewater, supported by the good linear correlation between BOD concentration and coulombs generation (regression coefficient, R2 = 0.9992) and the small relative error of 4% between MFC-type sensor and BOD5. Such device provides a low-cost, easy-operated, fast-response, sensitive and reliable method to measure BOD in wastewater, and also is suitable for on-line measurements.

  8. Generation of nearly 3D-unpolarized evanescent optical near fields using total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Timo; Popov, Sergei; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-domain partial polarization of optical fields composed of two evanescent waves created in total internal reflection by random electromagnetic beams with orthogonal planes of incidence. We show that such a two-beam configuration enables to generate nearly unpolarized, genuine three-component (3D) near fields. This result complements earlier studies on spectral polarization, which state that at least three symmetrically propagating beams are required to produce a 3D-unpolarized near field. The degree of polarization of the near field can be controlled by adjusting the polarization states and mutual correlation of the incident beams.

  9. Generation of nearly 3D-unpolarized evanescent optical near fields using total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Timo; Popov, Sergei; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-domain partial polarization of optical fields composed of two evanescent waves created in total internal reflection by random electromagnetic beams with orthogonal planes of incidence. We show that such a two-beam configuration enables to generate nearly unpolarized, genuine three-component (3D) near fields. This result complements earlier studies on spectral polarization, which state that at least three symmetrically propagating beams are required to produce a 3D-unpolarized near field. The degree of polarization of the near field can be controlled by adjusting the polarization states and mutual correlation of the incident beams. PMID:27367071

  10. Equivalent material modelling of sandwich beams, evanescent solutions and damping investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rijk, Sophie; Nijman, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for representing the transverse vibrations of sandwich beams as equivalent Timoshenko beams is developed. Special attention is given to damping modelling together with the evanescent parts of the solutions to assert applicability of the approach to any boundary conditions. Shear stiffness is evaluated based on current knowledge. The latter is then used to update the reference theory for vibrations in sandwich beams. Analytical case studies are presented to show the performance and limitations of the method and compared with experimental data.

  11. Evanescent wave amplification and subwavelength imaging by ultrathin uniaxial μ-near-zero material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan

    2014-02-15

    We demonstrate strong evanescent wave amplification by a thin slab of uniaxial μ-near-zero (UMNZ) material. It is found that while retaining the same amplification effect, the slab can be made arbitrarily thin when the negative permeability along the axis of anisotropy approaches zero. Numerical results show that using a single layer of split-ring resonators (SRRs) with its thickness equal three thousandth of the incident wavelength (λ/3000), a subwavelength source distribution with λ/4 resolution can be transferred to a distance of λ/3.

  12. Evanescent-wave coupled right angled buried waveguide: Applications in carbon nanotube mode-locking

    SciTech Connect

    Mary, R.; Thomson, R. R.; Kar, A. K.; Brown, G.; Popa, D.; Sun, Z.; Torrisi, F.; Hasan, T.; Milana, S.; Bonaccorso, F.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2013-11-25

    We present an evanescent-field device based on a right-angled waveguide. This consists of orthogonal waveguides, with their points of intersection lying along an angled facet of the chip. Light guided along one waveguide is incident at the angled dielectric-air facet at an angle exceeding the critical angle, so that the totally internally reflected light is coupled into the second waveguide. By depositing a nanotube film on the angled surface, the chip is then used to mode-lock an Erbium doped fiber ring laser with a repetition rate of 26 MHz, and pulse duration of 800 fs.

  13. Quantitative measurement of piezoelectric coefficient of thin film using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenli; Luo, Zhenlin; Liu, Chihui; Wu, Wenbin; Gao, Chen; Lu, Yalin

    2008-06-01

    This article describes a new approach to quantitatively measure the piezoelectric coefficients of thin films at the microscopic level using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope. This technique can resolve 10pm deformation caused by the piezoelectric effect and has the advantages of high scanning speed, large scanning area, submicron spatial resolution, and a simultaneous accessibility to many other related properties. Results from the test measurements on the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of PZT thin film agree well with those from other techniques listed in literatures.

  14. CD40 Stimulation Obviates Innate Sensors and Drives T Cell Immunity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Katelyn T; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2016-06-21

    Cancer immunotherapies are more effective in tumors with robust T cell infiltrates, but mechanisms to convert T cell-devoid tumors with active immunosuppression to those capable of recruiting T cells remain incompletely understood. Here, using genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), we demonstrate that a single dose of agonistic CD40 antibody with chemotherapy rendered PDA susceptible to T cell-dependent destruction and potentiated durable remissions. CD40 stimulation caused a clonal expansion of T cells in the tumor, but the addition of chemotherapy optimized myeloid activation and T cell function. Although recent data highlight the requirement for innate sensors in cancer immunity, these canonical pathways-including TLRs, inflammasome, and type I interferon/STING-played no role in mediating the efficacy of CD40 and chemotherapy. Thus, CD40 functions as a non-redundant mechanism to convert the tumor microenvironment immunologically. Our data provide a rationale for a newly initiated clinical trial of CD40 and chemotherapy in PDA. PMID:27292635

  15. Time-resolved evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of heme protein adsorption to glass.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi-Mei; Xia, Shanhong; Matsuda, Naoki

    2008-03-01

    Evanescent wave has been recognized as a highly sensitive optical probe for surface monitoring. By use of slab optical waveguides, time-resolved evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy was developed for the investigation of the interfacial behavior of biomolecules with a chromophore. In this study, 30-microm thick glass sheets served as freestanding multimode waveguides that were combined with a simple fiber-coupling method to lead to a broadband evanescent wave absorption spectrometer. With such a homemade instrument, adsorption of heme proteins onto glass slides from static aqueous solution was monitored in situ. The experimental results reveal that the interfacial behavior of myoglobin (Mb) is different from that of hemoglobin (Hb) and cytochrome c (Cc). Formation of dynamic equilibrium for Mb adsorption at both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces always is behind the occurrence of the maximum coverage. However, simultaneous formation of the dynamic equilibrium and the maximum coverage was observed for Hb and Cc adsorptions.

  16. Nano-scale three dimensional surface relief features using single exposure counterpropagating multiple evanescent waves interference phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Chua, Jeun Kee; Tan, Sia Kim; Lin, Qun Yin

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, fabrication of nano-scale 3-D features by total internal reflection generated single exposure counter propagating multiple evanescent waves interference lithography (TIR-MEWIL) in a positive tone resist is investigated numerically. Using a four incident plane waves configuration from an 364nm wavelength illumination source, the simulated results indicate that the proposed technique shows potential in realizing periodic surface relief features with diameter as small as 0.08lambda and height-to-diameter aspect ratio as high as 10. It is also demonstrated that the sensitivity of multiple evanescent waves' interference depends on the polarization and phase of the incident plane waves, and can be tailored to obtain different geometry features. A modified cellular automata algorithm has been employed to simulate three-dimensional photoresist profiles that would result from exposure to the studied evanescent waves interference configurations.

  17. Zinspy Sensors with Enhanced Dynamic Range for Imaging Neuronal Cell Zinc Uptake and Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Ryu, Jubin W.; Jaworski, Jacek; Feazell, Rodney P.; Sheng, Morgan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Thiophene moieties were incorporated into previously described Zinspy (ZS) fluorescent Zn(II) sensor motifs (Nolan, E. M.; Lippard, S. J. Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 8310–8317) to provide enhanced fluorescence properties, low-micromolar dissociation constants for Zn(II), and improved Zn(II) selectivity. Halogenation of the xanthenone and benzoate moieties of the fluorescein platform systematically modulates the excitation and emission profiles, pH-dependent fluorescence, Zn(II) affinity, and Zn(II) complexation rates, offering a general strategy for tuning multiple properties of xanthenone-based metal ion sensors. Extensive biological studies in cultured cells and primary neuronal cultures demonstrate 2-{6-hydroxy-3-oxo-4,5-bis[(pyridin-2-ylmethylthiophen-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid (ZS5) to be a versatile imaging tool for detecting Zn(II) in vivo. ZS5 localizes to the mitochondria of HeLa cells and allows visualization of glutamate-mediated Zn(II) uptake in dendrites and Zn(II) release resulting from nitrosative stress in neurons. PMID:17132019

  18. Optical Characterization of Commercial Lithiated Graphite Battery Electrodes and in Situ Fiber Optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Norris, Ryan C; Iyer, Krishna; Zdravkova, Liliana; Yu, Aiping; Nieva, Patricia

    2016-07-27

    Optical characterization of graphite anodes in lithium ion batteries (LIB) is presented here for potential use in estimating their state of charge (SOC). The characterization is based on reflectance spectroscopy of the anode of commercial LIB cells and in situ optical measurements using an embedded optical fiber sensor. The optical characterization of the anode using wavelengths ranging from 500 to 900 nm supports the dominance of graphite over the solid electrolyte interface in governing the anode's reflectance properties. It is demonstrated that lithiated graphite's reflectance has a significant change in the near-infrared band, 750-900 nm, compared with the visible spectrum as a function of SOC. An embedded optical sensor is used to measure the transmittance of graphite anode in the near-infrared band, and the results suggest that a unique inexpensive method may be developed to estimate the SOC of a LIB. PMID:27379859

  19. Optical Characterization of Commercial Lithiated Graphite Battery Electrodes and in Situ Fiber Optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Norris, Ryan C; Iyer, Krishna; Zdravkova, Liliana; Yu, Aiping; Nieva, Patricia

    2016-07-27

    Optical characterization of graphite anodes in lithium ion batteries (LIB) is presented here for potential use in estimating their state of charge (SOC). The characterization is based on reflectance spectroscopy of the anode of commercial LIB cells and in situ optical measurements using an embedded optical fiber sensor. The optical characterization of the anode using wavelengths ranging from 500 to 900 nm supports the dominance of graphite over the solid electrolyte interface in governing the anode's reflectance properties. It is demonstrated that lithiated graphite's reflectance has a significant change in the near-infrared band, 750-900 nm, compared with the visible spectrum as a function of SOC. An embedded optical sensor is used to measure the transmittance of graphite anode in the near-infrared band, and the results suggest that a unique inexpensive method may be developed to estimate the SOC of a LIB.

  20. Using graphene nano-particle embedded in photonic crystal fiber for evanescent wave mode-locking of fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Yang, Chun-Yu; Liou, Jia-Hong; Yu, Chin-Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-07-15

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with high-quality graphene nano-particles uniformly dispersed in the hole cladding are demonstrated to passively mode-lock the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by evanescent-wave interaction. The few-layer graphene nano-particles are obtained by a stabilized electrochemical exfoliation at a threshold bias. These slowly and softly exfoliated graphene nano-particle exhibits an intense 2D band and an almost disappeared D band in the Raman scattering spectrum. The saturable phenomena of the extinction coefficient β in the cladding provides a loss modulation for the intracavity photon intensity by the evanescent-wave interaction. The evanescent-wave mode-locking scheme effectively enlarges the interaction length of saturable absorption with graphene nano-particle to provide an increasing transmittance ΔT of 5% and modulation depth of 13%. By comparing the core-wave and evanescent-wave mode-locking under the same linear transmittance, the transmittance of the graphene nano-particles on the end-face of SMF only enlarges from 0.54 to 0.578 with ΔT = 3.8% and the modulation depth of 10.8%. The evanescent wave interaction is found to be better than the traditional approach which confines the graphene nano-particles at the interface of two SMF patchcords. When enlarging the intra-cavity gain by simultaneously increasing the pumping current of 980-nm and 1480-nm pumping laser diodes (LDs) to 900 mA, the passively mode-locked EDFL shortens its pulsewidth to 650 fs and broadens its spectral linewidth to 3.92 nm. An extremely low carrier amplitude jitter (CAJ) of 1.2-1.6% is observed to confirm the stable EDFL pulse-train with the cladding graphene nano-particle based evanescent-wave mode-locking.

  1. Novel S-MSPQC cell sensor for real time monitoring the injury of endothelial cell by LPS and assessing the drug effect on this injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Feifei; Lian, Yan; He, Fengjiao

    2015-09-15

    A novel square Au microelectrode multi-channel series piezoelectric quartz crystal (S-MSPQC) cell sensor was constructed by square Au microelectrode in series connected with quartz crystal sensor in MSPQC. The experimental results showed square shape Au microelectrode was more sensitive than normally used interdigital microelectrode. New constructed S-MSPQC was successfully used for real time monitoring the injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells which induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and assessing the drug effects of two anti-oxidative vitamins, VC and VE and their combination against this injury. The detection results showed that the low concentration of LPS may promote the proliferation of the HUVEC cells at first 12h, then it caused the cell apoptosis. The pretreatment of VC or VE on the cells for 12h before adding the LPS could partially reduced the injury of LPS on HUVEC cells. The sensor detection results were all consisted with the results detected by MTT assay and microscopy observation. The synergistic effect of the combination of VC-VE on LPS-induced cell injury was also observed by sensor. Compared with the traditional biological methods, the proposed method is sensitive, label-free, non-invasive, cheap, simple, and automatic. It provides a new automatic tool for cell monitor in the field of cell biology, cytobiology, and drug effects research. PMID:25889345

  2. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells

    PubMed Central

    Pech, Ulrike; Dipt, Shubham; Barth, Jonas; Singh, Priyanka; Jauch, Mandy; Thum, Andreas S.; Fiala, André; Riemensperger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity, and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells). A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function. PMID:24065891

  3. Monitoring cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) in stimulated breast cancer cells using genetically encoded FRET sensors.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Anne M; Taylor, Kathryn M; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    The Zn(2+)-specific ion channel ZIP7 has been implicated to play an important role in releasing Zn(2+) from the ER. External stimulation of breast cancer cells has been proposed to induce phosphorylation of ZIP7 by CK2α, resulting in ZIP7-mediated Zn(2+) release from the ER into the cytosol. Here, we examined whether changes in cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) concentrations can be detected upon such external stimuli. Two previously developed FRET sensors for Zn(2+), eZinCh-2 (Kd = 1 nM at pH 7.1) and eCALWY-4 (Kd = 0.63 nM at pH 7.1), were expressed in both the cytosol and the ER of wild-type MCF-7 and TamR cells. Treatment of MCF-7 and TamR cells with external Zn(2+) and pyrithione, one of the previously used triggers, resulted in an immediate increase in free Zn(2+) in both cytosol and ER, suggesting that Zn(2+) was directly transferred across the cellular membranes by pyrithione. Cells treated with a second trigger, EGF/ionomycin, showed no changes in intracellular Zn(2+) levels, neither in multicolor imaging experiments that allowed simultaneous imaging of cytosolic and ER Zn(2+), nor in experiments in which cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) were monitored separately. In contrast to previous work using small-molecule fluorescent dyes, these results indicate that EGF-ionomycin treatment does not result in significant changes in cytosolic Zn(2+) levels as a result from Zn(2+) release from the ER. These results underline the importance of using genetically encoded fluorescent sensors to complement and verify intracellular imaging experiments with synthetic fluorescent Zn(2+) dyes. PMID:26739447

  4. A miniature porous aluminum oxide-based flow-cell for online water quality monitoring using bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Schreuder, Erik; Ingham, Colin J; Heideman, René; Rosen, Rachel; Belkin, Shimshon

    2015-02-15

    The use of live bacterial reporters as sensing entities in whole-cell biosensors allows the investigation of the biological effects of a tested sample, as well as the bioavailability of its components. Here we present a proof of concept for a new design for online continuous water monitoring flow-cell biosensor, incorporating recombinant reporter bacteria, engineered to generate an optical signal (fluorescent or bioluminescent) in the presence of the target compound(s). At the heart of the flow-cell is a disposable chip made of porous aluminum oxide (PAO), which retains the sensor microorganisms on its rigid planar surface, while its high porosity allows an undisturbed access both to the sample and to essential nutrients. The ability of the bacterial reporters to detect model toxic chemicals was first demonstrated using a "naked" PAO chip placed on solid agar, and later in a chip encased in a specially designed flow-through configuration which enables continuous on-line monitoring. The applicability of the PAO chip to simultaneous online detection of diverse groups of chemicals was demonstrated by the incorporation of a 6-member sensor array into the flow-through chip. The selective response of the array was also confirmed in spiked municipal wastewater effluents. Sensing activity was retained by the bacteria after 12-weeks storage of freeze-dried biochips, demonstrating the biochip potential as a simple minimal maintenance "plug-in" cartridge. This low-cost and easy to handle PAO-based flow-cell biosensor may serve as a basis for a future platform for water quality monitoring.

