Science.gov

Sample records for evidence based review

  1. Evidence-based radiology: review and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Medina, L Santiago; Blackmore, C Craig

    2007-08-01

    Evidence-based radiology (EBR) is an important tool for the practice of radiology. The user of the EBR approach identifies evidence in a systematic fashion and then assimilates information through in-depth, explicit critical review of the best-designed and most recent literature on the subject in question. Clinical decision making is then based on the best current evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values. Substantial progress has been made in the review and dissemination of EBR. Dissemination of EBR within radiology has two critical aspects. The first is increased understanding of the methods required for EBR and of the appropriate use of EBR. The second important component is the dissemination of the data and critical literature reviews necessary to allow use of the EBR approach. Resources available for both EBR methods and EBR data in radiology include societies, journals, medical meetings, Web sites, and textbooks. Although radiology has made important progress in this field in recent years, the specialty is still behind other specialties that have been at the forefront of evidence-based medicine in the past decade.

  2. Cellulite: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2015-08-01

    Cellulite is a multifactorial condition that is present in 80-90 % of post-pubertal women. Despite its high prevalence, it remains a major cosmetic concern for women. A wide range of products and treatments for cellulite reduction is available; however, no systematic review has been performed so far to evaluate the efficacy of the available treatment options for cellulite. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatments for cellulite reduction. This systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Only original articles in English or German reporting data on the efficacy of cellulite treatments from in vivo human studies were considered. In total, 67 articles were analyzed for the following information: therapy, presence of a control group, randomization, blinding, sample size, description of statistical methods, results, and level of evidence. Most of the evaluated studies, including laser- and light-based modalities, radiofrequency, and others had important methodological flaws; some did not use cellulite severity as an endpoint or did not provide sufficient statistical analyses. Of the 67 studies analyzed in this review, only 19 were placebo-controlled studies with randomization. Some evidence for potential benefit was only seen for acoustic wave therapy (AWT) and the 1440 nm Nd:YAG minimally invasive laser. This article provides a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatment for cellulite reduction. No clear evidence of good efficacy could be identified in any of the evaluated cellulite treatments.

  3. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eui Geum

    2016-06-01

    As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR), a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings.

  4. Chronic constipation: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence; Riutta, Taylor; Kotecha, Jyoti; Rosser, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition seen in family practice among the elderly and women. There is no consensus regarding its exact definition, and it may be interpreted differently by physicians and patients. Physicians prescribe various treatments, and patients often adopt different over-the-counter remedies. Chronic constipation is either caused by slow colonic transit or pelvic floor dysfunction, and treatment differs accordingly. To update our knowledge of chronic constipation and its etiology and best-evidence treatment, information was synthesized from articles published in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Levels of evidence and recommendations were made according to the Strength of Recommendation taxonomy. The standard advice of increasing dietary fibers, fluids, and exercise for relieving chronic constipation will only benefit patients with true deficiency. Biofeedback works best for constipation caused by pelvic floor dysfunction. Pharmacological agents increase bulk or water content in the bowel lumen or aim to stimulate bowel movements. Novel classes of compounds have emerged for treating chronic constipation, with promising clinical trial data. Finally, the link between senna abuse and colon cancer remains unsupported. Chronic constipation should be managed according to its etiology and guided by the best evidence-based treatment.

  5. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

  6. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

  7. Managing and reviewing evidence-based changes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Helen; Price, Lynda

    Nurses lead many projects to manage change aimed at improving patient safety and care. This two-part series offers practical guidance on how to bring about an evidence-based change in practice, and how to demonstrate the success, or otherwise, of that change. Part 2 is concerned with discovering why the practice is falling short, how to implement improvements and measure the effect of the changes. It also highlights ways in which nurses can use their work as part of the revalidation process.

  8. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  9. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  10. Practice-Based Evidence in Community Guide Systematic Reviews.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Namita; Thota, Anilkrishna B; Proia, Krista K; Jamieson, Sara; Mercer, Shawna L; Elder, Randy W; Yoon, Paula; Kaufmann, Rachel; Zaza, Stephanie

    2017-03-01

    To assess the relative contributions and quality of practice-based evidence (PBE) and research-based evidence (RBE) in The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). We developed operational definitions for PBE and RBE in which the main distinguishing feature was whether allocation of participants to intervention and comparison conditions was under the control of researchers (RBE) or not (PBE). We conceptualized a continuum between RBE and PBE. We then categorized 3656 studies in 202 reviews completed since The Community Guide began in 1996. Fifty-four percent of studies were PBE and 46% RBE. Community-based and policy reviews had more PBE. Health care system and programmatic reviews had more RBE. The majority of both PBE and RBE studies were of high quality according to Community Guide scoring methods. The inclusion of substantial PBE in Community Guide reviews suggests that evidence of adequate rigor to inform practice is being produced. This should increase stakeholders' confidence that The Community Guide provides recommendations with real-world relevance. Limitations in some PBE studies suggest a need for strengthening practice-relevant designs and external validity reporting standards.

  11. Management of REM sleep behavior disorder: An evidence based review

    PubMed Central

    Devnani, Preeti; Fernandes, Racheal

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream enactment behavior resulting from a loss of REM skeletal muscle atonia. The neurobiology of REM sleep and the characteristic features of REM atonia have an important basis for understanding the aggravating etiologies the proposed pharmacological interventions in its management. This review outlines the evidence for behavioral and therapeutic measures along with evidence-based guidelines for their implementation, impact on falls, and effect on polysomnography (PSG) while highlighting the non-motor, autonomic, and cognitive impact of this entity. PubMed databases were reviewed upto May 2013 in peer-reviewed scientific literature regarding the pathophysiology and management of RBD in adults. The literature was graded according to the Oxford centre of evidence-based Medicine Levels. An early intervention that helps prevent consequences such as falls and provides a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms and allocates a unique platform that RBD portrays with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency. RBD provides a unique platform with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency, providing an opportunity for early intervention both to prevent consequences such as falls and provide a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:25745301

  12. Barriers to evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has emerged as an effective strategy to improve health care quality. The aim of this study was to systematically review and carry out an analysis on the barriers to EBM. Different database searching methods and also manual search were employed in this study using the search words ('evidence-based' or 'evidence-based medicine' or 'evidence-based practice' or 'evidence-based guidelines' or 'research utilization') and (barrier* or challenge or hinder) in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane library, Pro Quest, Magiran, SID. Out of 2592 articles, 106 articles were finally identified for study. Research barriers, lack of resources, lack of time, inadequate skills, and inadequate access, lack of knowledge and financial barriers were found to be the most common barriers to EBM. Examples of these barriers were found in primary care, hospital/specialist care, rehabilitation care, medical education, management and decision making. The most common barriers to research utilization were research barriers, cooperation barriers and changing barriers. Lack of resources was the most common barrier to implementation of guidelines. The result of this study shows that there are many barriers to the implementation and use of EBM. Identifying barriers is just the first step to removing barriers to the use of EBM. Extra resources will be needed if these barriers are to be tackled. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing: an evidence based review.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Michael J; Warning, William J

    2015-10-01

    The scope of pharmacist services for patients with pulmonary disease has primarily focused on drug related outcomes; however pharmacists have the ability to broaden the scope of clinical services by performing diagnostic testing including quality spirometry testing. Studies have demonstrated that pharmacists can perform quality spirometry testing based upon international guidelines. The primary aim of this review was to assess the published evidence of pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing based upon American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines. In order to accomplish this, the description of evidence and type of outcome from these services were reviewed. A literature search was conducted using five databases [PubMed (1946-January 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews] with search terms including pharmacy, spirometry, pulmonary function, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to publications in English and reported in humans. In addition, Uniform Resource Locators and Google Scholar searches were implemented to include any additional supplemental information. Eight studies (six prospective multi-center trials, two retrospective single center studies) were included. Pharmacists in all studies received specialized training in performing spirometry testing. Of the eight studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 (100%) demonstrated acceptable repeatability of spirometry testing based upon standards set by the ATS/ERS guidelines. Acceptable repeatability of seven studies ranged from 70 to 99% consistent with published data. Available evidence suggests that quality spirometry testing can be performed by pharmacists. More prospective studies are needed to add to the current evidence of quality spirometry testing performed by

  14. Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

    2014-01-01

    Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

  15. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  16. [A review of current concepts in evidence-based radiology].

    PubMed

    Roldán-Valadez, Ernesto; Lee, Angel; Jiménez-Corona, Aída; Vega-González, Iván; Martínez-López, Manuel; Vázquez-LaMadrid, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    It has been noted that "Good doctors use both individual clinical expertise and the best available external evidence, and neither alone is enough. " Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as the process of systematically finding, critically appraising, and using contemporary research published in the medical literature as a basis to make decisions regarding individual patient care and health care policy. In radiology, including its diagnostic and interventional aspects, the principles and practice of EBM have not been thoroughly studied. In this brief review article, we describe key aspects of evidence-based radiology (EBR), concepts and steps followed in EBM and meta-analysis. The skills required to practice EBR are identified, and the roles of EBR in radiologic practice, education, and research are discussed. The application of EBM principles to diagnostic imaging facilitates the interpretation of imaging studies and produces a sound and comprehensive radiologic evaluation. This review could be useful for radiologists and clinicians at any stage of their training or career. It encourages the practice of EBM and EBR especially in developing countries.

  17. Caesarean Delivery Rate Review: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Degani, N; Sikich, N

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2007, caesarean deliveries comprised 28% of all hospital deliveries in Ontario. Provincial caesarean delivery rates increased with maternal age and varied by Local Health Integration Network. However, the accepted rate of caesarean delivery in a low-risk maternal population remains unclear. Objectives To review the literature to assess factors that affect the likelihood of experiencing a caesarean delivery, and to examine Ontario caesarean delivery rates to determine whether there is rate variation across the province. Data Sources Data sources included publications from OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID Embase, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, as well as data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstracts Database and the Better Outcomes and Registry Network. Review Methods A mixed-methods approach was used, which included a systematic review of the literature to delineate factors associated with the likelihood of caesarean delivery and an analysis of administrative and clinical data on hospital deliveries in Ontario to determine provincial caesarean delivery rates, variation in rates, and reasons for variation. Results Fourteen systematic reviews assessed 14 factors affecting the likelihood of caesarean delivery; 7 factors were associated with an increased likelihood of caesarean delivery, and 2 factors were associated with a decreased likelihood. Five factors had no influence. One factor provided moderate-quality evidence supporting elective induction policies in low-risk women. The overall Ontario caesarean delivery rate in a very-low-risk population was 17%, but varied significantly across Ontario hospitals. Limitations The literature review included a 5–year period and used only systematic reviews. The determination of Robson class for women is based on care received in hospital only, and the low-risk population may have

  18. Comprehensive evidence-based review on European antitussives

    PubMed Central

    Morice, Alyn; Kardos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute cough caused by viral respiratory tract infections is probably the most common illness to afflict mankind. Despite the widespread but ineffective prescribing of antibiotics, there is no specific therapy. Home remedies and over-the-counter medicines are the mainstay for treatment of this short-lived but debilitating condition where cough is a major troublesome symptom. Across Europe, there are large variations in the recommendations made by healthcare professionals for the treatment of acute cough. This has arisen through custom and practice based on the evidence of historical studies performed to standards well short of what would be considered legitimate today. Acute cough is particularly difficult to study in a controlled setting because of the high rate of spontaneous remission and a large placebo effect. Here we detail the validated modern methodology used to assess the efficacy of antitussives and review the drugs commonly used in Europe against these standards. PMID:27547407

  19. Smoking and Male Infertility: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Harlev, Avi; Gunes, Sezgin Ozgur; Shetty, Amit; du Plessis, Stefan Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have reported that the contents of cigarette smoke negatively affect sperm parameters, seminal plasma, and various other fertility factors. Nevertheless, the actual effect of smoking on male fertility is not clear. The effect of smoking on semen parameters is based on the well-established biological finding that smoking increases the presence of reactive oxygen species, thereby resulting in oxidative stress (OS). OS has devastating effects on sperm parameters, such as viability and morphology, and impairs sperm function, hence reducing male fertility. However, not all studies have come to the same conclusions. This review sheds light upon the arguable association between smoking and male fertility and also assesses the impact of non-smoking routes of tobacco consumption on male infertility. It also highlights the evidence that links smoking with male infertility, including newly emerging genetic and epigenetic data, and discusses the clinical implications thereof. PMID:26770934

