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Sample records for evaporation concentrates etude

  1. Laser-printed superhydrophobic evaporating drop concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhchenko, Alexey; Vitrik, Oleg; Syubaev, Sergey; Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr

    2017-09-01

    We present an all-laser micro-machined superhydrophobic/hydrophilic structure for a targeted pre- concentration of analyte molecules from an deposited water drop. The design of the evaporating concentrator combines the superhydrophylic Au-coated central pillar surrounded by the high-aspect-ratio microstructures having hierarchical micro/nano roughness both fabricated in a bulk polytetrafluoroethylene substrate using by a direct micro-machining with a femtosecond-pulse filament. The surrounding high-aspect-ratio textures posseses a high contact angle exceeding 170° and hysteresis less than 1.5° for the deposited 3-μl. water drop providing controllable pre-concentration of the analyte from the evaporating drop within a small superhydrophylic area of about 80×80 µm2 and resulting in the increase of the initial analyte concentration by 104 times.

  2. Vapor compression evaporator concentrates, recovers alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.N.; Robe, K.; Bacchetti, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on presenting a solution to the high energy cost of operating a steam heated, single effect evaporator used by Monsanto Industrial Chemical Company at a plant in Seattle, Wash., to produce vanillin from pulp and paper mill sulfite. Use of the single effect flash evaporator resulted in high energy usage due not only to the ''single effect'' use of steam, but also because energy consumption was reduced only slightly at low operating rates. The solution to this problem was the replacement of the single effect evaporator with a vapor recompression evaporator. Operating for over 1 1/2 years, the vapor recompression evaporator system has had no significant maintenance problems. The system operates with only 1/60th the steam consumption and 15% of the total energy consumption of the previous evaporator and has had no tube fouling. Also, since the distillate is condensed within the evaporator, less cooling water is required, allowing two heat exchangers to be taken out of service. When operating at less than design capacity, the energy consumption drops almost linearly with the feed rate. At low feed rates, a by-pass valve unloads the compressor to reduce energy consumption. Total energy consumption, now 15% of the previous level, results in an estimated pay-back of less than three years.

  3. Mineral recovery from inland reverse osmosis concentrate using isothermal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadesmaeili, Farah; Badr, Mostafa Kabiri; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Fox, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Mineral recovery from reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate after concentration by a secondary sea water-type RO system with lime-soda pretreatment was the focus of this study. Lime-soda pretreatment removed Ca, Mg and Si allowing for the application of sea water-type RO resulting in a concentrate composed of sodium, potassium, sulfate and chloride. The overall objective was reduction in concentrate volume that will require disposal by evaporation while producing by-products with potential resale value. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium calculations using Pitzer's correlations for 25 °C, accurately predicted the solubility and evaporation path of the sodium sulfate minerals as potential by-products. Bench-scale evaporation experiments verified the model predictions and indicated that 81-88% of the sodium sulfate by-products were Na(2)SO(4).

  4. Solute concentration-dependent contact angle hysteresis and evaporation stains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-07-08

    The presence of nonvolatile solutes in a liquid drop on a solid surface can affect the wetting properties. Depending on the surface-activity of the solutes, the extent of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can vary with their concentration and the pattern of the evaporation stain is altered accordingly. In this work, four types of concentration-dependent CAH and evaporation stains are identified for a water drop containing polymeric additives on polycarbonate. For polymers without surface-activity such as dextran, advancing and receding contact angles (θa and θr) are independent of solute concentrations, and a concentrated stain is observed in the vicinity of the drop center after complete evaporation. For polymers with weak surface-activity such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), both θa and θr are decreased by solute addition, and the stain pattern varies with increasing PEG concentration, including a concentrated stain and a mountain-like island. For polymers with intermediate surface-activity such as sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS), θa descends slightly, but θr decreases significantly after the addition of a substantial amount of NaPSS, and a ring-like stain pattern is observed. Moreover, the size of the ring stain can be controlled by NaPSS concentration. For polymers with strong surface-activity such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), θa remains essentially a constant, but θr is significantly lowered after the addition of a small amount of PVP, and the typical ring-like stain is seen.

  5. Development of an evaporation-based microfluidic sample concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nigel R.; Lukyanov, Anatoly; Bardell, Ron L.; Seifried, Lynn; Shen, Mingchao

    2008-02-01

    MicroPlumbers Microsciences LLC, has developed a relatively simple concentrator device based on isothermal evaporation. The device allows for rapid concentration of dissolved or dispersed substances or microorganisms (e.g. bacteria, viruses, proteins, toxins, enzymes, antibodies, etc.) under conditions gentle enough to preserve their specific activity or viability. It is capable of removing of 0.8 ml of water per minute at 37°C, and has dimensions compatible with typical microfluidic devices. The concentrator can be used as a stand-alone device or integrated into various processes and analytical instruments, substantially increasing their sensitivity while decreasing processing time. The evaporative concentrator can find applications in many areas such as biothreat detection, environmental monitoring, forensic medicine, pathogen analysis, and agricultural industrial monitoring. In our presentation, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of the concentrator. We discuss multiphysics simulations of the heat and mass transport in the device that we used to select the design of the concentrator and the protocol of performance testing. We present the results of experiments evaluating water removal performance.

  6. Effect of Concentration on Evaporation Rate for Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in a Falling Film Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akira; Ide, Tetsuo

    Experiments on evaporation for lithium bromide aqueous solution (0-55 wt% LiBr) were made in Summary a externally heated wetted-wall column under reduced pressures. The evaporation rates of 5 and 8 wt% LiBr-water solutions were similar to those of water. The evaporation rates, however, owered with further increase of the concentration of LiBr, and at low feed rates the evaporation rates lowered with decrease of the feed rate because the temperature of the falling film rose. On the other hand, at high feed rates the evaporation rates lowered with increase of feed rates because the heat transfer coefficients of the falling film decreased. Therefore, a maximum evaporation rate existed and it was supposed that there is the optimum feed rate. The experimental data agreed with the values that were calculated numerically based on the unidirectional model that lithium bromide didn't move through falling film.

  7. Evaporation in relation to CO 2 concentration: Analysis of mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, C. S. P.; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Rao, Surampalli; Abd Elbasit, Mohamed A. M.; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the potential of mass transfer approach in estimating evaporation changes under different CO 2 levels are evaluated using data from controlled chamber experiments in which radiation and wind velocity were kept constant and temperature and relative humidity profiles were varied in different patterns along with CO 2 concentration. Currently, FAO procedure lists three approaches to compute air vapour pressure based on temperature and relative humidity profiles. In this study, the impact of using different procedures of estimating air vapour pressure is examined to assess the use of mass transfer approach for estimating evaporation. To achieve this, a part of the data is used to calibrate mass transfer coefficient which is subsequently used to project evaporation for future states. Accordingly, strategies are ranked for their potential in estimating evaporation. The effect of evaporation rate is compared at 400 ppm and 600 ppm CO 2 level. It has been observed that the evaporation rate is more pronounced at higher CO 2 level.

  8. Enhancing radiolytic stability upon concentration of tritium-labeled pharmaceuticals utilizing centrifugal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rosemary; Helmy, Roy; Waterhouse, David

    2015-05-30

    Tritium radiopharmaceuticals are often used in drug development because of their desirable specific activity. The inherent instability of these radioactive tracers often leads to a requirement to purify prior to use. Purification methodologies such as preparative chromatography and solid/liquid extractions often utilize water as a solvent, which is not suitable for long-term storage and necessitates removal. Rotary evaporation has traditionally been utilized for the removal of this unwanted solvent, however, this method has been shown to lead to decomposition of the tritium species in some cases. Centrifugal evaporation is a milder concentration method which has been demonstrated to effectively remove solvents. In this study, we show that centrifugal evaporation leads to effective concentration of tritium samples without the decomposition typically observed by rotary evaporation.

  9. Evaporation rates of water from concentrated oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Aranberri, I; Binks, B P; Clint, J H; Fletcher, P D I

    2004-03-16

    We have investigated the rate of water evaporation from concentrated oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing an involatile oil. Evaporation of the water continuous phase causes compression of the emulsion with progressive distortion of the oil drops and thinning of the water films separating them. Theoretically, the vapor pressure of water is sensitive to the interdroplet interactions, which are a function of the film thickness. Three main possible situations are considered. First, under conditions when the evaporation rate is controlled by mass transfer across the stagnant vapor phase, model calculations show that evaporation can, in principle, be slowed by repulsive interdroplet interactions. However, significant retardation requires very strong repulsive forces acting over large separations for typical emulsion drop sizes. Second, water evaporation may be limited by diffusion in the network of water films within the emulsion. In this situation, water loss by evaporation from the emulsion surface leads to a gradient in the water concentration (and in the water film thickness). Third, compression of the drops may lead to coalescence of the emulsion drops and the formation of a macroscopic oil film at the emulsion surface, which serves to prevent further water evaporation. Water mass-loss curves have been measured for silicone o/w emulsions stabilized by the anionic surfactant SDS as a function of the water content, the thickness of the stagnant vapor-phase layer, and the concentration of electrolyte in the aqueous phase, and the results are discussed in terms of the three possible scenarios just described. In systems with added salt, water evaporation virtually ceases before all the water present is lost, probably as a result of oil-drop coalescence resulting in the formation of a water-impermeable oil film at the emulsion surface.

  10. Influence of three different concentration techniques on evaporation rate, color and phenolics content of blueberry juice.

    PubMed

    Elik, Aysel; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Maskan, Medeni; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2016-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of three different concentration processes open-pan, rotary vacuum evaporator and microwave heating on evaporation rate, the color and phenolics content of blueberry juice. Kinetics model study for changes in soluble solids content (°Brix), color parameters and phenolics content during evaporation was also performed. The final juice concentration of 65° Brix was achieved in 12, 15, 45 and 77 min, for microwave at 250 and 200 W, rotary vacuum and open-pan evaporation processes, respectively. Color changes associated with heat treatment were monitored using Hunter colorimeter (L*, a* and b*). All Hunter color parameters decreased with time and dependently studied concentration techniques caused color degradation. It was observed that the severity of color loss was higher in open-pan technique than the others. Evaporation also affected total phenolics content in blueberry juice. Total phenolics loss during concentration was highest in open-pan technique (36.54 %) and lowest in microwave heating at 200 W (34.20 %). So, the use of microwave technique could be advantageous in food industry because of production of blueberry juice concentrate with a better quality and short time of operation. A first-order kinetics model was applied to modeling changes in soluble solids content. A zero-order kinetics model was used to modeling changes in color parameters and phenolics content.

  11. Six-stage falling-film evaporator concentrates stillage to 60% solids

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, L.; Patan, K.; Hodel, A.E.

    1987-06-01

    Shepherd Oil Company produces motor grade ethanol using cane molasses base stock as raw material. A beer fermentation process generates the ethanol out of a dilute molasses liquor. After the alcohol is extracted from the beer, the remaining low solids (5%) residue must be concentrated to about 60% solids before it can be used. The resulting concentrate is then fortified with sugar and minerals and marketed as CMFS (Concentrated Molasses Feed Stock). The entire process was set up to be energy efficient. The stillage, which comes off the distillation tower at about 270F, is flashed to about 210F in a waste heat recovery exchanger to transfer heat to the beer-stripper feed. Concentration of the stillage was considered difficult because the syrup-like material tends to foul heat transfer surfaces. The degree of fouling depends upon the source of the molasses base stock. The concentrate tends to deteriorate if exposed to high temperature for an extended period of time. Low heat transfer coefficients and the thermal sensitivity of the concentrate made selection of the type of stillage evaporators critical to the process efficiency. Based upon an engineering evaluation, Sheperd Oil Company chose a falling film evaporatory of sanitary design as the most efficient way to concentrate the stillage. The evaporation requirements were evaluated and stillage samples were analyzed by the evaporator manufacturer. A 6-effect, 7-body system was selected as the optimum energy costs. The falling film system evaporates about 200,000 lb/hr. The economy is about 7.17 pounds of evaporation per pound of live steam.

  12. Membrane assisted and temperature controlled on-line evaporative concentration for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Fornells, E; Barnett, B; Bailey, M; Shellie, R A; Hilder, E F; Breadmore, M C

    2017-02-24

    A membrane evaporation concentrator for continuous flow conditions is introduced. The membrane evaporation concentrator provides nearly 30-fold concentration in less than 60min whilst maintaining solute integrity under different sub-ambient pressure conditions and mild temperatures. To better understand the performance of the concentrator, a theoretical model was developed using caffeine as a model analyte, and used to predict the concentration performance of three target analytes at different conditions. An exponential relationship exists between temperature and concentration factor. By using the model it was determined that a 10-fold concentration (±0.5) can be performed at 56.72±0.07°C and at a flow rate of 10μLmin(-1). Altogether, the model provides a better understanding of the process and ease of application in a wide variety of analytical methods. This work demonstrates that it is possible to obtain high concentrations with a continuously flowing fluid when temperature is precisely controlled and in times that are reasonable compared to existing evaporation concentration procedures.

  13. Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogen-Based Direct Visualization of Concentration Gradient Inside an Evaporating Binary Sessile Droplet.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin; Xie, Ni; Qiu, Zijie; Yang, Junxian; He, Minghao; Wong, Kam Sing; Tang, Ben Zhong; Qiu, Huihe

    2017-08-30

    In this study, the concentration gradient inside evaporating binary sessile droplets of 30, 50, and 60 vol % tetrahydrofuran (THF)/water mixtures was investigated. The 5 μL THF/water droplets were evaporated on a transparent hydrophobic substrate. This is the first demonstration of local concentration mapping within an evaporating binary droplet utilizing the aggregation-induced emission material. During the first two evaporation stages of the binary droplet, the local concentration can be directly visualized by the change of fluorescence emission intensity. Time-resolved average and local concentrations can be estimated by using the pre-established function of fluorescence intensity versus water volume fraction.

  14. Liquid-phase continuity and solute concentration dynamics during evaporation from porous media: Pore-scale processes near vaporization surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2010-04-01

    Evaporation from porous media involves complex pore scale transport processes affecting liquid phase distribution and fluxes. Often, the initial evaporation rate is nearly constant and supplied by capillary flow from wetted zones below to the surface. Sustaining constant flow against gravity hinges on an upward capillary gradient and on liquid phase continuity with hydraulic conductivity sufficient for supplying evaporative flux. The pore scale liquid phase adjustments during evaporative displacement necessary for maintaining a constant flux have been postulated but rarely measured. In this study we employed detailed imaging using x-ray synchrotron radiation to study liquid phase distribution and dynamics at the most sensitive domain just below the surface of evaporating sand columns. Three-dimensional images at a resolution of 7 microns were obtained from sand column (mean particle size 0.6 mm) initially saturated with calcium iodide solution (4% by mass) to enhance image contrast. Detailed imaging of near-surface liquid phase distribution during evaporation confirmed phase continuity at micrometric scale and provided quantitative estimates of liquid conductance in agreement with values required to supply evaporative flux. Temporal variations in bulk salt concentrations determined from x-ray attenuation were proportional to evaporative water mass loss. Highly resolved salt concentration images revealed existence of evaporating chimneys that supply the bulk of evaporative demand. Delineated mass loss dynamics and salt distribution measured by the x-ray attenuation were in reasonable agreement with a simplified analytical convection-diffusion model for salt dynamics during evaporation from porous media.

  15. Correlations between short-term indoor and outdoor PM concentrations at residences with evaporative coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Whai; Paschold, Helmut; Morales, Hugo; Chianelli, Julian

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) was monitored at 10 residences in the El Paso, Texas region in the summer of 2001. Concurrent indoor and outdoor 10-min averaged PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations were recorded for 2 days each to establish the indoor-outdoor PM correlation for typical west Texas residences equipped with evaporative coolers. Indoor PM concentrations stabilize in approximately 10 min in a typical house equipped with evaporative coolers. If the ambient PM concentration remains steady, a 10-min average indoor air sample after the first 10-min period would contain 99% outdoor air and a 1-h average indoor air sample would actually be represented by 95% of the outdoor air. A strong diurnal pattern of PM 10 indoor and outdoor was observed in 9 out of the 10 tested houses independent of the possible human activities and other indoor sources at each residence. Consistent with prior regional studies, indoor and outdoor PM 10 concentrations at these houses frequently peaked with strong association with each other in the evening hours between 6 and 9 pm. In addition, it is observed that both indoor and outdoor PM 10 peaked after the wind speed and wind gust peaked. Indoor PM concentration peaks clearly correlated with documentation of human activities, however, these peaks tended to be of shorter duration due to the high ventilation rates of the evaporative coolers. Evaporative coolers were found to act as PM filters that effectively replace indoor air rapidly creating indoor concentrations approximately 40% of outdoor PM 10 and 35% of outdoor PM 2.5. Both cooler types, rigid media and aspen pad, appeared to produce similar reduction rates for both PM 2.5 and PM 10.

  16. Concentration of Melton Valley Storage Tank surrogates with a wiped film evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, M.D.; Farr, L.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Hewitt, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes experiments to determine whether a wiped film evaporator (WFE) might be used to concentrate low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLLW). Solutions used in these studies were surrogates that contain no radionuclides. The compositions of the surrogates were based on one of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). It was found that a WFE could be used to concentrate LLLW to varying degrees by manipulating various parameters. The parameters studied were rotor speed, process fluid feed temperature and feed rate, and evaporator temperature. Product consistency varied from an unsaturated liquid to a dry powder. Volume reductions up to 68% were achieved. System decontamination factors were consistently in the range of 10{sup 4}.

  17. Effect of mineral viscosity-enhancing admixtures on the solidification of evaporator concentrates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yung; Huang, Wan-Ting

    2015-11-15

    It is known that partial replacement of cement by viscosity-enhancing admixtures, also known as anti-washout admixtures, affects the quality of the waste form or concrete. To reduce the bleeding rate of the paste, the characteristics of various mineral viscosity-enhancing admixtures dispersed in saline solutions were investigated, including sedimentation and viscosity. The admixture candidates included fly ash, silica fume, bentonite, and palygorskite. The effect of these admixtures blended with a cement-based matrix on the bleeding rate of the solidification of evaporator concentrates was also examined in this paper. The experimental results show the palygorskite Type 400 is the best choice to improve the quality of waste form, due to its excellent suspension property in the saline solution. The bleeding rate of paste decreased as the dispersion volume of the admixture suspension increased. For consideration of the quality of waste forms and the concentrate loading, the optimization of the palygorskite/concentrate ratio of 15-17 wt% and solidification agent/concentrate ratio of 1.0-1.2 were adopted. With this recipe, the quality of waste forms resulting from the solidification of simulated and actual evaporator concentrates mainly containing chloride met the regulations' requirements.

  18. Characteristics of heat transfer fouling of thin stillage using model thin stillage and evaporator concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Ravi Kumar

    The US fuel ethanol demand was 50.3 billion liters (13.3 billion gallons) in 2012. Corn ethanol was produced primarily by dry grind process. Heat transfer equipment fouling occurs during corn ethanol production and increases the operating expenses of ethanol plants. Following ethanol distillation, unfermentables are centrifuged to separate solids as wet grains and liquid fraction as thin stillage. Evaporator fouling occurs during thin stillage concentration to syrup and decreases evaporator performance. Evaporators need to be shutdown to clean the deposits from the evaporator surfaces. Scheduled and unscheduled evaporator shutdowns decrease process throughput and results in production losses. This research were aimed at investigating thin stillage fouling characteristics using an annular probe at conditions similar to an evaporator in a corn ethanol production plant. Fouling characteristics of commercial thin stillage and model thin stillage were studied as a function of bulk fluid temperature and heat transfer surface temperature. Experiments were conducted by circulating thin stillage or carbohydrate mixtures in a loop through the test section which consisted of an annular fouling probe while maintaining a constant heat flux by electrical heating and fluid flow rate. The change in fouling resistance with time was measured. Fouling curves obtained for thin stillage and concentrated thin stillage were linear with time but no induction periods were observed. Fouling rates for concentrated thin stillage were higher compared to commercial thin stillage due to the increase in solid concentration. Fouling rates for oil skimmed and unskimmed concentrated thin stillage were similar but lower than concentrated thin stillage at 10% solids concentration. Addition of post fermentation corn oil to commercial thin stillage at 0.5% increments increased the fouling rates up to 1% concentration but decreased at 1.5%. As thin stillage is composed of carbohydrates, protein, lipid

  19. A Remote Absorption Process for Disposal of Evaporate and Reverse Osmosis Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, D.A.

    2008-07-01

    Many commercial nuclear plants and DOE facilities generate secondary waste streams consisting of evaporator bottoms and reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate. Since liquids are not permitted in disposal facilities, these waste streams must be converted to dry solids, either by evaporation to dried solids or by solidification to liquid-free solids. Evaporation of the liquid wastes reduces their volume, but requires costly energy and capital equipment. In some cases, concentration of the contaminants during drying can cause the waste to exceed Class A waste for nuclear utilities or exceed DOE transuranic limits. This means that disposal costs will be increased, or that, when the Barnwell, SC disposal site closes to waste outside of the Atlantic Compact in July 2008, the waste will be precluded from disposal for the foreseeable future). Solidification with cement agents requires less energy and equipment than drying, but results in a volume increase of 50-100%. The doubling or tripling of waste weight, along with the increased volume, sharply increases shipping and disposal costs. Confronted with these unattractive alternatives, Diversified Technologies Services (DTS), in conjunction with selected nuclear utilities and D and D operations at Rocky Flats, undertook an exploratory effort to convert this liquid wastewater to a solid without using cement. This would avoid the bulking effect of cement, and permit the waste to be disposed of the Energy Solutions facility in Utah as well as some DOE facilities. To address the need for an attractive alternative to drying and cement solidification, a test program was developed using a polymer absorbent media to convert the concentrate streams to a liquid-free waste form that meets the waste acceptance criteria of the pertinent burial sites. Two approaches for mixing the polymer with the liquid were tested: mechanical mixing and in-situ incorporation. As part of this test program, a process control program (PCP) was developed that is

  20. Thermal characteristics of a medium-level concentration photovoltaic unit with evaporation cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yuri V.; Reyz, Michael A.; Fisher, Yossi

    2009-08-01

    The results of thermal analysis and experiments are presented for a 1-kW brand new medium-level (8X) concentration photovoltaic (CPV) unit that is cooled by evaporation and built as an elongated floating solar unit. The unit keeps the silicon PV elements at low and stable temperature around the clock, significantly outperforms competitors' systems in terms of the power output and the life span of identical PV elements. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that the PV element temperature level exceeds the temperature level of water in the water basin (used as a heat sink) by just a few degrees.

  1. Evaporative Concentration of 100x J13 Ground Water at 60% Relative Humidity and 90C

    SciTech Connect

    Staggs, K; Maureen Alai,; Hailey, P; Carroll, S A; Sutton, M; Nguyen, Q A

    2003-12-04

    In these experiments we studied the behavior of a synthetic concentrated J13 solution as it comes in contact with a Ni-Cr-Mo-alloy selected for waste canisters in the designated high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concentrated synthetic J13 solution was allowed to drip slowly onto heated test specimens (90 C, 60% relative humidity) where the water moved down the surface of the specimens, evaporated and minerals precipitated. Mineral separation or zoning along the evaporation path was not observed. We infer from solid analyses and geochemical modeling, that the most corrosive components (Ca, Mg, and F) are limited by mineral precipitation. Minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include thermonatrite, natrite, and trona, all sodium carbonate minerals, as well as kogarkoite (Na{sub 3}SO{sub 4}F), halite (NaCl), and niter (KNO{sub 3}). Calcite and a magnesium silicate precipitation are based on chemical analyses of the solids and geochemical modeling. The most significant finding of this study is that sulfate and fluoride concentrations are controlled by the solubility of kogarkoite. Kogarkoite thermodynamic data are needed in the Yucca Mountain Project database to predict the corrosiveness of carbonate brines and to establish the extent to which fluoride is removed from the brines as a solid.

  2. Relating Nimbus-7 37 GHz data to global land-surface evaporation, primary productivity and the atmospheric CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Global observations at 37 GHz by the Nimbus-7 SMMR are related to zonal variations of land surface evaporation and primary productivity, as well as to temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The temporal variation of CO2 concentration and the zonal variations of evaporation and primary productivity are shown to be highly correlated with the satellite sensor data. The potential usefulness of the 37-GHz data for global biospheric and climate studies is noted.

  3. Relating Nimbus-7 37 GHz data to global land-surface evaporation, primary productivity and the atmospheric CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Global observations at 37 GHz by the Nimbus-7 SMMR are related to zonal variations of land surface evaporation and primary productivity, as well as to temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The temporal variation of CO2 concentration and the zonal variations of evaporation and primary productivity are shown to be highly correlated with the satellite sensor data. The potential usefulness of the 37-GHz data for global biospheric and climate studies is noted.

  4. Detection of Heavy-metal Ions Based on Evaporative Concentration Using a Super-hydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagimachi, Isao; Nashida, Norihiro; Iwasa, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    A concentrator chip which could detect a variety of heavy-metal ions was fabricated. To improve the detection sensitivity, a droplet of a sample solution was concentrated evaporatively using a super-hydrophobic surface formed with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) beads. The system consists of a working electrode at the center, surrounded by an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry was conducted using concentrator chips with different working electrode materials. A significant increase in peak height was observed as the sensitive area decreased and the volume of the droplet increased. When a 5-μl droplet was used, the detection limit for lead, cadmium, and arsenic ions was 1 ppb.

  5. Equilibrium ammonium concentration in slurry mix evaporator condensate tank (SMECT) with ammonia scrubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    1992-09-25

    During design reviews of the Recycle Colection Tank (RCT) at the Savannah River Site it was determined that in all cases the RCT scrub solution could not be routed to the RCT. During transfers to the tank farm (estimated ten hour cycle), the ammonia evolved from the RCT is scrubbed by the RCT scrubber and the ammonia scrub water must be returned to the SMECT. The result of this is an increased steady state concentration of ammonium in the SMECT water used for the ammonia scrubbers. The maximum ammonium concentration is necessary for the sizing of the ammonia scrubbers for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT),Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), and RCT.

  6. Droplet evaporation with complexity of evaporation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet often exhibits a mixed evaporation mode, where the contact radius and the contact angle simultaneously vary with time. For sessile water droplets containing polymers with different initial polymer concentrations, we experimentally study their evaporation dynamics by measuring mass and volume changes. We show how diffusion-limited evaporation governs droplet evaporation, regardless of the complexity of evaporation behavior, and how the evaporation rate depends on the polymer concentration. Finally, we suggest a unified expression for a diffusion-limited evaporation rate for a sessile droplet with complexity in evaporation dynamics.

  7. Concentration of Tea Extracts by Osmotic Evaporation: Optimisation of Process Parameters and Effect on Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Marisa P.; Alves, Vítor D.; Coelhoso, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the concentration process of three different tea extracts (medicinal Rosil No. 6, Black, and Forest Fruit teas) using the osmotic evaporation (OE) process, was studied. The effect of the OE process on the content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity was evaluated. The concentration process was carried out in a hollow-fibre membrane contactor with an effective surface area of 0.54 m2. The tea extract was circulated through the shell side of the contactor, while a concentrated osmotic solution (CaCl2 5 M) was circulated inside the fibres. The flux, the driving force, and the mass transfer coefficient were evaluated. A decrease of the water flux over time was observed and was attributed only to the decrease of the driving force, caused by the dilution of the osmotic solution. Using a surface area/feed volume ratio of 774 m2·m−3, it is possible to reach a tea concentration of 40% (w/w) in 5 h, with a constant water flux and without losing the phenolic content and antioxidant potential in most teas. PMID:28036043

  8. Short communication: Effects of nanofiltration and evaporation on the physiochemical properties of milk protein during processing of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jialu; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Shaozong; Liu, Chang; Li, Yan; Li, Haimei; Zhang, Liebing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of nanofiltration and evaporation concentration technologies on the physiochemical properties of milk protein concentrate (MPC) during processing. Skim milk, ultrafiltered milk, evaporated milk, nanofiltered milk, evaporated MPC, and nanofiltered MPC samples were collected at different processing stages. Chemical composition, microstructure of casein micelles, free sulfhydryl content, and surface hydrophobicity of the samples were determined. The insolubility index of MPC was also determined. Casein micelles aggregated compactly after evaporation while surface hydrophobicity increased and free sulfhydryl content decreased in evaporated milk compared with skim milk. However, the microstructure of the casein micelles was relatively undisturbed after nanofiltration, with reduced surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl content. No significant difference was found in chemical composition between the 2 MPC preparations: approximately 61.40% protein and 28.49% lactose. In addition, the particulate microstructures of both MPC were similar. However, the insolubility index of evaporated MPC was significantly (0.58mL) higher than that of nanofiltered MPC. Nanofiltration may be an effective way to improve the solubility of MPC products.

  9. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  10. Concentration and Separation of Active Proteins from Potato Industry Waste Based on Low-Temperature Evaporation and Ethanol Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Ahokas, Mikko; Järvinen, Juho; Toivanen, Juho; Tanskanen, Juha P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Potato fruit juice, a residue of starch industry, contains up to 2.5% [w/w] of proteins that are potentially valuable raw-materials of food, cosmetic, and pharma industries. The recovery of protein from the potato fruit juice is limited by the lack of industrially feasible concentration and separation technologies. The present research thus aimed at development of such process for the separation of active protease inhibitors from potato fruit juice. Methods. Low temperature mechanical vapor recompression evaporation was applied for concentration of potato fruit juice followed by ethanol precipitation for recovery of active proteins. The effects of precipitation temperature and precipitative agents were investigated employing response surface modeling methodology. Results. Concentration of potato fruit juice by evaporation was successful without loss of trypsin inhibition activity. Precipitation using 6.5 M ethanol at low temperature (0–+4°C) was found suitable for the recovery of active protease inhibitors from the concentrate. Piloting at starch industry yielded 50% of total proteins, with a high quantity of active protease inhibitors and a minor inclusion of other proteins. Conclusion. Concentration by low-temperature evaporation, followed by ethanol precipitation of protease inhibitors at optimized temperature, is an attractive option for valorization of potato fruit juice. PMID:28299232

  11. A Monte Carlo approach for determining cluster evaporation rates from concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona

    2016-11-01

    Evaporation rates of small negatively charged sulfuric acid-ammonia clusters are determined by combining detailed cluster formation simulations with cluster distributions measured in the CLOUD experiment at CERN. The analysis is performed by varying the evaporation rates with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), running cluster formation simulations with each new set of evaporation rates and comparing the obtained cluster distributions to the measurements. In a second set of simulations, the fragmentation of clusters in the mass spectrometer due to energetic collisions is studied by treating also the fragmentation probabilities as unknown parameters and varying them with MCMC. This second set of simulations results in a better fit to the experimental data, suggesting that a large fraction of the observed HSO4- and HSO4- ṡ H2SO4 signals may result from fragmentation of larger clusters, most importantly the HSO4- ṡ (H2SO4)2 trimer.

  12. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  13. Evaporator fouling tendencies of thin stillage and concentrates from the dry grind process

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the US, more than 200 maize processing plants use multiple effect evaporators to remove water from thin stillage and steepwater during dry grind and wet milling processes, respectively. During the dry grind process, unfermentables are centrifuged and the liquid fraction, thin stillage, is concen...

  14. In-line sample concentration by evaporation through porous hollow fibers and micromachined membranes embedded in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hainan; Tiggelaar, Roald M; Schlautmann, Stefan; Bart, Jacob; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-02-01

    Two types of microfluidic systems, a porous hollow fiber and a thin supported membrane with an array of micromachined holes, are investigated for concentrating mass-limited analyte samples. Water evaporation is driven by the partial pressure difference across the hydrophobic membrane, induced by dry sweeping gas on the permeate side. An analytical model permitting clarification of the contribution of design and process parameters on acquisition of concentrated solution and prediction of achievable concentration factors is presented. Concentrating an exemplary solution utilizing the two systems has been studied at different experimental conditions to validate the model. The results show that the hollow fiber gives controllable concentration factors of more than 10. For the micromachined membrane concentrator concentration factors of 6-8 were achieved, at much lower flow rates than predicted by the model. Because of the asymptotic dependence of concentration factor on flow rate, accurate control of the liquid feed is extremely critical in the flow rate range where high concentration factors are obtained, and the smallest variations in liquid flow rate may easily lead to supersaturation and deposition of solutes in the pores. This changes membrane porosity in an unpredictable way and limits the maximum attainable concentration factor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Effects of the rate of evaporation and film thickness on nonuniform drying of film-forming concentrated colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Narita, T; Hébraud, P; Lequeux, F

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report on nonuniform distribution of film-forming waterborne colloidal suspensions above the critical concentration phi(c) of the colloidal glass transition during drying. We found that colloidal suspension films dry nonuniformly when the initial rate of evaporation E and/or the initial thickness l(0) are high. We found that a Peclet number Pe, defined as Pe = El(0)/D, where D is the diffusion coefficient of the colloids in the diluted suspensions, does not predict uniformity of drying of the concentrated suspensions, contrary to the reported work on drying of diluted suspensions. Since the colloidal particles are crowded and their diffusive motion is restricted in concentrated suspensions, we assumed that above phi(c) water is transported to the drying surface by hydrodynamic flow along the osmotic pressure gradient. The permeability of water through channels between deforming particles is estimated by adapting the theory of foam drainage. We defined a new Peclet number Pe' by substituting the transport coefficient of flow (defined as the permeability divided by the viscosity, multiplied by the osmotic pressure gradient) for the diffusion coefficient. This extended Peclet number predicted the nonuniform drying with a criterion of Pe' > 1. These results indicate that the mechanism of water transport to the drying surface in concentrated suspensions is water permeation by osmotic pressure, which is faster than mutual diffusion between water and particles --that has been observed in diluted suspensions and discussed by Routh and Russel. The theory fits well the experimental drying curves for various thicknesses and rates of evaporation. The particle distribution in the drying films is also estimated and it is indicated that the latex distribution is nonuniform when Pe' > 1.

  16. A Disposable Microfluidic Virus Concentration Device Based on Evaporation and Interfacial Tension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jane Yuqian; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Liu, Lena; Chang, Jessie; Pollock, Nira R.; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a disposable and highly effective polymeric microfluidic viral sample concentration device capable of increasing the concentration of virus in a human nasopharyngeal specimen more than one order of magnitude in less than 30 min without the use of a centrifuge. The device is fabricated using 3D maskless xurography method using commercially available polymeric materials, which require no cleanroom operations. The disposable components can be fabricated and assembled in five minutes. The device can concentrate a few milliliters (mL) of influenza virus in solution from tissue culture or clinical nasopharyngeal swab specimens, via reduction of the fluid volume, to tens of microliters μL). The performance of the device was evaluated by nucleic acid extraction from the concentrated samples, followed by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The viral RNA concentration in each sample was increased on average over 10-fold for both cultured and patient specimens compared to the starting samples, with recovery efficiencies above 60% for all input concentrations. Highly concentrated samples in small fluid volumes can increase the downstream process speed of on-chip nucleic acid extraction, and result in improvements in the sensitivity of many diagnostic platforms that interrogate small sample volumes. PMID:26617991

  17. Etude de la cinétique de polarisation de concentration en microfiltration du sang en régime transitoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, L. H.; Laurent, J. M.; Jaffrin, M. Y.

    1994-12-01

    In plasma separation by membrane, the blood flows tangentially along a microporous membrane while the plasma crosses the membrane under the action of a transmembrane pressure gradient. As in other cross flow filtrations of suspensions, the permeate flux increases linearly at low transmembrane pressure and reaches a plateau at high transmembrane pressure due to concentration polarization and membrane fouling. Concentration polarization consists in the formation of a high particle concentration boundary layer near the membrane which is assumed to occur rapidly, in less than one minute. In the case of plasma filtration from blood, this layer consists of cells which are rejected by the membrane and it forms a reversible secondary membrane which becomes the limiting filtration mechanism. In this condition, the permeate flux becomes approximately independent of transmembrane pressure and is controlled mostly by the shear rate. In order to study the kinetics and time scales of establishment of these phenomena, we have investigated the transient response of microporous membrane under stepped charges in transmembrane pressure. When the pressure is suddenly raised from the unpolarized regime to a level corresponding to complete concentration polarization, the permeate flux reaches a peak in 0.4-0.6s, which surpasses the equilibrium level by 60 to 80% depending upon the pressure, returning to the concentration polarization equilibrium level in 3 to 4s. These data show that the membrane retains its original permeability only during the first 0.5s of the pressure change and that concentration polarization takes about 3 to 4s to build-up. This formation time decreases with increasing pressure. When the pressure returns to its initial level, the concentration polarization disappears instantaneously and the process can be repeated at a frequency up to 0.7Hz. However, when a stepped pressure increase is applied in the concentration polarization regime, with initial pressure above

  18. Evaporating firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  19. Evaporation into Couette Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    v Yi Statistical analysis dependent variable Greek Symbols 13 Contact angle of sessile drop a Concentration thickness A Evaporated vapor penetration...31 5 FIGURES 1. Configuration of Three Sessile Drops ............................................. 10 2. Sketch of...Droplet Geometry ............................................................. 11 3. Shape Factor as a Function of Contact Angle

  20. Laser Evaporation Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    concentrated aqua regia and hydrochloric energy ions. The minimum pulsed evaporation rate which acid, respectively. The metallic films capped by cw laser...Force Office of Scientific Research or the U.S. Government. 17 COSATI CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessarl and identif by block

  1. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of heating near the top of streamers in ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, where the plasma is weakly contained by the magnetic field. Heating causes slow opening of field lines and release of new solar wind. It was discovered in simulations and, due to the absence of loss mechanisms, the ultimate end point is the complete evaporation of the streamer. Of course streamers do not behave in this way because there are losses by thermal conduction and radiation. Physically, heating is also expected to depend on ambient conditions. We use our global MHD model with thermal conduction to examine the effect of changing the heating scale height. We also apply and extend an analytic model of streamers developed by Pneuman (1968) to show that steady streamers are unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than approximately 2 x 10(exp 6) K.

  2. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  3. Modeling nanofluid sessile drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William J.; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.

    2017-07-01

    Modeling predictions for the evaporation of nanofluid pinned sessile drops are reported. Drops of fluids containing suspended nanoparticles have reduced evaporation rates relative to their pure fluid counterparts due to the agglomeration of nanoparticles at the surface resulting in a reduction in available liquid at the drop surface for evaporation. The present model implements a mechanism for the reduction in the surface concentration of the evaporating liquid based on the fractal geometry of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoparticle packing near the drop pinned contact line results in regions where a maximum nanoparticle volume fraction is attained, leading to significant reductions in the evaporative mass flux. Model predictions for the evaporation rate of pure ethanol and ethanol containing suspended aluminum nanoparticles are compared to experiments from the literature with excellent agreement for the reduction in evaporation rate due to nanoparticle loading and in reasonable quantitative agreement for the evaporation rate. The maximum allowable nanoparticle volume fraction is shown to be an important parameter in governing the evaporation rate of nanofluid sessile drops.

  4. Evaporation and concentration gradients created by episodic river recharge in a semi-arid zone aquifer: Insights from Cl-, δ18O, δ2H, and 3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, K. T.; Hollins, S. E.; Hughes, C. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Chisari, R.; Griffiths, A.; Crawford, J.

    2015-10-01

    This study has significantly advanced our understanding of the origin of groundwater recharge in a semi-arid zone region of the Darling River catchment, Australia. The generally accepted hypothesis in arid zone environments in Australia that river water forms the primary groundwater recharge source has proven difficult to monitor. This is due to the time lags between large floods, the remoteness and expense of studying these hydrologically complex systems in detail. In addition, the highly episodic nature of dryland rivers complicates the interpretation of the groundwater signal. A range of hydrochemical tracers (chloride, oxygen-18, deuterium and tritium) measured in rain, river water, soil water and groundwater were used in this multi-year study to trace the pathways of groundwater recharge under wet and dry climatic conditions. The evaporation and Cl concentrations observed in the unsaturated zone confirmed that small volumetric inputs from periodic rainfall were not the major recharge mechanism. Sampling which included an overbank flooding event in March 2012 provided firm evidence for groundwater originating from high flow episodic river recharge. The use of long-term environmental data to understand how economically important water resources respond to climate change with increasing temperatures is considered essential for future sustainability.

  5. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  6. Evaporation dehydrator

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, L.

    1985-08-06

    A method and apparatus for the treatment of oilfield heavy oil emulsions is provided. The method utilizes, in combination, the steps of evaporation, vapor/liquid separation, and solids settling to dehydrate, degassify and remove solids from the heavy oil emulsion and produce oil having less than 0.5% by volume basic solids and water. The apparatus comprises an insulated, horizontal, cylindrical vessel. Mounted in the upper end of the vessel chamber is an inclined, tubular member having a closed upper end and an open lower end. At its closed end, the member forms a receiving chamber. A mechanical foam breaker extends transversely across the interior of the tubular member, downstream of the chamber. A stack of angularly inclined, heated trays, arranged in zigzag fashion, are positioned beneath the tubular member, to provide an elongate flowpath. The lower end of the tubular member is positioned to feed onto the upper end of the first tray. The flowpath formed by the stack of trays terminates at a level above the bottom of the vessel, so that a quiescent settling sump is provided by the base of the vessel. The vessel includes a feed inlet opening into the receiving chamber, a vapor outlet leading from the top of said vessel, and liquid and solids outlets leading from the sump. A stream of pre-heated heavy oil emulsion is fed to the receiving chamber, wherein part of the contained water in the vapor form breaks out. The foaming stream is contained by the tubular member and is substantially disintegrated by the foam breaker. The stream then issues onto the upper end of the stack of trays and is heated as it passes as a shallow, broad layer over the trays, to gradually evaporate the remaining water from the emulsion and solids. The dehydrated solids are settled out in the sump, leaving oil containing less than 0.5% basic solids and water.

  7. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  8. Application of 'Six Sigma{sup TM}' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Perdue, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six Sigma{sup TM}' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six Sigma{sup TM} tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six Sigma{sup TM} tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of input

  9. Evaporation from open microchannel grooves.

    PubMed

    Kachel, Sibylle; Zhou, Ying; Scharfer, Philip; Vrančić, Christian; Petrich, Wolfgang; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2014-02-21

    The evaporation of water from open u-shaped microchannel grooves was investigated with particular emphasis on the roles of channel width and air flow conditions. Given the small dimensions of the microchannels, all measurements were conducted in a range where convection and diffusion are of equal importance and known correlations for the calculation of mass transfer coefficients cannot be applied. The evaporation rates were measured using a new optical method and a gravimetric method. Both measurement methods yielded mass transfer coefficients that are in agreement with each other. The observed relation between mass transfer coefficient, air velocity and channel width vastly differs from the predictions obtained from macroscopic structures. With respect to diagnostic devices we conclude that analyte concentration in an open microchannel groove strongly increases even within short times due to the evaporation process and we show that wider channels are more favourable in terms of minimizing the relative evaporation rate.

