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Sample records for events er-5-3 channel

  1. Channel Transmission Loss Studies During Ephemeral Flow Events: ER-5-3 Channel and Cambric Ditch, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Miller; S.A. Mizell; R.H. French; D.G. Meadows; M.H. Young

    2005-10-01

    Transmission losses along ephemeral channels are an important, yet poorly understood, aspect of rainfall-runoff prediction. Losses occur as flow infiltrates channel bed, banks, and floodplains. Estimating transmission losses in arid environments is difficult because of the variability of surficial geomorphic characteristics and infiltration capacities of soils and near-surface low-permeability geologic layers (e.g., calcrete). Transmission losses in ephemeral channels are nonlinear functions of discharge and time (Lane, 1972), and vary spatially along the channel reach and with soil antecedent moisture conditions (Sharma and Murthy, 1994). Rainfall-runoff models used to estimate peak discharge and runoff volume for flood hazard assessment are not designed specifically for ephemeral channels, where transmission loss can be significant because of the available storage volume in channel soils. Accuracy of the flow routing and rainfall-runoff models is dependent on the transmission loss estimate. Transmission loss rate is the most uncertain parameter in flow routing through ephemeral channels. This research, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), is designed to improve understanding of the impact of transmission loss on ephemeral flood modeling and compare various methodologies for predicting runoff from rainfall events. Various applications of this research to DOE projects include more site-specific accuracy in runoff prediction; possible reduction in size of flood mitigation structures at the NTS; and a better understanding of expected infiltration from runoff losses into landfill covers. Two channel transmission loss field experiments were performed on the NTS between 2001 and 2003: the first was conducted in the ER-5-3 channel (Miller et al., 2003), between March and June 2001, and the second was conducted in the Cambric Ditch (Mizell et al., 2005), between April

  2. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at

  3. Vegetation and Channel Morphology Responses to Ordinary High Water Discharge Events in Arid West Stream Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    events that occur between periods of drought. It is important to understand how vegetation and stream channel morphology respond to various discharge...because there were no discharge events in our study watersheds during our study period that were large enough to affect this part of the channel...AZ 36.94389103 –109.7106684 Southwest– Northeast Compound/ Single Thread Tropical/ Subtropical Steppe Soft Rock Jurassic Navajo sandstone In a

  4. Event scale variability of mixed alluvial-bedrock channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kristen; Turowski, Jens; Hovius, Niels

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between flood events and fluvial behavior is critical for understanding how rivers may respond to the changing hydrologic forcing that may accompany climate change. In mixed bedrock-alluvial rivers, the response of the system to a flood event can be affected by a large number of factors, including coarse sediment availability in the channel, sediment supply from the hillslopes, bedrock-controlled changes in channel width and planform, and the shape of the hydrograph. We use the Daan River Gorge in western Taiwan as a case study to directly observe the effect of individual flood events on channel evolution. The 1200 m long and up to 20 m deep bedrock gorge formed in response to uplift of the riverbed during the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. The extremely rapid pace of change ensures that flood events have measurable and often dramatic effects on the channel. Taiwan is subject to both summer typhoons and a spring monsoon, resulting in numerous channel-altering floods with a range of magnitudes. Discharge is therefore highly variable, ranging from 5 to over 2000 m3/s, and changes in the channel are almost entirely driven by discrete flood events. Since early 2009 we have monitored changes in the gorge with repeated RTK GPS surveys, laser rangefinder measurements, and terrestrial LIDAR surveys. Six rainfall stations and five water level gauges provide hydrological data for the basin. We find a distinct relationship between flood magnitude and the magnitude of geomorphic change; however, we do not find a clear relationship between flood characteristics and the direction of change - whether the channel experienced aggradation or erosion in a particular flood. Upstream coarse sediment supply and the influence of abrupt changes in channel width on bedload flux through the gorge appear to have important influences on the channel response. The better understand these controls, we use the model sedFlow (Heimann et al., 2014) to explore the effects of interactions

  5. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryAs pressure increases on the availability of water resources worldwide, especially in the face of climatic change, it is probable that the likelihood of streams undergoing at least some periods of drying will increase in arid and semi-arid regions. This has implications for the ongoing management of waterways in these areas. One area of concern is the potential occurrence of hypoxic blackwater events upon re-instatement of flows in creek and river channels following periods of drying. Hypoxic blackwater events are characterised by high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the metabolism of which results in low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water column, which can cause fish and crustacean mortality. Therefore, understanding hypoxic blackwater events is important in order to reduce the potential for fish mortalities and other water quality impacts from both managed and natural flows. In this study, we set out to determine the factors that influenced the occurrence of a hypoxic blackwater event in the Edward-Wakool river system, in southern NSW, Australia during the previous austral summer (2008-2009). Standing stocks of plant litter, emergent macrophytes and river red gum saplings ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn.), as well as rates of litterfall, were determined in dry and inundated channels. A series of mesocosm experiments were undertaken to determine which carbon source was the greatest contributor to DOC and to DO depletion, and what loadings could result in hypoxia. These experiments were then used to create a simple algorithm relating carbon loading in a dry channel to DOC in the overlying water column following inundation. Results revealed that plant litter was the main contributor to water column DOC and to DO depletion. Litter loadings equal to or greater than 370 g m -2 were found to cause DO in a shallow (20 cm) water column at 20 °C to fall to zero within two days. This loading was approximately half of that found in dry channels in the

  6. Low intravascular pressure activates endothelial cell TRPV4 channels, local Ca2+ events, and IKCa channels, reducing arteriolar tone

    PubMed Central

    Bagher, Pooneh; Beleznai, Timea; Kansui, Yasuo; Mitchell, Ray; Garland, Christopher J.; Dora, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+-activated K channels (SKCa and IKCa channels) generate hyperpolarization that passes to the adjacent smooth muscle cells causing vasodilation. IKCa channels focused within EC projections toward the smooth muscle cells are activated by spontaneous Ca2+ events (Ca2+ puffs/pulsars). We now show that transient receptor potential, vanilloid 4 channels (TRPV4 channels) also cluster within this microdomain and are selectively activated at low intravascular pressure. In arterioles pressurized to 80 mmHg, ECs generated low-frequency (∼2 min−1) inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-based Ca2+ events. Decreasing intraluminal pressure below 50 mmHg increased the frequency of EC Ca2+ events twofold to threefold, an effect blocked with the TRPV4 antagonist RN1734. These discrete events represent both TRPV4-sparklet- and nonsparklet-evoked Ca2+ increases, which on occasion led to intracellular Ca2+ waves. The concurrent vasodilation associated with increases in Ca2+ event frequency was inhibited, and basal myogenic tone was increased, by either RN1734 or TRAM-34 (IKCa channel blocker), but not by apamin (SKCa channel blocker). These data show that intraluminal pressure influences an endothelial microdomain inversely to alter Ca2+ event frequency; at low pressures the consequence is activation of EC IKCa channels and vasodilation, reducing the myogenic tone that underpins tissue blood-flow autoregulation. PMID:23071308

  7. 77 FR 42464 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal... ``Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD'' in the... Channel, in Prince George's County, MD, effective from 5 a.m. until 11 a.m. on August 5, 2012....

  8. Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFET’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-15

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) is...is shown to agree with the experimental trends. SEU, DMOS, HEXFET, Single-Event- Burnout (SEB), N-Channel MOSFET, Temperature dependence .

  9. 78 FR 19155 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville... Channel Sprint'' swim event, to be held on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in... life on navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to restrict vessel traffic on...

  10. Geomorphic and Land Management Effects on Channel Altering Events in the Klamath Mountain, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A.; Mikulovsky, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Channel altering events have many impacts on stream channels and can be the result of debris flows, hyper-concentrated flows or severe flooding. They play a major role in coarse woody debris delivery to fish bearing streams and provide a mix of sediment to the higher order streams. Channel altering events can reduce or even temporarily eliminate riparian vegetation along the stream channel and create changes in the stream bed such as aggradation and degradation. These processes are a natural part of steep, rugged landscapes such as that of the Klamath Mountains and have long-term benefits to the stream systems. The process can be accelerated however, by land management activities or severe wildfire events. Previous investigations have focused on the impacts to landsliding rates as a result of timber harvest, wildfire and forest roads. These studies are limited in spatial extent and have not combined timber harvest, wildfire, forest roads, storm intensity and geomorphic characteristics in the same investigation. In addition, previous studies have not included areas where landslides did not occur for comparison. This study investigates the relationships between landform, timber harvest, forest roads, wildfire, and storm intensity over the Klamath Mountains in Northern California. The study investigates the initiation points of channel altering events that occurred in the flood of December 1996/January 1997. Channel altering event initiation points are the uppermost point of an altered channel segment (highest elevation) as apparent on aerial photos. The initiation points are compared to stratified random points in and near channels where no channel altering event occurred. The initiation points and random points were attributed with information such as aspect, hillslope gradient, elevation, bedrock type, landform, storm intensity and land management practices. A logistic regression analysis will determine if there is a suite of characteristics that separated the

  11. Bayesian Statistical Inference in Ion-Channel Models with Exact Missed Event Correction.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michael; Calderhead, Ben; Girolami, Mark A; Sivilotti, Lucia G

    2016-07-26

    The stochastic behavior of single ion channels is most often described as an aggregated continuous-time Markov process with discrete states. For ligand-gated channels each state can represent a different conformation of the channel protein or a different number of bound ligands. Single-channel recordings show only whether the channel is open or shut: states of equal conductance are aggregated, so transitions between them have to be inferred indirectly. The requirement to filter noise from the raw signal further complicates the modeling process, as it limits the time resolution of the data. The consequence of the reduced bandwidth is that openings or shuttings that are shorter than the resolution cannot be observed; these are known as missed events. Postulated models fitted using filtered data must therefore explicitly account for missed events to avoid bias in the estimation of rate parameters and therefore assess parameter identifiability accurately. In this article, we present the first, to our knowledge, Bayesian modeling of ion-channels with exact missed events correction. Bayesian analysis represents uncertain knowledge of the true value of model parameters by considering these parameters as random variables. This allows us to gain a full appreciation of parameter identifiability and uncertainty when estimating values for model parameters. However, Bayesian inference is particularly challenging in this context as the correction for missed events increases the computational complexity of the model likelihood. Nonetheless, we successfully implemented a two-step Markov chain Monte Carlo method that we called "BICME", which performs Bayesian inference in models of realistic complexity. The method is demonstrated on synthetic and real single-channel data from muscle nicotinic acetylcholine channels. We show that parameter uncertainty can be characterized more accurately than with maximum-likelihood methods. Our code for performing inference in these ion channel

  12. Relative Time-scale for Channeling Events Within Chaotic Terrains, Margaritifer Sinus, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, D.

    1985-01-01

    A relative time scale for ordering channel and chaos forming events was constructed for areas within the Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Transection and superposition relationships of channels, chaotic terrain, and the surfaces surrounding them were used to create the relative time scale; crater density studies were not used. Channels and chaos in contact with one another were treated as systems. These systems were in turn treated both separately (in order to understand internal relationships) and as members of the suite of Martian erosional forms (in order to produce a combined, master time scale). Channeling events associated with chaotic terrain development occurred over an extended geomorphic period. The channels can be divided into three convenient groups: those that pre-date intercrater plains development post-plains, pre-chasma systems; and those associated with the development of the Vallis Marineris chasmata. No correlations with cyclic climatic changes, major geologic events in other regions on Mars, or triggering phenomena (for example, specific impact events) were found.

  13. 75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on the waters of Banks Channel... will sponsor the ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters of Banks... Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the auspices of the Marine Event Permit issued to...

  14. 77 FR 47520 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ..., Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY..., to be held on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North... Intracoastal Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim event. DATES: This...

  15. 77 FR 35321 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ..., Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local... Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim event. DATES: Comments and related material must be...

  16. Event-related brain potentials to irrelevant auditory stimuli during selective listening: effects of channel probability.

    PubMed

    Akai, Toshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the cognitive process reflected by a positive deflection to irrelevant auditory stimuli (Pdi) during selective listening. Event-related brain potentials were recorded from 9 participants in a two-channel (left/right ears) selective listening task. Relative event probabilities of the relevant/irrelevant channels were 25%/75%, 50%/50%, and 75%/25%. With increasing probability of the relevant channel, behavioral performances (the reaction time and hit rate) for the targets within the relevant channel improved, reflecting development of a more robust attentional trace. At the same time, the amplitude of the early Pdi (200-300 ms after stimulus onset) elicited by the stimuli in the irrelevant channel with a decreased probability was enhanced in the central region. This positive relation between the strength of the attentional trace and the amplitude of the early Pdi suggests that the early Pdi is elicited by a mismatching between an incoming irrelevant stimulus and an attentional trace.

  17. Effectiveness of public health messaging and communication channels during smoke events: A rapid systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fish, Jennifer A; Peters, Micah D J; Ramsey, Imogen; Sharplin, Greg; Corsini, Nadia; Eckert, Marion

    2017-05-15

    Exposure to smoke emitted from wildfire and planned burns (i.e., smoke events) has been associated with numerous negative health outcomes, including respiratory symptoms and conditions. This rapid review investigates recent evidence (post-2009) regarding the effectiveness of public health messaging during smoke events. The objectives were to determine the effectiveness of various communication channels used and public health messages disseminated during smoke events, for general and at-risk populations. A search of 12 databases and grey literature yielded 1775 unique articles, of which 10 were included in this review. Principal results were: 1) Smoke-related public health messages are communicated via a variety of channels, but limited evidence is available regarding their effectiveness for the general public or at-risk groups. 2) Messages that use simple language are more commonly recalled, understood, and complied with. Compliance differs according to socio-demographic characteristics. 3) At-risk groups may be advised to stay indoors before the general population, in order to protect the most vulnerable people in a community. The research included in this review was observational and predominantly descriptive, and is therefore unable to sufficiently answer questions regarding effectiveness. Experimental research, as well as evaluations, are required to examine the effectiveness of modern communication channels, channels to reach at-risk groups, and the 'stay indoors' message. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Landscape response to rare flood events: a feedback cycle in channel-hillslope coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golly, Antonius; Turowski, Jens; Hovius, Niels; Badoux, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Fluvial channels and the surrounding landscapes are in a permanent feedback relation, exchanging mass and energy. Only rarely we get the opportunity to observe the processes at work and study the underlying cause and effect relations. This is especially difficult, since processes can be highly non-linear, and the response to a trigger may occur after a lag time such that their correspondence is not immediately obvious. In the Erlenbach, a mountain stream in the Swiss Prealps, we study the mechanistic relations between in-channel hydrology, channel morphology, external climatic forcing and the surrounding sediment sources to identify relevant controls of sediment input and their characteristic scales. Here, we present time-lapse observations of a suspended slow-moving landslide complex with a direct connection to the channel. The channel-hillslope system was in a stable system state for several months. Only after a flood event, in which a channel step was eroded at the base of the hillslope, the hillslope was destabilized through debuttressing. As a consequence, the landslide was reactivated and entered a sustained phase of integral motion. The response phase ended when the landslide material reached the channel and formed a new channel step, re-buttressing the hillslope. The observations reveal that, at least in the Erlenbach, sediment input from the hillslopes is not a uniform process controlled by precipitation only. Instead, a perturbation of the system in form of the erosion of an alluvial channel step was necessary to initiate the feedback cycle. The observation illustrates the importance of a thorough identification of the process mechanics to understand the sediment dynamics and the formation of landscapes on long time-scales.

  19. Multi-channel linear descriptors for event-related EEG collected in brain computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xiao-mei; Zheng, Chong-xun; Xu, Jin; Bin, Guang-yu; Wang, Hong-wu

    2006-03-01

    By three multi-channel linear descriptors, i.e. spatial complexity (Ω), field power (Σ) and frequency of field changes (Φ), event-related EEG data within 8-30 Hz were investigated during imagination of left or right hand movement. Studies on the event-related EEG data indicate that a two-channel version of Ω, Σ and Φ could reflect the antagonistic ERD/ERS patterns over contralateral and ipsilateral areas and also characterize different phases of the changing brain states in the event-related paradigm. Based on the selective two-channel linear descriptors, the left and right hand motor imagery tasks are classified to obtain satisfactory results, which testify the validity of the three linear descriptors Ω, Σ and Φ for characterizing event-related EEG. The preliminary results show that Ω, Σ together with Φ have good separability for left and right hand motor imagery tasks, which could be considered for classification of two classes of EEG patterns in the application of brain computer interfaces.

  20. Methods for improved forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M [Philadelphia, TN

    2007-04-24

    This disclosed invention concerns improvements in forewarning of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from mechanical devices, electrical devices, biomedical data, and other physical processes. First, a single channel of process-indicative data is selected that can be used in place of multiple data channels without sacrificing consistent forewarning of critical events. Second, the method discards data of inadequate quality via statistical analysis of the raw data, because the analysis of poor quality data always yields inferior results. Third, two separate filtering operations are used in sequence to remove both high-frequency and low-frequency artifacts using a zero-phase quadratic filter. Fourth, the method constructs phase-space dissimilarity measures (PSDM) by combining of multi-channel time-serial data into a multi-channel time-delay phase-space reconstruction. Fifth, the method uses a composite measure of dissimilarity (C.sub.i) to provide a forewarning of failure and an indicator of failure onset.

  1. Cell design modifications to harden a N-channel power IGBT against single event latchup

    SciTech Connect

    Lorfevre, E.; Sagnes, B.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Calvet, M.C.; Ecoffet, R.

    1999-12-01

    Device simulator is used to analyze the heavy ion induced failure mechanism in Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) and to investigate hardening solutions. Single Event Latchup was already identified as the failure mechanism. Lateral and vertical modifications of the P{sup +} plug are proposed to reduce the efficiency of the parasitic thyristor, responsible for the latchup, and validated by 2D-simulations on a N-channel IGBT cell structure.

  2. Antibiotic translocation through membrane channels: temperature-dependent ion current fluctuation for catching the fast events.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Chimerel, Catalin; Mach, Tivadar; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2009-10-01

    Temperature-dependent facilitated permeation of antibiotics through membrane channels was investigated. Here we reconstituted single OmpF trimers from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) into a planar lipid bilayer. The penetration of ampicillin through OmpF causes fluctuation in the ion current, and analysis of the fluctuations at different temperatures allows us to determine the mode of permeation. The residence time of the drug inside the channel decays strongly with temperature, reaching the resolution limit of the instrument at 30 degrees C. The number of events increases exponentially with temperature up to 30 degrees C and then gradually decreases as temperature increases. At room temperature, we observe about 25 events per second per monomer of the trimeric channel and an extrapolation to 37 degrees C gives roughly 50 events. The activation energy for ampicillin translocation through OmpF is estimated to be around 13 kT. Temperature-dependent study gives new insights into the faster translocation of small substrates through biological nanopores.

  3. EEG channel selection using particle swarm optimization for the classification of auditory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Nambu, Isao; Hokari, Haruhide; Wada, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) rely on the accurate classification of event-related potentials (ERPs) and their performance greatly depends on the appropriate selection of classifier parameters and features from dense-array electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Moreover, in order to achieve a portable and more compact BMI for practical applications, it is also desirable to use a system capable of accurate classification using information from as few EEG channels as possible. In the present work, we propose a method for classifying P300 ERPs using a combination of Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA) and a multiobjective hybrid real-binary Particle Swarm Optimization (MHPSO) algorithm. Specifically, the algorithm searches for the set of EEG channels and classifier parameters that simultaneously maximize the classification accuracy and minimize the number of used channels. The performance of the method is assessed through offline analyses on datasets of auditory ERPs from sound discrimination experiments. The proposed method achieved a higher classification accuracy than that achieved by traditional methods while also using fewer channels. It was also found that the number of channels used for classification can be significantly reduced without greatly compromising the classification accuracy.

  4. EEG Channel Selection Using Particle Swarm Optimization for the Classification of Auditory Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hokari, Haruhide

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) rely on the accurate classification of event-related potentials (ERPs) and their performance greatly depends on the appropriate selection of classifier parameters and features from dense-array electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Moreover, in order to achieve a portable and more compact BMI for practical applications, it is also desirable to use a system capable of accurate classification using information from as few EEG channels as possible. In the present work, we propose a method for classifying P300 ERPs using a combination of Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA) and a multiobjective hybrid real-binary Particle Swarm Optimization (MHPSO) algorithm. Specifically, the algorithm searches for the set of EEG channels and classifier parameters that simultaneously maximize the classification accuracy and minimize the number of used channels. The performance of the method is assessed through offline analyses on datasets of auditory ERPs from sound discrimination experiments. The proposed method achieved a higher classification accuracy than that achieved by traditional methods while also using fewer channels. It was also found that the number of channels used for classification can be significantly reduced without greatly compromising the classification accuracy. PMID:24982944

  5. 3D modelling of the climatic impact of outflow channel formation events on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbet, Martin; Forget, Francois; Head, James W.; Wordsworth, Robin

    2017-05-01

    Mars was characterized by cataclysmic groundwater-sourced surface flooding that formed large outflow channels and that may have altered the climate for extensive periods during the Hesperian era. In particular, it has been speculated that such events could have induced significant rainfall and caused the formation of late-stage valley networks. We present the results of 3-D Global Climate Model simulations reproducing the short and long term climatic impact of a wide range of outflow channel formation events under cold ancient Mars conditions. We find that the most intense of these events (volumes of water up to 107 km3 and released at temperatures up to 320 K) cannot trigger long-term greenhouse global warming, regardless of how favorable are the external conditions (e.g. obliquity and seasons). Furthermore, the intensity of the response of the events is significantly affected by the atmospheric pressure, a parameter not well constrained for the Hesperian era. Thin atmospheres (P < 80 mbar) can be heated efficiently because of their low volumetric heat capacity, triggering the formation of a convective plume that is very efficient in transporting water vapor and ice at the global scale. Thick atmospheres (P > 0.5 bar) have difficulty in producing precipitation far from the water flow area, and are more efficient in generating snowmelt. In any case, outflow channel formation events at any atmospheric pressure are unable to produce rainfall or significant snowmelt at latitudes below 40°N. As an example, for an outflow channel event (under a 0.2 bar atmospheric pressure and 45° obliquity) releasing 106 km3 of water heated at 300 K and at a discharge rate of 109 m3 s-1 , the flow of water reaches the lowest point of the northern lowlands (around ∼70°N, 30°W) after ∼3 days and forms a 200 m deep lake of 4.2 × 106 km2 after ∼20 days; the lake becomes entirely covered by an ice layer after ∼500 days. Over the short term, such an event leaves 6.5 × 103 km3

  6. Detections of Planets in Binaries Through the Channel of Chang-Refsdal Gravitational Lensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Shin, In-Gu; Jung, Youn Kil

    2017-02-01

    Chang-Refsdal (C-R) lensing, which refers to the gravitational lensing of a point mass perturbed by a constant external shear, provides a good approximation in describing lensing behaviors of either a very wide or a very close binary lens. C-R lensing events, which are identified by short-term anomalies near the peak of high-magnification lensing light curves, are routinely detected from lensing surveys, but not much attention is paid to them. In this paper, we point out that C-R lensing events provide an important channel to detect planets in binaries, both in close and wide binary systems. Detecting planets through the C-R lensing event channel is possible because the planet-induced perturbation occurs in the same region of the C-R lensing-induced anomaly and thus the existence of the planet can be identified by the additional deviation in the central perturbation. By presenting the analysis of the actually observed C-R lensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319, we demonstrate that dense and high-precision coverage of a C-R lensing-induced perturbation can provide a strong constraint on the existence of a planet in a wide range of planet parameters. The sample of an increased number of microlensing planets in binary systems will provide important observational constraints in giving shape to the details of planet formation, which have been restricted to the case of single stars to date.

  7. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Takashi; Tran, Daniel; Errakhi, Rafik; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Meimoun, Patrice; Briand, Joël; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François

    2010-10-13

    Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3) treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3)-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3), Ca(2+) influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3); namely, H(2)O(2) generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3)-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s) for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  8. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  9. 33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100.35T05-0482..., Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following location is a regulated area... Bascule Bridge, mile 283.1, latitude 34°13′06″ North, longitude 077°48′44″ West, at Wrightsville Beach...

  10. 33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100.35T05-0482..., Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following location is a regulated area... Bascule Bridge, mile 283.1, latitude 34°13′06″ North, longitude 077°48′44″ West, at Wrightsville Beach...

  11. Simulating single-event burnout of n-channel power MOSFET's

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.H.; Hohl, J.H.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Heavy ions are ubiquitous in a space environment. Single-event burnout of power MOSFET's is a sudden catastrophic failure mechanism that is initiated by the passage of a heavy ion through the device structure. The passage of the heavy ion generates a current filament that locally turns on a parasitic n-p-n transistor inherent to the power MOSFET. Subsequent high currents and high voltage in the device induce second breakdown of the parasitic bipolar transistor and hence meltdown of the device. This paper presents a model that can be used for simulating the burnout mechanism in order to gain insight into the significant device parameters that most influence the single-event burnout susceptibility of n-channel power MOSFET's.

  12. Magnetic Field Modeling of Hot Channels in four Flare/CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Su, Yingna

    2017-08-01

    We study the magnetic structure and 3D geometrical morphology of four active regions with sigmoidal hot channels which produced flare/CME events. Observational study has been done by Cheng & Ding (2016). Using the flux rope insertion method developed by van Ballegooijen (2004), we construct a series of magnetic field models of the four flare/CME events. Through comparing with non-potential coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA , we find that the critical stable model (i.e.,a magnetic field configuration at the boundary between stable and unstable states in parameter space) and the best-fit preflare model (unstable model) which best matches observations for every case, and we think that the real preflare magnetic field configuration may lie between the two models. Finally we calculate the magnetic energy free energy and magnetic helicity of the two selected models,and study the eruption mechanism.

  13. Proactive compared with passive adverse event recognition: calcium channel blocker-associated edema.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2008-09-01

    This article examines the concept of passive compared with proactive surveillance for monitoring adverse events occurring with antihypertensive medications, using the example of calcium channel blocker (CCB)-induced peripheral edema. Monitoring adverse events and clinical trial safety are important functions and dependent on investigator protocols and data and safety monitoring teams. Compared with proactive surveillance, voluntary reporting systems tend to yield a lower frequency of adverse events occurrence. Limitation of data has the potential to directly influence clinical and prescribing practices. This discussion addresses advantages of proactive surveillance accomplished by patient solicitation of adverse events and investigators' direct clinical examination. A literature search between the years 2000 and 2007 was conducted on MEDLINE for randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses reporting the incidence of dihydropyridine-associated peripheral edema. The incidence of edema was high in clinical trials in which patients were actively questioned about edema development and tended to be higher than reported in the prescribing information. The incidence of dihydropyridine CCB-induced edema appears to be dependent on the method of edema assessment.

  14. Photogrammetric recognition of subglacial drainage channels during glacier lake outburst events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, Ellen; Koschitzki, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, many glaciers all over the world have been distinctly retreating and thinning. One of the consequences of this is the increase of so called glacier lake outburst flood events (GLOFs): Lakes that have been dammed by a glacier spontaneously start to drain through a subglacial channel underneath the glacier due to their outweighing hydrostatic pressure. In a short period of time, the lake water drains under the glacier and causes floods in downstream valleys. In many cases the latter become hazardous for people and their property. Due to glacier movement, the tunnel will soon collapse, and the glacier lake refills, thus starting a new GLOF cycle. The mechanisms ruling GLOF events are yet still not fully understood by glaciologists. Thus, there is a demand for data and measurement values that can help to understand and model the phenomena. In view of the above, we will show how photogrammetric image sequence analysis can be used to collect data which allows for drawing conclusions about the location and development of a subglacial channel. The work is a follow-up on earlier work on a photogrammetric GLOF early warning system (Mulsow et. al., 2013). For the purpose of detecting the subglacial tunnel, a camera has been installed in a pilot study to observe the area of the Colonia glacier (Northern Patagonian ice field) where it dams the lake Lago Cachet II. To verify the hypothesis, that the course of the subglacial tunnel is indicated by irregular surface motion patterns during its collapse, the camera acquired image sequences of the glacier surface during several GLOF events. Applying LSM-based tracking techniques to these image sequences, surface feature motion trajectories could be obtained for a dense raster of glacier points. Since only a single camera has been used for image sequence acquisition, depth information is required to scale the trajectories. Thus, for scaling and georeferencing of the measurements a GPS-supported photogrammetric network

  15. Estimation of Channel-Forming Discharge and Large-Event Geomorphic Response Using HEC-RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, P.; Strom, K.; Hosseiny, S. M. H.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the present work was to consider the functionality and applicability of HEC-RAS sediment transport simulations in two situations. The first was as a mode for obtaining quick estimates of the effective discharge, one measure of channel-forming discharge, and the second was as a mode to quickly estimate sediment transport and the commensurate potential erosion and deposition during large flood events. Though there are many other sediment transport and morphodynamic models available, e.g., CCHE1D, Nays2DH, we were interested in using HEC-RAS since this is the model of choice for many regulatory bodies, e.g., FEMA, cities, and counties. This makes using the sediment transport capability of HEC-RAS a natural extension of models that already otherwise exist and are well calibrated. In first looking at the utility of these models, we wanted to estimate the effective discharge of streams. Effective discharge is one way of defining the channel-forming discharge for a stream and is therefore an important parameter in natural channel design and restoration efforts. By running this range of floods, one can easily obtain an estimate for recurrence interval most responsible for moving the majority of sediment over a long time period. Results were compared to data collected within our research group on the Brazos River (TX). Effective discharge is an important estimate, particularly in understanding the equilibrium channel condition. Nevertheless, large floods are contemporaneously catastrophic and understanding their potential effects is desirable. Finally, we performed some sensitivity analysis to better understand the underlying assumptions of the various sediment transport model options and how they might affect the outcome of the aforementioned computations.

  16. Total ionizing dose and single-event effect in vertical channel double-gate nMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; An, Xia; Xue, Shoubin; Huang, Liangxi; Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Ru

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event effect (SEE) in vertical channel double-gate (DG) nMOSFETs are comprehensively investigated. Due to the vertical channel structure and the excellent gate control capability, the vertical channel DG transistor is relatively resistant to TID and transient ionization effect. However, the dc characteristics of vertical channel DG device are very sensitive to permanent damage induced by a few ions hitting the device. The on-state current and transconductance of the vertical channel DG MOSFETs show significant degradation after exposure to heavy ions, which is attributed to the formation of displacement damage in the channel. As the device feature size scales down to the deca-nanometer regime, the influence of permanent damage induced by a few ions striking the device static performance cannot be ignored and should be seriously considered in radiation-hardened technologies.

  17. Three-channel Lissajous' trajectories of auditory event-related potentials to target stimuli.

    PubMed

    Attias, J; Pratt, H

    1990-01-01

    Three orthogonal recordings ('X,' 'Y' and 'Z') of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by auditory target stimuli were represented in 3-dimensional voltage-space, to produce 3-channel Lissajous' trajectories (3-CLTs). Stimuli were verbal or non-verbal and were differentiated by their pitch, phonemic or phonetic attributes. Visual inspection and quantitative evaluations unexpectedly revealed that the 3-CLT of these ERPs strongly resembles a 'hair-pin' trajectory. This trajectory titled in space at characteristic angles with each of the analysis axes: 133 degrees with the 'X' axis, 87 degrees with the 'Y' axis, and 54 degrees with the 'Z' axis. The relatively small inter-subject variability observed in the geometrical measures, particularly in orientation, may be attributed to the slight variation in the underlying generators. 3-CLT analysis could be useful in future clinical as well as source studies of ERP generators.

  18. 3D Modelling of the impact of outflow channel events on Late Hesperian Mars climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbet, M.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.; Head, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    During late Hesperian, large outflow channels observed in the Chryse Planitia area [1] are thought to have been carved by catastrophic and sudden water floods [2,3]. It has been speculated that such events may have modified the climate, at least locally and episodically, and could have induced precipitations and even rain [4] that could explain the formation of Late Hesperian valley networks under a cold contemporaneous climate. We present below 3D modeling of a sudden and extreme release of warm liquid water in the Chryse Planitia area on ancient Mars, assuming a faint young Sun and CO2 -dominated atmospheres thicker than today. 3D climate modeling under these conditions [5,6], and performed with a water cycle taking into account water vapor and clouds, have not been able yet to produce liquid water or at least significant precipitations by climatic processes anywhere on the planet, even when maximizing the greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds.

  19. Implementing Dense Arrays of Single-Channel Seismic Recorders to Detect Global Teleseism Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, C. T.; Sheehan, A. F.; Yang, Z.; Harder, S. H.; Miller, K. C.; Worthington, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    Single-Channel Reftek RT125A (Texan) seismic recorders have frequently been used to detect active-source seismic events (blasts). However, they have been thought to be inefficient for recording global seismicity over long time scales because of short battery life (days), single-channel capability, and typically high frequency response of associated geophones. The goal of this research is to determine just how effective Texan recorders can be for passive teleseism detection. An array of >800 Reftek RT125A recorders and geophones (OYO Geospace 4.5Hz) was recently deployed across the Bighorn Mountain Range in northern Wyoming as part of the EarthScope Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) Flexible Array experiment. In addition, 38 broadband and 172 short-period 3-component seismic stations were interspersed in the array, which we hope will aid in the detection of S wave arrival. Each RT125A was swapped every 4 days to replace batteries and offload data, allowing for a continuous data record over 15 days and potentially recording several global events per day. Because the array is densely spaced (~1km) we expect to be able to image the subsurface with a higher precision than was possible with wider arrays. Preliminary results have shown that M~5.0 events were discernable up to 8,000 km distance, and several M>6.0 were observable from any distance. For example the P, PP and S waves from a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands, AK (12:58GMT Aug 4 2010, depth 27km) can be seen clearly across the entire array. Despite the fact that the geophones are 4.5 Hz instruments, quality signals up to 3 s are observed for teleseisms with no special processing. Regional and local events are also well recorded, including a magnitude 4.8 earthquake near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, associated aftershocks of the Jackson Hole earthquake, and over 200 local mine blasts. The mine blasts were large enough to be recorded by the USArray Array Network Facility (ANF), requiring usable

  20. Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-29

    Two channels are visible in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft . The smaller one near the bottom did not carve as deeply as the larger channel at the top. The channel near the top of the image is near the origin of Mamers Valles.

  1. Observations of event-based streambed deformation in a gravel bed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, Judith K.

    2006-11-01

    The streambed is the major source of bed load sediment in gravel bed channels and is necessarily deformed during floods that mobilize sediment. This study uses observations of scour and fill from Carnation Creek, Canada, to articulate at-a-point relations of the occurrence and magnitude of bed deformation and the resulting adjustments in bed configuration over a series of flood events. The likelihood of local bed deformation by scour, fill, or both depends on flow magnitude. At most locations, there is an imbalance of scour and fill that leads to adjustments in bed elevation, and these imbalances increase with flow. Persistent deformation of locations in lower portions of the bed topography tend to produce larger total exchanges between bed and mobile sediment over the flood series but locations that experience similar frequencies of bed deformation do not produce unique depth distributions. These results underscore the importance of understanding the coupling of scour and fill that produces streambed adjustment when modeling streambed evolution and managing river habitat.

  2. Universality of Poisson indicator and Fano factor of transport event statistics in ion channels and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cao, Jianshu; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A

    2013-01-17

    We consider a generic stochastic model of ion transport through a single channel with arbitrary internal structure and kinetic rates of transitions between internal states. This model is also applicable to describe kinetics of a class of enzymes in which turnover events correspond to conversion of substrate into product by a single enzyme molecule. We show that measurement of statistics of single molecule transition time through the channel contains only restricted information about internal structure of the channel. In particular, the most accessible flux fluctuation characteristics, such as the Poisson indicator (P) and the Fano factor (F) as function of solute concentration, depend only on three parameters in addition to the parameters of the Michaelis-Menten curve that characterizes average current through the channel. Nevertheless, measurement of Poisson indicator or Fano factor for such renewal processes can discriminate reactions with multiple intermediate steps as well as provide valuable information about the internal kinetic rates.