  20. AMNIOTIC FLUID EMBOLISM: AN EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Agudelo, Agustin; Romero, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We conducted an evidence-based review of information bout amniotic fluid embolism (AFE). The estimated incidence of AFE is 1:15,200 and 1:53,800 deliveries in North America and Europe, respectively. The case fatality rate and perinatal mortality associated with AFE are 13–30% and 9–44%, respectively. Risk factors associated with an increased risk of AFE include advanced maternal age, placental abnormalities, operative deliveries, eclampsia, polyhydramnios, cervical lacerations, and uterine rupture. The hemodynamic response in AFE is biphasic, with initial pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure, followed by left ventricular failure. Promising therapies include selective pulmonary vasodilators and recombinant activated facto Vlla. Important topics for future research are presented. PMID:19879393

  1. Pharmacological management of tetanus: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus is becoming rarer in both industrialized and developing nations due to an effective vaccination program. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated there was a 93% reduction in newborns dying from tetanus worldwide, compared to the situation in the late 1980s. Due to its rarity, many diagnostic delays occur as physicians may not consider the diagnosis until the manifestations become overt. Without timely diagnosis and proper treatment, severe tetanus is fatal (mortality is also influenced by the comorbidities of the patient). The principles of treating tetanus are: reducing muscle spasms, rigidity and autonomic instability (with ventilatory support when necessary); neutralization of tetanus toxin with human antitetanus immunoglobulin or equine antitetanus sera; wound debridement; and administration of antibiotics to eradicate locally proliferating bacteria at the wound site. It is difficult to conduct trials on different treatment modalities in tetanus due to both logistical and ethical reasons. However, it is imperative that physicians are aware of the best evidence-based treatment strategies currently available to improve the outcome of patients. This review concentrates on analyzing the current evidence on the pharmacological management of tetanus. PMID:25029486

  2. Pharmacological management of tetanus: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Fernando, Deepika; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-03-26

    Tetanus is becoming rarer in both industrialized and developing nations due to an effective vaccination program. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated there was a 93% reduction in newborns dying from tetanus worldwide, compared to the situation in the late 1980s. Due to its rarity, many diagnostic delays occur as physicians may not consider the diagnosis until the manifestations become overt. Without timely diagnosis and proper treatment, severe tetanus is fatal (mortality is also influenced by the comorbidities of the patient). The principles of treating tetanus are: reducing muscle spasms, rigidity and autonomic instability (with ventilatory support when necessary); neutralization of tetanus toxin with human antitetanus immunoglobulin or equine antitetanus sera; wound debridement; and administration of antibiotics to eradicate locally proliferating bacteria at the wound site. It is difficult to conduct trials on different treatment modalities in tetanus due to both logistical and ethical reasons. However, it is imperative that physicians are aware of the best evidence-based treatment strategies currently available to improve the outcome of patients. This review concentrates on analyzing the current evidence on the pharmacological management of tetanus.

  3. Cesarean delivery technique: evidence or tradition? A review of the evidence-based cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Encarnacion, Betsy; Zlatnik, Marya G

    2012-08-01

    Cesarean delivery is the most common surgical procedure performed in the United States, yet the techniques used during this procedure often vary significantly among providers. The purpose of this review was to evaluate and outline current evidence behind the cesarean delivery technique. A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the terms cesarean section and cesarean delivery and the technique of interest, for example, cesarean section prophylactic antibiotics. Few aspects of the cesarean delivery were found to have high-quality consistent evidence to support use of a particular technique. Because many aspects of the procedure are based on limited or no data, more studies on specific cesarean delivery techniques are clearly needed. Providers should be aware of which components of the cesarean delivery are evidence-based versus not when performing this procedure.

  4. Health care-associated pneumonia: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Russell T; Frei, Christopher R

    2011-08-01

    Health care-associated pneumonia is a relatively new classification of pneumonia that includes community-dwelling pneumonia patients having contact with the health care system. Current data indicate that health care-associated pneumonia patients present with more severe disease, are more likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens, and suffer increased mortality compared with community-acquired pneumonia patients. Guidelines recommend that these patients receive empiric antibiotics similar to those recommended for nosocomial pneumonia; however, it is not currently known if outcomes are improved when health care-associated pneumonia patients are treated with these therapies. In addition, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors are based on limited data and are a poor predictor of patients likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens. Many questions remain on how to most appropriately care for this growing group of pneumonia patients. This review is an evidence-based discussion of current health care-associated pneumonia data, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors, and limitations and additional considerations for the health care-associated pneumonia classification system.

  5. Herbs commonly used by women: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Bonnie J

    2002-10-01

    To review the evidence of herbs commonly used by women. Articles were located by searching Medline, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and the Combined Health Information Database and by hand searching the reference lists of recent systematic reviews. The databases were searched in January 2000 and October 2000 by using the Latin and common name of each herb. Preference was given to randomized, placebo-controlled trials. When available, English language studies were reviewed. If not, data are presented from review articles that summarize the foreign study. Many women use herbal therapies. In the United States, herbs are considered dietary supplements. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cannot remove them from the market unless they are proven unsafe. The herb industry plans to improve monitoring. Many prospective randomized controlled trials are being funded. Gingko biloba seems to slow the progression of dementia but increases the risk of bleeding. St John's Wort is efficacious for treating mild to moderate depression but has many drug interactions. Ginseng seems to improve well being in perimenopausal women, but it is often impure and has side effects and drug interactions. Garlic slightly lowers blood pressure and lipids. Echinacea slightly decreases the duration of colds but does not prevent them. Valerian is beneficial for insomnia, but there is no long-term safety data. Black cohosh may help the symptoms of perimenopause, and chasteberry may improve premenstrual syndrome. More study is needed on both herbs. Some herbs are medically useful, but the American public would benefit from increased regulation. Manufacturers should be able to ensure that herbs contain pure ingredients. Side effects and drug interactions should be listed. Well-designed studies are being conducted. The results will be helpful to physicians and patients when the clinical evidence becomes available.

  6. Herbs commonly used by women: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Bonnie J

    2003-05-01

    To review the evidence of herbs commonly used by women. Articles were located by searching Medline, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and the Combined Health Information Database and by hand searching the reference lists of recent systematic reviews. The databases were searched in January 2000 and October 2000 by using the Latin and common name of each herb. Preference was given to randomized, placebo-controlled trials. When available, English language studies were reviewed. If not, data are presented from review articles that summarize the foreign study. Many women use herbal therapies. In the United States, herbs are considered dietary supplements. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cannot remove them from the market unless they are proven unsafe. The herb industry plans to improve monitoring. Many prospective randomized controlled trials are being funded. Gingko biloba seems to slow the progression of dementia but increases the risk of bleeding. St John's Wort is efficacious for treating mild to moderate depression but has many drug interactions. Ginseng seems to improve well being in perimenopausal women, but it is often impure and has side effects and drug interactions. Garlic slightly lowers blood pressure and lipids. Echinacea slightly decreases the duration of colds but does not prevent them. Valerian is beneficial for insomnia, but there is no long-term safety data. Black cohosh may help the symptoms of perimenopause, and chasteberry may improve premenstrual syndrome. More study is needed on both herbs. Some herbs are medically useful, but the American public would benefit from increased regulation. Manufacturers should be able to ensure that herbs contain pure ingredients. Side effects and drug interactions should be listed. Well-designed studies are being conducted. The results will be helpful to physicians and patients when the clinical evidence becomes available.

  7. Clinical use of Skype: a review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Nigel R; Gray, Leonard C; Smith, Anthony C

    2012-04-01

    Skype is a popular and free software application that allows PCs and mobile devices to be used for video communication over the Internet. We reviewed the literature to determine whether the clinical use of Skype is supported by evidence. One small (n = 7) controlled clinical trial had assessed the effect of nursing communication using Skype on elderly patients with dementia and their carers. However, we were unable to identify any large, well-designed studies which had formally evaluated the safety, clinical effectiveness, security and privacy of Skype for the routine delivery of patient care. While there were many case reports and small studies, no firm evidence either in favour of, or against the use of Skype for clinical telehealth was found. The risks and benefits of using Skype for clinical purposes are not known.

  8. Promoting Evidence-Based Practice: Models and Mechanisms from Cross-Sector Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutley, Sandra; Walter, Isabel; Davies, Huw T. O.

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on both a cross-sector literature review of mechanisms to promote evidence-based practice and a specific review of ways of improving research use in social care. At the heart of the article is a discussion of three models of evidence-based practice: the research-based practitioner model, the embedded research model, and the…

  9. Behavioural Treatments for Tourette Syndrome: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Madeleine; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a disorder characterised by multiple motor and vocal tics and is frequently associated with behavioural problems. Tics are known to be affected by internal factors such as inner tension and external factors such as the surrounding environment. A number of behavioural treatments have been suggested to treat the symptoms of TS, in addition to pharmacotherapy and surgery for the most severe cases. This review compiled all the studies investigating behavioural therapies for TS, briefly describing each technique and assessing the evidence in order to determine which of these appear to be effective. Different behavioural therapies that were used included habit reversal training (HRT), massed negative practice, supportive psychotherapy, exposure with response prevention, self-monitoring, cognitive-behavioural therapy, relaxation therapy, assertiveness training, contingency management, a tension-reduction technique and biofeedback training. Overall, HRT is the best-studied and most widely-used technique and there is sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that it is an effective treatment. Most of the other treatments, however, require further investigation to evaluate their efficacy. Specifically, evidence suggests that exposure with response prevention and self-monitoring are effective, and more research is needed to determine the therapeutic value of the other treatments. As most of the studies investigating behavioural treatments for TS are small-sample or single-case studies, larger randomised controlled trials are advocated. PMID:23187152

  10. Behavioural treatments for Tourette syndrome: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Frank, Madeleine; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a disorder characterised by multiple motor and vocal tics and is frequently associated with behavioural problems. Tics are known to be affected by internal factors such as inner tension and external factors such as the surrounding environment. A number of behavioural treatments have been suggested to treat the symptoms of TS, in addition to pharmacotherapy and surgery for the most severe cases. This review compiled all the studies investigating behavioural therapies for TS, briefly describing each technique and assessing the evidence in order to determine which of these appear to be effective. Different behavioural therapies that were used included habit reversal training (HRT), massed negative practice, supportive psychotherapy, exposure with response prevention, self-monitoring, cognitive-behavioural therapy, relaxation therapy, assertiveness training, contingency management, a tension-reduction technique and biofeedback training. Overall, HRT is the best-studied and most widely-used technique and there is sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that it is an effective treatment. Most of the other treatments, however, require further investigation to evaluate their efficacy. Specifically, evidence suggests that exposure with response prevention and self-monitoring are effective, and more research is needed to determine the therapeutic value of the other treatments. As most of the studies investigating behavioural treatments for TS are small-sample or single-case studies, larger randomised controlled trials are advocated.

  11. Development of an evidence-based review with recommendations using an online iterative process.

    PubMed

    Rudmik, Luke; Smith, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    The practice of modern medicine is governed by evidence-based principles. Due to the plethora of medical literature, clinicians often rely on systematic reviews and clinical guidelines to summarize the evidence and provide best practices. Implementation of an evidence-based clinical approach can minimize variation in health care delivery and optimize the quality of patient care. This article reports a method for developing an "Evidence-based Review with Recommendations" using an online iterative process. The manuscript describes the following steps involved in this process: Clinical topic selection, Evidence-hased review assignment, Literature review and initial manuscript preparation, Iterative review process with author selection, and Manuscript finalization. The goal of this article is to improve efficiency and increase the production of evidence-based reviews while maintaining the high quality and transparency associated with the rigorous methodology utilized for clinical guideline development. With the rise of evidence-based medicine, most medical and surgical specialties have an abundance of clinical topics which would benefit from a formal evidence-based review. Although clinical guideline development is an important methodology, the associated challenges limit development to only the absolute highest priority clinical topics. As outlined in this article, the online iterative approach to the development of an Evidence-based Review with Recommendations may improve productivity without compromising the quality associated with formal guideline development methodology. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  12. Postprostatectomy radiation therapy: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mark V; Champ, Colin E; Den, Robert B; Scher, Eli D; Shen, Xinglei; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Lallas, Costas D; Knudsen, Karen E; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-12-01

    While the majority of men with localized prostate cancer who undergo a radical prostatectomy will remain disease free, men with certain clinical and pathological features are known to be at an increased risk for developing a biochemical recurrence and, ultimately, distant metastatic disease. The optimal management of these patients continues to be a source of controversy. To date, three randomized Phase III trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for patients with certain adverse pathological features results in an improvement in several clinically-relevant end points, including biochemical recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Despite the evidence from these trials showing a benefit for ART, many believe that ART results in overtreatment and unwarranted treatment morbidity for a significant number of patients. Many physicians, therefore, instead advocate for close observation followed by early salvage radiation therapy (SRT) at the time of a biochemical recurrence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence for and to distinguish between ART and early SRT. We will also highlight current and future areas of research for this patient population, including radiation treatment dose escalation, hypofractionation and androgen deprivation therapy. We will also discuss the cost-effectiveness of ART and early SRT.