  10. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  11. Method of evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, Eugene R.

    1987-01-01

    Liquids, such as juices, milk, molten metal and the like are concentrated by forming uniformly-sized, small droplets in a precision droplet forming assembly and deploying the droplets in free fall downwardly as a central column within an evacuated column with cool walls. A portion of the solvent evaporates. The vapor flows to the wall, condenses, and usually flows down the wall as a film to condensate collector and drain. The vertical column of freely falling droplets enters the splash guard. The condensate can be collected, sent to other towers or recycled.

  12. Tear film dynamics with evaporation and osmolarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Javed; Braun, Richard

    2011-11-01

    We consider a model problem for the evaporation and breakup up of tear film. The model includes the effects of surface tension, Marangoni stresses, insoluble surfactant transport, evaporation, osmolarity transport, osmosis and wetting of corneal surface. Evaporation is made dependent on surface concentration in order to mimic the lipid layer of the tear film when there is a single fluid layer in the model. In many cases for a single layer, the Marangoni effect seems to eliminate a localized area of increased evaporation due to reduced surfactant concentration. In this model the osmolarity in the tear film increases because of average evaporation rate rather than by a locally increased evaporation rate. If time permits, the effect of having a second fluid layer, representing the lipid layer, will be explored as well.

  13. ETUDE - European Trade Union Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creanor, Linda; Walker, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Describes transnational distance learning activities among European trade union educators carried out as part of the European Trade Union Distance Education (ETUDE) project, supported by the European Commission. Highlights include the context of international trade union distance education; tutor training course; tutors' experiences; and…

  14. Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) draws up, proposes and conducts France's space policy. Its role is to develop the uses of space, to meet the civilian and military needs of public bodies and of the scientific community, and to foster the development and dissemination of new applications, designed to create wealth and jobs....

  15. Advanced evaporator technology progress report FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the work that was completed in FY 1992 on the program {open_quotes}Technology Development for Concentrating Process Streams.{close_quotes} The purpose of this program is to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process. Concentrating these streams and minimizing the volume of waste generated can significantly reduce disposal costs; however, equipment to concentrate the streams and recycle the decontaminated condensates must be installed. LICON, Inc., is developing an evaporator that shows a great deal of potential for this application. In this report, concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of an evaporator operated in a radioactive environment are discussed. These concepts include criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. Both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed to design an effective process for concentrating process streams. Therefore, literature surveys were completed and are summarized in this report. A model that is being developed to predict vapor phase compositions is described. A laboratory-scale evaporator was purchased and installed to study the evaporation process and to collect additional data. This unit is described in detail. Two new LICON evaporators are being designed for installation at Argonne-East in FY 1993 to process low-level radioactive waste generated throughout the laboratory. They will also provide operating data from a full-sized evaporator processing radioactive solutions. Details on these evaporators are included in this report.

  16. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  17. Evaporation in space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    'Normal evaporation' equations for predicting the compositional changes with time and temperature have been developed and correlated with actual experimental data. An evaporative congruent temperature is defined and used to explain, predict, or plan space experiments on anomalous constitutional melting (on cooling) or solidification (on heating). Uneven evaporation causes reactive jetting forces capable of initiating new convection currents, nongravitational accelerations, surface vibrations, or other disturbances. Applications of evaporation to space manufacturing are described concerning evaporative purification, surface cooling, specimen selection, particles splitting, freezing data interpretation, material loss and dimensional control, and surface contamination or compositional changes.

  18. Evaporation From Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Hedstrom, N.; Leshkevich, G.; Fortin, V.; Charpentier, D.; Haywood, H.

    2009-05-01

    Evaporation is a critical component of the water balance of each of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and understanding the magnitude and physical controls of evaporative water losses are important for several reasons. Recently, low water levels in Lakes Superior and Michigan/Huron have had socioeconomic, ecological, and even meteorological impacts (e.g. water quality and quantity, transportation, invasive species, recreation, etc.). The recent low water levels may be due to increased evaporation, but this is not known as operational evaporation estimates are currently calculated as the residual of water or heat budgets. Perhaps surprisingly, almost nothing is known about evaporation dynamics from Lake Superior and few direct measurements of evaporation have been made from any of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This research is the first to attempt to directly measure evaporation from Lake Superior by deploying eddy covariance instrumentation. Results of evaporation rates, their patterns and controlling mechanisms will be presented. The direct measurements of evaporation are used with concurrent satellite and climate model data to extrapolate evaporation measurements across the entire lake. This knowledge could improve predictions of how climate change may impact the lake's water budget and subsequently how the water in the lake is managed.

  19. Modeling evaporation of sessile drops with moving contact lines.

    PubMed

    Murisic, N; Kondic, L

    2008-12-01

    We consider evaporation of pure liquid drops on a thermally conductive substrate. Two commonly used evaporative models are considered: one that concentrates on the liquid phase in determining the evaporative flux and the other one that centers on the gas-vapor phase. A single governing equation for the evolution of drop thickness, including both models, is developed. We show how the derived governing equation can be used to predict which evaporation model is appropriate for different considered experimental conditions.

  20. New insights into saline water evaporation from porous media: Complex interaction between evaporation rates, precipitation, and surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri-Kuehni, Salomé M. S.; Vetter, Thomas; Webb, Colin; Shokri, Nima

    2017-06-01

    Understanding salt transport and deposition patterns during evaporation from porous media is important in many engineering and hydrological processes such as soil salinization, ecosystem functioning, and land-atmosphere interaction. As evaporation proceeds, salt concentration increases until it exceeds solubility limits, locally, and crystals precipitate. The interplay between transport processes, crystallization, and evaporation influences where crystallization occurs. During early stages, the precipitated salt creates an evolving porous structure affecting the evaporation kinetics. We conducted a comprehensive series of experiments to investigate how the salt concentration and precipitation influence evaporation dynamics. Our results illustrate the contribution of the evolving salt crust to the evaporative mass losses. High-resolution thermal imaging enabled us to investigate the complex temperature dynamics at the surface of precipitated salt, providing further confirmation of salt crust contribution to the evaporation. We identify different phases of saline water evaporation from porous media with the corresponding dominant mechanisms in each phase and extend the physical understanding of such processes.

  1. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  2. Evaluation of antioxidant activity, colour and some nutritional characteristics of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) juice and its sour concentrate processed by conventional evaporation.

    PubMed

    Orak, H Hülya

    2009-01-01

    In this study the antioxidant activity, colour and some nutritional characteristics of pomegranate juice (PJ) and its traditional sour concentrate (CPJ), produced in Denizli, Turkey, were analysed. The total anthocyanin content of PJ was found to be 492.9 mg/l but it was not determined in CPJ. The total phenolics were also found to be 3,246 and 9,870 microg/ml in PJ and CPJ, respectively. The antioxidant activity (percentage of inhibition of on peroxidation in linoleic acid system) of CPJ was determined to be higher (85.91%) than that of PJ (79.06%). During the concentration process, the reducing sugars, glucose and fructose level of CPJ showed an increase to 46.46%, 23.89%, and 22.53%, respectively. In CPJ the amounts of sodium, iron, zinc, copper and lead were found lower than those of PJ. On the other hand, potassium and magnesium mineral contents increased during concentration. Among the various elements, cadmium, mercury, manganese, cobalt and boron were also analysed for determination of metallic contamination, but they were not found in PJ juice and CPJ. 5-Hydroxymethyl furfural was determined to be at a significant level in CPJ as a result of the heat process.

  3. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  4. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  5. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  6. Visualization of an evaporating thin layer during the evaporation of a nanofluid droplet.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hwan; Allen, Jeffrey S; Choi, Chang Kyoung; Lee, Seong Hyuk

    2015-02-03

    During the evaporation of a droplet, there exists an evaporating thin layer that is difficult to visualize because of optical restrictions. The present study visualized this thin layer by using a reflective-mode, confocal microscope that can provide improved signal-to-noise focal plane imaging over traditional optical microscopy while simultaneously serving as an interferometer when imaging thin liquid films. The spatial distribution of the evaporating thin layer thickness was determined from interferometric fringe analysis. Three distinct fringe patterns, or regions, were observed depending on the nanoparticle concentration. These regions are referred to as uniform, slow extension, and rapid extension. The formation of the three regions is closely associated with the variation of the evaporating thin layer thickness of a nanofluid droplet. The nanoparticle bank formed near the contact line region substantially affects the rate of change in the evaporating thin layer thickness that increases with the nanoparticle concentration.

  7. Effects of nanoparticles on nanofluid droplet evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2010-09-01

    Laponite, Fe2O3 and Ag nanoparticles were added to deionized water to study their effect of evaporation rates. The results show that these nanofluid droplets evaporate at different rates (as indicated by the evaporation rate constant K in the well known D2-law) from the base fluid. Different particles lead to different values of K. As the particle concentration increases due to evaporation. K values of various Ag and Fe2O3 nanofluids go through a transition from one value to another, further demonstrating the effect of increasing nanoparticle concentration. The implication for the heat of vaporization (hfg) is discussed.

  8. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  9. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Evaporating suspensions of colloidal particles lead to the formation of a variety of patterns, ranging from rings left behind a coffee drop to periodic bands or uniform solid films deposited on a substrate suspended vertically in a container of the colloidal solution. To characterize the transition between different types of patterns, we develop minimal models of the liquid meniscus deformation due to the evaporation and colloidal deposition. A complementary multiphase model allows us to investigate the detailed dynamics of patterning in a drying solvent. This approach couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving liquid-air interface to the dynamics inside the suspension, i.e. the liquid flow, local variations of the particle concentration, and the propagation of the deposition front where the solute forms a wet, incompressible porous medium at high concentrations. The results of our theory are in good agreement with direct observations. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.

  10. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  11. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  12. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  13. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  14. Evaporation from microreservoirs.

    PubMed

    Lynn, N Scott; Henry, Charles S; Dandy, David S

    2009-06-21

    As a result of very large surface area to volume ratios, evaporation is of significant importance when dealing with lab-on-a-chip devices that possess open air/liquid interfaces. For devices utilizing a reservoir as a fluid delivery method to a microfluidic network, excessive evaporation can quickly lead to reservoir dry out and overall device failure. Predicting the rates of evaporation from these reservoirs is difficult because the position of the air/liquid interface changes with time as the volume of liquid in the reservoir decreases. Here we present a two-step method to accurately predict the rates of evaporation of such an interface over time. First, a simple method is proposed to determine the shape of an air/liquid meniscus in a reservoir given a specific liquid volume. Second, computational fluid dynamics simulations are used to calculate the instantaneous rate of evaporation for that meniscus shape. It is shown that the rate of evaporation is strongly dependent on the overall geometry of the system, enhanced in expanding reservoirs while suppressed in contracting reservoirs, where the geometry can be easily controlled with simple experimental methods. Using no adjustable parameters, the model accurately predicts the position of the inner moving contact line as a function of time following meniscus rupture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) reservoirs, and predicts the overall time for the persistence of liquid in those reservoirs to within 0.5 minutes. The methods in this study can be used to design holding reservoirs for lab-on-a-chip devices that involve no external control of evaporation, such that evaporation rates can be adjusted as necessary by modification of the reservoir geometry.

  15. Mixed feed evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Vakil, Himanshu B.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1982-01-01

    In the preparation of the gaseous reactant feed to undergo a chemical reaction requiring the presence of steam, the efficiency of overall power utilization is improved by premixing the gaseous reactant feed with water and then heating to evaporate the water in the presence of the gaseous reactant feed, the heating fluid utilized being at a temperature below the boiling point of water at the pressure in the volume where the evaporation occurs.

  16. Evaporation from microreservoirs†

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, N. Scott; Henry, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    As a result of very large surface area to volume ratios, evaporation is of significant importance when dealing with lab-on-a-chip devices that possess open air/liquid interfaces. For devices utilizing a reservoir as a fluid delivery method to a microfluidic network, excessive evaporation can quickly lead to reservoir dry out and overall device failure. Predicting the rates of evaporation from these reservoirs is difficult because the position of the air/liquid interface changes with time as the volume of liquid in the reservoir decreases. Here we present a two-step method to accurately predict the rates of evaporation of such an interface over time. First, a simple method is proposed to determine the shape of an air/liquid meniscus in a reservoir given a specific liquid volume. Second, computational fluid dynamics simulations are used to calculate the instantaneous rate of evaporation for that meniscus shape. It is shown that the rate of evaporation is strongly dependent on the overall geometry of the system, enhanced in expanding reservoirs while suppressed in contracting reservoirs, where the geometry can be easily controlled with simple experimental methods. Using no adjustable parameters, the model accurately predicts the position of the inner moving contact line as a function of time following meniscus rupture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) reservoirs, and predicts the overall time for the persistence of liquid in those reservoirs to within 0.5 minutes. The methods in this study can be used to design holding reservoirs for lab-on-a-chip devices that involve no external control of evaporation, such that evaporation rates can be adjusted as necessary by modification of the reservoir geometry. PMID:19495463

  17. Saline Evaporation from Porous Media: Characteristics of Salt Precipitation and Its Effect on Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, U.; Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.; Grader, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    Salt precipitation as subflorescence or efflorescence crust occurs during saline solutions evaporation from porous media. Non-linear synergy between evaporation and salt precipitation processes results in a complex mechanism that has yet to be quantitatively understood. Presented here is a series of experiments and a mathematical model that shed light on these processes. Experiments include: (1) long-term column evaporation experiments to quantify changes in evaporation rates due to salt precipitation; (2) long-term Hele-Shaw evaporation experiments to visualize salt precipitation at the macro scale; and (3) CT scans of evaporated porous media pre-saturated with NaI solutions to observe salt precipitation at the pore scale. Experiments were conducted for homogeneous and heterogeneous media using a number of saline solutions (NaCl, CaSO4, KCl, CuSO4 and NaI). A mathematical model was developed to explore quantitatively the physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the evaporation-salt precipitation process. The model simulated salt precipitation and it affect on evaporation. Three new stages of evaporation are introduced and defined for saline solutions: SS1, SS2 and SS3. SS1 exhibits a low and gradual decrease in evaporation rate caused by a changing osmotic potential. During SS2, evaporation rate falls precipitously a salt precipitates. SS3 is characterized by a constant, low evaporation rate. The phenomenological similarity to the classical evaporation stages of pure water, S1, S2 and S3, are only coincidental, the three saline stages correspond to entirely different mechanisms. The mathematical model was used to also quantify the diffusion coefficient through a salt crust. Heterogeneity during saline evaporation was found to strongly control the location of salt precipitation: salt precipitation occurred mainly within the fine-pore regions which act as a wick transporting water from the coarser media. Heterogeneity also permits greater saline evaporation by

  18. Simultaneous spreading and evaporation: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Sergey; Trybala, Anna; Rubio, Ramon G; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Velarde, Manuel G

    2014-04-01

    derived theoretically and confirmed experimentally. The theory developed for pure liquids is applicable also to nanofluids, where a good agreement with the available experimental data has been found. However, in the case of evaporation of surfactant solutions the process deviates from the theoretical predictions for pure liquids at concentration below critical wetting concentration and is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at concentrations above it.

  19. Evaporatively driven morphological instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2007-07-01

    Simple observations of evaporating solutions reveal a complex hierarchy of spatiotemporal instabilities. We analyze one such instability suggested by the qualitative observations of Du and Stone and find that it is driven by a variant of the classical morphological instability in alloy solidification. In the latter case a moving solid-liquid interface is accompanied by a solutally enriched boundary layer that is thermodynamically metastable due to constitutional supercooling. Here, we consider the evaporation of an impure film adjacent to a solid composed of the nonvolatile species. In this case, constitutional supercooling within the film is created by evaporation at the solution-vapor interface and this drives the corrugation of the solid-solution interface across the thickness of the film. The principal points of this simple theoretical study are to suggest an instability mechanism that is likely operative across a broad range of technological and natural systems and to focus future quantitative experimental searches.

  20. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  1. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  2. Evaporation of droplets of surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Sergey; Trybala, Anna; Agogo, Hezekiah; Kovalchuk, Nina; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G; Starov, Víctor M; Velarde, Manuel G

    2013-08-13

    The simultaneous spreading and evaporation of droplets of aqueous trisiloxane (superspreader) solutions onto a hydrophobic substrate has been studied both experimentally, using a video-microscopy technique, and theoretically. The experiments have been carried out over a wide range of surfactant concentration, temperature, and relative humidity. Similar to pure liquids, four different stages have been observed: the initial one corresponds to spreading until the contact angle, θ, reaches the value of the static advancing contact angle, θad. Duration of this stage is rather short, and the evaporation during this stage can be neglected. The evaporation is essential during the next three stages. The next stage after the spreading, which is referred to herein as the first stage, takes place at constant perimeter and ends when θ reaches the static receding contact angle, θr. During the next, second stage, the perimeter decreases at constant contact angle θ = θr for surfactant concentration above the critical wetting concentration (CWC). The static receding contact angle decreases during the second stage for concentrations below CWC because the concentration increases due to the evaporation. During the final stage both the perimeter and the contact angle decrease. In what follows, we consider only the longest stages I and II. The developed theory predicts universal curves for the contact angle dependency on time during the first stage, and for the droplet perimeter on time during the second stage. A very good agreement between theory and experimental data has been found for the first stage of evaporation, and for the second stage for concentrations above CWC; however, some deviations were found for concentrations below CWC.

  3. Non-destructive method for inward leakage detection of a plate evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Ales

    2007-05-01

    A new non-destructive method was developed for the detection of refrigerant leakage at an evaporator's inflow. Nitrogen and oxygen gas were successively blown through the evaporator. A gas analyser was applied at the outflow of the evaporator and the oxygen concentration measured. It was possible to detect any leakage by investigating the oxygen concentration-time history diagram.

  4. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  5. Geochemistry: Evaporating planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Edward D.

    2017-09-01

    Two studies show that evaporation of molten rock was intrinsic to the formation of Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System, suggesting that violent collisions played a key part in the formation process. See Letters p.507 & p.511

  6. Hydrophobically modified nanoparticle suspensions to enhance water evaporation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi; Li, Xiaoying; Yuan, Hao; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-10-01

    The evaporation rates of water can be enhanced by adding the hydrophobically modified nanoparticles as a suspension. The magnitudes of enhancement are related to the diameter and mass concentration of nanoparticles. In particular, a 15% enhancement was achieved after adding the modified Al2O3 nanoparticle with a diameter of 13 nm and mass percentage of 0.02%. A theoretical model was established in order to estimate the evaporation rates of hydrophobic particle-based nanofluids. The obtained results indicate that the enhanced evaporation rates are attributed to the elevated saturated vapor pressures of the nanofluids. These results may have important applications for energy-efficient enhancement of water evaporation rates.

  7. 40 CFR 86.1217-96 - Evaporative emission enclosure calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurements may be omitted if methanol-fueled vehicles will not be tested in the evaporative enclosure... well as hydrocarbons are present in the evaporative enclosure, the HFID hydrocarbon concentration measurement includes the partial response of the HFID to methanol plus the hydrocarbons. Determination of...

  8. Increased evaporation kinetics of sessile droplets by using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A H; Nguyen, Anh V

    2012-12-11

    The effect of nanoparticles on the evaporation of a sessile droplet into air is still controversial. Unlike insoluble surfactants which reduce the droplet evaporation rate, here we show that the presence of nanoparticles and the increase of their concentration lead to an increase in the overall rate of diffusive evaporation and, consequently, a decrease of the droplet lifetime. The nanoparticles accumulating at the droplet edge due to the well-known coffee-ring effect pin the three-phase contact line for an extended time and maintain a large air-water interface area, leading to the increased evaporation rate. We provide a full analytical prediction for the lifetime of a sessile droplet evaporating by the combined pinned-receding mode. A master equation and a master diagram for the droplet lifetime of the combined mode are obtained and experimentally validated, and explain the effect of nanoparticles on increasing the global evaporation rate and decreasing the droplet lifetime.

  9. Evaporation of Ethanol-Water Binary Mixture Sessile Liquid Marbles.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Bormashenko, Edward; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M; Dao, Dzung V; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-21

    Liquid marble is a liquid droplet coated with particles. Recently, the evaporation process of a sessile liquid marble using geometric measurements has attracted great attention from the research community. However, the lack of gravimetric measurement limits further insights into the physical changes of a liquid marble during the evaporation process. Moreover, the evaporation process of a marble containing a liquid binary mixture has not been reported before. The present paper investigates the effective density and the effective surface tension of an evaporating liquid marble that contains aqueous ethanol at relatively low concentrations. The effective density of an evaporating liquid marble is determined from the concurrent measurement of instantaneous mass and volume. Density measurements combined with surface profile fitting provide the effective surface tension of the marble. We found that the density and surface tension of an evaporating marble are significantly affected by the particle coating.

  10. Effect of Variable Gravity on Evaporation of Binary Fluids in a Capillary Pore Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girgis, Morris M.; Matta, Nabil S.; Kolli, Kiran; Brown, Leon; Bain, James, Jr.; McGown, Juantonio

    1996-01-01

    The research project focuses on experimental investigation of the capillary-pumped evaporative heat transfer phenomenon. The objective is to examine whether the heat transfer and stability of a heated meniscus in a capillary pore can be enhanced by adding trace amounts of a non-volatile solute to a solvent and to understand the changes that occur. The experimental setup consists of a single pore evaporator connected to a reservoir which supplies liquid to the evaporator. In addition to the experiments of capillary-pumped evaporation, a parallel experimental study has been conducted to systematically investigate the effects of gravity as well as the effects of bulk composition on the heat transfer characteristics of evaporating binary thin films near the contact line region along an inclined heated surface. To investigate the buoyancy effects on evaporation along an inclined heated surface, the angle of inclination from a horizontal plane was varied fro 15 C to 90 C. An optimum concentration between 0.5% and 1% decane in pentane/decane solutions has been demonstrated at different angles of inclination. Improved heat transfer was found for the geometry with the smallest angle of inclination of 15 degrees. In addition, flow visualization has revealed that at low inclination angles effective heat transfer takes place primarily due to an extension of the thin film near the contact line. At these low inclination angles, the optimum concentration is associated with enhanced wetting characteristics and reduced thermocapillary stresses along the interface.

  11. Effect of Variable Gravity on Evaporation of Binary Fluids in a Capillary Pore Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girgis, Morris M.; Matta, Nabil S.; Kolli, Kiran; Brown, Leon; Bain, James, Jr.; McGown, Juantonio

    1996-01-01

    The research project focuses on experimental investigation of the capillary-pumped evaporative heat transfer phenomenon. The objective is to examine whether the heat transfer and stability of a heated meniscus in a capillary pore can be enhanced by adding trace amounts of a non-volatile solute to a solvent and to understand the changes that occur. The experimental setup consists of a single pore evaporator connected to a reservoir which supplies liquid to the evaporator. In addition to the experiments of capillary-pumped evaporation, a parallel experimental study has been conducted to systematically investigate the effects of gravity as well as the effects of bulk composition on the heat transfer characteristics of evaporating binary thin films near the contact line region along an inclined heated surface. To investigate the buoyancy effects on evaporation along an inclined heated surface, the angle of inclination from a horizontal plane was varied fro 15 C to 90 C. An optimum concentration between 0.5% and 1% decane in pentane/decane solutions has been demonstrated at different angles of inclination. Improved heat transfer was found for the geometry with the smallest angle of inclination of 15 degrees. In addition, flow visualization has revealed that at low inclination angles effective heat transfer takes place primarily due to an extension of the thin film near the contact line. At these low inclination angles, the optimum concentration is associated with enhanced wetting characteristics and reduced thermocapillary stresses along the interface.

  12. DWPF RECYCLE EVAPORATOR FLOWSHEET EVALUATION (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-30

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the high level waste slurries stored at the Savannah River Site into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. The vitrification process results in the generation of approximately five gallons of dilute recycle streams for each gallon of waste slurry vitrified. This dilute recycle stream is currently transferred to the H-area Tank Farm and amounts to approximately 1,400,000 gallons of effluent per year. Process changes to incorporate salt waste could increase the amount of effluent to approximately 2,900,000 gallons per year. The recycle consists of two major streams and four smaller streams. The first major recycle stream is condensate from the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), and is collected in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT). The second major recycle stream is the melter offgas which is collected in the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT). The four smaller streams are the sample flushes, sump flushes, decon solution, and High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME) dissolution solution. These streams are collected in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) or the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). All recycle streams are currently combined in the RCT and treated with sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide prior to transfer to the tank farm. Tank Farm space limitations and previous outages in the 2H Evaporator system due to deposition of sodium alumino-silicates have led to evaluation of alternative methods of dealing with the DWPF recycle. One option identified for processing the recycle was a dedicated evaporator to concentrate the recycle stream to allow the solids to be recycled to the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the condensate from this evaporation process to be sent and treated in the Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). In order to meet process objectives, the recycle stream must be concentrated to 1/30th of the feed volume during the evaporation process. The concentrated stream

  13. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  14. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  15. Lysozyme pattern formation in evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorr, Heather Meloy

    Liquid droplets containing suspended particles deposited on a solid, flat surface generally form ring-like structures due to the redistribution of solute during evaporation (the "coffee ring effect"). The forms of the deposited patterns depend on complex interactions between solute(s), solvent, and substrate in a rapidly changing, far from equilibrium system. Solute self-organization during evaporation of colloidal sessile droplets has attracted the attention of researchers over the past few decades due to a variety of technological applications. Recently, pattern formation during evaporation of various biofluids has been studied due to potential applications in medical screening and diagnosis. Due to the complexity of 'real' biological fluids and other multicomponent systems, a comprehensive understanding of pattern formation during droplet evaporation of these fluids is lacking. In this PhD dissertation, the morphology of the patterns remaining after evaporation of droplets of a simplified model biological fluid (aqueous lysozyme solutions + NaCl) are examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Lysozyme is a globular protein found in high concentration, for example, in human tears and saliva. The drop diameters, D, studied range from the micro- to the macro- scale (1 microm -- 2 mm). In this work, the effect of evaporation conditions, solution chemistry, and heat transfer within the droplet on pattern formation is examined. In micro-scale deposits of aqueous lysozyme solutions (1 microm < D < 50 microm), the protein motion and the resulting dried residue morphology are highly influenced by the decreased evaporation time of the drop. The effect of electrolytes on pattern formation is also investigated by adding varying concentrations NaCl to the lysozyme solutions. Finally, a novel pattern recognition program is described and implemented which classifies deposit images by their solution chemistries. The results presented in this Ph

  16. Falling film evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Bruns, Lester E.

    1976-01-01

    A falling film evaporator including a vertically oriented pipe heated exteriorly by a steam jacket and interiorly by a finned steam tube, all heating surfaces of the pipe and steam tube being formed of a material wet by water such as stainless steel, and packing within the pipe consisting of Raschig rings formed of a material that is not wet by water such as polyvinylidene fluoride.

  17. Vertical counterflow evaporative cooler

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-01-25

    An evaporative heat exchanger having parallel plates that define alternating dry and wet passages. A water reservoir is located below the plates and is connected to a water distribution system. Water from the water distribution system flows through the wet passages and wets the surfaces of the plates that form the wet passages. Air flows through the dry passages, mixes with air below the plates, and flows into the wet passages before exiting through the top of the wet passages.

  18. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  19. Evaporation of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavelier, Alain

    2011-09-01

    Among the five hundreds extrasolar planets known, almost 30% orbit closer than 0.1 AU from their parent star. We will review the observations and the corresponding models of the evaporation of these "Hot-exoplanets". The observations started with the discovery made with HST that the planet orbiting HD209458 has an extended atmosphere of escaping hydrogen. Subsequent observations obtained with STIS and ACS and most recently with COS confirm the escape of the gas. And, even more, atomic oxygen, ionized carbon and silicon have been shown to be present at very high altitude in the upper atmosphere. Observations of other targets like HD189733b and Wasp-12 show that evaporation is a general phenomenon which could contribute to the evolution of planets orbiting close to their parent stars. To interpret these observations, we developed models to quantify the escape rate from the measured occultation depths. Numerous models have also been published to investigate mechanisms which can lead to the estimated escape rate. In general, the high temperature of the upper atmosphere heated by the far and extreme UV combined with the tidal forces allow a very efficient evaporation of the upper atmosphere. We will review the different models and their implications, in particular in the light of the new Kepler results. Finally we will also present the latest observations of the gas escaping HD189833b. These observations have been obtained with the repaired HST/STIS.

  20. Complex Effects of Salinity on Water Evaporation From Porous Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri-Kuehni, S. M. S.; Webb, C.; Shokri, N.

    2016-12-01

    Saline water evaporation from porous media is influenced by transport properties of porous media, properties of the evaporating solution and external conditions. In this work, we investigated the effects of salt concentration on the drying behaviour of a porous medium and its surface temperature. Our key focus was about how the precipitated salt forming at the surface of drying porous media influences the evaporation rate. To do so, a series of evaporation experiments were conducted using columns packed with sand particles saturated with NaCl solutions of varying concentrations. The columns were placed on digital balances to record the evaporation dynamics and were exposed to metal halide lamps to boost the evaporation. A FLIR thermal camera was fixed above the sand columns to record the surface temperature. Additional experiments were conducted using sand packs saturated with salty water in the presence of water table at well-defined depths using Mariotte flasks. We could delineate the effects of salt concentration and crust formation on the general dynamics of the evaporation process (at different salt concentrations). Microscopic analysis of precipitated salt at the surface revealed the complex dynamics of salt evolution at the surface and its consequences on the evaporation behaviour. Our results suggest that the presence of porous salt at the surface causes top-supplied creeping of the solution feeding the growth of subsequent precipitation. This causes appearance and disappearance of cold-spots at the surface of porous media brought about by crust formation and preferential water evaporation visualized by the thermal images. This study extends the fundamental understanding of the evaporation of saline water from porous media.

  1. Evaporative instabilities in climbing films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, A. E.; Bush, John W. M.

    2001-09-01

    We consider flow in a thin film generated by partially submerging an inclined rigid plate in a reservoir of ethanol or methanol water solution and wetting its surface. Evaporation leads to concentration and surface tension gradients that drive flow up the plate. An experimental study indicates that the climbing film is subject to two distinct instabilities. The first is a convective instability characterized by flattened convection rolls aligned in the direction of flow and accompanied by free-surface deformations; in the meniscus region, this instability gives rise to pronounced ridge structures aligned with the mean flow. The second instability, evident when the plate is nearly vertical, takes the form of transverse surface waves propagating up the plate.

  2. Evaporation kinetics of aqueous acetic acid droplets: effects of soluble organic aerosol components on the mechanism of water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Kaitlin C; Shih, Orion; Wong, Nolan L; Drisdell, Walter S; Saykally, Richard J; Cohen, Ronald C

    2013-07-28

    The presence of organic surfactants in atmospheric aerosol may lead to a depression of cloud droplet growth and evaporation rates affecting the radiative properties and lifetime of clouds. Both the magnitude and mechanism of this effect, however, remain poorly constrained. We have used Raman thermometry measurements of freely evaporating micro-droplets to determine evaporation coefficients for several concentrations of acetic acid, which is ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol and has been shown to adsorb strongly to the air-water interface. We find no suppression of the evaporation kinetics over the concentration range studied (1-5 M). The evaporation coefficient determined for 2 M acetic acid is 0.53 ± 0.12, indistinguishable from that of pure water (0.62 ± 0.09).

  3. 8. August, 1971. SECOND FLOOR LOOKING NW. EVAPORATOR UNITS USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. August, 1971. SECOND FLOOR LOOKING NW. EVAPORATOR UNITS USED IN SEQUENCE TO REDUCE OR CONCENTRATE BEET JUICE. - Utah Sugar Company, Garland Beet Sugar Refinery, Factory Street, Garland, Box Elder County, UT

  4. Low chemical concentrating steam generating cycle

    DOEpatents

    Mangus, James D.

    1983-01-01

    A steam cycle for a nuclear power plant having two optional modes of operation. A once-through mode of operation uses direct feed of coolant water to an evaporator avoiding excessive chemical concentration buildup. A recirculation mode of operation uses a recirculation loop to direct a portion of flow from the evaporator back through the evaporator to effectively increase evaporator flow.

  5. Tank 26F-2F Evaporator Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-12-19

    Tank 26F supernate sample was sent by Savannah River Remediation to Savannah River National Laboratory for evaporation test to help understand the underlying cause of the recent gravity drain line (GDL) pluggage during operation of the 2F Evaporator system. The supernate sample was characterized prior to the evaporation test. The evaporation test involved boiling the supernate in an open beaker until the density of the concentrate (evaporation product) was between 1.4 to 1.5 g/mL. It was followed by filtering and washing of the precipitated solids with deionized water. The concentrate supernate (or concentrate filtrate), the damp unwashed precipitated solids, and the wash filtrates were characterized. All the precipitated solids dissolved during water washing. A semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis on the unwashed precipitated solids revealed their composition. All the compounds with the exception of silica (silicon oxide) are known to be readily soluble in water. Hence, their dissolution during water washing is not unexpected. Even though silica is a sparingly water-soluble compound, its dissolution is also not surprising. This stems from its small fraction in the solids as a whole and also its relative freshness. Assuming similar supernate characteristics, flushing the GDL with water (preferably warm) should facilitate dissolution and removal of future pluggage events as long as build up/aging of the sparingly soluble constituent (silica) is limited. On the other hand, since the amount of silica formed is relatively small, it is quite possible dissolution of the more soluble larger fraction will cause disintegration or fragmentation of the sparingly soluble smaller fraction (that may be embedded in the larger soluble solid mass) and allow its removal via suspension in the flushing water.

  6. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  7. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J M; Valles, James M

    2017-03-10

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  8. The evaporation of the water-sodium chlorides solution droplets on the heated substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the evaporation of a sessile water- sodium chlorides solution drop to open atmosphere on the solid substrate (anodized aluminum) under the varying heat flux. The main parameters defining drop profile were obtained: contact diameter, contact angle, height of the drop. The specific evaporation rate was calculated. The influence of the initial concentration of the evaporated solution to a value of the specific evaporation rate has been found out. The specific evaporation rate decreases with increasing of the concentration.

  9. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  10. Reservoir evaporation in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Ayala, Rolando A.

    2014-03-01

    The role of reservoir surface evaporation in river/reservoir water budgets and water management is explored using a modeling system that combines historical natural hydrology with current conditions of water resources development and management. The long-term mean evaporation from the 3415 reservoirs in the Texas water rights permit system is estimated to be 7.53 billion m3/year, which is equivalent to 61% of total agricultural or 126% of total municipal water use in the state during the year 2010. Evaporation varies with the hydrologic conditions governing reservoir surface areas and evaporation rates. Annual statewide total evaporation volumes associated with exceedance probabilities of 75%, 50%, and 25% are 7.07, 7.47, and 7.95 billion m3/year, respectively. Impacts of evaporation are greatest during extended severe droughts that govern water supply capabilities.

  11. Evaporation of inclined water droplets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-16

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  12. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  13. Crystallization of proteins by dynamic control of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. G.; Bray, T. L.; Suddath, F. L.

    1991-03-01

    It is expected that the kinetics of supersaturation, which is directly related to the evaporation of solvent from a crystallization solution, will greatly affect both nucleation and crystal growth processes. Therefore, a novel device has been developed which allows computer regulation of the flow of N 2(g) over a hanging drop to dynamically control the evaporation of solvent. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the amount of water vapor transferred from the drop to the gas stream and provides closed loop control of the evaporation process. Data acquisition and control are accomplished using a custom program written with LabVIEW software (National Instruments) on a Macintosh II microcomputer. Quantitation of several evaporation protocols has been accomplished using both the thermal conductivity detector and a novel conductance cell that allows continuous measurement of solution analyte concentrations. Crystals of hen egg white lysozyme have been grown at different evaporation rates and analyzed according to size and number of single crystals.

  14. Uranium solubility studies during waste evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    1993-08-16

    The liquid waste streams from chemical processing of reactor-irradiated targets and fuel are neutralized with excess NaOH and discharged to mild steel waste tanks for interim storage. To reduce the number of tanks required, and thus the cost of waste storage, the supernate is evaporated to about 70% solids, discharged while hot into clean waste tanks. As the solution cools, solids crystallize from the saturated solution and form a solid layer on the bottom of the tank. The supernate is re-evaporated to concentrate the volume further. Evaporation and crystallization are continued until, for tank 41, the tank is almost filled with crystallized salts. In the DWPF processing scheme, these salts will be redissolved in water and {sup 137}Cs precipitated with sodium tetraphenylborate in the in-tank precipitation facility. The decontaminated supernate is now mixed with cement and stored as a solid monolith; the precipitated Cs and the base-insoluble solids are encapsulated in glass for permanent storage. Questions have been raised about the nuclear safety of these operations, particularly for tank 41, where the waste source was waste from the H-Area fuel processing. One scenario for a potential nuclear accident considers that the salts in tank 41 would dissolve in water, but the enriched uranium solids would not dissolve. The uranium is hypothesized to settle to the bottom of the tank and become concentrated enough to reach a critical mass. A second scenario, promulgated by West Valley, is that uranium would precipitate in the evaporator and form a critical mass in the evaporator. To shed some light on the probable behavior of U in the waste system, the solubility of U in synthetic waste was studied. The results are reported here.

  15. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  16. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks.

    PubMed

    Lone, Saifullah; Zhang, Jia Ming; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-03-13

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  17. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life—a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called “Ouzo effect.” Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop. PMID:27418601

  18. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-08-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life—a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called “Ouzo effect.” Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  19. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J G M; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-08-02

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life-a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called "Ouzo effect." Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  20. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  1. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  2. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  3. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called "Ouzo effect." Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  4. Analysis of the effects of evaporative cooling on the evaporation of liquid droplets using a combined field approach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Liran

    2015-01-01

    During liquid evaporation, the equations for the vapor concentration in the atmosphere and for the temperature in the liquid are coupled and must be solved in an iterative manner. In the present paper, a combined field approach which unifies the coupled fields into one single hybrid field and thus makes the iteration unnecessary is proposed. By using this approach, the influences of the evaporative cooling on the evaporation of pinned sessile droplets are investigated, and its predictions are found in good agreement with the previous theoretical and experimental results. A dimensionless number Ec which can evaluate the strength of the evaporative cooling is then introduced, and the results show that both the evaporation flux along the droplet surface and the total evaporation rate of the droplet decrease as the evaporative cooling number Ec increases. For drying droplets, there exists a critical value EcCrit below which the evaporative cooling effect can be neglected and above which the significance of the effect increases dramatically. The present work may also have more general applications to coupled field problems in which all the fields have the same governing equation. PMID:25721987

  5. The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Presgrove, S.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

  6. The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Presgrove, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

  7. Evaporation loss of dissolved volatile substances from ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiichi; Takenaka, Norimichi; Bandow, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2008-08-21

    Volatile acidic solutes were used to make dilute solutions, which were frozen by various methods. The concentration of solutes and the pH of the samples were measured before and after being frozen. When the sample solution is frozen from the bottom to the top, solutes are concentrated into the unfrozen solution (i.e., the upper part of the sample) due to the freeze concentration effect. Thereafter, concentrated anions combine with protons to form acids, and the amount of acids in the unfrozen solution increase as the ice formation progresses. At the end of freezing, the acid is saturated at the ice surface, and if the formed acid is volatile, then evaporation occurs. Frozen solutions were allowed to stand below 0 degrees C, where evaporation rates were obtained in the following order: formate > acetate > propionate > n-butyrate > chloride > nitrate. Except for nitrate, evaporation rates were enough to take place in frozen water of the natural environment (e.g., ice crystal, graupel, snow crystal, and frozen droplets). The relationship between the evaporation rate of volatile acids and their physical properties demonstrate that the evaporation rates of weak acids are faster than those of strong acids, and the evaporation rates among weak acids are the same as the volatility of weak acids.

  8. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Water Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Usui, Kota; Bonn, Mischa

    2015-12-04

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor, and is a key step in Earth's water cycle. At the molecular level, evaporation requires breaking at least one very strong intermolecular bond between two water molecules at the interface. Despite the importance of this process the molecular mechanism by which an evaporating water molecule gains sufficient energy to escape from the surface has remained elusive. Here, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations at the water-air interface with polarizable classical force field models, that the high kinetic energy of the evaporated water molecule is enabled by a well-timed making and breaking of hydrogen bonds involving at least three water molecules at the interface, the recoil of which allows one of the molecules to escape. The evaporation of water is thus enabled by concerted, ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics of interfacial water, and follows one specific molecular pathway.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Microstructured Evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibel, W.; Westermann, S.; Maikowske, S.; Brandner, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have become more and more popular over the last decades [1]. Cooling is a topic where microstructures offer significant advantages compared to conventional techniques due the much higher possible surface to volume ratios and short heat transfer lengths. By evaporating of a fluid in microchannels, compact, fast and powerful cooling devices become possible [2]. Experimental results for different designs of microstructured evaporators are presented here. They have been obtained either using water as evaporating coolant or the refrigerant R134a (Tetrafluoroethane). A new microstructured evaporator design consisting of bended microchannels instead of straight channels for a better performance is shown and compared to previous results [2] for the evaporation of R134a in straight microchannels.

  12. Measurement of evaporation from snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaser, G.

    1982-04-01

    As part of a combined study of the ice, water and energy balance of Hintereisferner (Ötztal Alps) evaporation from snow and ice is measured since 1978 at an altitudes of 3030 m. These measurements are performed with plexiglass lysimeters of 400 em2 surface area. Evaluation of meteorological records yield a good correlation of evaporation with the difference of vapor pressure of the air and of the surface, respectively, for various classes of wind speed. The daily variation displays maximum evaporation before noon, and condensation during the afternoon with a maximum two hours after sunset. There is a sharp reversal from condensation to evaporation around midnight. The mean evaporation of a 12-day period in July/August 1980 was 0.25 mm per day, with a peak of 2.0 mm per day.

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Usui, Kota; Bonn, Mischa

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor, and is a key step in Earth's water cycle. At the molecular level, evaporation requires breaking at least one very strong intermolecular bond between two water molecules at the interface. Despite the importance of this process the molecular mechanism by which an evaporating water molecule gains sufficient energy to escape from the surface has remained elusive. Here, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations at the water-air interface with polarizable classical force field models, that the high kinetic energy of the evaporated water molecule is enabled by a well-timed making and breaking of hydrogen bonds involving at least three water molecules at the interface, the recoil of which allows one of the molecules to escape. The evaporation of water is thus enabled by concerted, ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics of interfacial water, and follows one specific molecular pathway.