  3. Strong regulation of slow anion channels and abscisic acid signaling in guard cells by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Schelle, I; Liao, Y J; Schroeder, J I

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that slow anion channels in guard cells need to be activated to trigger stomatal closing and efficiently inactivated during stomatal opening. The patch-clamp technique was employed here to determine mechanisms that produce strong regulation of slow anion channels in guard cells. MgATP in guard cells, serving as a donor for phosphorylation, leads to strong activation of slow anion channels. Slow anion-channel activity was almost completely abolished by removal of cytosolic ATP or by the kinase inhibitors K-252a and H7. Nonhydrolyzable ATP, GTP, and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate did not replace the ATP requirement for anion-channel activation. In addition, down-regulation of slow anion channels by ATP removal was inhibited by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. Stomatal closures in leaves induced by the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and malate were abolished by kinase inhibitors and/or enhanced by okadaic acid. These data suggest that ABA signal transduction may proceed by activation of protein kinases and inhibition of an okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase. This modulation of ABA-induced stomatal closing correlated to the large dynamic range for up- and down-regulation of slow anion channels by opposing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in guard cells. The presented opposing regulation by kinase and phosphatase modulators could provide important mechanisms for signal transduction by ABA and other stimuli during stomatal movements. PMID:11607582

  4. Ambient Tremor Triggered by Long-term Slow Slip Event in Bungo Channel, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, K.; Hirose, H.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tanaka, S.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a stick-slip in the transition zone between locked and stable sliding zones on the plate interface in Southwest Japan and Cascadia. ETS episode with duration of several days usually recurs at interval of several months at each segment. On the other hand, in the Bungo channel region where is the western edge of the ETS zone in SW Japan, tremor activity continued for several months during the long-term slow slip event (SSE) in 2003 and 2010. In this paper, the relationship between long-term SSE and surrounded triggered tremor is discussed. Tremor triggered by the long-term SSE is spatially localized in the narrow width of about 10 km at the shallowest part of the tremor zone, and at the neighboring area just downdip from the source fault of the SSE. The frequency distribution of tremor along the dip direction during the SSE period is consistent with the spatial distribution of total slip estimated for 2010 SSE. Therefore, the slip of the long-term SSE penetrated in the ETS zone may generate tremor. The daily number of the activated tremor is 12-14 during the SSE; however, it is 40-50 for regular ETS episode during the inter-SSE period. On the other hand, slip rates of the long-term SSE and ETS are typically 1 mm/d and 3 mm/d, respectively. Therefore, tremor rate may be controlled by slip rate. After SSEs in 2003 and 2010, tremor activity seems to slightly increase in the east region within 50 km from the triggered tremor area. Such 7-year period variation in tremor activity is observed in only the shallower side of the tremor zone. Moreover, pattern of the long-term variation seems to slightly migrate to east during a few years. We interpret that a tiny transient slip after the long-term SSE slowly propagates between transition and locked zones. Tremor activity at the shallowest part of the tremor zone in the Bungo channel continued longer than that of regular ETS in the late 2006 during the inter-SSE period. Associated tiny GPS

  5. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    great promise for the drone photogrammetry methods, which encouraged the exploration of the possibility of repeat aerial surveys to evaluate channel response to high flow events. Repeat drone surveys were performed following a sequence of high-flow events in Proctor Creek to evaluate the possibility of using these methods for assessment of stream channel response to flooding.

  6. Finite-Horizon H∞ Consensus for Multiagent Systems With Redundant Channels via An Observer-Type Event-Triggered Scheme.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenying; Wang, Zidong; Ho, Daniel W C

    2017-06-06

    This paper is concerned with the finite-horizon H∞ consensus problem for a class of discrete time-varying multiagent systems with external disturbances and missing measurements. To improve the communication reliability, redundant channels are introduced and the corresponding protocol is constructed for the information transmission over redundant channels. An event-triggered scheme is adopted to determine whether the information of agents should be transmitted to their neighbors. Subsequently, an observer-type event-triggered control protocol is proposed based on the latest received neighbors' information. The purpose of the addressed problem is to design a time-varying controller based on the observed information to achieve the H∞ consensus performance in a finite horizon. By utilizing a constrained recursive Riccati difference equation approach, some sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the H∞ consensus performance, and the controller parameters are also designed. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the desired reliability of redundant channels and the effectiveness of the event-triggered control protocol.

  7. 78 FR 34881 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville... event, to be held on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North... during the event. This action will restrict vessel traffic on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

  8. Channel Geometry and Flood Flows: Quantifying over-bank flow dynamics during high-flow events in North Carolina's floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Vimal, S.; Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural riparian areas play numerous roles in the maintenance and improvement of stream water quality. Both restoration of riparian areas and improvement of hydrologic connectivity to the stream are often key goals of river restoration projects. These management actions are designed to improve nutrient removal by slowing and treating overland flow delivered from uplands and by storing, treating, and slowly releasing streamwater from overbank inundation during flood events. A major question is how effective this storage of overbank flow is at treating streamwater based on the cumulative time stream discharge at a downstream location has spent in shallower, slower overbank flow. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program maintains a detailed statewide Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) using HEC-RAS modeling, lidar, and detailed surveyed river cross-sections. FRIS provides extensive information regarding channel geometry on approximately 39,000 stream reaches (a slightly coarser spatial resolution than the NHD+v2 dataset) with tens of cross-sections for each reach. We use this FRIS data to calculate volume and discharge from floodplain riparian areas separately from in-channel flow during overbank events. Preliminary results suggest that a small percentage of total annual discharge interacts with the full floodplain extent along a stream reach due to the infrequency of overbank flow events. However, with the significantly different physical characteristics of the riparian area when compared to the channel itself, this overbank flow can provide unique services to water quality. Our project aims to use this information in conjunction with data from the USGS SPARROW program to target non-point source hotspots of Nitrogen and Phosphorus addition and removal. By better understanding the flow dynamics within riparian areas during high flow events, riparian restoration projects can be carried out with improved efficacy.

  9. Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-20

    Today's VIS image shows a number of unnamed channels located on the northeastern margin of Terra Sabaea. Orbit Number: 61049 Latitude: 33.5036 Longitude: 58.6967 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-09-18 12:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20097

  10. 75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon,'' to be held on the waters adjacent to Wrightsville Beach... 13, 2010, the Wilmington YMCA will sponsor the ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance... Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the auspices of the marine event permit issued to the event sponsor and...

  11. Constraint on Additional Planets in Planetary Systems Discovered Through the Channel of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y.-K.; Park, H.

    2015-04-01

    High-magnification gravitational microlensing events provide an important channel of detecting planetary systems with multiple giants located at their birth places. In order to investigate the potential existence of additional planets, we reanalyze the light curves of the eight high-magnification microlensing events, for each of which a single planet was previously detected. The analyzed events include OGLE-2005-BLG-071, OGLE-2005-BLG-169, MOA-2007-BLG-400, MOA-2008-BLG-310, MOA-2009-BLG-319, MOA-2009-BLG-387, MOA-2010-BLG-477, and MOA-2011-BLG-293. We find that including an additional planet improves fits with {Δ }{{χ }2}\\lt 80 for seven out of eight analyzed events. For MOA-2009-BLG-319, the improvement is relatively big with {Δ }{{χ }2}∼ 143. From inspection of the fits, we find that the improvement of the fits is attributed to systematics in data. Although no clear evidence of additional planets is found, it is still possible to constrain the existence of additional planets in the parameter space. For this purpose, we construct exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of an additional planet as a function of its separation and mass ratio. We also present the exclusion ranges of additional planets with 90% confidence level for Jupiter-, Saturn-, and Uranus-mass planets.

  12. Influences of high-flow events on a stream channel altered by construction of a highway bridge: A case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, Lara B.; Welsh, Stuart A.; Anderson, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Impacts of highway construction on streams in the central Appalachians are a growing concern as new roads are created to promote tourism and economic development in the area. Alterations to the streambed of a first-order stream, Sauerkraut Run, Hardy County, WV, during construction of a highway overpass included placement and removal of a temporary culvert, straightening and regrading of a section of stream channel, and armourment of a bank with a reinforced gravel berm. We surveyed longitudinal profiles and cross sections in a reference reach and the altered reach of Sauerkraut Run from 2003 through 2007 to measure physical changes in the streambed. During the four-year period, three high-flow events changed the streambed downstream of construction including channel widening and aggradation and then degradation of the streambed. Upstream of construction, at a reinforced gravel berm, bank erosion was documented. The reference section remained relatively unchanged. Knowledge gained by documenting channel changes in response to natural and anthropogenic variables can be useful for managers and engineers involved in highway construction projects.

  13. 76 FR 60729 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to restrict vessel traffic on Banks, Motts, and...: If you have questions on this temporary ] rule, call or e-mail BOSN3 Joseph M. Edge, Coast Guard Sector North Carolina, Atlantic Beach, NC; telephone (252) 247-4525, e-mail Joseph.M.Edge@uscg.mil ....

  14. 78 FR 20849 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Potomac River; National Harbor Access Channel, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... regulations are necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. This action.... The purpose of the rule is to ensure safety of life on navigable waters of the United States during... individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This proposed rule...

  15. Structure and dynamics underlying elementary ligand binding events in human pacemaking channels

    PubMed Central

    Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Klenchin, Vadim A; White, David S; Cowgill, John B; Cui, Qiang; Goldsmith, Randall H; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Although molecular recognition is crucial for cellular signaling, mechanistic studies have relied primarily on ensemble measures that average over and thereby obscure underlying steps. Single-molecule observations that resolve these steps are lacking due to diffraction-limited resolution of single fluorophores at relevant concentrations. Here, we combined zero-mode waveguides with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to directly observe binding at individual cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNBDs) from human pacemaker ion channels critical for heart and brain function. Our observations resolve the dynamics of multiple distinct steps underlying cyclic nucleotide regulation: a slow initial binding step that must select a 'receptive' conformation followed by a ligand-induced isomerization of the CNBD. X-ray structure of the apo CNBD and atomistic simulations reveal that the isomerization involves both local and global transitions. Our approach reveals fundamental mechanisms underpinning ligand regulation of pacemaker channels, and is generally applicable to weak-binding interactions governing a broad spectrum of signaling processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20797.001 PMID:27858593

  16. Rare events via multiple reaction channels sampled by path replica exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2008-09-01

    Transition path sampling (TPS) was developed for studying activated processes in complex systems with unknown reaction coordinate. Transition interface sampling (TIS) allows efficient evaluation of the rate constants. However, when the transition can occur via more than one reaction channel separated by a high barrier, TPS and TIS are ineffective in sampling both channels. The combination of replica exchange with TIS can overcome this problem. This work shows how, by including both the backward and forward reactions, the corresponding rate constants, as well as the free energy barrier can be computed in a single simulation. The method is illustrated on a two dimensional potential using the Langevin dynamics. In addition, a simpler algorithm based on only forward shooting from the interfaces is shown to give equally accurate results, and forms a bridge between the transition interface and the forward flux sampling methods. The diffusive behavior of the replicas can be used to assess the quality of the choice of the order parameter used for the interfaces.

  17. Reach-scale channel sensitivity to multiple human activities and natural events: Lower Santa Clara River, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Peter W.; Dusterhoff, Scott R.; Sears, William A.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the cumulative impact of natural and human influences on the sensitivity of channel morphodynamics, a relative measure between the drivers for change and the magnitude of channel response, requires an approach that accommodates spatial and temporal variability in the suite of primary stressors. Multiple historical data sources were assembled to provide a reach-scale analysis of the lower Santa Clara River (LSCR) in Ventura County, California, USA. Sediment supply is naturally high due to tectonic activity, earthquake-generated landslides, wildfires, and high magnitude flow events during El Niño years. Somewhat typically for the region, the catchment has been subject to four reasonably distinct land use and resource management combinations since European-American settlement. When combined with analysis of channel morphological response (quantifiable since ca. 1930), reach-scale and temporal differences in channel sensitivity become apparent. Downstream reaches have incised on average 2.4 m and become narrower by almost 50% with changes focused in a period of highly sensitive response after about 1950 followed by forced insensitivity caused by structural flood embankments and a significant grade control structure. In contrast, the middle reaches have been responsive but are morphologically resilient, and the upstream reaches show a mildly sensitive aggradational trend. Superimposing the natural and human drivers for change reveals that large scale stressors (related to ranching and irrigation) have been replaced over time by a suite of stressors operating at multiple spatial scales. Lower reaches have been sensitive primarily to 'local' scale impacts (urban growth, flood control, and aggregate mining) whereas, upstream, catchment-scale influences still prevail (including flow regulation and climate-driven sediment supply factors). These factors illustrate the complexity inherent to cumulative impact assessment in fluvial systems, provide evidence for a

  18. Real time measurements of sediment transport and bed morphology during channel altering flow and sediment transport events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Joanna Crowe; Waters, Kevin A.; Cannatelli, Kristen M.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time measurements of bed changes over a reach are a missing piece needed to link bed morphology with sediment transport processes during unsteady flows when the bed adjusts quickly to changing transport rates or visual observation of the bed is precluded by fine sediment in the water column. A new technique is presented that provides continuous measurement of sediment movement over the length of a flume. A bedload monitoring system (BLMS) was developed that makes use of pressure pillows under a false flume bottom to measure sediment and water weights over discrete flume channel sections throughout a flow event. This paper details the construction of the BLMS and provides examples of its use in a laboratory setting to reconstruct bed slopes during unsteady flows and to create a real-time record of sediment transport rates across the flume channel bed during a sediment transporting flow. Data gathered from the BLMS compared well against techniques commonly in use in flume studies. When the BLMS was analyzed in conjunction with bed surface DEMs and differenced DEMs, a complete transport and bed adjustment picture was constructed. The difference DEMs provided information on the spatial extent of bed morphology changes. The BLMS supplied the data record necessary to reconstruct sediment transport records through the downstream channel, including locations and time periods of temporary sediment storage and supply. The BLMS makes it possible to construct a continuous record of the spatial distribution of sediment movement through the flume, including areas of temporary aggradation and degradation. Exciting implications of future research that incorporates a BLMS include a more informed management of river systems as a result of improved temporal predictions of sediment movement and the associated changes in channel slope and bed morphology.

  19. 33 CFR 100.35T05-0276 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD. 100.35T05-0276 Section 100.35T05-0276 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.35T05-0276 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events;...

  20. Sensing fluid pressure during plucking events in a natural bedrock channel and experimental flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C.; Harbor, D. J.; Keel, D.; Levy, S.; Kuehner, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    River channel erosion by plucking is believed to be the dominant erosional process in channels with fractured or jointed bedrock. However, despite its significance as an erosional mechanism, plucking is poorly studied in both laboratory and natural channels. In previous flume studies, model bedrock was plucked by fluid forces alone in nonuniform flow near jumps and waves even where blocks do not protrude into the flow. Here we develop sensor systems to test the hypothesis that bed fluid pressure gradients lift "pluckable" bedrock blocks in a natural field setting and a hydraulic flume. The field setting closely mimics the previous flume setup; the instrumented block is downstream of a roughly 1m step and exhibits no protrusion into the flow. The presence of the step promotes nonuniform flow which changes pressure in the bedrock crack network; slabs of bedrock that have slid downstream and sediment that has been pushed upstream 3-4 m under the bed and in the cracks suggest the influence of pressure differences throughout the crack network and below the bed. In this initial deployment, we evaluate a sensor that monitors movement and simultaneous pressure above and below the block. Sensors are emplaced in a 26kg, 45-cm-long, 20-cm-wide block broken from a 4.5-m-long, 11-cm-thick sandstone bed with a dense network of cracks nearly parallel to flow direction and include a tri-axial accelerometer/gyroscope and two fluid pressure sensors. The electronics are housed in a custom-designed 3D-printed ABS waterproof capsule that is mounted in a vertical hole through the rock. A concurrent flume study develops the sensors necessary to investigate the longitudinal pressure difference below a step using multiple analog sensors (0-1 psi gauge pressure) mounted flush to a false floor under the center of a 30x14-cm test zone. The 15-mm-wide sensors are aligned along the flow centerline and are placed under 25 1-cm-thick "pluckable" bedrock blocks constructed with a proprietary

  1. Characterization of bed load discharge in unsteady flow events in an ephemeral channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfi, Eran

    2017-04-01

    There are many methods and equations for estimating bedload flux in steady flow conditions. Yet, very little is known about the effect of very unsteady flows, such as flash floods, on bedload flux. The unpredictable nature of the floods together with many logistic difficulties and safety issues in monitoring explain this gap in knowledge. Global climate change may increase flood event occurrence, making their understanding even more crucial. This research focuses on two durations of flash floods where the flow is most rapidly changing: a) flash flood bore arriving on dry river bed and b) flash flood bore arriving on a column of moving water. The methodology of our study is based on the demonstrated ability of the Eshtemoa gauging station to automatically monitor the variation of bedload flux depending on flow and bed characteristics, along with innovative equipment including hydrophones and geophones for capturing acoustic signals of bedload sediments (1 Hz), video cameras for continuous monitoring of water surface velocity (by the LSPIV method to determine its structure and velocity) and 3-D velocimetry for characterizing turbulence (40 Hz). Additional to these, a well-planned deployment was carried out, including alerting sensors and cellular transmission, enabling to be onsite when bores arrive. During the winter of 2015-2016 two flow events were sufficiently large to transport significant amounts of bedload; the magnitude of the larger event occurs once in a few years. Calibration between the acoustic indirect sensor and the direct slot sampler allow determination of bedload flux at a frequency of 1 Hz. Analyses of the two events indicate an increase of the turbulent nature (increase of the turbulent kinetic energy and the instantaneous vertical velocities), shear stress and bedload flux during the rising limb in the first two minutes of bore arrival.

  2. Investigating reaction pathways in rare events simulations of antibiotics diffusion through protein channels.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Eric; Kumar, Amit; Ruggerone, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2010-11-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, outer-membrane protein channels, such as OmpF of Escherichia coli, constitute the entry point of various classes of antibiotics. While antibacterial research and development is declining, bacterial resistance to antibiotics is rising and there is an emergency call for a new way to develop potent antibacterial agents and to bring them to the market faster and at reduced cost. An emerging strategy is to follow a bottom-up approach based on microscopically founded computational based screening, however such strategy needs better-tuned methods. Here we propose to use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with the metadynamics algorithm, to study antibiotic translocation through OmpF at a molecular scale. This recently designed algorithm overcomes the time scale problem of classical MD by accelerating some reaction coordinates. It is expected that the initial assumption of the reaction coordinates is a key determinant for the efficiency and accuracy of the simulations. Previous studies using different computational schemes for a similar process only used one reaction coordinate, which is the directionality. Here we go further and see how it is possible to include more informative reaction coordinates, accounting explicitly for: (i) the antibiotic flexibility and (ii) interactions with the channel. As model systems, we select two compounds covering the main classes of antibiotics, ampicillin and moxifloxacine. We decipher the molecular mechanism of translocation of each antibiotic and highlight the important parameters that should be taken into account for improving further simulations. This will benefit the screening and design for antibiotics with better permeation properties.

  3. A Bed Load Monitoring System for Real Time Sediment Transport and Bed Morphology during Channel Altering Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, J. C.; Waters, K. A.; Cannatelli, K.

    2014-12-01

    A new technique is presented that provides continuous measurement of sediment movement over the length of a flume. Real-time measurements of bed changes over a reach are a missing piece needed to link bed morphology with sediment transport processes during unsteady flows when the bed adjusts quickly to changing transport rates or visual observation of the bed is precluded by fine sediment in the water column. A bed load monitoring system (BLMS) was developed that records the sediment and water loads over discrete bed lengths throughout a flow event. It was designed for laboratory application where controlled measurement methods are possible. Upon data processing, the BLMS provides a continuous measure of the sediment load across the bed from which sediment movement rates through the reach, including areas of temporary aggradation or degradation, can be reconstructed. Examples are provided of how the bed load monitoring system has been applied during sediment feed and sediment recirculation experiments to further the interpretation of channel processes occurring during large flows. We detail the use of the BLMS to measure bed slopes during unsteady flows and to measure the movement of sediment downstream following different methods of dam removal. We evaluate the BLMS for use where DEM differencing was also applied to illustrate the information provided by each measurement method. Exciting implications of future research that incorporates a BLMS include a more informed management of river systems as a result of improved temporal predictions of sediment movement and the associated changes in channel slope and morphology.

  4. Modeling the Effectiveness of a Storm Surge Barrier System for the Houston Ship Channel during Hurricane Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J.; Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.; Christian, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Houston Ship Channel (HSC) is home to the second-busiest port in the nation in terms of overall tonnage, and contains one of the largest petrochemical complexes in the world. As such, undisturbed operations of the HSC are vital to ensuring the economic prosperity of local, state, and national interests. History has proven that coastal infrastructure systems and operations at the HSC are easily disrupted by rainfall and storm surge from intense hurricanes (e.g. Hurricane Ike). To quantitatively evaluate flood and storm surge vulnerability, a coupled riverine-coastal hydraulic model is developed for the HSC and Galveston Bay as an initial testbed for simulating extreme flooding scenarios. A numerical investigation is made on the coupled interactions of upstream watershed runoff and downstream surge level occurrences, as well as the effectiveness of a proposed storm surge gate protecting inland HSC infrastructure during a simulated Hurricane Ike event, and associated Ike variations. Sensitivities in peak stage, instantaneous flow, and relative timing of these events are explored for Hurricane Ike rainfall-surge conditions and various perturbations related thereto. Results show that a surge gate system can be effective to reduce flood elevation and floodplain extent in the HSC area, but that net flood protection is largely dependent on the varied timings on the watershed rainfall-runoff and coastal surge dynamics.

  5. OGLE-2016-BLG-0263Lb: Microlensing Detection of a Very Low-mass Binary Companion through a Repeating Event Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bond, I. A.; and; Albrow, M. D.; Chung, S.-J.; Jung, Y. K.; Ryu, Y.-H.; Shin, I.-G.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, S.-L.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, Y.; Park, B.-G.; The KMTNet Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; The OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Evans, P.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Ranc, C.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yamada, T.; Yamada, T.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery of a planet-mass companion to the microlens OGLE-2016-BLG-0263L. Unlike most low-mass companions that were detected through perturbations to the smooth and symmetric light curves produced by the primary, the companion was discovered through the channel of a repeating event, in which the companion itself produced its own single-mass light curve after the event produced by the primary had ended. Thanks to the continuous coverage of the second peak by high-cadence surveys, the possibility of the repeating nature due to source binarity is excluded with a 96% confidence level. The mass of the companion estimated by a Bayesian analysis is {M}{{p}}={4.1}-2.5+6.5 {M}{{J}}. The projected primary-companion separation is {a}\\perp ={6.5}-1.9+1.3 au. The ratio of the separation to the snow-line distance of {a}\\perp /{a}{sl}∼ 15.4 corresponds to the region beyond Neptune, the outermost planet of the solar system. We discuss the importance of high-cadence surveys in expanding the range of microlensing detections of low-mass companions and future space-based microlensing surveys.

  6. Influential factors on debris flow events and hillslope-channel connectivity in Alpine regions: case studies from two Alpine regions in Styria, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traper, Sandra; Pöppl, Ronald; Rascher, Eric; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In recent times different types of natural disasters like debris flow events have attracted increasing attention worldwide, since they can cause great damage and loss of infrastructure or even lives is not unusual when it comes to such an event. The engagement with debris flows is especially important in mountainous areas like Austria, since Alpine regions have proved to be particularly prone to the often harmful consequences of such events because of increasing settlement of previously uninhabited regions. Due to those frequently damaging effects of debris flows, research on this kind of natural disaster often focuses on mitigation and recovery measures after an event and on how to restore the initial situation. However, a view on the situation of an area, where severe debris flows recently occurred and are well documented, before the actual event can aid in discovering important preparatory factors that contribute to initiating debris flows and hillslope-channel connectivity in the first place. Valuable insights into the functioning and preconditions of debris flows and their potential connectivity to the main channel can be gained. The study focuses on two geologically different areas in the Austrian Alps, which are both prone to debris flows and have experienced rather severe events recently. Based on data from debris flow events in two regions in Styria (Austria), the Kleinsölk and the Johnsbach valleys, the aim of the study is to identify factors which influence the development of debris flows and the potential of such debris flows to reach the main channel potentially clogging up the river (hillslope-channel connectivity). The degree of hillslope-channel coupling was verified in extensive TLS and ALS surveys, resulting in DEMs of different resolution and spatial extension. Those factors are obtained, analyzed and evaluated with DEM-based GIS- and statistical analyses. These include factors that are attributed to catchment topography, such as slope angle

  7. Bioavailability of Mercury to Riverine Food Webs as a Function of Flood-Event Inundation of Channel Boundary Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Pellachini, C.; Blum, J. D.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Donovan, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioavailability of sediment-adsorbed contaminants to food webs in river corridors is typically controlled by biological, chemical, and physical factors, but understanding of their respective influences is limited due to a dearth of landscape-scale investigations of these biogeochemical links. Studies that account for the dynamics and interactions of hydrology and sediment transport in affecting the reactivity of sediment-adsorbed heavy metals such as mercury (Hg) are particularly lacking. Sequences of flood events generate complex inundation histories with banks, terraces, and floodplains that have the potential to alter local redox conditions and thereby affect the oxidation of elemental Hg0 to inorganic Hg(II), and the microbial conversion of Hg(II) to methylmercury (MeHg), potentially increasing the risk of Hg uptake into aquatic food webs. However, the probability distributions of saturation/inundation frequency and duration are typically unknown for channel boundaries along sediment transport pathways, and landscape-scale characterizations of Hg reactivity are rare along contaminated rivers. This research provides the first links between the dynamics of physical processes and biochemical processing and uptake into food webs in fluvial systems beset by large-scale mining contamination. Here we present new research on Hg-contaminated legacy terraces and banks along the Yuba River anthropogenic fan, produced by 19th C. hydraulic gold mining in Northern California. To assess the changes in Hg(II) availability for methylation and MeHg bioavailability into the food web, we combine numerical modeling of streamflow with geochemical assays of total Hg and Hg reactivity to identify hot spots of toxicity within the river corridor as a function of cycles of wetting/drying. We employ a 3D hydraulic model to route historical streamflow hydrographs from major flood events through the Yuba and Feather Rivers into the Central Valley to assess the frequency and duration of

  8. 33 CFR 100.35T05-0276 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... publish a notice in the Fifth Coast Guard District Local Notice to Mariners and issue a marine information... Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD. 100.35T05-0276 Section 100.35T05-0276 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE...

  9. A Single Crossing-Over Event in Voltage-Sensitive Na+ Channel Genes May Cause Critical Failure of Dengue Mosquito Control by Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Koichi; Komagata, Osamu; Itokawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Tomita, Takashi; Kasai, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-sensitive sodium (Na+) channel (Vssc) is the target site of pyrethroid insecticides. Pest insects develop resistance to this class of insecticide by acquisition of one or multiple amino acid substitution(s) in this channel. In Southeast Asia, two major Vssc types confer pyrethroid resistance in the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, namely, S989P+V1016G and F1534C. We expressed several types of Vssc in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effect of amino acid substitutions in Vssc on pyrethroid susceptibilities. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 100- and 25-fold, respectively, while S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 1100-fold. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 10- and 1-fold (no reduction), respectively, but S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 90-fold. These results imply that pyrethroid insecticides are highly likely to lose their effectiveness against A. aegypti if such a Vssc haplotype emerges as the result of a single crossing-over event; thus, this may cause failure to control this key mosquito vector. Here, we strongly emphasize the importance of monitoring the occurrence of triple mutations in Vssc in the field population of A. aegypti. PMID:25166902

  10. Evidence for s-channel single-top-quark production in events with one charged lepton and two jets at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Vázquez, F; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-13

    We report evidence for s-channel single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV using a data set that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb(-1) collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the s-channel process including two jets and one leptonically decaying W boson. The observed significance is 3.8 standard deviations with respect to the background-only prediction. Assuming a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), we measure the s-channel cross section to be 1.41(-0.42)(+0.44) pb.

  11. Coupling effect analysis between landslides, river channel changes and sediment budgets - extreme climate events in Laishe River, southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Mei-Jen; Tseng, Chih-Ming

    2016-04-01

    amount of migration along Laishe River by analyzing the 3D DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS40) before and after typhoon event. Recently, this research integrates Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and oblique photogrammetric technologies for image acquisition by 5-10cm GSD photos. This approach permits to construct true 3D model so as to decipher ground information more realistically. 10-20cm DSM and DEM, and field GPS, were compiled together to decipher the morphologic changes. All the information, especially by means of true 3D model, the datasets provides detail ground information that may use to evaluate the landslide triggering mechanism and river channel evolution. The goals of this study is to integrates the UAS system and to decipher the sliding process and morphologic changes of large landslide areas, sediment transport and budgets, and to investigate the phenomenon of river migration. The results of this study provides not only geomatics and GIS dataset of the hazards, but also for essential geomorphologic information for other study, and for hazard mitigation and planning, as well.

  12. Risks of congenital malformations and perinatal events among infants exposed to calcium channel and beta-blockers during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Robert L.; Eastman, David; McPhillips, Heather; Raebel, Marsha A.; Andrade, Susan E; Smith, David; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Dublin, Sascha; Platt, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers are widely used during pregnancy, but data on their safety for the developing infant is scarce. We used population-based data from 5 HMOs to study risks for perinatal complications and congenital defects among infants exposed in-utero. Methods We studied women older than 15 years delivering an infant between 1/1/96 to 12/31/00, who had been continuously enrolled with prescription drug coverage for >= one year prior to delivery. Information on prescription drug dispensings, inpatient and outpatient diagnoses and procedures was obtained from automated databases at each HMO. Results There were 584 full-term infants exposed during pregnancy to beta-blockers and 804 full-term infants exposed to calcium-channel blockers, and over 75,000 unexposed mother-infant pairs with >= 30 days follow-up. Infants exposed to beta-blockers in the third trimester of pregnancy had over three-fold increased risk for hypoglycemia (RR 3.1; 95% CI 2.2, 4.2) and an approximately two-fold increased risk for feeding problems (RR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3, 2.5). Infants exposed to calcium-channel blockers in the third trimester had an increased risk for seizures (RR 3.6 95% CI 1.3, 10.4). Chart review confirmed the majority of the exposed seizure and hypoglycemia cases. There were no increased risks for congenital anomalies among either group of infants, except for the category of upper alimentary tract anomalies; this increased risk was based on only two exposed cases. Conclusions Infants whose mothers receive beta-blockers are at increased risk for neonatal hypoglycemia, while those whose mothers take calcium-channel blockers are at increased risk for neonatal seizures. PMID:21254284

  13. 77 FR 23119 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Smoking the Sound; Biloxi Ship Channel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Smoking the... regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce Special Local Regulations for the Smoking the Sound boat..., and persons on navigable waters during the Smoking the Sound boat races. During the enforcement...

  14. How does rapidly changing discharge during storm events affect transient storage and channel water balance in a headwater mountain stream?

    Treesearch

    Adam S. Ward; Michael N. Gooseff; Thomas J. Voltz; Michael Fitzgerald; Kamini Singha; Jay P. Zarnetske

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of transient storage in coupled surface-water and groundwater systems are widely made during base flow periods and rarely made during storm flow periods. We completed 24 sets of slug injections in three contiguous study reaches during a 1.25 year return interval storm event (discharge ranging from 21.5 to 434 L s1 ) in a net gaining headwater stream within...

  15. Effects of a calcium channel agonist on the electrical, ionic and secretory events in mouse pancreatic B-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Henquin, J.C.; Schmeer, W.; Nenquin, M.; Meissner, H.P.

    1985-09-16

    The changes in pancreatic B-cell function produced by a Ca channel agonist, the dihydropyridine derivative CGP 28392, have been studied with mouse islets. CGP 28392 (5 microM) modified the electrical activity induced in B-cells by 10 mM glucose: the duration and the amplitude of the slow waves of membrane potential increased, but the overall spike activity decreased. Simultaneously, CGP 28392 markedly increased insulin release and UVCaS efflux, and slightly accelerated YWRb efflux from islet cells. These latter effects were abolished by omission of extracellular CaS . Qualitatively similar changes were observed at 15 mM glucose, whereas CGP 28392 was ineffective at 3 mM glucose. These results strongly suggest that an influx of CaS contributes to the slow waves of membrane potential triggered by glucose, and underline the importance of this influx of CaS for the control of insulin release by the sugar.

  16. The chemically homogeneous evolutionary channel for binary black hole mergers: rates and properties of gravitational-wave events detectable by advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, S. E.; Mandel, I.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the predictions for detectable gravitational-wave signals from merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in massive short-period stellar binaries. We find that ˜500 events per year could be detected with advanced ground-based detectors operating at full sensitivity. We analyse the distribution of detectable events, and conclude that there is a very strong preference for detecting events with nearly equal components (mass ratio >0.66 at 90 per cent confidence in our default model) and high masses (total source-frame mass between 57 and 103 M⊙ at 90 per cent confidence). We consider multiple alternative variations to analyse the sensitivity to uncertainties in the evolutionary physics and cosmological parameters, and conclude that while the rates are sensitive to assumed variations, the mass distributions are robust predictions. Finally, we consider the recently reported results of the analysis of the first 16 double-coincident days of the O1 LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) observing run, and find that this formation channel is fully consistent with the inferred parameters of the GW150914 binary black hole detection and the inferred merger rate.

  17. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in Top-Antitop Quark Events in the Lepton+Jets Channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Orbaker, Douglas Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetries in top-antitop quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions decaying via the lepton+jets channel. Using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, we measure the forward-backward asymmetry in top-antitop quark events to be $\\left(9.2 \\pm 3.7\\right)\\%$, after background processes have been subtracted. After correcting for the effects of acceptance and detector reconstruction, we measure an asymmetry of $\\left(19.6 \\pm 6.5\\right)\\%$. In addition, we measure an acceptance-corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from top-antitop quark decay of $\\left(15.2 \\pm 4.0\\right)\\%$. We compare these results to predictions from the MC@NLO next-to-leading-order QCD simulation.

  18. Combination effect of calcium channel blocker and valsartan on cardiovascular event prevention in patients with high-risk hypertension: ancillary results of the KYOTO HEART Study.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takahisa; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Jun; Kimura, Shinzo; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    The ancillary analysis of the KYOTO HEART Study (n = 3031) was designed to assess the combined treatment with calcium channel blocker (CCB) plus valsartan for high-risk hypertension. With-CCB (n = 1807) showed less primary events than without-CCB (n = 1224) (P = .037), in which acute myocardial infarction was significantly reduced. With-CCB plus valsartan (n = 773) showed lower incidence than with-CCB plus non-angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (n = 1034) (P = .0002), in which angina pectoris and heart failure were significantly reduced. Without-CCB plus valsartan (n = 744) was superior to without-CCB plus non-ARB (n = 480) (P = .0013), in which stroke was reduced. CCB-based therapy was useful, and CCB plus valsartan combination provided a more efficient prevention for high-risk hypertensive patients.

  19. Quantifying the in-channel retention of cohesive sediments during artificial flood events using FTIR-DRIFT spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtenbach, A.; Gallé, T.; Buis, K.; de Sutter, R.; Troch, P.; Eisold, B.; Bierl, R.; Symader, W.

    2010-05-01

    Cohesive sediments control river ecosystem quality both as a transport medium for contaminants and as clogging material of stream bottom habitats. However, experimental field studies with fine-grained sediments in fluvial systems are rather scarce owing to the lack of adequate tracers and detection methods. As a result, current modelling approaches only insufficiently describe hydrodynamic transport and depositional behaviour of fine-grained sediments in rivers. We adopted two strategies to specifically study cohesive sediment dynamics in natural systems under defined boundary conditions. First, artificial floods were generated in the Olewiger Bach basin (24 km²), a mid-mountain gravel bed river, in order to characterise the in-channel fine sediment dynamics on their own. The advantage of these artificial flood waves lies in the selective control on some governing processes by experimental design. Second, fine sediment transport and deposition during these controlled reservoir releases were analysed by introducing the clay mineral kaolinite as a fine particle tracer, whose concentration was measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in diffuse reflectance mode (DRIFT). The DRIFT technique offers some important advantages such as the ability to assess both mineral and organic structures in aquatic particles, good sensitivity and high throughput (Gallé et al. 2004). Our laboratory tests confirm that FTIR-DRIFT spectrometry is capable of detecting the kaolinite tracer even in low percentage solid concentrations. The mass balance of the injected kaolinite for near bank-full artificial floods showed that, in spite of the very fine material and the non-stationary boundary conditions, over 50 percent of the tracer could be retained over a flow length of only 500 m. By combining fine particulate and natural dissolved tracers (e.g. dissolved organic carbon, DOC) we were able to identify the hyporheic zone as a potential short-term retention and storage

  20. Calcium Channel Blockers in Secondary Cardiovascular Prevention and Risk of Acute Events: Real-World Evidence from Nested Case-Control Studies on Italian Hypertensive Elderly.