  5. Evanescent waves in high numerical aperture aplanatic solid immersion microscopy: effects of forbidden light on subsurface imaging.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Abdulkadir; Uyar, Aydan; Cilingiroglu, T Berkin; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ünlü, M Selim

    2014-04-01

    The collection of light at very high numerical aperture allows detection of evanescent waves above the critical angle of total internal reflection in solid immersion lens microscopy. We investigate the effect of such evanescent modes, so-called forbidden light, on the far-field imaging properties of an aplanatic solid immersion microscope by developing a dyadic Green's function formalism in the context of subsurface semiconductor integrated circuit imaging. We demonstrate that the collection of forbidden light allows for sub-diffraction spatial resolution and substantial enhancement of photon collection efficiency albeit inducing wave-front discontinuities and aberrations.

  6. Cell-based sensor system using L6 cells for broad band continuous pollutant monitoring in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Kubisch, Rebekka; Bohrn, Ulrich; Fleischer, Maximilian; Stütz, Evamaria

    2012-01-01

    Pollution of drinking water sources represents a continuously emerging problem in global environmental protection. Novel techniques for real-time monitoring of water quality, capable of the detection of unanticipated toxic and bioactive substances, are urgently needed. In this study, the applicability of a cell-based sensor system using selected eukaryotic cell lines for the detection of aquatic pollutants is shown. Readout parameters of the cells were the acidification (metabolism), oxygen consumption (respiration) and impedance (morphology) of the cells. A variety of potential cytotoxic classes of substances (heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, neurotoxins, waste water) was tested with monolayers of L6 cells (rat myoblasts). The cytotoxicity or cellular effects induced by inorganic ions (Ni(2+) and Cu(2+)) can be detected with the metabolic parameters acidification and respiration down to 0.5 mg/L, whereas the detection limit for other substances like nicotine and acetaminophen are rather high, in the range of 0.1 mg/L and 100 mg/L. In a close to application model a real waste water sample shows detectable signals, indicating the existence of cytotoxic substances. The results support the paradigm change from single substance detection to the monitoring of overall toxicity.

  7. Cell-based sensor system using L6 cells for broad band continuous pollutant monitoring in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Kubisch, Rebekka; Bohrn, Ulrich; Fleischer, Maximilian; Stütz, Evamaria

    2012-01-01

    Pollution of drinking water sources represents a continuously emerging problem in global environmental protection. Novel techniques for real-time monitoring of water quality, capable of the detection of unanticipated toxic and bioactive substances, are urgently needed. In this study, the applicability of a cell-based sensor system using selected eukaryotic cell lines for the detection of aquatic pollutants is shown. Readout parameters of the cells were the acidification (metabolism), oxygen consumption (respiration) and impedance (morphology) of the cells. A variety of potential cytotoxic classes of substances (heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, neurotoxins, waste water) was tested with monolayers of L6 cells (rat myoblasts). The cytotoxicity or cellular effects induced by inorganic ions (Ni(2+) and Cu(2+)) can be detected with the metabolic parameters acidification and respiration down to 0.5 mg/L, whereas the detection limit for other substances like nicotine and acetaminophen are rather high, in the range of 0.1 mg/L and 100 mg/L. In a close to application model a real waste water sample shows detectable signals, indicating the existence of cytotoxic substances. The results support the paradigm change from single substance detection to the monitoring of overall toxicity. PMID:22737014

  8. On the use of evanescent plane waves for low-frequency energy transmission across material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2015-10-01

    The transmission of airborne sound into high-impedance media is of interest in several applications. For example, sonic booms in the atmosphere may impact marine life when incident on the ocean surface, or affect the integrity of existing structures when incident on the ground. Transmission across high impedance-difference interfaces is generally limited by reflection and refraction at the surface, and by the critical angle criterion. However, spatially decaying incident waves, i.e., inhomogeneous or evanescent plane waves, may transmit energy above the critical angle, unlike homogeneous plane waves. The introduction of a decaying component to the incident trace wavenumber creates a nonzero propagating component of the transmitted normal wavenumber, so energy can be transmitted across the interface. A model of evanescent plane waves and their transmission across fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces is developed here. Results are presented for both air-water and air-solid interfaces. The effects of the incident wave parameters (including the frequency, decay rate, and incidence angle) and the interfacial properties are investigated. Conditions for which there is no reflection at the air-solid interface, due to impedance matching between the incident and transmitted waves, are also considered and are found to yield substantial transmission increases over homogeneous incident waves. PMID:26520290

  9. A reusable evanescent wave immunosensor for highly sensitive detection of bisphenol A in water samples

    PubMed Central

    Xiao-hong, Zhou; Lan-hua, Liu; Wei-qi, Xu; Bao-dong, Song; Jian-wu, Sheng; Miao, He; Han-chang, Shi

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a compact and portable planar waveguide evanescent wave immunosensor (EWI) for highly sensitive detection of BPA. The incident light is coupled into the planar waveguide chip via a beveled angle through undergoing total internal reflection, where the evanescent wave field forms and excites the binding fluorophore-tagged antibodies on the chip surface. Typical calibration curves obtained for BPA has detection limits of 0.03 μg/L. Linear response for BPA ranged from 0.124 μg/L–9.60 μg/L with 50% inhibition concentration for BPA of 1.09 ± 0.25 μg/L. The regeneration of the planar optical waveguide chip allows the performance of more than 300 assay cycles within an analysis time of about 20 min for each assay cycle. By application of effective pretreatment procedure, the recoveries of BPA in real water samples gave values from 88.3% ± 8.5% to 103.7% ± 3.5%, confirming its application potential in the measurement of BPA in reality. PMID:24699239

  10. On the use of evanescent plane waves for low-frequency energy transmission across material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2015-10-01

    The transmission of airborne sound into high-impedance media is of interest in several applications. For example, sonic booms in the atmosphere may impact marine life when incident on the ocean surface, or affect the integrity of existing structures when incident on the ground. Transmission across high impedance-difference interfaces is generally limited by reflection and refraction at the surface, and by the critical angle criterion. However, spatially decaying incident waves, i.e., inhomogeneous or evanescent plane waves, may transmit energy above the critical angle, unlike homogeneous plane waves. The introduction of a decaying component to the incident trace wavenumber creates a nonzero propagating component of the transmitted normal wavenumber, so energy can be transmitted across the interface. A model of evanescent plane waves and their transmission across fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces is developed here. Results are presented for both air-water and air-solid interfaces. The effects of the incident wave parameters (including the frequency, decay rate, and incidence angle) and the interfacial properties are investigated. Conditions for which there is no reflection at the air-solid interface, due to impedance matching between the incident and transmitted waves, are also considered and are found to yield substantial transmission increases over homogeneous incident waves.

  11. The significance of the evanescent spectrum in structure-waveguide interaction problems.

    PubMed

    Tsouvalas, Apostolos; van Dalen, Karel N; Metrikine, Andrei V

    2015-10-01

    Modal decomposition is often applied in elastodynamics and acoustics for the solution of problems related to propagation of mechanical disturbances in waveguides. One of the key elements of this method is the solution of an eigenvalue problem for obtaining the roots of the dispersion equation, which signify the wavenumbers of the waves that may exist in the system. For non-dissipative media, the wavenumber spectrum consists of a finite number of real roots supplemented by infinitely many imaginary and complex ones. The former refer to the propagating modes in the medium, whereas the latter constitute the so-called evanescent spectrum. This study investigates the significance of the evanescent spectrum in structure-waveguide interaction problems. Two cases are analysed, namely, a beam in contact with a fluid layer and a cylindrical shell interacting with an acousto-elastic waveguide. The first case allows the introduction of a modal decomposition method and the establishment of appropriate criteria for the truncation of the modal expansions in a simple mathematical framework. The second case describes structure-borne wave radiation in an offshore environment during the installation of a pile with an impact hammer-a problem that has raised serious concerns in recent years due to the associated underwater noise pollution. PMID:26520340

  12. Experimental investigation of evanescence-based infrared biodetection technique for micro-total-analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arvind; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2009-09-01

    The advent of microoptoelectromechanical systems (MOEMS) and its integration with other technologies such as microfluidics, microthermal, immunoproteomics, etc. has led to the concept of an integrated micro-total-analysis systems (μTAS) or Lab-on-a-Chip for chemical and biological applications. Recently, research and development of μTAS have attained a significant growth rate over several biodetection sciences, in situ medical diagnoses, and point-of-care testing applications. However, it is essential to develop suitable biophysical label-free detection methods for the success, reliability, and ease of use of the μTAS. We proposed an infrared (IR)-based evanescence wave detection system on the silicon-on-insulator platform for biodetection with μTAS. The system operates on the principle of bio-optical interaction that occurs due to the evanescence of light from the waveguide device. The feasibility of biodetection has been experimentally investigated by the detection of horse radish peroxidase upon its reaction with hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and subwavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gawhary, Omar; Schilder, Nick J.; da Costa Assafrao, Alberto; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul

    2012-05-01

    It was predicted a few years ago that a medium with negative index of refraction would allow for perfect imaging. Although no material has been found so far that behaves as a perfect lens, some experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions in the near-field, or quasi-static, regime where the behaviour of a negative index medium can be mimicked by a thin layer of noble metal, such as silver. These results are normally attributed to the excitation of surface plasmons in the metal, which only leads to the restoration of p-polarized evanescent waves. In this work, we show that the restoration of s-polarized evanescent waves and, correspondingly, sub-wavelength imaging by a single dielectric slab are possible. Specifically, we show that at λ = 632 nm a thin layer of GaAs behaves as a superlens for s-polarized waves. Replacing the single-metal slab by a dielectric is not only convenient from a technical point of view, it being much easier to deposit and control the thickness and flatness of dielectric films than metal ones, but also invites us to re-think the connection between surface plasmon excitation and the theory of negative refraction.

  14. A reusable evanescent wave immunosensor for highly sensitive detection of bisphenol A in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Hong, Zhou; Lan-Hua, Liu; Wei-Qi, Xu; Bao-Dong, Song; Jian-Wu, Sheng; Miao, He; Han-Chang, Shi

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposed a compact and portable planar waveguide evanescent wave immunosensor (EWI) for highly sensitive detection of BPA. The incident light is coupled into the planar waveguide chip via a beveled angle through undergoing total internal reflection, where the evanescent wave field forms and excites the binding fluorophore-tagged antibodies on the chip surface. Typical calibration curves obtained for BPA has detection limits of 0.03 μg/L. Linear response for BPA ranged from 0.124 μg/L-9.60 μg/L with 50% inhibition concentration for BPA of 1.09 +/- 0.25 μg/L. The regeneration of the planar optical waveguide chip allows the performance of more than 300 assay cycles within an analysis time of about 20 min for each assay cycle. By application of effective pretreatment procedure, the recoveries of BPA in real water samples gave values from 88.3% +/- 8.5% to 103.7% +/- 3.5%, confirming its application potential in the measurement of BPA in reality.

  15. A faster aggregation for 3D fast evanescent wave solvers using rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, Ignace Pissoort, Davy; Olyslager, Femke

    2007-11-10

    A novel technique to accelerate the aggregation and disaggregation stages in evanescent plane wave methods is presented. The new method calculates the six plane wave radiation patterns from a multipole expansion (aggregation) and calculates the multipole expansion of an incoming field from the six plane wave incoming field patterns. It is faster than the direct approach for multipole orders larger than one, and becomes six times faster for large multipole orders. The method relies on a connection between the discretizations of the six integral representations, and on the fact that the Wigner D-matrices become diagonal for rotations around the z-axis. The proposed technique can also be extended to the vectorial case in two different ways, one of which is very similar to the scalar case. The other method relies on a Beltrami decomposition of the fields and is faster than the direct approach for any multipole order. This decomposition is also not limited to evanescent wave solvers, but can be used in any vectorial multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

  16. Infrared evanescent field sensing with quantum cascade lasers and planar silver halide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Christy; Katzir, Abraham; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-07-15

    We demonstrate the first midinfrared evanescent field absorption measurements with an InGaAs/AlInAs/InP distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) light source operated at room temperature coupled to a free-standing, thin-film, planar, silver halide waveguide. Two different analytes, each matched to the emission frequency of a QCL, were investigated to verify the potential of this technique. The emission of a 1650 cm(-1) QCL overlaps with the amide absorption band of urea, which was deposited from methanol solution, forming urea crystals at the waveguide surface after solvent evaporation. Solid urea was detected down to 80.7 microg of precipitate at the waveguide surface. The emission frequency of a 974 cm(-1) QCL overlaps with the CH3-C absorption feature of acetic anhydride. Solutions of acetic anhydride in acetonitrile have been detected down to a volume of 0.01 microL (10.8 microg) of acetic anhydride solution after deposition at the planar waveguide (PWG) surface. Free-standing, thin-film, planar, silver halide waveguides were produced by press-tapering heated, cylindrical, silver halide fiber segments to create waveguides with a thickness of 300-190 microm, a width of 3 mm, and a length of 35 mm. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) evanescent field absorption measurements with planar silver halide waveguides and transmission absorption QCL measurements verify the obtained results.

  17. Spatially resolved electrical characterisation of graphene layers by an evanescent field microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Andrew; Hao, Ling; Klein, Norbert; Gallop, John; Mattevi, Cecilia; Shaforost, Olena; Lees, Kevin; Clarke, Bob

    2014-02-01

    An evanescent field microwave microscope has been developed at the National Physical Laboratory. This instrument has multiple applications and has been developed to allow traceable measurements of local complex permittivity, unlike most other microwave scanning microscopes. In this paper we describe basic operation of the microscope and show measurements on graphene samples produced at Imperial College. The microscope obtains images by raster scanning of a wire probe in ‘contact mode’. Of particular interest to the graphene community is the possibility of being able to scan over large areas (up to 4×4 mm2), and to be able to measure actual values of surface resistance without a requirement for metal contacts. As an ultrathin semimetal, a graphene layer being placed in the evanescent field of the probe is expected to behave like a lossy dielectric material, its microwave loss tangent is proportional to its conductivity. Employing a high Q dual mode re-entrant cavity as host resonator and a spherical metal probe of 180 μm diameter, we found that spatial variations of the conductivity of graphene can be clearly resolved.

  18. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, Michael J.; Watts, Michael R.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2010-10-26

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  19. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Yadav, S.; Cicek, D.; Schneider, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm‑1) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30–50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  20. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Yadav, S.; Cicek, D.; Schneider, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm-1) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ˜11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  1. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Yilmazoglu, O; Yadav, S; Cicek, D; Schneider, J J

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm(-1)) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  2. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  3. 2D ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor for tracking of cells proliferation and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Ding, Changqin; Zhou, Jie; Tian, Yang

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular pH plays a vital role no matter in physiological or pathological studies. In this work, a hydrogel, CD@Nile-FITC@Gel (Gel sensor), entrapping the ratiometric fluorescent probe CD@Nile-FITC was developed. The Gel sensor was successfully used for real-time extracellular pH monitoring. In the case of CD@Nile-FITC, pH-sensitive fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was chosen as the response signal for H(+) and Nile blue chloride (Nile) as the reference signal. The developed fluorescent probe exhibited high selectivity for pH over other metal ions and amino acids. Meanwhile, the carbon-dots-based inorganic-organic probe demonstrated excellent photostability against long-term light illumination. In order to study the extracellular pH change in processes of cell proliferation and metabolism, CD@Nile-FITC probe was entrapped in sodium alginate gel and consequently formed CD@Nile-FITC@Gel. The MTT assay showed low cytotoxicity of the Gel and the pH titration indicated that it could monitor the pH fluctuations linearly and rapidly within the pH range of 6.0-9.0, which is valuable for physiological pH determination. As expected, the real-time bioimaging of the probe was successfully achieved.