  14. Forest evaporation models: relationships between stand growth and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maitre, D. C.; Versfeld, D. B.

    1997-06-01

    The relationships between forest stand structure, growth and evaporation were analysed to determine whether forest evaporation can be estimated from stand growth data. This approach permits rapid assessment of the potential impacts of afforestation on the water regime. The basis for this approach is (a) that growth rates are determined by water availability and limited by the maximum water extraction potential, and (b) that stand evaporation is proportional to biomass and biomass increment. The relationships between stand growth and evaporation were modelled for a set of catchment experiments where estimates of both growth and evaporation were available. The predicted mean evaporation, over periods of several years, was generally within 10% of the measured mean annual evaporation (rainfall minus streamflow) when the model from one catchment was applied to other catchments planted with the same species. The residual evaporation, after fitting the models, was correlated with rainfall: above-average rainfall resulted in above-average evaporation. This relationship could be used to derive estimates for dry and wet years. Analyses using the models provide additional evidence that Eucalyptus grandis may be depleting groundwater reserves in catchments where its roots can reach the water table. The models are designed to be integrated into a plantation management system which uses a geographic information system for spatial analysis and modelling. The use of readily available growth parameters as predictor variables may reduce our dependence on intricate process-based models. This is seen as an efficient way of extrapolating existing catchment data — reflecting the impacts of forestry on water supplies across a range of sites, climatic zones and species. This approach has the potential for further development, especially in dealing with low flows and faster growing species.

  15. Waste Feed Evaporation: Physical Properties and Solubility Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2003-08-25

    Caustic adjustment of the UF recycle stream was required to prevent gel formation for the solutions tested. Actual amounts of caustic adjustment required will vary depending on the composition and volume ratios of the UF recycle. The concentration of recycles in the waste feed evaporator as required to blend with waste feed streams to provide a feed to the ultrafiltration process with a supernate specific gravity of 1.22 is feasible. No problems (such as severe foaming) were noted during the lab-scale testing that would preclude operation of the evaporator. The physical properties of the recycles and waste feed blends fit well to correlations based on sodium concentration and temperature. Evaporation of streams containing high levels of insoluble solids may lead to ''bumping'' or other undesirable behavior in the evaporator at insoluble solids. Sodium alumino-silicate solids were not noted in the evaporator feed or concentrate, but NAS did form in the blends of concentrated recycle and waste feeds. Strontium was found to precipitate during neutralization of the acid cleaning solution and remain precipitated during evaporation. Mercury was found to be significantly soluble in Envelope A simulants and the solubility of mercury increased during evaporation. No mercury was detected in the offgas system after evaporation using Envelope A simulants. Mercury was significantly less soluble in a simulant of AZ-102. Filtration of the Envelope A waste simulants was affected by the addition of recycle to the process, but the impact was primarily due to an increase in the amount of insoluble solids in the blended stream compared to the waste feed.

  16. Lake Evaporation: a Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amayreh, Jumah Ahmad

    1995-01-01

    Reliable evaporation data are an essential requirement in any water and/or energy budget studies. This includes operation and management of both urban and agricultural water resources. Evaporation from large, open water surfaces such as lakes and reservoirs may influence many agricultural and irrigation decisions. In this study evaporation from Bear Lake in the states of Idaho and Utah was measured using advanced research instruments (Bowen Ratio and Eddy Correlation). Actual over-lake evaporation and weather data measurements were used to understand the mechanism of evaporation in the lake, determine lake-related parameters (such as roughness lengths, heat storage, net radiation, etc.), and examine and evaluate existing lake evaporation methods. This enabled the development of a modified and flexible model incorporating the tested methods for hourly and daily best estimates of lake evaporation using nearby simple land-based weather data and, if available, remotely sensed data. Average evaporation from Bear Lake was about 2 mm/day during the summer season (March-October) of this two-year (1993-1994) study. This value reflects the large amount of energy consumed in heating the water body of the lake. Moreover, evaporation from the lake was not directly related to solar radiation. This observation was clear during night time when the evaporation continued with almost the same rate as daytime evaporation. This explains the vital role of heat storage in the lake as the main driving energy for evaporation during night time and day time cloudy sky conditions. When comparing over-lake and nearby land-based weather parameters, land-based wind speed was the only weather parameter that had a significant difference of about 50% lower than over-lake measurements. Other weather parameters were quite similar. The study showed that evaporation from the lake can be accurately estimated using Penman-type equations if related parameters such as net radiation, heat storage, and

  17. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  18. Front instabilities in evaporatively dewetting nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Vancea, I; Thiele, U; Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Stannard, A; Martin, C P; Blunt, M O; Moriarty, P J

    2008-10-01

    Various experimental settings that involve drying solutions or suspensions of nanoparticles-often called nanofluids-have recently been used to produce structured nanoparticle layers. In addition to the formation of polygonal networks and spinodal-like patterns, the occurrence of branched structures has been reported. After reviewing the experimental results we use a modified version of the Monte Carlo model first introduced by Rabani [Nature 426, 271 (2003)] to study structure formation in evaporating films of nanoparticle solutions for the case that all structuring is driven by the interplay of evaporating solvent and diffusing nanoparticles. After introducing the model and its general behavior we focus on receding dewetting fronts which are initially straight but develop a transverse fingering instability. We analyze the dependence of the characteristics of the resulting branching patterns on the driving effective chemical potential, the mobility and concentration of the nanoparticles, and the interaction strength between liquid and nanoparticles. This allows us to understand the underlying instability mechanism.

  19. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  20. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  1. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  2. Report on Analyses of WAC Samples of Evaporator Overheads - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-03-18

    In November and December of 2004, the Tank Farm submitted annual samples from 2F, 2H and 3H Evaporator Overhead streams for characterization to verify compliance with the new Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and to look for organic species. With the exception of slightly high ammonia in the 2F evaporator overheads and high radiation control guide number for the 3H and 2F evaporator overhead samples, all the overheads samples were found to be in compliance with the Effluent Treatment Facility WAC. The ammonium concentration in the 2F-evaporator overhead, at 33 mg/L, was above the ETF waste water collection tank (WWCT) limits of 28 mg/L. The RCG Number for the 3H and 2F evaporator samples at, respectively, 1.38E-02 and 8.24E-03 were higher than the WWCT limit of 7.69E-03. The analytical detection limits for americium-241 and radium-226 in the evaporator samples were not consistently met because of low WWCT detection limits and insufficient evaporator samples.

  3. Field Evaporation of Grounded Arsenic Doped Silicon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zexiang; She, Juncong; Li, Zhibing; Wang, Weiliang; Chen, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the field evaporation of grounded arsenic (As) doped silicon (Si) clusters composed of 52 atoms with density functional theory (DFT) to mimic Si nano structures of hundreds of nanometers long standing on a substrate. Six cluster structures with different As doping concentrations and dopant locations are studied. The critical evaporation electric fields are found to be lower for clusters with higher doping concentrations and doping sites closer to the surface. We attribute the difference to the difference in binding energies corresponding to the different As-doping concentrations and to the doping locations. Our theoretical study could shed light on the stability of nano apexes under high electric field.

  4. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Laden with Particles and Insoluble Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Chandra Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar K

    2016-07-12

    We consider the flow dynamics of a thin evaporating droplet in the presence of an insoluble surfactant and noninteracting particles in the bulk. On the basis of lubrication theory, we derive a set of evolution equations for the film height, the interfacial surfactant, and bulk particle concentrations, taking into account the dependence of liquid viscosity on the local particle concentration. An important ingredient of our model is that it takes into account the fact that the surfactant adsorbed at the interface hinders evaporation. We perform a parametric study to investigate how the presence of surfactants affects the evaporation process as well as the flow dynamics with and without the presence of particles in the bulk. Our numerical calculations show that the droplet lifetime is affected significantly by the balance between the ability of the surfactant to enhance spreading, suppressing the effect of thermal Marangoni stresses-induced motion, and to hinder the evaporation flux through the reduction of the effective interfacial area of evaporation, which tend to accelerate and decelerate the evaporation process, respectively. For particle-laden droplets and in the case of dilute solutions, the droplet lifetime is found to be weakly dependent on the initial particle concentration. We also show that the particle deposition patterns are influenced strongly by the direct effect of the surfactant on the evaporative flux; in certain cases, the "coffee-stain" effect is enhanced significantly. A discussion of the delicate interplay between the effects of capillary pressure and solutal and thermal Marangoni stresses, which drive the liquid flow inside of the evaporating droplet giving rise to the observed results, is provided herein.

  5. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  6. Horst Meyer and Quantum Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, S.

    2016-11-01

    With their 1963 article in Cryogenics Horst Meyer and his collaborators triggered intense research activity on the evaporation of superfluid helium. Discussing this subject with him in 1975 was enlightening. Fifty years later, the analogy between the photoelectric effect and the evaporation of superfluid helium in the low temperature limit is not yet clear, although remarkable progress has been made in its observation and its understanding. This special issue of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics is an opportunity to recall the history of quantum evaporation, and to express my gratitude to Horst Meyer. It describes quickly most of the experimental and theoretical works which have been published on quantum evaporation during the last 50 years, but it is not a comprehensive review of this fascinating subject.

  7. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Rawlinson, K. Scott

    1994-01-01

    An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

  8. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  9. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  10. Integrating variations in the soil chloride profile and evaporativity for in-situ estimation of evaporation in arid zones: an application in south-eastern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhlassa, Saïdati; Ammary, Bouchaib; Paré, Samuel; Safsaf, Naima

    2016-11-01

    In arid regions, knowledge of the evaporation rate from the water table is essential for appropriate management of scarce resources and to prevent land degradation. Soil chloride profiles in the unsaturated zone of a bare soil in an arid area of south-eastern Morocco were used to assess the evaporation flux, using chloride inventories in conjunction with evaporative demand. Moisture fluxes were calculated from measured chloride concentrations on the basis of a steady-state flow model. The chloride profiles displayed large variations in concentrations and had (1) low chloride concentrations near the soil surface, (2) maximum chloride concentrations at depths of 11-14 cm beneath the soil surface, respectively in July and February, and (3) gradually decreasing chloride concentrations while depth increased below these peaks. Evaporative demands were found to be inversely proportional to the depth of evaporation fronts and proportional to evaporation fluxes. In addition, the evaporation along the profiles seems to be controlled by the soil composition and texture. The investigation of chloride profiles in February and July enabled the determination of a value for annual evaporation (˜30 mm), which is in good agreement with the value estimated by the Allison-Barnes type model (˜32 mm).

  11. [Soil evaporation under perforated plastic mulch].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Quanjiu; Wang, Wenyan; Shao, Ming'an

    2005-03-01

    In arid and semiarid regions of northwestern China, where evaporation exceeds precipitation, perforated plastic mulches are widely used to decrease soil water evaporation. To determine the effects of various perforated plastic mulches on soil water evaporation after irrigation, a soil column experiment was conducted, which consisted of six mulches with different perforated rates and four levels of irrigation, and the soil water evaporation from each soil column was measured. The results showed that with 100% perforated mulch, the cumulative evaporation was 2.8-48.5 times higher than that of the control, and increased with increasing irrigation amount. There was a linear relationship between cumulative evaporation and time, which followed the Gardner's theory of bare soil evaporation. A three-factor (evaporation time, perforated rate and irrigation amount) function of cumulative evaporation and the functions of relative cumulative evaporation and cumulative evaporation per unit hole area film were established, which fitted the observed data very well.

  12. Structural and evaporative evolutions in desiccating sessile drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, B.; Brutin, D.

    2011-07-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited drop of whole blood. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation, and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter, leading to a final typical pattern. Two distinct regimes of evaporation are highlighted: the first is driven by convection, diffusion, and gelation in a liquid phase, whereas the second, with a much slower rate of evaporation, is characterized by the mass transport of the liquid left over in the gellified biocomponent matter. A diffusion model of the drying process allows a prediction of the transition between these two regimes of evaporation. Moreover, the formation of cracks and other events occurring during the drying are examined and shown to be driven by critical solid mass concentrations.

  13. Structural and evaporative evolutions in desiccating sessile drops of blood.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Brutin, D

    2011-07-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited drop of whole blood. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation, and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter, leading to a final typical pattern. Two distinct regimes of evaporation are highlighted: the first is driven by convection, diffusion, and gelation in a liquid phase, whereas the second, with a much slower rate of evaporation, is characterized by the mass transport of the liquid left over in the gellified biocomponent matter. A diffusion model of the drying process allows a prediction of the transition between these two regimes of evaporation. Moreover, the formation of cracks and other events occurring during the drying are examined and shown to be driven by critical solid mass concentrations.

  14. Evaporation of sessile droplets on nano-porous alumina surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanchit K.; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Khanderkar, Sameer

    2013-07-01

    An experimental investigation of evaporation of sessile droplets is presented on nano-porous alumina surfaces with different pore distribution morphologies and pore sizes. Evaporation can be considered as a quasi-steady-state process, such that the vapor concentration distribution above the droplet satisfies the Laplace equation, but with a timevarying droplet surface. For benchmarking, the evaporation of sessile water and ethanol droplets is also investigated on standard borosilicate glass and Teflon surfaces respectively, and results are compared with the previous work. Contact angle variation with time is also recorded and high speed videos showing the spreading process of droplets on nanoporous surfaces are taken. The results clearly show that nano-structuring is an effective tool to control wettability as well as the diffusive evaporation process.

  15. Tubeless evaporation process development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    A tubeless evaporation process which has the potential to combine the advantage of both evaporation and freezing processes, without their disadvantages is being developed. The TEP is capable of concentrating process solutions of such things as sugar, caustic soda, salt, sodium sulfate, black liquor from the pulp and paper industry, cooling tower blowdown, ''spent'' pickling liquor (sulfuric acid) from the steel industry, and nitric acid with potential energy savings of half to three-quarters of the energy required by conventional evaporators, with about half of the capital and maintenance cost. It has similar potential for the production of fresh water from seawater. The process uses working fluids (WF's) at their freezing point to effect direct contact heat exchange. The purpose of this project was to find additional and lower cost WF's in the laboratory, to obtain sizing information for the major equipment for an economic evaluation and a pilot plant design in a bench scale plant, and to perform the economic evaluation, and the pilot plant design and cost estimate. 6 refs., 37 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  17. Wind increases "evaporative demand" but reduces plant water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, determined by stomatal or canopy resistance. Therefore, so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand" or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. An increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is generally believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress, aggravating drought effects. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at the leaf scale. In fact, in a range of field measurements, we found that water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, enabling plants to conserve water during photosynthesis. We estimate that the observed global decrease in terrestrial near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We conclude that trends in wind speed and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have to be considered explicitly for the estimation of drought effects on

  18. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  19. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  20. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  1. Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

  2. Influence of Oil on Refrigerant Evaporator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong-Soo, Kim; Nagata, Katsuya; Katsuta, Masafumi; Tomosugi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kouichiro; Horichi, Toshiaki

    To explore the quantitative effect of the lubrication oil on the thermal and hydraulic evaporator performance, the detailed structure of two-phase refrigerant (R11) and lubrication oil (Suniso 5GS) flow has been investigated. Experiment has been performed using a transparent tube 20mm in inner diameter and 2600mm in total length as main test section, which was heated by surrounding hot water bath. This water bath also functioned as the visual observation section of the transition of two-phase flow pattern. Oil mass concentration was controlled initially, and circulated into the system. The void fraction at the main test section was measured by direct volume measurement using so-called "Quick Closing Valve" method. Since the effect of oil on the transition of two-phase flow pattern is emphasized at the low flow rate, operation was made at relatively low mass velocity, 50 and 100 kg/m2·s, five different oil concentrations were taken. Throughout the experiment, the evaporation pressure was kept at 105 kPa. In general, when contamination of the lubrication oil happened, the void fraction was decreasing due to the change of viscosity and surface tension and the occurence of the foaming. To correlate the void fraction as function of quality, Zivi's expression was modified to include the effect of oil concentration. The agreement between the data and this proposed correlation was favorable. Finally, to take into account the effect of lubrication oil, the new flow pattern diagram was proposed.

  3. Evaporation of particle-laden droplets on a superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Masoud; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigated the evaporation dynamics of water droplets suspended with minute particles of varying concentrations on a superhydrophobic surface. The contact angle, diameter, and height of the droplets decreased during the evaporation process. For pure water, the droplet went through a wetting transition from a partial wetting (Cassie-Baxter), with a large contact angle (>140°), to completely wetting (Wenzel) state, with a small contact angle. Unlike pure water, the nanofluid droplets maintain high contact angles (>100°) during evaporation. We found that the contact line was pinned, and an increase (10 %) in the weight fraction of nanoparticles led to a remarkable 40 % decrease in the total drying time. The nanofluid droplets left donut-shaped drying patterns. In these final drying structures, a shrinkage of the droplet height and base diameter was observed for nanofluids with lower concentrations. The results show that droplet evaporation rate and deposit pattern depend on the concentration of nanoparticles, implying the crucial influences of water evaporation and particle migration dynamics and time-scales.

  4. The Effect of Dynamic Evaporation Rates on the Mobility of Pharmaceuticals in Unsaturated Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normile, H.; Papelis, C.; Kibbey, T. C. G.

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this work was on investigating how dynamic rates of evaporation affect the fate and transport of pharmaceutical compounds in unsaturated porous media. The environmental processes of saturation and evaporation control local concentrations of contaminants in pore water of porous media. Specifically, the rate of evaporation can affect the identity and extent of solid formation of a pharmaceutical compound. A range of experiments with different evaporation rates were conducted on sand columns saturated with a solution of ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Experiments were designed to simulate increased and decreased pore-water concentrations of a compound due to evaporation and resaturation, respectively. Results suggest that varied rates of evaporation cause differences in compound adsorption behavior. This result has significant implications for understanding fate and transport within the unsaturated zone. Preliminary models exploring the impact on contaminant mobility are discussed.

  5. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Nurtaç

    2006-12-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written responses and to further probe their understandings of the questions asked in the test. The findings revealed a number of misconceptions, many of which have not been previously documented. The results have implications for tertiary level teaching suggesting that a substantial review of teaching strategies is needed.

  6. Evaporation from layered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2010-06-01

    Evaporation rates from porous media may vary considerably due to changes in internal transport mechanisms and potential interruption of hydraulic continuity; both are influenced by media pore space properties. Evaporation behavior in layered porous media is affected by thickness and sequence of layering and capillary characteristics of each layer. We propose a composite characteristic length for predicting drying front depth at the end of a period with a high and constant drying rate (stage 1 evaporation) from layered porous media. The model was tested in laboratory experiments using Hele-Shaw cells filled with alternating layers of coarse and fine sands considering different combinations of thicknesses and positions. The presence of textural interfaces affects drying rate, modifies liquid phase configuration, and affects the dynamics of the receding drying front. Neutron radiography measurements were used to delineate dynamics of liquid phase distribution with high temporal and spatial resolution. Results show that air invading an interface between fine and coarse sand layers results in a capillary pressure jump and subsequent relaxation that significantly modify liquid phase distribution compared with evaporation from homogeneous porous media. Insights are potentially useful for designing mulching strategies and capillary barriers aimed at reducing evaporative losses.

  7. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F. L.; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  8. Etude paleomagnetique des sediments holocenes de la Fosse du Mackenzie, mer de Beaufort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barris, Elissa

    Les etudes paleomagnetiques a haute resolution sont d'importance en magnetostratigraphie et geomagnetisme, particulierement dans l'Arctique en raison de l'inaccessibilite et des faibles vitesses de sedimentation dans plusieurs secteurs. Deux carottes sedimentaires representant l'Holocene recent ont ete recoltees dans la Fosse du Mackenzie, une region avec des vitesses de sedimentation relativement elevees. Une carotte boite et un Calypso square core ont ete preleves a deux sites (690 et 680). Les proprietes physiques et magnetiques et la granulometrie ont ete mesurees, ainsi que les aimantations remanentes naturelle, anhysteretique, isothermale et isothermale saturee (NRM, ARM, IRM et SIRM). L'hysteresis magnetique indique une forte concentration de magnetite de type pseudo-single domain, un porteur ideal de remanence, alors que les mesures de la susceptibilite magnetique suggerent une concentration uniforme. Les valeurs de deviation angulaire maximale (MAD) et du champ median destructif (MDF) indiquent des donnees de direction d'excellente qualite et une coercivite typique de la magnetite, respectivement. Finalement, dans la carotte 690 et la partie intermediaire de la 680, l'inclinaison vane autour des valeurs d'un dipole axial geocentrique (GAD) pour la latitude des sites, renforcant la fiabilite du signal paleomagnetique. Finalement, des proxies de la paleointensite relative ont ete construits pour les carottes 690 et 680 en normalisant la NRM par l'IRM et l'ARM, respectivement. Vingt-et-une coquilles de pelecypodes reparties dans les deux carottes ont ete recoltees pour construire un modele d'âge au radiocarbone a chaque si te, une tâche necessaire pour la mise en contexte d'un enregistrement paleomagnetique, mais souvent difficile dans l'Arctique. En utilisant ces modeles d'âge, les enregistrements paleomagnetiques ont ete compares avec d'autres provenant du bas-Arctique et des moyennes latitudes, soulignant leur potentiel pour des etudes

  9. Microdroplet evaporation with a forced pinned contact line.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Kevin; Putnam, Shawn A

    2014-09-02

    Experimental and numerical investigations of water microdroplet evaporation on heated, laser patterned polymer substrates are reported. The study is focused on both (i) controlling a droplet's contact line dynamics during evaporation to identifying how the contact line influences evaporative heat transfer and (ii) validating numerical simulations with experimental data. Droplets are formed on the polymer surface using a bottom-up methodology, where a computer-controlled syringe pump feeds water through a 200 μm diameter fluid channel within the heated polymer substrate. This methodology facilitates precise control of the droplet's growth rate, size, and inlet temperature. In addition to this microchannel supply line, the substrate surfaces are laser patterned with a moatlike trench around the fluid-channel outlet, adding additional control of the droplet's contact line motion, area, and contact angle. In comparison to evaporation on a nonpatterned polymer surface, the laser patterned trench increases contact line pinning time by ∼60% of the droplet's lifetime. Numerical simulations of diffusion controlled evaporation are compared the experimental data with a pinned contact line. These diffusion based simulations consistently over predict the droplet's evaporation rate. In efforts to improve this model, a temperature distribution along the droplet's liquid-vapor interface is imposed to account for the concentration distribution of saturated vapor along the interface, which yields improved predictions within 2-4% of the experimental data throughout the droplet's lifetime on heated substrates.

  10. Tubular sublimatory evaporator heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An evaporative refrigerator or cooler comprising a bundle of spaced, porous walled tubes closed at one of their ends and vented to a vacuum at the other end is disclosed. The tube bundle is surrounded by a water jacket having a hot water inlet distribution manifold and a cooled water outlet through a plenum chamber. Hot water is pumped into the jacket to circulate around the tubes, and when this water meets the vacuum existing inside the tubes, it evaporates thereby cooling the water in the jacket. If cooling proceeds to the point where water penetrating or surrounding all or part of the tubes freezes, operation continues with local sublimation of the ice on the tubes while the circulating water attempts to melt the ice. Both sublimation and evaporation may take place simultaneously in different regions of the device.

  11. Sagging of evaporating droplets of colloidal suspensions on inclined substrates.

    PubMed

    Espín, Leonardo; Kumar, Satish

    2014-10-14

    A droplet of a colloidal suspension placed on an inclined substrate may sag under the action of gravity. Solvent evaporation raises the concentration of the colloidal particles, and the resulting viscosity changes may influence the sag of the droplet. To investigate this phenomenon, we have developed a mathematical model for perfectly wetting droplets based on lubrication theory and the rapid-vertical-diffusion approximation. Precursor films are assumed to be present, the colloidal particles are taken to be hard spheres, and particle and liquid dynamics are coupled through a concentration-dependent viscosity and diffusivity. Evaporation is assumed to be limited by how rapidly solvent molecules can transfer from the liquid to the vapor phase. The resulting one-dimensional system of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the evolution of the droplet height and particle concentration is solved numerically for a range of initial particle concentrations and substrate temperatures. The solutions reveal that the interaction between evaporation and non-Newtonian suspension rheology gives rise to several distinct regimes of droplet shapes and particle concentration distributions. The results provide insight into how evaporation and suspension rheology can be tuned to minimize sagging as well as the well-known coffee-ring effect, an outcome which is important for industrial coating processes.

  12. Etude du Photochromisme et de la Photorefractivite dans le Poly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghailane, Fatima

    1995-11-01

    Nous avons etudie la possibilite d'utiliser un materiau organique, le poly(vinylcarbazole) comme milieu de stockage optique de masse en temps reel. Ce materiau dope aux photochromes presente un potentiel non negligeable pour l'holographie de volume en temps reel. Plusiers cycles, Ecriture-Lecture-Effacement, ont ete enregistres dans cette matrice polymerique avec une resolution assez elevee. Une etude a ete menee afin d'obtenir la valeur des parametres comme l'epaisseur du film et l'intensite d'ecriture pour un angle d'enregistrement theta_{ acute ecriture} donne qui permettent d'obtenir les meilleures efficacites diffractionelles tout en preservant ce milieu de tout effet de fatigue ou de degradation. Ce polymere devient photorefractif une fois melange avec un bon accepteur de charge, le trinitrofluorenone et un bon chromophore non-lineaire, le disperse orange 25. Nous avons etudie experimentalement la conductivite en obscurite et la photoconductivite de ce materiau. Des simulations numeriques ont ete realisees en se basant sur le modele de Poole-Frenkel. Nous avons aussi etudie l'implantation de faisceaux d'ions d'oxygene d'energie 200 keV pour inscrire dans le PVCz un guide d'onde plan a profil d'indice. Une etude ESCA complete cette partie afin de savoir les modifications induites par implementation ionique a l'interieur du film polymerique.

  13. Evaporation of nebular fines during chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2008-06-01

    temperatures is kinetically inhibited, radiation associated with chondrule formation would have accelerated the conversion. There is now evidence that an appreciable fraction of the nanodiamonds previously held to be presolar were actually formed in the solar nebula. Industrial condensation of diamonds from mixtures of CH 4 and H 2 implies that high nebular CH 4/CO ratios favored nanodiamond formation. A large fraction of chondritic insoluble organic matter may have formed in related processes. At low nebular temperatures appreciable water should have been incorporated into the smoke that condensed following dust (and some chondrule) evaporation. If chondrule formation continued down to temperatures as low as 250 K this process could account for the water concentration observed in primitive chondrites such as LL3.0 and CO3.0 chondrites. Higher H 2O contents in CM and CI chondrites may reflect asteroidal redistribution. In some chondrite groups (e.g., CR) the Mg/Si ratio of matrix material is appreciably (30%) lower than that of chondrules but the bulk Mg/Si ratio is roughly similar to the CI or solar ratio. This has been interpreted as a kind of closed-system behavior sometimes called "complementarity." This leads to the conclusion that nebular fines were efficiently agglomerated. Its importance, however is obscured by the observation that bulk Mg/Si ratios in ordinary and enstatite chondrites are much lower than those in carbonaceous chondrites, and thus that complementarity did not hold throughout the solar nebula.

  14. Evaporation control research, 1959-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1963-01-01

    Two hundred and forty-five dispersions of long-chain alkanols were formulated by using various emulsifiers and alkanols. The dispensing and spreading ability of each of these formulations was tested. The most promising emulsifier that could be used with any of the alkanols was glyceryl monostearate (self-emulsifying). However, the concentration of the alkanol in the dispersion form varied somewhat: with the length of the carbon chain. A maximum concentration of 16 percent was obtained using the longer chain alkanols in the dispersion form without losing any of the properties of a fluid. Nine field tests were undertaken on small stock tanks. The retardant materials used in these tests were dodecanol, hexadecanol, and octadecanol. These materials were applied in either liquid or dispersion form. Four types of dispensing equipment were tested. The first type used a pressure system which sprayed a liquid onto the surface of the water. An anemometer and wind-controlled vane, operated by an electrical system, determined the length End frequency of application. The second type was similar to the first except that gravity was utilized to force the liquid onto the surface. The third type. used a drip system with rates of about 10 drops per minute. The fourth type used a gravity feed and a wind-controlled valve which allowed the dispersion material to flow onto the surface of the water when the wind was in the proper direction. In the field tests, the best reduction in evaporation was obtained using octadecanol in dispersion form and dispensed with the wind-controlled valve and gravity feed system. The maximum reduction in evaporation for a 2-week period was 27 percent. However, the economics of suppressing evaporation from stock tanks is questionable because of the short travel time across the tank by the film. There are still many problems unsolved. Some of these can be resolved in the laboratory whereas others can be resolved only in the field. Some of the more serious

  15. Rate of runaway evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Groep, J. van de; Straten, P. van der; Vogels, J. M.

    2011-09-15

    Evaporative cooling is a process that is essential in creating Bose-Einstein condensates in dilute atomic gasses. This process has often been simulated based on a model using a truncated Boltzmann distribution. This model assumes that the energy distribution up to the threshold energy can still be described by a Boltzmann distribution: it assumes detailed balance up to the threshold energy. However, the evolution of the distribution function in time is not taken into account. Here we solve the kinetic Boltzmann equation for a gas undergoing evaporative cooling in a harmonic and linear trap in order to determine the evolution of the energy distribution. The magnitude of the discrepancy with the truncated Boltzmannmodel is calculated by including a polynomial expansion of the distribution function. We find that up to 35% fewer particles are found in the high-energy tail of the distribution with respect to the truncated Boltzmann distribution and up to 15% more collisions are needed to reach quantum degeneracy. Supported by a detailed investigation of the particle loss rate at different energies, we conclude that the limited occupation of high-energy states during the evaporation process causes the lowering of the evaporation speed and efficiency.

  16. Observations of Si field evaporation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keith; Sebastian, Jason; Gerstl, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Field evaporation studies of crystalline <100> Si were performed in a three-dimensional atom-probe, which utilized a local electrode geometry. Several distinct phenomena were observed. Si field evaporation rates showed: (1) no measurable dependence on temperature below 110K, (2) an exponential dependence on evaporation rate as a function of temperature above 110K, and (3) no dependence on substrate doping (i.e., electrical conductivity) as high as 10 Omega cm in the temperature range of 40-150K. Two distinct evaporation modes were observed. The first was associated with approximately 1at% H+ in the mass spectrum. Negligible amounts of H were detected in the mass spectra of the second mode. When the pulse fraction (pf) was increased from 5% to 30%, the presence of H+ in the mass spectra, i.e. operation in the first mode, was associated with a degradation in mass resolution by as much as 80% for the 10 Omega cm Si samples. Conversely, no loss in mass resolution was detected for the approximately 0.001 Omega cm samples over the pf range studied.

  17. Leachate evaporation using landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.M.; Grace, V.M.; Freivald, W.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a century-old technology with a new twist of using landfill gas as a fuel in an evaporation system. The system is designed to help landfills reduce the cost of leachate disposal while also destroying VOC emissions in an enclosed flare.

  18. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  19. Evaporation rate of nucleating clusters.

    PubMed

    Zapadinsky, Evgeni

    2011-11-21

    The Becker-Döring kinetic scheme is the most frequently used approach to vapor liquid nucleation. In the present study it has been extended so that master equations for all cluster configurations are included into consideration. In the Becker-Döring kinetic scheme the nucleation rate is calculated through comparison of the balanced steady state and unbalanced steady state solutions of the set of kinetic equations. It is usually assumed that the balanced steady state produces equilibrium cluster distribution, and the evaporation rates are identical in the balanced and unbalanced steady state cases. In the present study we have shown that the evaporation rates are not identical in the equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. The evaporation rate depends on the number of clusters at the limit of the cluster definition. We have shown that the ratio of the number of n-clusters at the limit of the cluster definition to the total number of n-clusters is different in equilibrium and unbalanced steady state cases. This causes difference in evaporation rates for these cases and results in a correction factor to the nucleation rate. According to rough estimation it is 10(-1) by the order of magnitude and can be lower if carrier gas effectively equilibrates the clusters. The developed approach allows one to refine the correction factor with Monte Carlo and molecular dynamic simulations.

  20. 40 CFR 86.117-96 - Evaporative emission enclosure calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration. Methanol measurements may be omitted if methanol-fueled vehicles will not be tested in the.... When methanol as well as hydrocarbons are present in the evaporative enclosure, the HFID hydrocarbon concentration measurement includes the partial response of the HFID to methanol plus the...

  1. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  2. A study of the evaporation of gold solutions.

    PubMed

    Buksak, D; Chow, A

    1972-11-01

    The study indicates that despite several reports to the contrary, gold does not volatilize appreciably during the evaporation of aqueous solutions. Gold solutions were shown to have a tendency to creep significantly in solutions of various metal concentrations, acid content and salt content, and that careful washing must be carried out to obtain quantitative recovery.

  3. Investigation of micro/nanoring formation by protein solution evaporation inside confined microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Kuo-Feng; Juang, Yi-Je

    2012-03-01

    In this study, fabrication of the micro/nanoring-like structures was accomplished via solution evaporation inside the microwells. A phenomenological mechanism for the evaporation process inside the microconfinement was proposed, which is different from that for evaporation of a droplet on a substrate in the ambient condition where either the coffee-ring effect or the Marangoni effect is observed. Moreover, reasoning about how the solvent evaporates from the microwells was also provided. It was found that the normalized height of the deposited structure was approximately proportional to the solution concentration.

  4. On the theory relating changes in area-average and pan evaporation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, W.; Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Roderick, M. L.; Scott, R.

    2009-12-01

    Theory relating changes in area-average evaporation with changes in the evaporation from pans or open water is developed. Such changes can arise by Type (a) processes related to large-scale changes in atmospheric concentrations and circulation that modify surface evaporation rates in the same direction, and Type (b) processes related to coupling between the surface and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the landscape scale that usually modify area-average evaporation and pan evaporation in different directions. The interrelationship between evaporation rates in response to Type (a) changes is derived. They have the same sign and broadly similar magnitude but the change in area-average evaporation is modified by surface resistance. As an alternative to assuming the complementary evaporation hypothesis, the results of previous modeling studies that investigated surface-atmosphere coupling are parameterized and used to develop a theoretical description of Type (b) coupling via vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the ABL. The interrelationship between appropriately normalized pan and area-average evaporation rates is shown to vary with temperature and wind speed but, on average, the Type (b) changes are approximately equal and opposite. Long-term Australian pan evaporation data are analyzed to demonstrate the simultaneous presence of Type (a) and (b) processes, and observations from three field sites in southwestern USA show support for the theory describing Type (b) coupling via VPD. England's victory over Australia in 2009 Ashes cricket test match series will not be mentioned.

  5. Numerical study of heat and mass transfer of ammonia-water in falling film evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xianbiao; Ma, Weibin; Huang, Yuanfeng

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the performance of the heat and mass transfer of ammonia water during the process of falling film evaporation in vertical tube evaporator, a mathematical model of evaporation process was developed and solved based on stream function. Then an experimental study of falling film evaporation was carried out in order to validate the mathematical model. A series of parameters, such as velocity, film thickness and concentration, etc., were obtained from the mathematical model. The calculated results show that the average velocity and the film thickness change sharp at the entrance region when x < 100 mm, while they vary slightly in the fully developed region when x > 100 mm. The film thickness depends largely on the flow rate of solution. It is observed that the heating power and mass flow of solution significantly affect the concentration difference between the inlet and outlet of evaporation tube. The calculated results reveal that the tube length has a significant impact on the amounts of ammonia vapor evaporated. It is suggested that the roll-worked enhanced tube should be used in order to decrease the concentration gradient in the film thickness direction and enhance the heat and mass transfer rate. Furthermore, the experimental and calculated results indicate that the inlet solution concentration has a great influence on the heat exchange capacity, the amounts of ammonia vapor evaporated and the evaporation pressure.

  6. Microfabricated Valveless Devices for Thermal Bioreactions based on Diffusion-limited Evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Ming; Burns, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic devices that reduce evaporative loss during thermal bioreactions such as PCR without microvalves have been developed by relying on the principle of diffusion-limited evaporation. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the sample evaporative loss can be reduced by more than 20 times using long narrow diffusion channels on both sides of the reaction region. In order to further suppress the evaporation, the driving force for liquid evaporation is reduced by two additional techniques: decreasing the interfacial temperature using thermal isolation and reducing the vapor concentration gradient by replenishing water vapor in the diffusion channels. Both thermal isolation and vapor replenishment techniques can limit the sample evaporative loss to approximately 1% of the reaction content. PMID:18094766

  7. Rain scavenging of soluble gases by non-evaporating and evaporating droplets from inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2013-11-01

    We suggest a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of soluble gaseous pollutants by non-evaporating and evaporating droplets that is valid for arbitrary initial vertical distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere. It is shown that for low gradients of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere, scavenging of gaseous pollutants is governed by a linear wave equation that describes propagation of a wave in one direction. The derived equation is solved by the method of characteristics. Scavenging coefficient and the rates of precipitation scavenging are calculated for wet removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ammonia (NH3) using measured initial distributions of trace gases. It is shown that scavenging coefficient for arbitrary initial vertical distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere is non-stationary and height-dependent. In case of exponential initial distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere, scavenging coefficient for non-evaporating droplets in the region between the ground and the position of a scavenging front is a product of rainfall rate, solubility parameter, and the growth constant in the formula for the initial profile of a soluble trace gas in the atmosphere. This expression yields the same estimate of scavenging coefficient for sulfur dioxide scavenging by rain as field estimates presented in McMahon and Denison (1979). It is demonstrated that the smaller the slope of the concentration profile the higher the value of a scavenging coefficient.

  8. Evaporation kinetics of surfactant solution droplets on rice (Oryza sativa) leaves

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li-Dong; Zheng, Li; Xu, Jun; Li, Feng-Min; Huang, Qi-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of evaporating sessile droplets on hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces is widely studied, and many models for these processes have been developed based on experimental evidence. However, few research has been explored on the evaporation of sessile droplets of surfactant or pesticide solutions on target crop leaves. Thus, in this paper the impact of surfactant concentrations on contact angle, contact diameter, droplet height, and evolution of the droplets’ evaporative volume on rice leaf surfaces have been investigated. The results indicate that the evaporation kinetics of surfactant droplets on rice leaves were influenced by both the surfactant concentrations and the hydrophobicity of rice leaf surfaces. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the surfactant CMC (critical micelle concentration), the droplet evaporation time is much longer than that of the high surfactant concentration. This is due to the longer existence time of a narrow wedge region under the lower surfactant concentration, and such narrow wedge region further restricts the droplet evaporation. Besides, our experimental data are shown to roughly collapse onto theoretical curves based on the model presented by Popov. This study could supply theoretical data on the evaporation of the adjuvant or pesticide droplets for practical applications in agriculture. PMID:28472108

  9. Evaporation kinetics of surfactant solution droplets on rice (Oryza sativa) leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Lu; Cao, Chong; Cao, Li-Dong; Zheng, Li; Xu, Jun; Li, Feng-Min; Huang, Qi-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of evaporating sessile droplets on hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces is widely studied, and many models for these processes have been developed based on experimental evidence. However, few research has been explored on the evaporation of sessile droplets of surfactant or pesticide solutions on target crop leaves. Thus, in this paper the impact of surfactant concentrations on contact angle, contact diameter, droplet height, and evolution of the droplets' evaporative volume on rice leaf surfaces have been investigated. The results indicate that the evaporation kinetics of surfactant droplets on rice leaves were influenced by both the surfactant concentrations and the hydrophobicity of rice leaf surfaces. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the surfactant CMC (critical micelle concentration), the droplet evaporation time is much longer than that of the high surfactant concentration. This is due to the longer existence time of a narrow wedge region under the lower surfactant concentration, and such narrow wedge region further restricts the droplet evaporation. Besides, our experimental data are shown to roughly collapse onto theoretical curves based on the model presented by Popov. This study could supply theoretical data on the evaporation of the adjuvant or pesticide droplets for practical applications in agriculture.

  10. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  11. Synthesis on evaporation partitioning using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Bogaard, Thom; Wenninger, Jochen; Jonson Sutanto, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Partitioning of evaporation into productive (transpiration) and non-productive evaporation (interception, soil evaporation) is of highest importance for water management practices, irrigation scheme design, and climate modeling. Despite this urge, the magnitude of the ratio of transpiration over total evaporation is still under debate and poorly understood due to measuring difficulties. However, with the current development in isotope measuring devices, new opportunities arise to untangle the partitioning of evaporation. In this paper we synthesize the opportunities and limitations using stable water isotopes in evaporation partitioning. We will analyze a set of field as well as laboratory studies to demonstrate the different evaporation components for various climate and vegetation conditions using stable isotopes 18O/16O and 2H/1H. Experimental data on evaporation partitioning of crops, grass, shrubs and trees are presented and we will discuss the specific experimental set-ups and data collection methods. The paper will be a synthesis of these studies.

  12. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  13. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  14. Analysis of energy use in tomato evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, T.; Conant, T.

    1980-01-01

    Field performance data for four tomato product evaporators are presented and analyzed. Steam and feed flow rates along with steam economies were measured and are compared to steady state theoretical evaporator models.

  15. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, Richard Doin; Lamb, Kenneth Mitchel; Matejka, Leon Anthony; Nenni, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  16. How surfactants influence evaporation-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepelt, Robert; Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2014-11-01

    Capillary flows appear spontaneously in sessile evaporating drops and give rise to particle accumulation around the contact lines, commonly known as coffee-stain effect (Deegan et al., Nature, 1997). On the other hand, out-of-equilibrium thermal effects may induce Marangoni flows in the droplet's surface that play an important role in the flow patterns and in the deposits left on the substrate. Some authors have argued that contamination or the presence of surfactants might reduce or eventually totally annul the Marangoni flow (Hu & Larson, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2006). On the contrary, others have shown an enhancement of the reverse surface flow (Sempels et al., Nat. Commun., 2012). In this work, we employ Astigmatic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) to obtain the 3D3C evaporation-driven flow in both bulk and droplet's surface, using surfactants of different ionic characters and solubility. Our conclusions lead to a complex scenario in which different surfactants and concentrations yield very different surface-flow patterns, which eventually might influence the colloidal deposition patterns.