    PubMed

    Bettiol, Alessandra; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Vannacci, Alfredo; Lombardi, Niccolò; Onder, Graziano; Agabiti, Nera; Vitale, Cristiana; Trifirò, Gianluca; Corrao, Giovanni; Roberto, Giuseppe; Mugelli, Alessandro; Chinellato, Alessandro

    2017-10-03

    Antihypertensive treatment with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) is consolidated in clinical practice; however, different studies observed increased risks of acute events for short-acting CCBs. This study aimed to provide real-world evidence on risks of acute cardiovascular (CV) events, hospitalizations and mortality among users of different CCB classes in secondary CV prevention. Three case-control studies were nested in a cohort of Italian elderly hypertensive CV-compromised CCBs users. Cases were subjects with CV events (n = 25,204), all-cause hospitalizations (n = 19,237), or all-cause mortality (n = 17,996) during the follow-up. Up to four controls were matched for each case. Current or past exposition to CCBs at index date was defined based on molecule, formulation and daily doses of the last CCB delivery. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Compared to past users, current CCB users had significant reductions in risks of CV events [OR 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.91)], hospitalization [0.90 (0.88-0.93)] and mortality [0.48 (0.47-0.49)]. Current users of long-acting dihydropyridines (DHPs) had the lowest risk [OR 0.87 (0.84-0.90), 0.86 (0.83-0.90), 0.55 (0.54-0.56) for acute CV events, hospitalizations and mortality], whereas current users of short-acting CCBs had an increased risk of acute CV events [OR 1.77 (1.13-2.78) for short-acting DHPs; 1.19 (1.07-1.31) for short-acting non-DHPs] and hospitalizations [OR 1.84 (0.96-3.51) and 1.23 (1.08-1.42)]. The already-existing warning on short-acting CCBs should be potentiated, addressing clinicians towards the choice of long-acting formulations.

  1. Recent evolution of surge-related events and assessment of coastal flooding risk on the eastern coasts of the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirazzoli, Paolo Antonio; Costa, Stéphane; Dornbusch, Uwe; Tomasin, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    This paper is based on statistical analysis of hourly tide measurements for some 285 equivalent full years from the stations of Weymouth, Bournemouth, Portsmouth, Newhaven, Dover and Sheerness in the UK, and of Cherbourg, Le Havre, Dieppe, Boulogne, Calais and Dunkirk in France. For each tidal value, surge heights have been determined and correlated with hourly or three-hourly wind and air pressure data from nearby meteorological stations. Major surges in the area are generally produced by storms associated with wind from north-west or south-west that tend to push oceanic water into the Channel. Recent medium-term climate evolution does not seem to increase the flooding risk at French stations, where surge-related winds tend to decrease in frequency and speed (Cherbourg, Dieppe and Boulogne) or show little change (Le Havre). However, the long-term risk of flooding will increase through the loss in land elevation due to a continuation of the local relative sea-level rise, especially if this effect will be enhanced by an acceleration in the global sea-level rise predicted by climatic models. The northern side of the Channel (Weymouth, Bournemouth and Portsmouth) is mainly exposed to southerly winds that show variable trends. It is also apparently affected by strong subsidence trends during the last two decades. If lasting, such trends can only increase long-term flooding risk. The flooding risk has not increased near the eastern end of the Channel. The duration of significant cyclonic events tends to decrease near Cherbourg but tends to increase near Weymouth, with no conclusive trends in other stations (Portsmouth, Calais and Dunkirk), where extreme surges may occur also in relatively high-air-pressure situations. In conclusion, medium-term coastal flooding risk seems to increase especially at Weymouth, Bournemouth and Portsmouth, and also, but less so, at Le Havre and Sheerness. In addition, few extreme surges occurred during the last decades at the time of spring

  2. Spatiotemporal slip distributions of three long-term slow slip events beneath the Bungo Channel, southwest Japan, inferred from inversion analyses of GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Yoshiko; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We estimated spatiotemporal slip distributions from three long-term slow slip events (L-SSEs) that occurred beneath the Bungo Channel at the convergent plate boundary between the subducting oceanic Philippine Sea plate and the continental Amurian plate in southwest Japan between 1997 and 1998, 2002 and 2004 and 2009 and 2011. For this purpose, we employed an inversion method using a Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC), which included the following three prior constraints: the spatial slip distribution was smooth to some extent, slip directions were mostly oriented in the direction of plate convergence and the temporal change in slip was smooth to some extent. Our results revealed that the three L-SSEs had a common feature: slipped regions expanded southwestward at accelerating slip velocities. We also found that major slipped regions migrated southwestward by approximately 50-100 km yr-1. In contrast, southwestward and northeastward migration of the slipped regions, whose direction differed from event to event, was also identified before or after the periods when the slip velocities were at their greatest. Comparing the obtained spatiotemporal slip distributions of the three L-SSEs with slip-deficit rate distributions obtained in our previous study, we investigated the accumulation process of the slip deficit caused by slip-deficit rate distributions and the release processes of the slip deficit caused by the obtained spatiotemporal slip distributions of the three L-SSEs. At the western plate interface of the Bungo Channel, as the slip-deficit rate was small and the amounts of slips associated with the three L-SSEs were large, most of the accumulated slip deficit was estimated to have been released. In contrast, at the eastern plate interface, as the slip-deficit rate was large and the amounts of slips associated with the three L-SSEs were small, the slip deficit was estimated to have accumulated effectively. These results suggest that the slipped regions of the

  3. Search for s-channel single-top-quark production in events with missing energy plus jets in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Vázquez, F; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-13

    The first search for single-top-quark production from the exchange of an s-channel virtual W boson using events with an imbalance in the total transverse energy, b-tagged jets, and no identified leptons is presented. Assuming the electroweak production of top quarks of mass 172.5 GeV/c(2) in the s channel, a cross section of 1.12(-0.57)(+0.61) (stat+syst) pb with a significance of 1.9 standard deviations is measured. This measurement is combined with the result obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, b-tagged jets, and exactly one identified lepton, yielding a cross section of 1.36(-0.32)(+0.37) (stat+syst) pb, with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations.

  4. An angiotensin II receptor blocker-calcium channel blocker combination prevents cardiovascular events in elderly high-risk hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease better than high-dose angiotensin II receptor blockade alone.

    PubMed

    Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2013-01-01

    The OSCAR study was a multicenter, prospective randomized open-label blinded end-point study of 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients comparing the efficacy of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) uptitration to an ARB plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) combination. In this prospective study, we performed prespecified subgroup analysis according to baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as an eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Blood pressure was lower in the combined therapy than in the high-dose ARB cohort in both groups with and without CKD. In patients with CKD, significantly more primary events (a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death) occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group (30 vs. 16, respectively, hazard ratio 2.25). Significantly more cerebrovascular and more heart failure events occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group. In patients without CKD, however, the incidence of primary events was similar between the two treatments. The treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant. Allocation to the high-dose ARB was a significant independent prognostic factor for primary events in patients with CKD. Thus, the ARB plus CCB combination conferred greater benefit in prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with CKD compared with high-dose ARB alone. Our findings provide new insight into the antihypertensive strategy for elderly hypertensive patients with CKD.

  5. Sediment budget analysis from Landslide debris and river channel change during the extreme event - example of Typhoon Morakot at Laonong river, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Mei-Jen; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Chao, Yu-Jui

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Typhoon Morakot brought extreme and long-time rainfall for Taiwan in August 2009. It further caused huge loss of life and property in central and southern Taiwan. Laonong River is the largest tributary of Gaoping River. It's length is 137 km, and the basin area is 1373 km2. More than 2000mm rainfall brought and maximum rainfall exceeded 100mm/hr in the region by Typhoon Morakot in Aug, 2009. Its heavy rains made many landslides and debris flew into the river and further brought out accumulation and erosion on river banks of different areas. It caused severe disasters within the Laonong River drainage. In the past, the study of sediment blockage of river channel usually relies on field investigation, but due to inconvenient transportation, topographical barriers, or located in remote areas, etc. the survey is hardly to be completed sometimes. In recent years, the rapid development of remote sensing technology improves image resolution and quality significantly. Remote sensing technology can provide a wide range of image data, and provide essential and precious information. Furthermore, although the amount of sediment transportation can be estimated by using data such as rainfall, river flux, and suspended loads, the situation of large debris migration cannot be studied via those data. However, landslides, debris flow and river sediment transportation model in catchment area can be evaluated easily through analyzing the digital terrain model (DTM) . The purpose of this study is to investigate the phenomenon of river migration and to evaluate the amount of migration along Laonong River by analyzing the DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS 40) before and after typhoon event. The results show that lateral

  6. [Characteristics of single event-related cerebral hemodynamics during verbal task in emotionally charged state measured by multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in patients with schizophrenia: comparison with healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoshihisa; Morita, Kiichiro; Mori, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Fujiki, Ryo; Ishii, Youhei; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2013-01-01

    Neared infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is one of the recently developed methodologies which can measure cerebral blood volumes to determine the blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration simultaneously at multiple points with marked time resolution. Monitoring the changes in the Hb concentration yields site-specific readings on blood flow and, thus, on neural activities. The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of a single event-related oxyhemoglobin concentration [oxy-Hb] changes in patients with schizophrenia using multi-channel NIRS during a word generation task, Japanese 'Shiritori', and single-word generation task in an emotionally charged state induced by three facial expressions of "crying", "neutral", and "smiling" babies' photographs. Thirty-four patients with schizophrenia and 34 age-matched healthy controls participated in the present study after giving consent. In healthy controls, [oxy-Hb] changes when viewing the "crying" baby's photograph were significantly larger than when viewing the "smiling" baby's photograph. On the other hand, in patients with schizophrenia, [oxy-Hb] changes when viewing the "smiling" baby's photograph were significantly larger than when viewing the "crying" baby's photograph. These results suggest that cautions/execution functions in patients with schizophrenia during the single event word "Shiritori" task measured by multi-channel NIRS were impaired. It was also suggested that, in patients with schizophrenia, the affective reaction influenced by each photograph may be different from healthy controls (mismatch). Multi-channel NIRS can be a useful tool for research and clinical purposes in psychiatry.

  7. Preprocessing by a Bayesian single-trial event-related potential estimation technique allows feasibility of an assistive single-channel P300-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Goljahani, Anahita; D'Avanzo, Costanza; Silvoni, Stefano; Tonin, Paolo; Piccione, Francesco; Sparacino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A major clinical goal of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) is to allow severely paralyzed patients to communicate their needs and thoughts during their everyday lives. Among others, P300-based BCIs, which resort to EEG measurements, have been successfully operated by people with severe neuromuscular disabilities. Besides reducing the number of stimuli repetitions needed to detect the P300, a current challenge in P300-based BCI research is the simplification of system's setup and maintenance by lowering the number N of recording channels. By using offline data collected in 30 subjects (21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 9 controls) through a clinical BCI with N = 5 channels, in the present paper we show that a preprocessing approach based on a Bayesian single-trial ERP estimation technique allows reducing N to 1 without affecting the system's accuracy. The potentially great benefit for the practical usability of BCI devices (including patient acceptance) that would be given by the reduction of the number N of channels encourages further development of the present study, for example, in an online setting.

  8. Digital coincidence counting (DCC) and its use in the corrections for out-of-channel gamma events in 4pi beta-gamma coincidence counting.

    PubMed

    Keightle, J D; Watt, G C

    2002-01-01

    The digital coincidence counting system developed by NPL and ANSTO is briefly described along with its benefits in the data collection and processing for the 4pi beta-gamma coincidence counting technique of radionuclide standardization. One of these benefits is the automatic detection of and correction for out-of-channel coincidences in the Computer Discrimination method. Where the criteria for the use of the Cox-Isham/Smith correction formulae for dead times and resolving times are not met, a generalized approximation based on the work of Campion is suggested.

  9. An EPA pilot study characterizing fungal and bacterial populations at homes after flooding events at the Martin Peña Channel community-Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this program is to characterize fungal and bacterial populations in the MPC residences in San Juan, Puerto Rico, following flooding events. These profiles will be generated by comparing the fungal and bacterial populations in two groups of residences: hom...

  10. Microelectrode Arrays of Diamond-Insulated Graphitic Channels for Real-Time Detection of Exocytotic Events from Cultured Chromaffin Cells and Slices of Adrenal Glands.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Marcantoni, Andrea; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

    2016-08-02

    A microstructured graphitic 4 × 4 multielectrode array was embedded in a single-crystal diamond substrate (4 × 4 μG-SCD MEA) for real-time monitoring of exocytotic events from cultured chromaffin cells and adrenal slices. The current approach relies on the development of a parallel ion beam lithographic technique, which assures the time-effective fabrication of extended arrays with reproducible electrode dimensions. The reported device is suitable for performing amperometric and voltammetric recordings with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, by simultaneously acquiring data from 16 rectangularly shaped microelectrodes (20 × 3.5 μm(2)) separated by 200 μm gaps. Taking advantage of the array geometry we addressed the following specific issues: (i) detect both the spontaneous and KCl-evoked secretion simultaneously from several chromaffin cells directly cultured on the device surface, (ii) resolve the waveform of different subsets of exocytotic events, and (iii) monitoring quantal secretory events from thin slices of the adrenal gland. The frequency of spontaneous release was low (0.12 and 0.3 Hz, respectively, for adrenal slices and cultured cells) and increased up to 0.9 Hz after stimulation with 30 mM KCl in cultured cells. The spike amplitude as well as rise and decay time were comparable with those measured by carbon fiber microelectrodes and allowed to identify three different subsets of secretory events associated with "full fusion" events, "kiss-and-run" and "kiss-and-stay" exocytosis, confirming that the device has adequate sensitivity and time resolution for real-time recordings. The device offers the significant advantage of shortening the time to collect data by allowing simultaneous recordings from cell populations either in primary cell cultures or in intact tissues.

  11. Source attribution and quantification of benzene event emissions in a Houston ship channel community based on real-time mobile monitoring of ambient air.

    PubMed

    Olaguer, Eduardo P; Erickson, Matthew H; Wijesinghe, Asanga; Neish, Bradley S

    2016-02-01

    A mobile laboratory equipped with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) operated in Galena Park, Texas, near the Houston Ship Channel during the Benzene and other Toxics Exposure Study (BEE-TEX). The mobile laboratory measured transient peaks of benzene of up to 37 ppbv in the afternoon and evening of February 19, 2015. Plume reconstruction and source attribution were performed using the four-dimensional (4D) variational data assimilation technique and a three-dimensional (3D) micro-scale forward and adjoint air quality model based on mobile PTR-MS data and nearby stationary wind measurements at the Galena Park Continuous Air Monitoring Station (CAMS). The results of inverse modeling indicate that significant pipeline emissions of benzene may at least partly explain the ambient concentration peaks observed in Galena Park during BEE-TEX. Total pipeline emissions of benzene inferred within the 16-km(2) model domain exceeded point source emissions by roughly a factor of 2 during the observational episode. Besides pipeline leaks, the model also inferred significant benzene emissions from marine, railcar, and tank truck loading/unloading facilities, consistent with the presence of a tanker and barges in the Kinder Morgan port terminal during the afternoon and evening of February 19. Total domain emissions of benzene exceeded corresponding 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI) estimates by a factor of 2-6. Port operations involving petrochemicals may significantly increase emissions of air toxics from the transfer and storage of materials. Pipeline leaks, in particular, can lead to sporadic emissions greater than in emission inventories, resulting in higher ambient concentrations than are sampled by the existing monitoring network. The use of updated methods for ambient monitoring and source attribution in real time should be encouraged as an alternative to expanding the conventional monitoring network.

  12. Lava Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-03

    The channels and linear depression in this image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located on the western margin of the Elysium Volcanic complex. The channels were created by lava flow.

  13. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  14. Cl(-) channels in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida; MacAulay, Nanna; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2016-10-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also determines sensitivity towards cytostatic drugs such as cisplatin. Recent data point to a molecular and functional relationship of LRRC8A and anoctamins (ANOs). ANO6, 9, and 10 (TMEM16F, J, and K) augment apoptotic Cl(-) currents and AVD, but it remains unclear whether these anoctamins operate as Cl(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated by cell swelling, it is possible that CFTR serves RVD/AVD through accumulation of ROS and activation of independent membrane channels such as ANO6. Thus activation of ANO6 will support cell shrinkage and induce additional apoptotic events, such as membrane phospholipid scrambling.

  15. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  16. Sensing pressure with ion channels.

    PubMed

    Nilius, Bernd; Honoré, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Opening of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) is the earliest event occurring in mechanosensory transduction. The molecular identity of mammalian SACs has long remained a mystery. Only very recently, Piezo1 and Piezo2 have been shown to be essential components of distinct SACs and moreover, purified Piezo1 forms cationic channels when reconstituted into artificial bilayers. In line with these findings, dPiezo was demonstrated to act in the Drosophila mechanical nociception pathway. Finally, the 3D structure of the two-pore domain potassium channel (K(2P)), TRAAK [weakly inward rectifying K⁺ channel (TWIK)-related arachidonic acid stimulated K⁺ channel], has recently been solved, providing valuable information about pharmacology, selectivity and gating mechanisms of stretch-activated K⁺ channels (SAKs). These recent findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of molecular and cellular mechanotransduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rippley Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a narrow channel on the upper east flank of the martian volcano, Hadriaca Patera. Because it is located on a volcano, most likely this channel was formed by lava, perhaps as a lava tube at which the thin roof later collapsed. Large ripples of windblown sediment now occur on the channel floor; their crests are generally perpendicular to the channel walls, suggesting that winds blow up and down through this channel.

    Location near: 30.5oS, 266.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  18. Rippley Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a narrow channel on the upper east flank of the martian volcano, Hadriaca Patera. Because it is located on a volcano, most likely this channel was formed by lava, perhaps as a lava tube at which the thin roof later collapsed. Large ripples of windblown sediment now occur on the channel floor; their crests are generally perpendicular to the channel walls, suggesting that winds blow up and down through this channel.

    Location near: 30.5oS, 266.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  19. Single-channel properties of IKs potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sigworth, F J

    1998-12-01

    Expressed in Xenopus oocytes, KvLQT1 channel subunits yield a small, rapidly activating, voltage- dependent potassium conductance. When coexpressed with the minK gene product, a slowly activating and much larger potassium current results. Using fluctuation analysis and single-channel recordings, we have studied the currents formed by human KvLQT1 subunits alone and in conjunction with human or rat minK subunits. With low external K+, the single-channel conductances of these three channel types are estimated to be 0.7, 4.5, and 6.5 pS, respectively, based on noise analysis at 20 kHz bandwidth of currents at +50 mV. Power spectra computed over the range 0.1 Hz-20 kHz show a weak frequency dependence, consistent with current interruptions occurring on a broad range of time scales. The broad spectrum causes the apparent single-channel current value to depend on the bandwidth of the recording, and is mirrored in very "flickery" single-channel events of the channels from coexpressed KvLQT1 and human minK subunits. The increase in macroscopic current due to the presence of the minK subunit is accounted for by the increased apparent single-channel conductance it confers on the expressed channels. The rat minK subunit also confers the property that the outward single-channel current is increased by external potassium ions.

  20. Clinical events in high-risk hypertensive patients randomly assigned to calcium channel blocker versus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in the antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment to prevent heart attack trial.

    PubMed

    Leenen, Frans H H; Nwachuku, Chuke E; Black, Henry R; Cushman, William C; Davis, Barry R; Simpson, Lara M; Alderman, Michael H; Atlas, Steven A; Basile, Jan N; Cuyjet, Aloysius B; Dart, Richard; Felicetta, James V; Grimm, Richard H; Haywood, L Julian; Jafri, Syed Z A; Proschan, Michael A; Thadani, Udho; Whelton, Paul K; Wright, Jackson T

    2006-09-01

    The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering treatment to prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) provides a unique opportunity to compare the long-term relative safety and efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and calcium channel blocker-initiated therapy in older hypertensive individuals. Patients were randomized to amlodipine (n=9048) or lisinopril (n=9054). The primary outcome was combined fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction, analyzed by intention-to-treat. Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, stroke, combined cardiovascular disease (CVD), end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cancer, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Mean follow-up was 4.9 years. Blood pressure control was similar in nonblacks, but not in blacks. No significant differences were found between treatment groups for the primary outcome, all-cause mortality, ESRD, or cancer. Stroke rates were higher on lisinopril in blacks (RR=1.51, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.86) but not in nonblacks (RR=1.07, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.28), and in women (RR=1.45, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.79), but not in men (RR=1.10, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.31). Rates of combined CVD were higher (RR=1.06, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.12) because of higher rates for strokes, peripheral arterial disease, and angina, which were partly offset by lower rates for heart failure (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.96) on lisinopril compared with amlodipine. Gastrointestinal bleeds and angioedema were higher on lisinopril. Patients with and without baseline coronary heart disease showed similar outcome patterns. We conclude that in hypertensive patients, the risks for coronary events are similar, but for stroke, combined CVD, gastrointestinal bleeding, and angioedema are higher and for heart failure are lower for lisinopril-based compared with amlodipine-based therapy. Some, but not all, of these differences may be explained by less effective blood pressure control in the lisinopril arm.

  1. Mechanosensitive Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinac, Boris

    Living cells are exposed to a variety of mechanical stimuli acting throughout the biosphere. The range of the stimuli extends from thermal molecular agitation to potentially destructive cell swelling caused by osmotic pressure gradients. Cellular membranes present a major target for these stimuli. To detect mechanical forces acting upon them cell membranes are equipped with mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Functioning as molecular mechanoelectrical transducers of mechanical forces into electrical and/or chemical intracellular signals these channels play a critical role in the physiology of mechanotransduction. Studies of prokaryotic MS channels and recent work on MS channels of eukaryotes have significantly increased our understanding of their gating mechanism, physiological functions, and evolutionary origins as well as their role in the pathology of disease.

  2. Channel catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter provides a comprehensive overview of channel catfish aquaculture. Sections include fish biology; commercial culture; culture facilities; production practices; water quality management; nutrition, feeding and feed formulation; infectious diseases; harvesting and processing; and the...

  3. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  4. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  5. Event Perception.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2011-11-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives.

  6. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  7. Modelling Martian surface channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulthard, T. J.; Skinner, C.; Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive and large surface channel features found at Athabasca and Kasei have previously been attributed to the erosional power of flowing water with palaeoflood discharges being estimated from the surface channel dimensions. However, in order for these channels to be alluvial there are several basic questions to be answered. Are water flows under Martian conditions capable of eroding the amounts of sediment required to leave these channels? Are our present estimates of palaeoflood discharge of correct magnitude to carry out this erosion? And are the channels a product of one or many flood events? Here, we use a numerical model (CAESAR-Lisflood) that links a two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow scheme to a sediment transport model to simulate fluvial morphodynamics in the Athabasca and Kasei regions. CAESAR-Lisflood has been successfully applied to simulating flooding, erosion and deposition on Earth in a number of locations, and allows the development of channels, bars, braids and other fluvial features to be modelled. The numerical scheme of the model was adapted to Martian conditions by adjusting gravity, drag co-efficient, roughness and grainsize terms. Preliminary findings indicate that fluvial erosion and deposition is capable of creating mega channel features found at these sites and that existing palaeflood estimates are commensurate with channel forming discharges for these features.

  8. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  9. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  10. Inverted Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows sinuous ridges and other landforms exposed by erosion in the Aeolis region of Mars. The ridges in this scene indicate the locations of ancient channels in a fan of sediment deposited in this region. Over time, wind erosion has removed surrounding materials and left the channels, which had been filled by sediment, standing as ridges.

    Location near: 4.5oS, 205.2oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  11. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  12. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  13. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  14. Nonlinear channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D.; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K.; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R.; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  15. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  16. Landslide-channel feedbacks amplify flood response and channel erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Georgina; Kean, Jason; Rengers, Francis; Ryan, Sandra; Rathburn, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Flood stream power is amplified in mountainous catchments by channel confinement and steep slopes, generating widespread channel erosion and causing significant challenges for flood risk management. Approaches to predicting flood channel response include identification of stream power thresholds. However, in a mountainous catchment in Colorado, USA, we find that stream power, estimated from the pre-storm DEM, was not a good predictor of channel flood response and that landslide-channel feedbacks better explain the observed pattern of channel erosion. The North St Vrain is a 250 km2 catchment in the Colorado Front Range. It was among several catchments impacted by a 1000 yr prolonged rainfall event in September 2013, which generated a 200 yr flood and >100 landslides in the catchment. We estimated peak discharge and stream power using radar-based rainfall data, wherein the rainfall was converted to a discharge based on the upstream drainage area and assuming no infiltration (a reasonable assumption after 3 days of heavy rainfall). Measured high water marks in key reaches were used to calculate a field-based estimate of peak discharge. These discharge estimates were compared with spatial erosion estimates, calculated using the differenced pre- and post-flood LiDAR DEMs. We found that the onset of profound channel erosion was determined by the formation and failure of an in-channel dam. The dam, composed of debris flow and tributary sediment input, was sufficiently large (˜150,000 m3) to temporarily overwhelm channel transport capacity even during flood. Our field-based estimate of peak discharge downstream of the dam is more than 2 times greater than our rainfall-based estimate, which suggests a dam burst event occurred. Further downstream we observe additional channel reaches in which erosion was amplified by landslide and tributary sediment input, either through the formation and failure of dams or potentially through sediment bulking alone. These findings imply

  17. EVENT SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2012-01-01

    One way to understand something is to break it up into parts. New research indicates that segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful events is a core component of ongoing perception, with consequences for memory and learning. Behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that event segmentation is automatic and that people spontaneously segment activity into hierarchically organized parts and sub-parts. This segmentation depends on the bottom-up processing of sensory features such as movement, and on the top-down processing of conceptual features such as actors’ goals. How people segment activity affects what they remember later; as a result, those who identify appropriate event boundaries during perception tend to remember more and learn more proficiently. PMID:22468032

  18. Voltage-Gated Lipid Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times. PMID:23823188

  19. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  20. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  1. Commercialism in Public Schools: Focusing on Channel One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Margaret Putman

    A study measured the effectiveness of the Channel One news program on student achievement in current events. Data were collected to measure the difference in current events knowledge between those students who viewed and discussed Channel One, and those students who had no access to the program. Data based on gender differences in student…

  2. Rare Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    terrorists are likely to acquire and use WMDs over the next ten years. • Provide means to target areas, entities and persons facilitating adver - sary WMD...complicated and unpredictable to begin with, but also that human adver - saries (unlike physical disasters) will react and adapt to our planning to try to make...virulent vaccine strain (Keim et al., 2001). The latter might not be regarded as a bioterrorism event, even though it caused seven deaths and incited

  3. Eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Arnadóttir, Jóhanna; Chalfie, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are gated directly by physical stimuli and transduce these stimuli into electrical signals. Several criteria must apply for a channel to be considered mechanically gated. Mechanosensitive channels from bacterial systems have met these criteria, but few eukaryotic channels have been confirmed by the same standards. Recent work has suggested or confirmed that diverse types of channels, including TRP channels, K(2P) channels, MscS-like proteins, and DEG/ENaC channels, are mechanically gated. Several studies point to the importance of the plasma membrane for channel gating, but intracellular and/or extracellular structures may also be required.

  4. Measurement of the W boson polarisation in $$t\\bar{t}$$ events from pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV in the lepton + jets channel with ATLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-04-26

    This paper presents a measurement of the polarisation of W bosons from tt¯ decays, reconstructed in events with one high-pT lepton and at least four jets. Data from pp collisions at the LHC were collected at √s = 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb–1. The angle θ* between the b-quark from the top quark decay and a direct W boson decay product in the W boson rest frame is sensitive to the W boson polarisation. Two different W decay products are used as polarisation analysers: the charged lepton and the down-type quark for the leptonicallymore » and hadronically decaying W boson, respectively. The most precise measurement of the W boson polarisation via the distribution of cosθ* is obtained using the leptonic analyser and events in which at least two of the jets are tagged as b-quark jets. The fitted fractions of longitudinal, left- and right-handed polarisation states are F0 = 0.709 ± 0.019, FL = 0.299 ± 0.015 and FR = –0.008 ± 0.014, and are the most precisely measured W boson polarisation fractions to date. Limits on anomalous couplings of the Wtb vertex are set.« less

  5. Measurement of the W boson polarisation in [Formula: see text] events from pp collisions at [Formula: see text] = 8 TeV in the lepton + jets channel with ATLAS.

    PubMed

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Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the polarisation of W bosons from [Formula: see text] decays, reconstructed in events with one high-[Formula: see text] lepton and at least four jets. Data from pp collisions at the LHC were collected at [Formula: see text] = 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb[Formula: see text]. The angle [Formula: see text] between the b-quark from the top quark decay and a direct W boson decay product in the W boson rest frame is sensitive to the W boson polarisation. Two different W decay products are used as polarisation analysers: the charged lepton and the down-type quark for the leptonically and hadronically decaying W boson, respectively. The most precise measurement of the W boson polarisation via the distribution of [Formula: see text] is obtained using the leptonic analyser and events in which at least two of the jets are tagged as b-quark jets. The fitted fractions of longitudinal, left- and right-handed polarisation states are [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], and are the most precisely measured W boson polarisation fractions to date. Limits on anomalous couplings of the Wtb vertex are set.

  6. Measurement of the W boson polarisation in t\\bar{t} events from pp collisions at √{s} = 8 TeV in the lepton + jets channel with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the polarisation of W bosons from t\\bar{t} decays, reconstructed in events with one high-p_{{ T }} lepton and at least four jets. Data from pp collisions at the LHC were collected at √{s} = 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb^{-1}. The angle θ ^{*} between the b-quark from the top quark decay and a direct W boson decay product in the W boson rest frame is sensitive to the W boson polarisation. Two different W decay products are used as polarisation analysers: the charged lepton and the down-type quark for the leptonically and hadronically decaying W boson, respectively. The most precise measurement of the W boson polarisation via the distribution of cos {θ ^{*}} is obtained using the leptonic analyser and events in which at least two of the jets are tagged as b-quark jets. The fitted fractions of longitudinal, left- and right-handed polarisation states are F0= 0.709 ± {0.019}, FL= 0.299 ± {0.015} and FR= -0.008 ± {0.014}, and are the most precisely measured W boson polarisation fractions to date. Limits on anomalous couplings of the Wtb vertex are set.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  8. Sedimentary links between hillslopes and channels in a dryland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollings, R.

    2016-12-01

    The interface between hillslopes and channels is recognised as playing an important role in basin evolution and functioning. However, this interaction has not been described well in landscapes such as drylands, in which the diffuse process of runoff-driven sediment transport is important for sediment communication to the channel and to the basin outlet. This paper combines field measurements of surface sediment grain sizes in channels and on hillslopes with high resolution topography, >60 years of rainfall and runoff data from the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Arizona, and simple calculations of spatial stress distributions for various hydrologic scenarios to explore the potential for sediment to move from hillslopes to channels and through channels across the entire basin. Here we generalise the net movement of sediment in to or out of channel reaches, at high resolution in WGEW, as the balance between hillslope sediment supply to the channel and channel evacuation, in response to a variety of storms and discharge events. Our results show that downstream of small, unit source area watersheds, the balance in the channel often switches from being supply-dominated to being evacuation dominated for all scenarios. The low frequency but high discharge event in the channel seems to control the long term evolution of the channel, as stress is far greater for this scenario than other scenarios tested. The results draw on the high variability of rainfall characteristics to drive runoff events and so provides a physical explanation for long-term evolution of the channel network in drylands.

  9. The evolution of bacterial mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Booth, Ian R; Miller, Samantha; Müller, Axel; Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Mechanosensitive channels are ubiquitous and highly studied. However, the evolution of the bacterial channels remains enigmatic. It can be argued that mechanosensitivity might be a feature of all membrane proteins with some becoming progressively less sensitive to membrane tension over the course of evolution. Bacteria and archaea exhibit two main classes of channels, MscS and MscL. Present day channels suggest that the evolution of MscL may be highly constrained, whereas MscS has undergone elaboration via gene fusion (and potentially gene fission) events to generate a diversity of channel structures. Some of these channel variants are constrained to a small number of genera or species. Some are only found in higher organisms. Only exceptionally have these diverse channels been investigated in any detail. In this review we consider both the processes that might have led to the evolved complexity but also some of the methods exploiting the explosion of genome sequences to understand (and/or track) their distribution. The role of MscS-related channels in calcium-mediated cell biology events is considered.

  10. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(2), February 29, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1.

  11. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  12. The Psychology of Channeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretically analyzes phenomenon of channeling from perspective of C. G. Jung's analytic psychology. Hypothesizes that contact with otherworldly spiritual beings claimed by channelers is actually projected contact with contents of channeler's own unconscious mind. Suggests that channelers seek more constructive ways of contacting their…

  13. Serial data transmission between redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Binnall, Daniel G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Data is communicated between redundant channels formatted in blocks having an initial command word followed by a destination code, starting address and a variable number of data words including a word count. The blocks are transmitted between each channel and all of the channels over cross-channel data links, each channel receiving the data blocks and determining the validity thereof by counting the number of data words received and comparing that number to the word count transmitted for that block. An interrupt signal indicative of invalidity of a block is provided in the event of a miscompare. A stop address is generated for each block received for storage at the start address. A memory address is generated for each valid word received for storage in sequence starting immediately after the start address. The next block received has its start address placed immediately at the end of the previously received block.

  14. Microlayer during boiling in narrow slot channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diev, Mikhail D.; Leontiev, Alexander I.

    1997-01-01

    An international space station Alpha will have a two-phase thermal control system. Boiling of a liquid ammonia will be a process of heat collection in evaporative heat exchangers. Unfortunately, only little data is available for boiling heat transfer in microgravity. Geometries of boiling channels working good in normal gravity are not appropriate in microgravity, and special means should be worked out to avoid some undesired events. From this point of view, the narrow slot channels may be assumed as a promising geometry for microgravity operation. During boiling in narrow slots, the vapor bubbles are flattened between the channel walls. The vapor phase and the channel wall are separated by a thin liquid film which is known as a microlayer. The paper presents the experimental results compared to the theoretical analysis, the paper also shows the narrow slot channels as a perspective configuration for microgravity applications.

  15. Comparative Study between Sequential Automatic and Manual Home Respiratory Polygraphy Scoring Using a Three-Channel Device: Impact of the Manual Editing of Events to Identify Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Glenda; Bosio, Martín; Salvado, Alejandro; Nogueira, Facundo; Nigro, Carlos; Borsini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective. According to current guidelines, autoscoring of respiratory events in respiratory polygraphy requires manual scoring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between automatic analysis and manual scoring to identify patients with suspected OSA. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed 791 records from respiratory polygraphy (RP) performed at home. The association grade between automatic scoring and manual scoring was evaluated using Kappa coefficient and the agreement using Bland and Altman test and intraclass correlation coefficient (CCI). To determine the accuracy in the identification of AHI ≥ 30 eV/h, the ROC curve analysis was used. Results. The population analyzed consisted of 493 male (62.3%) and 298 female patients, with an average age of 54.7 ± 14.20 years and BMI of 32.7 ± 8.21 kg/m(2). There was no significant difference between automatic and manual apnea/hypopnea indexes (aAHI, mAHI): aAHI 17.25 (SD: 17.42) versus mAHI 21.20 ± 7.96 (p; NS). The agreement between mAHI and aAHI to AHI ≥ 30 was 94%, with a Kappa coefficient of 0.83 (p < 0.001) and a CCI of 0.83. The AUC-ROC, sensitivity, and specificity were 0.99 (CI 95%: 0.98-0.99, p < 0.001), 86% (CI 95%: 78.7-91.4), and 97% (CI 95%: 96-98.3), respectively. Conclusions. We observed good agreement between automatic scoring and sequential manual scoring to identify subjects with AHI ≥ 30 eV/h.

  16. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (6), June 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-005 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  17. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 25(10), October 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-010 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1 . Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos

  18. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(3), March 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  19. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (7), July 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-007 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  20. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (1), January 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-001 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  1. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(9), September 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-013 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  2. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (5), May 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-004 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  3. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  4. New observations of sinuous channels on the Amazon Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    sudden changes in the planform shape of meanders farther down the channel. Thus while similarities in sinuosity patterns suggest that both submarine channels and river channels are being altered by repetitive flow events, channel-wall slumping in submarine channels may affect submarine channel evolution to a greater extent than similar events in rivers.

  5. Store-Operated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca2+ sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca2+ from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca2+ depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease. PMID:26400989

  6. Store-Operated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Prakriya, Murali; Lewis, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca(2+) sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca(2+) depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease.

  7. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  8. Event segmentation ability uniquely predicts event memory.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Jesse Q; Zacks, Jeffrey M; Hambrick, David Z; Zacks, Rose T; Kurby, Christopher A; Bailey, Heather R; Eisenberg, Michelle L; Beck, Taylor M

    2013-11-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan.