  4. Degron protease blockade sensor to image epigenetic histone protein methylation in cells and living animals.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-16

    Lysine methylation of histone H3 and H4 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in treating various cellular diseases. The availability of an in vivo assay that enables rapid screening and preclinical evaluation of drugs that potentially target this cellular process will significantly expedite the pace of drug development. This study is the first to report the development of a real-time molecular imaging biosensor (a fusion protein, [FLuc2]-[Suv39h1]-[(G4S)3]-[H3-K9]-[cODC]) that can detect and monitor the methylation status of a specific histone lysine methylation mark (H3-K9) in live animals. The sensitivity of this sensor was assessed in various cell lines, in response to down-regulation of methyltransferase EHMT2 by specific siRNA, and in nude mice with lysine replacement mutants. In vivo imaging in response to a combination of methyltransferase inhibitors BIX01294 and Chaetocin in mice reveals the potential of this sensor for preclinical drug evaluation. This biosensor thus has demonstrated its utility in the detection of H3-K9 methylations in vivo and potential value in preclinical drug development. PMID:25489787

  5. Design and Characterization of a Sensorized Microfluidic Cell-Culture System with Electro-Thermal Micro-Pumps and Sensors for Cell Adhesion, Oxygen, and pH on a Glass Chip

    PubMed Central

    Bonk, Sebastian M.; Stubbe, Marco; Buehler, Sebastian M.; Tautorat, Carsten; Baumann, Werner; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We combined a multi-sensor glass-chip with a microfluidic channel grid for the characterization of cellular behavior. The grid was imprinted in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Mouse-embryonal/fetal calvaria fibroblasts (MC3T3-E1) were used as a model system. Thin-film platinum (Pt) sensors for respiration (amperometric oxygen electrode), acidification (potentiometric pH electrodes) and cell adhesion (interdigitated-electrodes structures, IDES) allowed us to monitor cell-physiological parameters as well as the cell-spreading behavior. Two on-chip electro-thermal micro-pumps (ETμPs) permitted the induction of medium flow in the system, e.g., for medium mixing and drug delivery. The glass-wafer technology ensured the microscopic observability of the on-chip cell culture. Connecting Pt structures were passivated by a 1.2 μm layer of silicon nitride (Si3N4). Thin Si3N4 layers (20 nm or 60 nm) were used as the sensitive material of the pH electrodes. These electrodes showed a linear behavior in the pH range from 4 to 9, with a sensitivity of up to 39 mV per pH step. The oxygen sensors were circular Pt electrodes with a sensor area of 78.5 μm2. Their sensitivity was 100 pA per 1% oxygen increase in the range from 0% to 21% oxygen (air saturated). Two different IDES geometries with 30- and 50-μm finger spacings showed comparable sensitivities in detecting the proliferation rate of MC3T3 cells. These cells were cultured for 11 days in vitro to test the biocompatibility, microfluidics and electric sensors of our system under standard laboratory conditions. PMID:26263849

  6. Design and Characterization of a Sensorized Microfluidic Cell-Culture System with Electro-Thermal Micro-Pumps and Sensors for Cell Adhesion, Oxygen, and pH on a Glass Chip.

    PubMed

    Bonk, Sebastian M; Stubbe, Marco; Buehler, Sebastian M; Tautorat, Carsten; Baumann, Werner; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-07-30

    We combined a multi-sensor glass-chip with a microfluidic channel grid for the characterization of cellular behavior. The grid was imprinted in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Mouse-embryonal/fetal calvaria fibroblasts (MC3T3-E1) were used as a model system. Thin-film platinum (Pt) sensors for respiration (amperometric oxygen electrode), acidification (potentiometric pH electrodes) and cell adhesion (interdigitated-electrodes structures, IDES) allowed us to monitor cell-physiological parameters as well as the cell-spreading behavior. Two on-chip electro-thermal micro-pumps (ETμPs) permitted the induction of medium flow in the system, e.g., for medium mixing and drug delivery. The glass-wafer technology ensured the microscopic observability of the on-chip cell culture. Connecting Pt structures were passivated by a 1.2 μm layer of silicon nitride (Si3N4). Thin Si3N4 layers (20 nm or 60 nm) were used as the sensitive material of the pH electrodes. These electrodes showed a linear behavior in the pH range from 4 to 9, with a sensitivity of up to 39 mV per pH step. The oxygen sensors were circular Pt electrodes with a sensor area of 78.5 μm(2). Their sensitivity was 100 pA per 1% oxygen increase in the range from 0% to 21% oxygen (air saturated). Two different IDES geometries with 30- and 50-μm finger spacings showed comparable sensitivities in detecting the proliferation rate of MC3T3 cells. These cells were cultured for 11 days in vitro to test the biocompatibility, microfluidics and electric sensors of our system under standard laboratory conditions.

  7. Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 is a glycolytic sensor differentially regulating cell proliferation, cell size and apoptotic cell death dependent on glucose supply

    SciTech Connect

    Spoden, Gilles A.; Rostek, Ursula; Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria; Mazurek, Sybille; Zwerschke, Werner

    2009-10-01

    The glycolytic key regulator pyruvate kinase M2 (M2-PK or PKM2) can switch between a highly active tetrameric and an inactive dimeric form. The transition between the two conformations regulates the glycolytic flux in tumor cells. We developed specific M2-PK-binding peptide aptamers which inhibit M2-PK, but not the 96% homologous M1-PK isoenzyme. In this study we demonstrate that, at normal blood glucose concentrations, peptide aptamer-mediated inhibition of M2-PK induces a significant decrease of the population doubling (PDL rate) and cell proliferation rate as well as an increase in cell size, whereas under glucose restriction an increase in PDL and cell proliferation rates but a decrease in cell size was observed. Moreover, M2-PK inhibition rescues cells from glucose starvation-induced apoptotic cell death by increasing the metabolic activity. These findings suggest that M2-PK is a metabolic sensor which regulates cell proliferation, cell growth and apoptotic cell death in a glucose supply-dependent manner.

  8. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multimodal Sensor for In vivo Brain Function Imaging with a Function for Simultaneous Cell Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Ayato; Mitani, Masahiro; Minami, Hiroki; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a multimodal complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor device embedded with Au electrodes for fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the deep brain of mice. The Au electrodes were placed on the pixel array of the image sensor. Windows over the photodiodes were opened in the electrode area for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the same area of the brain tissue. The sensor chip was shaped like a shank and was packaged by two packaging methods for high strength or minimal invasion. The experimental results showed that the 90 ×90 µm2 Au electrodes with windows were capable of injecting theta burst stimulation (TBS)-like current pulses at 0.2-1 mA in a saline solution. We successfully demonstrated that fluorescent imaging and TBS-like current injection can be simultaneously performed in the electrode area of a brain phantom.

  9. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multimodal Sensor for In vivo Brain Function Imaging with a Function for Simultaneous Cell Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayato Tagawa,; Masahiro Mitani,; Hiroki Minami,; Toshihiko Noda,; Kiyotaka Sasagawa,; Takashi Tokuda,; Jun Ohta,

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a multimodal complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor device embedded with Au electrodes for fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the deep brain of mice. The Au electrodes were placed on the pixel array of the image sensor. Windows over the photodiodes were opened in the electrode area for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the same area of the brain tissue. The sensor chip was shaped like a shank and was packaged by two packaging methods for high strength or minimal invasion. The experimental results showed that the 90 × 90 μm2 Au electrodes with windows were capable of injecting theta burst stimulation (TBS)-like current pulses at 0.2-1 mA in a saline solution. We successfully demonstrated that fluorescent imaging and TBS-like current injection can be simultaneously performed in the electrode area of a brain phantom.

  10. A thermo-stabilized flow cell for surface plasmon resonance sensors in D-shaped plastic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cennamo, N.; Chiavaioli, F.; Trono, C.; Tombelli, S.; Giannetti, A.; Baldini, F.; Zeni, L.

    2016-05-01

    The first example of an optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. In this work, an IgG/anti-IgG assay was implemented as model bioassay, with the IgG biolayer deposited on the sensor gold surface and the biological target, anti-IgG, transported through a new thermo-stabilized flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. This complete optical sensor system can be used for the future reduction of the device cost and dimension, with the possibility of integrating the POF-SPR sensing platform with microfluidic and optoelectronic devices.

  11. An Evanescent Microwave Probe for Super-Resolution Nondestructive Imaging of Metals, Semiconductors, Dielectrics, Composites and Biological Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pathak, P. S.; Tabib-Azar, M.; Ponchak, G.

    1998-01-01

    Using evanescent microwaves with decay lengths determined by a combination of microwave wavelength (lambda) and waveguide termination geometry, we have imaged and mapped material non-uniformities and defects with a resolving capability of lambda/3800=79 microns at 1 GHz. In our method a microstrip quarter wavelength resonator was used to generate evanescent microwaves. We imaged materials with a wide range of conductivities. Carbon composites, dielectrics (Duroid, polymers), semiconductors (3C-SiC, polysilicon, natural diamond), metals (tungsten alloys, copper, zinc, steel), high-temperature superconductors, and botanical samples were scanned for defects, residual stresses, integrity of brazed junctions, subsurface features, areas of different film thickness and moisture content. The evanescent microwave probe is a versatile tool and it can be used to perform very fast, large scale mapping of a wide range of materials. This method of characterization compares favorably with ultrasound testing, which has a resolution of about 0.1 mm and suffers from high absorption in composite materials and poor transmission across boundaries. Eddy current methods which can have a resolution on the order of 50 microns are restricted to evaluating conducting materials. Evanescent microwave imaging, with careful choice of operating frequency and probe geometry, can have a resolution of up to 1 micron. In this method we can scan hot and moving objects, sample preparation is not required, testing is non-destructive, non-invasive and non-contact, and can be done in air, in liquid or in vacuum.

  12. Investigation of biological cell-protein interactions using SPR sensor through laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Wang, Xueliang; Liu, Guiying; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-03-01

    A new method for investigating biological cell-protein interactions was developed by using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance (LSCI-SPR) system. Mouse normal IgG was modified on the SPR chip. The suspension mouse lymphocyte cancer cells (L5178Y cells) labeled by Hoechst33342 freely flowed into the surface of the SPR sensor chip. By changing the concentration of the cells, the fluorescence images and the SPR signal were synchronously recorded in real time. The red fluorescence points in the imaging region increased with increase in the concentration of the mouse lymphocyte cancer cells and fit well with the change in the SPR signal. Different suspending cells were chosen to investigate cell-protein interactions through antigen-antibody reactions on the biological cell surfaces through binding detection. This method has potential application in cell biology and pharmacology.

  13. Ammonia sensor based on QEPAS with HC-PBF as reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Feng, Qiaoling; Wang, Congying; Wei, Yufeng; Wang, Xuefeng; Liang, Tongli

    2015-08-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensors involves with many desirable features, such as being small and portable, with fast continuous in situ measurements possible. In QEPAS systems, reference cells filled with gas mixtures for wavelength locking and calibration are used to improve the precision and stability of the trace gas concentration measurement. For this study, a 5 m length hollow core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) splicing with single mode fibers at two ends was manufactured as reference cell, which has long absorption path, low transmission loss and easy connectivity. Hollow cores under high pressure (3.0 × 105 Pa) were filled with a certified mixture of ammonia and nitrogen gas to reach equilibrium rapidly. The experiment results indicated that absorption spectra of reference cell with a low loss <3.5dB maintained stable after 150 days at atmosphere. For trace gas detection, 1.531 μm DFB laser with wavelength modulation technique was demonstrated based on QEPAS. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA) of 1.18×10-7 cm-1W/√Hz was obtained at room temperature and pressure of 760 Torr. This results in a minimum detection limit of 3.6ppm for noise equivalent concentration within a 1s lock in integration time.

  14. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100 Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases.

  15. Advances in using MRI probes and sensors for in vivo cell tracking as applied to regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Gilad, Assaf A.; McMahon, Michael T.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The field of molecular and cellular imaging allows molecules and cells to be visualized in vivo non-invasively. It has uses not only as a research tool but in clinical settings as well, for example in monitoring cell-based regenerative therapies, in which cells are transplanted to replace degenerating or damaged tissues, or to restore a physiological function. The success of such cell-based therapies depends on several critical issues, including the route and accuracy of cell transplantation, the fate of cells after transplantation, and the interaction of engrafted cells with the host microenvironment. To assess these issues, it is necessary to monitor transplanted cells non-invasively in real-time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a tool uniquely suited to this task, given its ability to image deep inside tissue with high temporal resolution and sensitivity. Extraordinary efforts have recently been made to improve cellular MRI as applied to regenerative medicine, by developing more advanced contrast agents for use as probes and sensors. These advances enable the non-invasive monitoring of cell fate and, more recently, that of the different cellular functions of living cells, such as their enzymatic activity and gene expression, as well as their time point of cell death. We present here a review of recent advancements in the development of these probes and sensors, and of their functioning, applications and limitations. PMID:26035841

  16. Detection of bioavailable cadmium, lead, and arsenic in polluted soil by tailored multiple Escherichia coli whole-cell sensor set.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Ma, Anzhou; Wang, Thanh; Lin, Jianqiang; Wang, Hailin; Du, Binghai; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    Microbial whole-cell sensor has been widely used to assess bioavailability and risk of toxic elements, but their environmental use is still limited due to the presence of other interfering pollutants and the nonspecific binding in cells, which leads to inaccurate results. Here, we proposed a strategy combining Escherichia coli sensor set with binary regression models for the specific detection of bioavailable cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) in a co-polluted environment. Initial tests suggested that the sensor set respectively termed pcadCluc, pzntRluc, and parsRluc could be classified into two groups according to their specific response to Cd, Pb, and As: group 1 (pcadCluc and pzntRluc) induced by a Cd-Pb mix and group 2 (parsRluc) induced by a Cd-As mix. Based on the variance in responses of each sensor to mixtures of target elements, three binary linear equations for two sensor groups were set up to calculate the individual concentrations in the mixture solutions. This method was then used to quantify the bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As in soils from a co-polluted mining region and to compare the results with other methods. Results showed that the conventional single target sensor method overestimated the bioavailability of each element, while sensor set was credible for accurate bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As quantification and comparable with the results from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Our method can potentially be extended to cover the specific detection of other bioavailable toxic elements in different environmental settings. PMID:26138890

  17. Detection of bioavailable cadmium, lead, and arsenic in polluted soil by tailored multiple Escherichia coli whole-cell sensor set.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Ma, Anzhou; Wang, Thanh; Lin, Jianqiang; Wang, Hailin; Du, Binghai; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    Microbial whole-cell sensor has been widely used to assess bioavailability and risk of toxic elements, but their environmental use is still limited due to the presence of other interfering pollutants and the nonspecific binding in cells, which leads to inaccurate results. Here, we proposed a strategy combining Escherichia coli sensor set with binary regression models for the specific detection of bioavailable cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) in a co-polluted environment. Initial tests suggested that the sensor set respectively termed pcadCluc, pzntRluc, and parsRluc could be classified into two groups according to their specific response to Cd, Pb, and As: group 1 (pcadCluc and pzntRluc) induced by a Cd-Pb mix and group 2 (parsRluc) induced by a Cd-As mix. Based on the variance in responses of each sensor to mixtures of target elements, three binary linear equations for two sensor groups were set up to calculate the individual concentrations in the mixture solutions. This method was then used to quantify the bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As in soils from a co-polluted mining region and to compare the results with other methods. Results showed that the conventional single target sensor method overestimated the bioavailability of each element, while sensor set was credible for accurate bioavailable Cd, Pb, and As quantification and comparable with the results from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Our method can potentially be extended to cover the specific detection of other bioavailable toxic elements in different environmental settings.

  18. Optical refractive index biosensor using evanescently coupled lateral Bragg gratings on silicon-on-insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Astudillo, Manuel; Takahisa, Hiroki; Okayama, Hideaki; Nakajima, Hirochika

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a compact silicon-on-insulator optical biosensor based on lateral Bragg gratings evanescently coupled to a waveguide. The device is fabricated by electron-beam lithography and dry-etched in a single step with inductive coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE). Fully etched grating couplers are used to couple the light in and out of the chip, while lateral Bragg gratings are used as the sensing element of the device. A sensitivity of 22 nm/RIU is obtained by exposing the device to deionized water with different NaCl concentrations with a footprint area of 15 × 4 µm2 that allows for densely multiplexed solutions.