  13. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Marieke; Hesselink, Gijs; Geense, Wytske; Vincent, Charles; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October 2015. Study selection English-language systematic reviews of interventions aimed at reducing adverse events in hospitals, including studies with an experimental design and reporting adverse event rates, were included. Two reviewers independently assessed each study's quality and extracted data on the study population, study design, intervention characteristics and adverse patient outcomes. Results Sixty systematic reviews with moderate to high quality were included. Statistically significant pooled effect sizes were found for 14 types of interventions, including: (1) multicomponent interventions to prevent delirium; (2) rapid response teams to reduce cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality rates; (3) pharmacist interventions to reduce adverse drug events; (4) exercises and multicomponent interventions to prevent falls; and (5) care bundle interventions, checklists and reminders to reduce infections. Most (82%) of the significant effect sizes were based on 5 or fewer primary studies with an experimental study design. Conclusions The evidence for patient-safety interventions implemented in hospitals worldwide is weak. The findings address the need to invest in high-quality research standards in order to identify interventions that have a real impact on patient safety. Interventions to prevent delirium, cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality, adverse drug events, infections and falls are most effective and should therefore be prioritised by clinicians. PMID:27687901

  14. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  15. Reservoir triggering seismicity in Greece: An evidence based review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlou, Kyriaki; Drakatos, George; Kouskouna, Vasiliki; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    First filling and water fluctuation in artificial lakes and reservoirs are known causes of local seismicity. In Greece, 117 dams were built over the past 60 years, of which, however, only 22 have a capacity greater than 20x206cm3 and could thus affect seismicity in a meaningful way. Most of these larger dams have been constructed and operated by the Greek Public Power Corporation (PPC). The paper aims at a comprehensive review of all relevant studies, undertaken so far, and critically examines the evidence of reservoir triggering seismicity and possible accelerated earthquake occurrence provided. The main reservoirs examined include the Marathon, Kremasta, Pournari, Ilarion and Polyphyto artificial lakes, all of which have recorded seismic events associated with their filling and/or operation for the time period up to 2010. Seismic activity that correlates with maximum or minimum water level fluctuations leads to conclusions about a possible triggering seismicity due to a pore pressure diffusion (drained or un-drained response). In each case we review the cross-correlation coefficients between the reservoir levels and triggered events, and discuss the reasons for their association from an engineering geological (mechanical properties of rocks and formations) and seismological (triggered events) perspective. Our work suggests that, whilst in these cases PCC performs very well the task of hydrological and energy management of the reservoirs, it is crucially important to monitor and validate the daily seismicity at and around the artificial lakes for a better understanding of the upmost limit of triggered seismicity, and possible triggered landslides in the areas surrounding its main reservoirs.

  16. Antioxidant supplements and semen parameters: An evidence based review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Sedigheh; Bashiri, Reihane; Ghadiri-Anari, Akram; Nadjarzadeh, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on male infertility. There is limited evidence about the influence of nutrition on quality of semen. Approximately, 30-80% of infertility cases are caused by oxidative stress and decreased level of seminal total antioxidant capacity. This study was aimed to review the effects of oral antioxidant supplements on improving major semen parameters such as sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA damage, and fertility rate. Data were extracted from PubMed and Google scholar database by using the terms “antioxidant”, “multivitamin”, “carnitine”, “CoQ10”, “vitamin C”, “vitamin E”, “zinc”, “folic acid”, “N-acetyl cysteine” and “selenium” combined with “male infertility”, “semen”, and “sperm” to generate a set of relevant citations. Supplements such as CoQ10 and alpha-tocopherol significantly improve sperm count. Also, carnitine has positive effects on sperm motility and morphology. Simultaneous administration of vitamin E and vitamin C reduces the sperm DNA damage. However, in some studies, one or more factors have not changed substantially. In most of the studies, antioxidant supplementation improved the number, motility, morphology and sometimes DNA integrity of sperm. The present study showed that antioxidant supplements, especially a combination of antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and CoQ10 intake can effectively improve semen parameters in infertile men. PMID:28066832

  17. Levodopa for idiopathic restless legs syndrome: evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Conti, Cristiane Fiquene; de Oliveira, Márcio Moysés; Andriolo, Regis Bruni; Saconato, Humberto; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib; Valbuza, Juliana Spelta; Coin de Carvalho, Luciane Bizari; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2007-10-15

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensory motor disorder characterized by a distressing urge to move the legs and sometimes also other parts of the body usually accompanied by a marked sense of discomfort or pain in the leg or other affected body part. The prevalence of RLS is estimated at 2.7 to 5% of adults and it is more common in women. The treatment of RLS with levodopa has been reported thus a systematic synthesis of evidence is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of levodopa for RLS. Systematic review of randomized or quasi-randomized, double blind trials on levodopa. Relief of restless legs symptoms marked on a validated scale, subjective sleep quality, sleep quality measured by night polysomnography and actigraphy, quality of life measured by subjective measures, adverse events associated with the treatments. Nine eligible clinical trials were included. The subjective analyses of these studies showed contradictory results, although the objective analyses showed that treatment group had a statistically significant improvement of periodic leg movement (PLM) index, favoring the treatment group. The most commonly adverse event seen was gastrointestinal symptoms. The short-term treatment with levodopa was demonstrated effective and safety for PLM, but there was only few trials assessing long-term treatment and the augmentation phenomenon in RLS. Further long-term randomized controlled trials using standard follow-up measurements as the International RLS Study Group Rating Scale are necessary.

  18. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercises on Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Rebecca J.; Strand, Edythe; Lof, Gregory L.; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the current evidence for the use of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech (i.e., speech physiology, speech production, and functional speech outcomes) as a means of supporting further research and clinicians' use of evidence-based practice. Method: The peer-reviewed literature from 1960…

  19. Commissioning Pharmacological Treatments for Drug Users: A Brief Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, Jenny; Oliver, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To provide a brief review of relevant existing evidence regarding pharmacological treatment for drug users, in order to enable commissioners and service providers to make informed decisions that are evidence based wherever possible. Methods: The review process involved an examination of key reference texts and literature derived from…

  20. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercises on Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Rebecca J.; Strand, Edythe; Lof, Gregory L.; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the current evidence for the use of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech (i.e., speech physiology, speech production, and functional speech outcomes) as a means of supporting further research and clinicians' use of evidence-based practice. Method: The peer-reviewed literature from 1960…

  1. Plantar fasciitis: evidence-based review of diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cole, Charles; Seto, Craig; Gazewood, John

    2005-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis causes heel pain in active as well as sedentary adults of all ages. The condition is more likely to occur in persons who are obese or in those who are on their feet most of the day. A diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is based on the patient's history and physical findings. The accuracy of radiologic studies in diagnosing plantar heel pain is unknown. Most interventions used to manage plantar fasciitis have not been studied adequately; however, shoe inserts, stretching exercises, steroid injection, and custom-made night splints may be beneficial. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy may effectively treat runners with chronic heel pain but is ineffective in other patients. Limited evidence suggests that casting or surgery may be beneficial when conservative measures fail.

  2. Treatment of cutaneous warts: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Dall'oglio, Federica; D'Amico, Valentina; Nasca, Maria R; Micali, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Cutaneous warts are common skin lesions caused by human papillomavirus infection. Treatment is aimed at relieving the patient's physical and psychological discomfort and at preventing the spread of infection by autoinoculation. Among the available medical and destructive therapeutic options for cutaneous warts, none is uniformly effective or virucidal. Moreover, in most cases their safety and efficacy has not been assessed in double-blind, controlled clinical trials, so that the reproducibility of many of the listed treatments is difficult to evaluate and a possible placebo effect cannot be ruled out. The aim of this article is to describe the outcome of current therapies for each clinical wart type according to evidence-based medicine studies published in the literature. For each clinical form, the existing treatments are classified as first-, second-, and third-line therapy. First-line therapy includes medical treatments (salicylic acid, silver nitrate, glutaraldehyde) that are useful to treat a single wart or a few and/or small common warts of short duration (less than 1 year). If these treatments have failed or are contraindicated, cryotherapy may be considered as second-line therapy. For recurrent or difficult-to-treat lesions, third-line therapy includes a variety of alternative therapeutic options (topical, intralesional, systemic, and physical destruction) that are generally off-label (not US FDA approved), and whose use is limited by drawbacks or adverse effects. From pooled evidence-based medicine data, it is possible to conclude that significantly higher remission rates may be expected only with cryotherapy and salicylic acid used in combination.

  3. Fever of unknown origin: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ramasamy, Balaji; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi H

    2012-10-01

    Fever is a common problem for which patients seek medical advice. Fortunately, in most cases, fever is self-limiting or the etiology of fever is promptly established. Sustained, unexplained fever despite a comprehensive work up is recognized as fever of unknown origin (FUO), which frequently poses a clinical challenge. For a methodical approach, FUO is recently categorized into classic FUO, nosocomial FUO, neutropenic FUO and HIV-associated FUO based on the clinical setting and patient's underlying immune status. This review focuses on the key factors of classic FUO. The etiologic clues obtainable from the history, bedside physical examination findings and pertinent laboratory tests are discussed. Also, FUO in older patients and tuberculosis as a cause of FUO are briefly discussed.

  4. A Review of the Evidence Base of Functional Assessment-Based Interventions for Young Students Using One Systematic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Brenna K.; Oakes, Wendy Peia; Fettig, Angel; Lane, Kathleen Lynne

    2015-01-01

    This review of the literature was conducted to explore the evidence base for functional assessment-based interventions (FABIs) for one systematic approach developed by Umbreit, Ferro, Liaupsin, and Lane (2007). Specifically, this review examined the evidence base for this systematic approach to FABI for young students by applying quality…

  5. [Dyslipidaemia and vascular risk. A new evidence based review].

    PubMed

    Pallarés-Carratalá, V; Pascual-Fuster, V; Godoy-Rocatí, D

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is one of the major risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Early detection and therapeutic intervention are key elements in the adequate prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is essential to have knowledge of the therapeutic arsenal available for their appropriate use in each of the clinical situations that might be presented in our patients. In the past 3 years, there has been a proliferation of multiple guidelines for the clinical management of patients with dyslipidaemia, with apparent contradictory messages regarding the achievement of the control objectives, which are confusing clinicians. This review aims to provide an updated overview of the situation as regards dyslipidaemia, based on the positioning of both European and American guidelines, through different risk situations and ending with the concept of atherogenic dyslipidaemia as a recognized cardiovascular risk factor. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Naturally Occurring Wound Healing Agents: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Karapanagioti, E G; Assimopoulou, A N

    2016-01-01

    Nature constitutes a pool of medicines for thousands of years. Nowadays, trust in nature is increasingly growing, as many effective medicines are naturally derived. Over the last decades, the potential of plants as wound healing agents is being investigated. Wounds and ulcers affect the patients' life quality and often lead to amputations. Approximately 43,000,000 patients suffer from diabetic foot ulcers worldwide. Annually, $25 billion are expended for the treatment of chronic wounds, with the number growing due to aging population and increased incidents of diabetes and obesity. Therefore a timely, orderly and effective wound management and treatment is crucial. This paper aims to systematically review natural products, mainly plants, with scientifically well documented wound healing activity, focusing on articles based on animal and clinical studies performed worldwide and approved medicinal products. Moreover, a brief description of the wound healing mechanism is presented, to provide a better understanding. Although a plethora of natural products are in vitro and in vivo evaluated for wound healing activity, only a few go through clinical trials and even fewer launch the market as approved medicines. Most of them rely on traditional medicine, indicating that ethnopharmacology is a successful strategy for drug development. Since only 6% of plants have been systematically investigated pharmacologically, more intensified efforts and emerging advancements are needed to exploit the potentials of nature for the development of novel medicines. This paper aims to provide a reliable database and matrix for thorough further investigation towards the discovery of wound healing agents.