  9. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N.; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K+) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K+ channel modulating agents demonstrated that K+ channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K+ channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) were identified as the K+ channel family mediating BUNV K+ channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. PMID:26677217

  10. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-02-12

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K(+)) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K(+) channel modulating agents demonstrated that K(+) channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K(+) channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K(+) channels (K2P) were identified as the K(+) channel family mediating BUNV K(+) channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Experimental quantum channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, He; Liu, Chang; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Yao, Xing-Can; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Sanders, Barry C.; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulation is of great importance in quantum information science. Here, we report an experimental quantum channel simulator imbued with an algorithm for imitating the behavior of a general class of quantum systems. The reported quantum channel simulator consists of four single-qubit gates and one controlled-not gate. All types of quantum channels can be decomposed by the algorithm and implemented on this device. We deploy our system to simulate various quantum channels, such as quantum-noise channels and weak quantum measurement. Our results advance experimental quantum channel simulation, which is integral to the goal of quantum information processing.

  12. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  13. Hadamard quantum broadcast channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingle; Das, Siddhartha; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-10-01

    We consider three different communication tasks for quantum broadcast channels, and we determine the capacity region of a Hadamard broadcast channel for these various tasks. We define a Hadamard broadcast channel to be such that the channel from the sender to one of the receivers is entanglement-breaking and the channel from the sender to the other receiver is complementary to this one. As such, this channel is a quantum generalization of a degraded broadcast channel, which is well known in classical information theory. The first communication task we consider is classical communication to both receivers, the second is quantum communication to the stronger receiver and classical communication to other, and the third is entanglement-assisted classical communication to the stronger receiver and unassisted classical communication to the other. The structure of a Hadamard broadcast channel plays a critical role in our analysis: The channel to the weaker receiver can be simulated by performing a measurement channel on the stronger receiver's system, followed by a preparation channel. As such, we can incorporate the classical output of the measurement channel as an auxiliary variable and solve all three of the above capacities for Hadamard broadcast channels, in this way avoiding known difficulties associated with quantum auxiliary variables.

  14. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  15. A CORBA event system for ALMA common software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugate, David W.

    2004-09-01

    The ALMA Common Software notification channel framework provides developers with an easy to use, high-performance, event-driven system supported across multiple programming languages and operating systems. It sits on top of the CORBA notification service and hides nearly all CORBA from developers. The system is based on a push event channel model where suppliers push events onto the channel and consumers process these asynchronously. This is a many-to-many publishing model whereby multiple suppliers send events to multiple consumers on the same channel. Furthermore, these event suppliers and consumers can be coded in C++, Java, or Python on any platform supported by ACS. There are only two classes developers need to be concerned with: SimpleSupplier and Consumer. SimpleSupplier was designed so that ALMA events (defined as IDL structures) could be published in the simplest manner possible without exposing any CORBA to the developer. Essentially all that needs to be known is the channel's name and the IDL structure being published. The API takes care of everything else. With the Consumer class, the developer is responsible for providing the channel's name as well as associating event types with functions that will handle them.

  16. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-11

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  17. Bayesian sparse channel estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chulong; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems, the technique used to estimate and track the time-varying multipath channel is critical to ensure reliable, high data rate communications. It is recognized that wireless channels often exhibit a sparse structure, especially for wideband and ultra-wideband systems. In order to exploit this sparse structure to reduce the number of pilot tones and increase the channel estimation quality, the application of compressed sensing to channel estimation is proposed. In this article, to make the compressed channel estimation more feasible for practical applications, it is investigated from a perspective of Bayesian learning. Under the Bayesian learning framework, the large-scale compressed sensing problem, as well as large time delay for the estimation of the doubly selective channel over multiple consecutive OFDM symbols, can be avoided. Simulation studies show a significant improvement in channel estimation MSE and less computing time compared to the conventional compressed channel estimation techniques.

  18. Quasi-Anonymous Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    QUASI- ANONYMOUS CHANNELS Ira S. Moskowitz Center for High Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC...Assurance Computer Systems - Code 5540 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA Abstract Although both anonymity and covert...channels are part of the larger topic of information hiding, there also exists an intrinsic linkage between anonymity and covert channels. This linkage

  19. Channel morphology [Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Alvin L. Medina; Daniel G. Neary

    2012-01-01

    Channel morphology has become an increasingly important subject for analyzing the health of rivers and associated fish populations, particularly since the popularization of channel classification and assessment methods. Morphological data can help to evaluate the flows of sediment and water that influence aquatic and riparian habitat. Channel classification systems,...

  20. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  1. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  2. On 1-qubit channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Armin

    2001-09-01

    The entropy HT (ρ) of a state with respect to a channel T and the Holevo capacity of the channel require the solution of difficult variational problems. For a class of 1-qubit channels, which contains all the extremal ones, the problem can be significantly simplified by attaching a unique Hermitian antilinear operator ϑ to every channel of the considered class. The channel's concurrence CT can be expressed by ϑ and turns out to be a flat roof. This allows to write down an explicit expression for HT. Its maximum would give the Holevo (one-shot) capacity.

  3. Incompatibility of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2017-03-01

    Two quantum channels are called compatible if they can be obtained as marginals from a single broadcasting channel; otherwise they are incompatible. We derive a characterization of the compatibility relation in terms of concatenation and conjugation, and we show that all pairs of sufficiently noisy quantum channels are compatible. The complement relation of incompatibility can be seen as a unifying aspect for several important quantum features, such as impossibility of universal broadcasting and unavoidable measurement disturbance. We show that the concepts of entanglement breaking channel and antidegradable channel can be completely characterized in terms compatibility.

  4. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  5. Ion channels in plants

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  6. Nested Channels near Hellas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-30

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft shows a channel system flowing to the southwest toward the huge Hellas impact basin. We're not sure if this channel-inside-a-channel was carved by flowing water or lava. Flowing water erodes channels, and flowing lava both erodes and melts surrounding rock to form channels. It's not clear whether a huge surge of water or lava first formed the wide channel and then subsided into a trickle to form this narrow, inner channel, or if a trickle formed the inner channel and a subsequent surge formed the wider one. Detailed analysis of the shape could reveal which scenario is most likely, as well as whether water or lava is responsible. Relevant observations for such a determination would include, for example, the facts that the channels lack levees (ridges along the banks) and that the inner channel diverts around a mound, which at one time was an island. This channel system flowed to the southwest toward the huge Hellas impact basin.

  7. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  8. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  9. Periodic forcing of a K+ channel at various temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Petracchi, D; Pellegrini, M; Pellegrino, M; Barbi, M; Moss, F

    1994-01-01

    The random sequence of openings and closings of single ion channels and the channel conductances have been the object of intense study over the past two decades with a view toward illuminating the underlying kinetics of the channel protein molecules. Channels that are sensitive to voltage, such as many K(+)-selective channels, have been particularly useful, because the kinetic rates can be manipulated by changing the membrane voltage. Most such studies have been performed under stationary conditions and usually at a single temperature. Here we report the results of experiments with sinusoidal modulation of the membrane potential performed at several temperatures. Dwell time and cycle histograms, objects not normally associated with ion channel experiments, are herein reported. From the last, the transition probability densities for channel opening and closing events are obtained. A new and unusual phase anticipation is observed in the cycle histograms, and its temperature dependence is measured. PMID:8075322

  10. Flow of foam through a convergent channel.

    PubMed

    Dollet, Benjamin; Bocher, Claire

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the flow of a foam confined as a bubble monolayer between two plates through a convergent channel. We quantify the velocity, the distribution and orientation of plastic events, and the elastic stress, using image analysis. We use two different soap solutions: a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, with a negligible wall friction between the bubbles and the confining plates, and a mixture containing a fatty acid, giving a large wall friction. We show that for SDS solutions, the velocity profile obeys a self-similar form which results from the superposition of plastic events, and the elastic deformation is uniform. For the other solution, the velocity field differs and the elastic deformation increases towards the exit of the channel. We discuss and quantify the role of wall friction on the velocity profile, the elastic deformation, and the rate of plastic events.

  11. Construction dynamics of a lava channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Favalli, Massimiliano; Mazzarini, Francesco; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2009-05-01

    of this short-lived case show that care must be taken when using channel dimensions to infer flow dynamics. In our case, the full channel depth is not exposed. Instead the channel floor morphology reflects late stage pond filling and drainage rather than true channel-contained flow. Components of the compound levee relate to different flow regimes operating at different times during the eruption and associated with different effusion rates, flow dynamics and time scales. For example, although high effusion rate, brim-full flow was maintained for a small fraction of the channel lifetime, it emplaced a pile of pahoehoe overflow units that account for 60% of the total levee height. We show how time-varying volume flux is an important parameter in controlling channel construction dynamics. Because the complex history of lava delivery to a channel system is recorded by the final channel morphology, time-varying flow dynamics can be determined from the channel morphology. Developing methods for quantifying detailed flux histories for effusive events from the evidence in outcrop is therefore highly valuable. We here achieve this by using high-resolution spatial data for a channel system at Kilauea. This study not only indicates those physical and dynamic characteristics that are typical for basaltic lava flows on Hawaiian volcanoes, but also a methodology that can be widely applied to effusive basaltic eruptions.

  12. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  13. Cholesterol and Kir channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena

    2009-01-01

    To date, most of the major types of Kir channels, Kir2s, Kir3s, Kir4s and Kir6s, have been found to partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains and/or to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol. Surprisingly, however, in spite of the structural similarities between different Kirs, effects of cholesterol on different types of Kir channels vary from cholesterol-induced decrease in the current density (Kir2 channels) to the loss of channel activity by cholesterol depletion (Kir4 channels) and loss of channel coupling by different mediators (Kir3 and Kir6 channels). Recently, we have gained initial insights into the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol-induced suppression Kir2 channels, but mechanisms underlying cholesterol sensitivity of other Kir channels are mostly unknown. The goal of this review is to present a summary of the current knowledge of the distinct effects of cholesterol on different types of Kir channels in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19548316

  14. Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    It s long been known that the Sun plays host to the most energetic explosions in the solar system. But key insights into the forms that energy takes have only recently become available. Solar flares have been phenomena of both academic and practical interest since their discovery in 1859. From the academic point of view, they are the nearest events for studying the explosive release of energy in astrophysical magnetized plasmas. From the practical point of view, they disrupt communication channels on Earth, from telegraph communications in 1859 to radio and television signals today. Flares also wreak havoc on the electrical power grid, satellite operations, and GPS signals, and energetic charged particles and radiation are dangerous to passengers on high-altitude polar flights and to astronauts. Flares are not the only explosive phenomena on the Sun. More difficult to observe but equally energetic are the large coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the ejection of up to ten billion tons of magnetized plasma into the solar wind at speeds that can exceed 1000 km/s. CMEs are primarily observed from the side, with coronagraphs that block out the bright disk of the Sun and lower solar atmosphere so that light scattered from the ejected mass can be seen. Major geomagnetic storms are now known to arise from the interaction of CMEs with Earth's magnetosphere. Solar flares are observed without CMEs, and CMEs are observed without flares. The two phenomena often occur together, however, and almost always do in the case of large flares and fast CMEs. The term solar eruptive event refers to the combination of a flare and a CME. Solar eruptive events generate a lot of heat: They can heat plasma to temperatures as high at 50 million Kelvin, producing radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. But that s not all. A fascinating aspect of solar eruptive events is the acceleration of electrons and ions to suprathermal often relativistic energies. The accelerated particles are primarily

  15. Assessing Special Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Special events defined as being "newsworthy events" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special events that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of events; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some event in an organization.…

  16. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  17. Convection surrounding mesoscale ionospheric flow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Y.; Moen, J.; Baker, J. B. H.; Carlson, H. C.

    2011-05-01

    We evaluate data from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Svalbard radar (ESR) and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft coupled with data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) polar cap convection patterns in order to study how the ionospheric convection evolves around a sequence of transient, mesoscale flow channel events in the duskside of the cusp inflow region. On a northwestward convection background for the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BY positive and BZ negative, a sequence of three eastward flow channels formed over the course of 1 hour in response to three sharp IMF rotations to IMF BY negative and IMF BZ positive. The first and third channels, due to IMF BY negative periods of ˜13 min and >30 min, respectively, develop in a similar manner: they span the entire ESR field of view and widen poleward with increasing time elapsed since their first appearance until the IMF rotates back. The convection patterns are consistent with the line-of-sight data from the ESR and DMSP within a 10 min adaption time. The flow lines form a twin-vortex flow, with the observed channel being the twin vortices' center flow. The fitting algorithm was pushed to its limits in terms of spatial resolution in this study. During portions of the channel events, the suggested twin-cell flow is not in agreement with our physical interpretation of the flow channels being reconnection events because cell closure is suggested across an anticipated nonreconnecting open-closed boundary. For these segments, we present simulated patterns which have been arrived at by a combination of looking at the raw data and examining the fitted convection patterns.

  18. R type anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Diatloff, Eugene; Peyronnet, Rémi; Colcombet, Jean; Thomine, Sébastien; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Plant genomes code for channels involved in the transport of cations, anions and uncharged molecules through membranes. Although the molecular identity of channels for cations and uncharged molecules has progressed rapidly in the recent years, the molecular identity of anion channels has lagged behind. Electrophysiological studies have identified S-type (slow) and R-type (rapid) anion channels. In this brief review, we summarize the proposed functions of the R-type anion channels which, like the S-type, were first characterized by electrophysiology over 20 years ago, but unlike the S-type, have still yet to be cloned. We show that the R-type channel can play multiple roles. PMID:21051946

  19. Introduction to sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Peters, Colin H; Ruben, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are present in many tissue types within the human body including both cardiac and neuronal tissues. Like other channels, VGSCs activate, deactivate, and inactivate in response to changes in membrane potential. VGSCs also have a similar structure to other channels: 24 transmembrane segments arranged into four domains that surround a central pore. The structure and electrical activity of these channels allows them to create and respond to electrical signals in the body. Because of their distribution throughout the body, VGSCs are implicated in a variety of diseases including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and neuropathic pain. As such the study of these channels is essential. This brief review will introduce sodium channel structure, physiology, and pathophysiology.

  20. Holter and Event Monitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Holter and Event Monitors Also known as ambulatory EKG; continuous EKG; EKG event monitors. Holter and event monitors are small, portable electrocardiogram devices ...

  1. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  2. HIPPI and Fibre Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The High-Performance Parallel Interface (HIPPI) and Fibre Channel are near-gigabit per second data communications interfaces being developed in ANSI standards Task Group X3T9.3. HIPPI is the current interface of choice in the high-end and supercomputer arena, and Fibre Channel is a follow-on effort. HIPPI came from a local area network background, and Fibre Channel came from a mainframe to peripheral interface background.

  3. Examining the Impact of the Channel One School Newscasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Evonne H.

    The impact of the Channel One school newscasts on student knowledge of current events and on student attitudes was studied with tenth and eleventh graders in six suburban high schools in the Midwest. Three schools (464 students) received the newscast and the remaining schools (604 subjects) did not. Current events knowledge was assessed with a…

  4. Calcium Channel Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... calcium channel blockers interact with grapefruit products. References Kaplan NM, et al. Treatment of hypertension: Drug therapy. In: Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Wolters Kluwer ...

  5. Switchable topological phonon channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süsstrunk, Roman; Zimmermann, Philipp; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2017-01-01

    Guiding energy deliberately is one of the central elements in engineering and information processing. It is often achieved by designing specific transport channels in a suitable material. Topological metamaterials offer a way to construct stable and efficient channels of unprecedented versatility. However, due to their stability it can be tricky to terminate them or to temporarily shut them off without changing the material properties massively. While a lot of effort was put into realizing mechanical topological metamaterials, almost no works deal with manipulating their edge channels in sight of applications. Here, we take a step in this direction, by taking advantage of local symmetry breaking potentials to build a switchable topological phonon channel.

  6. Selfcomplementary Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaczyński, Marek; Roga, Wojciech; Życzkowski, Karol

    2016-10-01

    Selfcomplementary quantum channels are characterized by such an interaction between the principal quantum system and the environment that leads to the same output states of both interacting systems. These maps can describe approximate quantum copy machines, as perfect copying of an unknown quantum state is not possible due to the celebrated no-cloning theorem. We provide here a parametrization of a large class of selfcomplementary channels and analyze their properties. Selfcomplementary channels preserve some residual coherences and residual entanglement. Investigating some measures of non-Markovianity, we show that time evolution under selfcomplementary channels is highly non-Markovian.

  7. Conductance of Ion Channels - Theory vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Mijajlovic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane ion channels mediate a number of essential physiological processes in a cell ranging from regulating osmotic pressure to transmission of neural signals. Kinetics and selectivity of ion transport is of critical importance to a cell and, not surprisingly, it is a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this presentation we will analyze in detail computer simulations of two simple channels from fungi - antiamoebin and trichotoxin. Each of these channels is made of an alpha-helical bundle of small, nongenomically synthesized peptides containing a number of rare amino acids and exhibits strong antimicrobial activity. We will focus on calculating ionic conductance defined as the ratio of ionic current through the channel to applied voltage. From molecular dynamics simulations, conductance can be calculated in at least two ways, each involving different approximations. Specifically, the current, given as the number of charges transferred through the channel per unit of time, can be obtained from the number of events in which ions cross the channel during the simulation. This method works well for large currents (high conductance values and/or applied voltages). If the number of crossing events is small, reliable estimates of current are difficult to achieve. Alternatively, conductance can be estimated assuming that ion transport can be well approximated as diffusion in the external potential given by the free energy profile. Then, the current can be calculated by solving the one-dimensional diffusion equation in this external potential and applied voltage (the generalized Nernst-Planck equation). To do so three ingredients are needed: the free energy profile, the position-dependent diffusion coefficient and the diffusive flux of ions into the channel. All these quantities can be obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. An important advantage of this method is that it can be used equally well to estimating large and small currents

  8. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  9. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  10. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  11. Ion channels in microbes.

    PubMed

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-10-01

    Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric, view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Although at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant, and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future.

  12. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2007-12-13

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either deexcite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission prefragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  13. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Joergen

    2008-04-17

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either de-excite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission pre-fragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  14. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  15. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Early observations of Mars conducted by means of telescopes are considered. Secchi introduced the Italian word 'canale' ('channel') in 1869 to describe apparent lines on the planet's surface. Between 1877 and 1888 Schiaparelli mapped a profusion of 'canali'. Schiaparelli's work led to famous controversies about Mars. This book attempts to investigate the puzzle posed by the Martian channels, taking into account also the results of the studies conducted with the aid of the two orbiting Viking spacecraft which have produced a total number of nearly 60,000 pictures. The channel types are discussed along with questions regarding the distribution, the ages, and the proposed origins of the channels. Attention is given to the geomorphology of Mars, the patterns and networks of Martian valleys, ice and the Martian surface, the outflow channels, catastrophic flood processes, questions of analogy between terrestrial and Martian geographic features, and Martian phenomena associated with water liquid or water ice.

  16. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Early observations of Mars conducted by means of telescopes are considered. Secchi introduced the Italian word 'canale' ('channel') in 1869 to describe apparent lines on the planet's surface. Between 1877 and 1888 Schiaparelli mapped a profusion of 'canali'. Schiaparelli's work led to famous controversies about Mars. This book attempts to investigate the puzzle posed by the Martian channels, taking into account also the results of the studies conducted with the aid of the two orbiting Viking spacecraft which have produced a total number of nearly 60,000 pictures. The channel types are discussed along with questions regarding the distribution, the ages, and the proposed origins of the channels. Attention is given to the geomorphology of Mars, the patterns and networks of Martian valleys, ice and the Martian surface, the outflow channels, catastrophic flood processes, questions of analogy between terrestrial and Martian geographic features, and Martian phenomena associated with water liquid or water ice.

  17. Learning to Describe Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchan, Judith Felson

    1986-01-01

    The article discusses language structures of three hierarchical levels of event descriptions: (1) single-action events (semantic relations, aspectual meaning and lexical verbs or verb phrases, (2) event relations (tense markers, conjunctions, adverbs, perfect tense); (3) event schemas (lexical terms and phrases marking beginnings and endings). A…

  18. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  19. Event-by-event jet quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ramirez, E.

    2010-08-14

    High momentum jets and hadrons can be used as probes for the quark gluon plasma (QGP) formed in nuclear collisions at high energies. We investigate the influence of fluctuations in the fireball on jet quenching observables by comparing propagation of light quarks and gluons through averaged, smooth QGP fireballs with event-by-event jet quenching using realistic inhomogeneous fireballs. We find that the transverse momentum and impact parameter dependence of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} can be fit well in an event-by-event quenching scenario within experimental errors. However the transport coefficient {cflx q} extracted from fits to the measured nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in averaged fireballs underestimates the value from event-by-event calculations by up to 50%. On the other hand, after adjusting {cflx q} to fit R{sub AA} in the event-by-event analysis we find residual deviations in the azimuthal asymmetry v{sub 2} and in two-particle correlations, that provide a possible faint signature for a spatial tomography of the fireball. We discuss a correlation function that is a measure for spatial inhomogeneities in a collision and can be constrained from data.

  20. Channel Narrowing and Channel Reset: Effects of a Large Flood on the Vegetated, Narrowing Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2008, heavy precipitation from a tropical storm in the Sierra Madre Occidental, MX, produced large amounts of stream flow to the Rio Conchos and lower Rio Grande. This flood was well publicized in the media due to the widespread flooding in Ojinaga, Chih., and Presidio, TX. Gage records indicate that this flood had an approximate recurrence of 15 years as measured on the Rio Grande near Presidio. Nevertheless, flood stages were the highest ever recorded and resulted from a significant loss of channel capacity due to channel narrowing that had occurred during the previous 18 years. Measurements from aerial photographs indicate that channel width had decreased between 35 and 50% between 1990 and 2008 during regional drought. During this period of low stream flow, invasion by non-native riparian vegetation (Tamarix spp., Arundo donax) helped trap sediment and promote floodplain accretion. Our resurveys of the channel indicate that the 2008 flood was a reset event and that the channel was re-widened by 32 to 48%. Repeated, oblique photographs showed significant channel migration and large scale floodplain stripping during this flood. These results show that although riparian vegetation may actively promote channel narrowing and floodplain accretion, moderately large floods may cause large scale bank erosion, floodplain stripping, and vegetation removal in alluvial valleys subject to large-scale invasion by nonnative plants.

  1. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  2. Mars channels--new data on ages

    SciTech Connect

    Masursky, H.; Chapman, M.; Dial, A.L. Jr.; Strobell, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed study of channels in the Mangala and Kasei Valles regions of Mars strengthens a theory that the authors presented earlier: that channeling episodes have occurred at many different times and by several different mechanisms. The study utilized new, high-resolution, 1:500,000-scale maps compiled as base material for selecting candidate sites for a future Mars rover/lander/sample return spacecraft. Nestus Valles, west of Mangala Valles, are incised in young basaltic lava flows and are overlain by a very young volcanic unit, possibly a pyroclastic deposit. Crater statistics define the relative ages of the volcanic units that bound the ages of the very young, episodic, fluvial events that formed the channels. Samples collected at the Nestus site by a future lander/rover vehicle and returned to Earth for radiometric analysis would determine the age of these events more precisely. Similar relations exists for many small channels northeast of Mangala Valles. Narrow, young channels are incised in the floors of the intermediate-size valleys of Asopus, Hermus, and Abus Valles. At Abus, the mouth of a broad valley is buried by young basalt flows; a younger inner valley cuts into these flows and is buried, in turn, by a younger flow. A lobe of one of these flow invades and flows part way up the mouth of Taus Valles. In the Kasei Valles region, parts of the older, very broad, Kasei outflow channel are incised by fluvial grooving and contain streamlined islands; a younger, narrower, inner valley cuts the older valley; both valleys are buried by younger lobate basaltic lava flows.

  3. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  4. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  5. Assay for calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  6. Search for s -Channel Single-Top-Quark Production in Events with Missing Energy Plus Jets in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D’Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Vázquez, F.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-06-09

    The first search for single-top-quark production from the exchange of an s -channel virtual W boson using events with an imbalance in the total transverse energy, b -tagged jets, and no identified leptons is presented. Assuming the electroweak production of top quarks of mass 172.5 GeV / c 2 in the s channel, a cross section of 1.1 2 $+ 0.61\\atop{- 0.57}$ ( stat + syst ) pb with a significance of 1.9 standard deviations is measured. This measurement is combined with the result obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, b -tagged jets, and exactly one identified lepton, yielding a cross section of 1.3 6$+ 0.37\\atop{- 0.32}$ ( stat + syst ) pb, with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations.

  7. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  8. Potassium channels in the heart: structure, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Eleonora; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Bartos, Daniel C; Bers, Donald M; Chen-Izu, Ye; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Colecraft, Henry M; Delisle, Brian P; Heijman, Jordi; Navedo, Manuel F; Noskov, Sergei; Proenza, Catherine; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    This paper is the outcome of the fourth UC Davis Systems Approach to Understanding Cardiac Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Arrhythmias Symposium, a biannual event that aims to bring together leading experts in subfields of cardiovascular biomedicine to focus on topics of importance to the field. The theme of the 2016 symposium was 'K(+) Channels and Regulation'. Experts in the field contributed their experimental and mathematical modelling perspectives and discussed emerging questions, controversies and challenges on the topic of cardiac K(+) channels. This paper summarizes the topics of formal presentations and informal discussions from the symposium on the structural basis of voltage-gated K(+) channel function, as well as the mechanisms involved in regulation of K(+) channel gating, expression and membrane localization. Given the critical role for K(+) channels in determining the rate of cardiac repolarization, it is hardly surprising that essentially every aspect of K(+) channel function is exquisitely regulated in cardiac myocytes. This regulation is complex and highly interrelated to other aspects of myocardial function. K(+) channel regulatory mechanisms alter, and are altered by, physiological challenges, pathophysiological conditions, and pharmacological agents. An accompanying paper focuses on the integrative role of K(+) channels in cardiac electrophysiology, i.e. how K(+) currents shape the cardiac action potential, and how their dysfunction can lead to arrhythmias, and discusses K(+) channel-based therapeutics. A fundamental understanding of K(+) channel regulatory mechanisms and disease processes is fundamental to reveal new targets for human therapy.

  9. Reconfigurable virtual electrowetting channels.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ananda; Kreit, Eric; Liu, Yuguang; Heikenfeld, Jason; Papautsky, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Lab-on-a-chip systems rely on several microfluidic paradigms. The first uses a fixed layout of continuous microfluidic channels. Such lab-on-a-chip systems are almost always application specific and far from a true "laboratory." The second involves electrowetting droplet movement (digital microfluidics), and allows two-dimensional computer control of fluidic transport and mixing. The merging of the two paradigms in the form of programmable electrowetting channels takes advantage of both the "continuous" functionality of rigid channels based on which a large number of applications have been developed to date and the "programmable" functionality of digital microfluidics that permits electrical control of on-chip functions. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time programmable formation of virtual microfluidic channels and their continuous operation with pressure driven flows using an electrowetting platform. Experimental, theoretical, and numerical analyses of virtual channel formation with biologically relevant electrolyte solutions and electrically-programmable reconfiguration are presented. We demonstrate that the "wall-less" virtual channels can be formed reliably and rapidly, with propagation rates of 3.5-3.8 mm s(-1). Pressure driven transport in these virtual channels at flow rates up to 100 μL min(-1) is achievable without distortion of the channel shape. We further demonstrate that these virtual channels can be switched on-demand between multiple inputs and outputs. Ultimately, we envision a platform that would provide rapid prototyping of microfluidic concepts and would be capable of a vast library of functions and benefitting applications from clinical diagnostics in resource-limited environments to rapid system prototyping to high throughput pharmaceutical applications.

  10. PQMon: a powerful veto for burst events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötter, K.; Heng, I. S.; Hewitson, M.; Strain, K. A.; Woan, G.; Ward, H.

    2003-09-01

    Data taken by the gravitational wave detector GEO 600 (Danzmann K et al 1994 GEO 600—Proposal for a 600m Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna (Garching: MPQ)) during the science run 'S1' contain a large number of transients. In order to reduce the false-alarm rate of burst gravitational wave search algorithms it is desirable to veto all those transients that are clearly not of gravitational wave origin. This paper presents a method of vetoing transients by looking at the 'in-phase' (P) and 'quadrature' (Q) channels of the demodulated interferometer output signal. By taking advantage of the fact that the P-channel and the Q-channel have different sensitivities to gravitational wave burst events, this method can veto transients that have a power distribution different from the signature of a signal induced by a gravitational wave.

  11. Episodes, events, and models

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  12. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  13. ARQ on fading channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirouti, Patrick; Leib, Harry; Morgera, Salvatore D.

    A recursive procedure for obtaining a (2 to the power n)-state extended Gilbert-Elliott fading channel model suitable for n-bit block codes is described. The extended model may be used for numerical assessment of the throughput of a variety of popular automatic repeat-request schemes used over fading channels such as those encountered in mobile communications systems. Computationally efficient lower and upper performance bounds are also developed for low memory fading channels. It is found that the throughput of the stop-and-wait protocol exhibits a maximum; therefore, there exists an optimum codeword length for this automatic repeat-request scheme.

  14. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  15. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  16. Combined single channel and single molecule detection identifies subunit composition of STIM1-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sampieri, Alicia; Moreno, Claudia; Pacheco, Jonathan; Salgado, Alfonso; Sherry, Ryan; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium ion stores initiates a rapid cascade of events culminating with the activation of the so-called Store-Operated Channels (SOC) at the plasma membrane. Calcium influx via SOC is essential in the initiation of calcium-dependent intracellular signaling and for the refilling of internal calcium stores, ensuring the regeneration of the signaling cascade. In spite of the significance of this evolutionary conserved mechanism, the molecular identity of SOC has been the center of a heated controversy spanning over the last 20 years. Initial studies positioned some members of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel superfamily of channels (with the more robust evidence pointing to TRPC1) as a putative SOC. Recent evidence indicates that Stromal Interacting Molecule 1 (STIM1) activates some members from the TRPC family of channels. However, the exact subunit composition of TRPC channels remains undetermined to this date. To identify the subunit composition of STIM1-activated TRPC channels, we developed novel method, which combines single channel electrophysiological measurements based on the patch clamp technique with single molecule fluorescence imaging. We termed this method Single ion Channel Single Molecule Detection technique (SC-SMD). Using SC-SMD method, we have obtained direct evidence of the subunit composition of TRPC channels activated by STIM1. Furthermore, our electrophysiological-imaging SC-SMD method provides evidence at the molecular level of the mechanism by which STIM1 and calmodulin antagonize to modulate TRPC channel activity.

  17. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  18. Ion channels and transporters in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2015-10-01

    An elaborate interplay between ion channels and transporters, components of the cytoskeleton, adhesion molecules, and signaling cascades provides the basis for each major step of the metastatic cascade. Ion channels and transporters contribute to cell motility by letting through or transporting ions essential for local Ca2+, pH and--in cooperation with water permeable aquaporins--volume homeostasis. Moreover, in addition to the actual ion transport they, or their auxiliary subunits, can display non-conducting activities. They can exert kinase activity in order to phosphorylate cytoskeletal constituents or their associates. They can become part of signaling processes by permeating Ca2+, by generating local pH-nanodomains or by being final downstream effectors. A number of channels and transporters are found at focal adhesions, interacting directly or indirectly with proteins of the extracellular matrix, with integrins or with components of the cytoskeleton. We also include the role of aquaporins in cell motility. They drive the outgrowth of lamellipodia/invadopodia or control the number of β1 integrins in the plasma membrane. The multitude of interacting ion channels and transporters (called transportome) including the associated signaling events holds great potential as therapeutic target(s) for anticancer agents that are aimed at preventing metastasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  19. 28-Channel rotary transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transformer transmits power and digital data across rotating interface. Array has many parallel data channels, each with potential l megabaud data rate. Ferrite-cored transformers are spaced along rotor; airgap between them reduces crosstalk.

  20. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  1. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  2. Fractures and Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-22

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft of the Claritas Fossae region illustrates how fractures affect other features. In this instance, the fractures control the path of several channels from upper right towards lower left.

  3. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  4. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  5. Fast activation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels of skeletal muscle. Multiple pathways of channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors of the transverse tubule membrane play two roles in excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: (a) they function as the voltage sensor which undergoes fast transition to control release of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and (b) they provide the conducting unit of a slowly activating L-type calcium channel. To understand this dual function of the DHP receptor, we studied the effect of depolarizing conditioning pulse on the activation kinetics of the skeletal muscle DHP-sensitive calcium channels reconstituted into lipid bilayer membranes. Activation of the incorporated calcium channel was imposed by depolarizing test pulses from a holding potential of -80 mV. The gating kinetics of the channel was studied with ensemble averages of repeated episodes. Based on a first latency analysis, two distinct classes of channel openings occurred after depolarization: most had delayed latencies, distributed with a mode of 70 ms (slow gating); a small number of openings had short first latencies, < 12 ms (fast gating). A depolarizing conditioning pulse to +20 mV placed 200 ms before the test pulse (-10 mV), led to a significant increase in the activation rate of the ensemble averaged-current; the time constant of activation went from tau m = 110 ms (reference) to tau m = 45 ms after conditioning. This enhanced activation by the conditioning pulse was due to the increase in frequency of fast open events, which was a steep function of the intermediate voltage and the interval between the conditioning pulse and the test pulse. Additional analysis demonstrated that fast gating is the property of the same individual channels that normally gate slowly and that the channels adopt this property after a sojourn in the open state. The rapid secondary activation seen after depolarizing prepulses is not compatible with a linear activation model for the calcium channel, but is highly consistent with a cyclical model. A six- state cyclical model is

  6. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  7. Langevin approach for stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics with discretization of channel open fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yandong; Rüdiger, Sten; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-12-01

    The random opening and closing of ion channels establishes channel noise, which can be approximated and included into stochastic differential equations (Langevin approach). The Langevin approach is often incorporated to model stochastic ion channel dynamics for systems with a large number of channels. Here, we introduce a discretization procedure of a channel-based Langevin approach to simulate the stochastic channel dynamics with small and intermediate numbers of channels. We show that our Langevin approach with discrete channel open fractions can give a good approximation of the original Markov dynamics even for only 10 K channels. We suggest that the better approximation by the discretized Langevin approach originates from the improved representation of events that trigger action potentials.

  8. The tenth annual Ion Channel Retreat, Vancouver, Canada, June 25-27, 2012.

    PubMed

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Jamieson, Ashley Lauren; Liang, Sophia; Brugger, Saranna; Liang, Dong

    2013-05-01

    Ten years after Aurora Biomed (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) hosted the inaugural Ion Channel Retreat, this event is recognized as a leading conference for ion channel researchers. Held annually in Vancouver, this meeting consistently provides an outlet for researchers to share their findings while learning about new concepts, methods, and technologies. Researchers use this forum to discuss and debate a spectrum of topics from ion channel research and technology to drug discovery and safety. The Retreat covered key subjects in the ion channel industry, including ion channels as disease targets, transient receptor protein channels as pain and disease targets, ion channels as pain targets, ion channel structure and function, ion channel screening technologies, cardiac safety and toxicology, and cardiac function and pharmacology.

  9. The Tenth Annual Ion Channel Retreat, Vancouver, Canada, June 25–27, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Liang, Sophia; Brugger, Saranna; Liang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ten years after Aurora Biomed (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) hosted the inaugural Ion Channel Retreat, this event is recognized as a leading conference for ion channel researchers. Held annually in Vancouver, this meeting consistently provides an outlet for researchers to share their findings while learning about new concepts, methods, and technologies. Researchers use this forum to discuss and debate a spectrum of topics from ion channel research and technology to drug discovery and safety. The Retreat covered key subjects in the ion channel industry, including ion channels as disease targets, transient receptor protein channels as pain and disease targets, ion channels as pain targets, ion channel structure and function, ion channel screening technologies, cardiac safety and toxicology, and cardiac function and pharmacology. PMID:23679851

  10. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  11. Fracture channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  12. Event Logic Assistant (Elan)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-14

    as a basis for Phase II research. 2 Background 2.1 Event logic 2.1.1 Event structures Intuitively, an event structure is an abstract algebraic ...Theoretical Computer Science, 149:257–298, 1995. [2] Uri Abraham. Models for Concurrency, volume 11 of Algebra , Logic and Applications Series. Gordon...the ordering of events in a distributed system. Comms. ACM, 21(7):558–65, 1978. [28] Leslie Lamport. Hybrid systems in TLA+. In Grossman , Nerode, Ravn

  13. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, W; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events for periods of minutes within a defined range of negative membranes voltages. The second channel type has a conductance of 150 pS and a lower selectivity for Na+ and K+ (2.2:1); only a few opening and closing events are observed with this channel after one voltage jump. The latter type of channel is also found with highly purified Na+-channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax. A qualitative analysis of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the high conductance channel has been carried out. Channel properties are affected not only by saxitoxin but also by a scorpion (Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toxin and a sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata) toxin both known to be selective for the Na+-channel. The spontaneous transformation of the large conductance channel type into the small one has been considered; the two channel types may represent the expression of activity of different conformational states of the same protein. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6325173

  14. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hanke, W; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-03-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events for periods of minutes within a defined range of negative membranes voltages. The second channel type has a conductance of 150 pS and a lower selectivity for Na+ and K+ (2.2:1); only a few opening and closing events are observed with this channel after one voltage jump. The latter type of channel is also found with highly purified Na+-channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax. A qualitative analysis of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the high conductance channel has been carried out. Channel properties are affected not only by saxitoxin but also by a scorpion (Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toxin and a sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata) toxin both known to be selective for the Na+-channel. The spontaneous transformation of the large conductance channel type into the small one has been considered; the two channel types may represent the expression of activity of different conformational states of the same protein.