  19. Near-wall colloidal dynamics probed by evanescent-wave dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blawzdziewicz, J.; Wajnryb, E.; Lang, P.; Young, Y.-N.; Dhont, J. K. G.; Cichocki, B.

    2009-11-01

    We present theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations of evane-scent-wave dynamic light scattering (EWDLS) in a wall-bounded colloidal suspension of spheres. The first cummulant γ1 representing the initial decay of the time autocorrelation function of the scattered field is expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic tensor Hw(,q) describing response of the suspension to a spatially varying harmonic force damped exponentially away from the wall. The wavelength of the harmonic spatial variation corresponds to the scattering vector q in the EWDLS experiments, and the exponential decay is characterized by the decay length &-1circ; of the evanescent wave. The hydrodynamic tensor Hw is evaluated using viral expansion at low densities and numerical simulations at higher densities. A complex non-isotropic structure of the tensor Hw(,q) reflects the hydrodynamic particle-wall coupling and wall-induced short range suspension ordering. Our theory and simulations agree well with the results of EWDLS experiments.

  20. Optofluidic distributed feedback lasers with evanescent pumping: Reduced threshold and angular dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Markus; Whitworth, Guy L.; Schubert, Marcel; Dietrich, Christof P.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Turnbull, Graham A.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate an evanescently pumped water-based optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a record low pump threshold of ETH=520 n J . The low threshold results from an optimized mode shape, which is achieved by a low refractive index substrate, and from the use of a mixed-order DFB grating. Investigating the photonic band structure via angular dispersion analysis both above and below lasing threshold allows us to measure the refractive index of the liquid gain layer and to determine the device parameters such as the waveguide core layer thickness. We show that it is possible to tailor the divergence of the lasing emission by varying the number of second order grating periods used for outcoupling.

  1. Monitoring adsorption and sedimentation using evanescent-wave cavity ringdown ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Stamataki, Katerina; Papadakis, Vassilis; Everest, Michael A; Tzortzakis, Stelios; Loppinet, Benoit; Peter Rakitzis, T

    2013-02-10

    We monitor the adsorption of Rhodamine 800, and the sedimentation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) suspension at the surface of a fused-silica prism, by measuring both the absorption and s-p phase shift Δ of a 740 nm probe laser beam, using evanescent-wave cavity ringdown ellipsometry (EW-CRDE). The two systems demonstrate the complementary strengths of EW-CRDE, as the progress of adsorption of the Rhodamine 800 dye can only be observed sensitively via the measurement of absorption, whereas the progress of sedimentation of PTFE can only be observed sensitively via the measurement of Δ. We show that EW-CRDE provides a sensitive method for the measurement of Δ and demonstrates precision in Δ of about 10(-4) deg.

  2. Transmission of evanescent wave modes through a slab of negative-refractive-index material.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, David A

    2011-02-01

    There has been a long-standing argument about Pendry's suggestion that a plane harmonic evanescent (surface) wave along the interface between free space and a slab of ɛ=-1, μ=-1 double-negative (DNG) medium will emerge on the far side with recovery of phase and amplitude. While this is possible, it is subject to parameter restrictions. This work generalizes previous work and now gives analytical criteria for when to expect such a recovery in a Smith-Kroll DNG medium. Basically this requires, among other things, a relatively narrow bandwidth and relatively small transverse-mode component. There also is a very strong dependence on the ratio of slabwidth to plasma wavelength.

  3. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  4. Observation of Photon Echoes From Evanescently Coupled Rare-Earth Ions in a Planar Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Sara; Bartholomew, John G; Madden, Stephen; Vu, Khu; Sellars, Matthew J

    2015-07-01

    We report the measurement of the inhomogeneous linewidth, homogeneous linewidth, and spin-state lifetime of Pr3+ ions in a novel waveguide architecture. The TeO2 slab waveguide deposited on a bulk Pr3+∶Y2SiO5 crystal allows the 3H4↔1D2 transition of Pr3+ ions to be probed by the optical evanescent field that extends into the substrate. The 2-GHz inhomogeneous linewidth, the optical coherence time of 70±5  μs, and the spin-state lifetime of 9.8±0.3  s indicate that the properties of ions interacting with the waveguide mode are consistent with those of bulk ions. This result establishes the foundation for large, integrated, and high performance rare-earth-ion quantum systems based on a waveguide platform. PMID:26182097

  5. Hollow-fiber evanescent light-wave atom-bottle trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1997-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental demonstrations have shown that blue-detuned laser light, propagating in the annular core-cladding region of a hollow-glass fiber, produces a repulsive, evanescent light-wave potential in the hollow, that can be used to guide near-resonant atoms down the fiber. In this work, I show that slight modifications to the hollow-fiber geometry can be used to turn this atom guide into an atom-bottle trap. The trap can be open and shut by varying the aperture angle at which light couples into the fiber, allowing the atoms to be easily loaded. This trap has an advantage over other optical atom traps in that the atoms move coherently in a field-free region with only brief specular reflections at the step-like potential walls.

  6. Evanescent Microwave Probes on High-Resistivity Silicon and its Application in Characterization of Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, M.; Akinwande, D.; Ponchak, George E.; LeClair, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    In this article we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of very high quality factor 10 GHz microstrip resonators on high-resistivity (high-rho) silicon substrates. Our experiments show that an external quality factor of over 13 000 can be achieved on microstripline resonators on high-rho silicon substrates. Such a high Q factor enables integration of arrays of previously reported evanescent microwave probe (EMP) on silicon cantilever beams. We also demonstrate that electron-hole pair recombination and generation lifetimes of silicon can be conveniently measured by illuminating the resonator using a pulsed light. Alternatively, the EMP was also used to nondestructively monitor excess carrier generation and recombination process in a semiconductor placed near the two-dimensional resonator.

  7. Reprint of : Dynamics of a quantum wave emitted by a decaying and evanescent point source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Muga, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    We put forward a model that describes a decaying and evanescent point source of non-interacting quantum waves in 1D. This point-source assumption allows for a simple description that captures the essential aspects of the dynamics of a wave traveling through a classically forbidden region without the need to specify the details of the inner region. The dynamics of the resulting wave is examined and several characteristic times are identified. One of them generalizes the tunneling time-scale introduced by Büttiker and Landauer and it characterizes the arrival of the maximum of the wave function. Diffraction in time and deviations from exponential decay are also studied. Here we show that there exists an optimal injection frequency and detection point for the observation of these two quantum phenomena.

  8. Diffracted Evanescent Wave Model for Enhanced, Suppressed and Directional Transmission through Subwavelength Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezec, Henri

    2005-03-01

    The transmission spectrum of an array of subwavelength apertures in a metal film displays a set of peaks related to the periodicity. Extraordinary transmission efficiencies at these positions have been claimed and associated with discrete grating-coupling conditions that excite surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs). In this talk, we re-evaluate the magnitude and origin of the effect by proper normalization of the as-collected transmission spectrum of the array to that of the corresponding isolated hole. The normalized spectrum then reveals a sequence of both enhancements and suppressions of modest and similar magnitude (less than a factor of ten). This continuous modulation is inconsistent with an SPP-based interpretation, but rather suggests an underlying mechanism based on interference. A subwavelength aperture couples inefficiently to a specific surface mode such as an SPP because it diffracts light into a continuum of evanescent surface waves with a large distribution of in-plane k-vectors. We show however that these components sum to form an effective surface wave which is coherent over a short range and phase-shifted with respect to the source. We confirm the presence of this composite diffracted evanescent wave (CDEW) via interferometric experiments involving pairs of subwavelength apertures. We propose a new model for the anomalous transmission of hole arrays in which enhancement and suppression result from the interference of light directly incident upon (or emerging from) a given hole with CDEWs launched by neighboring holes. This model successfully predicts equivalent effects in non-metallic systems. In addition, it accounts for the salient optical properties of single apertures surrounded by surface corrugations, such as efficient, low-divergence beaming.

  9. Performance enhancement of a photonic crystal microcavity and related localization of evanescent Bloch waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Andika; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Tjia, May-On

    2011-08-01

    A study is carried out to investigate the possible enhancement of photonic crystal (PC) microcavity performance induced by geometrical and permittivity variations in relation to localization of the associated evanescent Bloch wave. The study is focused on PCs of hexagonally packed dielectric rods. A numerical scheme formulated on the basis of Green's function method with multipole expansion approximation is employed to exhibit explicitly the exponential growth curves of the spontaneous emission rate (F) and quality factor (Q) of the cavity with respect to increasing number of surrounding layers (N), which are characterized by their growth rates kF. While the same exponential growth pattern is found for PCs with different rod parameters, the associated growth rates do show distinct and significant differences, implying that an appropriate choice of the rod parameters may produce a large performance enhancement for the microcavity or achieve the same performance with a largely reduced surrounding layer number. Meanwhile, the corresponding spatial decay constants of the evanescent Bloch waves, represented by its smallest Im(k) in the photonic gap, are calculated by means of the extended plane-wave expansion method. The resulting smallest values of Im(k) show their strong correlation with kF as characterized by their linear relation. The study further demonstrates that a judicious choice of the defect rod parameters may also give rise to a remarkable performance enhancement of the microcavity, even at a reduced number of surrounding rod layers. Remarkably, the [kF,Im(k)] values of all PCs considered are located on the same linear correlation line.

  10. Quantitative High-Resolution Sensing of DNA Hybridization Using Magnetic Tweezers with Evanescent Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Piercen M.; Park, Jin Seon; Vezenov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    We applied the combined approach of evanescent nanometry and force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers to quantify the degree of hybridization of a single synthetic single-stranded DNA oligomer to a resolution approaching a single-base. In this setup, the 200 nucleotide long DNA was covalently attached to the surface of an optically transparent solid support at one end and to the surface of a superparamagnetic fluorescent microsphere (force probe) at the other end. The force was applied to the probes using an electromagnet. The end-to-end molecular distance (i.e. out-of-image-plane position of the force probe) was determined from the intensity of the probe fluorescent image observed with total-internal reflectance microscopy. An equation of state for single stranded DNA molecules under tension (extensible freely jointed chain) was used to derive the penetration depth of the evanescent field and to calibrate the magnetic properties of the force probes. The parameters of the magnetic response of the force probes obtained from the equation of state remained constant when changing the penetration depth, indicating a robust calibration procedure. The results of such a calibration were also confirmed using independently measured probe-surface distances for probes mounted onto cantilevers of an atomic force microscope. Upon hybridization of the complementary 50 nucleotide-long oligomer to the surface-bound 200-mer, the changes in the force-distance curves were consistent with the quantitative conversion of 25% of the original single-stranded DNA to its double-stranded form, which was modeled as an elastic rod. The method presented here for quantifying the hybridization state of the single DNA molecules has potential for determining the degree of hybridization of individual molecules in a single molecule array with high accuracy. PMID:21103547

  11. Redesigned Gas Mass Flow Sensors for Space Shuttle Pressure Control System and Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if a state of the art micro-machined silicon solid state flow sensor could be used to replace the existing space shuttle orbiter flow sensors. The rather aggressive goal was to obtain a new sensor which would also be a multi-gas sensor and operate over a much wider flow range and with a higher degree of accuracy than the existing sensors. Two types of sensors were tested. The first type was a venturi throat design and the second was a bypass design. The accuracy of venturi design was found to be marginally acceptable. The bypass sensor was much better although it still did not fully reach the accuracy goal. Two main problems were identified which would require further work.

  12. Tools for water quality monitoring and mapping using paper-based sensors and cell phones.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Clémence; Glen, Chad; Aubie, Brandon; Wallace, Dan; Jahanshahi-Anbuhi, Sana; Pennings, Kevin; Daigger, Glen T; Pelton, Robert; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we describe a combination of paper-based sensors and a novel smart-phone application for on-site quantification of colorimetric readouts as an ultra-low cost solution to monitoring water quality. The system utilizes a paper-based analytical device (μPAD) that produces a colorimetric signal that is dependent on the concentration of a specific target; a cell phone equipped with a camera for capturing images of two μPADs - one tested with a water sample and the other tested with clean water that is used as a control; and an on-site image processing app that uses a novel algorithm for quantifying color intensity and relating this to contaminant concentration. The cell phone app utilizes a pixel counting algorithm that performs with less bias and user subjectivity than the typically used lab-based software, ImageJ. The use of a test and control strip reduces bias from variations in ambient lighting, making it possible to acquire and process images on-site. The cell phone is also able to GPS tag the location of the test, and transmit results to a newly developed website, WaterMap.ca, that displays the quantitative results from the water samples on a map. We demonstrate our approach using a previously developed μPAD that detects the presence of organophosphate pesticides based on the inhibition of immobilized acetylcholinesterase by these contaminants. The objective of this paper is to highlight the importance and potential of developing and integrated monitoring system consisting of μPADs, cell-phones and a centralized web portal for low-cost monitoring environmental contaminants at a large-scale. PMID:25546358

  13. Tools for water quality monitoring and mapping using paper-based sensors and cell phones.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Clémence; Glen, Chad; Aubie, Brandon; Wallace, Dan; Jahanshahi-Anbuhi, Sana; Pennings, Kevin; Daigger, Glen T; Pelton, Robert; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we describe a combination of paper-based sensors and a novel smart-phone application for on-site quantification of colorimetric readouts as an ultra-low cost solution to monitoring water quality. The system utilizes a paper-based analytical device (μPAD) that produces a colorimetric signal that is dependent on the concentration of a specific target; a cell phone equipped with a camera for capturing images of two μPADs - one tested with a water sample and the other tested with clean water that is used as a control; and an on-site image processing app that uses a novel algorithm for quantifying color intensity and relating this to contaminant concentration. The cell phone app utilizes a pixel counting algorithm that performs with less bias and user subjectivity than the typically used lab-based software, ImageJ. The use of a test and control strip reduces bias from variations in ambient lighting, making it possible to acquire and process images on-site. The cell phone is also able to GPS tag the location of the test, and transmit results to a newly developed website, WaterMap.ca, that displays the quantitative results from the water samples on a map. We demonstrate our approach using a previously developed μPAD that detects the presence of organophosphate pesticides based on the inhibition of immobilized acetylcholinesterase by these contaminants. The objective of this paper is to highlight the importance and potential of developing and integrated monitoring system consisting of μPADs, cell-phones and a centralized web portal for low-cost monitoring environmental contaminants at a large-scale.

  14. Size-based cell sorting with a resistive pulse sensor and an electromagnetic pump in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongxin; Li, Mengqi; Pan, Xinxiang; Wang, Qi; Li, Dongqing

    2015-02-01

    An electrokinetic microfluidic chip is developed to detect and sort target cells by size from human blood samples. Target-cell detection is achieved by a differential resistive pulse sensor (RPS) based on the size difference between the target cell and other cells. Once a target cell is detected, the detected RPS signal will automatically actuate an electromagnetic pump built in a microchannel to push the target cell into a collecting channel. This method was applied to automatically detect and sort A549 cells and T-lymphocytes from a peripheral fingertip blood sample. The viability of A549 cells sorted in the collecting well was verified by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. The results show that as many as 100 target cells per minute can be sorted out from the sample solution and thus is particularly suitable for sorting very rare target cells, such as circulating tumor cells. The actuation of the electromagnetic valve has no influence on RPS cell detection and the consequent cell-sorting process. The viability of the collected A549 cell is not impacted by the applied electric field when the cell passes the RPS detection area. The device described in this article is simple, automatic, and label-free and has wide applications in size-based rare target cell sorting for medical diagnostics.