  17. Modeling Tear Film Evaporation and Breakup with Duplex Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapf, Michael; Braun, Richard; Begley, Carolyn; Driscoll, Tobin; King-Smith, Peter Ewen

    2015-11-01

    Tear film thinning, hyperosmolarity, and breakup can irritate and damage the ocular surface. Recent research hypothesizes deficiencies in the lipid layer may cause locally increased evaporation, inducing conditions for breakup. We consider a model for team film evolution incorporating two mobile fluid layers, the aqueous and lipid layers. In addition, we include the effects of salt concentration, osmosis, evaporation as modified by the lipid layer, and the polar portion of the lipid layer. Numerically solving the resulting model, we explore the conditions for tear film breakup and analyze the response of the system to changes in our parameters. Our studies indicate sufficiently fast peak values or sufficiently wide areas of evaporation promote TBU, as does diffusion of solutes. In addition, the Marangoni effect representing polar lipids dominates viscous dissipation from the non-polar lipid layer in the model. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1412085 and NIH grant 1R01EY021794.

  18. Fine structure of the vapor field in evaporating dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villermaux, E.; Moutte, A.; Amielh, M.; Meunier, P.

    2017-07-01

    Making use of an original technique which permits the simultaneous measurement of both the displacement field of evaporating droplets in a spray, and of their vapor, we investigate the relevance of a scenario introduced earlier to describe the evaporation dynamics of dense sprays [Phys. Rev. Fluids 1, 014201 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.014201]. A plume of dense acetone droplets evaporating in air is studied, for which the stirring field is measured by particle image velocimetry of the droplets, and the vapor field is imaged quantitatively by laser-induced fluorescence. We show, thanks to these unique in situ measurements, that the spray boundary with the diluting environment is slaved at the dynamics of its saturating vapor concentration field, whose structure is analyzed for different well defined local flow topologies.

  19. Evaporation from a sphagnum moss surface

    Treesearch

    D.S. Nichols; J.M. Brown

    1980-01-01

    Peat cores, 45 cm in diameter, were collected from a sphagnum bog in northern Minnesota, and used to measure the effects of different temperatures and water levels on evaporation from a sphagnum moss surface in a growth chamber. Under all conditions, evaporation from the moss surface was greater than that from a free-water surface. Evaporation from the moss increased...

  20. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  1. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.130 Evaporated milk. (a) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk. It...

  2. Modeling evaporative loss of oil mist collected by sampling filters.

    PubMed

    Raynor, P C; Volckens, J; Leith, D

    2000-01-01

    Oil mists can cause respiratory distress and have been linked to skin and gastrointestinal cancers in workers. Standard concentration assessment methods call for sampling these mists with fibrous or membrane filters. Previous experimental studies using glass fiber (GF) filters and polyvinyl chloride and polytetrafluoroethylene membrane filters indicate that mist sampled onto filters may volatilize. A model has been developed to predict the evaporation of mist collected on a fibrous sampling filter. Evaporation of retained fluid from membrane filters can be modeled by treating the filter as though it is a fibrous filter. Predictions from the model exhibit good agreement with experimental results. At low mist concentrations, the model indicates that evaporation of retained mineral oil occurs readily. At high mist concentrations, significant evaporation from the filters is not expected because the vapor accompanying the airborne mist is already saturated with the compounds in the oil. The findings from this study indicate that sampling mineral oil mist with filters in accordance with standard methods can lead to estimates of worker exposure to oil mist that are too low.

  3. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  4. Evaporation of Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    The usual explanation of the isotropy of the universe is that inflation would have smoothed out any inhomogeneities. However, if the universe was initially fractal or in a foam like state, an overall inflation would have l it in the same state. I suggest that the universe did indeed begin with a tangled web of wormholes connecting pairs of black holes but that the inflationary expansion was unstable: wormholes that are slightly smaller correspond to black holes that are hotter than the cosmological background and evaporate away. This picture is supported by calculations with Raphael Bousso of the evaporation of primordial black holes in the s-wave and large N approximations.

  5. Evaporation by mechanical vapor recompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, C. H.; Coury, G. E.

    1980-04-01

    Progress in the development of a study of the application of the technologies of mechanical vapor recompression and falling film evaporation as applied to the beet sugar industry is reported. Progress is reported in the following areas: technical literature search; report on visit to European factories using these technologies; energy balance studies of factories offered by the industry as candidates for the demonstration plants; and report on energy balance studies and the recommendations as to the site for the demonstration plant.

  6. Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; VanEssen, D.C.

    1998-02-01

    The project reported here was conducted to demonstrate a skid-mounted, subatmospheric evaporator to concentrate liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This waste is similar to wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River. A single-stage subatmospheric evaporator rated to produce 90 gallons of distillate per hour was procured from Delta Thermal, Inc., of Pensacola, Florida, and installed in an existing building. During the 8-day demonstration, 22,000 gal of LLLW was concentrated by 25% with the evaporator system. Decontamination factors achieved averaged 5 x 10{sup 6} (i.e., the distillate contained five million times less Cesium 137 than the feed). Evaporator performance substantially exceeded design requirements and expectations based on bench-scale surrogate test data. Out-of tank evaporator demonstration operations successfully addressed the feasibility of hands-on maintenance. Demonstration activities indicate that: (1) skid-mounted, mobile equipment is a viable alternative for the treatment of ORNL LLLW, and (2) hands-on maintenance and decontamination for movement to another site is achievable. Cost analysis show that 10% of the demonstration costs will be immediately recovered by elimination of solidification and disposal costs. The entire cost of the demonstration can be recovered by processing the inventory of Melton Valley Storage Tank waste and/or sluice water prior to solidifications. An additional savings of approximately $200,000 per year can be obtained by processing newly generated waste through the system. The results indicate that this type of evaporator system should be considered for application across the DOE complex. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A New Microstructure Device for Efficient Evaporation of Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Juergen J.; Maikowske, Stefan; Vittoriosi, Alice

    high-speed videography have been integrated into the experimental setup. Fundamental research onto the influences of the geometry and dimensions of the integrated micro channels, the inlet flow distribution system geometry as well as the surface quality and surface coatings of the micro channels have been performed. While evaporation of liquids in crossflow and counterflow or co-current flow micro channel devices is possible, it is, in many cases, not possible to obtain superheated steam due to certain boundary conditions [4]. In most cases, the residence time is not sufficiently long, or the evaporation process itself cannot be stabilized and controlled precisely enough. Thus, a new design was proposed to obtain complete evaporation and steam superheating. This microstructure evaporator consists of a concentric arrangement of semi-circular walls or semi-elliptic walls providing at least two nozzles to release the generated steam. The complete arrangement forms a row of circular blanks. An example of such geometry is shown in Figure 7. A maximum power density of 1400 kW·m-2 has been transferred using similar systems, while liquid could be completely evaporated and the generated steam superheated. This is, compared to liquid heat exchanges, a small value, but it has to be taken in account that the specific heat capacity of vapour is considerably smaller than that of liquids. It could also be shown that the arrangement in circular blanks with semi-elliptic side walls acts as a kind of micro mixer for the remaining liquid and generated steam and, therefore, enhances the evaporation.

  8. Experimental results on evaporation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana Otero, Jose; Parra Fabian, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    A liquid contained in a vertical glass tube is suddenly depressurized from a high initial pressure down to one for which the stable state is vapour, so vaporization sets off at the free surface. For large enough evaporation rates, the planar vapour-liquid interface is Darrieus-Landau unstable [1], leading to the interface surface rippling close to the instability threshold. Further increasing the initial to final pressure ratio brings about evaporation waves [2,3], in which a highly corrugated front propagates downwards into the liquid. A new experimental method is presented as well as some experimental results obtained by tracking the evolution of the front with a high speed camera. In addition, a number of new phenomena related to the dynamics of bubbles growth at the walls has been uncovered. In particular, a new mode of propagation of the evaporation front is found. In this mode the front originates from below the interface, so the propagation is upwards against gravity with a curved but smooth front.[4pt] [1] F. J. Higuera, Phys. Fluids, V. 30, 679 (1987).[0pt] [2] J.E.Shepherd and B.Sturtevant, J.Fluid Mech., V.121,379 (1982).[0pt] [3] P.Reinke and G.Yadigaroglu, Int.J.Multiph. Flow, V.27,1487 (2001).

  9. Evaporation of sessile droplets affected by graphite nanoparticles and binary base fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2014-11-26

    The effects of ethanol component and nanoparticle concentration on evaporation dynamics of graphite-water nanofluid droplets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the formed deposition patterns vary greatly with an increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 50 vol %. Nanoparticles have been observed to be carried to the droplet surface and form a large piece of aggregate. The volume evaporation rate on average increases as the ethanol concentration increases from 0 to 50 vol % in the binary mixture nanofluid droplets. The evaporation rate at the initial stage is more rapid than that at the late stage to dry, revealing a deviation from a linear fitting line, standing for a constant evaporation rate. The deviation is more intense with a higher ethanol concentration. The ethanol-induced smaller liquid-vapor surface tension leads to higher wettability of the nanofluid droplets. The graphite nanoparticles in ethanol-water droplets reinforce the pinning effect in the drying process, and the droplets with more ethanol demonstrate the depinning behavior only at the late stage. The addition of graphite nanoparticles in water enhances a droplet baseline spreading at the beginning of evaporation, a pinning effect during evaporation, and the evaporation rate. However, with a relatively high nanoparticle concentration, the enhancement is attenuated.

  10. Evaporator Development for an Evaporative Heat Pipe System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Leigh C.

    2004-01-01

    As fossil fuel resources continue to deplete, research for alternate power sources continues to develop. One of these alternate technologies is fuel cells. They are a practical fuel source able to provide significant amounts of power for applications from laptops to automobiles and their only byproduct is water. However, although this technology is over a century old and NASA has been working with it since the early 1960 s there is still room for improvement. The research I am involved in at NASA's Glenn Research Center is focusing on what is called a regenerative fuel cell system. The unique characteristic of this type of system is that it used an outside power source to create electrolysis of the water it produces and it then reuses the hydrogen and oxygen to continue producing power. The advantage of this type of system is that, for example, on space missions it can use solar power to recharge its gas supplies between periods when the object being orbited blocks out the sun. This particular system however is far from completion. This is because of the many components that are required to make up a fuel cell that need to be tested individually. The specific part of the system that is being worked on this summer of 2004 is the cooling system. The fuel cell stack, that is the part that actually creates the power, also produces a lot of heat. When not properly cooled, it has been known to cause fires which, needless to say are not conducive to the type of power that is trying to be created. In order to cool the fuel cell stack in this system we are developing a heat pipe cooling system. One of the main components of a heat pipe cooling system is what is known as the evaporator, and that is what happens to be the part of the system we are developing this summer. In most heat pipe systems the evaporator is a tube in which the working fluid is cooled and then re-circulated through the system to absorb more heat energy from the fuel cell stack. For this system, instead

  11. Evaporator Development for an Evaporative Heat Pipe System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Leigh C.

    2004-01-01

    As fossil fuel resources continue to deplete, research for alternate power sources continues to develop. One of these alternate technologies is fuel cells. They are a practical fuel source able to provide significant amounts of power for applications from laptops to automobiles and their only byproduct is water. However, although this technology is over a century old and NASA has been working with it since the early 1960 s there is still room for improvement. The research I am involved in at NASA's Glenn Research Center is focusing on what is called a regenerative fuel cell system. The unique characteristic of this type of system is that it used an outside power source to create electrolysis of the water it produces and it then reuses the hydrogen and oxygen to continue producing power. The advantage of this type of system is that, for example, on space missions it can use solar power to recharge its gas supplies between periods when the object being orbited blocks out the sun. This particular system however is far from completion. This is because of the many components that are required to make up a fuel cell that need to be tested individually. The specific part of the system that is being worked on this summer of 2004 is the cooling system. The fuel cell stack, that is the part that actually creates the power, also produces a lot of heat. When not properly cooled, it has been known to cause fires which, needless to say are not conducive to the type of power that is trying to be created. In order to cool the fuel cell stack in this system we are developing a heat pipe cooling system. One of the main components of a heat pipe cooling system is what is known as the evaporator, and that is what happens to be the part of the system we are developing this summer. In most heat pipe systems the evaporator is a tube in which the working fluid is cooled and then re-circulated through the system to absorb more heat energy from the fuel cell stack. For this system, instead

  12. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  13. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  14. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  15. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

  16. Atmospheric dispersion of ammonia accidentally released from the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.

    1997-11-01

    Two errors have been identified in the authorization basis for the 242-A Evaporator at the Hanford Site. These errors, which appear in the 242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Final Safety Analysis Report analysis of ammonia gas concentrations accidentally released from the 242-A Evaporator, are: (1) the vessel ventilation system flow rate used in the previous calculations is a factor of ten higher than the actual flow rate, and (2) the previous calculations did not account for the ammonia source term reduction that would occur via condensation of ammonia vapors, which will remove a large fraction of the ammonia from the exhaust gas stream. The purpose of this document is to correct these errors and recalculate the maximum ground-level concentrations of ammonia released to the environment as a result of potential errors in blending Evaporator feed. The errors offset each other somewhat, so it is unlikely that the 242-A Evaporator has operated outside its current authorization basis. However, the errors must be corrected and the results incorporated into a revision of the 242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Safety Analysis Report, WHC-SD-WM-SAR-023. An EPA-approved atmospheric dispersion model, SCREEN3, was used to recalculate the maximum ground-level concentrations of ammonia that would be released from the 242-A Evaporator as a result of a feed-blending error. The results of the re-analysis of the 242-A Evaporator`s ammonia release scenario are as follows. The onsite receptor 100 m away from the release point (242-A vessel vent stack) is projected to be exposed to a maximum ground-level concentration of ammonia of 8.3 ppm. The maximally-exposed offsite receptor, located at the nearest Hanford Site boundary 16 km away from the 242-A vessel vent stack, will be exposed to a maximum ground-level concentration of 0.11 ppm ammonia.

  17. Internal dynamics of evaporating droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeeli, A.; Arpaci, V.; Chai, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The full Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved for the fluid inside and outside of a droplet using a front tracking/finite difference method. The boundaries of the domain are taken periodic in the horizontal direction and wall bounded in the vertical direction. The behavior of a two-dimensional deformable liquid drop in zero gravity is studied and the dynamics of the flow is analyzed. The effects of governing nondimensional parameters on the evaporation rate are also discussed.

  18. Influence of Oil on Refrigerant Evaporator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Soo; Nagata, Karsuya; Katsuta, Masafumi; Tomosugi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kouichiro; Horichi, Toshiaki

    In vapor compression refrigeration system using oil-lubricated compressors, some amount of oil is always circulated through the system. Oil circulation can have a significant influence on the evaporator performance of automotive air conditioner which is especially required to cool quickly the car interior after a period standing in the sun. An experimental investigation was carried out an electrically heated horizontal tube to measure local heat transfer coefficients for various flow rates and heat fluxes during forced convection boiling of pure refrigerant R12 and refrigerant-oil mixtures (0-11% oil concentration by weight) and the results were compared with oil free performance. Local heat transfer coefficients increased at the region of low vapor quality by the addition of oil. On the other hand, because the oil-rich liquid film was formed on the heat transfer surface, heat transfer coefficients gradually decreased as the vapor quality became higher. Average heat transfer coefficient reached a maximum at about 4% oil concentration and this trend agreed well with the results of Green and Furse. Previous correlations, using the properties of the refrigerant-oil mixture, could not predict satisfactorily the local heat transfer coefficients data. New correlation modified by oil concentration factor was developed for predicting the corresponding heat transfer coefficient for refrigerant-oil mixture convection boiling. The maximum percent deviation between predicted and measured heat transfer coefficient was within ±30%.

  19. Dynamics of evaporating sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil; Karapetsas, George; Kim, Jungho; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    A sessile droplet laying on a horizontal substrate evaporates into its surrounding gas. The dynamics of this physical system are investigated by means of 3D Direct Numerical Simulations and experiments. A non-isothermal two-phase model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal evolution of the system under consideration. Transient species transport in the gas phase is also accounted for via the general advection-diffusion governing equation. The interface mass transfer is computed considering that the vapour diffusion is the rate-limiting mechanism. On this premise, it is assumed that the liquid and the gas maintain thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium at the interface. The same system is also experimentally investigated by simultaneously recording the droplet evaporation in a controlled environment with a CCD camera (side) and an IR camera (top). Comparisons between numerical and experimental data are presented along with a discussion of the role played by other singularities of the system, namely the triple line, the effect of thermocapillarity, etc. Fundación Caja Madrid, EPSRC DTA & ThermaPOWER (EU IRSES-PIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  20. Hydrodynamic Instabilities Produced by Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2012-11-01

    When a liquid layer (alcohol in the present work) is in an environment where its relative humidity is less than 100 percent evaporation appears. When RH is above a certain threshold the liquid is at rest. If RH decreases below this threshold the flow becomes unstable, and hydrodynamic cells develop. The aim of this work is to understand the formation of those cells and its main features. Firstly, we investigate how the cell size depends on the layer width. We also study how temperature depends on the vertical coordinate when the cells are present. An inverse temperature gradient is found, that is, the bottom of liquid layer is colder than the free surface. This shows that the intuitive idea that the cells are due to a direct temperature gradient, following a Marangoni-like process, does not work. We propose the hypothesis that the evaporation produce a pressure gradient that is responsible of the cell development. On the other hand, using a Schlieren technique we study the topography of the free surface when cells are present. Finally the alcohol vapor layer adjacent to the liquid surface is explored using scattering experiments, giving some insight on the plausibility of the hypothesis described previously. Authors acknowledge support by DGAPA-UNAM under project IN116312 ``Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  1. Confinement-induced alterations in the evaporation dynamics of sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Lalit; Chakraborty, Suman; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-02-07

    Evaporation of sessile droplets has been a topic of extensive research. However, the effect of confinement on the underlying dynamics has not been well explored. Here, we report the evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet in a confined fluidic environment. Our findings reveal that an increase in the channel length delays the completion of the evaporation process and leads to unique spatio-temporal evaporation flux and internal flow. The evaporation modes (constant contact angle and constant contact radius) during the droplet lifetime however exhibit global similarity when normalized by appropriate length and timescales. These results are explained in light of an increase in vapor concentration inside the channel due to greater accumulation of water vapor on account of increased channel length. We have formulated a theoretical framework which introduces two key parameters namely an enhanced concentration of the vapor field in the vicinity of the confined droplet and a corresponding accumulation lengthscale over which the accumulated vapor relaxes to the ambient concentration. Using these two parameters and modified diffusion based evaporation we are able to show that confined droplets exhibit a universal behavior in terms of the temporal evolution of each evaporation mode irrespective of the channel length. These results may turn out to be of profound importance in a wide variety of applications, ranging from surface patterning to microfluidic technology.

  2. Simulated Waste Testing Of Glycolate Impacts On The 2H-Evaporator System

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.

    2013-08-13

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a total or partial replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste tank farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the tank farm were addressed via a literature review, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the non-radioactive simulant tests impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The testing for which non-radioactive simulants could be used involved the following: the partitioning of glycolate into the evaporator condensate, the impacts of glycolate on metal solubility, and the impacts of glycolate on the formation and dissolution of sodium aluminosilicate scale within the evaporator. The following are among the conclusions from this work: Evaporator condensate did not contain appreciable amounts of glycolate anion. Of all tests, the highest glycolate concentration in the evaporator condensate was 0.38 mg/L. A significant portion of the tests had glycolate concentration in the condensate at less than the limit of quantification (0.1 mg/L). At ambient conditions, evaporator testing did not show significant effects of glycolate on the soluble components in the evaporator concentrates. Testing with sodalite solids and silicon containing solutions did not show significant effects of glycolate on sodium aluminosilicate formation or dissolution.

  3. Evaporative demand, transpiration, and photosynthesis: How are they changing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, G. D.; Roderick, M. L.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon dioxide concentration is increasing. This affects photosynthesis via increases in substrate availability (Farquhar et al. 1980). It reduces the amount of water transpired by plants to fix a given amount of carbon into an organic form; i.e it increases transpiration efficiency (Wong et al. 1979). It also warms the earth's surface. It is commonly supposed that this warming causes an increase in evaporative demand - the rate of water loss from a wet surface. This supposition has then been extended to effects on plant water availability, with the idea that there would be offsets to the gains in productivity associated with increased transpiration efficiency. The assumption that increased temperature means increased evaporative demand has also been applied to global maps of changes in soil water content. However, observations of pan evaporation rate show that this measure of evaporative demand has been decreasing in most areas examined over the last few decades. We reconcile these observations with theory by noting that, on long time scales, warming also involves water bodies, so that the vapour pressure at the earth's surface also increases. Using the physics of pan evaporation (Rotstayn et al. 2006) we show that the reduction in evaporative demand has been associated with two main effects, (1) "dimming", a reduction in sunlight received at the earth's surface because of aerosols and clouds, being the first phenomenon identified (Roderick and Farquhar 2002), and (2) "stilling", a reduction in wind speed, being the second (Roderick et al. 2007). We show that better accounting for changes in evaporative demand is important for estimating soil water changes, particularly in regions where precipitation exceeds evaporative demand (i.e where there are rivers) (Hobbins et al. 2008). We synthesise some of these results with others on vegetation change. References: Farquhar, GD, von Caemmerer, S, and Berry, JA, 1980: A biochemical model of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation

  4. Observations on an evaporative, elbow thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, G.S.H.; Fu, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The performance of the evaporative elbow system was found to be superior to that of the nonevaporative system, but comparable to the performance of the linear system. The parametric role of the evaporator wall temperature, the condenser wall temperature, and the vapor saturation temperature was demonstrated, each revealing a similar monotonic effect. With the evaporator upright, the data were found to be similar to, but displaced from, the upright condenser data. The upright evaporator gave the better performance, but not overwhelmingly so. The limit of performance with the condenser upright was found to be dictated by evaporator dryout. In the upright evaporator configuration, the limit may be attributed to flooding in the poorly draining condenser; this limit was indistinguishable from geyser behavior at low vapor pressures. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Effect of DOC on evaporation from small Wisconsin lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watras, C. J.; Morrison, K. A.; Rubsam, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation (E) dominates the loss of water from many small lakes, and the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E) often governs water levels. In this study, evaporation rates were estimated for three small Wisconsin lakes over several years using 30-min data from floating evaporation pans (E-pans). Measured E was then compared to the output of mass transfer models driven by local conditions over daily time scales. The three lakes were chosen to span a range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (3-20 mg L-1), a solute that imparts a dark, tea-stain color which absorbs solar energy and limits light penetration. Since the lakes were otherwise similar, we hypothesized that a DOC-mediated increase in surface water temperature would translate directly to higher rates of evaporation thereby informing climate response models. Our results confirmed a DOC effect on surface water temperature, but that effect did not translate to enhanced evaporation. Instead the opposite was observed: evaporation rates decreased as DOC increased. Ancillary data and prior studies suggest two explanatory mechanisms: (1) disproportionately greater radiant energy outflux from high DOC lakes, and (2) the combined effect of wind speed (W) and the vapor pressure gradient (es - ez), whose product [W(es - ez)] was lowest on the high DOC lake, despite very low wind speeds (<1.5 m s-1) and steep forested uplands surrounding all three lakes. Agreement between measured (E-pan) and modeled evaporation rates was reasonably good, based on linear regression results (r2: 0.6-0.7; slope: 0.5-0.7, for the best model). Rankings based on E were similar whether determined by measured or modeled criteria (high DOC < low DOC). Across the 3 lakes and 4 years, E averaged ∼3 mm d-1 (C.V. 9%), but statistically significant differences between lakes resulted in substantial differences in cumulative E that were consistent from year to year. Daily water budgets for these lakes show that inputs

  6. Steam oxidation and chromia evaporation in ultrasupercritical steam boilers and turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2009-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 {sup o}C and 340 atm, so-called ultrasupercritical conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  7. Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  8. Laboratory-scale experiments applied to the design of a two-stage submerged combustion evaporation system.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dongbei; Xu, Yudong; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Liu, Fuqiang; Nie, Yongfeng

    2007-01-01

    To simulate a submerged combustion evaporation (SCE) process under laboratory conditions, this study conducted three kinds of indirect-heating evaporation experiments, including normal evaporation, vacuum evaporation, and gas-carrying evaporation experiments on mature municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate. The results showed that the organic concentrations in terms of COD in condensates were always very high at the beginning, then decreased rapidly, and stabilized at a low level, which suggests that only the forepart of vapors need to be safely treated to control the discharge of organic pollutants. This study applied the process in developing a two-stage SCE system, which has been implemented for the treatment of biologically pretreated and concentrated leachate from Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) combined process in the Beishenshu MSW Landfill, Beijing, China. The result shows that the two-stage SCE system can successfully further concentrate refractory organic matter in concentrated leachate and remove volatile organics from the vapor.

  9. Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel J; Hu, Hua; Conrad, Jacinta C; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2007-04-06

    We investigate evaporative lithography as a route for patterning colloidal films. Films are dried beneath a mask that induces periodic variations between regions of free and hindered evaporation. Direct imaging reveals that particles segregate laterally within the film, as fluid and entrained particles migrate towards regions of higher evaporative flux. The films exhibit remarkable pattern formation that can be regulated by tuning the initial suspension composition, separation distance between the mask and underlying film, and mask geometry.

  10. Expressions for the evaporation of sessile liquid droplets incorporating the evaporative cooling effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-12-15

    The evaporation along the surface of pinned, sessile droplets is investigated numerically by using the combined field approach. In the present model, the evaporative cooling at the droplet surface which leads to a reduction in the evaporation is taken into account. Simple, yet accurate analytical expressions for the local evaporation flux and for the total evaporation rate of sessile droplets are obtained. The theoretical analyses indicate that the reduction in the evaporation becomes more pronounced as the evaporative cooling number Ec increases. The results also reveal that the variation of total evaporation rate with contact angle will change its trend as the intensity of the evaporative cooling changes. For small values of Ec, the total evaporation rate increases with the contact angle, the same as predicted by Deegan et al. and by Hu and Larson in their isothermal models in which the evaporative cooling is neglected. Contrarily, when the evaporative cooling effect is strong enough, the total evaporation rate will decrease as the contact angle increases. The present theory is corroborated experimentally, and found in good agreement with the expressions proposed by Hu and Larson in the limiting isothermal case.

  11. Etude du comportement rheologique de suspensions colloidales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yziquel, Florence

    Colloidal suspensions exhibit complex rheological behavior. The particles interact between themselves with forces of which the nature and magnitude depend on the surrounding medium. When the forces are strong enough, this organized structure which can be broken down, distorted or rearranged under shear flow. Hence, the suspension rheology depends greatly on the structure evolution during the flow. The main objective of this work was to propose a rheological model to describe the suspension behavior taking the structure evolution into account. To understand the rheological behavior of these systems, two different suspensions have been studied. The first system is a "model" suspension of fumed silica particles. These colloidal particles interact between themselves through hydrogen bonds with silanol groups on their surface inducing a network formation even at small mass fraction. The rheological properties of particles in suspension in polar and nonpolar media were studied as functions of size, concentration and surface treatment of particles. The rheological behavior, for small strain amplitude oscillatory flow, is strongly nonlinear. These nonlinear viscoelastic properties have been interpreted in terms of dissipated energy and attributed to the network breakdown. The experimental data have been compared with Coussot and Oldroyd modified models predictions. These two models only describe qualitatively the rheological behavior of fumed silica suspensions in nonpolar media. The second system studied here is a coating color. This concentrated suspension is mainly composed by kaolin particles sterically stabilized by water-soluble polymer adsorbed on their surface. The steady shear viscosity and the dynamic properties have been studied as a function of polymer concentration for two different water-soluble polymers. It was shown that the rheological properties are controlled by the structure evolution under shear flow. A structural model has been proposed to describe

  12. Evaporation Mechanism of Cu from Liquid Fe Containing C and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2016-08-01

    A number of liquid-gas experiments were carried out in order to elucidate evaporation mechanism of Cu from liquid Fe containing C and S. Rate of Cu evaporation in liquid Fe droplets at 1873 K (1600 °C) was determined using electromagnetic levitation equipment. Evaporation rate of the Cu under various conditions (flow rate of gas mixtures, initial C, and S concentrations) was examined. It was found from a series of kinetic analyses of the experimental data that Cu evaporates in forms of Cu(g) and CuS(g). As was reported for the Sn evaporation from liquid iron (Jung et al. Met. Mater. Trans. 46B, 250-258, 2014), S plays two roles for the evaporation of Cu: accelerating the rate by forming CuS(g) and decelerating the rate by blocking evaporation sites. As a result of these combinatorial effects, the evaporation of Cu is decelerated at low S content, but is accelerated at high S content. Based on the elucidated mechanism, an evaporation model equation for Cu was developed in the present study, which takes into account (1) evaporation of Cu in the two forms (Cu(g) and CuS(g)), (2) surface blocking by S using ideal Langmuir adsorption, and (3) effect of C. The obtained rate constant of a reaction Cu i + S i = CuS i (g), k CuS R , is 1.37 × 10-9 m4 mol-1 s-1, and the residual rate constant, k CuS r , is 4.11 × 10-10 m4 mol-1 s-1 at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both of them were found to be one order lower than those for Sn evaporation.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of falling film evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed for falling film evaporation in vacuum using heat transfer relations. An experimental device was designed. experimental set-up which was used was equipped with a triangular weir distribution device and it had the ability to record data up to 3 m. Experiments were performed in a single-effect process with sucrose-water solution varying from 3 to 20% concentration rate of sucrose and we used a vertical tube evaporator with the dimensions of laboratory scale. The model that was developed considers convection, shear stress, viscosity and conjugate heat transfer while most of the previous works ignored these factors. The main factors influencing the heat transfer mechanism performance of the unit were investigated and analyzed. We concluded that the experimental studies are verified by the developed model. Furthermore, it was also concluded that, the heat transfer is affected by the mass flow rate, sucrose concentration rate in solution, film thickness and pressure.

  14. Separation of boric acid from PWR waste by volatilization during evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, A.; Braet, J.; Smaers, F.; De Regge, P.

    1997-01-01

    SCK{circ}CEN has developed a process to separate boric acid during and/or after evaporation of the liquid waste from pressurized light-water reactors. The key goal is to achieve higher waste volume reduction factors, while maintaining low activity discharge limits. An additional goal is to obtain purified boric acid for recycling. The process is based on the volatility of boric acid in steam. The liquid waste is treated in a semicontinuous evaporator, which operates preferentially at a higher temperature than the present evaporators. The stream loaded with boric acid is fed to a column for fractional condensation with partial reflux. In this way, one obtains a highly concentrated waste that contains all the radioactive and chemical impurities and little boron, a concentrated boric acid solution which can be reused, as well as a highly decontaminated effluent without boron. In case replacement or adaptation of existing evaporators is less practical, one can adapt the process for the treatment of evaporator concentrates. After having been intensively tested at SCK{circ}CEN, the process has recently been demonstrated in a small pilot installation and with realistic liquid waste, at the nuclear power station in Doel, Belgium. The results corresponded to the theoretical predictions. After a transitional period, the boron concentration in the evaporator no longer increased and consequently did not limit the achievable waste volume reduction factor. The boric acid was recovered from the steam and during a supplementary treatment additional boric acid from the waste concentrate was recovered.

  15. Apparatus and method for evaporator defrosting

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Domitrovic, Ronald E.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for warm-liquid defrosting of the evaporator of a refrigeration system. The apparatus includes a first refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands refrigerant for cooling the evaporator, a second refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands the refrigerant after the refrigerant has passed through the evaporator, and a defrosting control for the first refrigerant expansion device and second refrigerant expansion device to selectively defrost the evaporator by causing warm refrigerant to flow through the evaporator. The apparatus is alternately embodied with a first refrigerant bypass and/or a second refrigerant bypass for selectively directing refrigerant to respectively bypass the first refrigerant expansion device and the second refrigerant expansion device, and with the defrosting control connected to the first refrigerant bypass and/or the second refrigerant bypass to selectively activate and deactivate the bypasses depending upon the current cycle of the refrigeration system. The apparatus alternately includes an accumulator for accumulating liquid and/or gaseous refrigerant that is then pumped either to a refrigerant receiver or the first refrigerant expansion device for enhanced evaporator defrosting capability. The inventive method of defrosting an evaporator in a refrigeration system includes the steps of compressing refrigerant in a compressor and cooling the refrigerant in the condenser such that the refrigerant is substantially in liquid form, passing the refrigerant substantially in liquid form through the evaporator, and expanding the refrigerant with a refrigerant expansion device after the refrigerant substantially passes through the evaporator.

  16. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Paul John; Miller, Bruce G.; Wincek, Ronald T.; Decker, Glenn E.; Johnson, David K.

    2009-04-07

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  17. Aircraft Measurements on Microburst Development from Hydrometeor Evaporation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, William P., III; Rodi, Alfred R.

    1987-10-01

    During the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project in 1982, the University of Wyoming's King Air research aircraft made observations of raindrop size distributions, vertical and horizontal air motions, and the temperature and moisture variables in and near precipitation shafts. This research examines the kinematic, thermodynamic, and microphysical characteristics of microburst-producing showers. Four precipitation showers with radar reflectivities of <35 dBZ were selected for study, three of which produced microbursts.An equivalent potential temperature (e) analysis, as well as vertical velocity measurements at cloud base, showed no strong evidence that the downdrafts were originating well above cloud base.A simple evaporation and downdraft model was used to examine the role of hydrometeor evaporation below cloud base as a microburst forcing mechanism. The one-dimensional model without entrainment provided the conceptual basis for microburst development by means of microphysical forcing alone. Cooling rates, caused by the evaporation of precipitation below cloud base, were calculated from the observed hydrometeor spectra and humidity profiles. The vertical profiles of the cooling rates were used to estimate downdraft magnitudes. The calculated downdraft speeds were in reasonable agreement with the observed speeds suggesting that, at least in these weak systems, subcloud evaporation was the predominant microburst forcing mechanism.The conditions favorable to microburst development were found to be consistent with previous studies. They included: 1) a deep, dry adiabatic layer below cloud base, 2) a high concentration of hydrometeors at or below cloud base, and 3) low humidity values in the descending parcel.

  18. DNA multi-ring formation via evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Maheshwari, Siddharth; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2007-03-01

    We present a study of multi-ring pattern formation of DNA aggregates during the solvent evaporation of a DNA droplet. When the contact line of a droplet is pinned at a solid substrate, a `coffee ring' pattern is often observed due to the outward flow during evaporation which carries the nonvolatile solute to the edge of the contact line. Here we report a remarkable observation of multiple rings of DNA stain, where stretched DNA molecules connect each ring. We use a high-speed confocal scanning microscope to investigate the kinetics of the multi-ring formation, when DNAs aggregate at the contact-line and cause a stick-slip receding process with periodic depinning of the contact line. A saw-tooth pattern in measured contact angle during droplet evaporation confirms the stick-slip receding dynamics, and a miscible viscous fingering pattern further confirms the stagnation flow responsible for the formation of consecutive rings. We also report a scaling behavior of the multi-ring wavelength with DNA concentration, droplet size and evaporation temperature, consistent with our proposed mechanism.

  19. Minimizing contamination hazards to waterbirds using agricultural drainage evaporation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, David F.; Smith, Lynda A.; Drezner, Deborah S.; Shoemaker, J. David

    1991-11-01

    In much of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, inadequate drainage of applied irrigation water and accumulating salts in the soil have necessitated the installation of subsurface tile drainage systems to preserve crop productivity. At present, these subsurface drainage waters are disposed of by means of evaporation ponds or discharges into the San Joaquin River. Unfortunately, most of these agricultural drainage waters contain high concentrations of salts and naturally occurring trace elements, such as selenium, and recent evidence indicates that substantial numbers of waterbirds are exposed to contamination by selenium in the evaporation ponds. In order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the adverse impacts on wildlife using the ponds, alternative pond management methods must be identified and evaluated for implementation. A number of methods have the potential to be cost-effective in significantly reducing the contamination hazard to birds using agricultural evaporation ponds. Twenty general methods were evaluated in this study, and four methods are recommended for implementation: remove levee vegetation, remove windbreaks, deepen the ponds, and haze birds. A number of other methods are recommended for further consideration because they appear to have good prospects for reducing the contamination hazard: steepen interior levee slopes, apply herbicides and insecticides, place netting on pond shorelines, and provide freshwater habitat adjacent to evaporation ponds. It may be necessary to use a combination of methods to effectively control selenium contamination of aquatic birds because it is unlikely that a single affordable pond management method will be able to entirely eliminate the contamination hazard.

  20. Concrete characterization for the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator Closure Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prignano, A.L.

    1995-02-21

    This report summarizes the sampling activities undertaken and the analytical results obtained in a concrete sampling and analyses study performed for the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE) closure site. The 300 ASE is identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) unit that will be closed in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations. No constituents of concern were found in concentrations indicating contamination of the concrete by 300 ASE operations.

  1. Low-Volatility Compound Evaporation from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in April-August 2010 provided an unusual opportunity to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on a large scale. Chemicals with differing volatility, evaporating at different rates, were spatially separated and released to the atmosphere at different locations. The resulting distribution of vapor and aerosol phase organic compounds were measured during research flights of the NOAA WP-3D aircraft over the Gulf in June 2010 (de Gouw et al., 2011). Known volatile SOA precursors (C8 to C11 hydrocarbons) were measured in a thin plume downwind of DWH. SOA was measured in a much wider plume, indicating contributions from less volatile compounds evaporating further from the source. Estimates of semi- and intermediate- volatile compound evaporation rates from the oil spill have been improved using a component-wise first-order kinetics model in which the evaporation rate of a compound is proportional to both its vapor pressure and mole fraction. The model was validated through proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer measurements of evaporating South Louisiana crude oil and calibration mixtures of aromatic compounds. These new evaporation rate estimates highlight several concepts important to a revised interpretation of the June 2010 aerosol measurements. The rates of evaporation (and thus atmospheric concentrations) of low-volatility compounds did not necessarily reflect surface distribution. Low volatility compounds reached peak evaporation rates at appreciable distances from the source, and the area from which significant amounts of chemical were emitted was larger than previously thought.

  2. Evaporation of sessile water/ethanol drops in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-12-21

    The evaporation of water/ethanol drops with different mixing ratios was investigated at controlled vapor pressure of water (relative humidity) and ethanol in the background gas. Therefore, a drop of about 1 microL was deposited on a hydrophobized silicon substrate at room temperature in a closed cell. With a microscope camera we monitored the contact angle, the volume and the contact radius of the drops as function of time. Pure water drops evaporated in constant contact angle mode. The evaporation rate of water decreased with increasing humidity. In mixed drops ethanol did not evaporate completely at first, but a fraction still remained in the drop until the end of evaporation. Depending on ethanol concentration in the drop and on relative humidity in the background gas, water vapor condensed at the beginning of the evaporation of mixed drops. Also, at a high vapor pressure of ethanol, ethanol condensed at the beginning of the evaporation. The presence of ethanol vapor accelerated the total evaporation time of water drops.

  3. Self-wrapping of an ouzo drop induced by evaporation on a superamphiphobic surface.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Versluis, Michel; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2017-04-12

    Evaporation of multi-component drops is crucial to various technologies and has numerous potential applications because of its ubiquity in nature. Superamphiphobic surfaces, which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, can give a low wettability not only for water drops but also for oil drops. In this paper, we experimentally, numerically and theoretically investigate the evaporation process of millimetric sessile ouzo drops (a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and trans-anethole) with low wettability on a superamphiphobic surface. The evaporation-triggered ouzo effect, i.e. the spontaneous emulsification of oil microdroplets below a specific ethanol concentration, preferentially occurs at the apex of the drop due to the evaporation flux distribution and volatility difference between water and ethanol. This observation is also reproduced by numerical simulations. The volume decrease of the ouzo drop is characterized by two distinct slopes. The initial steep slope is dominantly caused by the evaporation of ethanol, followed by the slower evaporation of water. At later stages, thanks to Marangoni forces the oil wraps around the drop and an oil shell forms. We propose an approximate diffusion model for the drying characteristics, which predicts the evaporation of the drops in agreement with experiment and numerical simulation results. This work provides an advanced understanding of the evaporation process of ouzo (multi-component) drops.

  4. Entropy Budget for Hawking Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Serrano, Ana; Visser, Matt

    2017-07-01

    Blackbody radiation, emitted from a furnace and described by a Planck spectrum, contains (on average) an entropy of $3.9\\pm 2.5$ bits per photon. Since normal physical burning is a unitary process, this amount of entropy is compensated by the same amount of "hidden information" in correlations between the photons. The importance of this result lies in the posterior extension of this argument to the Hawking radiation from black holes, demonstrating that the assumption of unitarity leads to a perfectly reasonable entropy/information budget for the evaporation process. In order to carry out this calculation we adopt a variant of the "average subsystem" approach, but consider a tripartite pure system that includes the influence of the rest of the universe, and which allows "young" black holes to still have a non-zero entropy; which we identify with the standard Bekenstein entropy.

  5. 242-A Evaporator waste analysis plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Basra, T.S.; Mulkey, C.H.

    1994-09-29

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) provides the plan for obtaining information needed for proper waste handling and processing in the 242-A Evaporator located on the Hanford Site. Regulatory and safety issues are addressed by establishing boundary conditions for waste received and treated at the 242-A Evaporator. The boundary conditions are set by establishing limits for items such as potential exothermic reactions, waste compatibility, and control of vessel vent organic emissions. Boundary conditions are also set for operational considerations and to ensure waste acceptance at receiving facilities. The issues that are addressed in this plan include prevention of exotherms in the waste, waste compatibility, vessel vent emissions, and compatibility with the liner in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The 242-A Evaporator feed stream is separated into two liquid streams: a concentrated slurry stream and a process condensate. A gaseous exhaust stream is also produced. The slurry contains the majority of the radionuclides and inorganic constituents. This stream is pumped back to the double shell tanks (DSTs) and stored for further treatment after being concentrated to target levels. The process condensate (PC) is primarily water that contains trace amounts of organic material and a greatly reduced concentration of radionuclides. The process condensate is presently stored in the (LERF) until it can be further processed in the Effluent Treatment Facility once it is operational.

  6. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  7. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew K; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason M

    2015-11-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an increase in the contact angle. However, the evaporation rate of salt-water droplets decreases as the salt concentration increases, due to the hydration of salt ions. When the water molecules have all evaporated from the droplet, two forms of salt crystals are deposited, clump and ringlike, depending on the solid-liquid interaction strength and the evaporation rate. To form salt crystals in a ring, it is crucial that there is a pinned stage in the evaporation process, during which salt ions can move from the center to the rim of the droplets. With a stronger solid-liquid interaction strength, a slower evaporation rate, and a higher salt concentration, a complete salt crystal ring can be deposited on the surface.