  7. Towards Evidence-Based Initial Teacher Education in Singapore: A Review of Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Ee-Ling; Hui, Chenri; Taylor, Peter G.; Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Initial teacher education (ITE) in Singapore is shifting towards evidence-based practice. Despite a clear policy orientation, ITE in Singapore has not yet produced the evidence base that it is anticipating. This paper presents an analytical review of previous research into ITE in Singapore and makes comparisons to the larger international context.…

  8. An evidence-based systematic review of Aloe vera by the natural standard research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Armstrong, Jennifer; Basch, Ethan; Basch, Samuel; Bent, Steve; Dacey, Cynthia; Dalton, Sean; Foppa, Ivo; Giese, Nicole; Hammerness, Paul; Kirkwood, Catherine; Sollars, David; Tanguay-Colucci, Shaina; Weissner, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  9. Evidence-based systematic review of saw palmetto by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Basch, Ethan; Bent, Steve; Boon, Heather; Corrado, Michelle; Foppa, Ivo; Hashmi, Sadaf; Hammerness, Paul; Kingsbury, Eileen; Smith, Michael; Szapary, Philippe; Vora, Mamta; Weissner, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Here presented is an evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  10. Marigold (Calendula officinalis L.): an evidence-based systematic review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Bent, Steve; Foppa, Ivo; Haskmi, Sadaf; Kroll, David; Mele, Michelle; Szapary, Philippe; Ulbricht, Catherine; Vora, Mamta; Yong, Sophanna

    2006-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology and dosing.

  11. Peppermint (Mentha piperita): an evidence-based systematic review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Keifer, David; Ulbricht, Catherine; Abrams, Tracee Rae; Basch, Ethan; Giese, Nicole; Giles, Mary; DeFranco Kirkwood, Catherine; Miranda, Michelle; Woods, Jen

    2007-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology and dosing.

  12. An evidence-based systematic review of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Basch, Ethan; Basch, Samuel; Bent, Steve; Boon, Heather; Burke, Dilys; Costa, Dawn; Falkson, Carla; Giese, Nicole; Goble, Michael; Hashmi, Sadaf; Mukarjee, Siddhartta; Papaliodis, George; Seamon, Erica; Tanguay-Colucci, Shaina; Weissner, Wendy; Woods, Jen

    2009-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  13. An evidence-based systematic review of spearmint by the natural standard research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Costa, Dawn; M Grimes Serrano, Jill; Guilford, Jacquelyn; Isaac, Richard; Seamon, Erica; Varghese, Minney

    2010-06-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of spearmint (Mentha spicata, Mentha viridis) including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  14. Agave (Agave americana): an evidence-based systematic review by the natural standard research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hackman, Dana A; Giese, Nicole; Markowitz, John S; McLean, Adam; Ottariano, Steven G; Tonelli, Chris; Weissner, Wendy; Welch, Shannon; Ulbricht, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  15. Evidence-based practice in health education and promotion: a review and introduction to resources.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth K; Alpi, Kristine M; Auerbach, Marilyn

    2010-05-01

    This review examines evidence-based practice (EBP) in health education and promotion with a focus on how academically trained health educators develop EBP skills and how health education and promotion practitioners access the literature to inform their activities. Competencies and credentialing in health education related to evidence-based practice are outlined and sources for evidence-based practice literature in health education and promotion are described. An exploratory questionnaire to consider teaching and resources in evidence-based practice was distributed to faculty and librarians from the top 10 ranked health education doctoral programs. Findings highlighted the integral value of EBP instruction to the curriculum. Growth opportunities in evidence-based health education and health promotion for instructors, practitioners, and librarians include promotion and expansion of online evidence-based public health resources to close the evidence-practice gap.

  16. Robotics in general surgery: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Baek, Se-Jin; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2014-05-01

    Since its introduction, robotic surgery has been rapidly adopted to the extent that it has already assumed an important position in the field of general surgery. This rapid progress is quantitative as well as qualitative. In this review, we focus on the relatively common procedures to which robotic surgery has been applied in several fields of general surgery, including gastric, colorectal, hepato-biliary-pancreatic, and endocrine surgery, and we discuss the results to date and future possibilities. In addition, the advantages and limitations of the current robotic system are reviewed, and the advanced technologies and instruments to be applied in the near future are introduced. Such progress is expected to facilitate the widespread introduction of robotic surgery in additional fields and to solve existing problems.

  17. Method for the evidence-based reviews on occupational therapy and stroke.

    PubMed

    Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah; Berlanstein, Debra R

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based reviews of the literature relevant to adults with stroke are important to the practice of occupational therapy. We describe the four questions that served as the focus for the evidence-based reviews of the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for adults with stroke. The questions include occupation- and activity-based interventions to improve occupational performance and social participation after stroke, as well as interventions for motor, cognitive, and psychological and emotional impairments after stroke. We include the background for the reviews; the process followed for addressing each question, including search terms and search strategy; the databases searched; and the methods used to summarize and critically appraise the literature. The final number of articles included in each evidence-based review; a summary of the themes of the results; the strengths and limitations of the findings; and implications for practice, education, and research are presented. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. Treatment of hypertension in athletes: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Chad

    2010-04-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular condition in adults. It is also very common in athletes. When lifestyle changes fail, medications may be needed for the treatment of hypertension. When choosing a drug for antihypertensive therapy, providers should choose an agent that has favorable effects on blood pressure and minimal detrimental hemodynamic change during exercise. Evidence supports that the medications with the most favorable effects are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, alpha-blockers, and cardiac-selective beta-blockers. The effects of diuretics are less desirable, and nonselective beta-blockers should be a last choice for hypertensive patients who are physically active.

  19. Social Workers' Attitudes toward Peer-Reviewed Literature: The Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Social workers from one state chapter of the National Association of Social Workers were surveyed to assess their use of and attitudes toward the peer-reviewed literature and their engagement in evidence-based practice. Results reveal that, in general, the practitioners in this study did not read the peer-reviewed literature, particularly articles…

  20. Social Workers' Attitudes toward Peer-Reviewed Literature: The Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Social workers from one state chapter of the National Association of Social Workers were surveyed to assess their use of and attitudes toward the peer-reviewed literature and their engagement in evidence-based practice. Results reveal that, in general, the practitioners in this study did not read the peer-reviewed literature, particularly articles…

  1. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: an evidence-based narrative review.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, M; Carvalho, B

    2016-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.

  2. Strawberry as a functional food: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arpita; Nguyen, Angel; Betts, Nancy M; Lyons, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research provides substantial evidence to classify strawberries as a functional food with several preventive and therapeutic health benefits. Strawberries, a rich source of phytochemicals (ellagic acid, anthocyanins, quercetin, and catechin) and vitamins (ascorbic acid and folic acid), have been highly ranked among dietary sources of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. It should however be noted that these bioactive factors can be significantly affected by differences in strawberry cultivars, agricultural practices, storage, and processing methods: freezing versus dry heat has been associated with maximum retention of strawberry bioactives in several studies. Nutritional epidemiology shows inverse association between strawberry consumption and incidence of hypertension or serum C-reactive protein; controlled feeding studies have identified the ability of strawberries to attenuate high-fat diet induced postprandial oxidative stress and inflammation, or postprandial hyperglycemia, or hyperlipidemia in subjects with cardiovascular risk factors. Mechanistic studies have elucidated specific biochemical pathways that might confer these protective effects of strawberries: upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, downregulation of NF-kB activity and subsequent inflammation, or inhibitions of carbohydrate digestive enzymes. These health effects may be attributed to the synergistic effects of nutrients and phytochemicals in strawberries. Further studies are needed to define the optimal dose and duration of strawberry intake in affecting levels of biomarkers or pathways related to chronic diseases.

  3. Developing primary care review criteria from evidence-based guidelines: coronary heart disease as a model.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Allen; McIntosh, Aileen; Anderson, Jeff; Gilbert, Claire; Field, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: National Health Service (NHS) initiatives such as Clinical Governance, National Service Frameworks and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) clinical guidelines programme create demand for tools to enable performance review by healthcare professionals. Ideally such tools should enable clinical teams to assess quality of care and highlight areas of good practice or where improvement is needed. They should also be able to be used to demonstrate progress towards goals and promote quality, while not unnecessarily increasing demand on limited resources or weakening professional control. AIM: To formulate and evaluate a method for developing, from clinical guidelines, evidence-based review criteria that are proritised, useful and relevant to general practices assessing quality of care for the primary care management of coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGN OF STUDY: A two-stage study comprising, first, a review of available evidence-based guidelines for CHD and, second, the definition and prioritization of associated review criteria from the most highly rated guidelines. SETTING: Primary healthcare teams in England. METHODS: Using structured methods, evidence-based clinical guidelines for CHD were identified and appraised to ensure their suitability as the basis for developing review criteria. Recommendations common to a number of guidelines were priortszid by a panel of general practitioners to develop review criteria suitable for use in primary care. RESULTS: A standardised method has been developed for constructing evidence-based review criteria from clinical guidelines. A limited, prioritized set of review criteria was developed for the primary care management of CHD. This was distributed around the NHS through the Royal College of General Practitioners for use by primary care teams across the United Kingdom. CONCLUSION: Developing useful, evidence-based review criteria is not a straightforward process, partly because of a lack of

  4. Oral therapy for onychomycosis: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Daniel Coelho; Lamas, Ana Paula Botto; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-02-01

    Onychomycosis is a very common fungal infection of the nail apparatus; however, it is very hard to treat, even when the causative agent is identified, and usually requires prolonged systemic antifungal therapy. Until the 1990s, oral treatment options included only griseofulvin and ketoconazole, and the cure rate was very low. New generations of antimycotics, such as fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine have improved treatment success. Literature was identified by performing a PubMed Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) search. Prospective and randomized clinical trials were chosen to be included in this review. Forty-six trials were included. Fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine are effective in the treatment of onychomycosis and have a good safety profile. When a dermatophyte is the pathogen, terbinafine produces the best results. For Candida and nondermatophyte infections, the azoles, mainly itraconazole, are the recommended therapy. In the majority of the studies, terbinafine treatment showed a higher cure ratio than the other drugs for dermatophyte onychomycosis.

  5. Selection for Surgical Training: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Schaverien, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    The predictive relationship between candidate selection criteria for surgical training programs and future performance during and at the completion of training has been investigated for several surgical specialties, however there is no interspecialty agreement regarding which selection criteria should be used. Better understanding the predictive reliability between factors at selection and future performance may help to optimize the process and lead to greater standardization of the surgical selection process. PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases were searched. Over 560 potentially relevant publications were identified using the search strategy and screened using the Cochrane Collaboration Data Extraction and Assessment Template. 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several selection criteria used in the traditional selection demonstrated inconsistent correlation with subsequent performance during and at the end of surgical training. The following selection criteria, however, demonstrated good predictive relationships with subsequent resident performance: USMLE examination scores, Letters of Recommendation (LOR) including the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), academic performance during clinical clerkships, the interview process, displaying excellence in extracurricular activities, and the use of unadjusted rank lists. This systematic review supports that the current selection process needs to be further evaluated and improved. Multicenter studies using standardized outcome measures of success are now required to improve the reliability of the selection process to select the best trainees. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Atypical Facial Pain: a Comprehensive, Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Austin L; Ehrhardt, Ken P; Tolba, Reda

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to focus on an excruciating disorder of the face, named atypical facial pain or persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP). It is considered an underdiagnosed condition with limited treatment options. Facial pain can be a debilitating disorder that affects patients' quality of life. Up to 26% of the general population has suffered from facial pain at some point in their lives. It is important to highlight the different types of facial pain to be able to properly manage this condition accordingly. Newer interventional modalities such as pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PFR) of the sphenopalatine ganglion, peripheral nerve field stimulators (PNFS), and botulinum toxin injections have promising results. In summary, more prospective studies such as randomized controlled trials are necessary to explore the possibility of their more widespread use as viable procedures for the treatment of PIFP. In this review article, we describe the workup and diagnosis of PIFP and highlight recent literature regarding the pathophysiology and treatment of PIFP. PIFP is an excruciating disorder of the face often misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia (TN) However, unlike TN symptoms, the pain is persistent rather than intermittent, usually unilateral, and without autonomic signs or symptoms. When a clinician encounters a patient with neuropathic facial pain whose symptoms are incongruent with the more common etiologies, the diagnosis of atypical facial pain must be entertained. Treatment of PIFP is multidisciplinary. Unfortunately, few randomized controlled trials for the treatment of PIFP exist. However, there are a select number of pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and interventional treatment options that have proven to be moderately effective.