  15. Chaperones as thermodynamic sensors of drug-target interactions reveal kinase inhibitor specificities in living cells.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Krykbaeva, Irina; Whitesell, Luke; Santagata, Sandro; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael S; Lindquist, Susan

    2013-07-01

    The interaction between the HSP90 chaperone and its client kinases is sensitive to the conformational status of the kinase, and stabilization of the kinase fold by small molecules strongly decreases chaperone interaction. Here we exploit this observation and assay small-molecule binding to kinases in living cells, using chaperones as 'thermodynamic sensors'. The method allows determination of target specificities of both ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors in the kinases' native cellular context in high throughput. We profile target specificities of 30 diverse kinase inhibitors against >300 kinases. Demonstrating the value of the assay, we identify ETV6-NTRK3 as a target of the FDA-approved drug crizotinib (Xalkori). Crizotinib inhibits proliferation of ETV6-NTRK3-dependent tumor cells with nanomolar potency and induces the regression of established tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we show that our approach is applicable to other chaperone and target classes by assaying HSP70/steroid hormone receptor and CDC37/kinase interactions, suggesting that chaperone interactions will have broad application in detecting drug-target interactions in vivo.

  16. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  17. Highly Stretchable Fully-Printed CNT-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biofuel Cells: Combining Intrinsic and Design-Induced Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Jeerapan, Itthipon; You, Jung-Min; Nuñez-Flores, Rogelio; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-13

    We present the first example of an all-printed, inexpensive, highly stretchable CNT-based electrochemical sensor and biofuel cell array. The synergistic effect of utilizing specially tailored screen printable stretchable inks that combine the attractive electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs with the elastomeric properties of polyurethane as a binder along with a judiciously designed free-standing serpentine pattern enables the printed device to possess two degrees of stretchability. Owing to these synergistic design and nanomaterial-based ink effects, the device withstands extremely large levels of strains (up to 500% strain) with negligible effect on its structural integrity and performance. This represents the highest stretchability offered by a printed device reported to date. Extensive electrochemical characterization of the printed device reveal that repeated stretching, torsional twisting, and indenting stress has negligible impact on its electrochemical properties. The wide-range applicability of this platform to realize highly stretchable CNT-based electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells has been demonstrated by fabricating and characterizing potentiometric ammonium sensor, amperometric enzyme-based glucose sensor, enzymatic glucose biofuel cell, and self-powered biosensor. Highly stretchable printable multianalyte sensor, multifuel biofuel cell, or any combination thereof can thus be realized using the printed CNT array. Such combination of intrinsically stretchable printed nanomaterial-based electrodes and strain-enduring design patterns holds considerable promise for creating an attractive class of inexpensive multifunctional, highly stretchable printed devices that satisfy the requirements of diverse healthcare and energy fields wherein resilience toward extreme mechanical deformations is mandatory. PMID:26694819

  18. Comparisons of optical pH and dissolved oxygen sensors with traditional electrochemical probes during mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Brorson, Kurt A; Moreira, Antonio R; Rao, Govind

    2007-07-01

    Small-scale upstream bioprocess development often occurs in flasks and multi-well plates. These culturing platforms are often not equipped to accurately monitor and control critical process parameters; thus they may not yield conditions representative of manufacturing. In response, we and others have developed optical sensors that enable small-scale process monitoring. Here we have compared two parameters critical to control in industrial cell culture, pH and dissolved oxygen (DO), measured with our optical sensors versus industrially accepted electrochemical probes. For both optical sensors, agreement with the corresponding electrochemical probe was excellent. The Pearson Correlations between the optical sensors and electrochemical probes were 98.7% and 99.7%, for DO and pH, respectively. Also, we have compared optical pH sensor performance in regular (320 mOsm/kg) and high-osmolality (450 mOsm/kg) cell culture media to simulate the increase in osmolality in pH-controlled cultures. Over a pH range of 6.38-7.98 the average difference in pH readings in the two media was 0.04 pH units. In summary, we have demonstrated that these optical sensors agree well with standard electrochemical probes. The accuracy of the optical probes demonstrates their ability to detect potential parameter drift that could have significant impact on growth, production kinetics, and protein product quality. We have also shown that an increase in osmolality that could result from controlling pH or operating the reactor in fed-batch mode has an insignificant impact on the functionality of the pH patches.

  19. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor.

  20. SirT1—A Sensor for Monitoring Self-Renewal and Aging Process in Retinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Kao, Chung-Lan; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Wu, Chih-Chia; Chen, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Woung, Lin-Chung; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Retinal stem cells bear potency of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into many retinal cells. Utilizing appropriate sensors one can effectively detect the self-renewal and aging process abilities. Silencing information regulator (SirT1), a member of the sirtuin family, is a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase and an essential mediator for longevity in normal cells by calorie restriction. We firstly investigate the SirT1 mRNA expression in retinal stem cells from rats and 19 human eyes of different ages. Results revealed that SirT1 expression was significantly decreased in in vivo aged eyes, associated with poor self-renewal abilities. Additionally, SirT1 mRNA levels were dose-dependently increased in resveratrol- treated retinal stem cells. The expression of SirT1 on oxidative stress-induced damage was significantly decreased, negatively correlated with the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with resveratrol could effectively further reduce oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment in retinal stem cells. Importantly, the anti-oxidant effects of resveratrol in H2O2-treated retinal stem cells were significantly abolished by knockdown of SirT1 expression (sh-SirT1). SirT1 expression provides a feasible sensor in assessing self-renewal and aging process in retinal stem cells. Resveratrol can prevent reactive oxygen species-induced damages via increased retinal SirT1 expression. PMID:22219708

  1. Development of the femtosecond energy diffusion sensor for use in the manufacture of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeskey, James Thomas, Jr.

    Before photovoltaics can compete with traditional sources of grid-connected power, the cost per Watt must come down. Toward this end, the Femtosecond Energy Diffusion (FED) sensor has been developed to improve the manufacturing process for thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. This may lead to both lower fabrication costs and increased cell efficiencies. The FED sensor is a non-contact, non-destructive device based on the pump-probe technique that can measure many important properties of amorphous silicon. It is used in conjunction with two newly developed computer models to measure the properties of the individual layers of an a-Si:H solar cell. These properties include the bandgap, the doping level, the alloying level, optical absorption, and a simplified density of states. In developing the sensor, a number of novel transient transmission experiments have been conducted. These experiments are among the first reported where the photon energies of both the pump and probe lasers fall within the bandtail energy region of a-Si:H. In addition to intrinsic a-Si:H, pump-probe experiments have been conducted on samples alloyed with germanium and carbon as well as samples doped with phosphorus and boron. Tests have been performed on samples with differing levels of hydrogenation created in two ways. Experiments performed on three samples comprising the build up of an a-Si:H p-i-n diode solar cell demonstrate the ability of the sensor to determine the properties of each new layer as it is deposited. This makes the FED sensor a potentially powerful tool for use in the manufacturing of a-Si:H solar cells. Two new models have been developed in order to explain the experimental results. The absorption model calculates absorptivity by combining thermally-induced bandgap reduction due to carrier thermalization and recombination with carrier trapping in order to fit the data obtained by the FED sensor. A second model, the multi-layer model, combines

  2. Continuous oxygen monitoring of mammalian cell growth on space shuttle mission STS-93 with a novel radioluminescent oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Reece, Julie S; Miller, Michael J; Arnold, Mark A; Waterhouse, Cris; Delaplaine, Ted; Cohn, Laura; Cannon, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A compact, flow-through oxygen sensor device based on luminescence quenching was used to monitor dissolved oxygen levels during mammalian cell growth on the STS-93 mission of the Columbia space shuttle. Excitation of an oxygen-sensitive ruthenium complex was provided by a radioluminescent light source (0.9 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm long), and the intensity of the resulting luminescence was measured by a simple photodiode detector. The use of radioluminescence for the excitation light source is a unique approach that provides many features important for long-term and remote monitoring applications. For the spaceflight experiment, human lung fibroblast cells (WI-38) were grown in hollow-fiber bioreactors. Oxygen concentration was measured in the flow path both before and after the bioreactor cartridge in order to gain information about the metabolism of the cells. The sensor was found to be nonperturbing to cell growth and withstood the challenging physical conditions of shuttle launch and landing while maintaining a stable calibration function. In addition, the sensor provided physically meaningful oxygen predictions.

  3. Nanoparticle-Based and Bioengineered Probes and Sensors to Detect Physiological and Pathological Biomarkers in Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Maysinger, Dusica; Ji, Jeff; Hutter, Eliza; Cooper, Elis

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs), carbon-based structures (C-dots, grapheme, and nanodiamonds) and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases), ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim "Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so" (Galileo Galilei). PMID:26733793

  4. Nanoparticle-Based and Bioengineered Probes and Sensors to Detect Physiological and Pathological Biomarkers in Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Maysinger, Dusica; Ji, Jeff; Hutter, Eliza; Cooper, Elis

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs), carbon-based structures (C-dots, grapheme, and nanodiamonds) and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases), ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim "Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so" (Galileo Galilei).

  5. Nanoparticle-Based and Bioengineered Probes and Sensors to Detect Physiological and Pathological Biomarkers in Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maysinger, Dusica; Ji, Jeff; Hutter, Eliza; Cooper, Elis

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs), carbon-based structures (C-dots, grapheme, and nanodiamonds) and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases), ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim “Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so” (Galileo Galilei). PMID:26733793

  6. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Yilmazoglu, O; Yadav, S; Cicek, D; Schneider, J J

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm(-1)) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  7. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Anbo

    2007-12-11

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  8. Practical, highly sensitive, and regenerable evanescent-wave biosensor for detection of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) in water.

    PubMed

    Han, Shitong; Zhou, Xiaohong; Tang, Yunfei; He, Miao; Zhang, Xinyu; Shi, Hanchang; Xiang, Yu

    2016-06-15

    A "turn-on" evanescent-wave fiber biosensor based on functional nucleic acids was developed for on-site detection of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) in environmental water samples. A two-step strategy was conducted to take advantage of the rapid binding of T-T mismatches with Hg(2+) and the cleavage of a substrate by 8-17 DNAzyme with Pb(2+) in solution, as well as sensitive DNA detection on a liquid-solid interface based on evanescent wave. The biosensor demonstrated high sensitivity (with a detection limit of 22 pM for Hg(2+) and 20 nM for Pb(2+)) and selectivity without any signal amplification, rapid detection (within 13 min per test), low cost (10-20 Chinese yuan per sample), and multiple-cycle regeneration (at least 18 times). The method was also successfully applied on Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) detection in real environmental water samples. PMID:26851585

  9. Fabrication of near-field optical apertures in aluminium by a highly selective corrosion process in the evanescent field.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, D; Stemmer, A

    2003-03-01

    A simple, one-step process to fabricate high-quality apertures for scanning near-field optical microscope probes based on aluminium-coated silicon nitride cantilevers is presented. A thin evanescent optical field at a glass-water interface was used to heat the aluminium at the tip apex due to light absorption. The heat induced a breakdown of the passivating oxide layer and local corrosion of the metal, which selectively exposed the front-most part of the probe tip from the aluminium. Apertures with a protruding silicon nitride tip up to 72 nm in height were fabricated. The height of the protrusion was controlled by the extent of the evanescent field, whereas the diameter depended on the geometry of the probe substrate. The corrosion process proved to be self-terminating, yielding highly reproducible tip heights. Near-field optical resolution in a transmission mode of 85 nm was demonstrated.

  10. Calculation of the radiation forces on a microsphere in the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber by ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Luo, J X; Liu, Z L; Wu, F P

    2016-02-20

    We use ray optics to calculate the radiation forces on a dielectric microsphere in the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber. We theoretically demonstrate that the gradient force may attract the microsphere onto the fiber surface. The scattering force may transport the microsphere along the fiber and in the light propagating direction. The impact of the sphere-fiber distance, sphere radius, and fiber radius on the scattering and gradient forces are investigated. The radius of nanofiber can be optimized for particle transportation.

  11. Exercise amount calculation using a wearable half-cell potential sensor for mobile aerobic exercise management.

    PubMed

    Choi, Changmok; Ko, Byung-hoon; Lee, Takhyung; Park, Gunguk; Shin, Kunsoo

    2013-01-01

    The obesity has grown to concerning proportions in recent years, and it causes heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and colon cancer. To get healthy weight, commercial wearable devices with a accelerometer have been released to help users to quantitatively manage calories. However, an accelerometer has disadvantages: large power consumption and expensive price. We suggested a new method to measure the exercise amount using a HCP sensor. We performed an experiment to compare accuracies of exercise amount estimation using a HCP sensor with using an accelerometer with five subjects, and the accuracy of the HCP sensor was comparable to it of the accelerometer. Since a HCP sensor has lower power consumption and cheaper price than an accelerometer, wearable sensor can be smaller and cheaper than current commercial devices.

  12. Microbial nar-GFP cell sensors reveal oxygen limitations in highly agitated and aerated laboratory-scale fermentors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose R; Cha, Hyung J; Rao, Govind; Marten, Mark R; Bentley, William E

    2009-01-01

    Background Small-scale microbial fermentations are often assumed to be homogeneous, and oxygen limitation due to inadequate micromixing is often overlooked as a potential problem. To assess the relative degree of micromixing, and hence propensity for oxygen limitation, a new cellular oxygen sensor has been developed. The oxygen responsive E. coli nitrate reductase (nar) promoter was used to construct an oxygen reporter plasmid (pNar-GFPuv) which allows cell-based reporting of oxygen limitation. Because there are greater than 109 cells in a fermentor, one can outfit a vessel with more than 109 sensors. Our concept was tested in high density, lab-scale (5 L), fed-batch, E. coli fermentations operated with varied mixing efficiency – one verses four impellers. Results In both cases, bioreactors were maintained identically at greater than 80% dissolved oxygen (DO) during batch phase and at approximately 20% DO during fed-batch phase. Trends for glucose consumption, biomass and DO showed nearly identical behavior. However, fermentations with only one impeller showed significantly higher GFPuv expression than those with four, indicating a higher degree of fluid segregation sufficient for cellular oxygen deprivation. As the characteristic time for GFPuv expression (approx 90 min.) is much larger than that for mixing (approx 10 s), increased specific fluorescence represents an averaged effect of oxygen limitation over time and by natural extension, over space. Conclusion Thus, the pNar-GFPuv plasmid enabled bioreactor-wide oxygen sensing in that bacterial cells served as individual recirculating sensors integrating their responses over space and time. We envision cell-based oxygen sensors may find utility in a wide variety of bioprocessing applications. PMID:19146688

  13. Microwave measurement of the permittivity for high dielectric constant materials using an extra-cavity evanescent waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Erhu; Jiang, Xing

    2002-11-01

    This article is concerned to a TE01n mode resonant cavity coupled through a hole located in the center of the end wall to a cylindrical waveguide (equal in diameter to hole) supporting the evanescent TE01 mode. When the evanescent guide contains a dielectric sample, propagation of the TE01 wave will be permitted in the dielectric filled part. The air filled part in front of the sample is used to adjust the coupling level; the air filled part of the sufficient length behind the sample is used to form a matched reactance termination, otherwise a metal block is inserted to form a short-circuit termination or a reactance termination. It is shown that while using these arrangements quite a large change in the resonant length (or resonant frequency) and Q factor of the cavity resonator will be obtained, when the sample possessed suitable electric thickness is inserted into the evanescent guide. Therefore, it should be capable of yielding accurate values of the complex permittivity for high dielectric constant materials. Fundamental principles and theoretical error of measurements of the complex permittivity as a function of the electric thickness in the sample due to the uncertainty of measurements in the resonant length and Q factor are discussed. The measured results at some frequencies of the X band and Ka band on two ceramics are given. The technique is compared with the parallel-plate method, showing that the dielectric properties have comparable values in both methods.