  8. Effect of nonionic surfactant on wetting behavior of an evaporating drop under a reduced pressure environment.

    PubMed

    Sefiane, Khellil

    2004-04-15

    The evaporation of sessile drops at reduced pressure is investigated. The evaporation of water droplets on aluminum and PTFE surfaces at reduced pressure was compared. It was found that water droplets on an aluminum surface exhibit a 'depinning jump' at subatmospheric pressures. This is when a pinned droplet suddenly depins, with an increase in contact angle and a simultaneous decrease in the base width. The evaporation of sessile water droplets with a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) added to an aluminum surface was then studied. The initial contact angle exhibited a minimum at 0.001 wt% Triton X-100. A maximum in the evaporation rate was also observed at the same concentration. Droplets with low surfactant concentrations are found to exhibit the 'depinning jump.' It is thought that the local concentration of the surfactant causes a gradient of surface tension. The balance at the contact angle is dictated by complex phenomena, including surfactant diffusion and adsorption processes at interfaces. Due to the strong evaporation near the triple line, an accumulation of the surfactant will lead to a surface tension gradient along the interface. The gradient of surface tension will influence the wetting behavior (Marangoni effect). At low surfactant concentrations the contact line depins under the strong effect of surface tension gradient that develops spontaneously over the droplet interface due to surfactant accumulation near the triple line. The maximum evaporation rate corresponds to a minimum contact angle for a pinned droplet.

  9. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew K.; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason M.

    2015-11-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an increase in the contact angle. However, the evaporation rate of salt-water droplets decreases as the salt concentration increases, due to the hydration of salt ions. When the water molecules have all evaporated from the droplet, two forms of salt crystals are deposited, clump and ringlike, depending on the solid-liquid interaction strength and the evaporation rate. To form salt crystals in a ring, it is crucial that there is a pinned stage in the evaporation process, during which salt ions can move from the center to the rim of the droplets. With a stronger solid-liquid interaction strength, a slower evaporation rate, and a higher salt concentration, a complete salt crystal ring can be deposited on the surface.

  10. Water evaporation: a transition path sampling study.

    PubMed

    Varilly, Patrick; Chandler, David

    2013-02-07

    We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPC/E model of liquid water. On the basis of thousands of evaporation trajectories, we characterize the members of the transition state ensemble (TSE), which exhibit a liquid-vapor interface with predominantly negative mean curvature at the site of evaporation. We also find that after evaporation is complete, the distributions of translational and angular momenta of the evaporated water are Maxwellian with a temperature equal to that of the liquid. To characterize the evaporation trajectories in their entirety, we find that it suffices to project them onto just two coordinates: the distance of the evaporating molecule to the instantaneous liquid-vapor interface and the velocity of the water along the average interface normal. In this projected space, we find that the TSE is well-captured by a simple model of ballistic escape from a deep potential well, with no additional barrier to evaporation beyond the cohesive strength of the liquid. Equivalently, they are consistent with a near-unity probability for a water molecule impinging upon a liquid droplet to condense. These results agree with previous simulations and with some, but not all, recent experiments.

  11. Representational Issues in Students Learning about Evaporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tytler, Russell; Prain, Vaughan; Peterson, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This study draws on recent research on the central role of representation in learning. While there has been considerable research on students' understanding of evaporation, the representational issues entailed in this understanding have not been investigated in depth. The study explored students' engagement with evaporation phenomena through…

  12. Optimized evaporation from a microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monazami, Reza; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-01

    Two-phase heat transfer devices, benefiting the unique thermal capacities of phase- change, are considered as the top choice for a wide range of applications involving cooling and temperature control. Evaporation and condensation in these devices usually take place on porous structures. It is widely accepted that they improve the evaporation rates and the overall performance of the device. The liquid menisci formed on the pores of a porous material can be viewed as the active sites of evaporation. Therefore, quantifying the rate of evaporation from a single pore can be used to calculate the total evaporation taking place in the evaporator given the density and the average size of the pores. A microchannel heat sink can be viewed as an structured porous material. In this work, an analytical model is developed to predict the evaporation rate from a liquid meniscus enclosed in a microchannel. The effects of the wall superheat and the width of the channel on the evaporation profile through the meniscus are studied. The results suggest that there is an optimum size for the width of the channel in order to maximize the thermal energy absorbed by the unit area of the heat sink as an array of microchannels.

  13. Representational Issues in Students Learning about Evaporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tytler, Russell; Prain, Vaughan; Peterson, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This study draws on recent research on the central role of representation in learning. While there has been considerable research on students' understanding of evaporation, the representational issues entailed in this understanding have not been investigated in depth. The study explored students' engagement with evaporation phenomena through…

  14. Evaporation mitigation using floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. Mahmudul; Peirson, William Leslie; Neyland, Bryce M.; Fiddis, Nicholas McQuistan

    2015-11-01

    Reducing evaporation losses from open water storages is of paramount importance in the improvement of water security in arid countries, including Australia. Widespread adoption of evaporation mitigation techniques has been prevented by their high capital and maintenance or operating costs. The use of clean, floating recycled materials to mitigate evaporation technique has been investigated systematically at sites within both the coastal and semi-arid zones of Australia. Evaporation reduction systematically increases with the proportion of covered surface. Evaporation is reduced by 43% at coastal site and 37% at arid zone site at the maximum packing densities achievable for a single layer of floating devices. The study highlights the importance of both long-term investigations and the climatic influences in the robust quantification of evaporation mitigation. The effects of solar radiation, temperature, wind speed and relative humidity on the evaporation rate at both study sites have been determined in terms of both the classical Penman model and FAO Penman Monteith model with corresponding pan coefficients quantified. FAO Penman Monteith model better estimates evaporation from the open reference tank.

  15. 242-A evaporator vacuum condenser system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.A.

    1994-09-28

    This document is written for the 242-A evaporator vacuum condenser system (VCS), describing its purpose and operation within the evaporator. The document establishes the operating parameters specifying pressure, temperature, flow rates, interlock safety features and interfacing sub-systems to support its operation.

  16. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk. It...

  17. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk. It...

  18. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk. It...

  19. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Description. Evaporated milk is the liquid food obtained by partial removal of water only from milk. It...

  20. Salinity is Reduced Below the Evaporation Front During Soil Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, M.; Carrera, J.; Olivella, S.; Massana, J.; Saaltink, M. W.; Ayora, C.; Lloret, A.

    2009-04-01

    Nearly 50% of irrigated lands in arid and semi-arid regimes have salinization problems. Salinization is generally caused by salts carried to the soil surface by capillary rising water and occurs under very dry conditions, when vapor fluxes become the main water flux mechanism. Despite its global importance, actual salinization mechanisms are only poorly understood. Soil salinization is generally studied by means of water and salt balances without entering on small scale processes. This may suffice for explaining large scale behavior but hardly for designing remediation practices. The objective of this work is to study the solute transport under evaporation conditions. We have performed laboratory experiments and modelled them. We have built open sand columns initially saturated with an epsomite (MgSO4•7H2O) solution. Evaporation was driven by an infrared lamp and proceeded until the overall saturation fell down to 0.32. Results imply that water vapor flows not only upwards above the evaporation front, but also downwards beneath this front, where it condensates. Condensation causes the dilution of the solution. That is, concentrations fall below the initial values. The experiments have been modelled with the program Retraso-CodeBright, which couples non isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport. Reproducing the observations required modifying the standard retention and relative permeability functions to include oven dry conditions. The model reproduces the observed concentration, water content and temperature profiles along the column and confirms the existence of condensation and decrease of salt concentration below the evaporation front. The model also allows us to distinguish the relevance between the advective and diffusive vapor fluxes, showing that the latter is, by far, the largest. The mechanism displays positives feedbacks, as condensation will be most intense in areas of highest salinity, thus diluting saline water that may have infiltrated.

  1. Salinity is Reduced Below the Evaporation Front During Soil Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, M.; Carrera, J.; Olivella, S.; Massana, J.; Saaltink, M. W.; Ayora, C.; Lloret, A.

    2008-12-01

    Nearly 50% of irrigated lands in arid and semi-arid regimes have salinization problems. Salinization is generally caused by salts carried to the soil surface by capillary rising water and occurs under very dry conditions, when vapor fluxes become the main water flux mechanism. Despite its global importance, actual salinization mechanisms are only poorly understood. Soil salinization is generally studied by means of water and salt balances without entering on small scale processes. This may suffice for explaining large scale behavior but hardly for designing remediation practices. The objective of this work is to study the solute transport under evaporation conditions. We have performed laboratory experiments and modelled them. We have built open sand columns initially saturated with an epsomite (MgSO4-7H2O) solution. Evaporation was driven by an infrared lamp and proceeded until the overall saturation fell down to 0.32. Results imply that water vapor flows not only upwards above the evaporation front, but also downwards beneath this front, where it condensates. Condensation causes the dilution of the solution. That is, concentrations fall below the initial values. The experiments have been modelled with the program RetrasoCodeBright, which couples non isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport. Reproducing the observations required modifying the standard retention and relative permeability functions to include oven dry conditions. The model reproduces the observed concentration, water content and temperature profiles along the column and confirms the existence of condensation and decrease of salt concentration below the evaporation front. The model also allows us to distinguish the relevance between the advective and diffusive vapor fluxes, showing that the latter is, by far, the largest. The mechanism displays positives feedbacks, as condensation will be most intense in areas of highest salinity, thus diluting saline water that may have infiltrated.

  2. Ion-pair evaporation from ionic liquid clusters.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Christopher J; Fernandez de la Mora, Juan

    2010-08-01

    A differential mobility analyzer (DMA) is used in atmospheric pressure N(2) to select a narrow range of electrical mobilities from a complex mix of cluster ions of composition (CA)(n)(C(+))(z). The clusters are introduced into the N(2) gas by electrospraying concentrated (approximately 20 mM) acetonitrile solutions of ionic liquids (molten salts) of composition CA (C(+) = cation, A(-) = anion). Mass analysis of these mobility-selected ions reveals the occurrence of individual neutral ion-pair evaporation events from the smallest singly charged clusters: (CA)(n)C(+)-->(CA)(n-1)C(+)+CA. Although bulk ionic liquids are effectively involatile at room temperature, up to six sequential evaporation events are observed. Because this requires far more internal energy than available in the original clusters, substantial heating (approximately 10 eV) must take place in the ion guides leading to the mass analyzer. The observed increase in IL evaporation rate with decreasing size is drastic, in qualitative agreement with the exponential vapor pressure dependence predicted by Kelvin's formula. A single evaporation event is barely detectable at n = 13, while two or more are prominent for n < or = 9. Magic number clusters (CA)(4)C(+) with singularly low volatilities are found in three of the four ionic liquids studied. Like their recently reported liquid phase prenucleation cluster analogs, these magic number clusters could play a key role as gas-phase nucleation seeds. All the singularly involatile clusters seen are cations, which may help understand commonly observed sign effects in ion-induced nucleation. No other charge-sign asymmetry is seen on cluster evaporation. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of droplet evaporation on fuel-air mixing rate in a burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komiyama, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Heywood, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments involving combustion of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels in a simple atmospheric pressure burner were used to evaluate the role of droplet evaporation in the fuel/air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames. Both air-assist atomization and pressure atomization processes were studied; fuel/air mixing rates were determined on the basis of cross-section average oxygen concentrations for stoichiometric overall operation. In general, it is concluded that droplets act as point sources of fuel vapor until evaporation, when the fuel jet length scale may become important in determining nonuniformities of the fuel vapor concentration. In addition, air-assist atomizers are found to have short droplet evaporation times with respect to the duration of the fuel/air mixing process, while for the pressure jet atomizer the characteristic evaporation and mixing times are similar.

  4. Coffee-ring and uniform deposits from sessile nanofluid droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Fei; Zhong, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation process has been investigated for the final deposits of particles for coffee-ring or uniform deposition. The 3-4 nm graphite nanoparticles are selected for preparing the nanofluids with surfactant or without the surfactant. The evaporation in term of contact angle, contact line, volume, spreading, etc, shows that the nanoparticles enhance the pinning effect and the evaporation rate, despite that the enhancement can be weakened as the nanoparticle concentration is higher in the samples without surfactant. In the sample with the surfactant, the variations of baseline, contact angle, volume and evaporation rate are abnormal at a certain surfactant concentration. Further discussion is conducted for the transition. The role of the surfactant influents the drying patterns from coffee ring to uniform deposition. The simulation is developed to help to understand the effect. The authors acknowledge the support of A*Star Public Sector Funding (1121202010).

  5. Water evaporation on highly viscoelastic polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pu, Gang; Severtson, Steven J

    2012-07-03

    Results are reported for a study on the evaporation of water droplets from a highly viscoelastic acrylic polymer surface. These are contrasted with those collected for the same measurements carried out on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). For PDMS, the evaporation process involves the expected multistep process including constant drop area, constant contact angle, and finally a combination of these steps until the liquid is gone. In contrast, water evaporation from the acrylic polymer shows a constant drop area mode throughout. Furthermore, during the evaporation process, the drop area actually expands on the acrylic polymer. The single mode evaporation process is consistent with formation of wetting structures, which cannot be propagated by the capillary forces. Expansion of the drop area is attributed to the influence of the drop capillary pressure. Furthermore, the rate of drop area expansion is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the polymer film.

  6. Calcium and titanium isotopic fractionations during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjun; Huang, Shichun; Davis, Andrew M.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2014-09-01

    Isotope fractionations associated with high temperature evaporation provide important constraints on the physicochemical processes that affected planetary materials at the birth of the solar system. Previous evaporation experiments have focused on isotopic fractionation of moderately to highly volatile elements. Here, we investigate the isotope fractionation behavior of two highly refractory elements, calcium and titanium, during evaporation of perovskite (CaTiO3) in a vacuum furnace. In our experiments, isotope fractionation during evaporation follows the Rayleigh law, but not the commonly used exponential law, with the dominant evaporating species being Ca(g) and TiO2(g). If isotope fractionations in early solar system materials did follow the Rayleigh law, the common practice of using an exponential fractionation law to correct for mass-dependent fractionation in the study of mass-independent fractionations may introduce significant artificial isotope anomalies.

  7. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation. PMID:27573848

  8. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  9. Towards universal buckling dynamics in nanocolloidal sessile droplets: the effect of hydrophilic to superhydrophobic substrates and evaporation modes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saptarshi; Bansal, Lalit; Miglani, Ankur

    2016-06-14

    The evaporation of a nanocolloidal sessile droplet exhibits preferential particle assembly, nanoporous shell formation and buckling to form cavities with unique morphological features. Here, we have established many universal trends that explain the buckling dynamics under one umbrella irrespective of hydrophobicity, evaporation mode and particle loading. We provide a regime map explaining the droplet morphology and buckling characteristics for droplet evaporation on various substrates. Specifically, we find that the final droplet volume and the radius of curvature at the buckling onset are universal functions of particle concentration. Furthermore, we establish that post-buckling cavity growth is evaporation driven regardless of the substrate.

  10. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  11. Enhancing mercury removal across air pollution control devices for coal-fired power plants by desulfurization wastewater evaporation.

    PubMed

    Bin, Hu; Yang, Yi; Cai, Liang; Linjun, Yang; Roszak, Szczepan

    2017-09-15

    Desulfurization wastewater evaporation technology is used to enhance the removal of gaseous mercury (Hg) in conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) for coal-fired power plants. It had been studied that gaseous Hg is oxidized and removed by selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) in coal-fired thermal experiment platform with WFGD wastewater evaporation. Effects of desulfurization wastewater evaporation position, evaporation temperature, and chlorine ion concentration on Hg oxidation were studied as well. The Hg(0) oxidation efficiency improved significantly over SCR after improving the flue gas temperature and concentration of chlorine ion in the wastewater. The Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was increased ranging from 30% to 60%, and the gaseous Hg removal efficiency was 62.16% in APCDs when wastewater evaporated before SCR. However, the Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was 18.99% and the gaseous Hg removal efficiency was 40.19% in APCDs when wastewater evaporated before ESP. The results show that WFGD wastewater evaporation before SCR is beneficial to improve Hg oxidized and removed efficiency in APCDs. The function of WFGD wastewater evaporation on Hg oxidation is due to reasons: active chlorine species generated through the evaporation process and promoted the Hg oxidation. Because Hg(2+) can be easily removed in ACPDs and chlorine ion is enriched in WFGD wastewater in power plants, this method realizes WFGD wastewater zero discharge and simultaneously enhances Hg removal in APCDs.

  12. LITERATURE REVIEW ON IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON THE 2H EVAPORATOR AND THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-05-10

    Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations {le} 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have

  13. Evaporation induced ordering in polymer-colloid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Black, Matthew; Cunningham, Thomas; Akcora, Pinar

    2013-03-01

    When evaporated from aqueous solutions, colloidal particles tend to deposit non-uniformly on hydrophilic substrates due to capillary flow from the center of droplet to the pinned contact line. The so called ``coffee-ring'' deposition has been extensively studied in polymer solutions and colloidal suspensions; however, the behavior of the mixtures of polymer-colloid suspensions under evaporation remains unexplored. The competition between the homogenous fluid phase and the depletion induced phase separation offers rich phase behavior to these three component systems over a wide range of size ratios and concentrations. In this work, we present the formation of long-range, ordered colloid-rich and polymer-rich phases with a well-defined periodicity from homogenous mixture of colloids and polymer via solvent evaporation. The kinetics of the phase separation, studied by video microscopy and Fourier transform analysis of the images obtained at different times, suggests that the early growth of the phases can be quantitatively described by spinodal decomposition kinetics. The effect of particle and polymer concentrations, polymer and particle size ratios, interparticle bridging and substrate on microscopic phase separation will be discussed.

  14. Modeling evaporation effects in conditional moment closure for spray autoignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesi, Giulio; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Devaud, Cécile B.; Bilger, Robert W.

    2011-10-01

    Simulations of an n-heptane spray autoigniting under conditions relevant to a diesel engine are performed using two-dimensional, first-order conditional moment closure (CMC) with full treatment of spray terms in the mixture fraction variance and CMC equations. The conditional evaporation term in the CMC equations is closed assuming interphase exchange to occur at the droplet saturation mixture fraction values only. Modeling of the unclosed terms in the mixture fraction variance equation is done accordingly. Comparison with experimental data for a range of ambient oxygen concentrations shows that the ignition delay is overpredicted. The trend of increasing ignition delay with decreasing oxygen concentration, however, is correctly captured. Good agreement is found between the computed and measured flame lift-off height for all conditions investigated. Analysis of source terms in the CMC temperature equation reveals that a convective-reactive balance sets in at the flame base, with spatial diffusion terms being important, but not as important as in lifted jet flames in cold air. Inclusion of droplet terms in the governing equations is found to affect the mixture fraction variance field in the region where evaporation is the strongest, and to slightly increase the ignition delay time due to the cooling associated with the evaporation. Both flame propagation and stabilization mechanisms, however, remain unaffected.

  15. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.

    2003-10-23

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate and off-gas streams with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI ESP model is constrained by available literature data.

  16. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Whipple, Richard E.; Grant, Patrick M.; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1981-01-01

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  17. Evaporative Gasoline Emissions and Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR’s minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb. PMID:20948946

  18. Evaporative gasoline emissions and asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-08-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR's minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb.

  19. Etude aerodynamique d'un jet turbulent impactant une paroi concave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Benoit

    Etant donne la demande croissante de temperatures elevees dans des chambres de combustion de systemes de propulsions en aerospatiale (turbomoteurs, moteur a reaction, etc.), l'interet dans le refroidissement par jets impactant s'est vu croitre. Le refroidissement des aubes de turbine permet une augmentation de temperature de combustion, ce qui se traduit en une augmentation de l'efficacite de combustion et donc une meilleure economie de carburant. Le transfert de chaleur dans les au bages est influence par les aspects aerodynamiques du refroidissement a jet, particulierement dans le cas d'ecoulements turbulents. Un manque de comprehension de l'aerodynamique a l'interieur de ces espaces confinees peut mener a des changements de transfert thermique qui sont inattendus, ce qui augmente le risque de fluage. Il est donc d'interet pour l'industrie aerospatiale et l'academie de poursuivre la recherche dans l'aerodynamique des jets turbulents impactant les parois courbes. Les jets impactant les surfaces courbes ont deja fait l'objet de nombreuses etudes. Par contre des conditions oscillatoires observees en laboratoire se sont averees difficiles a reproduire en numerique, puisque les structures d'ecoulements impactants des parois concaves sont fortement dependantes de la turbulence et des effets instationnaires. Une etude experimentale fut realisee a l'institut PPRIME a l'Universite de Poitiers afin d'observer le phenomene d'oscillation dans le jet. Une serie d'essais ont verifie les conditions d'ecoulement laminaires et turbulentes, toutefois le cout des essais experimentaux a seulement permis d'avoir un apercu du phenomene global. Une deuxieme serie d'essais fut realisee numeriquement a l'Universite de Moncton avec l'outil OpenFOAM pour des conditions d'ecoulement laminaire et bidimensionnel. Cette etude a donc comme but de poursuivre l'enquete de l'aerodynamique oscillatoire des jets impactant des parois courbes, mais pour un regime d'ecoulement transitoire, turbulent

  20. Water repellency diminishes peatland evaporation after wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettridge, N.; Lukenbach, M.; Hokanson, K. J.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.; Hopkinson, C.; Waddington, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Peatlands are a critically important global carbon reserve. There is increasing concern that such ecosystems are vulnerable to projected increases in wildfire severity under a changing climate. Severe fires may exceed peatland ecological resilience resulting in the long term degradation of this carbon store. Evaporation provides the primary mechanisms of water loss from such environments and can regulate the ecological stress in the initial years after wildfire. We examine variations in evaporation within burned peatlands after wildfire through small scale chamber and large scale remote sensing measurements. We show that near-surface water repellency limits peatland evaporation in these initial years post fire. Water repellent peat produced by the fire restricts the supply of water to the surface, reducing evaporation and providing a strong negative feedback to disturbance. This previously unidentified feedback operates at the landscape scale. High surface temperatures that result from large reductions in evaporation within water repellent peat are observed across the 60,000 ha burn scar three months after the wildfire. This large scale reduction in evaporation promotes high water table positions at a landscape scale which limits the rate of peat decomposition and supports the post fire ecohydrological recovery of the peatlands. However, severe burns are shown to exceed this negative feedback response. Deep burns at the peatland margins remove the hydrophobic layer, increasing post fire evaporation and leaving the peatland vulnerable to drying and associated ecological shifts.

  1. Tank 26 Evaporator Feed Pump Transfer Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, David; Dimenna, Richard; Lee, Si

    2009-02-11

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 26 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, located approximately 72 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank to the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results showed that, for the maximum and minimum supernate levels in Tank 26 (252.5 and 72 inches above the sludge layer, respectively), the evaporator feed pump will entrain between 0.03 and 0.1 wt% sludge undissolved solids weight fraction into the eductor, respectively, and therefore are an order of magnitude less than the 1.0 wt% undissolved solids loading criteria to feed the evaporator. Lower tank liquid levels, with respect to the sludge layer, result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased velocity of the plunging jets from the downcomer and evaporator feed pump bypass as well as decreased dissipation depth. Revision 1 clarifies the analysis presented in Revision 0 and corrects a mathematical error in the calculations for Table 4.1 in Revision 0. However, the conclusions and recommendations of the analysis do not change for Revision 1.

  2. Thermocapillary flow about an evaporating meniscus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Chung, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The steady motion and thermal behavior of an evaporating superheated liquid in a small cavity bounded by isothermal sidewalls is examined. Scaling analyses and a two-dimensional finite element model are used to investigate the influence of thermocapillarity, buoyancy, and temperature-dependent mass flux on flowfield, interfacial heat transfer, and meniscus morphology. Numerical investigations indicate the existence of two counter-rotating cells symmetric about the cavity center. Results also show that evaporation tends to counteract this circulation by directing flow toward the hotter sidewalls. Although thermocapillarity and evaporation yield different flowfield distributions, both effects tend to increase interfacial temperature and heat transfer.

  3. Evaporation of droplets on strongly hydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jutta M; Wilson, Stephen K; Duffy, Brian R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-31

    The manner in which the extreme modes of droplet evaporation (namely, the constant contact radius and the constant contact angle modes) become indistinguishable on strongly hydrophobic substrates is described. Simple asymptotic expressions are obtained which provide good approximations to the evolutions of the contact radius, the contact angle, and the volume of droplets evaporating in the extreme modes for a wide range of hydrophobic substrates. As a consequence, on strongly hydrophobic substrates it is appropriate to use the so-called "2/3 power law" to extrapolate the lifetimes of droplets evaporating in the constant contact radius mode as well as in the constant contact angle mode.

  4. Thin film evaporator recovers used oil

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, G. III

    1983-01-01

    This article is an evaluation of a thin film evaporator which is used to distill the lube oil fraction from depleted additives and other residues in the crankcase oil re-refining process at Booth Oil. Operating as a vacuum distillation unit, the thin film evaporator produces a lube oil base stock equivalent in quality, after post-treatment, to virgin base stock. The thin film evaporator recovers about 70 to 90% of used oil as lube oil distillate, depending on the quantity of non-volatile residue in the feed.

  5. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  6. Sampling gaseous compounds from essential oils evaporation by solid phase microextraction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Lai, Chin-Hsing

    2014-12-01

    Needle trap samplers (NTS) are packed with 80-100 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB) particles to extract indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study compared extraction efficiency between an NTS and a commercially available 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane-solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME) fiber sampler used to sample gaseous products in heated tea tree essential oil in different evaporation modes, which were evaporated respectively by free convection inside a glass evaporation dish at 27 °C, by evaporation diffuser at 60 °C, and by thermal ceramic wicks at 100 °C. The experimental results indicated that the NTS performed better than the SPME fiber samplers and that the NTS primarily adsorbed 5.7 ng ethylbenzene, 5.8 ng m/p-xylenes, 11.1 ng 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 12.4 ng 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 9.99 ng 1,4-diethylbenzene when thermal ceramic wicks were used to evaporate the tea tree essential oil during a 1-hr evaporation period. The experiment also indicated that the temperature used to heat the essential oils should be as low as possible to minimize irritant VOC by-products. If the evaporation temperature does not exceed 100 °C, the concentrations of main by-products trimethylbenzene and diethylbenzene are much lower than the threshold limit values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

  7. Experimental investigation of interfacial phenomena in evaporating sessile droplets for evaporative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Brendan; Mahmud, Md. Almostasim

    2016-11-01

    Evaporation of sessile droplets has applications in many fields, including evaporative cooling technology. An example from nature is human perspiration. Evaporative cooling applications typically operate at atmospheric pressure and 20 to 80°C, and systems that mimic perspiration require droplets that are continuously fed fluid. A number of studies have investigated phenomena associated with evaporating sessile droplets including (1) interfacial energy transport, (2) distribution of the evaporation flux along the interface, and (3) temperature discontinuities at the liquid-vapor interface; however, many of these studies were not undertaken in the regime relevant to evaporative cooling and used low pressures and temperatures or droplets that were not continuously fed fluid and changed shape as they were depleted. We will present the results from our experimental study, which examined these phenomena in the regime relevant to evaporative cooling to determine if they are present and if they have an impact on the evaporation behavior. In this regime we found that conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation, the local evaporation flux changed depending on thermocapillary convection, and interfacial temperature discontinuities were present.

  8. The Evaporation Rate and Net Radiation of white Class A Evaporation Pan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study experimentally investigates the influence of color on the evaporation rate of the Class A evaporation pan. Two Class A evaporation pans, one in the original galvanized metal color and the other painted white, are placed in the same meteorological station for eighteen months. Since the wind speed, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit are the same for both pans, the color and the resulting net radiation are the only causes for the difference in the evaporation rate. The results reveal that the average net radiation of the white pan is about 90% that of the metal-colored pan. This leads to the annual evaporation rate of the white pan (1041 mm/year) being only 75% of the evaporation rate (1392 mm/year) of the metal-colored pan. In addition, the prediction error of the daily evaporation rates by the energy budget method is lower than that of the Penman-Monteith type models. The differences between the measured evaporation rates of the two pans are analyzed to examine the role of irradiance on the pan evaporation rate. The results indicate that the irradiance absorbed by the pan wall can affect the energy budget and evaporation rate of the pan.

  9. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate solution drops placed on a hydrophobic substrate.

    PubMed

    Doganci, Merve Dandan; Sesli, Belma Uyar; Erbil, H Yildirim

    2011-10-15

    In this work, the effect of SDS anionic surfactant on the diffusion-controlled evaporation rate of aqueous solution drops placed on TEFLON-FEP substrate was investigated with 11 different SDS concentrations. Drop evaporation was monitored in a closed chamber having a constant RH of 54-57% by a video camera. The initial contact angle, θ(i) decreased from 104±2° down to 68±1° due to the adsorption of SDS both at the water-air and the solid-water interfaces. The adsorption of SDS on the solid surface was found to be 76% of that of its adsorption at the water-air interface by applying Lucassen-Reynders approach. An equation was developed for the comparison of the evaporation rates of drops having different θ(i) on the same substrate. It was found that the addition of SDS did not alter the drop evaporation rate considerably for the first 1200 s for all the SDS concentrations. The main difference was found to be the change of the mode of drop evaporation by varying the SDS concentration. The constant θ mode was operative up to 80 mM SDS concentration, whereas constant contact area mode was operative after 200 mM SDS concentrations due to rapid drop pining on the substrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New Directions for Evaporative Cooling Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Rita

    1981-01-01

    New energy saving technology can be applied to older cooling towers; in addition, evaporative chilling, a process that links a cooling tower to the chilling equipment, can reduce energy use by 80 percent. (Author/MLF)

  11. Potential Evaporation in North America Through 2100

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows the projected increase in potential evaporation through the year 2100, relative to 1980, based on the combined results of multiple climate models. The maximum increase across N...

  12. Development of Evaporative Emissions Calculations for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes methodology for developing evaporative emissions calculations for MOVES2009 Model. To describe development of inputs and calculations used in the MOVES2009 model to calculate on-highway emissions inventories.

  13. La structure de l'eau liquide: Une etude thermique par spectroscopie infrarouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larouche, Pascal

    Le probleme de la structure de l'eau liquide est important car l'eau est le liquide le plus present sur Terre, et complexe, la quete d'un modele precis pour decrire comment fonctionne ce liquide ayant debute des la fin du dix-neuvieme siecle. Cette etude aborde ce probleme en etudiant l'effet de l'augmentation de la temperature sur H2O et D 2O purs a l'aide de la spectroscopie infrarouge. L'intervalle de temperatures scrute est 29--93.1°C. Les spectres enregistres sont des spectres MIR-ATR entre 650 et 6000 cm-1 . L'analyse par facteurs de ces donnees permet de montrer que deux et seulement deux facteurs principaux sont necessaires pour decomposer tous les spectres experimentaux. Ces resultats sont confirmes grace a l'analyse par facteurs de spectres de la region FIR. Par la suite, la transformation en spectres de la partie reelle n et imaginaire k de l'indice de refraction permet de combiner les donnees des regions MIR et FIR. Une fois ce calcul termine, les spectres de transmission complets de H 2O et D2O entre 25 et 90°C sont connus. Ils sont ensuite utilises pour calculer par extrapolation le spectre des especes constituant l'eau liquide, puis leur abondance en fonction de la temperature. L'extrapolation de ces abondances montre que les especes correspondent a des temperatures limites de --18 et 122°C. Par la suite, la decomposition gaussienne des spectres d'especes met en evidence la riche structure de ces objets et permet de demontrer que l'apparent deplacement du massif d'absorption OH (OD) est produit par une variation de l'intensite des bandes et non pas de leur deplacement. L'examen attentif des spectres des especes prouve qu'il n'y a pas de OH libres crees par l'augmentation de la temperature: meme a 93.1°C, chaque molecule possede quatre liens-H. Ces conclusions sont de plus confirmees par une analyse thermodynamique du passage des molecules de la phase solide a la phase gazeuse. Pour diversifier la nature des resultats experimentaux utilises, des

  14. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  15. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  16. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  17. Evaporator film coefficients of grooved heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer rate in the meniscus attachment region of a grooved heat pipe evaporator is studied theoretically. The analysis shows that the evaporation takes place mainly in the region where the liquid changes its shape sharply. However, comparisons with available heat transfer data indicate that the heat transfer rate in the meniscus varying region is substantially reduced probably due to groove wall surface roughness.

  18. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporator of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2002-08-21

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods.

  19. On the Resistance to Transpiration of the Sites of Evaporation within the Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Graham D.; Raschke, Klaus

    1978-01-01

    The rates of transpiration from the upper and lower surfaces of leaves of Gossypium hirsutum, Xanthium strumarium, and Zea mays were compared with the rates at which helium diffused across those leaves. There was no evidence for effects of CO2 concentration or rate of evaporation on the resistance to water loss from the evaporating surface (“resistance of the mesophyll wall to transpiration”) and no evidence for any significant wall resistance in turgid tissues. The possible existence of a wall resistance was also tested in leaves of Commelina communis and Tulipa gesneriana whose epidermis could be easily peeled. Only when an epidermis was removed from a leaf, evaporation from the mesophyll tissue declined. We conclude that under conditions relevant to studies of stomatal behavior, the water vapor pressure at the sites of evaporation is equal to the saturation vapor pressure. PMID:16660404

  20. Evaporation Heat Transfer of Ammonia and Pressure Drop of Warm Water for Plate Type Evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibe, Mitsuteru; Lkegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori; Uehara, Haruo

    The performance test of three types of plate type evaporators for spring thermal energy conversion and ocean thermal energy conversion carried out. Ammonia is utilized as working fluid and warm water is utilized as heat source. An empirical correlation is proposed in order to predict the mean evaporation heat transfer coefficient of ammonia and heat transfer coefficient of warm water for plate type evaporators. The mean heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of warm water were compared with other researches.

  1. Estimating soil water evaporation using radar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, Ali M.; Scott, H. D.; Waite, W. P.; Asrar, G.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to evaluate the application of radar reflectivity as compared with the shortwave reflectivity (albedo) used in the Idso-Jackson equation for the estimation of daily evaporation under overcast sky and subhumid climatic conditions. Soil water content, water potential, shortwave and radar reflectivity, and soil and air temperatures were monitored during three soil drying cycles. The data from each cycle were used to calculate daily evaporation from the Idso-Jackson equation and from two other standard methods, the modified Penman and plane of zero-flux. All three methods resulted in similar estimates of evaporation under clear sky conditions; however, under overcast sky conditions, evaporation fluxes computed from the Idso-Jackson equation were consistently lower than the other two methods. The shortwave albedo values in the Idso-Jackson equation were then replaced with radar reflectivities and a new set of total daily evaporation fluxes were calculated. This resulted in a significant improvement in computed soil evaporation fluxes from the Idso-Jackson equation, and a better agreement between the three methods under overcast sky conditions.

  2. Droplet evaporation on a soluble substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailleur, Alexandra; Pirat, Christophe; Colombani, Jean; CNES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Stains left by evaporated droplets are ubiquitous in everyday life as well as in industrial processes. Whatever the composition of the evaporating liquid (colloidal suspensions, biological fluids...), the stains are mostly constituted by a deposit at the periphery of the dried drop, similar to a coffee stain (Deegan, 1997). All these studies have been carried with non-reacting solids. In this presentation, we focus on the behavior of a pure-water droplet evaporating on a soluble substrate which is more complex, since three phenomena are strongly interacting: the dissolution of the substrate, the diffusion/convection of the dissolved species into the drop and the evaporation of the liquid. NaCl and KCl single crystals have been chosen for this experimental study as they are fast-dissolving solids. We have observed that the dissolution induces a pinning of the triple line from the beginning of the evaporation, leading to a decrease of the contact angle in time. At the end of the evaporation, a peripheral deposit is always formed, proof of an outward flow inside the drop (coffee-ring effect). The authors would like to thank the CNES for the financial support.

  3. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  4. Water repellency diminishes peatland evaporation after wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettridge, Nick; Lukenbach, Max; Hokanson, Kelly; Devito, Kevin; Hopkinson, Chris; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are a critically important global carbon reserve. There is increasing concern that such ecosystems are vulnerable to projected increases in wildfire severity under a changing climate. Severe fires may exceed peatland ecological resilience resulting in the long term degradation of this carbon store. Evaporation provides the primary mechanisms of water loss from such environments and can regulate the ecological stress in the initial years after wildfire. We examine variations in evaporation within burned peatlands after wildfire through small scale chamber and large scale remote sensing measurements. We show that near-surface water repellency limits peatland evaporation in these initial years post fire. Water repellent peat produced by the fire restricts the supply of water to the surface, reducing evaporation and providing a strong negative feedback to disturbance. This previously unidentified feedback operates at the landscape scale. High surface temperatures that result from large reductions in evaporation within water repellent peat are observed across the 60,000 ha burn scar three months after the wildfire. This promotes high water table positions at a landscape scale which limit the rate of peat decomposition and supports the post fire ecohydrological recovery of the peatlands. However, severe burns are shown to exceed this negative feedback response. Deep burns at the peatland margins remove the hydrophobic layer, increasing post fire evaporation and leaving the peatland vulnerable to drying and associated ecological shifts.

  5. Accelerated evaporation of water on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wan, Rongzheng; Shi, Guosheng

    2017-03-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water on patterned graphene oxide is faster than that on homogeneous graphene oxide. The evaporation rate of water is insensitive to variation in the oxidation degree of the oxidized regions, so long as the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. The evaporation rate drops when the water film spreads onto the unoxidized regions. Further analysis showed that varying the oxidation degree observably changed the interaction between the outmost water molecules and the solid surface, but the total interaction for the outmost water molecules only changed a very limited amount due to the correspondingly regulated water-water interaction when the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. When the oxidation degree is too low and some unoxidized regions are also covered by the water film, the thickness of the water film decreases, which extends the lifetime of the hydrogen bonds for the outmost water molecules and lowers the evaporation rate of the water. The insensitivity of water evaporation to the oxidation degree indicates that we only need to control the scale of the unoxidized and oxidized regions for graphene oxide to regulate the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water.

  6. A note on evaporation from heated spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbassek, M.; Sigmund, P.

    1984-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of heat loss through evaporation on the surface temperature profile and the evaporation yield of an ion-induced spike. We derive a three-dimensional extension of a nonlinear integral equation first found by Mann and Wolf to describe the temperature profile in a semiinfinite medium in the presence of heat loss through the surface. The equation has been solved by perturbation expansion in powers of the evaporation rate. For heavy-ion induced, cylindrical elastic-collision spikes, noticeable but moderate corrections are found to evaporation yields estimated previously by neglecting heat loss due to evaporation. These results are relevant mainly to sputtering of metals by heavy atomic and molecular ion bombardment. Comments are also made on sputting of insulators both by heavy keV ions and by ionizing particles. Expressions for an effective sputter time and sputter area are derived for cylindrical geometry; both quantities turn out independent of the initial spike temperature. The sputter radius is normally greater than the depth of the crater formed; we conclude that the influence of crater formation on the evaporation yield is normally negligible.

  7. Evaporative condensing minimizes system power requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Knebel, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    Evaporative condensing is a heat-rejection technology widely applied with industrial refrigeration. When employed with HVAC systems it can reduce electrical energy and demand consumption of an HVAC system by 20 to 40%, depending on location, compared to air-cooled condensing. Evaporative condensing allows direct-expansion (DX) systems to achieve energy and demand consumption comparable to the most efficient chilled water central plant systems. As the industry focuses its attention on solving the problems of energy conservation, demand reduction, and global warming, high-efficiency air conditioning systems utilizing evaporative condensing provide a reliable and cost-effective solution today. This article addresses the advantages of evaporative condensing over air-cooled and water-cooled condensing in DX packaged systems as well as chiller/cooling tower systems. A review of condensing methods and standard system operating characteristics will be used as examples to illustrate the thermodynamic benefits of evaporative condensing. Requirements for successful operation of evaporative condensers will be discussed.

  8. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  9. TANK 26 EVAPORATOR FEED PUMP TRANSFER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Si Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2008-09-30

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 26 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, located approximately 72 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank to the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results showed that, for the maximum and minimum supernate levels in Tank 26 (252.5 and 72 inches above the sludge layer, respectively), the evaporator feed pump will entrain between 0.05 and 0.1 wt% sludge solids weight fraction into the eductor, respectively. Lower tank liquid levels, with respect to the sludge layer, result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased velocity of the plunging jets from the downcomer and evaporator feed pump bypass as well as decreased dissipation depth.

  10. TANK 32 EVAPORATOR FEED PUMP TRANSFER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Richard Dimenna, R; Si Lee, S

    2009-01-27

    The transfer of liquid salt solution from Tank 32 to an evaporator is to be accomplished by activating the evaporator feed pump, with the supernate surface at a minimum height of approximately 74.4 inches above the sludge layer, while simultaneously turning on the downcomer with a flow rate of 110 gpm. Previously, activation of the evaporator feed pump was an isolated event without any other components running at the same time. An analysis of the dissolved solution transfer has been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the amount of entrained sludge solids pumped out of the tank toward the evaporator with the downcomer turned on. The analysis results shows that, for the minimum tank liquid level of 105 inches above the tank bottom (which corresponds to a liquid depth of 74.4 inches above the sludge layer), the evaporator feed pump will contain less than 0.1 wt% sludge solids in the discharge stream, which is an order of magnitude less than the 1.0 wt% undissolved solids (UDS) loading criteria to feed the evaporator. Lower liquid levels with respect to the sludge layer will result in higher amounts of sludge entrainment due to the increased plunging jet velocity from the downcomer disturbing the sludge layer.

  11. Evaporation mitigation by floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. M.; Peirson, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of drought and consequent evaporation from open water bodies in arid parts of Australia continue to be a threat to water availability for agricultural production. Over many parts of Australia, the annual average evaporation exceeds the annual precipitation by more than 5 times. Given its significance, it is surprising that no evaporation mitigation technique has gained widespread adoption to date. High capital and maintenance costs of manufactured products are a significant barrier to implementation. The use of directly recycled clean plastic containers as floating modular devices to mitigate evaporation has been investigated for the first time. A six-month trial at an arid zone site in Australia of this potential cost effective solution has been undertaken. The experiment was performed using clean conventional drinking water bottles as floating modules on the open water surface of 240-L tanks with three varying degrees of covering (nil, 34% and 68%). A systematic reduction in evaporation is demonstrated during the whole study period that is approximately linearly proportional to the covered surface. These results provide a potential foundation for robust evaporation mitigation with the prospect of implementing a cost-optimal design.