  15. Predicting the Evolution of Tidal Channels in Muddy Coastlines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    marshes. We deployed a Nortek ADCP at the mouth of the creek to measure tidal elevation, water velocity, and concentration of suspended sediment in...time. A Sontek ADV was deployed in the bay in front of the channel mouth to record wave characteristics during the studied period. 2.2 TIDAL CHANNEL...Willapa Bay. Preliminary results show that wave characteristics during extreme events are well simulated by the wave model SWAN (Boij et al. 1999

  16. Channel planform evolution: Spatial and temporal aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusnák, M.; Frandofer, M.; Lehotský, M.

    2012-04-01

    The recent period is characterized by impacts of climate change. Increasing magnitude and frequency of flood events results in morphological and morphodynamical changes of river channels. It is a challenge for the fluvial geomorphology to highlight the morphological response to these events, because the knowledge of the morphological-sedimentological attributes of the river channel is the first step in pursue of a comprehensive knowledge of the riverine landscape and impact on its sustainable management. Research of the spatial variability of landforms and the regime of processes creates an appropriate knowledge base for other sciences interested in the riverine as well as terrestrial systems. The contribution deals with the morphological changes of the channel pattern of the River Topľa (115 km in total length, 1506 km2 of catchment area, average annual discharge 8.08 m3.s-1 in mouth). The 72.5 km long segment has been studied (Strahler ord. 4-7). It represents a transient from the mountain cobble-bed to the basin fine gravel-bed river. The Topľa is a less regulated and laterally partly confined river in northeastern Slovakia, with flysch geology. Three time horizons of the remote sensing imagery (1987, 2002 and 2009) have been analyzed using the GIS, with the reference time horizon of 1987. The analysis consists of identification and delimitation of an active channel bank line and the delimitation of the channel bars in the mentioned series of imageries. The active channel width, area of channel bars, lateral channel shift and area stricken by bank erosion were studied via overlaying layers. The last attribute showed a significant increase: during the 1987-2002 period the area of 32.6 ha was eroded, whereas during the following period (2002-2009) of frequent and intensive floods up to 70.0 ha was eroded. Likewise, the maximum channel shift was 260 m and 443 m in 1987-2002 and in 2002-2009 respectively. The key results are not only the values of these parameters

  17. Regulation of epileptiform discharges in rat neocortex by HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Asher J; Williams, Sidney B; Hablitz, John J

    2013-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, nonspecific cation (HCN) channels have a well-characterized role in regulation of cellular excitability and network activity. The role of these channels in control of epileptiform discharges is less thoroughly understood. This is especially pertinent given the altered HCN channel expression in epilepsy. We hypothesized that inhibition of HCN channels would enhance bicuculline-induced epileptiform discharges. Whole cell recordings were obtained from layer (L)2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons and L1 and L5 GABAergic interneurons. In the presence of bicuculline (10 μM), HCN channel inhibition with ZD 7288 (20 μM) significantly increased the magnitude (defined as area) of evoked epileptiform events in both L2/3 and L5 neurons. We recorded activity associated with epileptiform discharges in L1 and L5 interneurons to test the hypothesis that HCN channels regulate excitatory synaptic inputs differently in interneurons versus pyramidal neurons. HCN channel inhibition increased the magnitude of epileptiform events in both L1 and L5 interneurons. The increased magnitude of epileptiform events in both pyramidal cells and interneurons was due to an increase in network activity, since holding cells at depolarized potentials under voltage-clamp conditions to minimize HCN channel opening did not prevent enhancement in the presence of ZD 7288. In neurons recorded with ZD 7288-containing pipettes, bath application of the noninactivating inward cationic current (Ih) antagonist still produced increases in epileptiform responses. These results show that epileptiform discharges in disinhibited rat neocortex are modulated by HCN channels.

  18. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  19. Emerging Roles of Canonical TRP Channels in Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Bollimuntha, Sunitha; Selvaraj, Senthil

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling in neurons is intimately associated with the regulation of vital physiological processes including growth, survival and differentiation. In neurons, Ca2+ elicits two major functions. First as a charge carrier, Ca2+ reveals an indispensable role in information relay via membrane depolarization, exocytosis, and the release of neurotransmitters. Second on a global basis, Ca2+ acts as a ubiquitous intracellular messenger to modulate neuronal function. Thus, to mediate Ca2+-dependent physiological events, neurons engage multiple mode of Ca2+ entry through a variety of Ca2+ permeable plasma membrane channels. Here we discuss a subset of specialized Ca2+-permeable non-selective TRPC channels and summarize their physiological and pathological role in the context of excitable cells. TRPC channels are predominately expressed in neuronal cells and are activated through complex mechanisms, including second messengers and store depletion. A growing body of evidence suggests a prime contribution of TRPC channels in regulating fundamental neuronal functions. TRPC channels have been shown to be associated with neuronal development, proliferation and differentiation. In addition, TRPC channels have also been suggested to have a potential role in regulating neurosecretion, long term potentiation, and synaptic plasticity. During the past years, numerous seminal discoveries relating TRPC channels to neurons have constantly emphasized on the significant contribution of this group of ion channels in regulating neuronal function. Here we review the major groundbreaking work that has uniquely placed TRPC channels in a pivotal position for governing neuronal Ca2+ signaling and associated physiological responses. PMID:21290317

  20. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in non-sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Kraus-Friedmann, N

    2000-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels represent a class of ion channels activated directly by the binding of either cyclic-GMP or cyclic-AMP. They carry both mono and divalent cations, but select calcium over sodium. In the majority of the cases studied, binding of cyclic nucleotides to the channel results in the opening of the channel and the influx of calcium. As a consequence, cytosolic free calcium levels increase leading to the modifications of calcium-dependent processes. This represents and important link in the chain of events leading to the physiological response. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels were discovered in sensory cell types, in the retina, and in olfactory cells, and were extensively studied in those cells. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that such channels are present not only in sensory systems, but in most, if not all, cell types where cyclic nucleotides play a role in signal transduction. A hypothesis is presented here which attributes physiological importance to these channels in non-sensory organs. Four examples of such channels in non-sensory cells are discussed in detail: those in the liver, in the heart, in the brain, and in the testis with the emphasis on the possible physiological roles that these channels might have in these organs.

  1. Pool spacing in forest channels

    Treesearch

    David R. Montgomery; John M. Buffington; Richard D. Smith; Kevin M. Schmidt; George Pess

    1995-01-01

    Field surveys of stream channels in forested mountain drainage basins in southeast Alaska and Washington reveal that pool spacing depends on large woody debris (LWD) loading and channel type, slope, and width. Mean pool spacing in pool-riffle, plane-bed, and forced pool-riffle channels systematically decreases from greater than 13 channel widths per pool to less than 1...

  2. Venusian channels and valleys - Distribution and volcanological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, G.; Baker, V. R.; Gulick, V. C.; Parker, T. J.

    1993-03-01

    An updated map is presented which shows the distribution of more than 200 channels and valleys on Venus. A large number of channels are concentrated in equatorial regions characterized by highlands, rift and fracture zones, an associated volcanic features. Many channels associated with flow deposits are similar to typical terrestrial lava drainage channels. They are associated with a wide range of volcanic edifices. More than half of the sinuous rilles are associated with coronae, coronalike features, or arachnoids. Corona volcanism driven by mantle plume events may explain this association. Many valley network are observed in highlands and in association with coronae, coronalike features, or arachnoids. This indicates that highlands and coronae provided fractures and flow-viscosity lavas, both of which seem to be required for network formation by lava sapping processes. Canali-type channels have a unique distribution limited to some plains regions.

  3. CDF top results in the lepton + jets channel

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, G.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    Results from the 1992--1993 Tevatron run (ran IA) top search at CDF in the lepton+jets channel are reported. The jet-vertexing algorithm tags 6 events on a background of 2.3 {plus_minus} 0.3 events in the W+ {ge} 3 jets data sample, and the soft lepton analysis finds T events on a background of 3.1 {plus_minus} 0.3 events in the same data sample. Jet-vertex and soft-lepton tag correlations are described. Also given are the expected and observed number of tags in the Z+mulitjet control sample.

  4. Comparison of the 26 May 2012 SEP Event with the 3 November 2011 SEP Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, P. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Thakur, N.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    We compare the solar and interplanetary events associated with two large solar energetic particle (SEP) events on 26 May 2012 and 3 November 2011. Both SEP events were detected at three longitudinally widely separated locations by STEREO A and B spacecraft (more than 100 deg away from Earth) and the Wind and SOHO spacecraft near Earth. In Earth view, the November 2011 eruption occurred far behind the east limb at N09E154, whereas the May 2012 eruption occurred closer to the west limb at N15W121, suggesting that SEPs accelerated during the 2012 event might have easier access to Earth. Even though the 2012 event was more intense in the GOES >10 MeV proton channel (peak intensity 14 pfu) than the 2011 event (peak intensity 4 pfu), we find that the latter event was more intense at higher energies (> 40 MeV). Also, the initial rise at lower energies was slightly faster for the 2011 event as measured by SOHO/ERNE. In addition, the CME associated with the May 2012 event was faster with an estimated space speed of ~2029 km/s than that in the November 2011 event (1188 km/s). STEREO/EUVI images of the associated post-eruption arcades (PEAs) indicate that their orientations were different: the PEA of the May 2012 event had a high inclination (north-south), while the inclination of the PEA of the 2011 event was more moderate. Differences in the flux rope orientation may also have effect on the longitudinal extent of the SEP events. These observations suggest that the dependence of solar proton intensities on the observer's longitudinal distance from the solar source is more complex than traditionally assumed.

  5. Membrane bioelectrogenesis and ionic channel activity simulation under drug action.

    PubMed

    Pennec, J P; Iacobas, A D; Iacobas, S

    1995-01-01

    The concept of the ionic channel, as a protein with more discrete ionic conductance levels, is analyzed and a computer program, aiming to simulate its dynamics under the action of a pharmacological agent, is presented. The binding of a pharmacological agent modifies the set of the possible configurations and the channel energy spectrum. Therefore it modifies the transition probabilities and the dwelling times in the excited (generally conductive) states. The program creates a library of simulations of the electric activity of some user designated hypothetical models. The simulations are then statistically compared to the recorded single channel events to select the most suitable model.

  6. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  7. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  8. TRP channel gating physiology.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Posadas, Andrés; Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels participate in several processes of vital importance in cell and organism physiology, and have been demonstrated to participate in the detection of sensory stimuli. The thermo TRP's reviewed: TRPV1 (vanilloid 1), TRPM8 (melastatin 8) and TRPA1 (ankyrin-like 1) are known to integrate different chemical and physical stimuli such as changes in temperature and sensing different irritant or pungent compounds. However, despite the physiological importance of these channels the mechanisms by which they detect incoming stimuli, how the sensing domains are coupled to channel gating and how these processes are connected to specific structural regions in the channel are not fully understood, but valuable information is available. Many sites involved in agonist detection have been characterized and gating models that describe many features of the channel's behavior have been put forward. In this review we will survey some of the key findings concerning the structural and molecular mechanisms of TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 activation.

  9. Channel Identification Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s) onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits. PMID:23227035

  10. TRP Channels and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Louis S.; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-01-01

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control etc. PMID:22910182

  11. Calcium channels and migraine.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  12. Wideband transhorizon channel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndzi, David; Austin, John; Vilar, Enric

    2001-09-01

    The paper describes a 31.25 MHz bandwidth wideband channel sounder used to characterize a transhorizon path over the English Channel (La Manche) at 11.64 GHz. The measurements were done continuously for a period of 8 months (June 5, 1996, to January 5, 1997), capturing 515 Mb of data each day. A nonlinear regression technique, singular value decomposition prony (SVD-P), was used to estimate the channel impulse response from the measured transfer function. The received signal levels obtained together with their dynamic signatures were used to categorize the mechanisms into three broad groups: ducting, strong enhancements, and troposcatter. The statistical analysis carried out gave strong correlation between signal levels, delay spread, coherence bandwidth, and Doppler spread. The results also help to highlight the limitation of traditional channel characterization parameters such as delay spread. The investigation has also revealed the potential and propagation conditions of an over the sea transhorizon path as a high-data-rate communication channel. The research has qualified and quantified the interference potential in spectrum reuse and the frequency decorrelation probabilities to combat it.

  13. TRP channels and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-03-19

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control, etc.

  14. Wakefield Propagation in Plasma Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Shadwick, Brad; Wurtele, Johnathan

    2000-10-01

    Characteristics of laser wakefields propagating in plasma channels have been studied at the l'OASIS laser facility at LBNL. Plasma channels are formed in gas jets using the ignitor-heater method[1], allowing control of channel geometry and profile. The channels are characterized by longitudinal and transverse interferometry, giving both radial and longitudinal profiles of the channel. High intensity (>5E17 W/cm^2, 50fs) pulses at 800nm are guided in these channels and are used to create plasma wakes in the channel. Laser propagation in the channel is characterized by output mode images and energies, and the wakes are profiled by longitudinal spectral interferometry. Measurements of channel and wake profiles, and studies of wake dependence on channel parameters will be presented. [1]P.Volfbeyn, E.Esarey, W.P. Leemans, Phys Plasmas 6, 2269 (1999)

  15. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  16. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  17. Psychiatric Disorders and TRP Channels: Focus on Psychotropic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirdaş, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are mostly associated with the changes in neural calcium ion signaling pathways required for activity-triggered cellular events. One calcium channel family is the TRP cation channel family, which contains seven subfamilies. Results of recent papers have discovered that calcium ion influx through TRP channels is important. We discuss the latest advances in calcium ion influx through TRP channels in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. Activation of TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPV1 cation channels in the etiology of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, fear-associated responses, and depression modulate calcium ion influx. Evidence substantiates that anandamide and its analog (methanandamide) induce an anxiolytic-like effect via CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels. Intracellular calcium influx induced by oxidative stress has an significant role in the etiology of bipolar disorders (BDs), and studies recently reported the important role of TRP channels such as TRPC3, TRPM2, and TRPV1 in converting oxidant or nitrogen radical signaling to cytosolic calcium ion homeostasis in BDs. The TRPV1 channel also plays a function in morphine tolerance and hyperalgesia. Among psychotropic drugs, amitriptyline and capsazepine seem to have protective effects on psychiatric disorders via the TRP channels. Some drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine also seem to have an important role in alcohol addiction and substance abuse via activation of the TRPV1 channel. Thus, we explore the relationships between the etiology of psychiatric disorders and TRP channel-regulated mechanisms. Investigation of the TRP channels in psychiatric disorders holds the promise of the development of new drug treatments. PMID:26411768

  18. Psychiatric Disorders and TRP Channels: Focus on Psychotropic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirdaş, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are mostly associated with the changes in neural calcium ion signaling pathways required for activity-triggered cellular events. One calcium channel family is the TRP cation channel family, which contains seven subfamilies. Results of recent papers have discovered that calcium ion influx through TRP channels is important. We discuss the latest advances in calcium ion influx through TRP channels in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. Activation of TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPV1 cation channels in the etiology of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, fear-associated responses, and depression modulate calcium ion influx. Evidence substantiates that anandamide and its analog (methanandamide) induce an anxiolytic-like effect via CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels. Intracellular calcium influx induced by oxidative stress has an significant role in the etiology of bipolar disorders (BDs), and studies recently reported the important role of TRP channels such as TRPC3, TRPM2, and TRPV1 in converting oxidant or nitrogen radical signaling to cytosolic calcium ion homeostasis in BDs. The TRPV1 channel also plays a function in morphine tolerance and hyperalgesia. Among psychotropic drugs, amitriptyline and capsazepine seem to have protective effects on psychiatric disorders via the TRP channels. Some drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine also seem to have an important role in alcohol addiction and substance abuse via activation of the TRPV1 channel. Thus, we explore the relationships between the etiology of psychiatric disorders and TRP channel-regulated mechanisms. Investigation of the TRP channels in psychiatric disorders holds the promise of the development of new drug treatments.

  19. Chaos in quantum channels

    DOE PAGES

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; ...

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back upmore » our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.« less

  20. Chaos in quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  1. Entanglement-saving channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lami, L.; Giovannetti, V.

    2016-03-15

    The set of Entanglement Saving (ES) quantum channels is introduced and characterized. These are completely positive, trace preserving transformations which when acting locally on a bipartite quantum system initially prepared into a maximally entangled configuration, preserve its entanglement even when applied an arbitrary number of times. In other words, a quantum channel ψ is said to be ES if its powers ψ{sup n} are not entanglement-breaking for all integers n. We also characterize the properties of the Asymptotic Entanglement Saving (AES) maps. These form a proper subset of the ES channels that is constituted by those maps that not only preserve entanglement for all finite n but which also sustain an explicitly not null level of entanglement in the asymptotic limit n → ∞. Structure theorems are provided for ES and for AES maps which yield an almost complete characterization of the former and a full characterization of the latter.

  2. TRP channels and pain.

    PubMed

    Julius, David

    2013-01-01

    Nociception is the process whereby primary afferent nerve fibers of the somatosensory system detect noxious stimuli. Pungent irritants from pepper, mint, and mustard plants have served as powerful pharmacological tools for identifying molecules and mechanisms underlying this initial step of pain sensation. These natural products have revealed three members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family--TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1--as molecular detectors of thermal and chemical stimuli that activate sensory neurons to produce acute or persistent pain. Analysis of TRP channel function and expression has validated the existence of nociceptors as a specialized group of somatosensory neurons devoted to the detection of noxious stimuli. These studies are also providing insight into the coding logic of nociception and how specification of nociceptor subtypes underlies behavioral discrimination of noxious thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli. Biophysical and pharmacological characterization of these channels has provided the intellectual and technical foundation for developing new classes of analgesic drugs.

  3. Cryogenic microwave channelized receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, C.; Pond, J.M.; Tait, G.B.

    1996-07-01

    The channelized receiver being presented demonstrates the use of high temperature superconductor technology in a microwave system setting where superconductor, microwave-monolithic-integrated-circuit, and hybrid-integrated-circuit components are united in one package and cooled to liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The receiver consists of a superconducting X-band four-channel demultiplexer with 100-MHz-wide channels, four commercial monolithically integrated mixers, and four custom-designed hybrid-circuit detectors containing heterostructure ramp diodes. The composite receiver unit has been integrated into the payload of the second-phase NRL high temperature superconductor space experiment (HTSSE-II). Prior to payload assembly, the response characteristics of the receiver were measured as functions of frequency, temperature, and drive levels. The article describes the circuitry, discusses the key issues related to design and implementation, and summarizes the experimental results.

  4. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (<5 V) and provides a high drive current (>3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  5. 77 FR 43511 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Channel... temporarily changing the enforcement period of one special local regulation for a recurring marine event...

  6. 76 FR 44877 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    .... USCG-2011-0629] RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville... marine event in the Fifth Coast Guard District. The ``Wilmington YMCA Triathlon,'' conducted on...

  7. 77 FR 30929 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Number USCG-2012-0341] RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville... marine event in the Fifth Coast Guard District, specifically the ``Wilmington YMCA Triathlon'',...

  8. 76 FR 55561 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Channel... temporarily change the enforcement period of one special local regulation for a recurring marine event in...

  9. 76 FR 57645 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Temporary Change of Dates for Recurring Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Channel... following correction is made: Sec. 100.501 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Fifth Coast...

  10. Ionic Channels in Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losseva, T. V.; Fomenko, A. S.; Nemtchinov, I. V.

    2007-12-01

    We proceed to study the formation and propagation of ionic channels in thunderclouds in the framework of the model of the corona discharge wave propagation (Fomenko A.S., Losseva T.V., Nemtchinov I.V. The corona discharge waves in thunderclouds and formation of ionic channels // 2004 Fall Meeting. EOS Trans. AGU. 2004. V. 85. ¹ 47. Suppl. Abstract AE23A-0835.). In this model we proposed a hypothesis that the structure of a thundercloud becomes nonuniform due to corona discharge on the drops and ice particles and formation of ionic channels with higher conductivity than the surrounding air. When the onset strength of corona discharge becomes smaller than the electric field strength the corona discharge increases concentrations of ions in a small part of the cloud (a hot spot). An additional charge at opposite ends of the hot spot forms due to polarization process. The increased electric field initiates corona discharge in other parts of the cloud on ice particles and water drops with smaller sizes. The corona discharge front moves as a wave with the velocity of the order of ion drift and formes a highly conductive channel. We model this non-stationary problem with Poisson equation which is solved simultaneously with a simplified set of kinetic equations for ions, small charged particles and electrons (at high electric fields), including ionization due to electronic impact, attachment and formation of positive ions. By applying 3D numerical simulations we obtain the parameters of formed ionic channels with respect to onset electric fields both from large particles (in hot spot) and from small particles (surrounding hot spot), microscopic currents from particles with different sizes and the external electric field in the cloud. The interaction of ionic channels is also investigated. This work was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research (Project No 07-05-00998-à).

  11. The neutron channeling phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Shields, used for protection against radiation, are often pierced with vacuum channels for passing cables and other instruments for measurements. The neutron transmission through these shields is an unavoidable phenomenon. In this work we study and discuss the effect of channels on neutron transmission through shields. We consider an infinite homogeneous slab, with a fixed thickness (20 lambda, with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab), which contains a vacuum channel. This slab is irradiated with an infinite source of neutrons on the left side and on the other side (right side) many detectors with windows equal to 2 lambda are placed in order to evaluate the neutron transmission probabilities (Khanouchi, A., Aboubekr, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1994) Rencontre Nationale des Jeunes Chercheurs en Physique. Casa Blanca Maroc; Khanouchi, A., Sabir, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1995) Premier Congré International des Intéractions Rayonnements Matière. Eljadida Maroc). The neutron history within the slab is simulated by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) and using the exponential biasing technique in order to improve the Monte Carlo calculation (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). Then different geometries of the vacuum channel have been studied. For each geometry we have determined the detector response and calculated the neutron transmission probability for different detector positions. This neutron transmission probability presents a peak for the detectors placed in front of the vacuum channel. This study allowed us to clearly identify the neutron channeling phenomenon. One application of our study is to detect vacuum defects in materials.

  12. Chryse Outflow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of the south Chryse basin Valles Marineris outflow channels on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows on the southwest corner the chaotic terrain of the east part of Valles Marineris and two of its related canyons: Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north). Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southern part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander.

    This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 53 degrees; Mercator projection.

    The south Chryse outflow channels are cut an average of 1 km into the cratered highland terrain. This terrain is about 9 km above datum near Valles Marineris and steadily decreases in elevation to 1 km below datum in the Chryse basin. Shalbatana is relatively narrow (10 km wide) but can reach 3 km in depth. The channel begins at a 2- to 3-km-deep circular depression within a large impact crater, whose floor is partly covered by a chaotic material, and ends in Simud Valles. Tiu and Simud Valles consist of a complex of connected channel floors and chaotic terrain and extend as far south as and connect to eastern Valles Marineris. Ares Vallis originates from discontinuous patches of chaotic terrain within large craters. In the Chryse basin the Ares channel forks; one branch continues northwest into central Chryse Planitia (Latin for plain) and the other extends north into eastern Chryse Planitia.

  13. Chryse Outflow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of the south Chryse basin Valles Marineris outflow channels on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows on the southwest corner the chaotic terrain of the east part of Valles Marineris and two of its related canyons: Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north). Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southern part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander.

    This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 53 degrees; Mercator projection.

    The south Chryse outflow channels are cut an average of 1 km into the cratered highland terrain. This terrain is about 9 km above datum near Valles Marineris and steadily decreases in elevation to 1 km below datum in the Chryse basin. Shalbatana is relatively narrow (10 km wide) but can reach 3 km in depth. The channel begins at a 2- to 3-km-deep circular depression within a large impact crater, whose floor is partly covered by a chaotic material, and ends in Simud Valles. Tiu and Simud Valles consist of a complex of connected channel floors and chaotic terrain and extend as far south as and connect to eastern Valles Marineris. Ares Vallis originates from discontinuous patches of chaotic terrain within large craters. In the Chryse basin the Ares channel forks; one branch continues northwest into central Chryse Planitia (Latin for plain) and the other extends north into eastern Chryse Planitia.

  14. Amplification of electromagnetic signals by ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Galvanovskis, J; Sandblom, J

    1997-01-01

    Cells may respond to the exposure of low-frequency electromagnetic fields with changes in cell division, ion influx, chemical reaction rates, etc. The chain of events leading to such responses is difficult to study, mainly because of extremely small energies associated with low-frequency fields, usually much smaller than the thermal noise level. However, the presence of stochastic systems (for instance, ion channels) provides a basis for signal amplification, and could therefore, despite the low signal-to-noise ratio of the primary response, lead to the transmission of weak signals along the signaling pathways of cells. We have explored this possibility for an ion channel model, and we present a theory, based on the formalism of stochastically driven processes, that relates the time averages of the ion channel currents to the amplitude and frequency of the applied signal. It is concluded from this theory that the signal-to-noise ratio increases with the number of channels, the magnitude of the rate constants, and the frequency response of the intracellular sensing system (for instance, a calcium oscillator). The amplification properties of the stochastic system are further deduced from numerical simulations carried out on the model, which consists of multiple identical two-state channels, and the behavior for different parameters is examined. Numerical estimates of the parameters show that under optimum conditions, even very weak low-frequency electromagnetic signals (<100 Hz and down to 100 microT) may be detected in a cellular system with a large number of ion channels. PMID:9414219

  15. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  16. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  17. Wide, Branching Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    Southern spring on Mars brings sublimation of the seasonal dry ice polar cap. Gas trapped under the seasonal ice sheet carves channels on its way to escaping to the atmosphere. At this site, the channels are wider than we see elsewhere on Mars, perhaps meaning that the spider-like (or more scientifically, "araneiform") terrain here is older, or that the surface is more easily eroded. Seasonal fans of eroded surface material, pointed in two different directions, are deposited on the remaining ice. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13151

  18. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    ScienceCinema

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2016-07-12

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  19. How Gas Carves Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-24

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies a layer of dry ice covering Mars south polar layer. In the spring, gas created from heating of the dry ice escapes through ruptures in the overlying seasonal ice, entraining material from the ground below. The gas erodes channels in the surface, generally exploiting weaker material. The ground likely started as polygonal patterned ground (common in water-ice-rich surfaces), and then escaping gas widened the channels. Fans of dark material are bits of the surface carried onto the top of the seasonal ice layer and deposited in a direction determined by local winds. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11706

  20. Tharsis Grooved Channel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-04

    The Tharsis Montes region on Mars is a major center of volcanic and tectonic activity. The channel in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey is west of the relatively small volcano called Biblis Patera although it shows no obvious relationship to that volcano. Instead, it may be related to the more distant, but more massive volcano Olympus Mons to the north. The channel may have hosted flowing lava at one time but now contains a material that has eroded into an impressive ridge-and-groove pattern. These features may be yardangs, landforms produced from the erosion by wind of sedimentary material. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04020

  1. Alluvial channel hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Peter

    1988-07-01

    The development and utilisation of water resources for irrigation, hydropower and public supply can be severely affected by sediment. Where there is a mature and well vegetated landscape, sediment problems may be relatively minor; but where slopes are steep and vegetation sparse, the yield of sediment from the catchment gives high concentrations in the rivers. In utilising these resources, for whatever purpose, an understanding of the hydraulics of alluvial channels is vital. The regime of any conveyance channel in alluvium depends on the interrelationships of sediment transport, channel resistance and bank stability. The regime concept was originally based on empirical relations obtained from observations from canal systems in the Indian subcontinent, and for many years was surrounded by a certain degree of mystique and much scepticism from academics. In more recent years the unabashed empiricism of the original method has been replaced by process-based methods, which have also served as broad confirmation of the classic regime formulae, including their extension to natural channels and meandering channels. The empirical approach to the hydraulics of alluvial channels has thus been updated by physically based formulae for sediment transport and resistance, though there remains some uncertainty about the third function to complete the definition of slope and geometry. Latest thoughts in this respect are that the channel seeks a natural optimum state. Physical modelling using scaled down representations of rivers and estuaries has been used for almost a century, but it requires the correct simulation of the relevant processes. The coming of a better understanding of the physics of sediment transport and the complexity of alluvial channel roughness leads to the conclusion that only in very restricted circumstances can scale models simulate closely the full-size condition. However, the quantification of these processes has been instrumental in the development of

  2. Dialogue on private events

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David C.; Eshleman, John; Brandon, Paul; Layng, T. V. Joe; McDonough, Christopher; Michael, Jack; Schoneberger, Ted; Stemmer, Nathan; Weitzman, Ray; Normand, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, the authors corresponded on the topic of private events on the listserv of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group. Extracts from that correspondence raised questions about the role of response amplitude in determining units of analysis, whether private events can be investigated directly, and whether covert behavior differs from other behavior except in amplitude. Most participants took a cautious stance, noting not only conceptual pitfalls and empirical difficulties in the study of private events, but doubting the value of interpretive exercises about them. Others argued that despite such obstacles, in domains where experimental analyses cannot be done, interpretation of private events in the light of laboratory principles is the best that science can offer. One participant suggested that the notion that private events can be behavioral in nature be abandoned entirely; as an alternative, the phenomena should be reinterpreted only as physiological events. PMID:22477293

  3. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: Acoustic emissions and electron channeling analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this work are to: (i) Evaluate the initial stages of cleavage nucleation in single and polycrystalline samples; (ii) Determine the controlling event(s) which lead(s) to unstable cleavage (is it an unstable cluster'' of microcracks or a crack-tip opening displacement criterion for an array of ligaments surrounding these microcracks ); (iii) Determine how the process zone, which depends upon microstructure and processing history, affects the controlling event(s); (iv) Use selected area channeling patterns (SACP's) to assist in an independent measure of the cleavage fracture stress of grains cleaved at or just outside the elastic-plastic boundary; also, use it to evaluate static and dynamic strain distributions; and (v) Evaluate the effects of dislocation shielding and overload using combined methods of computational mechanics with discretized dislocation arrays and direct observations of dislocations using channeling, etch pit and birefringence methods. Accomplishments are discussed. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Ion channels in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  5. Learning in Tactile Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gescheider, George A.; Wright, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrotactile intensity-discrimination thresholds for sinusoidal stimuli applied to the thenar eminence of the hand declined as a function of practice. However, improvement was confined to the tactile information-processing channel in which learning had occurred. Specifically, improvements in performance with training within the Pacinian-corpuscle…

  6. Developments in relativistic channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy accelerator applications and particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used for accelerator extraction and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but have not yet been tried. 61 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  8. Covert Channels within IRC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    Distribution ~NA maintain primary management responsibility and Statement "A" - unclassifed, unlimited distribution ? authority to release all...AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED... DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GCE/ENG/11-04 COVERT CHANNELS WITHIN IRC Wayne C. Henry, BSCE Captain, USAF Approved

  9. Channels of Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule, J. Michael

    Defining propaganda as "efforts by special interests to win over the public covertly by infiltrating messages into various channels of public expression ordinarily viewed as politically neutral," this book argues that propaganda has become pervasive in American life. Pointing out that the 1990s society is inundated with propaganda from…

  10. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  11. Learning in Tactile Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gescheider, George A.; Wright, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrotactile intensity-discrimination thresholds for sinusoidal stimuli applied to the thenar eminence of the hand declined as a function of practice. However, improvement was confined to the tactile information-processing channel in which learning had occurred. Specifically, improvements in performance with training within the Pacinian-corpuscle…

  12. Visual Channel Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Philip H.; Suiter, Patricia A.

    This teacher training module classifies visual channel problems into the following four main areas: visual perception, revisualization (memory), visual-motor (eye-hand coordination), and ocular-motor tasks. Specific deficits are listed under these main headings, behaviors are given to help identify the problem, and ways to improve the condition…

  13. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  14. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  15. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  16. Event-by-Event Fission with FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J; Vogt, R

    2010-11-09

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. The presentation first discusses the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended up to energies where pre-equilibrium emission becomes significant and one or more neutrons may be emitted prior to fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n,f), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also briefly suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  17. The continuous slope-area method for computing event hydrographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Christopher F.; Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Wiele, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The continuous slope-area (CSA) method expands the slope-area method of computing peak discharge to a complete flow event. Continuously recording pressure transducers installed at three or more cross sections provide water-surface slopes and stage during an event that can be used with cross-section surveys and estimates of channel roughness to compute a continuous discharge hydrograph. The CSA method has been made feasible by the availability of low-cost recording pressure transducers that provide a continuous record of stage. The CSA method was implemented on the Babocomari River in Arizona in 2002 to monitor streamflow in the channel reach by installing eight pressure transducers in four cross sections within the reach. Continuous discharge hydrographs were constructed from five streamflow events during 2002-2006. Results from this study indicate that the CSA method can be used to obtain continuous hydrographs and rating curves can be generated from streamflow events.

  18. Origins of open-channel noise in the large potassium channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Open-channel noise was studied in the large potassium channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Inside-out patches were excised directly from the SR of split skeletal muscle fibers of lobster, with lobster relaxing ringer (LRR) in bath and pipette. The power spectrum of open- channel noise is very low and approximately flat in the 100 Hz-10 kHz frequency range. At 20 degrees C, with an applied voltage of 50 mV, the mean single-channel current (i) is 9 pA (mean single-channel conductance = 180 pS) and the mean power spectral density 1.1 x 10(-29) A2/Hz. The latter increases nonlinearly with (i), showing a progressively steeper dependence as (i) increases. At 20 mV, the mean power spectral density is almost independent of (i) and approximately 1.4 times that of the Johnson noise calculated for the equivalent ideal resistor with zero net current; at 70 mV it increases approximately in proportion to (i)2. The mean power spectral density has a weak temperature dependence, very similar to that of (i), and both are well described by a Q10 of 1.3 throughout the range 3-40 degrees C. Discrete ion transport events are thought to account for a significant fraction of the measured open-channel noise, probably approximately 30-50% at 50 mV. Brief interruptions of the single-channel current, due either to blockage of the open channel by an extrinsic aqueous species, or to intrinsic conformational changes in the channel molecule itself, were a possible additional source of open-channel noise. Experiments in modified bathing solutions indicate, however, that open-channel noise is not affected by any of the identified aqueous species present in LRR. In particular, magnesium ions, the species thought most likely to cause brief blockages, and calcium and hydrogen ions, have no detectable effect. This channel's openings exhibit many brief closings and substrates, due to intrinsic gating of the channel. Unresolved brief full closings are calculated to make a negligible contribution

  19. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  20. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  1. Improving Seismic Event Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-22

    according to age, four regions of low volcanic and earthquake activity, in addition to a region termed tectonic continent where activity is high. We... Queensland . 0 * il-’gme 7.2 shows tire locations of events whichl have been used. Ti1𔃼 events l:cI , ’"re,: hcc.eI with a inininmm of fcu; iecords

  2. CHED Events: Philadelphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-08-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Fall 2008 ACS Meeting in Philadelphia. Most will take place in the Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel, 17th and Race Streets: This includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet.

  3. Events by Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, David W.

    1980-01-01

    Institutions need coordinated events programs that support institutional goals and are closely related to them, whether the objective is fund raising, student recruitment, or improvement of the college image. Carefully selected and planned events create news, affect perceptions, influence attitudes, spark emotions, and affect people's decisions…

  4. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  5. Event generator overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Due to their ability to provide detailed and quantitative predictions, the event generators have become an important part of studying relativistic heavy ion physics and of designing future experiments. In this talk, the author will briefly summarize recent progress in developing event generators for the relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  6. Contrasting Large Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2010-10-01

    After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar event of 4 August 1972. The prior event, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two events, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 event is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar events can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.

  7. The elusive character of discontinuous deep-water channels: New insights from Lucia Chica channel system, offshore California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, K.L.; Fildani, A.; Paull, C.K.; Graham, S.A.; McHargue, T.R.; Caress, D.W.; McGann, M.