  14. Evanescent waves propagation along a periodically corrugated surface and their amplification by relativistic electron beam (quasi-optical theory)

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Malkin, A. M.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2013-06-15

    By using a quasi-optical approach, we study propagation of evanescent waves along a periodically corrugated surface and their excitation by relativistic electron beams. Under assumption of a shallow (in the scale of period) corrugation, the dispersion equation for normal waves is derived and two particular cases are studied. In the first case, the wave frequency is far from the Bragg resonance; therefore, the evanescent wave propagation can be described by using the impedance approximation with deceleration of the zeroth spatial harmonic. The second case takes place at the frequencies close to the Bragg resonance. There, the field can be represented as two counter-propagating quasi-optical wave beams, which are coupled on the corrugated surface and form an evanescent normal wave. With regard to the interaction with an electron beam, the first case corresponds to the convective instability that can be used for amplification of radiation, while the second case corresponds to the absolute instability used in surface-wave oscillators. This paper is focused on studying main features of amplifier schemes, such as the increments, electron efficiency, and formation of a self-consistent spatial structure of the radiated field. For practical applications, the feasibility of realization of relativistic surface-wave amplifiers in the submillimeter wavelength range is estimated.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Development of Electric Sensor as for Measurement of Red Blood Cell Deformability in Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kazuya; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Nakabe, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    A microsensor that can continuously measure the deformability of a single red blood cell (RBC) in its microchannels using microelectrodes is described in this paper. The time series of the electric resistance is measured using an AC current vs. voltage method as the RBC passes between counter-electrode-type micro-membrane sensors attached to the bottom wall of the microchannel. The RBC is deformed by the shear flow created in the microchannel; the degree of deformation depends on the elastic modulus of the RBC. The resistance distribution, which is unique to the shape of the RBC, is analyzed to obtain the deformability of each cell. First, a numerical simulation of the electric field around the electrodes and RBC is carried out to evaluate the influences of the RBC height position, channel height, distance between the electrodes, electrode width, and RBC shape on the sensor sensitivity. Then, a microsensor was designed and fabricated on the basis of the numerical results. Resistance measurement was carried out using samples of normal RBCs and rigidified (Ca2+–A23186 treated) RBCs. Visualization measurement of the cells' behavior was carried out using a high-speed camera, and the results were compared with those obtained above to evaluate the performance of the sensor. PMID:23112616

  16. Fuel sensor-less control of a liquid feed fuel cell under dynamic loading conditions for portable power sources (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. L.; Chen, C. Y.; Sung, C. C.; Liou, D. H.; Chang, C. Y.; Cha, H. C.

    This work presents a new fuel sensor-less control scheme for liquid feed fuel cells that is able to control the supply to a fuel cell system for operation under dynamic loading conditions. The control scheme uses cell-operating characteristics, such as potential, current, and power, to regulate the fuel concentration of a liquid feed fuel cell without the need for a fuel concentration sensor. A current integral technique has been developed to calculate the quantity of fuel required at each monitoring cycle, which can be combined with the concentration regulating process to control the fuel supply for stable operation. As verified by systematic experiments, this scheme can effectively control the fuel supply of a liquid feed fuel cell with reduced response time, even under conditions where the membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) deteriorates gradually. This advance will aid the commercialization of liquid feed fuel cells and make them more adaptable for use in portable and automotive power units such as laptops, e-bikes, and handicap cars.

  17. Fast and slow ion diffusion processes in lithium ion pouch cells during cycling observed with fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Lars Wilko; Kiesel, Peter; Ganguli, Anurag; Lochbaum, Alexander; Saha, Bhaskar; Schwartz, Julian; Bae, Chang-Jun; Alamgir, Mohamed; Raghavan, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Cell monitoring for safe capacity utilization while maximizing pack life and performance is a key requirement for effective battery management and encouraging their adoption for clean-energy technologies. A key cell failure mode is the build-up of residual electrode strain over time, which affects both cell performance and life. Our team has been exploring the use of fiber optic (FO) sensors as a new alternative for cell state monitoring. In this present study, various charge-cycling experiments were performed on Lithium-ion pouch cells with a particular class of FO sensors, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), that were externally attached to the cells. An overshooting of the volume change at high SOC that recovers during rest can be observed. This phenomenon originates from the interplay between a fast and a slow Li ion diffusion process, which leads to non-homogeneous intercalation of Li ions. This paper focuses on the strain relaxation processes that occur after switching from charge to no-load phases. The correlation of the excess volume and subsequent relaxation to SOC as well as temperature is discussed. The implications of being able to monitor this phenomenon to control battery utilization for long life are also discussed.

  18. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S.; Mills, Robert W.; Macri, Vincenzo S.; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Milan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  19. A Negative Index Metamaterial-Inspired UWB Antenna with an Integration of Complementary SRR and CLS Unit Cells for Microwave Imaging Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Islam, Md. Moinul; Samsuzzaman, Md.; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial incorporated UWB antenna with an integration of complementary SRR (split-ring resonator) and CLS (capacitive loaded strip) unit cells for microwave imaging sensor applications. This metamaterial UWB antenna sensor consists of four unit cells along one axis, where each unit cell incorporates a complementary SRR and CLS pair. This integration enables a design layout that allows both a negative value of permittivity and a negative value of permeability simultaneous, resulting in a durable negative index to enhance the antenna sensor performance for microwave imaging sensor applications. The proposed MTM antenna sensor was designed and fabricated on an FR4 substrate having a thickness of 1.6 mm and a dielectric constant of 4.6. The electrical dimensions of this antenna sensor are 0.20 λ × 0.29 λ at a lower frequency of 3.1 GHz. This antenna sensor achieves a 131.5% bandwidth (VSWR < 2) covering the frequency bands from 3.1 GHz to more than 15 GHz with a maximum gain of 6.57 dBi. High fidelity factor and gain, smooth surface-current distribution and nearly omni-directional radiation patterns with low cross-polarization confirm that the proposed negative index UWB antenna is a promising entrant in the field of microwave imaging sensors. PMID:26007721

  20. A Negative Index Metamaterial-Inspired UWB Antenna with an Integration of Complementary SRR and CLS Unit Cells for Microwave Imaging Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Islam, Md Moinul; Samsuzzaman, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-05-20

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial incorporated UWB antenna with an integration of complementary SRR (split-ring resonator) and CLS (capacitive loaded strip) unit cells for microwave imaging sensor applications. This metamaterial UWB antenna sensor consists of four unit cells along one axis, where each unit cell incorporates a complementary SRR and CLS pair. This integration enables a design layout that allows both a negative value of permittivity and a negative value of permeability simultaneous, resulting in a durable negative index to enhance the antenna sensor performance for microwave imaging sensor applications. The proposed MTM antenna sensor was designed and fabricated on an FR4 substrate having a thickness of 1.6 mm and a dielectric constant of 4.6. The electrical dimensions of this antenna sensor are 0.20 λ × 0.29 λ at a lower frequency of 3.1 GHz. This antenna sensor achieves a 131.5% bandwidth (VSWR < 2) covering the frequency bands from 3.1 GHz to more than 15 GHz with a maximum gain of 6.57 dBi. High fidelity factor and gain, smooth surface-current distribution and nearly omni-directional radiation patterns with low cross-polarization confirm that the proposed negative index UWB antenna is a promising entrant in the field of microwave imaging sensors.

  1. L-Lactate-selective microbial sensor based on flavocytochrome b2-enriched yeast cells using recombinant and nanotechnology approaches.

    PubMed

    Karkovska, Maria; Smutok, Oleh; Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years, nanotechnology is the most developing branch due to a wide variety of potential applications in biomedical, biotechnological and agriculture fields. The binding nanoparticles with various biological molecules makes them attractive candidates for using in sensor technologies. The particularly actual is obtaining the bionanomembranes based on biocatalytic elements with improved sensing characteristics. The aim of this investigation is to study the properties of microbial L-lactate-selective sensor based on using the recombinant Hansenula polymorpha yeast cells overproducing flavocytochrome b2 (FC b2), as well as additionally enriched by the enzyme bound with gold nanoparticles (FC b2-nAu). Although, the high permeability of the living cells to nanoparticles is being intensively studied (mostly for delivery of drugs), the idea of using both recombinant technology and nanotechnology to increase the amount of the target enzyme in the biosensing layer is really novel. The FC b2-nAu-enriched living and permeabilized yeast cells were used for construction of a bioselective membrane of microbial L-lactate-selective amperometric biosensor. Phenazine methosulphate was served as a free defusing electron transfer mediator which provides effective electron transfer from the reduced enzyme to the electrode surface. It was shown that the output to L-lactate of FC b2-nAu-enriched permeabilized yeast cells is 2.5-fold higher when compared to the control cells. The obtained results confirm that additional enrichment of the recombinant yeast cell by the enzyme bound with nanoparticles improves the analytical parameters of microbial sensor.

  2. Outward electron transfer by Saccharomyces cerevisiae monitored with a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell-type activity sensor.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Raphaël; Favre, Marie-France; Carrard, Delphine; Fischer, Fabian

    2010-03-01

    A Janus head-like bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell was constructed to monitor the electron transfer from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a woven carbon anode. The experiments were conducted during an ethanol cultivation of 170 g/l glucose in the presence and absence of yeast-peptone medium. First, using a basic fuel-cell type activity sensor, it was shown that yeast-peptone medium contains electroactive compounds. For this purpose, 1% solutions of soy peptone and yeast extract were subjected to oxidative conditions, using a microbial fuel cell set-up corresponding to a typical galvanic cell, consisting of culture medium in the anodic half-cell and 0.5 M K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in the cathodic half-cell. Second, using a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell, it was shown that electrons were transferred from yeast cells to the carbon anode. The participation of electroactive compounds in the electron transport was separated as background current. This result was verified by applying medium-free conditions, where only glucose was fed, confirming that electrons are transferred from yeast cells to the woven carbon anode. Knowledge about the electron transfer through the cell membrane is of importance in amperometric online monitoring of yeast fermentations and for electricity production with microbial fuel cells.

  3. Ultra-sensitive plasmonic nanometal scattering immunosensor based on optical control in the evanescent field layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Park, Guenyoung; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Kang, Seong Ho

    2015-01-15

    Novel, fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on nanobiochips was investigated based on plasmonic nanometal scattering in the evanescent field layer (EFL) using total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy. The plasmonic scattering of nanometals bonded to biomolecules was observed at different wavelengths by an electromagnetic field in the EFL. The changes in the scattering of nanometals on the gold-nanopatterned chip in response to the immunoreaction between silver nanoparticles and antibodies allowed fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on the nanobiochips. Under optimized conditions, the TIRS immunoassay chip detected different amounts of immobilized antigen, i.e., human cardiac troponin I. The sandwich immuno-reaction was quantitatively analyzed in the dynamic range of 720 zM-167 fM. The limit of detection (S/N=4) was 600 zM, which was ~140 times lower than limits obtained by previous total internal reflection fluorescence and dark field methods. These results demonstrate the possibility for a fluorescence-free biochip nanoimmunoassay based on the scattering of nanometals in the EFL.

  4. Evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy: a platform for the study of supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Powell, Hayley V; O'Connell, Michael A; Zhang, Meiqin; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-03-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) is advocated as an approach for monitoring the formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz substrates in situ and for the quantitative study of fast molecular adsorption kinetics at the resulting modified biomimetic surface. This approach is illustrated using SLBs of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements confirm the formation of bilayers on quartz. The subsequent interaction of the porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine-p,p',p'',p'''-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium hydrate (TPPS) with the cationic bilayer-modified silica surface has been studied using EW-CRDS combined with an impinging-jet to deliver analyte to the surface in a well-defined manner. The adsorption of TPPS to the bilayer was kinetically controlled and the adsorption rate constant was found to be 1.7 (±0.6) × 10(-4) cm s(-1) from finite element modeling of the jet hydrodynamics and associated convective-diffusion equation, coupled to a first-order surface process describing adsorption. These proof-of-concept studies provide a platform for the investigation of molecular processes at biomembranes using EW-CRDS for chemical species showing optical absorbance in the visible and ultraviolet range.

  5. Measurement bias in evanescent wave nano-velocimetry due to tracer size variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Huang, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Evanescent wave nano-velocimetry is an imaging tool for studying biophysical transport and nano-scale fluid mechanics via tracking the 2D or 3D motion of fluorescent nanoparticles within several hundred nanometers of a fluid--solid interface. Because the information on the third dimension is encoded in the tracer intensity, variation in the tracer size, which is proportional to the particle intensity, can lead to significant measurement uncertainty. In this work, we consider the measurement bias introduced by tracer size polydispersity on the fluid velocimetry measurements. We present a general theoretical model to account for tracer size variation, interaction potentials between tracers and the solid substrate (e.g., electrostatic, van der Waals forces) and analysis of image data. Computational results are provided for typical experimental conditions, and the implications for nano-velocimetry accuracy are discussed. We find that increased tracer particle size variation and the detectability limit of tracer intensity increase measurement bias by up to 10%, which should be accounted for in experimental measurements.

  6. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy: applications in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    A new powerful and highly sensitive technique for non-invasive biomedical diagnostics in vivo has been developed using Infrared Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FEW-FTIR). This compact and portable method allows to detect functional chemical groups and bonds via vibrational spectroscopy directly from surfaces including living tissue. Such differences and similarities in molecular structure of tissue and materials can be evaluated online. Operating in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle-infrared (MIR) range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and tissue for non-destructive, non-invasive, fast and remote (few meters) diagnostics and quality control of materials. This method utilizes highly flexible and extremely low loss unclad fibers, for example silver halide fibers. Applications of this method include investigations of normal skin, precancerous and cancerous conditions, monitoring of the process of aging, allergic reactions and radiation damage to the skin. This setup is suitable as well for the detection of the influence of environmental factors (sun, water, pollution, and weather) on skin surfaces. The FEW-FTIR technique is very promising also for fast histological examinations in vitro. In this review, we present recent investigations of skin, breast, lung, stomach, kidney tissues in vivo and ex vivo (during surgery) to define the areas of tumor localization. The main advantages of the FEW-FTIR technique for biomedical, clinical, and environmental applications are discussed.

  7. Ultra-sensitive plasmonic nanometal scattering immunosensor based on optical control in the evanescent field layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Park, Guenyoung; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Kang, Seong Ho

    2015-01-15

    Novel, fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on nanobiochips was investigated based on plasmonic nanometal scattering in the evanescent field layer (EFL) using total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy. The plasmonic scattering of nanometals bonded to biomolecules was observed at different wavelengths by an electromagnetic field in the EFL. The changes in the scattering of nanometals on the gold-nanopatterned chip in response to the immunoreaction between silver nanoparticles and antibodies allowed fluorescence-free detection of biomolecules on the nanobiochips. Under optimized conditions, the TIRS immunoassay chip detected different amounts of immobilized antigen, i.e., human cardiac troponin I. The sandwich immuno-reaction was quantitatively analyzed in the dynamic range of 720 zM-167 fM. The limit of detection (S/N=4) was 600 zM, which was ~140 times lower than limits obtained by previous total internal reflection fluorescence and dark field methods. These results demonstrate the possibility for a fluorescence-free biochip nanoimmunoassay based on the scattering of nanometals in the EFL. PMID:25128624

  8. Imaging single fluorescent molecules at the interface of an optical fiber probe by evanescent wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Tan, W

    1999-08-01

    We have developed a new fluorescent method for single-molecule detection (SMD) and imaging using an optical fiber probe. The fluorophores were excited by the evanescent wave field produced on the core surface of the optical fiber. This was achieved by exposing a section of the core of the optical fiber probe to the fluorophore solution. Both cylindrical and square optical fiber probes were used for SMD. The fluorescent signals were detected by an intensified charge-coupled device. Single rhodamine 6G molecules have been detected. The number of rhodamine 6G molecules imaged by the optical fiber probe showed an excellent linear relationship with the concentrations of the fluorophores. The SMD scheme was also applied to the imaging of biomolecules, such as molecular beacon DNA molecules, labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. Our results have shown that using an optical fiber is an easy yet effective approach to SMD. It represents a simpler fluorescent method for the detection of single-molecules in solution and at an interface.

  9. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells. Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  10. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  11. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  12. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  13. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K+ uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K+ transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K+-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K+ transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K+ transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K+ transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K+ uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K+-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around −120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K+, reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  14. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  15. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels.

  16. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with thermoelectrically cooled room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian Z.; Liu, Zhijun; Gmachl, Claire F.; Sivco, Deborah L.