  12. Evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Brown, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments, the evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured for LOX strand vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atmospheres. Gas sampling and chromatography analysis were also employed to profile the gas composition above the LOX surface for the purpose of model validation. A comprehensive theoretical model was formulated and solved numerically to simulate the evaporation process of LOX at high pressures. The model was based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentrations for a multicomponent system, with consideration of gravitational body force, solubility of ambient gases in liquid, and variable thermophysical properties. Good agreement between predictions and measured oxygen mole fraction profiles was obtained. The effect of pressure on the distribution of the Lewis number, as well as the effect of variable diffusion coefficient, were further examined to elucidate the high-pressure transport behavior exhibited in the LOX vaporization process.

  13. Rapid alpha spectroscopy of evaporated liquid residues for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Semkow, T M; Khan, A J; Haines, D K; Bari, A

    2009-04-01

    A new method for alpha spectroscopy of evaporated water residues was developed, consisting of evaporation of drinking water, flaming of the planchets, and alpha-spectroscopic measurements using a grid ionization chamber. The method can identify and quantify radioactivity concentrations > or =3 mBq L-1 in a matter of several hours, whereas determination of sub-mBq L-1 levels is achievable in 1 day. Detailed investigations of flaming of the planchets, the humidity effect, and alpha spectroscopy of thick sources are described. A three-dimensional calibration of the method was performed using standards containing 238U, 230Th, 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm radionuclides. In addition to its application to evaporated drinking water, this calibration is common for any environmental sample that can be prepared as a uniform layer, such as the residues from surface water, acidic washing or leaching from materials, as well as biological fluids such as urine. The developed method serves as a fast identifying or screening technique for emergency response involving alpha radioactivity.

  14. Evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Brown, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments, the evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured for LOX strand vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atmospheres. Gas sampling and chromatography analysis were also employed to profile the gas composition above the LOX surface for the purpose of model validation. A comprehensive theoretical model was formulated and solved numerically to simulate the evaporation process of LOX at high pressures. The model was based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentrations for a multicomponent system, with consideration of gravitational body force, solubility of ambient gases in liquid, and variable thermophysical properties. Good agreement between predictions and measured oxygen mole fraction profiles was obtained. The effect of pressure on the distribution of the Lewis number, as well as the effect of variable diffusion coefficient, were further examined to elucidate the high-pressure transport behavior exhibited in the LOX vaporization process.

  15. Microstructure Evolution during Solvent Evaporation from Thin Film Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Nigel; Souche, Mireille; Buxton, Gavin

    2009-03-01

    We present simulations of the phase separation dynamics in a thin film polymer blend solution subject to solvent evaporation [1]. If the upper and lower surfaces are neutral with respect to the different components, we find that as the solvent diffuses through the film, and evaporates from the surface, phase separation becomes energetically favourable progressively throughout the film. This produces an ordering front which propagates through the film and leaves an ordered lateral morphology in its wake. In order to understand microstructure evolution if the surface interactions are strong enough that the film initially separates into a two layers, we have perfomed a linear analysis of the Marangoni instability of a deformable interface between two fluid layers of finite depths, submitted to a gradient of solvent concentration induced by the evaporation [2]. Qualitative comparison with experimental observations of spin-coating processes of solution of two immiscible polymers are then performed, yielding satisfactory agreement.[0pt] [1] G. A. Buxton and N.Clarke, Europhysics Letters, 78, 56006, 2007.[0pt] [2] M. Souche and N. Clarke, European Physical Journal E, in press.

  16. Theoretical model for the evaporation loss of PM2.5 during filter sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Sih-Fan; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Wu, Yueh-Chuen; Chen, Chung-Fang

    2015-05-01

    The evaporation losses of PM2.5 particles in eight different size ranges corresponding to the 4th-10th stages and after filter of the MOUDI were calculated theoretically and then integrated to obtain the total PM2.5 evaporation loss. Results show that when PM2.5 particles are nearly neutral with pH in the range of 7-8, the evaporated concentrations predicted by the present model agree well with the experimental data with an average absolute difference of 20.2 ± 11.1%. When PM2.5 aerosols are acidic with pH less than 3.5, additional loss of nitrate and chloride can occur due to chemical interactions between collected particles and strong acids which are not considered in the present model. Under pH neutral conditions, the theoretical model was then used to examine the effect of PM2.5 concentration, gas-to-particle ratio, ambient temperature and relative humidity on the extent of evaporation loss. Results show that evaporated PM2.5 concentration increases with increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity, PM2.5 concentration and gas-to-particle ratio.

  17. Effects of the local structure dependence of evaporation fields on field evaporation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lan; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Withrow, Travis; Restrepo, Oscar D.; Windl, Wolfgang

    2015-12-14

    Accurate three dimensional reconstructions of atomic positions and full quantification of the information contained in atom probe microscopy data rely on understanding the physical processes taking place during field evaporation of atoms from needle-shaped specimens. However, the modeling framework for atom probe microscopy has only limited quantitative justification. Building on the continuum field models previously developed, we introduce a more physical approach with the selection of evaporation events based on density functional theory calculations. This model reproduces key features observed experimentally in terms of sequence of evaporation, evaporation maps, and depth resolution, and provides insights into the physical limit for spatial resolution.

  18. Etude sur les tendons en materiaux composites et leur application aux ancrages postcontraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennouf, Adil

    L'objectif general de la presente these est d'evaluer le comportement a l'arrachement et au fluage d'ancrages injectes constitues de tendons en materiaux composites afin d'etablir des recommandations plus appropriees et realistes pour le dimensionnement et la conception. Quatre types de tendons en materiaux composites, deux a base de fibres d'aramide et deux a base de fibres de carbone, ont ete utilises dans l'etude. Les travaux de recherche de cette these ont porte notamment sur: (I) Une caracterisation physique et mecanique des tendons en materiaux composites utilises dans l'etude. (II) Une etude en laboratoire sur les coulis de scellement. La premiere etape de cette etude a concerne le developpement d'un coulis de scellement performant adapte aux tendons en materiaux composites et a differentes situations d'injection. La seconde etape a traite des essais de caracterisations physique et mecanique du coulis de scellement developpe comparativement a trois coulis de scellement usuels d'un meme rapport E/L de 0,4. (III) Une etude sur des modeles reduits d'ancrages injectes. (IV) Une etude sur des modeles d'ancrages a grande echelle. La synthese de ces etudes a permis d'enoncer les principales conclusions suivantes: (1) Les valeurs moyennes des charges de rupture des tendons en materiaux composites ont ete de 1% a 29% superieures a celles specifiees par les manufacturiers. (2) L'etude sur les coulis de scellement a permis le developpement de coulis de ciment repondant aux criteres fixes, soient une grande stabilite, une bonne fluidite, une legere expansion et de bonnes caracteristiques mecaniques. (3) Les tendons en materiaux composites ont montre des contraintes d'adherence maximum superieures a celles des tendons en acier. (4) Le type de fibre, la configuration et le fini de surface des tendons en materiaux composites gouvernent leur resistance a l'adherence. (5) L'introduction de sable et d'autres ajouts comme les fines de silice et la poudre d'aluminium au coulis

  19. The effects of evaporating essential oils on indoor air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Huey-Jen; Chao, Chung-Jen; Chang, Ho-Yuan; Wu, Pei-Chih

    Essential oils, predominantly comprised of a group of aromatic chemicals, have attracted increasing attention as they are introduced into indoor environments through various forms of consumer products via different venues. Our study aimed to characterize the profiles and concentrations of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when evaporating essential oils indoors. Three popular essential oils in the market, lavender, eucalyptus, and tea tree, based on a nation-wide questionnaire survey, were tested. Specific aromatic compounds of interest were sampled during evaporating the essential oils, and analyzed by GC-MS. Indoor carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), and particulate matters (PM 10) were measured by real-time, continuous monitors, and duplicate samples for airborne fungi and bacteria were collected in different periods of the evaporation. Indoor CO (average concentration 1.48 vs. 0.47 ppm at test vs. background), CO 2 (543.21 vs. 435.47 ppm), and TVOCs (0.74 vs. 0.48 ppm) levels have increased significantly after evaporating essential oils, but not the PM 10 (2.45 vs. 2.42 ppm). The anti-microbial activity on airborne microbes, an effect claimed by the use of many essential oils, could only be found at the first 30-60 min after the evaporation began as the highest levels of volatile components in these essential oils appeared to emit into the air, especially in the case of tea tree oil. High emissions of linalool (0.092-0.787 mg m -3), eucalyptol (0.007-0.856 mg m -3), D-limonene (0.004-0.153 mg m -3), ρ-cymene (0.019-0.141 mg m -3), and terpinene-4-ol-1 (0.029-0.978 mg m -3), all from the family of terpenes, were observed, and warranted for further examination for their health implications, especially for their potential contribution to the increasing indoor levels of secondary pollutants such as formaldehyde and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in the presence of ozone.

  20. Interfacial phenomena in droplet evaporation and nanoparticle-cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohua

    2005-11-01

    The factors affecting droplet evaporation are discussed. It is found that the droplet morphology at a specific temperature is controlled by the physical properties of the liquid itself, such as the molecular weight, density, diffusion coefficient in air, and heat of vaporization. Two processes are included in droplet evaporation: (1) diffusion of liquid molecules into the air (diffusion part) and (2) flow of the liquid molecules from inside the droplet to the free outer shell liquid layer within the liquid-vapor interface (energy part). The diffusion part remains steady during drying and was not sensitive to the variation of temperature. The energy part, however, was an active factor and determined the differences in drop evaporation behaviors. A model is developed to measure the solubility parameters of the solvents via droplet evaporation. Droplets were deposited on Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) covered silicon surfaces and the contact angle and overall drop morphology are observed using a KSV contact angle goniometer as a function of time. OTS is considered a non-absorbing surface for the solvents examined and does not affect the accuracy of the measured results. This method allows determination of the attraction forces between solvent molecules in the condensed phases. The solubility parameter values of droplets containing pure water, methanol, ethanol and butanol are measured. The test results are independent of the droplet size. The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA is studied. Simultaneously, the DNA re-distribution and adsorption kinetics are measured by confocal microscopy. The DNA droplets are stained with ethidium bromide solution and deposited on OTS covered silicon surfaces. The results showed that the drying behavior depended on the DNA concentration. During drying, DNA relocation inside of the drop affects the internal forces of the liquid. A ring is formed at the air/solid/liquid interface. The absorbed amount of DNA was obtained by

  1. A Rinsing Effluent Evaporator for Dismantling Operations - 13271

    SciTech Connect

    Rives, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Between 1958 and 1997, the UP1 plant at Marcoule - located in the south of France - reprocessed and recycled nearly 20,000 MT of used fuel from special defense applications reactors, as well as fuel from the first generation of electricity generating reactors in France (natural uranium fuel, CO{sub 2}-cooled, graphite-moderated). Decommissioning and Dismantling of the UP1 plant and its associated units started in 1998. Since 2005, the UP1 facility has been operated by AREVA as the Marcoule Management and Operation contractor for French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). An important part of this decommissioning program deals with the vitrification facility of Marcoule. This facility includes 20 tanks devoted to interim storage of highly active solutions, prior to vitrification. In 2006, a rinsing program was defined as part of the tank cleanup strategy. The main objective of the rinsing phases was to decrease activity in order to limit the volume of 'long-life active' waste produced during the decommissioning operations, so the tanks can be dismantled without the need of remote operations. To enable this rinsing program, and anticipating large volumes of generated effluent, the construction of an evaporation unit proved to be essential. The main objective of this unit was to concentrate the effluent produced during tank rinsing operations by a factor of approximately 10, prior to it being treated by vitrification. The evaporator design phase was launched in September 2006. The main challenge for the Project team was the installation of this new unit within a nuclear facility still in operation and in existing compartments not initially designed for this purpose. Cold operating tests were completed in 2008, and in May 2009, the final connections to the process were activated to start the hot test phase. During the first hot test operations performed on the first batches of clean-up effluent, the evaporator had a major operating problem. Extremely large quantities of

  2. Singing as a Therapeutic Agent, inThe Etude, 1891-1949.

    PubMed

    Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The Etude music magazine, founded by Theodore Presser, was one of a number of popular music magazines published in the years prior to the establishment of the music therapy profession in 1950. During its publication run from 1883 to 1957, over 100 music therapy related articles appeared, including 13 on the health benefits of singing published between 1891 and 1949. Written by authors with diverse backgrounds, such as the famous Battle Creek, Michigan physician John Harvey Kellogg and Boston music critic Louis C. Elson, the articles contained consistent and adamant support regarding the health benefits of singing. The advantages described were both physical and psychological, and were recommended prophylactically for well persons and therapeutically for ill persons. Although the articles varied in perspective, from philosophical to theoretical to pedagogical, there is a consistent holistic medicine theme that appeared almost ahead of its time and no doubt linked to the push for vocal music education in that era. The importance of The Etude in promulgating ideas that helped shape the early practice of music therapy should not be underestimated. For much of its publication run The Etude was the largest music periodical in print, reaching its peak circulation of 250,000 copies per month in 1924.

  3. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    PubMed

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  4. Thermocapillary transport of energy during water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; Badam, V K; Durst, F; Ward, C A

    2005-11-01

    When evaporation occurs at a spherical water-vapor interface maintained at the circular mouth of a small funnel, studies of the energy transport have indicated that thermal conduction alone does not provide enough energy to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. If the Gibbs model of the interface is adopted and the "surface-thermal capacity" is assigned a value of 30.6+/-0.8 kJ/(m2 K), then for evaporation experiments with the interfacial temperature in the range -10 degrees C< or =TLV< or =3.5 degrees C and Marangoni number (Ma) in the range 100evaporated at cylindrical interfaces that were, on average, 4.4 times larger in area than that of the spherical interfaces used to measure the surface-thermal capacity initially. It is shown that using the value of the surface-thermal capacity determined at a spherical interface, the energy transported by thermocapillary convection and thermal conduction at a cylindrical interface is sufficient to evaporate the liquid at the observed rate. Knowing the value of the surface-thermal capacity also allows the local evaporation flux to be calculated from the measured temperature profiles in the liquid and vapor phases. The calculated local evaporation flux can then be used with statistical rate theory to calculate the vapor-phase pressure along the interface. The predicted mean vapor-phase pressure is in close agreement with that measured, and the predicted pressure gradient is consistent with that expected when thermocapillary convection is present.

  5. Evaporating Atmospheres Around Close-in Exoplanets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J.; Jackson, A.; Wu, Y.; Adams, F.

    2014-12-01

    The majority of currently observed exoplanets appear exceeding close to the central star (<0.1 AU) and as such are subject to intense high energy radiation from UV & X-ray photons. We will discuss that in such environments the atmospheres these planets are heated sufficiently that they can escape the planet's gravitational field in a hydrodynamic trans-sonic wind. We will show that this hydrodynamic mass-loss occurs for the majority of exoplanets at short periods, and for low-mass planets (<50 Mearth) is vigorous enough to significantly alter the planet's evolution. In some cases we will argue that an originally gas rich exoplanet can be completely evaporated leaving behind a bare rock core. In addition, we will present new multi-dimensional simulations of evaporation that include realistic treatment of the radiative transfer. These new simulations show that evaporation from 'hot' Jupiters is likely to be magnetically controlled, where mass-loss can only occur along open filed lines, where the interaction between the stellar and planetary magnetic field strongly controls the geometry of the evaporative flow. We will indicate how these new multi-dimensional radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations can be used to study the time-dependence of the outflow and link the small but growing number of observations of exoplanet evaporation to the theoretical models. Finally, we will indicate that asymmetric evaporative flows can lead to orbital evolution of planets at close separations. Figure Caption: "Flow structure from an evaporating Hot Jupiter with a magnetic field strength of 0.3 Gauss. Top panels show density and magnetic field configuration and bottom panel shows plasma beta and velocity structure; left panels show simulation domain, right panels show a zoom in on the planet."

  6. Model of spontaneous evaporating droplet on solid horizontal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin, S. Z.; Nagornov, O. V.; Trifonenkov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    Free evaporation of sessile liquid non-isothermal drop on solid substrate is analyzed. Exact formulae for temperature and concentration fields are found out as functions of dimensionless parameters. The non-uniform temperature distribution at the drop surface creates the thermocapillar Marangonni forces that change their direction in the vicinity of stagnation points. Direction of the forces and disposition of the stagnation points are derived as function of contact angle and thermodynamic parameters of model. Conditions for the stagnation points to appear are found out. Moreover, maximal value of contact angle corresponding to presence of stagnation points in droplet is calculated as a function of the thermal conductivity ratio.

  7. Waste volume reduction factors for potential 242-A evaporator feed

    SciTech Connect

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1995-05-04

    Double-shell tank (DST) storage space requirements have been shown to be highly dependent on the end point of 242-A operations. Consequences to the DST of various waste volumes, and concentrations, are evaluated. Only waste streams that are currently planned to be stored in the DST system before the year 2004 are discussed. As of January 1, 1995, approximately 27-million L (7.2-million gal) of dilute wastes are stored in the DSTs available for evaporator processing. Waste streams planned to be transferred to the DSTs before December 31, 2004, are identified. The DST volume for storing slurry from these wastes is presented in this document. At a final slurry specific gravity of -1.35, 22.5-million L (5.93-million gal) of DST space would be needed on December 31, 2004, to store the product from evaporator processing of these feedstocks. The expected volume needed if the resultant slurry were concentrated to the traditional double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) phase boundary (a specific gravity of {approximately}1.5) would be 17.7-million L (4.67-million gal). An additional 4.8-million L (1.26-million gal) is therefore needed if these wastes are concentrated to a specific gravity of 1.35 instead of the DSSF limit.

  8. Diffusion and evaporation of nitrogen on tungsten (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Coulman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Surface diffusion and evaporation from a layer of nitrogen chemisorbed on the (100) plane of tungsten was examined using Auger spectroscopy. The initial localized deposit required for diffusion measurements in a concentration gradient is created by a highly collimated molecular beam. The sample, under computer control, is moved across an electron beam, and the Auger spectra are recorded automatically at different points on the surface. Nitrogen diffusion over the (100) tungsten surface was found to be concentration independent, taking place over a barrier of 28 kcal/mole with a prefactor D/sub 0/ of 3.0 x 10/sup -2/cm/sup -2//sec. At temperatures 900 to 1050 K necessary to observe spreading on the order of 50-100 ..mu..m in the concentration profile, evaporation was found to be a competing process. Therefore, the desorption kinetics of ..beta.. chemisorbed nitrogen on W(100) was studied by a combination of Auger spectroscopy and flash desorption. The activation energy for desorption was found to be 82 kcal/mole with a prefactor of 0.01 molecules/(cm/sup 2/sec). A comparison with the diffusion of nitrogen on the W(110) surface is made, showing for the first time the effect of surface structure on the diffusion of a chemisorbed gas on a solid surface.

  9. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. FLASH EVAPORATOR, CONDENSER (PROJECT FROM EVAPORATOR), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. FLASH EVAPORATOR, CONDENSER (PROJECT FROM EVAPORATOR), AND STEAM EJECTOR (ALONG REAR WALL). INL NEGATIVE NO. 4377. M.H. Bartz, Photographer, 3/5/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R{sub ⊕}. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M

  11. Kepler Planets: A Tale of Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Wu, Yanqin

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ~0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R ⊕. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ~0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M ⊕ and the

  12. Evaporation and reference evapotranspiration trends in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Wild, Martin; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Calbó, Josep; Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Moran-Tejeda, Enrique; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Interest is growing in the trends of atmospheric evaporation demand, increasing the need for long-term time series. In this study, we first describe the development of a dataset on evaporation in Spain based on long-term series of Piché and pan measurement records. Piché measurements have been reported for >50 stations since the 1960s. Measurements of pan evaporation, which is a much more widely studied variable in the literature, are also available, but only since 1984 for 21 stations. Particular emphasis was placed on the homogenization of this dataset (for more details, we refer to Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2014, Clim Res, 61: 269-280). Both the mean annual Piché and pan series over Spain showed evaporative increases during the common study period (1985-2011). Furthermore, using the annual Piché records since the 1960s, an evaporation decline was detected from the 1960s to the mid-1980s, which resulted in a non-significant trend over the entire 1961-2011 period. Our results indicate agreement between the decadal variability of reference evapotranspiration (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2014, Glob Planet Chang, 121: 26-40) and surface solar radiation (Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013, Glob Planet Chang, 100: 343-352) and the evaporation from Piché and pan measurements since the mid-1980s, especially during summer. Nevertheless, this agreement needs attention, as Piché evaporimeters are inside meteorological screens and not directly exposed to radiation. Thus, as Piché readings are mainly affected by the aerodynamic term in Penman's evaporation equation and pan records are affected by both the heat balance and aerodynamic terms, the results suggest that both terms must be highly and positively correlated in Spain. In order to check this hypothesis, the radiative and aerodynamic components were estimated using the Penman's equation. The results show that the relationship with the radiative components is weaker than that with the aerodynamic component for both pan and

  13. Marangoni Convection and Deviations from Maxwells' Evaporation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, P. N.; Snell, E. H.; Adamek, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the convective dynamics of evaporating pools of volatile liquids using an ultra-sensitive thermal imaging camera. During evaporation, there are significant convective flows inside the liquid due to Marangoni forces. We find that Marangoni convection during evaporation can dramatically affect the evaporation rates of volatile liquids. A simple heat balance model connects the convective velocities and temperature gradients to the evaporation rates.

  14. Marangoni Convection and Deviations from Maxwells' Evaporation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, P. N.; Snell, E. H.; Adamek, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the convective dynamics of evaporating pools of volatile liquids using an ultra-sensitive thermal imaging camera. During evaporation, there are significant convective flows inside the liquid due to Marangoni forces. We find that Marangoni convection during evaporation can dramatically affect the evaporation rates of volatile liquids. A simple heat balance model connects the convective velocities and temperature gradients to the evaporation rates.

  15. Evaporation rate of PTFE liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, A.; Erbil, H. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Liquid marbles are hydrophilic liquid drops encapsulated with a hydrophobic powder. They behave as micro-reservoirs of liquids able to move rapidly without any leakage and are promising candidates to be applied in genetic analysis where 2D microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip methods are used. The manipulation of liquid marbles using gravitational, electrostatic and magnetic fields were recently investigated. In this work, we determined the evaporation rates of PTFE marbles formed by encapsulating PTFE micropowder on a water droplet in a closed chamber where relative humidity and temperature was kept constant. Evaporation rates of PTFE marbles were compared with the rates of pure water droplets in terms of evaporation resistance, ϕ parameter and it was found that PTFE marbles have longer life-time than water droplets so that ϕ values were found to increase regularly from 0.365 to 0.627 with the increase of RH of the evaporating medium. The barrier effect of PTFE microparticles at the water-air interface was more effective when water was evaporating slowly. PTFE water marbles have life-time of 26-60 min to retain their spherical shape under normal atmospheric conditions which is suitable for many promising applications in microfluidics, genetic analysis, electromagnetic actuators and valves.

  16. Gravity Effects in Condensing and Evaporating Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Som, S. M.; Allen, J. S.; Pedersen, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    A general overview of gravity effects in condensing and evaporating films is presented. The topics include: 1) Research Overview; 2) NASA Recognizes Critical Need for Condensation & Evaporation Research to Enable Human Exploration of Space; 3) Condensation and Evaporation Research in Reduced Gravity is Enabling for AHST Technology Needs; 4) Differing Role of Surface Tension on Condensing/Evaporating Film Stability; 5) Fluid Mechanisms in Condensing and Evaporating Films in Reduced Gravity; 6) Research Plan; 7) Experimental Configurations for Condensing Films; 8) Laboratory Condensation Test Cell; 9) Aircraft Experiment; 10) Condensation Study Current Test Conditions; 11) Diagnostics; 12) Shadowgraph Images of Condensing n- pentane Film in Unstable (-1g) Configuration; 13) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) at Constant Pressure; 14) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) with Cyclic Pressure; 15) Non-condensing Pumped Film in Normal Gravity (-1g); 16) Heat Transfer Coefficient in Developing, Unstable Condensing Film in Normal Gravity; 17) Heat Transfer for Unsteady Condensing Film (-1g); 18) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Stable (+1g) Configuration; and 19) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Unstable (-1g) Configuration.

  17. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  18. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

    2011-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  19. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-03-20

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm(2)), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50 kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm(2)) than by the smaller (1 nm(2)) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube.

  1. Evaporation Heat Transfer of Ammonia/Water Mixtures for Plate Type Evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibe, Mitsuteru; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    The performance test of plate type evaporators was carried out. Ammonia/Water mixtures were utilized as working fluid and warm water was utilized as heat source. Five kinds of ammonia mass fraction are tested. The overall heat transfer coefficient of ammonia/water mixtures was lower than the pure ammonia in the same experimental condition. In the convection dominant region, the mean evaporation heat transfer of ammonia/water mixtures was almost the same as ammonia by considering thermophysical properties. In the region where nucleate boiling contributes to the heat transfer, the mean evaporation heat transfer coefficient was influenced of mass fraction. An empirical correlation was proposed in order to predict the mean evaporation heat transfer coefficient of ammonia/water mixtures for plate type evaporators.

  2. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  3. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-11-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems.

  4. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems. PMID:26606898

  5. Evaporation of Water Droplets in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysokomornaya, O. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical solution of the problem of heat and mass transfer in evaporation of a droplet of water moving in a stream of high-temperature (up to 1200 K) gases is done on the basis of a system of nonlinear nonstationary partial differential equations describing conductive and radiative heat transfer in the droplet, as well as composite heat transfer at the ″liquid-gas″ interface. The values of the water evaporation rate have been determined. It is shown that the dependence of the evaporation rate on the droplet surface temperature has a nonlinear character. Characteristic relationships between the convective and radiative heat fluxes on the droplet surface (the radiative flux substantially exceeds the convective one; on decrease in the difference between the gas and droplet surface temperatures the difference between the radiative and convective heat fluxes decreases), the lifetimes (total evaporation) of droplets, as well as of the temperature and concentration of steam and gases in the vicinity of droplets have been determined. The calculated characteristics of the water droplet evaporation under conditions of high temperatures of the gas medium differ considerably from those obtained within the framework of the "diffusional" model of evaporation. A comparison of the results of numerical simulation with the experimental data obtained with the use of high-velocity panoramic optical methods of visualization by ″tracing particles″ is carried out.

  6. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-11-26

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems.

  7. Heating-Induced Evaporation of Nine Different Secondary Organic Aerosol Types.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Katheryn R; Li, Ziyue; Wilson, Kevin R; Cappa, Christopher D

    2015-10-20

    The volatility of the compounds comprising organic aerosol (OA) determines their distribution between the gas and particle phases. However, there is a disconnect between volatility distributions as typically derived from secondary OA (SOA) growth experiments and the effective particle volatility as probed in evaporation experiments. Specifically, the evaporation experiments indicate an overall much less volatile SOA. This raises questions regarding the use of traditional volatility distributions in the simulation and prediction of atmospheric SOA concentrations. Here, we present results from measurements of thermally induced evaporation of SOA for nine different SOA types (i.e., distinct volatile organic compound and oxidant pairs) encompassing both anthropogenic and biogenic compounds and O3 and OH to examine the extent to which the low effective volatility of SOA is a general phenomenon or specific to a subset of SOA types. The observed extents of evaporation with temperature were similar for all the SOA types and indicative of a low effective volatility. Furthermore, minimal variations in the composition of all the SOA types upon heating-induced evaporation were observed. These results suggest that oligomer decomposition likely plays a major role in controlling SOA evaporation, and since the SOA formation time scale in these measurements was less than a minute, the oligomer-forming reactions must be similarly rapid. Overall, these results emphasize the importance of accounting for the role of condensed phase reactions in altering the composition of SOA when assessing particle volatility.

  8. Heating-Induced Evaporation of Nine Different Secondary Organic Aerosol Types

    DOE PAGES

    Kolesar, Katheryn R.; Li, Ziyue; Wilson, Kevin R.; ...

    2015-09-22

    The volatility of the compounds comprising organic aerosol (OA) determines their distribution between the gas and particle phases. However, there is a disconnect between volatility distributions as typically derived from secondary OA (SOA) growth experiments and the effective particle volatility as probed in evaporation experiments. Specifically, the evaporation experiments indicate an overall much less volatile SOA. This raises questions regarding the use of traditional volatility distributions in the simulation and prediction of atmospheric SOA concentrations. Here, we present results from measurements of thermally induced evaporation of SOA for nine different SOA types (i.e., distinct volatile organic compound and oxidant pairs)more » encompassing both anthropogenic and biogenic compounds and O3 and OH to examine the extent to which the low effective volatility of SOA is a general phenomenon or specific to a subset of SOA types. The observed extents of evaporation with temperature were similar for all the SOA types and indicative of a low effective volatility. Furthermore, minimal variations in the composition of all the SOA types upon heating-induced evaporation were observed. These results suggest that oligomer decomposition likely plays a major role in controlling SOA evaporation, and since the SOA formation time scale in these measurements was less than a minute, the oligomer-forming reactions must be similarly rapid. Overall, these results emphasize the importance of accounting for the role of condensed phase reactions in altering the composition of SOA when assessing particle volatility.« less

  9. Evaporative Evolution of Carbonate-Rich Brines from Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Alai, M; Carroll, S A

    2004-04-14

    The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol%SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

  10. Volatility of organic aerosol: evaporation of ammonium sulfate/succinic acid aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Yli-Juuti, Taina; Zardini, Alessandro A; Eriksson, Axel C; Hansen, Anne Maria K; Pagels, Joakim H; Swietlicki, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Glasius, Marianne; Worsnop, Douglas R; Riipinen, Ilona; Bilde, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol.

  11. Volatility of Organic Aerosol: Evaporation of Ammonium Sulfate/Succinic Acid Aqueous Solution Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol. PMID:24107221

  12. Contact line and bulk velocities in evaporating micron-scale droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    The famous ``coffee stain'' phenomena is well known during the evaporation of a liquid droplet seeded with colloidal particles. However, the different phases of evaporation on a hydrophobic surface have not yet been fully explored and explained. In this experiment, evaporating micro-drops (diameter ~100 μm) are seeded with 300 nm red fluorescent particles and observed from below using epifluorescent microscopy. We observed four phases: (i) steady evaporation with the contact line retreating at a constant speed of ~2 μm/s (ii) stagnation of the contact line for several seconds; (iii) a sharp transition leading to fast evaporation with a rapidly retreating contact line, and (iv) final dry-out of the film leaving the particles immobilized on the substrate. These four phases of motion, as well as the pattern of the deposited nano-particles are strong functions of both the colloidal concentration and the static contact angle. Statistical Particle Tracking Velocimetry is used to quantify the velocity fields inside the micro-drop during the evaporation history.

  13. Measurements and simulations of the near-surface composition of evaporating ethanol-water droplets.

    PubMed

    Homer, Christopher J; Jiang, Xingmao; Ward, Timothy L; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Reid, Jonathan P

    2009-09-28

    The evolving composition of evaporating ethanol-water droplets (initially 32.6 or 45.3 microm radius) is probed by stimulated Raman scattering over the period 0.2 to 3 ms following droplet generation and with a surrounding nitrogen gas pressure in the range 10 to 100 kPa. The dependence of the evaporation rate on the relative humidity of the surrounding gas phase is also reported. The measured data are compared with both a quasi-steady state model and with numerical simulations of the evaporation process. Results from the numerical simulations are shown to agree closely with the measurements when the stimulated signal is assumed to arise from an outer shell with a probe depth of 2.9+/-0.4% of the droplet radius, consistent with a previous determination. Further, the time-dependent measurements are shown to be sensitive to the development of concentration gradients within evaporating droplets. This represents the first direct measurement of the spatial gradients in composition that arise during the evaporation of aerosol droplets and allows the influence of liquid phase diffusion within the condensed phase on droplet evaporation to be examined.

  14. Design for On-Sun Evaluation of Evaporator Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Colozza, Anthony; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    A heat pipe designed for operation as a solar power receiver should be optimized to accept the solar energy flux and transfer this heat into a reactor. Optical properties of the surface, thermal conductance of the receiver wall, contact resistance of the heat pipe wick, and other heat pipe wick properties ultimately define the maximum amount of power that can be extracted from the concentrated sunlight impinging on the evaporator surface. Modeling of solar power receivers utilizing optical and physical properties provides guidance to their design. On-sun testing is another important means of gathering information on performance. A test rig is being designed and built to conduct on-sun testing. The test rig is incorporating a composite strip mirror concentrator developed as part of a Small Business Innovative Research effort and delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center. In the strip concentrator numerous, lightweight composite parabolic strips of simple curvature were combined to form an array 1.5 m x 1.5 m in size. The line focus of each strip is superimposed in a central area simulating a point of focus. A test stand is currently being developed to hold the parabolic strip concentrator, track the sun, and turn the beam downward towards the ground. The hardware is intended to be sufficiently versatile to accommodate on-sun testing of several receiver concepts, including those incorporating heat pipe evaporators. Characterization devices are also being developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the solar concentrator, including a receiver designed to conduct calorimetry. This paper describes the design and the characterization devices of the on-sun test rig, and the prospect of coupling the concentrated sunlight to a heat pipe solar power receiver developed as part of another Small Business Innovative Research effort.

  15. Influence of Oil on Refrigerant Evaporator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong-Soo, Kim; Nagata, Katsuya; Katsuta, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kouichiro; Horichi, Toshiaki

    Compact heat exchager of serpentine type is mainly made of many straight and curved pipe, namely180°U-bend. In spite of the fact that almost half of heat transfer area is occupied by the curved section, up to now thermal and hydraulic characteritics of this section have been predicted assuming a straight tube. The existance of violent secondary flow and vortex, the flow direction circulating downward or upward, might be an important factor to determine the evaporator performance. In consideration to the above, in order to make clear the fundamental thermal and hydrauric characteristic, a study on two-phase refrigerant (R12) including lubrication oil (Suniso 5GS) effect on these in return bend (U-bend) have been made. The experiment was performed using a copper U-bend tube having an inner diameter of 8.7mm, thickness of 2mm and radius of curveture of 35.0mm. The total length of test section was 1965mm consisting of 655mm in upstream and downstream straight sections and 655mm in curved section. To confirm the uniform heat flux and uniform change of quality (0.1) at each heating section, seat-hed and flexible heater was wrapped around the outside of the test section. To observe the two phase flow regime, the transparent U-bend glass tube was used, instead of copper tube. The experment comporised systematic variation of mass velocity (100-250 kg/m2·s), mass concentration of lubrication oil (0-9%) and thermal equilibrium vapor quality (0.1-1.2). During the experiment, temperature of outside wall and pressure drop were measured and flow pattern was observed. As the results, the flow disturbance at the downstream of U-bend was violent at the wavy and stratified flow regime and the strong effect of lubrication oil was observed. The local pressure drop at the bend was five times lager than at straight tube. This factor was increased with increasing oil concentration. Finally, the emprical correlation to predict the pressure drop was developed.

  16. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  17. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  18. Evaporative Cooling in a Holographic Atom Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    We present progress on evaporative cooling of Rb-87 atoms in our Holographic Atom Trap (HAT). The HAT is formed by the interference of five intersecting YAG laser beams: atoms are loaded from a vapor-cell MOT into the bright fringes of the interference pattern through the dipole force. The interference pattern is composed of Talbot fringes along the direction of propagation of the YAG beams, prior to evaporative cooling each Talbot fringe contains 300,000 atoms at 50 micro-K and peak densities of 2 x 10(exp 14)/cu cm. Evaporative cooling is achieved through adiabatically decreasing the intensity of the YAG laser. We present data and calculations covering a range of HAT geometries and cooling procedures.

  19. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  20. Etude theorique des fluctuations structurales dans les composes organiques a dimensionnalite reduite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Benoit

    Les systemes a dimensionnalite reduite constituent maintenant une branche entiere de la physique de la matiere condensee. Cette derniere s'est developpee rapidement au cours des dernieres annees, avec la decouverte des materiaux organiques qui presentent, justement, des proprietes physiques fortement anisotropes. Cette these presente une etude en trois parties de plusieurs composes organiques qui, bien que tres differents du point de vue de leurs compositions chimiques et de leurs proprietes physiques a haute temperature, subissent tous une instabilite structurale a tres basse temperature. De plus, dans chacun des cas, l'instabilite structurale est precedee d'un important regime fluctuatif a partir duquel les proprietes physiques changent de maniere significative. Notre etude suit un ordre chronologique inverse puisque nous nous attardons en premier lieu au cas de composes recemment decouverts: les composes de la famille des (BCPTTF)2X (X = PF6 , AsF6). Ces derniers sont des isolants magnetiques a la temperature ambiante et subissent une instabilite structurale de type spin-Peierls a une temperature appelee TSP. En particulier, nous nous interessons a l'etude des proprietes physiques de ces systemes dans le regime fluctuatif, qui precede cette instabilite. Notre etude theorique nous permet de comprendre en detail comment ces systemes s'approchent de l'instabilite struturale. Dans la seconde partie de cette these, nous etudions le regime fluctuatif (pre-transitionnel) observe experimentalement dans le compose de (TMTTF)2PF6. Ce compose organique, dont la structure s'apparente aux sels de Bechgaard, subit une instabilite de type spin-Peierls a une temperature T SP = 19K. Bien que ce compose possede la particularite d'etre un bon conducteur a la temperature ambiante, il subit une transition de type Mott-Hubbard a une temperature Trho ≈ 220K et devient alors un isolant magnetique, analogue aux composes de la famille des (BCPTTF)2X. Le regime fluctuatif precedant l

  1. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  2. Evaporation control research, 1955-58

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruse, Robert R.; Harbeck, Guy Earl

    1960-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two compounds and compositions of matter were screened as potential evaporation retardants. The homologous straight-chain fatty alkanols are considered the best materials for retardants. Several methods of application of the alkanols to the reservoir surface were investigated. Although wick-type drippers for the application of liquids and cage rafts for the application of solids appear to be the most promising methods from an economic standpoint, both methods have serious disadvantages. Considerable study was given to reducing biochemical oxidation of the evaporation retardants. Copper in several forms was found adequate as a bacteriostatic agent but posed a potential hazard because of its toxicity. Many other bactericides that were tested were also toxic. Two sets of large-scale field tests have been completed and several others are still in progress. On the larger reservoirs, the reduction of evaporation was not more than 20 percent under the prevailing conditions and the application procedure used. Three major practical problems remain; namely, the effects and action of wind on the monofilm, the effects of biochemical oxidation, and the most effective method of application. Fundamental problems remaining include the effects of various impurities, and the composition of the best evaporation retardant; the long-range effects of monofilms on the limnology of a reservoir, including the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide; toxicological aspects of all components of any evaporation-retardant composition, plus toxicology of any composition chosen for large-scale use; and further studies of the calorimetry and thermodynamics involved in the mechanism of evaporation and its reduction by a monofilm.

  3. Modelling of influential parameters on a continuous evaporation process by Doehlert shells

    PubMed Central

    Porte, Catherine; Havet, Jean-Louis; Daguet, David

    2003-01-01

    The modelling of the parameters that influence the continuous evaporation of an alcoholic extract was considered using Doehlert matrices. The work was performed with a wiped falling film evaporator that allowed us to study the influence of the pressure, temperature, feed flow and dry matter of the feed solution on the dry matter contents of the resulting concentrate, and the productivity of the process. The Doehlert shells were used to model the influential parameters. The pattern obtained from the experimental results was checked allowing for some dysfunction in the unit. The evaporator was modified and a new model applied; the experimental results were then in agreement with the equations. The model was finally determined and successfully checked in order to obtain an 8% dry matter concentrate with the best productivity; the results fit in with the industrial constraints of subsequent processes. PMID:18924887

  4. Modelling of influential parameters on a continuous evaporation process by Doehlert shells.

    PubMed

    Fauduet, Henri; Porte, Catherine; Havet, Jean-Louis; Daguet, David

    2003-01-01

    The modelling of the parameters that influence the continuous evaporation of an alcoholic extract was considered using Doehlert matrices. The work was performed with a wiped falling film evaporator that allowed us to study the influence of the pressure, temperature, feed flow and dry matter of the feed solution on the dry matter contents of the resulting concentrate, and the productivity of the process. The Doehlert shells were used to model the influential parameters. The pattern obtained from the experimental results was checked allowing for some dysfunction in the unit. The evaporator was modified and a new model applied; the experimental results were then in agreement with the equations. The model was finally determined and successfully checked in order to obtain an 8% dry matter concentrate with the best productivity; the results fit in with the industrial constraints of subsequent processes.

  5. Evaporation of particles from hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejun, He; Jianshi, Wu; Wolfgang, Nörenberg

    1988-11-01

    For particle evaporation from hot nuclei a model is proposed which is applicable to high excitation energies where the mean free path of nucleons becomes comparable to or smaller than the size of the nucleus. The formalism allows to calculate the time evolution of the emitting system and the evaporation rates and spectra of the emitted particles. The nucleus 133Cs with an initial temperature of 18 MeV is studied as an example. Implications for intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions are indicated.

  6. Evaporation-induced assembly of biomimetic polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Joseph; Junkin, Michael; Cappello, Joseph; Wu Xiaoyi; Wong, Pak Kin

    2008-07-14

    We report an evaporation assisted plasma lithography (EAPL) process for guided self-assembly of a biomimetic silk-elastinlike protein (SELP). We demonstrate the formation of SELP structures from millimeter to submicrometer range on plasma-treatment surface templates during an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The self-assembly processes at different humidities and droplet volumes were investigated. The process occurs efficiently in a window of optimized operating conditions found to be at 70% relative humidity and 8 {mu}l volume of SELP solution. The EAPL approach provides a useful technique for the realization of functional devices and systems using these biomimetic materials.

  7. Do black holes really evaporate thermally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, F. J.

    1980-09-01

    The Raychaudhuri equation is used to analyze the effect of the Hawking radiation back reaction upon a black-hole event horizon. It is found that if the effective stress-energy tensor of the Hawking radiation has negative energy density as expected, then an evaporating black hole initially a solar mass in size must disappear in less than a second. This implies that either the evaporation process, if it occurs at all, must be quite different from what is commonly supposed, or else black-hole event horizons - and hence black holes - do not exist.

  8. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2010-07-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  9. Hot air drum evaporator. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Black, R.L.