  7. Community-based health insurance in low-income countries: a systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Björn

    2004-09-01

    Health policy makers are faced with competing alternatives, and for systems of health care financing. The choice of financing method should mobilize resources for health care and provide financial protection. This review systematically assesses the evidence of the extent to which community-based health insurance is a viable option for low-income countries in mobilizing resources and providing financial protection. The review contributes to the literature on health financing by extending and qualifying existing knowledge. Overall, the evidence base is limited in scope and questionable in quality. There is strong evidence that community-based health insurance provides some financial protection by reducing out-of-pocket spending. There is evidence of moderate strength that such schemes improve cost-recovery. There is weak or no evidence that schemes have an effect on the quality of care or the efficiency with which care is produced. In absolute terms, the effects are small and schemes serve only a limited section of the population. The main policy implication of the review is that these types of community financing arrangements are, at best, complementary to other more effective systems of health financing. To improve reliability and validity of the evidence base, analysts should agree on a more coherent set of outcome indicators and a more consistent assessment of these indicators. Policy makers need to be better informed as to both the costs and the benefits of implementing various financing options. The current evidence base on community-based health insurance is mute on this point.

  8. Methodology for lung cancer evidence review and guideline development: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd Edition).

    PubMed

    McCrory, Douglas C; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Heitzer, Julia; Colice, Gene; Alberts, W Michael

    2007-09-01

    To assemble a geographically diverse panel of experts in the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, representative of multiple clinical specialties, with the intention of developing clinically relevant practice guidelines for chest medicine and primary care physicians, including recommendations covering the full spectrum of care of the patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The Duke University Center for Clinical Health Policy Research was selected to review and summarize the current evidence in the treatment of NSCLC. The BlueCross BlueShield Association Technology Evaluation Center was chosen and funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to review and synthesize the current evidence on treatment of SCLC. Other chapters received existing guidelines, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses that were published since the first edition of these guidelines, as collected by the Duke University Evidence-based Practice Center. The writing committees for these chapters conducted searches for the primary articles and additional evidence in their topic area. The expert panel established clinical recommendations founded on the synthesis of this evidence. This section describes the approach used to develop the guidelines, including identifying, evaluating, and synthesizing the evidence, assessing the strength of evidence and grading the individual recommendations, and suggestions for implementation of the guidelines.

  9. The systematic review of the literature: a tool for evidence-based policy.

    PubMed

    Houde, Susan Crocker

    2009-09-01

    The systematic review of the literature is a valuable tool for gerontological nurses to influence policy decisions. There are several organizations that provide helpful guidelines for the conduct of systematic reviews of the literature, including the Cochrane Collaboration, the Joanna Briggs Institute, and the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information Co-Ordinating Centre at the Institute of Education, University of London. Gerontological nurses who have a strong foundation in research methodology and the skills to synthesize scientific evidence for the purpose of promoting evidence-based policy have the potential to positively influence health care outcomes for older adults. For nurses to assume a leadership role in synthesizing scientific evidence for evidence-based policy development and refinement, nursing education will need to assume a more active role in teaching systematic review methodology. This article presents an overview of resources for con-ducting systematic reviews of the literature and discusses the use of the systematic review as a tool for evidence-based policy.

  10. Evidence-based practice: how to perform and use systematic reviews for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Kranke, Peter

    2010-09-01

    One approach to clinical decision-making requires the integration of the best available research evidence with individual clinical expertise and patient values, and is known as evidence-based medicine (EBM). In clinical decision-making with the current best evidence, systematic reviews have an important role. This review article covers the basic principles of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and their role in the process of evidence-based decision-making. The problems associated with traditional narrative reviews are discussed, as well as the way systematic reviews limit bias associated with the assembly, critical appraisal and synthesis of studies addressing specific clinical questions. The relevant steps in writing a systematic review from the formulation of an initial research question to sensitivity analyses in conjunction with the combined analysis of the pooled data are described. Important issues that need to be considered when appraising a systematic review or meta-analysis are outlined. Some of the terms that are used in the reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, such as relative risk, confidence interval, Forest plot or L'Abbé plot, will be introduced and explained.

  11. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer disease: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R

    2003-05-01

    monitoring symptomatic progression in groups of patients with AD for drug trials. Furthermore, antemortem MR-based hippocampal volumes correlate with the pathologic stage of AD, and the rate of hippocampal volume loss on MR imaging correlates with clinical disease progression in the cognitive continuum from normal aging to MCI and to AD. Hence, as an in vivo correlate of pathologic involvement, structural imaging measures are potential surrogate markers for disease progression in patients with established AD and in patients with prodromal AD, who will benefit most from disease-modifying therapies underway.

  12. Transtheoretical Model-Based Dietary Interventions in Primary Care: A Review of the Evidence in Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela, Sanna; Poskiparta, Marita; Kasila, Kirsti; Vahasarja, Kati; Vanhala, Mauno

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence concerning stage-based dietary interventions in primary care among persons with diabetes or an elevated diabetes risk. Search strategies were electronic databases and manual search. Selection criteria were randomized controlled studies with stage-based dietary intervention, conducted in…

  13. Transtheoretical Model-Based Dietary Interventions in Primary Care: A Review of the Evidence in Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela, Sanna; Poskiparta, Marita; Kasila, Kirsti; Vahasarja, Kati; Vanhala, Mauno

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence concerning stage-based dietary interventions in primary care among persons with diabetes or an elevated diabetes risk. Search strategies were electronic databases and manual search. Selection criteria were randomized controlled studies with stage-based dietary intervention, conducted in…

  14. Exploration and practice of methods and processes of evidence-based rapid review on peer review of WHO EML application.

    PubMed

    Li, Youping; Yu, Jiajie; Du, Liang; Sun, Xin; Kwong, Joey S W; Wu, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lu, Jing; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Lingli

    2015-11-01

    After 38 years of development, the procedure of selection and evaluation of the World Health Organization Essential Medicine List (WHO EML) is increasingly scientific and formal. However, peer review for the applications of World Health Organization Essential Medicine List is always required in a short period. It is necessary to build up a set of methods and processes for rapid review. We identified the process of evidenced-based rapid review on WHO EML application for peer reviews according to 11 items which were required during reporting of the peer review results of the proposals. The most important items for the rapid review of World Health Organization Essential Medicine List peer reviewers are (1) to confirm the requirements and identify the purposes; (2) to establish the research questions and translate the questions into the 'Participants, Interventions, Comparators, Outcomes, Study design' (PICOS) format; (3) to search and screen available evidence, for which high-level evidence is preferred, such as systematic reviews or meta-analyses, health technology assessment, clinical guidelines; (4) to extract data, where we extract primary information based on the purposes; (5) to synthesize data by qualitative methods, assess the quality of evidence, and compare the results; (6) to provide the answers to the applications, quality of evidences and strength of recommendations. Our study established a set of methods and processes for the rapid review of World Health Organization Essential Medicine List peer review, and our findings were used to guide the reviewers to fulfill the 19(th) World Health Organization Essential Medicine List peer review. The methods and processes were feasible and met the necessary requirements in terms of time and quality. Continuous improvement and evaluation in practice are warranted. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Treacher Collins Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Evidence-Based Treatment and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Raul G; van Lieshout, Manouk J S; Joosten, Koen F M; Wolvius, Eppo B; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Versnel, Sarah L; Poublon, René M L; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2016-01-01

    No reviews or guidelines are available on evidence-based treatment for the multidisciplinary approach in Treacher Collins syndrome. The authors' aim is to provide an evidence-based review of multidisciplinary treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome based on levels of evidence and supported with graded recommendations. A systematic search was performed by means of the PubMed, Web-of-Science, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases (1985 to January of 2014). Included were clinical studies (with five or more Treacher Collins syndrome patients) related to therapy, diagnosis, or risk of concomitant diseases. Level of evidence of the selected articles was rated according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. After two panelists had reviewed each abstract separately, a consensus method was used to solve any disagreements concerning article inclusion. Of the 2433 identified articles, 63 studies (Level of Evidence II through V) were included. Conclusions and recommendations were extracted consecutively for the following items: upper airway; ear, hearing, and speech; the eye, eyelashes, and lacrimal system; growth, feeding, and swallowing; the nose; psychosocial factors; and craniofacial reconstruction. In this systematic review, current evidence for the multidisciplinary treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome is provided, recommendations for treatment are made, and a proposed algorithm for treatment is presented. Although some topics are well supported, others, especially ocular, nasal, speech, feeding, and swallowing problems, lack sufficient evidence. In addition, craniofacial surgical reconstruction lacks a sufficient level of evidence to provide a sound basis for a full treatment protocol. Despite the rarity of the syndrome, more research is needed to compare outcomes of several surgical treatments, especially in orbitozygomatic/maxillary regions.

  16. What Are the Effects of Teaching Evidence-Based Health Care (EBHC)? Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Young, Taryn; Rohwer, Anke; Volmink, Jimmy; Clarke, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background An evidence-based approach to health care is recognized internationally as a key competency for healthcare practitioners. This overview systematically evaluated and organized evidence from systematic reviews on teaching evidence-based health care (EBHC). Methods/Findings We searched for systematic reviews evaluating interventions for teaching EBHC to health professionals compared to no intervention or different strategies. Outcomes covered EBHC knowledge, skills, attitudes, practices and health outcomes. Comprehensive searches were conducted in April 2013. Two reviewers independently selected eligible reviews, extracted data and evaluated methodological quality. We included 16 systematic reviews, published between 1993 and 2013. There was considerable overlap across reviews. We found that 171 source studies included in the reviews related to 81 separate studies, of which 37 are in more than one review. Studies used various methodologies to evaluate educational interventions of varying content, format and duration in undergraduates, interns, residents and practicing health professionals. The evidence in the reviews showed that multifaceted, clinically integrated interventions, with assessment, led to improvements in knowledge, skills and attitudes. Interventions improved critical appraisal skills and integration of results into decisions, and improved knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour amongst practicing health professionals. Considering single interventions, EBHC knowledge and attitude were similar for lecture-based versus online teaching. Journal clubs appeared to increase clinical epidemiology and biostatistics knowledge and reading behavior, but not appraisal skills. EBHC courses improved appraisal skills and knowledge. Amongst practicing health professionals, interactive online courses with guided critical appraisal showed significant increase in knowledge and appraisal skills. A short workshop using problem-based approaches, compared to no

  17. What are the effects of teaching evidence-based health care (EBHC)? Overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Young, Taryn; Rohwer, Anke; Volmink, Jimmy; Clarke, Mike

    2014-01-01

    An evidence-based approach to health care is recognized internationally as a key competency for healthcare practitioners. This overview systematically evaluated and organized evidence from systematic reviews on teaching evidence-based health care (EBHC). We searched for systematic reviews evaluating interventions for teaching EBHC to health professionals compared to no intervention or different strategies. Outcomes covered EBHC knowledge, skills, attitudes, practices and health outcomes. Comprehensive searches were conducted in April 2013. Two reviewers independently selected eligible reviews, extracted data and evaluated methodological quality. We included 16 systematic reviews, published between 1993 and 2013. There was considerable overlap across reviews. We found that 171 source studies included in the reviews related to 81 separate studies, of which 37 are in more than one review. Studies used various methodologies to evaluate educational interventions of varying content, format and duration in undergraduates, interns, residents and practicing health professionals. The evidence in the reviews showed that multifaceted, clinically integrated interventions, with assessment, led to improvements in knowledge, skills and attitudes. Interventions improved critical appraisal skills and integration of results into decisions, and improved knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour amongst practicing health professionals. Considering single interventions, EBHC knowledge and attitude were similar for lecture-based versus online teaching. Journal clubs appeared to increase clinical epidemiology and biostatistics knowledge and reading behavior, but not appraisal skills. EBHC courses improved appraisal skills and knowledge. Amongst practicing health professionals, interactive online courses with guided critical appraisal showed significant increase in knowledge and appraisal skills. A short workshop using problem-based approaches, compared to no intervention, increased