    2005-11-01

    Quantum cascade lasers coupled directly to unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of simple liquid droplets. Quantum cascade lasers can be designed to emit across a wide range of mid-infrared wavelengths by tailoring the quantum-well structure, and the wavelength can be fine tuned by a thermoelectric cooler. Here, laser wavelengths were chosen which offer the largest absorption contrast between two constituents of a droplet. The laser was coupled to an unclad silver halide fiber, which penetrates through the droplet resting on a hydrophobic surface. For the same liquid composition and droplet size, the transmitted intensity is weaker for a droplet on a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-octyltrichlorosilane coated glass slide than for one on a hexadecanethiol (HDT) coated Au-covered glass slide because of the high reflectivity of the HDT/Au surface at mid-infrared wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of water, glycerol, α-tocophenol acetate, and squalane were measured by varying the immersion length of the fiber; i.e. the droplet size. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. We tested both aqueous liquid mixtures (acetone/water and ethanol/water) and oil-base solutions (n-dodecane/squalane and α-tocophenol acetate/squalane); α-tocophenol acetate and squalane are common ingredients of cosmetics, either as active ingredients or for chemical stabilization. Using a 300μm diameter silver halide fiber with a 25mm immersion length, the detection limits are 1 vol.% for α-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in water for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm -1 and 1363 cm -1, respectively. This work was previously been reported in J. Z. Chen et al. Optics Express 13, 5953 (2005).

  17. Local dielectric and strain measurements in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films by evanescent microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleismit, Richard A.; El Ashry, Mostafa; Kozlowski, Gregory; Amer, Maher S.; Kazimierczuk, Marian K.; Biggers, Rand R.

    2005-09-01

    The near-field evanescent microwave microscope is based on a coaxial transmission line resonator with a silver-plated tungsten tip protruding through an end-wall aperture. The sensor is used to measure local dielectric properties of thin-film YBa2Cu3O7-δ deposited on three different SrTiO3 bi-crystal substrates having mismatch grain boundary angles of 3°, 6°, and 12°. The measurements in the superconducting state are below critical temperature at T = 79.4 K. The dielectric property of the superconductor within the near field of the tip frustrates the electric field and measurably changes the transmission line's resonant frequency. The shift of the resonator's frequency is measured as a function of tip-sample separation and associated changes in quality factor (ΔQ) image scans of the thin film are presented. A quantitative relationship between the real and imaginary parts of the local dielectric constant and the frequency shift using the method of images is established. The comparison between experimental data and theory based on this method is given and discussed. Raman measurements of the intergranular strain within the YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film deposited on each SrTiO3 substrate in the region of the bi-crystal junction showed excellent correlation between grain boundary mismatch and induced grain boundary strain. Compressive strains normal to the a axis (i.e. tensile strains normal to the b axis) were detected across the grain boundary. The magnitude of induced strain as well as its spread away from the grain boundary increased as the mismatch angle increased.

  18. Fluorescence-Based Force/Tension Sensors: A Novel Tool to Visualize Mechanical Forces in Structural Proteins in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Sachs, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Three signaling systems, chemical, electrical, and mechanical, ubiquitously contribute to cellular activities. There is limited information on the mechanical signaling system because of a lack of tools to measure stress in specific proteins. Although significant advances in methodologies such as atomic force microscopy and laser tweezers have achieved great success in single molecules and measuring the mean properties of cells and tissues, they cannot deal with specific proteins in live cells. Recent Advances: To remedy the situation, we developed a family of genetically encoded optical force sensors to measure the stress in structural proteins in living cells. The sensors can be incorporated into specific proteins and are not harmful in transgenic animals. The chimeric proteins distribute and function as their wild-type counterparts, and local stress can be read out from changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Critical Issues: Our original sensor used two mutant green fluorescence proteins linked by an alpha helix that served as a linking spring. Ever since, we have improved the probe design in a number of ways. For example, we replaced the helical linker with more common elastic protein domains to better match the compliance of the wild-type hosts. We greatly improved sensitivity by using the angular dependence of FRET rather than the distance dependence as the transduction mechanism, because that has nearly 100% efficiency at rest and nearly zero when stretched. Future Directions: These probes enable researchers to investigate the roles of mechanical force in cellular activities at the level of single molecules, cells, tissues, and whole animals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 986–999. PMID:24205787

  19. Mitochondrial complex II is a source of the reserve respiratory capacity that is regulated by metabolic sensors and promotes cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Pfleger, J; He, M; Abdellatif, M

    2015-01-01

    The survival of a cell depends on its ability to meet its energy requirements. We hypothesized that the mitochondrial reserve respiratory capacity (RRC) of a cell is a critical component of its bioenergetics that can be utilized during an increase in energy demand, thereby, enhancing viability. Our goal was to identify the elements that regulate and contribute to the development of RRC and its involvement in cell survival. The results show that activation of metabolic sensors, including pyruvate dehydrogenase and AMP-dependent kinase, increases cardiac myocyte RRC via a Sirt3-dependent mechanism. Notably, we identified mitochondrial complex II (cII) as a target of these metabolic sensors and the main source of RRC. Moreover, we show that RRC, via cII, correlates with enhanced cell survival after hypoxia. Thus, for the first time, we show that metabolic sensors via Sirt3 maximize the cellular RRC through activating cII, which enhances cell survival after hypoxia. PMID:26225774

  20. Sensitivity and directionality of lipid bilayer mechanotransduction studied using a revised, highly durable membrane-based hair cell sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Freeman, Eric C.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-06-01

    A bioinspired, membrane-based hair cell sensor consists of a planar lipid bilayer formed between two lipid-coated water droplets that connect to an artificial hair. This assembly enables motion of the hair caused by mechanical stimuli to vibrate the bilayer and produce a capacitive current. In this work, the mechanoelectrical transduction mechanism and sensing performance is experimentally characterized for a more-durable, revised hair cell embodiment that includes a cantilevered hair rooted firmly in the surrounding solid substrate. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the revised membrane-based hair cell sensor produces higher time rates of change in capacitance (0.8-6.0 nF s-1) in response to airflow across the hair compared to the original sensor (45-60 pF s-1) that did not feature a cantilevered hair. The 10-fold to 100-fold increase in the time rate change of capacitance corresponds to greater membrane bending and, thus, higher sensing currents. Membranes in the revised sensor exhibit changes in area due to bending on the order of 0.2-2.0%, versus 0.02% for the original sensor. Experiments also reveal that the bilayer displays highest sensitivity to mechanical perturbations normal to the plane of the bilayer, a membrane can transduce hair motion at frequencies below the hair’s characteristic frequency, and bilayers formed between polymerized hydrogel volumes exhibit a higher sensing currents than those formed between liquid aqueous volumes. Finally, measurements of sensitivity (5-35 pA m-1 s-1) and minimum (4.0-0.6 m s-1) and maximum (28-13 m s-1) sensing thresholds to airflow are performed for the first time, and we observe maximum electrical power (˜65 pW) in the membrane occurs for combinations of slower airflow and higher voltage. These results highlight that along with the dimensions of the hair and the compositions of the aqueous volumes, sensing performance can be tuned with applied voltage.

  1. Evanescent wave fields at the plasma frequency in a microwave-generated hollow-cathode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, J.

    2006-08-01

    The different discharge regimes of the double-plate hollow-cathode are analysed with respect to the high plasmon levels, which are measured by the spectroscopic plasma-satellite method. The high-current glow discharge at start up creates a preplasma, which lets charging half-cycles start in an alternating order from both cathodes. They follow a cylindric boundary surrounding the central plasma cylinder, which exceeds the cut-off density, and thus constitute a self sustaining microwave oscillator. The ions from anodic space are radially attracted by the scattered Hertzian electrons and approach the central plasma, where they get neutralized upon penetrating the boundary, which is steadily displacing. Below the spiking threshold these ions of a high final radial velocity are responsible for the rapidly growing plasma core, whose expansion velocity has a strong cooling effect on the radial electron kinetic energy. Then a Lorentzian line shape indicating critical damping over a single oscillation is found for the near and the far satellites to the forbidden component of the helium I 447 nm line, corresponding to a field of up to 4 kV cm-1. The rotating wave approximation allows us to derive the exponential damping of the field envelope. The other solution of the rotating wave approximation is associated with the reflection of microwaves at the plasma boundary. Above the spiking threshold the production of wave fields around the plasma frequency in the central region is continued by the 4 ns current spikes. But the boundary conditions of high-current electron-neutral scattering require a spatially evanescent Green's function, therefore within both regions 2 mm adjacent to the cathode surfaces no plasma-satellites are then found.

  2. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2014-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 105 cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >103) to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high-finesse cavity

  3. Eliminating Unwanted Far-Field Excitation in Objective-Type TIRF. Part II. Combined Evanescent-Wave Excitation and Supercritical-Angle Fluorescence Detection Improves Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Maia; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Azimuthal beam scanning makes evanescent-wave (EW) excitation isotropic, thereby producing total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) images that are evenly lit. However, beam spinning does not fundamentally address the problem of propagating excitation light that is contaminating objective-type TIRF. Far-field excitation depends more on the specific objective than on cell scattering. As a consequence, the excitation impurities in objective-type TIRF are only weakly affected by changes of azimuthal or polar beam angle. These are the main results of the first part of this study (Eliminating unwanted far-field excitation in objective-type TIRF. Pt.1. Identifying sources of nonevanescent excitation light). This second part focuses on exactly where up beam in the illumination system stray light is generated that gives rise to nonevanescent components in TIRF. Using dark-field imaging of scattered excitation light we pinpoint the objective, intermediate lenses and, particularly, the beam scanner as the major sources of stray excitation. We study how adhesion-molecule coating and astrocytes or BON cells grown on the coverslip surface modify the dark-field signal. On flat and weakly scattering cells, most background comes from stray reflections produced far from the sample plane, in the beam scanner and the objective lens. On thick, optically dense cells roughly half of the scatter is generated by the sample itself. We finally show that combining objective-type EW excitation with supercritical-angle fluorescence (SAF) detection efficiently rejects the fluorescence originating from deeper sample regions. We demonstrate that SAF improves the surface selectivity of TIRF, even at shallow penetration depths. The coplanar microscopy scheme presented here merges the benefits of beam spinning EW excitation and SAF detection and provides the conditions for quantitative wide-field imaging of fluorophore dynamics at or near the plasma membrane. PMID:24606929

  4. Monitoring Intracellular pH Change with a Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor in Yeast and Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Robertson, J Brian; Xie, Qiguang; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2016-01-01

    "pHlash" is a novel bioluminescence-based pH sensor for measuring intracellular pH, which is developed based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). pHlash is a fusion protein between a mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) and a Venus fluorophore. The spectral emission of purified pHlash protein exhibits pH dependence in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro characterization of pHlash, and also in vivo assays including in yeast cells and in HeLa cells using pHlash as a cytoplasmic pH indicator. PMID:27424899

  5. Organic-inorganic hybrid material for the cells immobilization: long-term viability mechanism and application in BOD sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Shang, Li; Guo, Shaojun; Li, Dan; Liu, Changyu; Qi, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, organic-inorganic hybrid material, which is composed of silica and the grafting copolymer of poly (vinyl alcohol) and 4-vinylpyridine (PVA-g-P(4-VP)), was employed to immobilize Trichosporon cutaneum strain 2.570 cells. Cells entrapped into the hybrid material were found to keep a long-term viability. The mechanism of such a long-term viability was investigated by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Our studies revealed that arthroconidia produced in the extracellular material might play an important role in keeping the long-term viability of the immobilized microorganism. After the arthroconidia were activated, an electrochemical biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor based on cell/hybrid material-modified supporting membrane was constructed for verifying the proposed mechanism. The results and insight gained from the present experiments can be widely used to various biosensor designs.

  6. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anheier, N. C., Jr.; McDonald, C. E.; Cuta, J. M.; Cuta, F. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH4(+)). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  7. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  8. A gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence sensor for high sensitive and selective detection of thiols in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Yu, Hui; Hu, Yue; Chen, Mingzhong; Shao, Shijun

    2016-01-15

    A novel gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based sensor for detecting thiols in aqueous solution has been developed. Due to the weak N···Au interactions, meso-(4-pyridinyl)-substituted BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene) dyes were coordinated to AuNP surfaces, which effectively quenched the fluorescence of organic/inorganic hybrid systems. The fluorescent quenching mechanism was mainly ascribed to the highly efficient fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) and the inner filter effect. In the presence of thiols, meso-(4-pyridinyl)-substituted BODIPY chromophore were displaced and released from the AuNP surfaces and thus restored the fluorescence of BODIPY chromophore. The modulation of the fluorescence quenching efficiency of BODIPY–AuNPs in the presence of thiols can achieve a large turn-on fluorescence enhancement (40-fold) in aqueous solution. The new AuNP-based fluorescence sensor displayed desired properties such as high specificity, relatively low detection limit (30 nM for Cys), appreciable water solubility and rapid response time (within 2 min for Cys/Hcy). Moreover, the sensor has been successfully applied for monitoring and imaging of intracellular thiols within living HeLa cells. PMID:26278044

  9. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  10. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring.

  11. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring. PMID:24771348

  12. A low complexity wireless microbial fuel cell monitor using piezoresistive sensors and impulse-radio ultra-wide-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaldi, M.; Chiolerio, A.; Tommasi, T.; Hidalgo, D.; Canavese, G.; Stassi, S.; Demarchi, D.; Pirri, F. C.

    2013-05-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are energy sources which generate electrical charge thanks to bacteria metabolism. Although functionally similar to chemical fuel cells (both including reactants and two electrodes, and anode and cathode), they have substantial advantages, e.g. 1) operation at ambient temperature and pressure; 2) use of neutral electrolytes and avoidance of expensive catalysts (e.g. platinum); 3) operation using organic wastes. An MFC can be effectively used in environments where ubiquitous networking requires the wireless monitoring of energy sources. We then report on a simple monitoring system for MFC comprising an ultra-low-power Impulse-Radio Ultra-Wide-Band Transmitter (TX) operating in the low 0-960MHz band and a nanostructured piezoresistive pressure sensor connected to a discrete component digital read-out circuit. The sensor comprises an insulating matrix of polydimethylsiloxane and nanostructured multi-branched copper microparticles as conductive filler. Applied mechanical stress induces a sample deformation that modulates the mean distance between particles, i.e. the current flow. The read-out circuit encodes pressure as a pulse rate variation, with an absolute sensitivity to the generated MFC voltage. Pulses with variable repetition frequency can encode battery health: the pressure sensor can be directly connected to the cells membrane to read excessive pressure. A prototype system comprises two MFCs connected in series to power both the UWB transmitter which consumes 40μW and the read-out circuit. The two MFC generate an open circuit voltage of 1.0+/-0.1V. Each MFC prototype has a total volume of 0.34L and is formed by two circular Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chambers (anode and cathode) separated by a cation exchange membrane. The paper reports on the prototype and measurements towards a final solution which embeds all functionalities within a MFC cell. Our solution is conceived to provide energy sources integrating energy management

  13. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakisaka, Masanori; Nagao, Tetsuhiko; Yoshinari, Mototaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. Methods The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor. Results Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction. Conclusions These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells. PMID:26999015

  14. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361

  15. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  16. Calculation of the radiation forces on a microsphere in the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber by ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Luo, J X; Liu, Z L; Wu, F P

    2016-02-20

    We use ray optics to calculate the radiation forces on a dielectric microsphere in the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber. We theoretically demonstrate that the gradient force may attract the microsphere onto the fiber surface. The scattering force may transport the microsphere along the fiber and in the light propagating direction. The impact of the sphere-fiber distance, sphere radius, and fiber radius on the scattering and gradient forces are investigated. The radius of nanofiber can be optimized for particle transportation. PMID:26906604

  17. Imaging the evanescent intensity gradients of an optical waveguide using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi W.; Tsai, Din Ping; Jackson, Howard E.

    1999-11-01

    Imaging the local evanescent intensity gradients by using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope is developed. Two different optical structures, one a well- characterized BK-7 glass prism in the total internal reflection configuration, and the other a side-polished optical fiber waveguide with a step index of refraction, were studied. Results show distinct imaging contrast of the intensity gradients, the reveal the variations of the local index of refraction of waveguide. This is a novel near-field optical method, and can be used in the imaging of local index of refraction of a variety of optical waveguide structures.

  18. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment. PMID:26774094

  19. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment.