    2011-01-01

    New high-resolution autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) seafloor images, with 1 m lateral resolution and 0.3 m vertical resolution, reveal unexpected seafloor rugosity and low-relief (<10 m), discontinuous conduits over ~70 km2. Continuous channel thalwegs were interpreted originally from lower-resolution images, but newly acquired AUV data indicate that a single sinuous channel fed a series of discontinuous lower-relief channels. These discontinuous channels were created by at least four avulsion events. Channel relief, defined as the height from the thalweg to the levee crest, controls avulsions and overall stratigraphic architecture of the depositional area. Flowstripped turbidity currents separated into and reactivated multiple channels to create a distributary pattern and developed discontinuous trains of cyclic scours and megaflutes, which may be erosional precursors to continuous channels. The diverse features now imaged in the Lucia Chica channel system (offshore California) are likely common in modern and ancient systems with similar overall morphologies, but have not been previously mapped with lower-resolution detection methods in any of these systems. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  8. Use-dependent block of single sodium channels by lidocaine in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, T V; Courtney, K R; Clusin, W T

    1989-01-01

    Single sodium channel openings have been recorded from cell-attached patches of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes. A paired pulse protocol was used to test the hypothesis that channel openings are required for lidocaine block. While the averaged ensemble current during the test pulse was much reduced, there was no correlation between the appearance of channel openings during the conditioning pulse and the subsequent test pulse. Analysis of single channel records demonstrated that the unit conductance of open channels was not changed by lidocaine. The block of ensemble INa was explained by roughly equal reductions in number of open channel events, and in the average duration of opening for each event. These results suggest that lidocaine binding to Na+ channels is dependent upon voltage, but may occur before channel opening. A lidocaine-modified channel can still open, but will be less likely to remain open than a drug-free channel. These results are consistent with block of a pre-open state of the channel. PMID:2548633

  9. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    PubMed Central

    Tosti, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed. PMID:16684344

  10. Learning Channels and Verbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fan-Yu; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the basics of learning channels and how specification of stimuli can help enhance verbal behavior. This article will define learning channels and the role of the ability matrix in training verbal behavior.

  11. Sodium channel subconductance levels measured with a new variance-mean analysis

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The currents through single Na+ channels were recorded from dissociated cells of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle of the mouse. At 15 degrees C the prolonged bursts of Na+ channel openings produced by application of the drug DPI 201-106 had brief sojourns to subconductance levels. The subconductance events were relatively rare and brief, but could be identified using a new technique that sorts amplitude estimates based on their variance. The resulting "levels histogram" had a resolution of the conductance levels during channel activity that was superior to that of standard amplitude histograms. Cooling the preparation to 0 degrees C prolonged the subconductance events, and permitted further quantitative analysis of their amplitudes, as well as clear observations of single-channel subconductance events from untreated Na+ channels. In all cases the results were similar: a subconductance level, with an amplitude of roughly 35% of the fully open conductance and similar reversal potential, was present in both drug-treated and normal Na+ channels. Drug-treated channels spent approximately 3-6% of their total open time in the subconductance state over a range of potentials that caused the open probability to vary between 0.1 and 0.9. The summed levels histograms from many channels had a distinctive form, with broader, asymmetrical open and substate distributions compared with those of the closed state. Individual subconductance events to levels other than the most common 35% were also observed. I conclude that subconductance events are a normal subset of the open state of Na+ channels, whether or not they are drug treated. The subconductance events may represent a conformational alteration of the channel that occurs when it conducts ions. PMID:2849627

  12. Are restored side channels sustainable aquatic habitat features? Predicting the potential persistence of side channels as aquatic habitats based on their fine sedimentation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquier, Jérémie; Piégay, Hervé; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Vaudor, Lise

    2017-10-01

    .e., maximum shear stress) of upstream overflow events and the maximum intensity of backflow events (i.e., maximum backflow capacity). These predictors reflect the dominant role of side channel geometry (i.e., morphology of the upstream alluvial plug, slope conditions) in controlling their flooding regime. These models applied successfully to a wide range of channel morphologies and can be used to quantify a priori the likely effects and the sustainability of side channel restoration.

  13. Pretreating channel catfish with copper sulfate affects susceptibility to columnaris

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Columnaris disease is one of the most important bacterial diseases of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, commercially grown in the US. This disease can greatly diminish the profitability of aquaculture operations by large-scale mortality events, particularly in the fingerling production phase. ...

  14. 78 FR 37456 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New York. Under this temporary... event, the Town of Hempstead Annual Fireworks Display. DATES: This deviation is effective between 9:30 p..., 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday...

  15. Channel processes and watershed function

    Treesearch

    Tom Lisle

    1999-01-01

    Purpose of this presentation is to put channel monitoring in context of channel processes and dispel the myth of the learned sage walking up the stream channel observing changes in the channel and extrapolating how these changes came about without looking at the rest of the watershed. The message I want to convey is it is not only O.K.to peek at the rest of the...

  16. Meander properties of Venusian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, G.; Baker, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    Venusian lava channels have meander dimensions that relate to their mode of formation. Their meander properties generally follow terrestrial river trends of wavelength (L) to width (W) ratios, suggesting an equilibrium adjustment of channel form. Slightly higher L/W for many Venusian channels in comparison to terrestrial rivers may relate to nonaqueous flow processes. The unusually low L/W values for some Venusian and lunar sinuous rilles probably indicate modification of original meander patterns by lava-erosional channel widening.

  17. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  18. Universality of receptor channel responses.

    PubMed

    Kardos, J; Nyikos, L

    2001-12-01

    Rate parameters estimated for neurotransmitter-gated receptor channel opening and receptor desensitization are classified according to their dependence on the temporal resolution of the techniques applied in the measurements. Because allosteric proteins constituting receptor channels impose restrictions on the types of model suitable to describe the dynamic response of channels to neurotransmitters, Markovian, non-linear or fractal dynamic models and their possible extension to receptor channel response in excitable membranes are discussed.

  19. Nanochannels: biological channel analogues.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, H; Rajanikant, G K

    2012-06-01

    The flux of ions across the biological membrane is a central activity to many cellular processes, from conduction of nerve impulse to the apoptosis. Traffic of ions or molecules across the membrane and organelles is governed by natural machines of great precision; ion channels, a special class of proteins, reside in the biological membranes. Recent studies in the field of nanoscience have concentrated on to precisely mimic the physical and chemical properties of these pores that make them increasingly attractive in this field. Synthetic nanoporous materials have a great deal of medical applications, including biosensing, biosorting, immune-isolation and drug delivery. In this review, the authors briefly describe the interesting synthetic channels that are extensively studied, and also attempt to furnish a precise overview of recent advances in this arena.

  20. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  1. ``Just Another Distribution Channel?''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemstra, Wolter; de Leeuw, Gerd-Jan; van de Kar, Els; Brand, Paul

    The telecommunications-centric business model of mobile operators is under attack due to technological convergence in the communication and content industries. This has resulted in a plethora of academic contributions on the design of new business models and service platform architectures. However, a discussion of the challenges that operators are facing in adopting these models is lacking. We assess these challenges by considering the mobile network as part of the value system of the content industry. We will argue that from the perspective of a content provider the mobile network is ‘just another’ distribution channel. Strategic options available for the mobile communication operators are to deliver an excellent distribution channel for content delivery or to move upwards in the value chain by becoming a content aggregator. To become a mobile content aggregator operators will have to develop or acquire complementary resources and capabilities. Whether this strategic option is sustainable remains open.

  2. Chryse Outflow Channel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    A color image of the south Chryse basin Valles Marineris outflow channels on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows on the southwest corner the chaotic terrain of the east part of Valles Marineris and two of its related canyons: Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north). Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southern part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander. This image is a composite of NASA's Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 53 degrees; Mercator projection. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00418

  3. Lightning energetics: Estimates of energy dissipation in channels, channel radii, and channel-heating risetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this report, several lightning-channel parameters are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The electrodynamic model describes dart leaders and return strokes as electromagnetic waves that are guided along conducting lightning channels. According to the model, electrostatic energy is delivered to the channel by a leader, where it is stored around the outside of the channel; subsequently, the return stroke dissipates this locally stored energy. In this report this lightning-energy-flow scenario is developed further. Then the energy dissipated per unit length in lightning channels is calculated, where this quantity is now related to the linear charge density on the channel, not to the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference. Energy conservation is then used to calculate the radii of lightning channels: their initial radii at the onset of return strokes and their final radii after the channels have pressure expanded. Finally, the risetimes for channel heating during return strokes are calculated by defining an energy-storage radius around the channel and by estimating the radial velocity of energy flow toward the channel during a return stroke. In three appendices, values for the linear charge densities on lightning channels are calculated, estimates of the total length of branch channels are obtained, and values for the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference are estimated. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  4. Stream Channel Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    geometry of the stilling basin and appurtenances for optimum energy dissipation. The hydraulic design, based on a 100-year return period design storm...cases the only viable alternative based on present technology is to let the channel seek its oa equilibrium, but attempt to minimize total losses by...are degrading, resulting in bank caving, land loss , and damage to highway bridges. Many streams have enlarged to the extent that 50 to 100-year runoff

  5. Athermal channeled spectropolarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven

    2015-12-08

    A temperature insensitive (athermal) channeled spectropolarimeter (CSP) is described. The athermal CSP includes a crystal retarder formed of a biaxial crystal. The crystal retarder has three crystal axes, wherein each axis has its own distinct index of refraction. The axes are oriented in a particular manner, causing an amplitude modulating carrier frequency induced by the crystal retarder to be thermally invariant. Accordingly, a calibration beam technique can be used over a relatively wide range of ambient temperatures, with a common calibration data set.

  6. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  7. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    DOE PAGES

    Neuffer, David

    2017-09-25

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this study, we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  8. Cascading blockages in channel bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, C.; Talbot, J.

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of Nc parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary Nc and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary Nc and N =1 for coupled channels. For N >1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N =1 but decreases for N >1 . This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  9. Cascading blockages in channel bundles.

    PubMed

    Barré, C; Talbot, J

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of N(c) parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary N(c) and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary N(c) and N=1 for coupled channels. For N>1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N=1 but decreases for N>1. This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  10. Ion channels in the RPE.

    PubMed

    Wimmers, Sönke; Karl, Mike O; Strauss, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    In close interaction with photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role for visual function. The analysis of RPE functions, specifically ion channel functions, provides a basis to understand many degenerative diseases of the retina. The invention of the patch-clamp technique significantly improved the knowledge of ion channel structure and function, which enabled a new understanding of cell physiology and patho-physiology of many diseases. In this review, ion channels identified in the RPE will be described in terms of their specific functional role in RPE physiology. The RPE expresses voltage- and ligand-gated K(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+)-conducting channels. K(+) and Cl(-) channels are involved in transepithelial ion transport and volume regulation. Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels act as regulators of secretory activity, and ligand-gated cation channels contribute to RPE function by providing driving forces for ion transport or by influencing intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Collectively, activity of these ion channels determines the physiology of the RPE and its interaction with photoreceptors. Furthermore, changes in ion channel function, such as mutations in ion channel genes or a changed regulation of ion channel activity, have been shown to lead to degenerative diseases of the retina. Increasing knowledge about the properties of RPE ion channels has not only provided a new understanding of RPE function but has also provided greater understanding of RPE function in health and disease.

  11. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  12. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  13. Surgical Never Events and Contributing Human Factors

    PubMed Central

    Thiels, Cornelius A.; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Nienow, Joseph M.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Blocker, Renaldo C.; Aho, Johnathon M.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Cima, Robert R.; Hallbeck, Susan; Bingener, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report the first prospective analysis of human factors elements contributing to invasive procedural never events using a validated Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). Methods From 8/2009 - 8/2014 surgical and invasive procedural “Never Events” (retained foreign object, wrong site/side procedure, wrong implant, wrong procedure) underwent systematic causation analysis promptly after the event. Contributing human factors were categorized using Reason's 4 levels of error causation and 161 HFACS subcategories (nano-codes). Results During the study approximately 1.5 million procedures were performed and 69 never events were identified. A total of 628 contributing human factors nano-codes were identified. Action-based errors (n=260) and preconditions to actions (n=296) accounted for the majority of the nano-codes across all four types of events, with individual cognitive factors contributing half of the nano-codes. The most common action nano-codes were confirmation bias (n=36) and failed to understand (n=36). The most common pre-condition nano-codes were channeled attention on a single issue (n=33) and inadequate communication (n=30). Conclusion Targeting quality and system improvement interventions addressing cognitive factors and team resource management as well as perceptual biases may reduce errors and further improve patient safety. These results delineate targets to further reduce never events from our healthcare system. PMID:26032826

  14. Ion channeling revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  15. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  16. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  17. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  18. "Universe" event at AIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  19. Special Event Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a descriptive table of software that helps higher education institutions orchestrate events. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, specific features, and client type. (EV)

  20. News and Events

    Cancer.gov

    The latest news from the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research and the Alliance, as well as upcoming and past events attended by the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research staff, and relevant upcoming scientific meetings.

  1. CCG - News & Events

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  2. Special Event Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a descriptive table of software that helps higher education institutions orchestrate events. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, specific features, and client type. (EV)

  3. Event-sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Detector consists of matrix of storage elements which are activated by coincidence of failure-voltage pulses and clock pulses. Clock frequency used for event sequence detector can be selected to provide time resolution demanded by test at hand.

  4. 2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-08

    2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS AT THE U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS COME TOGETHER TO TEST THEIR ENGINEERING SKILLS OVER A SIMULATED OUTER PLANET OBSTACLE COURSE.

  5. Scorpion toxin peptide action at the ion channel subunit level.

    PubMed

    Housley, David M; Housley, Gary D; Liddell, Michael J; Jennings, Ernest A

    2016-10-10

    This review categorizes functionally validated actions of defined scorpion toxin (SCTX) neuropeptides across ion channel subclasses, highlighting key trends in this rapidly evolving field. Scorpion envenomation is a common event in many tropical and subtropical countries, with neuropharmacological actions, particularly autonomic nervous system modulation, causing significant mortality. The primary active agents within scorpion venoms are a diverse group of small neuropeptides that elicit specific potent actions across a wide range of ion channel classes. The identification and functional characterisation of these SCTX peptides has tremendous potential for development of novel pharmaceuticals that advance knowledge of ion channels and establish lead compounds for treatment of excitable tissue disorders. This review delineates the unique specificities of 320 individual SCTX peptides that collectively act on 41 ion channel subclasses. Thus the SCTX research field has significant translational implications for pathophysiology spanning neurotransmission, neurohumoral signalling, sensori-motor systems and excitation-contraction coupling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. QCD (&) event generators

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments in QCD phenomenology have spurred on several improved approaches to Monte Carlo event generation, relative to the post-LEP state of the art. In this brief review, the emphasis is placed on approaches for (1) consistently merging fixed-order matrix element calculations with parton shower descriptions of QCD radiation, (2) improving the parton shower algorithms themselves, and (3) improving the description of the underlying event in hadron collisions.

  7. CHED Events: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Spring 2008 ACS Meeting in New Orleans. Most will take place in the Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras Street; this includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet. Exceptions are the Sunday evening Poster Session and the Undergraduate Poster Sessions, which will be in Hall A of the Morial Convention Center.

  8. Spaces of Abstract Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajda, Ivan; Länger, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    We generalize the concept of a space of numerical events in such a way that this generalization corresponds to arbitrary orthomodular posets whereas spaces of numerical events correspond to orthomodular posets having a full set of states. Moreover, we show that there is a natural one-to-one correspondence between orthomodular posets and certain posets with sectionally antitone involutions. Finally, we characterize orthomodular lattices among orthomodular posets.

  9. Small Business Procurement Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    Small Business Procurement Event 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NDIA 27th Navy Gold Coast Small Business Procurement Event , 12-13 Aug 2014, San Diego, CA. 14. ABSTRACT...18 Target the Small Business Accessible Market within the Department of the Navy $77.8B Department of the Navy Total SB Eligible Spend

  10. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  11. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  12. Activating Event Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension. PMID:19298961

  13. Activating event knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-05-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension.

  14. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  15. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  16. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  17. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  18. Intersecting Channels near Olympica Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    This complicated area contains various types of channels, pits and fractures. We can determine the relative ages of the pits and channels based on which features cross-cut others. Older channels appear smooth-edged and shallow. Younger channels and pits are deeper and more sharp-edged, as well as less sinuous than the shallower channels. What caused this array of various channels and intersecting pits? This region is covered in vast lava flows. The collapse pits here may be collapsed lava tubes or where overlying rock "drained" into voids created by extensional faulting. The older smoother channel that seems to source from this region may have carried an outflow of groundwater. It continues on for over 100 kilometers (62 miles). The orientation and shapes of these features make an interesting geological puzzle. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21066

  19. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  20. Concepts of event-by-event analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stroebele, H.

    1995-07-15

    The particles observed in the final state of nuclear collisions can be divided into two classes: those which are susceptible to strong interactions and those which are not, like leptons and the photon. The bulk properties of the {open_quotes}matter{close_quotes} in the reaction zone may be read-off the kinematical characteristics of the particles observable in the final state. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the last interaction these particles have undergone. In a densly populated reaction zone strongly interacting particles will experience many collisions after they have been formed and before they emerge into the asymptotic final state. For the particles which are not sensitive to strong interactions their formation is also their last interaction. Thus photons and leptons probe the period during which they are produced whereas hadrons reflect the so called freeze-out processes, which occur during the late stage in the evolution of the reaction when the population density becomes small and the mean free paths long. The disadvantage of the leptons and photons is their small production cross section; they cannot be used in an analysis of the characteristics of individual collision events, because the number of particles produced per event is too small. The hadrons, on the other hand, stem from the freeze-out period. Information from earlier periods requires multiparticle observables in the most general sense. It is one of the challenges of present day high energy nuclear physics to establish and understand global observables which differentiate between mere hadronic scenarios, i.e superposition of hadronic interactions, and the formation of a partonic (short duration) steady state which can be considered a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  1. Comparison of long-term evolutionary trajectories of two ephemeral channels after channel-forming extraordinary floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsari, Eliisa; House, Kyle; Alho, Petteri; Baker, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Analyses of the evolutionary trajectories of braided ephemeral channels enable identification of trends, magnitudes and periodicity of the processes that affect the channels. In addition to infrequent great floods, relatively frequent, small discharge events have been shown to be important for the evolution of ephemeral channels. However, evolutionary trajectories have rarely been studied in small ephemeral rivers, that predominantly transport gravel, cobles and boulders. Ephemeral tributary channels typify the Colorado River basin (USA), and two examples are Bronco Creek and Eldorado Canyon. These streams experienced extraordinary great floods in 1971 and 1974 respectively, and they are comparable to each other in both basin size, and climatic conditions. Annual precipitation is less than 50 cm, and the average temperature of each month is above 7°C. More importantly, earlier studies have shown similarities in the hydraulics and geomorphic characteristics of the extraordinary floods, which removed the pre-flood bar and braiding structure from the channels. Thus, these two channels are ideal for comparisons of their evolutionary trajecties. Moreover, the availability of high-resolutions aerial photographs for both channels since 1954 allowed for decadal analyses. Our research has analyzed and compared the long-term evolutionary trajectories of the two ephemeral channels within Colorado River Basin based on series of aerial photos and digital elevation models. (1) We detected the development and adjustment of braiding since the extraordinary floods. The detected parameters include the braiding index, bar area and number, channel area and width, confluence number and density, and the proportion of inactive and active areas. (2) We also analyzed the time required for the ephemeral river system to evolve back to its prior state before the high magnitude floods. Finally, (3) we analyzed whether these temporal changes in channel evolution can reveal new insights as to

  2. Impacts of maintenance channel dredging in a northern Adriatic coastal lagoon. II: Effects on macrobenthic assemblages in channels and ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, Massimo; Pasteris, Andrea; Guerra, Roberta; Abbiati, Marco

    2009-10-01

    Coastal lagoons are ephemeral habitats whose conservation requires human intervention, such as maintenance dredging of inner channels. Dredging can reduce the abundance of benthic species due to the removal of individuals with the sediment, modify sediment properties, and resuspend fine sediment, nutrients and pollutants, which can lead to eutrophication, hypoxic events and increasing toxicity. Both direct effects in the dredged channel and possible indirect effects in surrounding shallow areas could be expected. This study assesses the effects of the channel maintenance dredging, performed between October 2004 and August 2005, on the invertebrate assemblages both in channels and adjacent ponds in the northern Adriatic coastal lagoon of Pialassa Baiona. The lagoon is affected by eutrophication, chemical and thermal pollution from wastewater treatment and power plants. Three impacted sites were located in the dredged channel and three in the adjacent interconnected shallow water ponds, while three non-impacted sites were located in a channel and in a pond far from the dredged area. Replicate samples were collected from each site one time before and one time after the dredging operations. Despite the extent of the intervention, effects of the dredging on macrobenthic assemblages were detected only within the dredged channel, while in the surrounding ponds no clear and unequivocal effects were found. In particular the dredging could have promoted the increase of the abundance of the polychaete Streblospio shrubsolii in the southern and central parts of the dredged channel and the increase in abundance of the amphipod Corophium insidiosum in the northern side, compared to the controls. Instead, species diversity was reduced in the central and northern parts of the dredged channel. These effects on the macrobenthic invertebrate assemblages could be related to the observed changes of sediment characteristics, contamination and toxicity. Overall, direct effects on benthic

  3. Coordinated signal integration at the M-type potassium channel upon muscarinic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Anastasia; Kang, Seungwoo; Smith, Ida M; Greene, Derek L; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D; Hoshi, Naoto

    2012-05-29

    Several neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, regulate neuronal tone by suppressing a non-inactivating low-threshold voltage-gated potassium current generated by the M-channel. Agonist dependent control of the M-channel is mediated by calmodulin, activation of anchored protein kinase C (PKC), and depletion of the phospholipid messenger phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). In this report, we show how this trio of second messenger responsive events acts synergistically and in a stepwise manner to suppress activity of the M-current. PKC phosphorylation of the KCNQ2 channel subunit induces dissociation of calmodulin from the M-channel complex. The calmodulin-deficient channel has a reduced affinity towards PIP2. This pathway enhances the effect of concomitant reduction of PIP2, which leads to disruption of the M-channel function. These findings clarify how a common lipid cofactor, such as PIP2, can selectively regulate ion channels.

  4. Putting ion channels to work: Mechanoelectrical transduction, adaptation, and amplification by hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Choe, Y.; Mehta, A. D.; Martin, P.

    2000-10-01

    As in other excitable cells, the ion channels of sensory receptors produce electrical signals that constitute the cellular response to stimulation. In photoreceptors, olfactory neurons, and some gustatory receptors, these channels essentially report the results of antecedent events in a cascade of chemical reactions. The mechanoelectrical transduction channels of hair cells, by contrast, are coupled directly to the stimulus. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of these channels shape our hearing process from the outset of transduction. Channel gating introduces nonlinearities prominent enough to be measured and even heard. Channels provide a feedback signal that controls the transducer's adaptation to large stimuli. Finally, transduction channels participate in an amplificatory process that sensitizes and sharpens hearing.

  5. Channel to Nowhere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 22 May 2003

    A channel-like feature roughly halfway between the Isidis Basin and Elysium Mons shows no connection to either a source region or terminal basin. It may be that this feature is not a channel at all and has instead arisen from the erosion of a once continuous layer of material into remnants that mimic a channel.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.9, Longitude 105 East (255) meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. The Tow Channel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-27

    This archival image was released as part of a gallery comparing JPL's past and present, commemorating the 80th anniversary of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Oct. 31, 2016. During World War II, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory had a contract with the U.S. Army to develop rocket torpedoes. This picture from August 1944 shows the test facility, known as the "Tow Channel." It was used for storage for many years before being torn out to make space for the Earth and Space Science Laboratory (Building 300) and the Microdevices Laboratory (Building 302). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21124

  9. Solar extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of “extreme events,” defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than S-2, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial 14C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observational results have impacted our use of the relatively limited historical record in new ways: the detection of actual events in the 14C tree-ring records, and the systematic observations of flares and “superflares” by the Kepler spacecraft. I discuss how these new findings may affect our understanding of the distribution function expected for extreme solar events.

  10. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  11. Bacterial sodium channels: models for eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels are made up of four linked homologous but different transmembrane domains. Bacteria express sodium channels comprised of four identical subunits, each being analogous to a single homologous domain of their eukaryotic counterparts. Key elements of primary structure are conserved between bacterial and eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels. The simple protein structure of the bacterial channels has allowed extensive structure-function probes of key regions as well as allowing determination of several X-ray crystallographic structures of these channels. The structures have revealed novel features of sodium and calcium channel pores and elucidated the structural importance of many of the conserved features of primary sequence. The structural information has also formed the basis for computational studies probing the basis for sodium and calcium selectivity and gating.

  12. A hybrid method for more efficient channel-by-channel reconstruction with many channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Lin, Wei; Duensing, George R; Reykowski, Arne

    2012-03-01

    In MRI, imaging using receiving coil arrays with a large number of elements is an area of growing interest. With increasing channel numbers for parallel acquisition, longer reconstruction times have become a significant concern. Channel reduction techniques have been proposed to reduce the processing time of channel-by-channel reconstruction algorithms. In this article, two schemes are combined to enable faster and more accurate reconstruction than existing channel reduction techniques. One scheme use two stages of channel reduction instead of one. The other scheme is to incorporate all acquired data into the final reconstruction. The combination of these two schemes is called flexible virtual coil. Applications of flexible virtual coil for partially parallel imaging, motion compensation, and compressed sensing are presented as specific examples. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a major impact in reducing computation cost in reconstruction with high-channel count coil elements. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  14. Event sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An event sequence detector is described with input units, each associated with a row of bistable elements arranged in an array of rows and columns. The detector also includes a shift register which is responsive to clock pulses from any of the units to sequentially provide signals on its output lines each of which is connected to the bistable elements in a corresponding column. When the event-indicating signal is received by an input unit it provides a clock pulse to the shift register to provide the signal on one of its output lines. The input unit also enables all its bistable elements so that the particular element in the column supplied with the signal from the register is driven to an event-indicating state.

  15. Temporal event sequence simplification.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Megan; Lan, Rongjian; Lee, Hanseung; Plaisant, Catherine; Shneiderman, Ben

    2013-12-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have emerged as a cost-effective data source for conducting medical research. The difficulty in using EHRs for research purposes, however, is that both patient selection and record analysis must be conducted across very large, and typically very noisy datasets. Our previous work introduced EventFlow, a visualization tool that transforms an entire dataset of temporal event records into an aggregated display, allowing researchers to analyze population-level patterns and trends. As datasets become larger and more varied, however, it becomes increasingly difficult to provide a succinct, summarizing display. This paper presents a series of user-driven data simplifications that allow researchers to pare event records down to their core elements. Furthermore, we present a novel metric for measuring visual complexity, and a language for codifying disjoint strategies into an overarching simplification framework. These simplifications were used by real-world researchers to gain new and valuable insights from initially overwhelming datasets.

  16. Space Borne Event Timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turko, B.

    1980-01-01

    The Space Borne Event Timer is a part of the NASA laser ranging system that is intended to operate aboard the Space Shuttle orbiting over California. The object is to measure, by laser ranging, the earth movement along the San Andreas fault and possibly forecast future earthquakes. A number of cube reflector targets will be placed along both sides of the fault. The ranging system aboard the Space Shuttle will fire a burst of laser pulses at each target and detect the reflected light. Time differences between pulses from the two sides of the fault will indicate earth displacements. The Space Borne Event Timer is a CAMAC compatible system that provides extremely accurate timing data and controls the operation of the ranging system. For each event the time is given in 19.53 increments from the instant of firing the laser to the instant the reflected light is received back, within a range of 130 days.

  17. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  18. Stream Channel Stability. Appendix E. Geomorphic Controls of Channel Stability,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    Erosion and Channels Research Unit, USDA Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford, MS. 1,"<Xi i .. i,,< .;,i,<..7 PREFACE This process -oriented study was...organized to investigate three complementary aspects of channel stability including (a) the nature of channel failure processes ; (b) the influences of...valley-fill depositional units on these processes and (c) the properties and distributions of the valley-fill units. The study was process oriented to

  19. The emergence of events.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, J; Kareev, Y

    1994-12-01

    Although the concept of an event is widely used as the basic unit in the organization of experience, memory and meaning, little attention has been paid to how events emerge or what determines the boundaries of an event. It is usually taken for granted that one knows what an event is or how events are demarcated. In this paper an explanation is offered for the emergence of events, the cut hypothesis, which states: "A sub-sequence of stimuli is cut out of a sequence to become a cognitive entity if it has been experienced many times in different contexts", and three experiments to demonstrate the predictive power of the hypothesis are described. The stimuli in all three experiments were video films, constructed by randomly assembling short excerpts from movies. In the first experiment the cut hypothesis was juxtaposed with the thesis of demarcation at major changes, and it was shown that, after experiencing a certain repeating sequence, subjects hardly considered dividing at an internal point, even if it was a point of maximal change; points of maximal change were determined on the basis of performance by control subjects who did not experience the repeating sequence. In the second experiment the cut hypothesis was juxtaposed with an associationistic explanation; it was shown that subjects who viewed a certain sequence repeating in variable contexts recognized it better than subjects who had viewed the same sequence repeating always in the same context. In the third experiment a prediction of the hypothesis on recall behaviour was tested and it was shown that experience with sequences of stimuli repeating in various contexts results in cohesion of their elements.

  20. Minio Vallis Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image is of the southern reach of Minio Vallis, a small fluvial channel located near the larger Mangala Vallis. Both channels are in the Tharsis region, in the area west of Arsia Mons and southeast of Medusae Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 208.1 East (151.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Effects of vegetation disturbance by fire on channel initiation thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Kevin D.; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Jencso, Kelsey; Woods, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The disturbance or removal of vegetation by wildfire influences channel incision following intense rainfall events. Here we empirically examine relationships between the severity of vegetation disturbance and geomorphic controls on threshold conditions that lead to channel incision. We conducted post-fire field mapping and digital spatial analyses across 97 recently formed channel heads in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Idaho, USA, to identify the relationship between remotely-sensed fire severity and vegetation disturbance and the source area and gradient conditions required for channel initiation. We found that the relationship between the size of source areas and source-area steepness was described by an inverse power function, consistent with established theory, across the range of fire severity, but that the magnitude of the slope-area relationship was significantly correlated with increasing fire severity. Further, at higher levels of fire severity, source areas above channel heads had lower slopes and somewhat larger areas. The findings suggest that the onset of channel incision defined by location of channel heads is controlled by fire severity and that the threshold for channel initiation decreases as vegetation disturbance increases. We also found that, in a subset of catchments for which LiDAR data were available, total curvature explained channel head location across the range of fire severity, with a small but significant contribution from source area steepness. Steepness remains more important at lower fire severity, however, and total curvature dominates where fire severity is most extreme. This suggests that forces of convergent flow are not fully expressed until a significant proportion of vegetation has been consumed such that flow resistance is minimized. Our findings, and the use of a continuous fire severity metric, contribute an ecohydrological and biogeomorphical template for studies of post-fire geomorphic responses and landscape

  4. Sarcolemmal KATP channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Baczkó, I; Husti, Z; Lang, V; Leprán, I; Light, P E

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause underlying 1) the development of ventricular fibrillation that results in sudden cardiac death and 2) atrial fibrillation that can lead to heart failure and stroke. Current pharmacological agents for the treatment of ventricular and atrial arrhythmias exhibit limited effectiveness and many of these agents can cause serious adverse effects - including the provocation of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels (sarcK(ATP)) couple cellular metabolism to membrane excitability in a wide range of tissues. In the heart, sarcK(ATP) are activated during metabolic stress including myocardial ischemia, and both the opening of sarcK(ATP) and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels protect the ischemic myocardium via distinct mechanisms. Myocardial ischemia leads to a series of events that promote the generation of arrhythmia substrate eventually resulting in the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. In this review, the possible mechanisms of the anti- and proarrhythmic effects of sarcK(ATP) modulation as well as the influence of pharmacological K(ATP) modulators are discussed. It is concluded that in spite of the significant advances made in this field, the possible cardiovascular therapeutic utility of current sarcK(ATP) channel modulators is still hampered by the lack of chamber-specific selectivity. However, recent insights into the chamber-specific differences in the molecular composition of sarcKATP in addition to already existing cardioselective sarcK(ATP) channel modulators with sarcK(ATP) isoform selectivity holds the promise for the future development of pharmacological strategies specific for a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Tissue channel morphology in Octopus.

    PubMed

    Browning, J; Casley-Smith, J R

    1981-01-01

    The morphology of tissue channels in muscle and neural tissues of Octopus was investigated, at the ultrastructural level, with a technique involving the precipitation of ferrocyanide ions. The numbers, sizes and conductivities of the channels were estimated from quantitative data. No evidence was gained to indicate that the low microvascular density in Octopus is coupled to an especially extensive network of extravascular channels. The tissue channel system in Octopus appears to be broadly comparable with the mammalian system; a lack of information prevents more appropriate comparisons with marine fishes. Probable functions of tissue channels in Octopus and mammals, and reasons for apparent similarities and differences in the channel organization of these divergent groups, are discussed.

  6. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  7. Multiplicative properties of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Mizanur

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the multiplicative behaviour of quantum channels, mathematically described by trace preserving, completely positive maps on matrix algebras. It turns out that the multiplicative domain of a unital quantum channel has a close connection to its spectral properties. A structure theorem (theorem 2.5), which reveals the automorphic property of an arbitrary unital quantum channel on a subalgebra, is presented. Various classes of quantum channels (irreducible, primitive, etc) are then analysed in terms of this stabilising subalgebra. The notion of the multiplicative index of a unital quantum channel is introduced, which measures the number of times a unital channel needs to be composed with itself for the multiplicative algebra to stabilise. We show that the maps that have trivial multiplicative domains are dense in completely bounded norm topology in the set of all unital completely positive maps. Some applications in quantum information theory are discussed.

  8. Wakefield Generation in Plasma Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W. P.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Esarey, E.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Laser wakefield generation in plasma channels is experimentally studied. Plasma channels, produced using the ignitor-heater method [1] in hydrogen and nitrogen, have been used to guide intense (> 5 x 10^17 W/cm^2), short (<70 fs) infrared (800 nm) laser pulses. Laser pulses injected into these channels produce a plasma wake with a phase velocity close to the speed of light. The transverse density profile of the channel determines the properties of the laser mode as well as of the plasma wave mode. The longitudinally integrated properties of the channel are measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using 400 nm radiation. The probe and reference beam are combined directly on a CCD camera to provide two-dimensional interferograms and also through a spectrometer to allow Fourier domain interferometry. Progress on measuring the transverse channel profile and wakefield amplitudes will be presented. [1] P. Volfbeyn, E. Esarey and W.P. Leemans, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2269 (1999).

  9. Language As Social Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harste, Jerome C.

    A taxonomy developed for the study of the growth and development of written language from the perspective of social event was tested with a group of 68 children, aged three to six years. The subjects were presented with a wide variety of environmental print messages (road signs, toys, fast food signs, and household products) and were questioned…

  10. Unusually Large Runup Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Medina, G.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.; Holman, R. A.; Ruggiero, P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the primary hydrodynamic processes that cause extreme runup events is important for the prediction of dune erosion and coastal flooding. Large runups may be caused by a superposition of physical and environmental conditions, bore-bore capture, infragravity-short wave interaction, and/or swash-backwash interaction. To investigate the conditions leading to these events we combine optical remote sensing observations (Argus) and state-of-the-art phase resolving numerical modeling (primarily NHWAVE). We evaluate runup time series derived from across-shore transects of pixel intensities in two very different beaches: Agate (Oregon, USA) and Duck (North Carolina, USA). The former is a dissipative beach where the runup is dominated by infragravity energy, whereas the latter is a reflective beach where the runup is dominated by short surface gravity waves. Phase resolving numerical models are implemented to explore an expanded parameter set and identify the mechanisms that control these large runups. Model results are in good qualitative agreement with observations. We also distinguish unexpected runups, which are defined by having an unexpectedly large excursion distance in comparison to the hourly-to-daily local runup conditions and do not necessarily represent a statistical extrema. These events pose significant safety hazards. We evaluate the relative contribution of the dominating physics to extreme and unexpected runup events.

  11. Brief resolved unexplained event

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  12. Teaching with Current Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher changed all his plans to teach the hurricane. When the Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, kids become naturally curious and seek answers in an event this big. The author suggests the use of tragedies to help them grow as students and as citizens.

  13. Teaching with Current Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher changed all his plans to teach the hurricane. When the Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, kids become naturally curious and seek answers in an event this big. The author suggests the use of tragedies to help them grow as students and as citizens.