  18. A Systematic, Multi-domain Review of Mobile Smartphone Apps for Evidence-Based Stress Management.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Sandra M; Monroe, Courtney M; West, Delia S

    2016-07-01

    Chronic stress presents a growing, pervasive burden in healthcare, and mobile smartphone applications (apps) have the potential to deliver evidence-based stress management strategies. This review identified and evaluated stress management apps across domains of (1) evidence-based content; (2) transparency in app development; and (3) functionality of the app interface. The iOS App Store was systematically searched. Apps with descriptions indicating that they targeted the intended audience and included evidence-related terminology, at least one evidence-based stress management strategy, and behavior change components were downloaded and evaluated by two independent raters across the three domains of evidence-based content, transparency, and functionality. A total of 902 apps were identified based on 21 searches. Of these, 60 met study criteria and were downloaded and evaluated between April and June 2015. Twenty (33%) ultimately did not deliver an evidence-based strategy. Of the delivered strategies, the most common were mindfulness and meditation (73%) and diaphragmatic breathing (25%). On average, apps addressed half of the transparency criteria, and nearly all (85%) were acceptable across usability criteria. A total of 32 apps included both evidence-based content and exhibited no problems with usability or functionality; apps affiliated with a non-profit, research-engaged institution comprised 31% of these. This review evaluated 60 iOS apps for stress management across domains of evidence-based content, transparency, and functionality; these apps have the potential to effectively supplement medical care. Findings further indicate that a comprehensive, multi-domain approach can distinguish apps that use evidence-based strategies from those that do not. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Evidence-based practice: a deconstruction and postmodern critique: book review article.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter

    2005-03-01

    This paper discusses the significance of postmodernism for healthcare practice, specifically the discourse known as 'evidence-based practice'. It considers two texts, both of which present postmodern analyses of contemporary issues. One text presents a deconstruction of evidence-based practice in an attempt to reveal its 'true' nature, which is portrayed as one that does not respect research paradigms other than the randomised controlled trial, merely pays lip service to expertise and fails to connect with the real nature of clinical practice. The second text considers the accusation that absolute relativism implied by postmodern approaches may permit an 'anything goes' mentality and provide succour to those advocating unacceptable practices. A 'defence' of postmodernism in relation to the accusation that it encourages holocaust denial is used to consider further the nature and limitations of postmodern critiques of evidence-based practice. This review concludes that postmodernism fundamentally challenges the apparent 'objectivity' of evidence-based practice but it does not challenge the fundamental rules for acquiring and testing evidence. Rather it is the selection of questions to be asked and answered by evidence-based practice/practitioners that is the true limitation. This is the ground upon which fruitful argument can be had about the significance of evidence without undermining the requirement that there be evidence and standards to judge such evidence.

  20. Evidence-based evaluation of information: the centrality and limitations of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Järvholm, Bengt; Bohlin, Ingemar

    2014-03-01

    This introductory paper considers the value and limitations of the methodology of systematic reviews especially according to the evidence-based movement. It explains some terms and organisations producing systematic reviews. It also discusses controversies. The first concerns the criteria by which the quality of individual studies is assessed, the second the possible effects of the affiliation of some reviewers, and the third the value of formalisation of procedure (i.e. the tensions between formal tools and professional judgments). The article contrasts the evidence-based formalism with other formalisms as those by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. It discusses systematic reviews in social science where interventions are complex, difficult to blind, and depend on context. Systematic reviews in working life research are often focusing on prevention. The formal evidence-based process may devaluate or disregard findings from mechanistic and observational studies. Hence such reviews may falsely conclude that existing knowledge about the risk of the factor is limited or nonexistent.

  1. Evidence Based Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Social Phobia: A Critical Review of Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulbure, Bogdan T.; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social…

  2. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Nick; Kennedy, Eilis

    2011-01-01

    For many years psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapies have been considered to lack a credible evidence-base and have consistently failed to appear in lists of "empirically supported treatments." This study systematically reviews the research evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and young people.…

  3. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review of Goji (Lycium spp.) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Bryan, J Kathryn; Costa, Dawn; Culwell, Samantha; Giese, Nicole; Isaac, Richard; Nummy, Katie; Pham, Thien; Rapp, Cathleen; Rusie, Erica; Weissner, Wendy; Windsor, Regina C; Woods, Jen; Zhou, Sara

    2015-06-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of goji (Lycium spp.) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration consolidates the safety and efficacy data available in the scientific literature using a validated, reproducible grading rationale. This article includes written and statistical analysis of clinical trials, plus a compilation of expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  4. Post-wildfire seeding in forests of the western United States: An evidence-based review

    Treesearch

    Donna Peppin; Peter Z. Fule; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Jan L. Beyers; Molly E. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species. We conducted an evidence-based review to examine the effectiveness and effects of post-wildfire seeding treatments on soil stabilization, non-...

  5. Meta-synthesis and evidence-based health care--a method for systematic review.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Anne; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Jylhä, Virpi; Holopainen, Arja

    2013-12-01

    Even the systematic reviews of qualitative studies are discussed health literature, the significance of their results is not fully recognised in evidence-based practice. The aim of this article is to describe the systematic reviews of qualitative studies, metasynthesis and its process and consider the meaning of meta-synthesis in evidence-based practice. Meta-synthesis is a method for synthesising knowledge, for example, relating to service users' healthcare-related experiences and the factors that facilitate their involvement in their own care and commitment to a healthy lifestyle. This type of knowledge is needed in evidence-based practice. Meta-synthesis is a concept that includes several methodologies in synthesising qualitative research findings. This article focuses on meta-synthesis with meta-aggregation as a method for combining data from original studies. Following the principles of scientific rigour, systematic reviews synthesise the best available and critically appraised knowledge. The article describes the process and the role of systematic review of qualitative studies and discusses its significance for evidence-based practice when making clinical and administrative decisions, as well as more widely in social and political decision-making. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. A review of evidence-based strategies to retain graduate nurses in the profession.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Aimee W; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    The national nursing shortage is projected to increase over the next decade. The need exists to identify effective evidence-based strategies to retain new nurses in the profession. Findings from a systematic review of the literature revealed 6 articles that discussed effective retention strategies. There was consistency among the strategies, indicating that longer interventions increase retention and satisfaction.

  7. An evidence-based systematic review of kudzu (Pueraria lobata) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Costa, Dawn; Dam, Chi; D'Auria, Denise; Giese, Nicole; Isaac, Richard; LeBlanc, Yvonne; Rusie, Erica; Weissner, Wendy; Windsor, Regina C

    2015-03-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of kudzu (Pueraria lobata) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration consolidates the safety and efficacy data available in the scientific literature using a validated, reproducible grading rationale. This article includes written and statistical analysis of clinical trials, plus a compilation of expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  8. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Nick; Kennedy, Eilis

    2011-01-01

    For many years psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapies have been considered to lack a credible evidence-base and have consistently failed to appear in lists of "empirically supported treatments." This study systematically reviews the research evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and young people.…

  9. Identifying Evidence-Based Practices for Behavior: Analysis of Studies Reviewed by the What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoy, Adam Scott

    2017-01-01

    Prior concerns have been raised about the ability of schools to access evidence-based practices, however, these practices are instrumental for addressing behavior concerns. This is particularly true at the secondary level, where students are more likely to be disproportionately identified for school removal. This review investigates studies of…

  10. Evidence Based Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Social Phobia: A Critical Review of Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulbure, Bogdan T.; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social…

  11. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of the Empirical Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mel; Joy, Elyssa; Plath, Debbie; Webb, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The article reports on the findings of a review of empirical studies examining the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the human services. Eleven studies were located that defined EBP as a research-informed, clinical decision-making process and identified barriers and facilitators to EBP implementation. A thematic analysis of the…

  12. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of the Empirical Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mel; Joy, Elyssa; Plath, Debbie; Webb, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The article reports on the findings of a review of empirical studies examining the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the human services. Eleven studies were located that defined EBP as a research-informed, clinical decision-making process and identified barriers and facilitators to EBP implementation. A thematic analysis of the…

  13. Vocational intervention based on the Model of Human Occupation: a review of evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jenica; Kielhofner, Gary

    2010-09-01

    Work is a growing concern in disability and rehabilitation fields. Specific evidence related to occupational therapy in the area of vocational rehabilitation is somewhat limited. With increased demands for occupation-focused, evidence-based, and theory-informed practice, this review aims to use clinically relevant questions to organize and synthesize evidence regarding work-related interventions specifically related to an occupation-focused theory, the Model of Human Occupation. A total of 45 published works related to both the MOHO and vocational issues were identified and included in the review. The review demonstrates that there is a range of evidence that supports the use of the MOHO and its tools as a basis for work-based clinical interventions. Evidence supports the conclusion that MOHO-based work assessments have good psychometric properties and are useful in evaluating vocational potential and needs. MOHO-based work programs have been shown to have a positive impact in improving vocational outcomes to a range of clients.

  14. Computer-based cognitive training for ADHD: a review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Brandeis, Daniel; Holtmann, Martin; Cortese, Samuele

    2014-10-01

    There has been an increasing interest in and the use of computer-based cognitive training as a treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The authors' review of current evidence, based partly on a stringent meta-analysis of 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in 2013, and an overview of 8 recently published RCTs highlights the inconsistency of findings between trials and across blinded and nonblinded ADHD measures within trials. Based on this, they conclude that more evidence from well-blinded studies is required before cognitive training can be supported as a frontline treatment of core ADHD symptoms.

  15. Systematic Review and Evidence Integration for Literature-Based Environmental Health Science Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Boyles, Abee L.; Wolfe, Mary S.; Bucher, John R.; Thayer, Kristina A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Systematic-review methodologies provide objectivity and transparency to the process of collecting and synthesizing scientific evidence in reaching conclusions on specific research questions. There is increasing interest in applying these procedures to address environmental health questions. Objectives: The goal was to develop a systematic-review framework to address environmental health questions by extending approaches developed for clinical medicine to handle the breadth of data relevant to environmental health sciences (e.g., human, animal, and mechanistic studies). Methods: The Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) adapted guidance from authorities on systematic-review and sought advice during development of the OHAT Approach through consultation with technical experts in systematic review and human health assessments, as well as scientific advisory groups and the public. The method was refined by considering expert and public comments and through application to case studies. Results and Discussion: Here we present a seven-step framework for systematic review and evidence integration for reaching hazard identification conclusions: 1) problem formulation and protocol development, 2) search for and select studies for inclusion, 3) extract data from studies, 4) assess the quality or risk of bias of individual studies, 5) rate the confidence in the body of evidence, 6) translate the confidence ratings into levels of evidence, and 7) integrate the information from different evidence streams (human, animal, and “other relevant data” including mechanistic or in vitro studies) to develop hazard identification conclusions. Conclusion: The principles of systematic review can be successfully applied to environmental health questions to provide greater objectivity and transparency to the process of developing conclusions. Citation: Rooney AA, Boyles AL, Wolfe MS, Bucher JR, Thayer KA. 2014. Systematic review and evidence integration for

  16. Nurse-led elective cardioversion: an evidence-based practice review.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    By posing a clinical practice question, this article aims to document and explore the published evidence base supporting nurse-led cardioversion. A literature review was undertaken to determine the best evidence for practice. Five articles and two conference abstracts describing practice were found to be pertinent to the question. Description of the methodology used was a weakness of all the articles studied, with only one article purported to be framed as a research study. The remainder describe a planned change in nursing practice to encompass the delivery of a service previously, organizationally viewed as, physician led. Evaluations of practice were descriptive and supported by audit data in most articles, however, appropriate evidential comparisons were not offered. These articles were critically appraised in relation to safety and efficacy. Whilst the evidence may be seen to be limited and weak, it does add credence to the notion that a nurse with a suitable experiential background and knowledge base can make a significant contribution to the care of this group of patients. It is clearly evident that further developments in practice should be framed within a research context to support and strengthen the evidence base. Four prominent themes emerged from the review, 'change milieu', 'reshaping boundaries', 'nurse-led', 'efficacy of practice', which are modelled into a conceptual framework. Nursing roles are expanding within the cardiological setting, affording practitioners unprecedented practice opportunities within a supportive organizational framework, however, these roles must be subject to appropriate evaluation in order to continue informing a robust evidence base.