    1980-11-12

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  10. A parameterization of the evaporation of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Michael E.; Oh, Jai-Ho; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    A general theoretical expression for the rainfall rate and the total evaporation rate as a function of the distance below cloud base is developed, and is then specialized to the gamma raindrop size distribution. The theoretical framework is used to analyze the data of Rosenfeld and Mintz (1988) on the radar observations of the rainfall rate as a function of the distance below cloud base, for rain falling from continental convective cells in central South Africa, obtaining a parameterization for the evaporation of rainfall.

  11. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  12. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  13. Statistical Model of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth; LeClercq, Patrick; Bellan, Josette

    2007-01-01

    An improved statistical model has been developed to describe the chemical composition of an evaporating multicomponent- liquid drop and of the mixture of gases surrounding the drop. The model is intended for use in computational simulations of the evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels, which are typically mixtures of as many as hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds. The present statistical model is an approximation designed to afford results that are accurate enough to contribute to understanding of the simulated physical and chemical phenomena, without imposing an unduly large computational burden.

  14. Black hole evaporation in conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Modesto, Leonardo; Porey, Shiladitya; Rachwał, Lesław

    2017-09-01

    We study the formation and the evaporation of a spherically symmetric black hole in conformal gravity. From the collapse of a spherically symmetric thin shell of radiation, we find a singularity-free non-rotating black hole. This black hole has the same Hawking temperature as a Schwarzschild black hole with the same mass, and it completely evaporates either in a finite or in an infinite time, depending on the ensemble. We consider the analysis both in the canonical and in the micro-canonical statistical ensembles. Last, we discuss the corresponding Penrose diagram of this physical process.

  15. Breakthrough Video: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) invented a breakthrough technology that improves air conditioning in a novel way—with heat. NREL combined desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90% less electricity and up to 80% less total energy than traditional air conditioning (AC). This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings.

  16. Forced flow evaporator for unusual gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niggemann, Richard E. (Inventor); Ellis, Wilbert E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low efficiency heat transfer in evaporators subject to unusual gravitational conditions is avoided through the use of a spiral evaporator conduit 12 receiving at an inlet 14 a vaporizable coolant at least partly in the liquid phase. Flow of the coolant through the conduit 12 demists the coolant by centrifuging the liquid phase against a pressurre wall 44 of the conduit 12. Vapor flow 40 induces counterrotating vortices 46, 48 which circulate the liquid phase coolant around the interior of the conduit 12 to wet all surfaces thereof.

  17. Direct Evaporative Precooling Model and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Ally, Moonis Raza; Rice, C Keith; Craddick, William G

    2011-01-01

    Evaporative condenser pre-cooling expands the availability of energy saving, cost-effective technology options (market engagement) and serves to expedite the range of options in upcoming codes and equipment standards (impacting regulation). Commercially available evaporative pre-coolers provide a low cost retrofit for existing packaged rooftop units, commercial unitary split systems, and air cooled chillers. We map the impact of energy savings and peak energy reduction in the 3 building types (medium office, secondary school, and supermarket) in 16 locations for three building types with four pad effectivenesses and show the effect for HVAC systems using either refrigerants R22 or R410A

  18. Sample Analysis Results for a Benchscale Evaporator Test Using a Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, D.M.

    2003-08-25

    This report provides the analytical results of samples taken during the low-activity waste evaporator process demonstration conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center with a 15-liter sample of Hanford tank 241-AN102 pretreated radioactive supernate. The objective of the task was to determine the concentration of various organic, inorganic and radionuclide constituents of potential concern and physical properties of the evaporator feed, concentrate, condensate and off gas for the Hanford River Protection Project. Over 150 samples and blanks were collected and analyzed in accordance with EPA methods. One hundred nineteen target organic analyze concentrations were shown to be less than the minimum quantitative limits in all samples (feed, concentrate, condensate, and off gas samples).Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was present in evaporator samples. THF was the most concentrated volatile compound detected in the off gas. No pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in any evaporator sample. Very low levels of some dioxins and furans were reported in the off-gas samples, but are thought to have been due to contamination. Most of the sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analyses provided results with sufficient pedigree to support the rigor associated with regulatory application of these results.

  19. On the kinetics of body versus end evaporation and addition of supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nitin S; van der Schoot, Paul

    2017-06-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of supramolecular polymers is dictated by how monomers, dimers, trimers etc., attach to and detach from each other. It is for this reasons that researchers have proposed a plethora of pathways to explain the kinetics of various self-assembling supramolecules, including sulfur, linear micelles, living polymers and protein fibrils. Recent observations hint at the importance of a hitherto ignored molecular aggregation pathway that we refer to as "body evaporation and addition". In this pathway, monomers can enter at or dissociate from any point along the backbone of the polymer. In this paper, we compare predictions for the well-established end evaporation and addition pathway with those that we obtained for the newly proposed body evaporation and addition model. We quantify the lag time, characteristic of nucleated reversible polymerisation, in terms of the time it takes to obtain half of the steady-state polymerised fraction and the apparent growth rate at that point, and obtain power laws for both as a function of the total monomer concentration. We find, perhaps not entirely unexpectedly, that the body evaporation and addition pathway speeds up the relaxation of the polymerised monomeric mass relative to that of the end evaporation and addition. However, the presence of the body evaporation and addition pathway does not affect the dependence of the lag time on the total monomer concentration and it remains the same as that for the case of end evaporation and addition. The scaling of the lag time with the forward rate is different for the two models, suggesting that they may be distinguished experimentally.

  20. Impact of type of salt and ambient conditions on saline water evaporation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri-Kuehni, Salomé M. S.; Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Webb, Colin; Shokri, Nima

    2017-07-01

    Saline water evaporation from porous media is important in many processes such as soil salinization, CO2 sequestration, crop production and water management. This process is influenced by the transport properties of porous media, properties of the evaporating solution and external conditions. In this work, we investigated the effects of external conditions and type of salt on the drying behaviour of sandy media and on the dynamics of surface salt precipitation. To do so, a comprehensive series of evaporation experiments were conducted using 33 columns packed with sand saturated with salt solutions. The evaporation experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber to investigate the effects of relative humidity, ambient temperature and type of salt on the evaporation process. Sodium Chloride, Calcium Chloride and Potassium Iodide with a wide range of concentration were used to saturate the sand columns mounted on digital balances. A digital camera was fixed at the surface of the sand packs to record the dynamics of salt precipitation at the surface. The results provide further confirmation that ambient conditions are the controlling factors during stage-1 evaporation of pure water. Additionally, the minor impact of the presence of precipitated salt at the surface on the saline water evaporation during the early stages of the process is discussed. Strong correlations between the cumulative water losses and the precipitation at the surface were found under different ambient conditions. The results obtained from different types of salt highlight the significant influence of the relationship between the saturated vapour pressure and salt concentration on the general dynamics of the process.

  1. Evaporation in dense suspension droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2014-11-01

    When a drop on a solid surface dries, a variety of drying dynamics emerge eventually. Here we show how colloidal particles affect drying dynamics in colloidal suspensions. By comparing drying dynamics of pure and colloidal fluids using confocal microscopy and mass balance, we demonstrate that the drying dynamics of colloidal fluids strongly depend on the colloid size and the initial concentration. The role of colloidal particles is complicated in the drying processes and related to the hydrodynamics for the porous medium. This work would offer clues for the dynamic nature of colloidal fluids and help to understand the drying-mediated processes such as spreading, painting, coating, and evapotranspiration. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  2. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Peterson, Keith; Zapata, Felipe, III; Dillon, Paul; Trevino, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future lunar extra-vehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using the Teflon membrane was tested successfully by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of the SWME development unit, which is being considered for service in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). Multiple PLSS SWME configurations were considered on the basis of thermal performance, mass, volume, and performance and manufacturing risk. All configurations were a variation of an alternating concentric water and vapor channel configuration or a stack of alternating rectangular water and vapor channels. Supporting thermal performance trades mapped maximum SWME heat rejection as a function of water channel thickness, vapor channel thickness, channel length, number of water channels, porosity of the membrane structural support, and backpressure valve throat area. Preliminary designs of each configuration were developed to determine total mass and volume as well as to understand manufacturing issues. Review of configurations led to the selection of a concentric annulus configuration that meets the requirements of 800 watts (W) of heat rejection. Detailed design of the SWME development unit will be followed by fabrication of a prototype test unit, with thermal testing expected to start in 2008.

  3. Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Kara; Kumar, Satish

    2011-11-01

    When a coffee droplet dries on a countertop, a dark ring of coffee solute is left behind, a phenomenon often referred to as ``the coffee-ring effect.'' A closely related yet less-well-explored phenomenon is the formation of a layer of particles, or skin, at the surface of the droplet. In this work, we explore the behavior of a mathematical model that can qualitatively describe both phenomena. We consider a thin axisymmetric droplet of a colloidal suspension on a horizontal substrate undergoing spreading and rapid evaporation. The lubrication approximation is applied to simplify the mass and momentum conservation equations, and the colloidal particles are allowed to influence droplet rheology through their effect on the viscosity. By describing the transport of the colloidal particles with the full convection-diffusion equation, we are able to capture depthwise gradients in particle concentration and thus describe skin formation, a feature neglected in prior models of droplet evaporation. Whereas capillarity creates a flow that drives particles to the contact line to produce a coffee-ring, Marangoni flows can compete with this and promote skin formation. Increases in viscosity due to particle concentration slow down droplet dynamics, and can lead to a significant reduction in the spreading rate.

  4. Fate of Potential Contaminants Due to Disposal of Olive Mill Wastewaters in Unprotected Evaporation Ponds.

    PubMed

    Kavvadias, V; Elaiopoulos, K; Theocharopoulos, Sid; Soupios, P

    2017-03-01

    The disposal of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) in shallow and unprotected evaporation ponds is a common, low-cost management practice, followed in Mediterranean countries. So far, the fate of potential soil pollutants in areas located near evaporation ponds is not adequately documented. This study investigates the extent in which the long-term disposal of OMW in evaporation ponds can affect the soil properties of the area located outside the evaporation pond and assesses the fate of the pollution loads of OMW. Four soil profiles situated outside and around the down slope side of the disposal area were excavated. The results showed considerable changes in concentration of soil phenols at the down-site soil profiles, due to the subsurface transport of the OMW. In addition, excessive concentrations of NH4(+), PO4(3-) and phenols were recorded in liquid samples taken from inside at the bottom of the soil profiles. It is concluded that unprotected evaporation ponds located in light texture soils pose a serious threat to favour soil and water pollution.

  5. Fluid flow and particle dynamics inside an evaporating droplet containing live bacteria displaying chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Thokchom, Ashish Kumar; Swaminathan, Rajaram; Singh, Anugrah

    2014-10-21

    Evaporation-induced particle deposition patterns like coffee rings provide easy visual identification that is beneficial for developing inexpensive and simple diagnostic devices for detecting pathogens. In this study, the effect of chemotaxis on such pattern formation has been realized experimentally in drying droplets of bacterial suspensions. We have investigated the velocity field, concentration profile, and deposition pattern in the evaporating droplet of Escherichia coli suspension in the presence and absence of nutrients. Flow visualization experiments using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carried out with E. coli bacteria as biological tracer particles. Experiments were conducted for suspensions of motile (live) as well as nonmotile (dead) bacteria. In the absence of any nutrient gradient like sugar on the substrate, both types of bacterial suspension showed two symmetric convection cells and a ring like deposition of particles after complete evaporation. Interestingly, the droplet containing live bacterial suspension showed a different velocity field when the sugar was placed at the base of the droplet. This can be attributed to the chemoattractant nature of the sugar, which induced chemotaxis among live bacteria targeted toward the nutrient site. Deposition of the suspended bacteria was also displaced toward the nutrient site as the evaporation proceeded. Our experiments demonstrate that both velocity fields and concentration patterns can be altered by chemotaxis to modify the pattern formation in evaporating droplet containing live bacteria. These results highlight the role of bacterial chemotaxis in modifying coffee ring patterns.

  6. 95-1 Campaign evaporator boildown results

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.L.

    1994-10-10

    The Process Chemistry Laboratories were requested to support the 242-A Evaporator restart as part of the overall 222-S laboratory effort. The net purpose of these studies is to determine the characteristics of double-shell tank materials as they are processed in the evaporator. The results for the boildown study (which includes pressure and temperature versus % waste volume reduction and density of final boildown residue) supporting the 242-A Evaporator restart are reported below. The boildown was performed in a vacuum distillation apparatus with an adjustable vacuum limiting manometer and an isolatable collection graduated cylinder. The boildown was conducted over a seven hour period. The evaporation was done at 60 torr (to avoid excessive foaming and bumping of solution) for approximately half of the boildown, the pressure then being reduced to 40 torr when the reduction in solution volume allowed this to be done. Percent waste volume reduction was measured by observing the amount of condensate collected in a graduated cylinder. As the graduated cylinder became full, it was isolated from the rest of the system and the condensate removed. Pressure was set using an electronic manometer with a low pressure limiter set at the desired level. Temperature was measured using a J-type thermocouple. The apparatus was calibrated by observing the pressure versus temperature response of pure water, and comparing the values thus obtained to published values.

  7. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  8. Coating a Sphere With Evaporated Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    In vacuum coating apparatus, metal evaporated onto sphere from small source located some distance away. Sphere held in path of metal vapor while rotated about axis that rocks back and forth. One tilting motion particularly easy to produce is sinusoidal rocking with frequency much lower than rotational frequency. Apparatus developed for coating single-crystal sapphire spheres with niobium.

  9. Behavior Of Evaporating Liquid Drops In Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette

    1990-01-01

    Report presents critical analysis of methods, developed for calculating behavior of evaporating liquid drops in dense and dilute clusters. Essential to understanding variety of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in combustion of sprayed fuels and in sprays used in agriculture, food industry, and painting. Presents insights on important aspects of two-phase flow.

  10. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Bue, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust nonventing system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. This water vapor is then captured by solid LiCl in the LCAR with a high enthalpy of absorption, resulting in sufficient temperature lift to reject heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the LCAR would be heated up and dried in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A engineering development prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The LCAR was able to stably reject 75 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  11. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  12. On the lifetimes of evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen; Stauber, Jutta; Duffy, Brian; Sefiane, Khellil

    2013-11-01

    The evaporation of a fluid droplet on a solid substrate is a practically important problem which has been the subject of considerable research in recent years, much of it motivated by a range of technological applications, such as the application of pesticides to plants, DNA microarray analysis, inkjet printing, micro-fabrication, and spray cooling. In particular, the lifetime of a fluid droplet is not only of fundamental scientific interest, but is also important in a number of technological applications, such as inkjet printing and spray cooling applications (in which shorter droplet lifetimes are often needed) and the application of pesticides to plants (in which longer droplet lifetimes are often needed). In this talk we will analyse the lifetimes of fluid droplets evaporating in a variety of modes and, in particular, show that the widely believed folklore that the lifetime of a droplet is always longer than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant radius (i.e. pinned contact line) mode and shorter than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant angle mode is not, in general, true.

  13. Evaporation of Liquid Hydrocarbon Mixtures on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Chevrier, V. F.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Singh, S.; Roe, L. A.; Wagner, A.

    2013-10-01

    Besides Earth, Titan is the only other known planetary body with proven stable liquids on its surface. The hydrological cycle of these liquid hydrocarbon mixtures is critical in understanding Titan’s atmosphere and surface features. Evaporation of liquid surface bodies has been indirectly observed as shoreline changes from measurements by Cassini ISS and RADAR (Hayes et al. 2011, Icarus 211, 655-671; Turtle et al. 2011, Science 18, 1414-1417.), but the long seasons of Saturn strongly limit the time span of these observations and their validity over the course of an entire Titan year. Using a novel Titan simulation chamber, the evaporation rate of liquid methane and dissolved nitrogen mixture under Titan surface conditions was derived (Luspay-Kuti et al. 2012, GRL 39, L23203), which is especially applicable to low latitude transient liquids. Polar lakes, though, are expected to be composed of a variety of hydrocarbons, primarily a mixture of ethane and methane (e.g. Cordier et al. 2009, ApJL 707, L128-L131). Here we performed laboratory simulations of ethane-methane mixtures with varying mole fraction under conditions suitable for the polar regions of Titan. We will discuss results specifically addressing the evaporation behavior as the solution becomes increasingly ethane dominated, providing quantitative values for the evaporation rate at every step. These laboratory results are relevant to polar lakes, such as Ontario Lacus, and can shed light on their stability.

  14. Evaporation And Ignition Of Dense Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Simple theoretical model makes useful predictions of trends. Pair of reports presents theoretical model of evaporation and ignition of sprayed liquid fuel. Developed as part of research in combustion of oil and liquid fuels derived from coal, tar sand, and shale in furnace. Work eventually contributes to increase efficiency of combustion and decrease pollution generated by burning of such fuels.

  15. Evaporation of Topopah Spring tuff pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Dibley, M J; Knauss, K G; Rosenberg, N D

    1999-09-10

    We report on the results to date for experiments on the evaporative chemical evolution of a CaSO, rich water representative of Topopah Spring Tuff porewater from Yucca Mountain. Data include anion and cation analysis and qualitative mineral identification for a series of open system experiments, with and without crushed tuff present, conducted at sub-boiling temperatures.

  16. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH(•)) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach.

  17. Evaporation-induced failure of hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Liu, T.; Ma, J.; Wang, P.; Wang, Y.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Jing, G.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophobic coatings have tremendous applications in many fields of industries, and their robustness is an important subject of investigation. Here we experimentally demonstrate the detachment of hydrophobic coating and the formation of the residual deposit resulting from an evaporating drop of water. A hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT) coating is employed to enhance the hydrophobicity of ZnO nanowire arrays (advancing and receding contact angle of 165° and 128°, respectively). Being a model system of the unique bonding interaction between ODT and ZnO, water drop drying on the structure of ODT/ZnO is examined. Our experimental results showed the significant depression and even failure of the hydrophobicity on this composite surface resulting from collecting the deposits of ODT molecules during the drop drying. By analyzing energy criterion and force balance, surface tension at the moving contact line is identified as a dominating destructive force to unstick the coating molecules. Interestingly, a normal rinsing stream does not damage this coating to alter its hydrophobicity, but rather is overshadowed by the evaporation of the tinny water drop. The drops of rain or condensed water outdoor may thus play the same role to damage the functional coatings after their evaporation. Our findings indicate that more delicate designs are needed to prevent the destructive effects of drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  18. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S.

    2009-09-01

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector.

  19. Modeling of solvent evaporation from polymer jets in electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Salkovskiy, Yury; Dzenis, Yuris A.

    2011-05-01

    Solvent evaporation plays a critical role in nanofiber formation in electrospinning. Here, we present a nonlinear mass diffusion-transfer model describing the drying process in dilute polymer solution jets. The model is used to predict transient solvent concentration profiles in polyacrylonitrile/N,N-dimethylformamide (PAN/DMF) jets with the initial radii ranging from 50 μm down to 100 nm. Numerical simulations demonstrate high transient inhomogeneity of solvent concentration over the jet cross-section in microscopic jets. The degree of inhomogeneity decreases for finer, submicron jets. The simulated jet drying time decreases rapidly with the decreasing initial jet radius, from seconds for microjets to single milliseconds for nanojets. The results demonstrate the need for further improved coupled multiphysics models of electrospinning jets.

  20. Flow transition within an evaporating binary mixture sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Christy, John R E; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Sefiane, Khellil

    2011-05-20

    The flow field along the base of an evaporating ethanol-water droplet and its evolution time was measured by particle image velocimetry. Three stages are revealed, a first stage dominated by multiple vortices, a second transition stage characterized by a remarkable spike in outward flow not previously identified, and a third stage dominated by outward flow identical to that found for pure water. Stage I is thought to be driven by surface tension gradients arising from local concentration variation. The spike in outward flow is explained in terms of a transition corresponding to almost total depletion of ethanol. An exponential decay in vorticity during the transition stage is explained in terms of ethanol diffusion from the bulk to the interface. We speculate on the existence of a zero-concentration wave propagating from the apex to the contact line corresponding to the final total depletion of ethanol.

  1. Evaporation and instabilities of microscopic capillary bridges

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Nobuo; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Kohonen, Mika M.

    2003-01-01

    The formation and disappearance of liquid bridges between two surfaces can occur either through equilibrium or nonequilibrium processes. In the first instance, the bridge molecules are in thermodynamic equilibrium with the surrounding vapor medium. In the second, chemical potential gradients result in material transfer; mechanical instabilities, because of van der Waals force jumps on approach or a Rayleigh instability on rapid separation, may trigger irreversible film coalescence or bridge snapping. We have studied the growth and disappearance mechanisms of laterally microscopic liquid bridges of three hydrocarbon liquids in slit-like pores. At rapid slit-opening rates, the bridges rupture by means of a mechanical instability described by the Young–Laplace equation. Noncontinuum but apparently reversible behavior is observed when a bridge is held at nanoscopic surface separations H close to the thermodynamic equilibrium Kelvin length, 2rKcosθ, where rK is the Kelvin radius and θ is the contact angle. During the course of slow evaporation (at H > 2rKcosθ) and subsequent regrowth by capillary condensation (at H < 2rKcosθ), the refractive index of the bridge may vary continuously and reversibly between that of the bulk liquid and vapor. The evaporation process becomes irreversible only at the very final stage of evaporation, when the refractive index of the fluid attains virtually that of the vapor. Measured refractive index profiles and the time-dependence of evaporating neck diameters also seem to differ from predictions based on a continuum picture of bridge evaporation far from the critical point. We discuss these findings in terms of the probable density profiles in evolving liquid bridges. PMID:12538868

  2. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Xue, Longjian

    2015-05-28

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol-gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 10(7) μm(3) are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media.

  3. The Evaporative Function of Cockroach Hygroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Insect hygroreceptors associate as antagonistic pairs of a moist cell and a dry cell together with a cold cell in small cuticular sensilla on the antennae. The mechanisms by which the atmospheric humidity stimulates the hygroreceptive cells remain elusive. Three models for humidity transduction have been proposed in which hygroreceptors operate either as mechanical hygrometers, evaporation detectors or psychrometers. Mechanical hygrometers are assumed to respond to the relative humidity, evaporation detectors to the saturation deficit and psychrometers to the temperature depression (the difference between wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures). The models refer to different ways of expressing humidity. This also means, however, that at different temperatures these different types of hygroreceptors indicate very different humidity conditions. The present study tested the adequacy of the three models on the cockroach’s moist and dry cells by determining whether the specific predictions about the temperature-dependence of the humidity responses are indeed observed. While in previous studies stimulation consisted of rapid step-like humidity changes, here we changed humidity slowly and continuously up and down in a sinusoidal fashion. The low rates of change made it possible to measure instantaneous humidity values based on UV-absorption and to assign these values to the hygroreceptive sensillum. The moist cell fitted neither the mechanical hygrometer nor the evaporation detector model: the temperature dependence of its humidity responses could not be attributed to relative humidity or to saturation deficit, respectively. The psychrometer model, however, was verified by the close relationships of the moist cell’s response with the wet-bulb temperature and the dry cell’s response with the dry-bulb temperature. Thus, the hygroreceptors respond to evaporation and the resulting cooling due to the wetness or dryness of the air. The drier the ambient air (absolutely) and

  4. The evaporative function of cockroach hygroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Insect hygroreceptors associate as antagonistic pairs of a moist cell and a dry cell together with a cold cell in small cuticular sensilla on the antennae. The mechanisms by which the atmospheric humidity stimulates the hygroreceptive cells remain elusive. Three models for humidity transduction have been proposed in which hygroreceptors operate either as mechanical hygrometers, evaporation detectors or psychrometers. Mechanical hygrometers are assumed to respond to the relative humidity, evaporation detectors to the saturation deficit and psychrometers to the temperature depression (the difference between wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures). The models refer to different ways of expressing humidity. This also means, however, that at different temperatures these different types of hygroreceptors indicate very different humidity conditions. The present study tested the adequacy of the three models on the cockroach's moist and dry cells by determining whether the specific predictions about the temperature-dependence of the humidity responses are indeed observed. While in previous studies stimulation consisted of rapid step-like humidity changes, here we changed humidity slowly and continuously up and down in a sinusoidal fashion. The low rates of change made it possible to measure instantaneous humidity values based on UV-absorption and to assign these values to the hygroreceptive sensillum. The moist cell fitted neither the mechanical hygrometer nor the evaporation detector model: the temperature dependence of its humidity responses could not be attributed to relative humidity or to saturation deficit, respectively. The psychrometer model, however, was verified by the close relationships of the moist cell's response with the wet-bulb temperature and the dry cell's response with the dry-bulb temperature. Thus, the hygroreceptors respond to evaporation and the resulting cooling due to the wetness or dryness of the air. The drier the ambient air (absolutely) and the

  5. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-01-01

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm2), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm2) than by the smaller (1 nm2) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube. PMID:22392972

  6. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  7. AN-107 (C) Simulant Bench-Scale LAW Evaporation with Organic Regulatory Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-05-15

    The overall objective of this work is to develop preliminary operating data including expected concentration endpoints using a C waste envelope simulant. The data is to be used for the preliminary Hanford RPP flow sheet development and LAW Melter Feed Evaporator design.

  8. Characterization of Samples from the 3H Evaporator System Including Effects of Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-05-15

    Analysis of several series of samples from the 3H Evaporator System have been completed. The goal of this work was to determine the effects of 3H operation including recycle of concentrated supernate from Tank 30H into the sludge layer of Tank 32H.

  9. Evaporator condensates: continuous bioprocessing of simulated sulfite condensates to produce single cell protein. [Candida utilis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, W.A.; Wines, B.; Baker, J.A.; Johanson, L.N.; McCarthy, J.L.

    1982-11-01

    The continuous bioprocessing of simulated steam-stripped sulfite pulp mill evaporator condensates using Candida utilis to produce single cell protein has been studied. At 32 degrees C, processing can be conducted at space velocities of up to 0.43 hr/sup -1/ with over 90% removal of acetic acid present at an initial concentration of 2 g/liter. (Refs. 16).

  10. Condensation and Evaporation of Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    condensable matter (see Chapter 1.08; Grossman, 1973; Wänke et al., 1974; Grossman and Ganapathy, 1976; Grossman et al., 1977), where CI chondrites are taken to represent total condensable matter.Elemental abundance patterns ordered by volatility certainly could have been produced by partial condensation, but they could also have been caused by partial evaporation. The relative importance of these opposite processes is still subject to debate and uncertainty. It should be remembered that condensation calculations typically assume chemical equilibrium in a closed system, in which case the system has no memory of the path by which it arrived at a given state, and thus the chemical and isotopic composition of the condensed phase cannot be used to distinguish between partial condensation and partial evaporation. Humayun and Clayton (1995) have taken a somewhat different view by arguing that condensation and evaporation are distinguishable, in that evaporation, but not condensation, will produce isotopically fractionated residues. With this idea in mind, they carefully measured the potassium isotopic compositions of a broad range of solar system materials with different degrees of potassium depletion and found them to be indistinguishable. This they took as evidence that evaporation could not have been a significant process in determining the diverse elemental abundance patterns of the various solar system materials they measured, because had evaporation been important in fractionating potassium it would have also fractionated the potassium isotopes. We will qualify this line of reasoning by arguing that evaporation and condensation can under certain conditions produce isotopically fractionated condensed phases (i.e., that partial evaporation can produce isotopically heavy residues and that partial condensation can produce isotopically light condensates) but that under other conditions both can produce elemental fractionations without significant isotopic fractionation. The

  11. A parametric study of a multiple droplet spray evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizza, J. J.

    1984-06-01

    In this paper, a closed form solution is presented for spray evaporation on the surface of a spray evaporator. A parametric analysis is performed using a multiple droplet model. Droplets on the evaporator surface are considered as point sinks of heat in a fixed geometric pattern. The method of image systems is used to satisfy both the heat conduction equation and the boundary condition equations. The evaporator parameters considered in the model are droplet size, distnces between droplets, evaporator wall thickness, wall conductivity and evaporator wall temperatures. The results include the heat flux profiles for a number of droplet spray densities and evaporator wall thicknesses. The results illustrate the importance of a number of physical parameters on the design of a spray evaporator. The relative spacing of the droplets on the surface of the evaporator is of paramount importance to the optimum utilization of the evaporator surface area. Both qualitative and quantitative information is presented on the system performance relative to parameter variability. In particular, information is provided to determine which set of conditions provides a uniform evaporator heat flux. This condition is desirable, since it makes optimum use of the evaporator surface relative to evaporation rate and heat transfer rate. The validity of the presentation is demonstrated by comparison with previously published experimental data.

  12. Evaporation and combustion of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The objective is to study the evaporation and combustion of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions both experimentally and theoretically. In the evaporation studies, evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured when LOX vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atm. A Varian 3700 gas chromatograph was employed to measure the oxygen concentration above the LOX surface. For the combustion tests, high-magnification video photography was used to record direct images of the flame shape of a LOX/H2/He laminar diffusion flame. The gas composition in the post-flame region is also being measured with the gas sampling and chromatography analysis. These data are being used to validate the theoretical model. A comprehensive theoretical model with the consideration of the solubility of ambient gases as well as variable thermophysical properties was formulated and solved numerically to study the gasification and burning of LOX at elevated pressures. The calculated flame shape agreed reasonably well with the edge of the observed luminous flame surface. The effect of gravity on the flame structure of laminar diffusion flames was found to be significant. In addition, the predicted results using the flame-sheet model were compared with those based upon full equilibrium calculations (which considered the formation of intermediate species) at supercritical pressures. Except at the flame front where temperature exceeded 2,800 K, the flame-sheet and equilibrium solutions in terms of temperature distributions were in very close agreement. The temperature deviation in the neighborhood of the flame front is caused by the effect of high-temperature dissociation.

  13. Membrane evaporative cooling to 30 degrees C or less: 2. Membrane evaporative air cooling.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Sidney

    2003-03-01

    Microporous hydrophobic membranes were examined for use in steady state membrane evaporative air cooling. The examination consisted of calculating membrane performance as a function of overall heat and mass transfer coefficients already obtained and reported in Part 1 (previous paper, this volume). This performance was compared with that obtained by similar calculations made on existing evaporative air coolers. It was found that the cooling performance of the membrane evaporative air cooler was not as good as that of the existing evaporative air cooler. This is to be expected since the existing cooler has only one resistance, the air boundary layer (ABL), whereas the membrane cooler has the ABL and the membrane resistance. However, the membrane air cooler has advantages, such as appreciably lower water consumption and operation under more sanitary conditions, that is, without intimate conjunction of flowing air and liquid water on solid surfaces.

  14. Membrane evaporative cooling to 30 degrees C or less: 1. Membrane evaporative cooling of contained water.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Sidney

    2003-03-01

    Microporous hydrophobic membranes have been examined for possible use as containers in the evaporative cooling of water, particularly in desert climates. An experimental determination was made of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients of these membranes while surmounting contained water and with air flowing over the surface of the membranes. Similar tests were made with water alone, that is, without a membrane. The coefficients were then used to compare the performance of existing (canvas water) coolers and membrane evaporative coolers under desert conditions. The performance of the membrane coolers was close enough to that of the canvas coolers that extensive investigation of various aspects of membrane evaporative cooling appears to be justified, particularly in view of the potential advantages of the latter over the existing evaporative cooling methods. For example, for cool storage of perishable goods in a desert climate, the membrane container might be uniquely qualified because of its low rate of water consumption compared to that of a canvas cooler.

  15. 7 CFR 58.921 - Concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concentration. 58.921 Section 58.921 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.921 Concentration. Concentrating by evaporation shall be accomplished with a minimum...

  16. 7 CFR 58.921 - Concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concentration. 58.921 Section 58.921 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.921 Concentration. Concentrating by evaporation shall be accomplished with a minimum...

  17. 7 CFR 58.921 - Concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concentration. 58.921 Section 58.921 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.921 Concentration. Concentrating by evaporation shall be accomplished with a minimum...

  18. 7 CFR 58.921 - Concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concentration. 58.921 Section 58.921 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.921 Concentration. Concentrating by evaporation shall be accomplished with a minimum...

  19. 7 CFR 58.921 - Concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concentration. 58.921 Section 58.921 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.921 Concentration. Concentrating by evaporation shall be accomplished with a minimum...

  20. Evaporation of pure liquids with increased viscosity in a falling film evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Felix; Scholl, Stephan

    2009-05-01

    The present study investigated fluid dynamics and heat transfer of viscous pure liquids in a falling film evaporator. This is of special benefit as it avoids mass transfer effects on the evaporation behaviour. Experiments at a single-tube glass falling film evaporator were conducted. It allowed a full-length optical film observation with a high-speed camera. Additionally the evaporator was equipped with a slotted weir distribution device. Test fluids provided viscosities ranging from μ = 0.3 to 41 mPa s. The Reynolds number was between 0.7 and 1,930. Surface evaporation and the transition to nucleate boiling were studied to gain information about the film stability at maximum wall superheat. A reliable database for laminar and laminar-wavy viscous single component films was created. The experimental results show a significant enhancement in the wave development due to the film distribution. A wavy flow with different wave velocities was superposed to the film in each liquid load configuration without causing a film breakdown or dry spots on the evaporator tube. It was found that nucleate boiling can be allowed without causing film instabilities over a significant range of wall superheat.

  1. Carbonate deposition on tail feathers of ruddy ducks using evaporation ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H.; Jarvis, R.L.; Gilmer, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Substantial carbonate deposits were observed on rectrices of Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) collected during 1982-1984 on evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Carbonate deposits were composed of about 75% aragonite and 25% calcite, both polymorphous forms of CaCO3. Significantly more carbonate deposits were observed on Ruddy Ducks as length of exposure to agricultural drain water increased, during the 1983-1984 field season when salt concentrations in the ponds were higher, and in certain evaporation-pond systems.

  2. Experimental Measurements of the Water Evaporation Rate of a Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turza, Róbert; Füri, Belo B.

    2017-03-01

    As the number of indoor swimming pools and wellness centers are currently growing, it is necessary to concentrate on the parameters of indoor environments. These parameters are necessary for the design of the HVAC systems that operate these premises. In indoor swimming-pool facilities, the energy demand is large due to ventilation losses from exhaust air. Since water evaporates from a pool's surface, exhaust air has a high water content and specific enthalpy. In this paper the results of the water evaporation rate measured from swimming pool surfaces at higher thermal water temperatures are described.

  3. Surfactant-induced Marangoni eddies alter the coffee-rings of evaporating colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G

    2012-03-20

    The influence of the small ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the evaporation of drying colloidal droplets is quantitatively investigated. The addition of SDS leads to a significantly more uniform deposition of colloidal particles after evaporation (i.e., the so-called "coffee-ring effect" is dramatically altered). We understand this phenomenon in the context of circulating radial Marangoni flows induced by the variation of SDS concentration along the air-water interface. Video microscopy permits the direct visualization of the colloidal particles involved in these flows, revealing a surprisingly stable "Marangoni eddy" that prevents particle deposition at the drop perimeter.

  4. Characterization of Post-Cleaning Solids Samples from the 2H Evaporator Pot

    SciTech Connect

    WILMARTH, WILLIAM

    2004-03-15

    Samples retrieved from the 2H Evaporator Pot in October of 2003 were of a similar nature as previous materials. The bulk of the sample was comprised of a sodium aluminosilicate phase, cancrinite. The concentration of uranium in the evaporator solids,however, was very low:less than 0.1 percentage weight. The uranium enrichment was depleted as expected and measured 0.6 percent. These data agree with uranium contents generated during experimental testing. Additionally, the overall specific radionuclide content is lower for this sample than previous measured on samples from the Gravity Drain Line in 1997 and the cone and wall in 2000.

  5. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  6. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  7. EVALUATION OF HADWACO MVR EVAPORATOR, ETV REPORT& STATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hadwaco US, Inc., manufactures a commercial ready mechanical vapor recompression (MVR) evaporator for use in the metal finishing industry. The evaporator utilizes proven MVR and falling film principles, with the key innovation being the construction material of the heat transfer ...

  8. EVALUATION OF HADWACO MVR EVAPORATOR, ETV REPORT& STATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hadwaco US, Inc., manufactures a commercial ready mechanical vapor recompression (MVR) evaporator for use in the metal finishing industry. The evaporator utilizes proven MVR and falling film principles, with the key innovation being the construction material of the heat transfer ...

  9. EVAPORATOR FLOOR, CLARIFIERS TO THE LEFT, SCALES TO THE RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EVAPORATOR FLOOR, CLARIFIERS TO THE LEFT, SCALES TO THE RIGHT, EVAPORATOR CELLS ONE, TWO AND THREE IN THE BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST FROM LIME VATS - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  10. Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

  11. Pasquill`s influence: on the evaporation from various liquids into the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Pasquill`s development of an evaporation model as well as his experimental work on the subject are important in view of the recent emphasis on toxic chemical releases to the environment. Pasquill`s contributions to the field of atmospheric diffusion are enormous and well-known. The Pasquill stability classification enables us to apply the Gaussian diffusion model in our daily life. The Gaussian diffusion model has been widely and routinely applied in industry for the estimate of the air concentration ant to manage the radioactive and hazardous wastes in recent years. Equally important bus no less than his contribution to the Gaussian diffusion model is Pasquill`s influence on the subject of evaporation from various liquid surfaces into the atmosphere. An evaporation model taking into account the vertical variations of the mean wind speed and the eddy exchange was first introduced by Sutton. The Sutton model made it possible to estimate toxic chemical release from a smooth liquid surface to the environment. In the Sutton model, the process of vapor transfer is based on the momentum exchange involving a parameter of the air viscosity. Pasquill modified Sutton`s evaporation theory by introducing another new parameter, the molecular diffusivity. This replaced the viscosity in the Sutton model, an important missing parameter. The Sutton-Pasquill evaporation model has found wide applications in industry for half a century. Out of these two parameters, a non-dimensional parameter can be formed; it can be used to modify the Pasquill evaporation model. Experimental data in the laboratories and the fields indicate that the rate of evaporation from a liquid surface is dependent on a Schmidt number. Thus, in this study, we will consider the modification of the Sutton-Pasquill model and provide some theoretical justifications.

  12. Process and apparatus for dehydrating waste solids concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, A.J.; Greenfield, C.

    1983-03-22

    An apparatus and process for dehydrating waste solids concentrates including secondary and digested sewage sludges and those concentrates prone to form emulsions upon the addition of oil are obtained and accomplished by mixing the sludge or other concentrate with fluidizing oil prior to dehydration by heat evaporation to maintain pumpability; recycling a portion of the substantially anhydrous waste solids and oil evaporator output slurry, and admixing it with the fluidizing oil and input sludge or concentrate to regulate the solids content and viscosity of the steady state feed mixture and thereby prevent fouling of the evaporator heat transfer surfaces and convert emulsions to suspensions.

  13. Flexible and transparent metallic grid electrodes prepared by evaporative assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jung Kyu; Lee, Jung Heon; Park, Jong Hyeok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2014-08-13

    We propose a novel approach to fabricating flexible transparent metallic grid electrodes via evaporative deposition involving flow-coating. A transparent flexible metal grid electrode was fabricated through four essential steps including: (i) polymer line pattern formation on the thermally evaporated metal layer onto a plastic substrate; (ii) rotation of the stage by 90° and the formation of the second polymer line pattern; (iii) etching of the unprotected metal region; and (iv) removal of the residual polymer from the metal grid pattern. Both the metal grid width and the spacing were systematically controlled by varying the concentration of the polymer solution and the moving distance between intermittent stop times of the polymer blade. The optimized Au grid electrodes exhibited an optical transmittance of 92% at 550 nm and a sheet resistance of 97 Ω/sq. The resulting metallic grid electrodes were successfully applied to various organic electronic devices, such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic solar cells (OSCs).

  14. Fluid-Evaporation Records Preserved in Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Sutton, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown earlier that the high SO3/Cl ratios found in secondary mineral assemblages in shergottite GRIM glasses (Gas-Rich Impact-Melt) likely resulted from interactions of regolith materials with sulfate-rich (and Cl-poor) solutions. The low SO3/Cl ratios determined in secondary salts in nakhalite fracture-fillings presumably formed by rock interactions with chloride-rich (and SO4-poor) solutions near Mars surface. The SO3 and Cl abundances determined by APXS in abraded rocks (RAT) from Endurance, Fram and Eagle craters indicate that these salt assemblages likely formed by evaporative concentration of brine fluids at Meridiani. The SO3/Cl ratios in the abraded rocks are examined here, instead of their absolute abundances, because the abundance ratios might provide better guide-lines for tracking the evolution of evaporating fluids at Meridiani. The SO3/Cl ratios in these samples, in turn, might provide clues for the mobile element ratios of the altering fluids that infiltrated into the Meridiani rocks.

  15. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Thermal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    For future lunar extravehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon(Registered Trademark) membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using this membrane was successfully tested by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of a compact sheet membrane SWME development unit for use in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element Portable Life Support System (Vogel and et. al., ICES 2008). Major design objectives included minimizing mass, volume, and manufacturing complexity while rejecting a minimum of 810 watts of heat from water flowing through the SWME at 91 kg/hr with an inlet temperature of 291K. The design meeting these objectives consisted of three concentric cylindrical water channels interlaced with four water vapor channels. Two units were manufactured for the purpose of investigating manufacturing techniques and performing thermal testing. The extensive thermal test measured SWME heat rejection as a function of water inlet temperatures, water flow-rates, water absolute pressures, water impurities, and water vapor back-pressures. This paper presents the test results and subsequent analysis, which includes a comparison of SWME heat rejection measurements to pretest predictions. In addition, test measurements were taken such that an analysis of the commercial-off-the-shelf vapor pressure control valve could be performed.

  16. Convection, evaporation, and condensation of binary fluids in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Roman; Qin, Tongran; Li, Yaofa; Chan, Benjamin; Yoda, Minami

    2011-11-01

    Phase change has a major effect on convection in liquid layers with a free surface. Significant latent heat generated at the free surface as a result of phase change can dramatically alter the interfacial temperature, inducing thermocapillary stresses. For binary fluids, differential evaporation leads to a variation in the concentration, and hence, induces solutocapillary stresses. This talk describes numerical and experimental studies of convection in alcohol-water mixtures due to a horizontal temperature gradient in the presence of phase change. Evaporation and condensation is known to be a notoriously difficult problem to model due to a poorly defined vapor transport problem which is strongly influenced by the presence/absence and flows of non-condensable gases (e.g., air). This issue is addressed by using a sealed cuvette heated at one end and cooled at the other. Both numerics and experiments show that, by adding or removing air from the cuvette, the direction of flow in a liquid layer covering the bottom of the cell can be reversed by emphasizing either thermocapillary or solutocapillary stresses. Supported by ONR.