  14. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children are taught to build their own spacecraft and habitat during a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Leland Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children react to food shrinking in a vacuum chamber during an Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Television Ceremonial Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Daniel; Katz, Elihu

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of televised ceremonies (such as the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana) as "media events" which allow viewers to vicariously enter into the ceremony. Compares them with cult movies that, over repeated viewing, encourage audience "participation." Focuses on the narrator's/commentator's role in shaping…

  17. Individual Events Judging Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronn-Mills, Daniel

    Understanding communication (of which individual events is a part) requires a triangle among theory-practice-criticism, and any missing component dramatically hinders understanding and ability. Students compete in, and judges judge, forensics to better enhance communication understanding and abilities. The process of oral interpretation requires a…

  18. Covert Channels and Anonymizing Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-30

    Covert Channels and Anonymizing Networks Ira S. Moskowitz Center for High Assurance Computer Systems Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375...ABSTRACT There have long been threads of investigation into covert channels, and threads of investigation into anonymity , but these two closely related...channel capacity and anonymity , and poses more questions than it answers. Even this preliminary work has proven difficult, but in this investigation lies

  19. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  20. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  1. Quaternary geology of the Channeled Scabland and adjacent areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The quaternary history of the channeled scabland is characterized by discrete episodes of catastrophic flooding and prolonged periods of loess accumulation and soil formation. The loess sequence was correlated with Richmond's Rocky Mountain glacial chronology. At least five major catastrophic flood events occurred in the general vicinity of the channeled scabland. The earliest episode occurred prior to the extensive deposition of the Palouse formation. The last major episode of flooding occurred between about 18,000 and 13,000 years ago. It probably consisted of two outbursts from glacial Lake Missoula.

  2. SIMULATING SUB-DECADAL CHANNEL MORPHOLOGIC CHANGE IN EPHEMERAL STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distributed watershed model was modified to simulate cumulative channel morphologic
    change from multiple runoff events in ephemeral stream networks. The model incorporates the general design of the event-based Kinematic Runoff and" Erosion Model (KINEROS), which describes t...

  3. SIMULATING SUB-DECADAL CHANNEL MORPHOLOGIC CHANGE IN EPHEMERAL STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distributed watershed model was modified to simulate cumulative channel morphologic
    change from multiple runoff events in ephemeral stream networks. The model incorporates the general design of the event-based Kinematic Runoff and" Erosion Model (KINEROS), which describes t...

  4. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3–4.9 W/cm2) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  5. Capacities of quantum amplifier channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haoyu; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum amplifier channels are at the core of several physical processes. Not only do they model the optical process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion, but the transformation corresponding to an amplifier channel also describes the physics of the dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting circuits, the Unruh effect, and Hawking radiation. Here we study the communication capabilities of quantum amplifier channels. Invoking a recently established minimum output-entropy theorem for single-mode phase-insensitive Gaussian channels, we determine capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels in three different scenarios. First, we establish the capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for one of the most general communication tasks, characterized by the trade-off between classical communication, quantum communication, and entanglement generation or consumption. Second, we establish capacities of quantum-limited amplifier channels for the trade-off between public classical communication, private classical communication, and secret key generation. Third, we determine the capacity region for a broadcast channel induced by the quantum-limited amplifier channel, and we also show that a fully quantum strategy outperforms those achieved by classical coherent-detection strategies. In all three scenarios, we find that the capacities significantly outperform communication rates achieved with a naive time-sharing strategy.

  6. Chaotic behavior of channeling particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Wang, Guang-Hou

    1994-03-01

    Channeling describes the collimated motion of energetic charged particles along the lattice plane or axis in a crystal. The energetic particles are steered through the channels formed by strings of atomic constituents in the lattice. In the case of planar channeling, the motion of a charged particle between the atomic planes can be periodic or quasiperiodic, such as a simple oscillatory motion in the transverse direction. In practice, however, the periodic motion of the channeling particles can be accompanied by an irregular, chaotic behavior. In this paper, the Moliere potential, which is considered as a good analytical approximation for the interaction of channeling particles with the rows of atoms in the lattice, is used to simulate the channeling behavior of positively charged particles in a tungsten (100) crystal plane. By appropriate selection of channeling parameters, such as the projectile energy E(0) and incident angle psi(0), the transition of channeling particles from regular to chaotic motion is demonstrated. It is argued that the fine structures that appear in the angular scan channeling experiments are due to the particles' chaotic motion.

  7. Genetic Control of Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmad S; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 80 genes in the human genome code for pore-forming subunits of potassium (K(+)) channels. Rare variants (mutations) in K(+) channel-encoding genes may cause heritable arrhythmia syndromes. Not all rare variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are necessarily disease-causing mutations. Common variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are increasingly recognized as modifiers of phenotype in heritable arrhythmia syndromes and in the general population. Although difficult, distinguishing pathogenic variants from benign variants is of utmost importance to avoid false designations of genetic variants as disease-causing mutations.

  8. TRP channels and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Chahl, Loris A

    2011-01-01

    Depression and schizophrenia are major psychiatric disorders that cause much human suffering. Current treatments have major limitations and new drug targets are eagerly sought. Study of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in these disorders is at an early stage and the potential of agents that activate or inhibit these channels remains speculative. The findings that TRPC6 channels promote dendritic growth and are selectively activated by hyperforin, the key constitutent of St John's wort, suggest that TRPC6 channels might prove to be a new target for antidepressant drug development. There is now considerable evidence that TRPV1 antagonists have anxiolytic activity but there is no direct evidence that they have antidepressant activity. There is also no direct evidence that TRP channels play a role in schizophrenia. However, the findings that TRPC channels are involved in neuronal development and fundamental synaptic mechanisms, and that TRPV1 channels play a role in central dopaminergic and cannabinoid mechanisms is suggestive of potential roles of these channels in schizophrenia. Investigation of TRP channels in psychiatric disorders holds the promise of yielding further understanding of the aetiology of psychiatric disorders and the development of new drug treatments.

  9. On funneling of tidal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, S.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2015-03-01

    Tidal channels dissect the tidal landscape and exert a crucial control on the morphodynamic evolution of these landscapes. Improving our understanding of channel equilibrium morphology is therefore an important issue for both theoretical and practical reasons. We analyze the case of a tidal channel dissecting a relatively short, unvegetated tidal flat characterized by microtidal conditions and a negligible external sediment supply. The three-dimensional equilibrium configuration of the channel is determined on the basis of a hydrodynamic model, describing the cross-sectional distribution of the longitudinal bed shear stresses, coupled with a morphodynamic model retaining the description of the main physical processes shaping the channel and the adjacent intertidal platform. Both channel bed and width are allowed to adapt to the flow field so that an equilibrium altimetric and planimetric configuration is eventually obtained, when erosion becomes negligibly small, and asymptotically constant elevations are reached everywhere within the domain. Model results reproduce several observed channel characteristics of geomorphic relevance, such as the relationship between channel cross-sectional area and the flowing tidal prism, the scaling of the width-to-depth ratio with channel width, and the longitudinal distributions of bed elevations and channel widths. In analogy with empirical evidence from estuaries, tidal channel funneling is usually assumed to be described by an exponential trend. Our theoretical analyses, modeling results, and observational evidence suggest that a linear relationship also provides a good approximation to describe longitudinal variations in channel width for short tidal channels. Longitudinal bed profiles characterized by a strong planform funneling tend to attain an upward concavity, whereas a low degree of convergence implies an almost linear profile. Finally, the model allows one to analyze the influence of environmental conditions (sediment

  10. Demystifying Mechanosensitive Piezo Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-06-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate touch, hearing, proprioception, and blood pressure regulation. Piezo proteins, including Piezo1 and Piezo2, represent a new class of mechanosensitive channels that have been reported to play key roles in most, if not all, of these modalities. The structural architecture and molecular mechanisms by which Piezos act as mechanosensitive channels, however, remain mysterious. Two new studies have now provided critical insights into the atomic structure and molecular basis of the ion permeation and mechano-gating properties of the Piezo1 channel.

  11. Agriculture: Natural Events and Disasters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Natural Events and DiasastersInformation on Natural Events and Disasters. Every year natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, fires, earthquakes, and tornadoes, challenge agricultural production.

  12. Fiber channel services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavalli, Kumar

    1993-02-01

    There exists an increasing need, in the user environment, for a computer interconnect scheme with higher speed, higher performance and longer reach than the presently available alternatives. There is also a great demand for a multidirectional networking to provide high bandwidth on demand, high distribution capability, random access and high transport flexibility. The users expect low access delay, low transfer delay, high data integrity and a definable quality of service from their networks. All these requirements, however, have to be met with the preservation of the existing software in which a lot of user investment has already been made. In answer to the demands, there has been an emergence of a new network to interconnect heterogeneous systems at very high cost performance ratio. This new network is based on Fiber Channel Standard, blessed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

  13. More About R Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. K.

    2007-12-01

    Much of our understanding of how subglacial drainage systems operate is based on key papers by Röthlisberger and Shreve that describe the steady-state hydraulics of circular ice-walled water conduits. Subsequent studies have extended these results to include transient conditions---relevant to diurnally- and seasonally-forced drainage systems---and to semi-circular bed-floored channels. In passing from circular to semi-circular conduits it is usual to adopt Nye's creep closure expression for circular tunnels and to assume that creep closure proceeds as it would for a circular ice-walled conduit. This assumption is only valid if ice can slip freely over the subglacial bed and it completely breaks down if free sliding is inhibited. Even for glaciers and ice streams that are sliding at fast rates the frictional resistance to conduit closure can be substantial and it is therefore impossible to maintain a semi-circular channel in a steady-state. The resulting difference between the rate of creep closure at the conduit ceiling and at the sidewalls forces the cross-sectional geometry of the conduit to evolve. At the time of writing it is unclear whether or not non-circular steady-state geometries can exist but either possibility is interesting. If there is no steady-state geometry then subglacial conduits must necessarily operate in an episodic manner. If steady-state geometries do exist then steady-state subglacial conduits must manifest along-path variations in their height-to-width aspect ratio in response to along-path changes in effective pressure and viscous dissipation.

  14. The Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Sebring, T. A.; Smith, B. W.; de Kock, M.; Wiecha, O.

    2004-11-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2-m telescope to be built at a new site near Happy Jack, Arizona. The DCT features a large prime focus mosaic CCD camera with a 2-degree-diameter field of view especially designed for surveys of KBOs, Centaurs, NEAs and other moving or time-variable targets. The telescope can be switched quickly to a Ritchey-Chretien configuration for optical/IR spectroscopy or near-IR imaging. This flexibility allows timely follow-up physical studies of high priority objects discovered in survey mode. The ULE (ultra-low-expansion) meniscus primary and secondary mirror blanks for the telescope are currently in fabrication by Corning Glass. Goodrich Aerospace, Vertex RSI, M3 Engineering and Technology Corp., and e2v Technologies have recently completed in-depth conceptual design studies of the optics, mount, enclosure, and mosaic focal plane, respectively. The results of these studies were subjected to a formal design review in July, 2004. Site testing at the 7760-ft altitude Happy Jack site began in 2001. Differential image motion observations from 117 nights since January 1, 2003 gave median seeing of 0.84 arcsec FWHM, and the average of the first quartile was 0.62 arcsec. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for securing long-term access to this site on the Coconino National Forest is nearing completion and ground breaking is expected in the spring of 2005. The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately undertaken with the DCT. An additional partner can be accommodated in the project. Interested parties should contact the lead author.

  15. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY OVERCROSSING OF ARROYO SECO CHANNEL. CHANNEL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY OVERCROSSING OF ARROYO SECO CHANNEL. CHANNEL IS BEHIND TREES AND BUSHES AT RIGHT AND LEFT. STONEY DRIVE PASSES UNDER PARKWAY. LOOKING 282°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Arroyo Seco Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at milepost 30.10, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Interaction of the BKCa channel gating ring with dendrotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Takacs, Zoltan; Imredy, John P; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Zhorov, Boris S; Moczydlowski, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of small homologous basic proteins, mamba snake dendrotoxins (DTX) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), block the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa, KCa1.1) by production of discrete subconductance events when added to the intracellular side of the membrane. This toxin-channel interaction is unlikely to be pharmacologically relevant to the action of mamba venom, but as a fortuitous ligand-protein interaction, it has certain biophysical implications for the mechanism of BKCa channel gating. In this work we examined the subconductance behavior of 9 natural dendrotoxin homologs and 6 charge neutralization mutants of δ-dendrotoxin in the context of current structural information on the intracellular gating ring domain of the BKCa channel. Calculation of an electrostatic surface map of the BKCa gating ring based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation reveals a predominantly electronegative surface due to an abundance of solvent-accessible side chains of negatively charged amino acids. Available structure-activity information suggests that cationic DTX/BPTI molecules bind by electrostatic attraction to site(s) on the gating ring located in or near the cytoplasmic side portals where the inactivation ball peptide of the β2 subunit enters to block the channel. Such an interaction may decrease the apparent unitary conductance by altering the dynamic balance of open versus closed states of BKCa channel activation gating. PMID:25483585

  17. Surfaces and boundaries in the mechanosensitive channel gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are gated by tension transmitted through the surrounding lipid bilayer. Inorganic ions or amphipathic modifiers that interact with the bilayer surface alter the packing of lipids and perturb the lateral pressure. We describe the effects of lanthanide ions, fluorinated alcohols and esters of parabenzoic acid as potent modifiers of MS channel gating. The other boundary that plays a critical role in channel gating is the water-vapor interface resulting from capillary dewetting of the hydrophobic gate. Molecular simulations predict two alternate positions for this boundary in the pore of the mechanosensitive channel MscS. We approached this problem experimentally by hydrophilizing the outer segment of the pore to resolve if it is `dry' in the closed state. We observed a reduction in activating tension, substantial changes in MscS kinetics and complete removal of gating hysteresis. The kinetic treatment of channel traces recorded in response to steps of tension suggested the sequence of events that leads to the channel opening implying that pore hydration and dewetting are the rate-limiting steps in MscS transitions.

  18. 78 FR 38577 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag National Harbor Event, Potomac River; National Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag National... Bull Flugtag National Harbor event'', to be held on the waters of the Potomac River on September 21...; Red Bull Flugtag National Harbor Event, Potomac River; National Harbor Access Channel, MD'' in the...

  19. Biological event composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, biological event extraction has emerged as a key natural language processing task, aiming to address the information overload problem in accessing the molecular biology literature. The BioNLP shared task competitions have contributed to this recent interest considerably. The first competition (BioNLP'09) focused on extracting biological events from Medline abstracts from a narrow domain, while the theme of the latest competition (BioNLP-ST'11) was generalization and a wider range of text types, event types, and subject domains were considered. We view event extraction as a building block in larger discourse interpretation and propose a two-phase, linguistically-grounded, rule-based methodology. In the first phase, a general, underspecified semantic interpretation is composed from syntactic dependency relations in a bottom-up manner. The notion of embedding underpins this phase and it is informed by a trigger dictionary and argument identification rules. Coreference resolution is also performed at this step, allowing extraction of inter-sentential relations. The second phase is concerned with constraining the resulting semantic interpretation by shared task specifications. We evaluated our general methodology on core biological event extraction and speculation/negation tasks in three main tracks of BioNLP-ST'11 (GENIA, EPI, and ID). Results We achieved competitive results in GENIA and ID tracks, while our results in the EPI track leave room for improvement. One notable feature of our system is that its performance across abstracts and articles bodies is stable. Coreference resolution results in minor improvement in system performance. Due to our interest in discourse-level elements, such as speculation/negation and coreference, we provide a more detailed analysis of our system performance in these subtasks. Conclusions The results demonstrate the viability of a robust, linguistically-oriented methodology, which clearly distinguishes

  20. Simulating complex ion channel kinetics with IonChannelLab

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In-silico simulation based on Markov chains is a powerful way to describe and predict the activity of many transport proteins including ion channels. However, modeling and simulation using realistic models of voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels exposed to a wide range of experimental conditions require building complex kinetic schemes and solving complicated differential equations. To circumvent these problems, we developed IonChannelLab a software tool that includes a user-friendly Graphical User Interface and a simulation library. This program supports channels with Ohmic or Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz behavior and can simulate the time-course of ionic and gating currents, single channel behavior and steady-state conditions. The program allows the simulation of experiments where voltage, ligand and ionic concentration are varied independently or simultaneously. PMID:20935453

  1. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  2. Event boundaries and anaphoric reference.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexis N; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-06-01

    The current study explored the finding that parsing a narrative into separate events impairs anaphor resolution. According to the Event Horizon Model, when a narrative event boundary is encountered, a new event model is created. Information associated with the prior event model is removed from working memory. So long as the event model containing the anaphor referent is currently being processed, this information should still be available when there is no narrative event boundary, even if reading has been disrupted by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. In those cases, readers may reactivate their prior event model, and anaphor resolution would not be affected. Alternatively, comprehension may not be as event oriented as this account suggests. Instead, any disruption of the contents of working memory during comprehension, event related or not, may be sufficient to disrupt anaphor resolution. In this case, reading comprehension would be more strongly guided by other, more basic language processing mechanisms and the event structure of the described events would play a more minor role. In the current experiments, participants were given stories to read in which we included, between the anaphor and its referent, either the presence of a narrative event boundary (Experiment 1) or a narrative event boundary along with a working-memory-clearing distractor task (Experiment 2). The results showed that anaphor resolution was affected by narrative event boundaries but not by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. This is interpreted as being consistent with the Event Horizon Model of event cognition.

  3. Littoral steering of deltaic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-11-01

    The typically single-threaded channels on wave-influenced deltas show striking differences in their orientations, with some channels oriented into the incoming waves (e.g., Ombrone, Krishna), and others oriented away from the waves (e.g., Godavari, Sao Francisco). Understanding the controls on channel orientation is important as the channel location greatly influences deltaic morphology and sedimentology, both subaerially and subaqueously. Here, we explore channel orientation and consequent feedbacks with local shoreline dynamics using a plan-form numerical model of delta evolution. The model treats fluvial sediment delivery to a wave-dominated coast in two ways: 1) channels are assumed to prograde in a direction perpendicular to the local shoreline orientation and 2) a controlled fraction of littoral sediment transport can bypass the river mouth. Model results suggest that channels migrate downdrift when there is a significant net littoral transport and alongshore transport bypassing of the river mouth is limited. In contrast, river channels tend to orient themselves into the waves when fluvial sediment flux is relatively large, causing the shoreline of the downdrift delta flank to attain the orientation of maximum potential sediment transport for the incoming wave climate. Using model results, we develop a framework to estimate channel orientations for wave-influenced deltas that shows good agreement with natural examples. An increase in fluvial sediment input can cause a channel to reorient itself into incoming waves, behavior observed, for example, in the Ombrone delta in Italy. Our results can inform paleoclimate studies by linking channel orientation to fluvial sediment flux and wave energy. In particular, our approach provides a means to quantify past wave directions, which are notoriously difficult to constrain.

  4. Events and subjective well-being: only recent events matter.

    PubMed

    Suh, E; Diener, E; Fujita, F

    1996-05-01

    The effect of life events on subjective well-being (SWB) was explored in a 2-year longitudinal study of 115 participants. It was found that only life events during the previous 3 months influenced life satisfaction and positive and negative affect. Although recent life events influenced SWB even when personality at Time 1 was controlled, distal life events did not correlate with SWB. SWB and life events both showed a substantial degree of temporal stability. It was also found that good and bad life events tend to covary, both between individuals and across periods of the lives of individuals. Also, when events of the opposite valence were controlled, events correlated more strongly with SWB. The counterintuitive finding that good and bad events co-occur suggests an exciting avenue for explorations of the structure of life events.

  5. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  6. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Tom Engler, deputy director of Center Planning and Development at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  7. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Rob Mueller, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, demonstrates the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, during a media event at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  8. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Greg C. Shavers, Lander Technology director at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  9. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Bob Richards, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to use Kennedy Space Center's facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  10. Transionospheric chirp event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Freeman, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means -- this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might ``see`` thousands of events per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of accurately analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our Event Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.

  11. Transionospheric chirp event classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argo, P. E.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Freeman, M. J.

    In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means - this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might 'see' thousands of events per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of accurately analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our Event Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.

  12. 2017 Solar Eclipse Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-11

    Brad Addona views the beginning of the August 21, 2017 at a viewing event for Marshall Space Flight Center’s activities building for Marshall employees. The Huntsville area experienced 97 percent occultation, nearly a complete blocking out of the sun by the orbit of Earth's moon. The next opportunity to view a solar eclipse in the eastern and central United States will occur in April 2024.

  13. Traumatic-event headaches

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic headaches from head trauma and whiplash injury are well-known and common, but chronic headaches from other sorts of physical traumas are not recognized. Methods Specific information was obtained from the medical records of 15 consecutive patients with chronic headaches related to physically injurious traumatic events that did not include either head trauma or whiplash injury. The events and the physical injuries produced by them were noted. The headaches' development, characteristics, duration, frequency, and accompaniments were recorded, as were the patients' use of pain-alleviative drugs. From this latter information, the headaches were classified by the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society as though they were naturally-occurring headaches. The presence of other post-traumatic symptoms and litigation were also recorded. Results The intervals between the events and the onset of the headaches resembled those between head traumas or whiplash injuries and their subsequent headaches. The headaches themselves were, as a group, similar to those after head trauma and whiplash injury. Thirteen of the patients had chronic tension-type headache, two had migraine. The sustained bodily injuries were trivial or unidentifiable in nine patients. Fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration was not evident in these patients of whom seven were not even seeking payments of any kind. Conclusions This study suggests that these hitherto unrecognized post-traumatic headaches constitute a class of headaches characterized by a relation to traumatic events affecting the body but not including head or whiplash traumas. The bodily injuries per se can be discounted as the cause of the headaches. So can fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration. Altered mental states, not systematically evaluated here, were a possible cause of the headaches. The overall resemblance of these headaches to the headaches after head or whiplash traumas implies

  14. Significant event auditing.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M

    2000-12-01

    Significant event auditing has been described for 5 years and it is slowly gaining credibility as an effective method of quality assurance in British general practice. This paper describes what it is, what its background is, how it is done and whether it is effective. While it needs a positive team culture - and therefore may not suit every practice - where it is used it appears to be a useful adjunct to a clinical audit programme.

  15. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    NASA Astronaut and Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin, talks to school children during an Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children are photographed by their parents during a hands-on experience with a mock spacesuit during a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Leland Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children watch a TV program showing how the Mars rover Curiosity landed on Mars during an Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children are given a hands-on experience with a mock spacesuit during a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Leland Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Predictability of rogue events.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2015-05-29

    Using experimental data from three different rogue wave supporting systems, determinism, and predictability of the underlying dynamics are evaluated with methods of nonlinear time series analysis. We included original records from the Draupner platform in the North Sea as well as time series from two optical systems in our analysis. One of the latter was measured in the infrared tail of optical fiber supercontinua, the other in the fluence profiles of multifilaments. All three data sets exhibit extreme-value statistics and exceed the significant wave height in the respective system by a factor larger than 2. Nonlinear time series analysis indicates a different degree of determinism in the systems. The optical fiber scenario is found to be driven by quantum noise whereas rogue waves emerge as a consequence of turbulence in the others. With the large number of rogue events observed in the multifilament system, we can systematically explore the predictability of such events in a turbulent system. We observe that rogue events do not necessarily appear without a warning, but are often preceded by a short phase of relative order. This surprising finding sheds some new light on the fascinating phenomenon of rogue waves.

  20. "Big Events" and Networks.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel; Rossi, Diana; Flom, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    Some, but not all, "big events" such as wars, revolutions, socioeconomic transitions, economic collapses, and ecological disasters in recent years seem to lead to large-scale HIV outbreaks (Friedman et al, in press; Hankins et al 2002). This was true of transitions in the USSR, South Africa and Indonesia, for example, but not those in the Philippines or (so far) in Argentina. It has been hypothesized that whether or not HIV outbreaks occur is shaped in part by the nature and extent of changes in the numbers of voluntary or involuntary risk-takers, which itself may be related to the growth of roles such as sex-sellers or drug sellers; the riskiness of the behaviors engaged in by risk-takers; and changes in sexual and injection networks and other "mixing patterns" variables. Each of these potential causal processes, in turn, is shaped by the nature of pre-existing social networks and the patterns and content of normative regulation and communication that happen within these social networks-and on how these social networks and their characteristics are changed by the "big event" in question. We will present ideas about what research is needed to help understand these events and to help guide both indigenous community-based efforts to prevent HIV outbreaks and also to guide those who organize external intervention efforts and aid.

  1. [Nonconvulsive events in children].

    PubMed

    Kaciński, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute the most important group of paroxysmal events in the developmental age. There are convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures. Nonconvulsive epileptic seizures must be differentiated from nonepileptic paroxysmal events. This paper recalls the importance of non-convulsive epileptic seizures in the developmental age. It should be helpful for improving the diagnosis and therapy of epilepsy and quality of life in childhood. Many papers across 17 years and own 10 years observations in Department of Pediatric Neurology, Jagiellonian Collegium Medicum in Krakow are presented. These scientific and observation data shows a great importance of nonconvulsive epileptic seizures for epileptic children health and for future of epileptology. Its occured as a short events usually, but also as a epileptic syndromes or non-convulsive status eopilepticus rarely. To establish diagnosis parents, teacher, psychologist, nurse and physician observations are necessary. A home video recordings, professional videoEEG rejestrations, and polysomnography play an important role as well. This paper recalls the importance of EEG analysis for proper differential diagnosis of nonconvulsive epileptic seizures. Adequate management with antiepileptic therapy improves epileptic children's life safety and their quality of life. A dynamic progress is observed in knowledge of nonconvulsive epileptic seizures in children. An practical example of it is evolution of a Panayiotopoulos syndrome recognazing with interest of the International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Some Aviation Growth Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2002-01-01

    The growth of aviation since the first flight of a heavier-than-air powered manned vehicle in 1903 has been somewhat remarkable. Some of the events that have influenced this growth are reviewed in this paper. This review will include some events prior to World War I; the influence of the war itself; the events during the post-war years including the establishment of aeronautical research laboratories; and the influence of World War II which, among other things, introduced new technologies that included rocket and jet propulsion and supersonic aerodynamics. The subsequent era of aeronautical research and the attendant growth in aviation over the past half century will be reviewed from the view point of the author who, since 1944, has been involved in the NACA/NASA aeronautical research effort at what is now the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The review will discuss some of the research programs related to the development of some experimental aircraft, the Century series of fighter aircraft, multi-mission aircraft, advanced military aircraft and missiles, advanced civil aircraft, supersonic transports, spacecraft and others.

  3. Photonic channels for quantum communication

    PubMed

    van Enk SJ; Cirac; Zoller

    1998-01-09

    A general photonic channel for quantum communication is defined. By means of local quantum computing with a few auxiliary atoms, this channel can be reduced to one with effectively less noise. A scheme based on quantum interference is proposed that iteratively improves the fidelity of distant entangled particles.

  4. One channel: open and closed.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Janice L; Roux, Benoît

    2005-10-01

    Structural information about the prokaryotic KirBac3.1 inward rectifier family K(+) channel from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum is reported. These results from two-dimensional electron cryomicroscopy (EM) shed light on the gating mechanism of members of the Kir channel family.

  5. Basal channels on ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O. V.

    2013-09-01

    Recent surveys of floating ice shelves associated with Pine Island Glacier (Antarctica) and Petermann Glacier (Greenland) indicate that there are channels incised upward into their bottoms that may serve as the conduits of meltwater outflow from the sub-ice-shelf cavity. The formation of the channels, their evolution over time, and their impact on ice-shelf flow are investigated using a fully-coupled ice-shelf/sub-ice-shelf ocean model. The model simulations suggest that channels may form spontaneously in response to meltwater plume flow initiated at the grounding line if there are relatively high melt rates and if there is transverse to ice-flow variability in ice-shelf thickness. Typical channels formed in the simulations have a width of about 1-3 km and a vertical relief of about 100-200 m. Melt rates and sea-water transport in the channels are significantly higher than on the smooth flat ice bottom between the channels. The melt channels develop through melting, deformation, and advection with ice-shelf flow. Simulations suggest that both steady state and cyclic state solutions are possible depending on conditions along the lateral ice-shelf boundaries. This peculiar dynamics of the system has strong implications on the interpretation of observations. The richness of channel morphology and evolution seen in this study suggests that further observations and theoretical analysis are imperative for understanding ice-shelf behavior in warm oceanic conditions.

  6. Channel routing for VLSI layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schory, Michael

    1988-12-01

    Channel routing for VLSI layout is reviewed and a set of features required of an industrial channel router is defined. A channel router, CAR, was implemented, based on the Greedy and Detour routers. Integrated circuit design is discussed, with attention to the various channel routing problems and models. The major requirements for an industrial channel router to be integrated within general cells and standard cells routing environments are discussed and their fulfillment in CAR is considered. CAR comprises: the Greedy router functionality; the Detour router's obstacle, obstruction and switch box extensions; rectilinear channels; ports located not on standard and immediately surrounding layers; middle ports within the channel; jog on conflict-only to reduce jog use; single layer jogs; and partial pre-routing and dynamic layer optimization. Special features of CAR include: extension of the net definition with a short range tendency; definition of net preferred track; net visibility range in rectilinear channels; an extended area mechanism to deal with obstacles, rectilinear edges, pre-routing and ports on unusual layers; unified jog cost evaluation functions; unified, efficient jog selection; a general evaluation function for track worth; and a net connectivity part to control and handle split nets. Examples are presented of CAR operations.

  7. Single Streptomyces lividans K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Heginbotham, Lise; LeMasurier, Meredith; Kolmakova-Partensky, Ludmilla; Miller, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Basic electrophysiological properties of the KcsA K+ channel were examined in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The channel displays open-state rectification and weakly voltage-dependent gating. Tetraethylammonium blocking affinity depends on the side of the bilayer to which the blocker is added. Addition of Na+ to the trans chamber causes block of open-channel current, while addition to the cis side has no effect. Most striking is the activation of KcsA by protons; channel activity is observed only when the trans bilayer chamber is at low pH. To ascertain which side of the channel faces which chamber, residues with structurally known locations were mapped to defined sides of the bilayer. Mutation of Y82, an external residue, results in changes in tetraethylammonium affinity exclusively from the cis side. Channels with cysteine residues substituted at externally exposed Y82 or internally exposed Q119 are functionally modified by methanethiosulfonate reagents from the cis or trans chambers, respectively. Block by charybdotoxin, known to bind to the channel's external mouth, is observed only when the toxin is added to the cis side of channels mutated to be toxin sensitive. These results demonstrate unambiguously that the protonation sites linked to gating are on the intracellular portion of the KcsA protein. PMID:10498673

  8. Analysis and functional implications of phosphorylation of neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and abundant posttranslational modification to eukaryotic proteins, regulating a plethora of dynamic cellular processes. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the breadth and importance of reversible phosphorylation in regulating the expression, localization and function of mammalian neuronal voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, key regulators of neuronal function. We highlight the role of modern mass spectrometric techniques and phosphospecific antibodies that reveal the extent and nature of phosphorylation at specific sites in Kv channels. We also emphasize the role of reversible phosphorylation in dynamically regulating diverse aspects of Kv channel biology. Finally, we discuss as important future directions the determination of the mechanistic basis for how altering phosphorylation state affects Kv channel expression, localization and function, the nature of macromolecular signaling complexes containing Kv channels and enzymes regulating their phosphorylation state, and the specific role of Kv channel phosphorylation in regulating neuronal function during physiological and pathophysiological events. PMID:20600597

  9. Ancient Streamlined Islands of the Palos Outflow Channel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    This image shows the northern terminus of an outflow channel located in the volcanic terrains of Amenthes Planum. The channel sources from the Palos impact crater to the south, where water flowed into the crater from Tinto Vallis and eventually formed a paleo lake. As rising lake levels breached through the crater's rim and inundated the plains to the north, the resulting high velocity, large discharge floods plucked out and eroded the volcanic plains scouring out the "Palos Outflow Channel" and the streamlined mesa-islands on its floor. These streamlined forms are the eroded remnants of plains material sculpted by catastrophic floods and are not sediment deposits emplaced by lower magnitude stream flows. Both the fluvial channel floor and the volcanic island surfaces are densely cratered by impacts suggesting that both the surfaces and the flood events are ancient. The morphology (shape) of the channel system and its islands have been preserved through the eons, but water has long been absent from this drainage system. Since then, winds have transported light-toned sediments across this terrain forming extensive dune fields within the channel system, on the floors of impact craters, and in other protected locations in the Palos Outflow Channel region. A closer look shows chevron, or fish-bone shaped, light-toned dunes located near the top of the image where numerous smaller channels have cut through the landscape. These dunes likely started out as Transverse Aeolian Ridges (TAR) that form perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction where the wind-blown sediment supply is scarce. This intriguing morphology likely reflects changes in the prevailing wind environment over time. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21023

  10. Multi-channel picosecond photon timing with microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T.

    2011-08-01

    Microchannel plate-based detectors have the capability to photon-count at time resolutions which outperform solid-state devices such as the APD or SiPM, and have a geometry that lends itself to pixelated readouts. We describe a multi-channel, photon-counting microchannel plate detector optimised for photon timing in the picosecond regime. The detector was originally developed for application to time-resolved spectroscopy in the life sciences, however its performance characteristics make it suitable for applications where high time resolution and multi-channel photon-counting are required including Cherenkov light detection in nuclear physics, particle physics, and astroparticle astronomy.We describe the prototype detector, a sealed tube device comprising an optical photocathode proximity focussed to a small pore microchannel plate stack. Event charge is collected on a multi-channel readout comprising an 8×8 pixel array, manufactured on a multilayer ceramic, which provides vacuum integrity for the detector enclosure and a multi-way electrical feedthrough for the readout array. Each pixel addresses one channel of a NINO ASIC, a multi-channel preamplifier-discriminator device. The discriminator outputs are timed to 25 ps by the HPTDC time-to-digital converter ASIC, which uses a time-over-threshold technique for amplitude walk correction. We present performance measurements using a pulsed laser of the 64 channel prototype system comprising a 25 mm detector, NINO front-end, and a CAEN V1290A VME module utilising HPTDC. We discuss the next phase in the project—design and manufacture of a 40 mm detector with a 16×16 pixel2 readout coupled to custom NINO/HPTDC electronics constructed as a series of 64 channel modules, expandable to even larger channel densities.

  11. A Drosophila mechanosensory transduction channel.

    PubMed

    Walker, R G; Willingham, A T; Zuker, C S

    2000-03-24

    Mechanosensory transduction underlies a wide range of senses, including proprioception, touch, balance, and hearing. The pivotal element of these senses is a mechanically gated ion channel that transduces sound, pressure, or movement into changes in excitability of specialized sensory cells. Despite the prevalence of mechanosensory systems, little is known about the molecular nature of the transduction channels. To identify such a channel, we analyzed Drosophila melanogaster mechanoreceptive mutants for defects in mechanosensory physiology. Loss-of-function mutations in the no mechanoreceptor potential C (nompC) gene virtually abolished mechanosensory signaling. nompC encodes a new ion channel that is essential for mechanosensory transduction. As expected for a transduction channel, D. melanogaster NOMPC and a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog were selectively expressed in mechanosensory organs.

  12. Continuity of Quantum Channel Capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Debbie; Smith, Graeme

    2009-11-01

    We prove that a broad array of capacities of a quantum channel are continuous. That is, two channels that are close with respect to the diamond norm have correspondingly similar communication capabilities. We first show that the classical capacity, quantum capacity, and private classical capacity are continuous, with the variation on arguments {\\varepsilon} apart bounded by a simple function of {\\varepsilon} and the channel’s output dimension. Our main tool is an upper bound of the variation of output entropies of many copies of two nearby channels given the same initial state; the bound is linear in the number of copies. Our second proof is concerned with the quantum capacities in the presence of free backward or two-way public classical communication. These capacities are proved continuous on the interior of the set of non-zero capacity channels by considering mutual simulation between similar channels.

  13. Channelling, a new immunization strategy.

    PubMed

    Gacharna Romero, M G; Silva Pizano, E; Avendano Lamo, J

    1985-01-01

    In 1981, with PAHO/WHO technical assistance, the Ministry of Health, Colombia, designed what is known as the channelling strategy, aimed at improving immunization coverage. This name was given because the strategy is designed to establish communication channels through direct action aimed at promoting health. Health workers and community leaders or guides conduct household visits to identify unvaccinated children or those with incomplete vaccination schedules and "channel" them to health centers or health posts. The channelling strategy developed in Colombia was briefly mentioned in the case study on the Colombian Vaccination Crusade of 1984. It is now being employed for ORT and other PHC components in the Colombian Child Survival and Development Plan, 1985-1987. In the meantime, other countries have adopted the channelling strategy, which is described in this article.