  17. Physical Examination Findings Among Children and Adolescents With Obesity: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Sarah; Lazorick, Suzanne; Hampl, Sarah; Skelton, Joseph A; Wood, Charles; Collier, David; Perrin, Eliana M

    2016-02-01

    Overweight and obesity affects 1 in 3 US children and adolescents. Clinical recommendations have largely focused on screening guidelines and counseling strategies. However, the physical examination of the child or adolescent with obesity can provide the clinician with additional information to guide management decisions. This expert-based review focuses on physical examination findings specific to children and adolescents with obesity. For each physical examination element, the authors define the finding and its prevalence among pediatric patients with obesity, discuss the importance and relevance of the finding, describe known techniques to assess severity, and review evidence regarding the need for additional evaluation. The recommendations presented represent a comprehensive review of current evidence as well as expert opinion. The goal of this review is to highlight the importance of conducting a targeted physical examination during pediatric weight management visits. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Quality of reporting of systematic reviews published in "evidence-based" Chinese journals.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Long; Ge, Long; Ma, Ji-Chun; Zeng, Qiao-Ling; Yao, Lu; An, Ni; Ding, Jie-Xian; Gan, Yu-Hong; Tian, Jin-Hui

    2014-06-07

    The number of systematic reviews (SRs)/meta-analyses (MAs) has increased dramatically in China over the past decades. However, evaluation of quality of reporting of systematic reviews published has not been undertaken. The objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of reporting of SRs/MAs assessing efficacy and/or harms of clinical interventions published in "evidence-based" Chinese journals. Web-based database searches were conducted for the Chinese Journal of Evidence-based Medicine, the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine, the Chinese Journal of Evidence Based Pediatrics, and the Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Cardiovascular Medicine. SRs/MAs assessing efficacy and/or harms of clinical interventions were included. The cut-off was December 31st 2011. The PRISMA statement was applied to assess the quality of reporting. Each item was assessed as follows: 'Yes' for total compliance, scored '1'; 'partial' for partial compliance, scored '0.5'; and 'No' for non-compliance, scored '0'. The review was considered to have major flaws if it received a total score of ≤15.0, minor flaws if it received a total score of 15.5 to 21.0, and minimal flaws if it received a total score 21.5 to 27.0. Odds ratios were used for binary variables, and the mean difference was used for continuous variables. Analyses were performed using RevMan 5.0 software. Overall, 487 SRs/MAs were identified and assessed. The included reviews had medium quality with minor flaws based on PRISMA total scores (range: 8.5-26.0; mean: 19.6 ± 3.3). The stratified analysis showed that SRs/MAs with more than 3 authors, from a university, hospital + university cooperation, multiple affiliations (≥2), and funding have significantly higher quality of reporting of SRs/MAs; 58% of the included reviews were considered to have minor flaws (total score of 15.6 to 21.0). Only 9.6% of reviews were considered to have major flaws. Specific areas needing improvement in reporting include the abstract

  19. An Integrative Literature Review of Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Breytenbach, Cecile; Ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma; Jordan, Portia J

    The aim of the study was to explore and describe the best available literature on evidence-based teaching strategies that can be used by nurse educators. Evidence-based teaching strategies in nursing education are fundamental to promote an in-depth understanding of information. Although some teaching strategies for nurse educators were identified, no integrative literature review was found summarizing the best teaching strategies for nurse educators. Integrative literature review. Sixteen studies were included encompassing eight teaching strategies (e-learning, concept mapping, Internet-based learning, web-based learning, gaming, problem-based learning, case studies, and evidence-based learning). Of these, three (concept mapping, Internet-based learning, and evidence-based learning) significantly increased student knowledge. All teaching strategies increased knowledge in some way, indicating that faculties should use a variety of teaching strategies. However, more research is needed to compare the impact of a variety of teaching strategies and the best use of different teaching strategies.

  20. Breast cancer-related lymphoedema and venepuncture: a review and evidence-based recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jakes, Adam D; Twelves, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoedema is a recognised complication of axillary surgery in women with early breast cancer. Such women are widely advised to avoid venepuncture on the ipsilateral side lest this cause complications including lymphoedema. This can lead to multiple failed venepuncture attempts causing distress to both patient and healthcare professional. We reviewed current guidelines and critically appraised the evidence relating the development of lymphoedema to venepuncture to educate healthcare professionals and develop evidence-based guidelines. A systematic search of bibliographic databases was performed and an Internet search undertaken to identify patient information leaflets from societies and support groups. Seven published articles were identified together with 15 published patient information leaflets. Only one small prospective study was identified (level of evidence 2), the remainder being case-control studies (level 3) or retrospective reviews (level 4). There is no good evidence that venepuncture can precipitate lymphoedema. New, patient-centred, evidence-based recommendations for venepuncture in women with breast cancer are proposed. Whenever possible, venepuncture should be performed on the contralateral arm. If this is not readily achieved, in the absence of lymphoedema it is preferable to consider venepuncture in the ipsilateral arm or insertion of a central venous device than to make further attempts in the contralateral arm or resort to sites such as veins in the foot. In the absence of lymphoedema, venesection in the ipsilateral arm carries little, if any, risk of additional complications. We offer evidence-based, patient-centred guidelines for venepuncture in patients with breast cancer following an axillary intervention.

  1. Evidence-based surgery for cesarean delivery: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Rouse, Dwight J; Berghella, Vincenzo; Baxter, Jason K; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our systematic review was to provide updated evidence-based guidance for surgical decisions during cesarean delivery (CD). We performed an English-language MEDLINE, PubMed, and COCHRANE search with the terms, cesarean section, cesarean delivery, cesarean, pregnancy, and randomized trials, plus each technical aspect of CD. Randomized control trials (RCTs) involving any aspect of CD technique from Jan. 1, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2012, were evaluated to update a previous systematic review. We also summarized Cochrane reviews, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses if they included additional RCTs since this review. We identified 73 RCTs, 10 metaanalyses and/or systematic reviews, and 12 Cochrane reviews during this time frame. Recommendations with high levels of certainty as defined by the US Preventive Services Task Force favor pre-skin incision prophylactic antibiotics, cephalad-caudad blunt uterine extension, spontaneous placental removal, surgeon preference on uterine exteriorization, single-layer uterine closure when future fertility is undesired, and suture closure of the subcutaneous tissue when thickness is 2 cm or greater and do not favor manual cervical dilation, subcutaneous drains, or supplemental oxygen for the reduction of morbidity from infection. The technical aspect of CD with high-quality, evidence-based recommendations should be adopted. Although 73 RCTs over the past 8 years is encouraging, additional well-designed, adequately powered trials on the specific technical aspects of CD are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine. Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    2011-02-01

    The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its implementation in daily clinical practice. Literature review. A mechanism based approach may be helpful to personalize medicine for the individual patient to which pharmacogenetics may contribute significantly. The lack of consistency in what we accept in bioequivalence and in pharmacogenetics of drug metabolising enzymes is discussed and illustrated with the example of nortriptyline. The impact of pharmacogenetics on examples like tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins and abacavir is described. Also the present status of the polymorphisms of 5-HT2A and C receptors in antipsychotic-induced weight gain is presented as a pharmacodynamic example with until now a greater distance to clinical implementation. The contribution of pharmacogenetics to tailor-made pharmacotherapy, which especially might be of value for patients deviating from the average, has not yet reached the position it seems to deserve.

  3. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine. Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    2013-06-01

    The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its implementation in daily clinical practice. Literature review. A mechanism based approach may be helpful to personalize medicine for the individual patient to which pharmacogenetics may contribute significantly. The lack of consistency in what we accept in bioequivalence and in pharmacogenetics of drug metabolising enzymes is discussed and illustrated with the example of nortriptyline. The impact of pharmacogenetics on examples like tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins and abacavir is described. Also the present status of the polymorphisms of 5-HT2A and C receptors in antipsychotic-induced weight gain is presented as a pharmacodynamic example with until now a greater distance to clinical implementation. The contribution of pharmacogenetics to tailor-made pharmacotherapy, which especially might be of value for patients deviating from the average, has not yet reached the position it seems to deserve.

  4. "Clinical approach to fibromyalgia: Synthesis of Evidence-based recommendations, a systematic review".

    PubMed

    Ángel García, Daniel; Martínez Nicolás, Ismael; Saturno Hernández, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Efforts have been made to standardise evidence-based practice, but clinical practice guidelines do not always follow strict development methods. The objective of this review is to identify the current guidelines, analyse the variability of its recommendations and make a synthesis for clinical practice. A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines was made in electronic databases and guidelines databases; using "fibromyalgia" AND ["guideline" OR "Clinical Practice guideline"] as terms, from January for 2003 to July of 2013. Guidelines were selected according to the following criteria: a) aimed to fibromyalgia treatment in adults; b) based on scientific evidence, systematically searched; c) evidence levels and strength of recommendation included; d) written in English or Spanish. From 249 initial results, six guides fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Clinical practice guidelines analysed in this review show great variability both in the presence and level of evidence and in the strength of recommendation of many treatments. Physical exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy are first-line treatments, showing high level of evidence. Amitriptyline, used for short periods of time for pain control, is the pharmacologic treatment with the most solid evidence. The multimodal approach reported better results than the isolated application of any treatment. Final recommendations in this review identify optimal treatments, facilitating the translation of evidence into practice and enabling more efficient and effective quality care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Concept and practice of evidence-based psychiatry and its application in Nigerian psychiatry: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Onifade, P O; Oluwole, L O

    2006-01-01

    The practice of Evidence-Based Psychiatry started in the 1990's, however prior to this time the practice of psychiatry did have an evidenced base though not structured and systematically spelt out. This study aimed to review the development of the concept and practice of Evidence-Based Psychiatry and to identify position of Nigerian psychiatry in it. Narrative reviews were made from information obtained from scientific publications i.e. (books and journals) and internet-based electronic articles. Evidence-Based Psychiatry emerged from Evidence-Based Medicine in the 1990's and aims to base practice on the best available evidence. The evidence is graded into A, B, and C, depending on the study design. Also critical to the practice of Evidence-Based Psychiatry is the availability of high-grade evidence and an efficient means of storing and retrieving it. Evidence-Based Psychiatry uses a systematic approach and involves five steps. Its scope covers aetiology, diagnosis, intervention, and prognosis. A comprehensive definition of Evidence-Based Psychiatry is given. There is a suggestion to change the term 'Evidence-Based' to 'Systematic Evidence-Based'. The right way to determine if a therapeutic intervention is evidence-based is to consider if the process that led to it is systematic in terms of the five steps of Evidence-Based Psychiatry. Nigeria is yet to develop structures required for Systematic Evidence-Based Psychiatry.