  17. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  18. Contributions a L'etude de Dispositifs D'optique Integree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touam, Tahar

    Cette these contient des contributions a l'etude de deux champs du vaste domaine de l'optique integree. A cet effet, nous avons divise notre travail en deux grandes parties:. Dans une premiere partie, nous traitons le probleme de la realisation d'une nouvelle classe de guides d'onde planaires utilisables dans le domaine de longueur d'onde de l'infrarouge moyen (infrarouge thermique), domaine ou l'apparition anticipee de fibres optiques a pertes extremement faibles rendraient fort interessante l'existence de tels guides d'onde planaires. Dans un premier temps, nous presentons une etude analytique originale d'une structure planaire a profil d'indice gradue, suivie d'une analyse d'un guide canal base sur cette structure. Dans un deuxieme temps, nous decrivons le procede de fabrication par pulverisation atomique d'un guide planaire forme d'arseniure de gallium (AsGa) sur du dioxyde de silicium (SiO_2 ), combinaison de materiau compatible avec l'infrarouge moyen. Finalement, nous presentons une etude de conception d'un reseau de surface destine a coupler la lumiere dans un tel guide, les autres methodes traditionnelles de couplage semblant peu appropriees aux environs de lambda = 10 mum. Dans une deuxieme partie, nous traitons le probleme de la jonction Y en optique integree, jonction qui soufre de pertes tres importantes des que l'angle d'ouverture devient interessant pour le concepteur de circuits integres optiques. L'analyse est basee sur la methode numerique dite BPM (Beam Propagation Method; methode de propagation du faisceau) qui fait l'objet d'un bref rappel. Nous poursuivons avec l'etude et l'optimisation d'une nouvelle jonction Y dont l'essence est l'utilisation du phenomene de diffraction a travers trois fentes de phase. Nous obtenons ainsi une tres bonne jonction, separant proprement le faisceau, a une ouverture de 10 degres. Finalement, nous faisons un rappel d'un profil d'indice dit "ideal" pour guides courbes et nous proposons l'utilisation de tels guides

  19. Low-Ceiling-Temperature Polymer Microcapsules with Hydrophobic Payloads via Rapid Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shijia; Yourdkhani, Mostafa; Possanza Casey, Catherine M; Sottos, Nancy R; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-14

    We report a microencapsulation procedure based on rapid solvent evaporation to prepare microcapsules with hydrophobic core materials and low-ceiling-temperature polymer shell wall of cyclic poly(phthalaldehyde) (cPPA). We use and compare microfluidic and bulk emulsions. In both methods, rapid solvent evaporation following emulsification resulted in kinetically trapped core-shell microcapsules, whereas slow evaporation resulted in acorn morphology. Through the systematic variation of encapsulation parameters, we found that polymer-to-core weight ratios higher than 1 and polymer concentrations higher than 4.5 wt % in the oil phase were required to obtain a core-shell structure. This microencapsulation procedure enabled the fabrication of microcapsules with high core loading, controlled size, morphology, and stability. This procedure is versatile, allowing for the encapsulation of other hydrophobic core materials, i.e., mineral oil and organotin catalyst, or using an alternative low-ceiling-temperature polymer shell wall, poly(vinyl tert-butyl carbonate sulfone).

  20. Development of a cosputter-evaporation chamber for Fe-Ga films

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N. A.; Yeh, S.-L.; Rigby, S.; Javed, A.; Gibbs, M. R. J.

    2008-07-15

    A new deposition technique involving the dc magnetron sputtering of Fe simultaneously with Ga evaporation has been developed to fabricate thin Fe{sub (1-x)}Ga{sub x} (0evaporation has been developed as an alternative to the sputtering of alloy targets, where the need for compositional variation can be hard to address. The new technique allows the freedom of composition that cosputtering would offer, but mitigates the issue of being unable to sputter Ga. The need for the preparation of alloy targets is also avoided. To control the concentration of the Ga in the films, the evaporation rate, the dc magnetron power, and the chamber pressure were varied. The films fabricated were studied to determine their magnetic and microstructural properties. The Fe-Ga films fabricated had magnetostriction constants which had increased by a factor of 5 compared to the same thickness of Fe film.

  1. Convective instability of sludge storage under evaporation and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Tatyana, Lyubimova

    2014-05-01

    The sludge storages are an important part of production cycle at salt manufacturing, water supply, etc. A quality of water in the storage depends on mixing of pure water and settled sediment. One of the leading factors is thermal convection. There are two main mechanisms of the layer instability exist. First, it is instability of water due to evaporation from the free surface [1]. It cools the water from upside, increases the particles concentration and leads to the instability in the near-surface layer. Second, the sediment absorbs a solar radiation and heats the liquid from below making it unstable in the near-bottom area. We assume the initial state is the mechanical equilibrium. The water and sediment particles are motionless, the sediment forms a uniform sludge layer of thickness z0, there are no evaporation and heating by solar energy, and the temperature has a linear profile is determined by fixed upper and bottom temperatures of the layer. Taking into account the evaporation and solar radiation absorption, we obtain a non-stationary solution for the temperature using Fourier series method. The local temperature gradients increases rapidly with time, and local Rayleigh number can be estimated by thermal conduction length Lt: Raloc(z,t) = gβ(δT(z,t)/δz)L4t-/νΞ , Lt ~ √Ξt, (1) where g is gravity acceleration, β, ν and Ξ are thermal volume expansion coefficient, kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the liquid, respectively. Raloc* reaches the critical value at finite time t* and water motion begins. The maximal power of solar radiation in visible band equals 230 Wt/m2 at the latitude of "Uralkalii" salt manufacturer (Berezniki, Perm Region, Russian Federation). We neglect IR and UV radiation because of its huge absorption by water [2]. The evaporation speed is found using results for shallow water reservoir [3] and meteorological data for Berezniki [4]. We get the t*~ 6 · 102 s (10 min) for the layer of 1 m depth and t*~ 2 · 103 s (40

  2. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  3. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  4. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  5. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  6. 7 CFR 58.913 - Evaporators and vacuum pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaporators and vacuum pans. 58.913 Section 58.913....913 Evaporators and vacuum pans. All equipment used in the removal of moisture from milk or milk... Sanitary Standards for Milk and Milk Products Evaporators and Vacuum Pans....

  7. Efficiency of using solid wood fuels in maple syrup evaporators

    Treesearch

    Lawrence D. Garrett

    1981-01-01

    A study of commercial, wood-fired evaporators revealed that normal expected thermal efficiencies are between 35 and 50 percent. The moisture content and quality of wood fuels used and the design and method of firing the evaporator are critical in determining evaporator efficiency and the economic implications of using wood.

  8. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

  9. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

  10. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets of Liquid on Solid Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, S.; Starov, V. M.; Velarde, M. G.; Rubio, R. G.

    Evaporation of sessile droplets of liquid on solid substrates is considered here. Different parameters and processes influencing the evaporation rate are discussed. Cases of complete wetting and partial wetting with contact angle hysteresis are described mathematically. The influence of Kelvin's and kinetic effects and subsequent deviation from diffusion-limited evaporation is shown by means of computer simulations.

  11. Trends in evaporation of a large subtropical lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Wang, Yongwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Piao, Meihua; Xiao, Wei; Lee, Xuhui

    2017-07-01

    How rising temperature and changing solar radiation affect evaporation of natural water bodies remains poor understood. In this study, evaporation from Lake Taihu, a large (area 2400 km2) freshwater lake in the Yangtze River Delta, China, was simulated by the CLM4-LISSS offline lake model and estimated with pan evaporation data. Both methods were calibrated against lake evaporation measured directly with eddy covariance in 2012. Results show a significant increasing trend of annual lake evaporation from 1979 to 2013, at a rate of 29.6 mm decade-1 according to the lake model and 25.4 mm decade-1 according to the pan method. The mean annual evaporation during this period shows good agreement between these two methods (977 mm according to the model and 1007 mm according to the pan method). A stepwise linear regression reveals that downward shortwave radiation was the most significant contributor to the modeled evaporation trend, while air temperature was the most significant contributor to the pan evaporation trend. Wind speed had little impact on the modeled lake evaporation but had a negative contribution to the pan evaporation trend offsetting some of the temperature effect. Reference evaporation was not a good proxy for the lake evaporation because it was on average 20.6 % too high and its increasing trend was too large (56.5 mm decade-1).

  12. Self-assembly of nanoparticles in evaporating particle-laden emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the scalable fabrication of nanostructures (e.g., nanomesh and nanoring arrays) via inkjet printing of oil-in-water emulsion drops containing nanoparticles in water. Nanoscale oil drops dispersed in water are used here as templates for assembly of nanoparticles on a substrate. The effect of oil vapor pressure on particle deposition morphologies is studied by using a variety of oils. For oil drops with a lower vapor pressure, non-uniform evaporation rate along the air-water interface drives dispersed oil drops to move and accumulate near the air/water/substrate contact line. These oil drops remain on the substrate while water is evaporating enabling nanoparticles to self-assemble into nanomeshes. While keeping the same oil concentration, oil drops with a higher vapor pressure completely evaporates near the contact line before water dries out, leading to nanoparticle deposition of coffee-ring structures. If nanoparticles are confined inside the dispersed oil drops, nanoring arrays are formed as the emulsion evaporates. The characteristics of the nanomeshes and nanorings are controlled by tuning the size and concentration of oil drops and nanoparticles, substrate wettability, surfactant concentration, and vapor pressure of oil.

  13. The evaporative demand drought index: Part I 1 – Linking drought evolution to variations in evaporative demand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many operational drought indices focus primarily on precipitation and temperature when depicting hydroclimatic anomalies, and this perspective can be augmented by analyses and products that reflect the evaporative dynamics of drought. We leverage the linkage between atmospheric evaporative demand (E...

  14. Evaporation studies on Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, V.L.; Perona, J.J.

    1993-03-01

    Evaporation studies were performed with Melton Valley storage tank liquid low-level radioactive waste concentrate and with surrogates (nonradioactive) to determine the feasibility of a proposed out-of-tank-evaporation project. Bench-scale tests indicated that volume reductions ranging from 30 to 55% could be attained. Vendor-site tests were conducted (with surrogate waste forms) using a bench-scale single-stage, low-pressure (subatmospheric), low-temperature (120 to 173{degree}F) evaporator similar to units in operation at several nuclear facilities. Vendor tests were successful; a 30% volume reduction was attained with no crystallization of solids and no foaming, as would be expected from a high pH solution. No fouling of the heat exchanger surfaces occurred during these tests. It is projected that 52,000 to 120,000 gal of water could be evaporated from the supernate stored in the Melton and Bethel Valley liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks with this type of evaporator.

  15. Process control plan for 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1

    SciTech Connect

    Le, E.Q.; Guthrie, M.D.

    1995-05-18

    The wastes from tanks 106-AP, 107-AP, and 106-AW have been selected to be candidate feed wastes for Evaporator Campaign 95-1. The wastes in tank 106-AP and 107-AP are primarily from B-Plant strontium processing and PUREX neutralized cladding removal, respectively. The waste in tank 106-AW originated primarily from the partially concentrated product from 242-A Evaporator Campaign 94-2. Approximately 8.67 million liters of waste from these tanks will be transferred to tank 102-AW during the campaign. Tank 102-AW is the dedicated waste feed tank for the evaporator and currently contains 647,000 liters of processable waste. The purpose of the 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1 Process Control Plan (hereafter referred to as PCP) is to certify that the wastes in tanks 106-AP, 107-AP, 102-AW, and 106-AW are acceptable for processing through evaporator and provide a general description of process strategies and activities which will take place during Campaign 95-1. The PCP also summarizes and presents a comprehensive characterization of the wastes in these tanks.

  16. Electrochemical treatment of evaporated residue of soak liquor generated from leather industry.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R; Sekaran, G

    2013-09-15

    The organic and suspended solids present in soak liquor, generated from leather industry, demands treatment. The soak liquor is being segregated and evaporated in solar evaporation pans/multiple effect evaporator due to non availability of viable technology for its treatment. The residue left behind in the pans/evaporator does not carry any reuse value and also faces disposal threat due to the presence of high concentration of sodium chloride, organic and bacterial impurities. In the present investigation, the aqueous evaporated residue of soak liquor (ERSL) was treated by electrochemical oxidation. Graphite/graphite and SS304/graphite systems were used in electrochemical oxidation of organics in ERSL. Among these, graphite/graphite system was found to be effective over SS304/graphite system. Hence, the optimised conditions for the electrochemical oxidation of organics in ERSL using graphite/graphite system was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). The mass transport coefficient (km) was calculated based on pseudo-first order rate kinetics for both the electrode systems (graphite/graphite and SS304/graphite). The thermodynamic properties illustrated the electrochemical oxidation was exothermic and non-spontaneous in nature. The calculated specific energy consumption at the optimum current density of 50 mA cm(-2) was 0.41 kWh m(-3) for the removal of COD and 2.57 kWh m(-3) for the removal of TKN.

  17. A High Performance Impedance-based Platform for Evaporation Rate Detection.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Lee, Pee-Yew; Chen, Cheng-You; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Yung-Sheng

    2016-10-17

    This paper describes the method of a novel impedance-based platform for the detection of the evaporation rate. The model compound hyaluronic acid was employed here for demonstration purposes. Multiple evaporation tests on the model compound as a humectant with various concentrations in solutions were conducted for comparison purposes. A conventional weight loss approach is known as the most straightforward, but time-consuming, measurement technique for evaporation rate detection. Yet, a clear disadvantage is that a large volume of sample is required and multiple sample tests cannot be conducted at the same time. For the first time in literature, an electrical impedance sensing chip is successfully applied to a real-time evaporation investigation in a time sharing, continuous and automatic manner. Moreover, as little as 0.5 ml of test samples is required in this impedance-based apparatus, and a large impedance variation is demonstrated among various dilute solutions. The proposed high-sensitivity and fast-response impedance sensing system is found to outperform a conventional weight loss approach in terms of evaporation rate detection.

  18. Emission inventory of evaporative emissions of VOCs in four metro cities in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjali; née Som Majumdar, Dipanjali

    2010-01-01

    High concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air of urban areas stress the need for the control of VOC emissions due to the toxic and carcinogenic nature of many VOCs commonly encountered in urban air. Emission inventories are an essential tool in the management of local air quality, which provide a listing of sources of air pollutant emissions within a specific area over a specified period of time. This study intended to provide a level IV emission inventory as par the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) definition for evaporative VOC emissions in the metro cities of India namely Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, and Kolkata. The vehicular evaporative emissions are found to be the largest contributor to the total evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons followed by evaporative losses related to petrol loading and unloading activities. Besides vehicle-related activities, other major sources contributing to evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons are surface coating, dry cleaning, graphical art applications, printing (newspaper and computer), and the use of consumer products. Various specific preventive measures are also recommended for reducing the emissions.

  19. Dynamics of pore-water and salt in estuarine marshes subjected to tide and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Shen, C.; Li, L.; Lockington, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to the tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore water from unsaturated soil surface with salt left in soils, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, solute concentration and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the tidal signal, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period in a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains close to that of seawater. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water-saturated soil is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the sandy supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  20. Pattern formation during the evaporation of a colloidal nanoliter drop: a numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Fang, Xiaohua; Attinger, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    An efficient way to precisely pattern particles on solid surfaces is to dispense and evaporate colloidal drops, as for bioassays. The dried deposits often exhibit complex structures exemplified by the coffee ring pattern, where most particles have accumulated at the periphery of the deposit. In this work, the formation of deposits during the drying of nanoliter colloidal drops on a flat substrate is investigated numerically and experimentally. A finite-element numerical model is developed that solves the Navier-Stokes, heat and mass transport equations in a Lagrangian framework. The diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. Laplace stresses and thermal Marangoni stresses are accounted for. The particle concentration is tracked by solving a continuum advection-diffusion equation. Wetting line motion and the interaction of the free surface of the drop with the growing deposit are modeled based on criteria on wetting angles. Numerical results for evaporation times and flow field are in very good agreement with published experimental and theoretical results. We also performed transient visualization experiments of water and isopropanol drops loaded with polystyrene microspheres evaporating on glass and polydimethylsiloxane substrates, respectively. Measured evaporation times, deposit shapes and sizes and flow fields are in very good agreement with the numerical results. Different flow patterns caused by the competition of Marangoni loops and radial flow are shown to determine the deposit shape to be either a ring-like pattern or a homogeneous bump.

  1. Dual-Mode Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Evaporation Kinetics of Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hanyu; He, Chi-Ruei; Basdeo, Carl; Li, Ji-Qin; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Li, Si-Yu; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are presented for the precision measurement of evaporation kinetics of binary mixtures using a quartz crystal resonator. A thin layer of light alcohol mixture including a volatile (methanol) and a much less volatile (1-butanol) components is deployed on top of the resonator. The normal or acoustic mode is to detect the moving liquid-vapor interface due to evaporation with a great spatial precision on the order of microns, and simultaneously the shear mode is used for in-situ detection of point viscosity or concentration of the mixture near the resonator. A one-dimensional theoretical model is developed to describe the underlying mass transfer and interfacial transport phenomena. Along with the modeling results, the transient evaporation kinetics, moving interface, and the stratification of viscosity of the liquid mixture during evaporation are simultaneously measured by the impedance response of the shear and longitudinal waves emitted from the resonator. The system can be used to characterize complicated evaporation kinetics involving multi-component fuels. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, NSF CMMI-0952646.

  2. A steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach for the study of evaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Yahia-Ouahmed, Méziane; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Two non-equilibrium methods (called bubble method and splitting method, respectively) have been developed and tested to study the steady state evaporation of a droplet surrounded by its vapor, where the evaporation continuously occurs at the vapor-liquid interface while the droplet size remains constant. In the bubble method, gas molecules are continuously reinserted into a free volume (represented by a bubble) located at the centre of mass of the droplet to keep the droplet size constant. In the splitting method, a molecule close to the centre of mass of the droplet is split into two: In this way, the droplet size is also maintained during the evaporation. By additional local thermostats confined to the area of insertion, the effect of frequent insertions on properties such as density and temperature can be limited to the immediate insertion area. Perturbations are not observed in other parts of the droplet. In the end, both the bubble method and the splitting method achieve steady-state droplet evaporation. Although these methods have been developed using an isolated droplet, we anticipate that they will find a wide range of applications in the study of the evaporation of isolated films and droplets or thin films on heated substrates or under confinement. They can in principle also be used to study the steady-state of other physical processes, such as the diffusion or permeation of gas molecules or ions in a pressure gradient or a concentration gradient.

  3. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  4. MD simulations of He evaporating from dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark A.; Koehler, Sven P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The velocity distribution of He atoms evaporating from a slab of liquid dodecane has been simulated. The distribution composed of ∼10 000 He trajectories is shifted to fractionally faster velocities as compared to a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of the liquid dodecane with an average translational energy of 1.05 × 2RT (or 1.08 × 2RT after correction for a cylindrical liquid jet), compared to the experimental work by Nathanson and co-workers (1.14 × 2RT) on liquid jets. Analysis of the trajectories allows us to infer mechanistic information about the modes of evaporation, and their contribution to the overall velocity distribution.

  5. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  6. Evaluating Evaporation with Satellite Thermal Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    satin11±m - mitted tuml Jbiftwe zadatcu mn a zopiar bmis oww =% of tho 9, Is wzam tvputin is &cmqi~n by th rat =u:pwt Of -ftm tho VOW OZfa to tt ~e. vmW f...Bay Monthly Evaporation at Tefferablre = 200C Epa = -10.819 + 1.416(20) = 17.501 E’I lake - (17.501) (0.7) (0.95) = 116 Eae= -6.709 + 0.917 (20) =1.3...Bear River Bay Day-Before Average Evaporation at Telperatiure =20 0 C Epa = -0.386 + 0.056(20) - 0.734 E ake (0.734) (0.7) (0.95) = 0.49~1 =lk -0.266

  7. Evaporation kinetics of DIDP plasticizer from PVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouani, Fatma; Mkacher, Inès; Colin, Xavier; Brument, Yves; Cristiano-Tassi, Antonella

    2014-05-01

    The physical loss of diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP) plasticizer from PVC films of about 50 μm thickness has been investigated between 95 and 160°C in air by FTIR spectrophotometry and gravimetry. Complementary OIT measurements have been performed to follow the stabilizer depletion and to confirm that the dehydrochlorination of PVC remains negligible for all exposure durations under study. As expected for thin PVC films, the overall loss kinetics obeys a first order law, indicating that it is controlled by DIDP evaporation. The corresponding coefficient of DIDP evaporation obeys an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of about 96 kJ mol-1. These results are in good agreement with those previously reported in the literature for other types of phthalate plasticizers of PVC.

  8. Thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation water recovery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Winkler, H. E.; Dehner, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The recently developed Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) offers a highly competitive approach to water recovery from waste fluids for future on-orbit stations such as the Space Operations Center. Low power, compactness and gravity insensitive operation are featured in this vacuum distillation subsystem that combines a hollow fiber membrane evaporator with a thermoelectric heat pump. The hollow fiber elements provide positive liquid/gas phase control with no moving parts other than pumps and an accumulator, thus solving problems inherent in other reclamation subsystem designs. In an extensive test program, over 850 hours of operation were accumulated during which time high quality product water was recovered from both urine and wash water at an average steady state production rate of 2.2 pounds per hour.

  9. Formation and evaporation of nonsingular black holes.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sean A

    2006-01-27

    Regular (nonsingular) space-times are given that describe the formation of a (locally defined) black hole from an initial vacuum region, its quiescence as a static region, and its subsequent evaporation to a vacuum region. The static region is Bardeen-like, supported by finite density and pressures, vanishing rapidly at large radius and behaving as a cosmological constant at small radius. The dynamic regions are Vaidya-like, with ingoing radiation of positive-energy flux during collapse and negative-energy flux during evaporation, the latter balanced by outgoing radiation of positive-energy flux and a surface pressure at a pair creation surface. The black hole consists of a compact space-time region of trapped surfaces, with inner and outer boundaries that join circularly as a single smooth trapping horizon.

  10. Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

    2011-08-12

    Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem.

  11. The leading edge of evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Guéna, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, A M

    2007-08-01

    New experiments on drops evaporating in normal atmosphere from smooth substrates in the situation of complete wetting are reported and compared with the available theoretical model. They are the continuation of previous work with alkane or water sessile drops, which is first briefly summarized. The model accounts very well for the dynamics of the drop radius, but the predictions are only qualitative for the contact angle, especially for small angles. Experiments with hanging drops allow us first to discard any influence of convection in the gas phase on the drops dynamics. Then the main part of the paper concerns new experiments with polydimethylsiloxane oligomers. These silicone oils are similar to alkanes as far as evaporation rate is concerned, but have lower surface tensions, and therefore smaller dynamic contact angles. The purity of the oils appears to be critical for the experiments, and requires a preliminary investigation. Then a systematic study of the drops dynamics is presented, as a basis for forthcoming theoretical work.

  12. Influence of Refrigerant Oil on Evaporator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Katsuta, Masafumi

    Because of the phase-out CFC Freon series required by Montreal Protocal, the conversion to HFC alternatives for vapor compression refrigeration system have been in progress. The each component design of these system should need to be reassessed, however, to improve the performance and compactness of the evaporator, an influence of the refrigerant oil on the refrigerant side heat transfer remains as an important and unsolved subject. In this article, the previous research progresses on the thermophysical properties, two-phase flow regimes and heat transfer in evaporator tube of refrigerant and oil mixture are briefly reviewed and the ability of these results to the combination of the alternative refrigerant and oil system is discussed. According to the review, the limited quantitative agreements were obtained from the perfect miscible refrigerant and oil mixture and, in particular, the much detailed research on the heat transfer mechanisms are required in future.

  13. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  14. Thermodynamic Modeling of Savannah River Evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-08-02

    A thermodynamic model based on the code SOLGASMIX is developed to calculate phase equilibrium in evaporators and related tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This model uses the Pitzer method to calculate activity coefficients, and many of the required Pitzer parameters have been determined in the course of this work. Principal chemical species in standard SRS simulant solutions are included, and the temperature range for most parameters has been extended above 100 C. The SOLGASMIX model and calculations using the code Geochemists Workbench are compared to actual solubility data including silicate, aluminate, and aluminosilicate solutions. In addition, SOLGASMIX model calculations are also compared to transient solubility data involving SRS simulant solutions. These comparisons indicate that the SOLGASMIX predictions closely match reliable data over the range of temperature and solution composition expected in the SRS evaporator and related tanks. Predictions using the Geochemists Workbench may be unreliable, due primarily to the use of an inaccurate activity coefficient model.

  15. Characterization results for the October 2015-Tank for farm 3H evaporator overhead examples

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, J. C.

    2016-01-28

    This report contains the radioanalytical results of the 3H evaporator overhead sample received at SRNL on October 13, 2015. Specifically, concentrations of 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I are reported and compared to the corresponding Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits of the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) Waste Water Collection Tank (WWCT) (rev. 6). All of the radionuclide concentrations in the sample were found to be in compliance with the ETP WAC limits.

  16. Characterization Results for the March 2016 H-Tank Farm 2H Evaporator Overhead Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, J. C.

    2016-05-09

    This report contains the radioanalytical results of the 2H evaporator overhead sample received at SRNL on March 16, 2016. Specifically, concentrations of 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I are reported and compared to the corresponding Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits of the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) Waste Water Collection Tank (WWCT) (rev. 6). All of the radionuclide concentrations in the sample were found to be in compliance with the ETP WAC limits.

  17. A physical model of the evaporating meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzamoghadam, A. ); Catton, I. )

    1988-02-01

    Transport phenomena associated with the heating of a stationary fluid near saturation by an inclined, partially submerged copper plate were studied analytically. Under steady-state evaporation, the meniscus profile was derived using an appropriate liquid film velocity and temperature distribution in an integral approach similar to boundary layer analysis. Derivation of the meniscus profile led to predicting heat transfer and performance as a function of angle of inclination of the plate.

  18. Fluid Flow in An Evaporating Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Larson, R.

    1999-01-01

    Droplet evaporation is a common phenomenon in everyday life. For example, when a droplet of coffee or salt solution is dropped onto a surface and the droplet dries out, a ring of coffee or salt particles is left on the surface. This phenomenon exists not only in everyday life, but also in many practical industrial processes and scientific research and could also be used to assist in DNA sequence analysis, if the flow field in the droplet produced by the evaporation could be understood and predicted in detail. In order to measure the fluid flow in a droplet, small particles can be suspended into the fluid as tracers. From the ratio of gravitational force to Brownian force a(exp 4)(delta rho)(g)/k(sub B)T, we find that particle's tendency to settle is proportional to a(exp 4) (a is particle radius). So, to keep the particles from settling, the droplet size should be chosen to be in a range 0.1 -1.0 microns in experiments. For such small particles, the Brownian force will affect the motion of the particle preventing accurate measurement of the flow field. This problem could be overcome by using larger particles as tracers to measure fluid flow under microgravity since the gravitational acceleration g is then very small. For larger particles, Brownian force would hardly affect the motion of the particles. Therefore, accurate flow field could be determined from experiments in microgravity. In this paper, we will investigate the fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under normal gravity, and compare experiments to theories. Then, we will present our ideas about the experimental measurement of fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under microgravity.

  19. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Darab, J.G.; Gross, M.E.

    1999-05-11

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer. 3 figs.

  20. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Darab, John G.; Gross, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer.

  1. Chromospheric evaporation in sympathetic coronal bright points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric evaporation is a key process in solar flares that has been extensively investigated using spectroscopic observations. However, direct soft X-ray (SXR) imaging of the process is rare, especially in remote brightenings associated with the primary flares that have recently attracted a great deal of attention. Aims: We intend to find the evidence for chromospheric evaporation and figure out the cause of the process in sympathetic coronal bright points (CBPs), i.e., remote brightenings induced by the primary CBP. Methods: We utilised the high-cadence and high-resolution SXR observations of CBPs from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) aboard the Hinode spacecraft on 2009 August 23. Results: We discovered a thermal conduction front propagating from the primary CBP (hereafter BP1) to the first of the sympathetic CBPs (hereafter BP2) that is 60″ away from BP1. The apparent velocity of the thermal conduction is ~138 km s-1. Afterwards, hot plasma flowed upwards into the loop connecting BP1 and BP2 at a speed of ~76 km s-1, a clear signature of chromospheric evaporation. Similar upflow was also observed in the loop connecting BP1 and the other sympathetic CBP (hereafter BP3) that is 80″ away from BP1, though less significant than BP2. The apparent velocity of the upflow is ~47 km s-1. The thermal conduction front propagating from BP1 to BP3 was not well identified except for the jet-like motion also originating from BP1. Conclusions: We propose that the gentle chromospheric evaporation in the sympathetic CBPs were caused by thermal conduction originating from the primary CBP.

  2. Sintered Lining for Heat-Pipe Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, D. M.; Eastman, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Hotspots eliminated by lining inner wall. Distribution of heat transfer liquid in heat-pipe evaporator improved by lining inner wall with layer of sintered metal. Sintered layer takes place of layer of screen wick formerly sintered or bonded to wall. Since sintered layer always full of liquid, no hotspot of type that previously arose where former screen wick did not fit properly against wall.

  3. Meteorological Factors Affecting Evaporation Duct Height Climatologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    part of the regions. 25 REFERENCES Bean, B. R. and E. J. Dutton, 1967: Radio meteorology. NBS monograph 92. National Bureau of Standards, Washington...lower boundary. Radio Sci., 13, 3, p. 489. Hitney, H. V., 1975: Propagation modeling in the evaporation duct. NELC TR-1947. Naval Electronics...Laboratory Center, San Diego, CA 92152. Jeske, H., 1971. The state of radar range propagation over sea. Tropospheric radio wave propagation, part II. NATO

  4. Impact of Soil Layering on Evaporation Driven Flow and Transport in Arid Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, W.; Nicholl, M. J.; Young, M. H.; Yu, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Coupling between soil development, hydrologic processes, and plant growth in arid regions is not well understood. Here, we integrate field, lab and numerical investigations to study the impact of soil layering on evaporation driven flow and transport in arid soils. Specifically, two hypotheses are proposed: 1) soil horizon development may significantly impact evaporation rate and spatio-temporal chemical species redistribution in arid soils; 2) differences in layering between soils beneath plant canopies and nearby interspace (bare soils) may significantly influence evaporation-driven upward water flow and solute transport. Field samples were collected from two 1-m deep soil pits in Eldorado Valley, approximately 50 km from Las Vegas, Nevada. One soil pit was located beneath a creosote bush, the other from the adjacent interspace. The overall concentrations of K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42-, and soluble salts in soils under plant canopy are much higher than those from the interspace. Salts accumulated at depths from 60 to 90 cm under the canopy; in contrast, the salt concentrations in bare soils were more uniform and may accumulate in relatively deeper layers. Soil samples taken from the pits will be packed into layered and non- layered columns, respectively, to examine the effects of soil layering on evaporation flow and transport. Evaporation rate, soil-water matric/osmotic potential, and temperature gradients in each column will be continuously monitored. Upward flow and transport in different soil layering under various conditions will be simulated using the HYDRUS model. It is expected that less soil horizon development will lead to higher evaporation rates, resulting in lower volumetric water content and higher accumulation of salts in the uppermost soil horizons.

  5. Effect of gasoline/methanol blends on motorcycle emissions: Exhaust and evaporative emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Mingda; Li, Jiaqiang; Peng, Zihang; Song, Yanan; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-02-01

    The emission characteristics of motorcycles using gasoline and M15 (consisting of 85% gasoline and 15% methanol by volume) were investigated in this article. Exhaust and evaporative emissions, including regulated and unregulated emissions, of three motorcycles were investigated on the chassis dynamometer over the Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) and in the Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination (SHED), respectively. The regulated emissions were detected by an exhaust gas analyzer directly. The unregulated emissions, including carbonyls, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and methanol, were sampled through battery-operated air pumps using tubes coated with 2,4-dintrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), Tenax TA and silica gel, respectively. The experimental results showed that, for exhaust emission, compared with those from gasoline fueled motorcycles, the concentration of total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO from motorcycles fueled with M15 decreased by 11%-34.5% and 63%-84% respectively, while the concentration of NOx increased by 76.9%-107.7%. Compared with those from gasoline fueled motorcycles, BTEX from motorcycles fueled with M15 decreased by 16%-60% while formaldehyde increased by 16.4%-52.5%. For evaporative emission, diurnal losses were more than hot soak losses and turned out to be dominated in evaporative emissions. In addition, compared with gasoline fueling motorcycles, the evaporative emissions of THC, carbonyls and VOCs from motorcycles fueled with M15 increased by 11.7%-37%, 38%-45% and 16%-42%, respectively. It should be noted that the growth rate of methanol was as high as 297%-1429%. It is important to reduce the evaporative emissions of methanol fueling motorcycles.

  6. Transport of Colloids along Corners: Visualization of Evaporation-Induced Flows beyond the Axisymmetric Condition.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Yáñez Soto, Bernardo; Arauz-Lara, José L

    2016-08-16

    Nonhomogeneous evaporation fluxes have been shown to promote the formation of internal currents in sessile droplets, explaining the patterns that suspended particles leave after the droplet has dried out. Although most evaporation experiments have been conducted using spherical-cap-shaped drops, which are essentially in an axisymmetric geometry, here we show an example of nonhomogeneous evaporation in asymmetric geometries, which is visualized by following the motion of colloidal particles along liquid fingers forming a meniscus at square corners. It is found that the particle's velocity increases with the diffusive evaporation factor [Formula: see text] for the three tested fluids: water, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and ethanol (EtOH). Here, [Formula: see text] is the vapor diffusivity in air, RH is the relative amount of vapor in the atmosphere, and cs is the saturated vapor concentration. We observed that in IPA and EtOH the internal currents promote a 3D spiral motion, whereas in water the particle's trajectory is basically unidirectional. By adding 0.25 critical micelle concentration (CMC) of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant in water, a velocity blast was observed in the whole circulation flow pattern, going from [Formula: see text] to nearly [Formula: see text] in the longitudinal velocity component. To assess the effect of breaking the axisymmetric condition on the evaporation flux profile, we numerically solved the diffusive equation in model geometries that preserve the value of the contact angle θ but introduce an additional angle ϕ that characterizes the solid substrate. By testing different combinations of θ and ϕ, we corroborated that the evaporation flux increases when the substrate and the gas-liquid curves meet at corners with increasing sharpness.

  7. Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Pot Bottom Sample [HTF-13-11-28H

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.

    2013-07-15

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2H-evaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2H-evaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ''as received'' basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st

  8. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10

  9. Modeling of Bulk Evaporation and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Ding, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the modeling and mathematical formulation of the bulk evaporation and condensation involved in liquid-vapor phase change processes. An internal energy formulation, for these phase change processes that occur under the constraint of constant volume, was studied. Compared to the enthalpy formulation, the internal energy formulation has a more concise and compact form. The velocity and time scales of the interface movement were obtained through scaling analysis and verified by performing detailed numerical experiments. The convection effect induced by the density change was analyzed and found to be negligible compared to the conduction effect. Two iterative methods for updating the value of the vapor phase fraction, the energy based (E-based) and temperature based (T-based) methods, were investigated. Numerical experiments revealed that for the evaporation and condensation problems the E-based method is superior to the T-based method in terms of computational efficiency. The internal energy formulation and the E-based method were used to compute the bulk evaporation and condensation processes under different conditions. The evolution of the phase change processes was investigated. This work provided a basis for the modeling of thermal performance of multi-phase nuclear fuel elements under variable gravity conditions, in which the buoyancy convection due to gravity effects and internal heating are involved.

  10. Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Bel, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.

    2009-04-09

    Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: 1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; 2) suppression of ELMs; 3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; 4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; 5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; 6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; 7) reduced SOL plasma density; and 8) reduced edge neutral density.

  11. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types in the parking lanes – permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). An impermeable liner installed 0.4 m below the driving surface in four 11.6-m by 4.74-m sections per each pavement type captures all infiltrating water and routes it to collection tanks that can contain events up to 38 mm. Each section has a design impervious area to permeable pavement area ratio of 0.66:1. Pressure transducers installed in the underdrain collection tanks measured water level for 24 months. Level was converted to volume using depth-to-volume ratios for individual collection tanks. Using a water balance approach, the measured infiltrate volume was compared to rainfall volume on an event-basis to determine the rainfall retained in the pavement strata and underlying aggregate. Evaporation since the previous event created additional storage in the pavement and aggregate layers. Events were divided into three groups based on antecedent dry period (ADP) and three, four-month categories of potential e

  12. Evaporation of hot jupiters and hot neptunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenreich, D.

    2011-02-01

    Among the nearly five hundred extra-solar planets known, almost 30% orbit closer than 0.1 AU from their parent star. We will review the observations and the corresponding models of the evaporation of these `hot jupiters'. The observations started with the discovery made with HST that the planet orbiting HD 209458 has an extended atmosphere of escaping hydrogen. Subsequent observations obtained with HST/STIS and HST/ACS confirm the escape of the gas. Even more, oxygen and carbon have been shown to be present at very high altitude in the upper atmosphere. Observations of other targets like HD 189733 and WASP-12 show that evaporation is a general phenomenon which could contribute to the evolution of planets orbiting close to their parent stars. To interpret these observations, we developed models to quantify the escape rate from the measured occultation depths. Numerous models have also been published to investigate mechanisms which can lead to the estimated escape rate. In general, the high temperature of the upper atmosphere heated by the far and extreme UV combined with the tidal forces allow a very efficient evaporation of the upper atmosphere. We will review the different models and their implications.

  13. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  14. Digitally Programmable Micro Evaporation Source for Nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Del Corro, Pablo; Stark, Thomas; Lally, Richard; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cris; Bishop, David

    2015-03-01

    There is a significant world-wide effort to develop nano-manufacturing methods that can extend into the deep nanoscale region, below 20 nm. Techniques include photolithography, nano-imprint and direct write methods such as dip-pen lithography and atomic calligraphy. A central component of any fabrication setup is the deposition control of the materials to be used. Here we present a MEMS based, multi-material evaporation source array with each source element consisting of a polysilicon plate suspended by two electrical constriction leads. When resistively heating the plate, the pre-loaded material is thermally evaporated off of the plate. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, digitally programmable evaporation source. Pulsing the source with precisely controlled peak voltage and timing can emit atom fluxes with an unprecedented level of control in terms of what, when and how many atoms get deposited. By varying their dimensions and arrangement, the source array can provide controllable atom fluxes ranging over ten orders of magnitude. Such a material source can provide precise control and flexibility when conducting nanopatterning and nanolithography.

  15. 17Oexcess in evaporated desert waters and vapor from evaporation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surma, J.; Assonov, S.; Staubwasser, M.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes are classical proxies for the investigation of climatic effects in hydrological processes. The combination of the isotopic ratios 17O/16O and 18O/16O in water allowed the determination of mass dependent processes and enabled differentiation between equilibrium and kinetic fractionation (Barkan and Luz, 2007). In analogy to d-excess, deviation in δ17O from the global average trend of meteoric water is defined as: 17Oexcess = δ'17O - 0.528 × δ'18O 17Oexcess depends on the impact of diffusive evaporation into air and thus reflects relative humidity conditions. The isotope ratios of water δ17O and δ18O were determined by isotope ratio gas mass spectrometry in dual inlet mode on a ThermoFinnigan MAT 253. The oxygen was extracted by water fluorination with CoF3. Our average measurement precision for δ17O is ×0.03 ‰, for δ18O ×0.05 ‰ and for 17Oexcess approximately ×7 per meg (1σ). We compared 17Oexcess in natural waters from the highly arid deserts of Sistan (East Iran) and Atacama (Chile) with data obtained from evaporation experiments. In these experiments, water was evaporated into a stream of dry nitrogen and vapor collected cryogenically. The data show a systematic depletion of 17Oexcess in water with increasing degree of evaporation in the residual water body. Most negative 17Oexcess were determined for samples from ponds (Sistan) and salars (Atacama). These strongly evaporated samples indicate an evaporation development, following a fractionation trend (λ) of approximately 0.523. The evaporation experiment shows a λ of 0.525 and is in agreement with water data from an experiment by Barkan and Luz (2007). The difference between natural and experimental evaporation suggests either different evaporation kinetics in the natural environment, variable proportion of kinetic and equilibrium fractionation, or additional diffusive processes during ground water seepage. References: Barkan, E. and Luz, L. (2007). Diffusivity

  16. Experimental investigation of interfacial energy transport in an evaporating sessile droplet for evaporative cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Md Almostasim; MacDonald, Brendan D

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally examine evaporation flux distributions and modes of interfacial energy transport for continuously fed evaporating spherical sessile water droplets in a regime that is relevant for applications, particularly for evaporative cooling systems. The contribution of the thermal conduction through the vapor phase was found to be insignificant compared to the thermal conduction through the liquid phase for the conditions we investigated. The local evaporation flux distributions associated with thermal conduction were found to vary along the surface of the droplet. Thermal conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation but did not account for all of the energy transport, contributing 64±3%, 77±3%, and 77±4% of the energy required for the three cases we examined. Based on the temperature profiles measured along the interface we found that thermocapillary flow was predicted to occur in our experiments, and two convection cells were consistent with the temperature distributions for higher substrate temperatures while a single convection cell was consistent with the temperature distributions for a lower substrate temperature.

  17. Experimental investigation of interfacial energy transport in an evaporating sessile droplet for evaporative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Md. Almostasim; MacDonald, Brendan D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally examine evaporation flux distributions and modes of interfacial energy transport for continuously fed evaporating spherical sessile water droplets in a regime that is relevant for applications, particularly for evaporative cooling systems. The contribution of the thermal conduction through the vapor phase was found to be insignificant compared to the thermal conduction through the liquid phase for the conditions we investigated. The local evaporation flux distributions associated with thermal conduction were found to vary along the surface of the droplet. Thermal conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation but did not account for all of the energy transport, contributing 64 ±3 % , 77 ±3 % , and 77 ±4 % of the energy required for the three cases we examined. Based on the temperature profiles measured along the interface we found that thermocapillary flow was predicted to occur in our experiments, and two convection cells were consistent with the temperature distributions for higher substrate temperatures while a single convection cell was consistent with the temperature distributions for a lower substrate temperature.

  18. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol.

    PubMed

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-04-29

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry.

  19. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry.

  20. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry. PMID:27125240