  14. Channel Aggregation Schemes for Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongheon; So, Jaewoo

    This paper proposed three channel aggregation schemes for cognitive radio networks, a constant channel aggregation scheme, a probability distribution-based variable channel aggregation scheme, and a residual channel-based variable channel aggregation scheme. A cognitive radio network can have a wide bandwidth if unused channels in the primary networks are aggregated. Channel aggregation schemes involve either constant channel aggregation or variable channel aggregation. In this paper, a Markov chain is used to develop an analytical model of channel aggregation schemes; and the performance of the model is evaluated in terms of the average sojourn time, the average throughput, the forced termination probability, and the blocking probability. Simulation results show that channel aggregation schemes can reduce the average sojourn time of cognitive users by increasing the channel occupation rate of unused channels in a primary network.

  15. Channel Floor Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  16. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Human Neutrophils and Eosinophils Requires Proton Channels but Not BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Femling, Jon K.; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Morgan, Deri; Rada, Balázs; Davis, A. Paige; Czirják, Gabor; Enyedi, Peter; England, Sarah K.; Moreland, Jessica G.; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Nauseef, William M.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Electrophysiological events are of central importance during the phagocyte respiratory burst, because NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and voltage sensitive. We investigated the recent suggestion that large-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, rather than proton channels, play an essential role in innate immunity (Ahluwalia, J., A. Tinker, L.H. Clapp, M.R. Duchen, A.Y. Abramov, S. Page, M. Nobles, and A.W. Segal. 2004. Nature. 427:853–858). In PMA-stimulated human neutrophils or eosinophils, we did not detect BK currents, and neither of the BK channel inhibitors iberiotoxin or paxilline nor DPI inhibited any component of outward current. BK inhibitors did not inhibit the killing of bacteria, nor did they affect NADPH oxidase-dependent degradation of bacterial phospholipids by extracellular gIIA-PLA2 or the production of superoxide anion (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Moreover, an antibody against the BK channel did not detect immunoreactive protein in human neutrophils. A required role for voltage-gated proton channels is demonstrated by Zn2+ inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity assessed by H2O2 production, thus validating previous studies showing that Zn2+ inhibited \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production when assessed by cytochrome c reduction. In conclusion, BK channels were not detected in human neutrophils or eosinophils, and

  18. 47 CFR 95.7 - Channel sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channel sharing. 95.7 Section 95.7... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.7 Channel sharing. (a) Channels or channel pairs (one 462... and use of channels to reduce interference and to make the most effective use of the facilities....

  19. 47 CFR 95.7 - Channel sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel sharing. 95.7 Section 95.7... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.7 Channel sharing. (a) Channels or channel pairs (one 462... and use of channels to reduce interference and to make the most effective use of the facilities....

  20. CAMAC based 4-channel 12-bit digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Sharma, Atish; Raval, Tushar; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2010-02-01

    With the development in Fusion research a large number of diagnostics are being used to understand the complex behaviour of plasma. During discharge, several diagnostics demand high sampling rate and high bit resolution to acquire data for rapid changes in plasma parameters. For the requirements of such fast diagnostics, a 4-channel simultaneous sampling, high-speed, 12-bit CAMAC digitizer has been designed and developed which has several important features for application in CAMAC based nuclear instrumentation. The module has independent ADC per channel for simultaneous sampling and digitization, and 512 Ksamples RAM per channel for on-board storage. The digitizer has been designed for event based acquisition and the acquisition window gives post-trigger as well as pre-trigger (software selectable) data that is useful for analysis. It is a transient digitizer and can be operated either in pre/post trigger mode or in burst mode. The record mode and the active memory size are selected through software commands to satisfy the current application. The module can be used to acquire data at high sampling rate for short time discharge e.g. 512 ms at 1MSPS. The module can also be used for long time discharge at low sampling rate e.g. 512 seconds at 1KSPS. This paper describes the design of digitizer module, development of VHDL code for hardware logic, Graphical User Interface (GUI) and important features of module from application point of view. The digitizer has CPLD based hardware logic, which provides flexibility in configuring the module for different sampling rates and different pre/post trigger samples through GUI. The digitizer can be operated with either internal (for testing/acquisition) or external (synchronized acquisition) clock and trigger. The digitizer has differential inputs with bipolar input range ±5V and it is being used with sampling rate of 1 MSamples Per Second (MSPS) per channel but it also supports higher sampling rate up to 3MSPS per channel. A

  1. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    SciTech Connect

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  2. Lighting up gap junction channels in a flash.

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-10-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication channels permit the exchange of small regulatory molecules and ions between neighbouring cells and coordinate cellular activity in diverse tissue and organ systems. These channels have short half-lives and complex assembly and degradation pathways. Much of the recent work elucidating gap junction biogenesis has featured the use of connexins (Cx), the constituent proteins of gap junctions, tagged with reporter proteins such as Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and has illuminated the dynamics of channel assembly in live cells by high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. With some studies, however, there are potential short-comings associated with the GFP chimeric protein technologies. A recent report by Gaietta et al., has highlighted the use of recombinant proteins with tetracysteine tags attached to the carboxyl terminus of Cx43, which differentially labels 'old' and 'new' connexins thus opening up new avenues for studying temporal and spatial localisation of proteins and in situ trafficking events. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2008-07-29

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  4. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  5. RFID Ownership Transfer with Positive Secrecy Capacity Channels

    PubMed Central

    Munilla, Jorge; Burmester, Mike; Peinado, Alberto; Yang, Guomin; Susilo, Willy

    2016-01-01

    RFID ownership transfer protocols (OTPs) transfer tag ownership rights. Recently, there has been considerable interest in such protocols; however, guaranteeing privacy for symmetric-key settings without trusted third parties (TTPs) is a challenge still unresolved. In this paper, we address this issue and show that it can be solved by using channels with positive secrecy capacity. We implement these channels with noisy tags and provide practical values, thus proving that perfect secrecy is theoretically possible. We then define a communication model that captures spatiotemporal events and describe a first example of symmetric-key based OTP that: (i) is formally secure in the proposed communication model and (ii) achieves privacy with a noisy tag wiretap channel without TTPs. PMID:28036085

  6. Convergence of estuarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dronkers, Job

    2017-07-01

    Tide-dominated coastal plain estuaries have typically up-estuary convergent tidal channels. Analysis of estuarine characteristics indicates a dependence of the convergence length on relative tidal amplitude, relative intertidal area and river flow velocity. In order to explain these relationships we investigate a condition for continuity of net sediment transport throughout the estuary, corresponding to morphodynamic equilibrium. We show, by using an analytical solution of the tidal equations, that this condition is equivalent to a condition on the convergence length. This condition is evaluated for 21 estuaries in different regions of the world. It appears that the convergence length determined in this way can explain observed convergence lengths for the considered set of estuaries. The dependence of the convergence length on different estuarine characteristics is analysed by solving the fully coupled hydro-morphodynamic equations. We show that this dependence limits the range of variation of the tidal velocity amplitude. The analysis provides insight in the morphological response of estuaries to human interventions. The condition can easily be evaluated to yield an estimate of this response.

  7. Event selection services in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Gallas, E.; Hrivnac, J.; Kenyon, M.; McGlone, H.; Malon, D.; Mambelli, M.; Nowak, M.; Viegas, F.; Vinek, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS has developed and deployed event-level selection services based upon event metadata records ("TAGS") and supporting file and database technology. These services allow physicists to extract events that satisfy their selection predicates from any stage of data processing and use them as input to later analyses. One component of these services is a web-based Event-Level Selection Service Interface (ELSSI). ELSSI supports event selection by integrating run-level metadata, luminosity-block-level metadata (e.g., detector status and quality information), and event-by-event information (e.g., triggers passed and physics content). The list of events that survive after some selection criterion is returned in a form that can be used directly as input to local or distributed analysis; indeed, it is possible to submit a skimming job directly from the ELSSI interface using grid proxy credential delegation. ELSSI allows physicists to explore ATLAS event metadata as a means to understand, qualitatively and quantitatively, the distributional characteristics of ATLAS data. In fact, the ELSSI service provides an easy interface to see the highest missing ET events or the events with the most leptons, to count how many events passed a given set of triggers, or to find events that failed a given trigger but nonetheless look relevant to an analysis based upon the results of offline reconstruction, and more. This work provides an overview of ATLAS event-level selection services, with an emphasis upon the interactive Event-Level Selection Service Interface.

  8. Event Discrimination using Convolutional Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Hareesh; Hughes, Richard; Daling, Alec; Winer, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) are computational models that have been shown to be effective at classifying different types of images. We present a method to use CNNs to distinguish events involving the production of a top quark pair and a Higgs boson from events involving the production of a top quark pair and several quark and gluon jets. To do this, we generate and simulate data using MADGRAPH and DELPHES for a general purpose LHC detector at 13 TeV. We produce images using a particle flow algorithm by binning the particles geometrically based on their position in the detector and weighting the bins by the energy of each particle within each bin, and by defining channels based on particle types (charged track, neutral hadronic, neutral EM, lepton, heavy flavor). Our classification results are competitive with standard machine learning techniques. We have also looked into the classification of the substructure of the events, in a process known as scene labeling. In this context, we look for the presence of boosted objects (such as top quarks) with substructure encompassed within single jets. Preliminary results on substructure classification will be presented.

  9. Ion channels in artificial bolaamphiphile membranes deposited on sensor chips: optical detection in an ion-channel-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalkhammer, Thomas G. M.; Weiss-Wichert, Christof; Smetazko, Michaela M.; Valina-Saba, Miriam

    1997-06-01

    Signal amplification using labels should be replaced by a technique monitoring the biochemical binding event directly. The use of a ligand coupled to an artificial gated membrane ion channel is a new promising strategy. Binding of protein- or DNA/RNA-analytes at ligand modified peptide channels results in an on/off-response of the channel current due to channel closure or distortion. The sensor consists of stable transmembrane channels with a ligand bound covalently at the peptide channel entrance, a sensor chip with a photostructurized hydrophobic polymer frame, a hydrophilic ion conducting membrane support, a lipid membrane incorporating the engineered ion channels, and a current amplifier or a sensitive fluorescence monitor. Detection of channel opening or closure can ether be obtained by directly monitoring membrane conductivity or a transient change of pH or ion concentration within the membrane compartment. This change can be induced by electrochemical or optical means and its decay is directly correlated to the permeability of the membrane. The ion concentration in the sub membrane compartment was monitored by incorporation of fluorescent indicator dyes. To obtain the stable sensor membrane the lipid layer had to be attached on a support and the floating of the second lipid membrane on top of the first one had to be prevented. Both problems do not occur using our new circular C44-C76 bolaamphiphilic lipids consisting of a long hydrophobic core region and two hydrophilic heads. Use of maleic ester-head groups enabled us to easily modify the lipids with amines, thioles, alcohols, phosphates, boronic acid as well as fluorescent dyes. The properties of these membranes were studied using LB and fluorescence techniques. Based on this detection principle miniaturized sensor chips with significantly enhanced sensitivity and large multi analyte arrays are under construction.

  10. 48-channel coincidence counting system for multiphoton experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Wei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Tao; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a coincidence counting system with 48 input channels which is aimed to count all coincidence events, up to 531 441 kinds, in a multiphoton experiment. Using the dynamic delay adjusting inside the Field Programmable Gate Array, the alignment of photon signals of 48 channels is achieved. After the alignment, clock phase shifting is used to sample signal pulses. Logic constraints are used to stabilize the pulse width. The coincidence counting data stored in a 1G bit external random access memory will be sent to the computer to analyze the amount of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coincidence events. This system is designed for multiphoton entanglement experiments with multiple degrees of freedom of photons.

  11. Event mapping meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, L.; Mason, D.

    1997-02-20

    A one-day meeting was held by the authors to evaluate how the strategic lab workshops would tie to this year`s tactical planning exercise. In particular, they wanted to find recent events that would support the tactical goal decisions of the Lab, and they wanted to find events that verify the Lab`s present course. The events which are each briefly discussed are: Galvin Commission recommends consolidating DOE defense labs (1995); Congressional subcommittee staff force budget cuts and consolidation (1995); 28% of DOE/DP budget held back pending completion of a clear 5-yr plan for nukes (1995); DOD and DOE focus on dual use (1995); LANL work includes weapons rebuilds (1995); LANL chosen by DOE to develop and test advanced remediation techniques (1995); AGEX/DARHT Project is stopped by suits from environmental activities (1996); Non-proliferation treaty renewed (1996); US complies with Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (1996); Capability based deterrence policy put into place (1998); Stockpile shrinks to approximately 2000 weapons (2005); DOE weapons labs re-chartered as true national labs (1996); DOE terminates all nuclear weapons testing support (1996); Industrial projects at LANL up 20% from previous year (1997); NIST-ATP Program becomes an interagency process (1997); DOE warns that spent commercial reactor fuels is a major proliferation threat (1998); Non-lethal weapons work helps to reshape LANL image (1998); Global warning theory proven (2005); Overall US spending on science has been flat or decreasing for three years (1998); and Economic role of LANL in northern New Mexico declines (2005).

  12. Channel responses to varying sediment input: A flume experiment modeled after Redwood Creek, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, M.A.; Sutherland, D.G.; Lisle, T.E.; Pryor, B.

    2009-01-01

    At the reach scale, a channel adjusts to sediment supply and flow through mutual interactions among channel form, bed particle size, and flow dynamics that govern river bed mobility. Sediment can impair the beneficial uses of a river, but the timescales for studying recovery following high sediment loading in the field setting make flume experiments appealing. We use a flume experiment, coupled with field measurements in a gravel-bed river, to explore sediment transport, storage, and mobility relations under various sediment supply conditions. Our flume experiment modeled adjustments of channel morphology, slope, and armoring in a gravel-bed channel. Under moderate sediment increases, channel bed elevation increased and sediment output increased, but channel planform remained similar to pre-feed conditions. During the following degradational cycle, most of the excess sediment was evacuated from the flume and the bed became armored. Under high sediment feed, channel bed elevation increased, the bed became smoother, mid-channel bars and bedload sheets formed, and water surface slope increased. Concurrently, output increased and became more poorly sorted. During the last degradational cycle, the channel became armored and channel incision ceased before all excess sediment was removed. Selective transport of finer material was evident throughout the aggradational cycles and became more pronounced during degradational cycles as the bed became armored. Our flume results of changes in bed elevation, sediment storage, channel morphology, and bed texture parallel those from field surveys of Redwood Creek, northern California, which has exhibited channel bed degradation for 30??years following a large aggradation event in the 1970s. The flume experiment suggested that channel recovery in terms of reestablishing a specific morphology may not occur, but the channel may return to a state of balancing sediment supply and transport capacity.

  13. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  14. Detection of solar events

    DOEpatents

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  15. 2017 Solar Eclipse Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-11

    Robert Wilson of the Solar/Solar terrestrial Studies team at the National Space Science and Technology Center, a joint research and collaborative think tank partnership of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and the Marshall Space Flight Center, adjusts his telescope which is set up as a viewing opportunity for MSFC employees prior to the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse event. The Huntsville area experienced 97 percent occultation, nearly a complete blocking out of the sun by the orbit of Earth's moon. The next opportunity to view a solar eclipse in the eastern and central United States will occur in April 2024.

  16. 2017 Solar Eclipse Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-11

    Sylvester Dorsey III, avionics lead for the Europa Deorbit Stage Team in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, is joined during Marshall's eclipse-viewing event by his three children, from left, Sylvester IV, Sidney and Sakari. Though Huntsville was south of the path of totality, the Dorseys were among those awestruck by the natural phenomenon. The Huntsville area experienced 97 percent occultation, nearly a complete blocking out of the sun by the orbit of Earth's moon. The next opportunity to view a solar eclipse in the eastern and central United States will occur in April 2024.

  17. Microlensing Event Caustic Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MACHO/GMAN Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The MACHO/GMAN Collaboration (cf. IAUC 6845) plus affiliate S.Rhie report that further observations of microlensing event MACHO-98-SMC-1 (R.A. = 0h45m35s.2, Decl. = -72o52'34" J2000) confirm the binary lens interpretation and yield a prediction for the time of the 2nd caustic crossing: June 19.2 +/- 1.5 UT. The confirming observations were obtained with the MSO 1.3m MACHO survey telescope and the CTIO 0.9-m telescope.

  18. Bolden STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-28

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, right, shares a laugh with U.S. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., center and U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., prior to an event at the MathScience Innovation Center, Friday, Jan. 28, 2011, in Richmond, Va. Bolden later spoke to students from Albert Hill Middle School highlighting the importance of science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, as he shared his life experiences with the students. (Photo Credit:NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. Ryanodine receptors as leak channels.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Ávila, Guillermo; Rueda, Angélica

    2014-09-15

    Ryanodine receptors are Ca(2+) release channels of internal stores. This review focuses on those situations and conditions that transform RyRs from a finely regulated ion channel to an unregulated Ca(2+) leak channel and the pathological consequences of this alteration. In skeletal muscle, mutations in either CaV1.1 channel or RyR1 results in a leaky behavior of the latter. In heart cells, RyR2 functions normally as a Ca(2+) leak channel during diastole within certain limits, the enhancement of this activity leads to arrhythmogenic situations that are tackled with different pharmacological strategies. In smooth muscle, RyRs are involved more in reducing excitability than in stimulating contraction so the leak activity of RyRs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks, locally activates Ca(2+)-dependent potassium channels to reduce excitability. In neurons the enhanced activity of RyRs is associated with the development of different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Huntington diseases. It appears then that the activity of RyRs as leak channels can have both physiological and pathological consequences depending on the cell type and the metabolic condition.

  20. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-Rong; Dong, Ming-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac K(+) channels are cardiomyocyte membrane proteins that regulate K(+) ion flow across the cell membrane on the electrochemical gradient and determine the resting membrane potential and the cardiac action potential morphology and duration. Several K(+) channels have been well studied in the human heart. They include the transient outward K(+) current I(to1), the ultra-rapidly activating delayed rectifier current I(Kur), the rapidly and slowly activating delayed rectifier currents I(Kr) and I(Ks), the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and ligand-gated K(+) channels, including adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) current (I(KATP)) and acetylcholine-activated current (I(KACh)). Regional differences of K(+) channel expression contribute to the variable morphologies and durations of cardiac action potentials from sinus node and atrial to ventricular myocytes, and different ventricular layers from endocardium and midmyocardium to epicardium. They also show different responses to endogenous regulators and/or pharmacological agents. K(+) channels are well-known targets for developing novel anti-arrhythmic drugs that can effectively prevent/inhibit cardiac arrhythmias. Especially, atrial-specific K(+) channel currents (I(Kur) and I(KACh)) are the targets for developing atrial-selective anti-atrial fibrillation drugs, which has been greatly progressed in recent years. This chapter concentrates on recent advances in intracellular signaling regulation and pharmacology of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  1. TRPV channels and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Baylie, R.L.; Brayden, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels, of the vanilloid subtype (TRPV), act as sensory mediators, being activated by endogenous ligands, heat, mechanical and osmotic stress. Within the vasculature, TRPV channels are expressed in smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, as well as in peri-vascular nerves. Their varied distribution and polymodal activation properties make them ideally suited to a role in modulating vascular function, perceiving and responding to local environmental changes. In endothelial cells, TRPV1 is activated by endocannabinoids, TRPV3 by dietary agonists, and TRPV4 by shear stress, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and downstream of Gq-coupled receptor activation. Upon activation, these channels contribute to vasodilation via nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and intermediate/small conductance potassium channel (IKCa/SKCa) dependent pathways. In smooth muscle, TRPV4 is activated by endothelial derived EETs, leading to large conductance potassium channel (BKCa) activation and smooth muscle hyperpolarization. Conversely, smooth muscle TRPV2 channels contribute to global calcium entry and may aid constriction. TRPV1 and TRPV4 are expressed in sensory nerves and can cause vasodilation through CGRP and substance P release as well as mediating vascular function via the baroreceptor reflex (TRPV1) or via increasing sympathetic outflow during osmotic stress (TRPV4). Thus, TRPV channels play important roles in the regulation of normal and pathological cellular function in the vasculature. PMID:21062421

  2. Ion Channels in Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Sezgin, Efe C.; Eckert, Franziska; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma exhibit a high metastatic tropism to the brain. Development of brain metastases severely worsens the prognosis of cancer patients and constrains curative treatment options. Metastasizing to the brain by cancer cells can be dissected in consecutive processes including epithelial–mesenchymal transition, evasion from the primary tumor, intravasation and circulation in the blood, extravasation across the blood–brain barrier, formation of metastatic niches, and colonization in the brain. Ion channels have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in tumor cells where they regulate neoplastic transformation, malignant progression or therapy resistance. Moreover, many ion channel modulators are FDA-approved drugs and in clinical use proposing ion channels as druggable targets for future anti-cancer therapy. The present review article aims to summarize the current knowledge on the function of ion channels in the different processes of brain metastasis. The data suggest that certain channel types involving voltage-gated sodium channels, ATP-release channels, ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and gap junction-generating connexins interfere with distinct processes of brain metastazation. PMID:27618016

  3. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  4. Microbial Senses and Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Ching; Zhou, Xin-Liang; Su, Zhen-Wei; Haynes, W. John; Loukin, Sephan H.; Saimi, Yoshiro

    The complexity of animals and plants is due largely to cellular arrangement. The structures and activities of macromolecules had, however, evolved in early microbes long before the appearance of this complexity. Among such molecules are those that sense light, heat, force, water, and ligands. Though historically and didactically associated with the nervous system, ion channels also have deep evolutionary roots. For example, force sensing with channels, which likely began as water sensing through membrane stretch generated by osmotic pressure, must be ancient and is universal in extant species. Extant microbial species, such as the model bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are equipped with stretch-activated channels. The ion channel proteins MscL and MscS show clearly that these bacterial channels receive stretch forces from the lipid bilayer. TRPY1, the mechanosensitive channel in yeast, is being developed towards a similar basic understanding of channels of the TRP (transientreceptor- potential) superfamily. TRPY1 resides in the vacuolar membrane and releases Ca2+ from the vacuole to the cytoplasm upon hyperosmotic shock. Unlike in most TRP preparations from animals, the mechanosensitivity of TRPY1 can be examined directly under patch clamp in either whole-vacuole mode or excised patch mode. The combination of direct biophysical examination in vitro with powerful microbial genetics in vivo should complement the study of mechanosensations of complex animals and plants.

  5. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  6. Information geometry of Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-06-15

    We define a local Riemannian metric tensor in the manifold of Gaussian channels and the distance that it induces. We adopt an information-geometric approach and define a metric derived from the Bures-Fisher metric for quantum states. The resulting metric inherits several desirable properties from the Bures-Fisher metric and is operationally motivated by distinguishability considerations: It serves as an upper bound to the attainable quantum Fisher information for the channel parameters using Gaussian states, under generic constraints on the physically available resources. Our approach naturally includes the use of entangled Gaussian probe states. We prove that the metric enjoys some desirable properties like stability and covariance. As a by-product, we also obtain some general results in Gaussian channel estimation that are the continuous-variable analogs of previously known results in finite dimensions. We prove that optimal probe states are always pure and bounded in the number of ancillary modes, even in the presence of constraints on the reduced state input in the channel. This has experimental and computational implications. It limits the complexity of optimal experimental setups for channel estimation and reduces the computational requirements for the evaluation of the metric: Indeed, we construct a converging algorithm for its computation. We provide explicit formulas for computing the multiparametric quantum Fisher information for dissipative channels probed with arbitrary Gaussian states and provide the optimal observables for the estimation of the channel parameters (e.g., bath couplings, squeezing, and temperature).

  7. IA channels: diverse regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Yarimar; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2014-04-01

    In many peripheral and central neurons, A-type K(+) currents, IA, have been identified and shown to be key determinants in shaping action potential waveforms and repetitive firing properties, as well as in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. The functional properties and physiological roles of native neuronal IA, however, have been shown to be quite diverse in different types of neurons. Accumulating evidence suggests that this functional diversity is generated by multiple mechanisms, including the expression and subcellular distributions of IA channels encoded by different voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel pore-forming (α) subunits, interactions of Kv α subunits with cytosolic and/or transmembrane accessory subunits and regulatory proteins and post-translational modifications of channel subunits. Several recent reports further suggest that local protein translation in the dendrites of neurons and interactions between IA channels with other types of voltage-gated ion channels further expands the functional diversity of native neuronal IA channels. Here, we review the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been shown or proposed to underlie the functional diversity of native neuronal IA channels.

  8. Convergence of ion channel genome content in early animal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has evolved multiple times, but animals are the only multicellular lineage with nervous systems. This fact implies that the origin of nervous systems was an unlikely event, yet recent comparisons among extant taxa suggest that animal nervous systems may have evolved multiple times independently. Here, we use ancestral gene content reconstruction to track the timing of gene family expansions for the major families of ion-channel proteins that drive nervous system function. We find that animals with nervous systems have broadly similar complements of ion-channel types but that these complements likely evolved independently. We also find that ion-channel gene family evolution has included large loss events, two of which were immediately followed by rounds of duplication. Ctenophores, cnidarians, and bilaterians underwent independent bouts of gene expansion in channel families involved in synaptic transmission and action potential shaping. We suggest that expansions of these family types may represent a genomic signature of expanding nervous system complexity. Ancestral nodes in which nervous systems are currently hypothesized to have originated did not experience large expansions, making it difficult to distinguish among competing hypotheses of nervous system origins and suggesting that the origin of nerves was not attended by an immediate burst of complexity. Rather, the evolution of nervous system complexity appears to resemble a slow fuse in stem animals followed by many independent bouts of gene gain and loss. PMID:25675537

  9. Resurfacing history of the Harmakhis Vallis channel, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, Soile; Kostama, Veli-Petri

    2016-10-01

    Harmakhis Vallis is one of the four major outflow channel systems (Dao, Niger, Harmakhis and Reull Valles) which cut the eastern rim region of the Hellas basin, the largest well-preserved impact structure of Mars. The structure of Harmakhis Vallis and the volume of its head depression, as well as the earlier dating studies suggest that the channel formed during the Hesperian period by collapsing when a large amount of subsurface fluids was released. Thus Harmakhis Vallis, as well as the other nearby outflow channels, represent a significant stage of the fluvial activity in the regional history. On the other hand, the channel lies on the Martian mid-latitude zone, where there are several geomorphologic indicators of past and possibly also contemporary ground ice. The floor of Harmakhis also displays evidence of a later-stage ice-related activity as the channel has been covered by lineated valley fill deposits and debris apron material.The eastern rim region of the Hellas impact basin has been the subject of numerous geologic mapping studies at various scales and using different imaging data sets. However, the Harmakhis Vallis channel itself has received less attention, or the studies on the channel have focused only on different geologic events as a separate subject. In this work, we present our mapping and dating results of the Harmakhis Vallis floor based on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's ConTeX camera imagery (CTX; ~5 m/pixel), which covers the entire Harmakhis channel system from its head depression to the beginning of the terminus. The purpose of the study is to outline how the floor of the Harmakhis Vallis channel has been modified after its formation, what kind of geologic processes have occurred on the channel and when, and by doing so, provide further understanding of the channel evolution and changes in the Martian climate. This work also gives information about the crater counting age determination method and its usability in the cases where only high

  10. Kinetics of 9-aminoacridine block of single Na channels

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) block of single Na channels in neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were studied using the gigohm seal, patch clamp technique, under the condition in which the Na current inactivation had been eliminated by treatment with N-bromoacetamide (NBA). Following NBA treatment, the current flowing through individual Na channels was manifested by square-wave open events lasting from several to tens of milliseconds. When 9-AA was applied to the cytoplasmic face of Na channels at concentrations ranging from 30 to 100 microM, it caused repetitive rapid transitions (flickering) between open and blocked states within single openings of Na channels, without affecting the amplitude of the single channel current. The histograms for the duration of blocked states and the histograms for the duration of open states could be fitted with a single-exponential function. The mean open time (tau o) became shorter as the drug concentration was increased, while the mean blocked time (tau b) was concentration independent. The association (blocking) rate constant, kappa, calculated from the slope of the curve relating the reciprocal mean open time to 9-AA concentration, showed little voltage dependence, the rate constant being on the order of 1 X 10(7) M-1s-1. The dissociation (unblocking) rate constant, l, calculated from the mean blocked time, was strongly voltage dependent, the mean rate constant being 214 s-1 at 0 mV and becoming larger as the membrane being hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence suggests that a first-order blocking site is located at least 63% of the way through the membrane field from the cytoplasmic surface. The equilibrium dissociation constant for 9-AA to block the Na channel, defined by the relation of l/kappa, was calculated to be 21 microM at 0 mV. Both tau -1o and tau -1b had a Q10 of 1.3, which suggests that binding reaction was diffusion controlled. The burst time in the presence of 9-AA, which is the sum of open times and blocked

  11. Rainfall Threshold For Slope-Channel Connectivity In Agricultural Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Święchowicz, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    Many rainfall events lead to the transfer of soil material from one slope section to another, which does not notably alter slope relief (first transfer threshold). Some events lead to the transfer of soil from the water divide to the footslope (second transfer threshold). In a few exceptional cases, soil material is transferred directly into river channels due to severe erosion moving large quantities of soil over long distances. Extreme events lead to the transfer of soil material down the entire slope length, its deposition at the footslope and even further across the valley floor. Sediment is transferred directly from slopes to river channels (third transfer threshold or slope-channel connectivity threshold). This work presents rainfall threshold values and probability of slope-to-river sediment transfer in a foothill agricultural catchment in Poland. The study is based on research performed in the Dworski Potok Catchment (227-275 m a.s.l.), which is a small agricultural foothill catchment (0.29 km2), situated in a moderate climate zone, with slopes covered with loess-like formations. The paper uses precipitation data for the period 1987-2009 obtained at the Łazy Field Research Station near Bochnia (Poland) and long-term field data on splash (2007-2009), slope wash (2007-2009) and linear erosion (1998-2009) on slopes. In Dworski Potok Catchment change in the slope relief was brought about by short transformation periods, during which soil erosion by water took place, especially if it was caused by events of high magnitude and low frequency. Those periods which, depending on the criterion adopted, lasted from 0.3 to 4% of the time of study were the most interesting and effective episodes in the development of slopes. It was determined that in the researched multi-year period, the transfer of soil material was possible to occur after certain parameters had exceeded the following threshold values: EI30 = 40.5 MJmmha-1h-1 or I30 = 9.8 mmh-1 for the first transfer

  12. Open channel structure of MscL and the gating mechanism of mechanosensitive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozo, Eduardo; Cortes, D. Marien; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Kloda, Anna; Martinac, Boris

    2002-08-01

    Mechanosensitive channels act as membrane-embedded mechano-electrical switches, opening a large water-filled pore in response to lipid bilayer deformations. This process is critical to the response of living organisms to direct physical stimulation, such as in touch, hearing and osmoregulation. Here, we have determined the structural rearrangements that underlie these events in the large prokaryotic mechanosensitive channel (MscL) using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and site-directed spin labelling. MscL was trapped in both the open and in an intermediate closed state by modulating bilayer morphology. Transition to the intermediate state is characterized by small movements in the first transmembrane helix (TM1). Subsequent transitions to the open state are accompanied by massive rearrangements in both TM1 and TM2, as shown by large increases in probe dynamics, solvent accessibility and the elimination of all intersubunit spin-spin interactions. The open state is highly dynamic, supporting a water-filled pore of at least 25Å, lined mostly by TM1. These structures suggest a plausible molecular mechanism of gating in mechanosensitive channels.

  13. Effects of calcium channel blockers on cloned cardiac K+ channels IKr and IKs.

    PubMed

    Chouabe, C; Drici, M D; Romey, G; Barhanin, J

    2000-01-01

    Cloned HERG and KvLQT1-IsK K+ channels have been expressed in mammalian cells and assayed as a target for calcium channel blockers. These channels generate the rapid and slow components of the cardiac delayed rectifier K+ current, and mutations can affect them that lead to long QT syndromes. HERG is blocked by bepridil (EC50 = 0.55 microM), verapamil (EC50 = 0.83 microM) and mibefradil (EC50 = 1.43 microM), whereas nitrendipine and diltiazem have negligible effects. Steady-state activation and inactivation parameters are shifted to more negative values in the presence of the blockers. Similarly, KvLQT1-IsK is inhibited by bepridil (EC50 = 10.0 microM) and mibefradil (EC50 = 11.8 microM), whilst being insensitive to nitrendipine, diltiazem or verapamil. This work may help to understand the mechanisms of action of verapamil in certain ventricular tachycardias as well as some of the deleterious adverse cardiac events associated with bepridil and mibefradil.

  14. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Carmen; Delpón, Eva

    2004-04-01

    Cardiac K+ channels are membrane-spanning proteins that allow the passive movement of K+ ions across the cell membrane along its electrochemical gradient. They regulate the resting membrane potential, the frequency of pacemaker cells and the shape and duration of the cardiac action potential. Additionally, they have been recognized as potential targets for the actions of neurotransmitters and hormones and class III antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the action potential duration (APD) and refractoriness and have been found effective to prevent/suppress cardiac arrhythmias. In the human heart, K+ channels include voltage-gated channels, such as the rapidly activating and inactivating transient outward current (Ito1), the ultrarapid (IKur), rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components of the delayed rectifier current and the inward rectifier current (IK1), the ligand-gated channels, including the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive (IKATP) and the acetylcholine-activated (IKAch) currents and the leak channels. Changes in the expression of K+ channels explain the regional variations in the morphology and duration of the cardiac action potential among different cardiac regions and are influenced by heart rate, intracellular signalling pathways, drugs and cardiovascular disorders. A progressive number of cardiac and noncardiac drugs block cardiac K+ channels and can cause a marked prolongation of the action potential duration (i.e. an acquired long QT syndrome, LQTS) and a distinct polymorphic ventricular tachycardia termed torsades de pointes. In addition, mutations in the genes encoding IKr (KCNH2/KCNE2) and IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) channels have been identified in some types of the congenital long QT syndrome. This review concentrates on the function, molecular determinants, regulation and, particularly, on the mechanism of action of drugs modulating the K+ channels present in the sarcolemma of human cardiac myocytes that contribute to the different phases of the cardiac action

  15. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Bob Richards, standing at left in front of the cameras, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to utilize Kennedy Space Center facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Third from left in the group is former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  16. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  17. Nutrition for distance events.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Millet, Gregoire; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of training is to prepare the distance athlete to perform at his or her best during major competitions. Whatever the event, nutrition plays a major role in the achievement of various factors that will see a runner or walker take the starting line in the best possible form. Everyday eating patterns must supply fuel and nutrients needed to optimize their performance during training sessions and to recover quickly afterwards. Carbohydrate and fluid intake before, during, and after a workout may help to reduce fatigue and enhance performance. Recovery eating should also consider issues for adaptation and the immune system that may involve intakes of protein and some micronutrients. Race preparation strategies should include preparation of adequate fuel stores, including carbohydrate loading for prolonged events such as the marathon or 50-km walk. Fluid and carbohydrate intake during races lasting an hour or more should also be considered. Sports foods and supplements of value to distance athletes include sports drinks and liquid meal supplements to allow nutrition goals to be achieved when normal foods are not practical. While caffeine is an ergogenic aid of possible value to distance athletes, most other supplements are of minimal benefit.

  18. A Ten Channel Temperature Controller.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    R 1D-A152 664 R TEN CHANNEL TEMPERATURE CONTROLLER(U) ROYAL AXRCRAFT 1/i ESTABLISHMENT FARNBOROUGH ( ENGLAND ) D H LISTER MAY 84 U A E RAE-T-P-1926...obtained with the design and build of a multi-channel temperature control unit for the first NGTE emissions van .While this was a platinum resistance...voltage switch, had proved highly reliable. It was decided therefore to capitalise on this experience and build, in-house, a modular multi-channel unit . A

  19. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs), are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV), Ca2+ (CaV), and K+ (KV) channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR), and the ATP-activated (P2XnR) receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+), whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−). In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers) of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific ion channel-linked disease (e

  20. Degradability of Bosonic Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, Filippo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2006-12-15

    The notion of weak-degradability of quantum channels is introduced by generalizing the degradability definition given by Devetak and Shor. Exploiting the unitary equivalence with beam-splitter/amplifier channels we then prove that a large class of one-mode Bosonic Gaussian channels are either weakly degradable or anti-degradable. In the latter case this implies that their quantum capacity Q is null. In the former case instead, this allows us to establish the additivity of the coherent information for those maps which admit unitary representation with single-mode pure environment.