  20. Application of in-cell touch sensor using photo-leakage current in dual gate a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Te-Chih; Chen, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yu-Te; Liao, Po-Yung; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Tsai, Wu-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Jen; Yan, Jing-Yi

    2012-11-01

    In-cell touch sensor that can be integrated with display pixel circuit using dual gate InGaZnO thin-film transistor is proposed. Under bottom gate operation, device characteristics are not sensitive to light illumination. On the contrary, light can lead to evident subthreshold leakage when operated with top gate. This behavior allows touch sensor to be realized by sensing the ambient light using top gate operation, without affecting normal bottom gate operated devices in display pixel. Further, the proposed operation method of touch sensor needs no additional fabrication and cost, and even black matrix is not required either.

  1. Half-cell potential analysis of an ammonia sensor with the electrochemical cell Au | YSZ | Au, V2O5-WO3-TiO2.

    PubMed

    Schönauer-Kamin, Daniela; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2013-04-10

    Half-cell potentials of the electrochemical cell Au, VWT | YSZ | Au are analyzed in dependence on oxygen and ammonia concentration at 550 °C. One of the gold electrodes is covered with a porous SCR catalyst, vanadia-tungstenia-titania (VWT). The cell is utilized as a potentiometric ammonia gas sensor and provides a semi-logarithmic characteristic curve with a high NH3 sensitivity and selectivity. The analyses of the Au | YSZ and Au, VWT | YSZ half-cells are conducted to describe the non-equilibrium behavior of the sensor device in light of mixed potential theory. Both electrode potentials provide a dependency on the NH3 concentration, whereby VWT, Au | YSZ shows a stronger effect which increases with increasing VWT coverage. The potential shifts in the anodic direction confirm the formation of mixed potentials at both electrodes resulting from electrochemical reactions of O2 and NH3 at the three-phase boundary. Polarization curves indicate Butler-Volmer-type kinetics. Modified polarization curves of the VWT covered electrode show an enhanced anodic reaction and an almost unaltered cathodic reaction. The NH3 dependency is dominated by the VWT coverage and it turns out that the catalytic properties of the VWT thick film are responsible for the electrode potential shift.

  2. Half-Cell Potential Analysis of an Ammonia Sensor with the Electrochemical Cell Au | YSZ | Au, V2O5-WO3-TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Schönauer-Kamin, Daniela; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Half-cell potentials of the electrochemical cell Au, VWT | YSZ | Au are analyzed in dependence on oxygen and ammonia concentration at 550 °C. One of the gold electrodes is covered with a porous SCR catalyst, vanadia-tungstenia-titania (VWT). The cell is utilized as a potentiometric ammonia gas sensor and provides a semi-logarithmic characteristic curve with a high NH3 sensitivity and selectivity. The analyses of the Au | YSZ and Au, VWT | YSZ half-cells are conducted to describe the non-equilibrium behavior of the sensor device in light of mixed potential theory. Both electrode potentials provide a dependency on the NH3 concentration, whereby VWT, Au | YSZ shows a stronger effect which increases with increasing VWT coverage. The potential shifts in the anodic direction confirm the formation of mixed potentials at both electrodes resulting from electrochemical reactions of O2 and NH3 at the three-phase boundary. Polarization curves indicate Butler-Volmer-type kinetics. Modified polarization curves of the VWT covered electrode show an enhanced anodic reaction and an almost unaltered cathodic reaction. The NH3 dependency is dominated by the VWT coverage and it turns out that the catalytic properties of the VWT thick film are responsible for the electrode potential shift. PMID:23575035

  3. Methanol selective fibre-optic gas sensor with a nanoporous thin film of organic-inorganic hybrid multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Okuda, H.; Lee, S.-W.

    2015-07-01

    The development of an evanescent wave optical fibre (EWOF) sensor modified with an organic-inorganic hybrid nanoporous thin film for alcohol vapor detection was demonstrated. The optical fibre with a core diameter of 200 μm was bent into U-shape probe optic fibre to enhance the penetation depth of light transferred into the evanescent filed. The bended region of the fibre was modified with a multilayered thin film of poly(allyamine hydrochloride) and silica nanoparticels, (PAH/SiO2)n, by a layer-by-layer (LbL) film deposition technique, followed by infusion of tetrakis(4- sulfophenyl)porphine, TPPS. The mesoporous film structure showed high sensitivity and selectivity to methanol by the aid of the TPPS infused inside the film. The optical sensor response was reversible and reproducible over many times of exposures to analytes, which was caused by the change in refractive index (RI) of the film.

  4. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2014-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 10(5) cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >10(3)); to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high

  5. G Protein-selective GPCR Conformations Measured Using FRET Sensors in a Live Cell Suspension Fluorometer Assay.

    PubMed

    Semack, Ansley; Malik, Rabia U; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2016-01-01

    Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based studies have become increasingly common in the investigation of GPCR signaling. Our research group developed an intra-molecular FRET sensor to detect the interaction between Gα subunits and GPCRs in live cells following agonist stimulation. Here, we detail the protocol for detecting changes in FRET between the β2-adrenergic receptor and the Gαs C-terminus peptide upon treatment with 100 µM isoproterenol hydrochloride as previously characterized(1). Our FRET sensor is a single polypeptide consisting serially of a full-length GPCR, a FRET acceptor fluorophore (mCitrine), an ER/K SPASM (systematic protein affinity strength modulation) linker, a FRET donor fluorophore (mCerulean), and a Gα C-terminal peptide. This protocol will detail cell preparation, transfection conditions, equipment setup, assay execution, and data analysis. This experimental design detects small changes in FRET indicative of protein-protein interactions, and can also be used to compare the strength of interaction across ligands and GPCR-G protein pairings. To enhance the signal-to-noise in our measurements, this protocol requires heightened precision in all steps, and is presented here to enable reproducible execution. PMID:27684955

  6. Fabrication and characterization of molecular beam epitaxy grown thin-film GaAs waveguides for mid-infrared evanescent field chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Christy; Giovannini, Marcella; Faist, Jérôme; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2006-06-15

    Thin-film GaAs waveguides were designed and fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy for use in mid-infrared (MIR) evanescent field liquid sensing. Waveguides were designed to facilitate the propagation of a single mode at a wavelength of 10.3 microm emitted from a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser, which overlaps with molecular selective absorption features of acetic anhydride. The characterization of the waveguides shows transmission across a broad MIR band. Evanescent field absorption measurements indicate a significant sensitivity enhancement in contrast to multimode planar silver halide waveguides.

  7. Survival probability of an immobile target in a sea of evanescent diffusive or subdiffusive traps: A fractional equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, E.; Yuste, S. B.; Lindenberg, Katja

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the survival probability of an immobile target surrounded by a sea of uncorrelated diffusive or subdiffusive evanescent traps (i.e., traps that disappear in the course of their motion). Our calculation is based on a fractional reaction-subdiffusion equation derived from a continuous time random walk model of the system. Contrary to an earlier method valid only in one dimension (d=1), the equation is applicable in any Euclidean dimension d and elucidates the interplay between anomalous subdiffusive transport, the irreversible evanescence reaction, and the dimension in which both the traps and the target are embedded. Explicit results for the survival probability of the target are obtained for a density ρ(t) of traps which decays (i) exponentially and (ii) as a power law. In the former case, the target has a finite asymptotic survival probability in all integer dimensions, whereas in the latter case there are several regimes where the values of the decay exponent for ρ(t) and the anomalous diffusion exponent of the traps determine whether or not the target has a chance of eternal survival in one, two, and three dimensions.

  8. Glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of glycan-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Mori, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Yabe, Rikio; Iwaki, Jun; Shikanai, Toshihide; Angata, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-10-01

    The extensive involvement of glycan-binding proteins (GBPs) as regulators in diverse biological phenomena provides a fundamental reason to investigate their glycan-binding specificities. Here, we developed a glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of GBPs. Eighty-nine selected multivalent glycoconjugates comprising natural glycoproteins, neo-glycoproteins, and polyacrylamide (PAA)-conjugated glycan epitopes were immobilized on an epoxy-activated glass slide. The GBP binding was monitored by an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted scanner at equilibrium without washing steps. The detection principle also allows direct application of unpurified GBPs with the aid of specific antibodies. Model experiments using plant lectins (RCA120, ConA, and SNA), galectins (3 and 8), a C-type lectin (DC-SIGN) and a siglec (CD22) provided data consistent with previous work within 4 h using less than 40 ng of GBPs per analysis. As an application, serum profiling of antiglycan antibodies (IgG and IgM) was performed with Cy3-labeled secondary antibodies. Moreover, novel carbohydrate-binding ability was demonstrated for a human IL-18 binding protein. Thus, the developed glycan array is useful for investigation of various types of GBPs, with the added advantage of wash-free analysis.

  9. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-02-04

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay.

  10. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay. PMID:26861328

  11. Study of the interaction of trastuzumab and SKOV3 epithelial cancer cells using a quartz crystal microbalance sensor.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Louise; Käck, Camilla; Aastrup, Teodor; Nicholls, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical methods founded upon whole cell-based assays are of importance in early stage drug development and in fundamental studies of biomolecular recognition. Here we have studied the binding of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on human ovary adenocarcinoma epithelial cancer cells (SKOV3) using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology. An optimized procedure for immobilizing the cells on the chip surface was established with respect to fixation procedure and seeding density. Trastuzumab binding to the cell decorated sensor surface was studied, revealing a mean dissociation constant, KD, value of 7 ± 1 nM (standard error of the mean). This study provides a new perspective on the affinity of the antibody-receptor complex presented a more natural context compared to purified receptors. These results demonstrate the potential for using whole cell-based QCM assay in drug development, the screening of HER2 selective antibody-based drug candidates, and for the study of biomolecular recognition. This real time, label free approach for studying interactions with target receptors present in their natural environment afforded sensitive and detailed kinetic information about the binding of the analyte to the target.

  12. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on an optical micro-fiber three-beam interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunyang; Ding, Hui; Lv, Fangxing

    2014-01-01

    With diameter close to the wavelength of the guided light and high index contrast between the fiber and the surrounding, an optical micro-fiber shows a variety of interesting waveguiding properties, including widely tailorable optical confinement, strong evanescent fields and waveguide dispersion. Among various micro-fiber applications, optical sensing has been attracting increasing research interest due to its possibilities of realizing miniaturized fiber optic sensors with small footprint, high sensitivity, and low optical power consumption. Typical micro-fiber based sensing structures, including Michelson interferometer, Mach-Zenhder interferometer, Fabry-Perot interferometer, micro-fiber ring resonator, have been proposed. The sensitivity of these structures heavily related to the fraction of evanescent field outside micro-fiber. In this paper, we report the first theoretical and experimental study of a new type of refractometric sensor based on micro-fiber three-beam interferometer. Theoretical and experimental analysis reveals that the sensitivity is not only determined by the fraction of evanescent field outside the micro-fiber but also related to the values of interferometric arms. The sensitivity can be enhanced significantly when the effective lengths of the interferometric arms tends to be equal. We argue that this has great potential for increasing the sensitivity of refractive index detection. PMID:25511687

  13. Glucose Dependency of the Metabolic Pathway of HEK 293 Cells Measured by a Flow-through Type pH/CO2 Sensor System Using ISFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Akira; Mohri, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michihiro; Naruse, Keiji

    Our group previously reported the application of a flow-through type pH/CO2 sensor system designed to evaluate the metabolic activity of cultured cells. The sensor system consists of two ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), an ISFET to measure the total pH change and an ISFET enclosed within a gas-permeable silicone tube to measure the pH change attributable to CO2. In that study, we used the system to quantitatively analyze metabolic switching induced by glucose concentration changes in three cultured cell types (bovine arterial endothelium cell (BAEC), human umbilical vein endothelium cell (HUVEC), and rat cardiomuscle cell (RCMC)), and to measure the production rates of total carbonate and free lactic acid in the cultured cells. In every cell type examined, a decrease in the glucose concentration led to an increase in total carbonate, a product of cellular respiration, and a decrease of free lactic acid, a product of glycolysis. There were very significant differences among the cell types, however, in the glucose concentrations at the metabolic switching points. We postulated that the cell has a unique switching point on the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to respiration. In this paper we use our sensor system to evaluate the metabolic switching of human embryonic kidney 293 cells triggered by glucose concentration changes. The superior metabolic pathway switched from glycolysis to respiration when the glucose concentration decreased to about 2 mM. This result was very similar to that obtained in our earlier experiments on HUVECs, but far different from our results on the other two cells types, BAECs and RCMCs. This sensor system will be useful for analyzing cellular metabolism for many applications and will yield novel information on different cell types.

  14. High angular sensitivity thin film tin oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Davinder; Madaan, Divya; Sharma, V. K.; Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present theoretical anlaysis of a thin film SnO2 (Tin Oxide) sensor for the measurement of variation in the refractive index of the bulk media. It is based on lossy mode resonance between the absorbing thin film lossy modes and the evanescent wave. Also the addition of low index dielectric matching layer between the prism and the lossy waveguiding layer future increase the angular sensitivity and produce an efficient refractive index sensor. The angular interrogation is done and obtained sensitivity is 110 degree/RIU. Theoretical analysis of the proposed sensor based on Fresnel reflection coefficients is presented. This enhanced sensitivity will further improve the monitoring of biomolecular interactions and the higher sensitivity of the proposed configurations makes it to be a much better option to be employed for biosensing applications.

  15. An Electromagnetic Sensor with a Metamaterial Lens for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Adriana; Steigmann, Rozina; Bruma, Alina; Šturm, Roman

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the study and implementation of a sensor with a metamaterial (MM) lens in electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation (eNDE). Thus, the use of a new type of MM, named Conical Swiss Rolls (CSR) has been proposed. These structures can serve as electromagnetic flux concentrators in the radiofrequency range. As a direct application, plates of composite materials with carbon fibers woven as reinforcement and polyphenylene sulphide as matrix with delaminations due to low energy impacts were examined. The evaluation method is based on the appearance of evanescent modes in the space between carbon fibers when the sample is excited with a transversal magnetic along z axis (TMz) polarized electromagnetic field. The MM lens allows the transmission and intensification of evanescent waves. The characteristics of carbon fibers woven structure became visible and delaminations are clearly emphasized. The flaws can be localized with spatial resolution better than λ/2000. PMID:26151206

  16. An Electromagnetic Sensor with a Metamaterial Lens for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Savin, Adriana; Steigmann, Rozina; Bruma, Alina; Šturm, Roman

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the study and implementation of a sensor with a metamaterial (MM) lens in electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation (eNDE). Thus, the use of a new type of MM, named Conical Swiss Rolls (CSR) has been proposed. These structures can serve as electromagnetic flux concentrators in the radiofrequency range. As a direct application, plates of composite materials with carbon fibers woven as reinforcement and polyphenylene sulphide as matrix with delaminations due to low energy impacts were examined. The evaluation method is based on the appearance of evanescent modes in the space between carbon fibers when the sample is excited with a transversal magnetic along z axis (TMz) polarized electromagnetic field. The MM lens allows the transmission and intensification of evanescent waves. The characteristics of carbon fibers woven structure became visible and delaminations are clearly emphasized. The flaws can be localized with spatial resolution better than λ/2000.

  17. Aptamer based electrochemical sensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachna; Varun Agrawal, Ved; Sharma, Pradeep; Varshney, R.; Sinha, R. K.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2012-04-01

    We report results of the studies relating to development of an aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The aminated 85-mer DNA aptamer probe specific for the A549 cells has been covalently immobilized onto silane self assembled monolayer (SAM) onto ITO surface using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The results of cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry studies reveal that the aptamer functionalized bioelectrode can specifically detect lung cancer cells in the concentration range of 103 to 107 cells/ml with detection limit of 103 cells/ml within 60 s. The specificity studies of the bioelectrode have been carried out with control KB cells. No significant change in response is observed for control KB cells as compared to that of the A549 target cells.

  18. Load-cell based characterization system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre's holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated.

  19. Load-cell based characterization system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre's holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated.

  20. Load-cell based characterization system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre's holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated. PMID:27475586