  6. Evidence-based Frameworks for Teaching and Learning in Classical Singing Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Crocco, Laura; Madill, Catherine J; McCabe, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The study systematically reviews evidence-based frameworks for teaching and learning of classical singing training. This is a systematic review. A systematic literature search of 15 electronic databases following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Eligibility criteria included type of publication, participant characteristics, intervention, and report of outcomes. Quality rating scales were applied to support assessment of the included literature. Data analysis was conducted using meta-aggregation. Nine papers met the inclusion criteria. No complete evidence-based teaching and learning framework was found. Thematic content analysis showed that studies either (1) identified teaching practices in one-to-one lessons, (2) identified student learning strategies in one-to-one lessons or personal practice sessions, and (3) implemented a tool to enhance one specific area of teaching and learning in lessons. The included studies showed that research in music education is not always specific to musical genre or instrumental group, with four of the nine studies including participant teachers and students of classical voice training only. The overall methodological quality ratings were low. Research in classical singing training has not yet developed an evidence-based framework for classical singing training. This review has found that introductory information on teaching and learning practices has been provided, and tools have been suggested for use in the evaluation of the teaching-learning process. High-quality methodological research designs are needed. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Botulinum Toxin Therapy for Osteoarticular Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum (BoNT) toxin has been used for its muscle-paralyzing action in conditions such as treatment of wrinkles, cervical dystonia and blephrospasm. There is preclinical and emerging clinical evidence of another mechanism of action of BoNT, namely, an antinociceptive action. In this review, we provide an evidence-based review of clinical studies of BoNT in osteoarticular conditions, such as osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain, and hand pain. Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) found evidence of short-term efficacy of an injection of BoNT in relief of pain, and in some cases, improvement of function and quality of life. However, more clinical trials are needed to better define the clinical use of BoNT for treatment of refractory osteoarticular pain. PMID:21304830

  8. Can choices between alternative hip prostheses be evidence based? a review of the economic evaluation literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement surgery places a considerable financial burden on health services and society. Given the large number of hip prostheses available to surgeons, reliable economic evidence is crucial to inform resource allocation decisions. This review summarises published economic evidence on alternative hip prostheses to examine the potential for the literature to inform resource allocation decisions in the UK. Methods We searched nine medical and economics electronic databases. 3,270 studies were initially identified, 17 studies were included in the review. Studies were critically appraised using three separate guidelines. Results Several methodological problems were identified including a lack of observed long term prosthesis survival data, limited up-to-date and UK based evidence and exclusion of patient and societal perspectives. Conclusions More clinical trials including long term follow-up and economic evaluation are needed. These should compare the cost-effectiveness of different prostheses with longer-term follow-up and including a wider perspective. PMID:21034434

  9. Methods of teaching medical trainees evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Dragan; Maloney, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    The principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) provide clinicians with the ability to identify, source, appraise and integrate research evidence into medical decision making. Despite the mantra of EBM encouraging the use of evidence to inform practice, there appears little evidence available on how best to teach EBM to medical trainees. A systematic review was performed to identify what type of educational method is most effective at increasing medical trainees' competency in EBM. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. Electronic searches were performed across three databases. Two reviewers independently searched, extracted and reviewed the articles. The quality of each study was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. In total, 177 citations were returned, from which 14 studies were RCTs and examined for full text. Nine of the studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Learner competency in EBM increased post-intervention across all studies. However, no difference in learner outcomes was identified across a variety of educational modes, including lecture versus online, direct versus self-directed, multidisciplinary versus discipline-specific groups, lecture versus active small group facilitated learning. The body of evidence available to guide educators on how to teach EBM to medical trainees is small, albeit of a good quality. The major limitation in assessing risk of bias was the inability to blind participants to an educational intervention and lack of clarity regarding certain aspects within studies. Further evidence, and transparency in design, is required to guide the development and implementation of educational strategies in EBM, including modes of teaching and the timing of delivering EBM content within the broader medical curriculum. Further research is required to determine the effects of timing, content and length of EBM courses and teaching methods. © 2014

  10. Optimising treatment resources for OCD: a review of the evidence base for technology-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Karina; Bee, Penny

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and disabling mental health problem. Only a minority of people receive evidence-based psychological treatments, and this deficit has prompted an increasing focus on delivering cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in new and innovative ways. To conduct a scoping review of the published evidence base for CBT-based interventions incorporating a health technology in the treatment of OCD. The questions posed by the review were (a) are technology-assisted treatments clinically effective, (b) are patient outcomes durable and (c) are more innovative services deemed acceptable by those individuals who engage in them? Scoping review of published studies using any study design examining CBT interventions incorporating a health technology for OCD. Electronic databases searched included MEDLINE (1966-2010), PsycInfo (1967-2010), EMBASE (1980-2010) and CINAHL databases (1982-2010). Thirteen studies were identified, of these, five used bibliotherapy, five examined computerised CBT (cCBT), two investigated telephone delivered CBT and one evaluated video conferencing. Overall studies were small and methodologically flawed, which precludes definitive conclusions of clinical effectiveness, durability or stakeholder satisfaction. To date the evidence base for technology-enhanced OCD treatments has undergone limited development. Future research should seek to overcome the methodological shortcomings of published work by conducting large-scale trials that incorporate clinical, cost and acceptability outcomes.

  11. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp developers rarely conduct or publish trial-based experimental validation of their apps. Indeed, a previous systematic review revealed a complete lack of trial-based evidence for many of the hundreds of MHapps available. Objective To guide future MHapp development, a set of clear, practical, evidence-based recommendations is presented for MHapp developers to create better, more rigorous apps. Methods A literature review was conducted, scrutinizing research across diverse fields, including mental health interventions, preventative health, mobile health, and mobile app design. Results Sixteen recommendations were formulated. Evidence for each recommendation is discussed, and guidance on how these recommendations might be integrated into the overall design of an MHapp is offered. Each recommendation is rated on the basis of the strength of associated evidence. It is important to design an MHapp using a behavioral plan and interactive framework that encourages the user to engage with the app; thus, it may not be possible to incorporate all 16 recommendations into a single MHapp. Conclusions Randomized controlled trials are required to validate future MHapps and the principles upon which they are designed, and to further investigate the recommendations presented in this review. Effective MHapps are required to help prevent mental health problems and to ease the burden on health systems. PMID:26932350

  12. Atypical odontalgia: a systematic review following the evidence-based principles of dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bosch-Aranda, María Louisa; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2011-07-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a severe and persistent pain involving controversial pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical management. Presented here is a systematic review of the literature on AO, using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) to assess the level of evidence and the quality of randomized clinical trials (RCT). A total of 54 articles were obtained of which 34 belonged to level 3 evidence, 17 to level 2, and 3 to level 1. Of these, only 8 RCT had an average quality of four points. The main finding of this systematic review is that only a few studies have systematically evaluated AO. It also determines a strength recommendation of level B to the theory of neuropathic origin of pain in AO and strength of recommendation level C for the pharmacological management of this condition. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review of the published literature on AO in order to determine the physiopathology and treatment based on the level of scientific evidence and following the evidence-based principles of dentistry.

  13. Parent ADHD and Evidence-Based Treatment for Their Children: Review and Directions for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Wang, Christine H; Woods, Kelsey E; Strickland, Jennifer; Stein, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    One fourth to one half of parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have ADHD themselves, complicating delivery of evidence-based child behavioral and pharmacological treatments. In this article, we review the literature examining the relation between parent ADHD and outcomes following behavioral and pharmacological treatments for children with ADHD. We also review research that has incorporated treatment of parent ADHD (either alone or in combination with child treatment) with the goal of improving parenting and child outcomes. Finally, we offer recommendations for future research on the relation between parent ADHD and evidence-based treatment outcomes for their children, with the purpose of advancing the science and informing clinical care of these families.

  14. Management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Covaro, Augusto; Vilà-Canet, Gemma; de Frutos, Ana García; Ubierna, Maite T.; Ciccolo, Francesco; Caceres, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis has become one of the most disabling pathologies in the elderly population. Some additional conditions such as foraminal stenosis or degenerative spondylosis with a history of back pain and leg pain must be considered before treatment. A completely appropriate protocol and unified management of spinal stenosis have not yet been well defined. The objective of this literature review is to provide evidence-based recommendations reflected in the highest-quality clinical literature available to address key clinical questions surrounding the management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Cite this article: Covaro A, Vilà-Canet G, García de Frutos A, Ubierna MT, Ciccolo F, Caceres E. Management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: an evidence-based review article. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:267-274. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000030. PMID:28461958

  15. Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Spinal Epidural Abscess: An Evidence-based Review.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Jenkins, Tyler J; Maslak, Joseph; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2015-07-01

    Spinal infections have historically been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current treatment protocols have improved patient outcomes through prompt and accurate infection identification, medical treatment, and surgical interventions. Medical and surgical management, however, remains controversial because of a paucity of high-level evidence to guide decision making. Despite this, an awareness of presenting symptoms, pertinent risk factors, and common imaging findings are critical for treating spine infections. The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature and present the latest evidence-based recommendations for the most commonly encountered primary spinal infections: vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

  16. IRB decision-making with imperfect knowledge: a framework for evidence-based research ethics review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily E; DuBois, James M

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe the five steps of evidence-based practice as applied to research ethics review and apply these steps to three exemplar dilemmas: incentive payments in substance abuse research; informed consent for biobanking; and placebo-controlled trials involving pregnant women in order to demonstrate the potential of empirical data to inform and improve IRB decision-making. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. Disaster management in low- and middle-income countries: scoping review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew Chee Keng; Booth, Andrew; Challen, Kirsty; Gardois, Paolo; Goodacre, Steve

    2014-10-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the prevalence and scale of disasters with low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) tending to be more affected. Consequently, disaster risk reduction has been advocated as a global priority. However, the evidence base for disaster management in these settings is unclear. This study is a scoping review of the evidence base for disaster management in LMIC. Potentially relevant articles between 1990 and 2011 were searched for, assessed for relevance and subsequently categorised using a thematic coding framework based on the US Integrated Emergency Management System model. Out of 1545 articles identified, only 178 were from LMIC settings. Most were of less robust design such as event reports and commentaries, and 66% pertained to natural disasters. There was a paucity of articles on disaster mitigation or recovery, and more were written on disaster response and preparedness issues. Considerably more articles were published from high-income country settings that may reflect a publication bias. Current grey literature on disaster management tends not to be peer reviewed, is not well organised and not easy to access. The paucity of peer-reviewed publications compromises evidence review initiatives that seek to provide an evidence-base for disaster management in LMIC. As such, there is an urgent need for greater research and publication of findings on disaster management issues from these settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Community-Based Participatory Research and Smoking Cessation Interventions: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Susan D.; Heath, Janie; Williams, Lovoria B.; Tingen, Martha S.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article presents a review of the evidence on the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and smoking cessation interventions. An overview of CBPR is provided, along with a description of the search methods and quality scoring. Research questions are explored to determine: if CBPR improves the quality of research methods and community involvement in cessation intervention studies; and, cessation outcomes when using CBPR approaches. Results of the review are provided along with a comprehensive table summarizing all included studies. Strengths and challenges of the CBPR approach are presented with recommendations for future research. PMID:22289400

  19. Nonablative Fractional Laser Resurfacing in Skin of Color: Evidence-based Review

    PubMed Central

    Alexis, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nonablative laser resurfacing represents one of the major advances in procedural dermatology over the past decade. However, its use in darker skin types is limited by safety concerns and a relative lack of available data. Aim: To provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of fractional lasers in darker skin types. Evidence review: A broad literature search of PubMed/Medline database was conducted in April 2016 using the term fractional lasers. A free text search of keywords including fractional resurfacing, nonablative lasers, skin type, skin of color, ethnic skin, Fitzpatrick skin type, Asian skin, African Americans, Afro-Caribbean, and Hispanics was also executed. An in-depth review of all the relevant articles fitting the authors’ inclusion/exclusion criteria was performed. Thereafter, each study was assigned levels of evidence per the Modified Criteria by Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. A recommendation was made for a specific treatment based on the presence of at least one Level 1 study or more than three Level 2 or 3 studies that had concordant results. Findings: The available evidence strongly suggests that fractional lasers are a favorable treatment option for a variety of dermatological diseases in Fitzpatrick skin phototypes IV to VI. Level 1 evidence was found for the use of fractional lasers for treating acne, striae and skin rejuvenation. Level 2 evidence was found for their use in acne scars, melasma, and surgical/traumatic scars. Conclusion: Fractional resurfacing is a safe and efficacious treatment option for various dermatological disorders in darker skin types; however, there is a paucity of high-quality studies involving skin types V and VI. PMID:28979657

  20. Cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and ACOG recommendations: a review.

    PubMed

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    To conduct a methodological review of the existing scientific literature within the field of cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and to establish their relevance to the ACOG Committee Opinion No. 378. The appropriate medical subject heading terms were selected and applied in the search of the Internet multiple databases since 1900 until January 2010. Articles focusing on cosmetic gynecology were reviewed. Also, anecdotal and advertising literatures were analyzed. A methodological review of the literatures was conducted. In peer review journals, 72 relevant articles related to cosmetic gynecology were identified. Anecdotal information was identified in 3 sources and over 1,100 published marketing literatures were identified on the Internet and no scientific journals. Among reviewed articles on cosmetic gynecology, only two articles met the level II-2 in evidence-based medicine. The absence of documentations on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic vaginal procedures in the scientific literatures was ACOG's main concern. Practicing cosmetic gynecology within ACOG recommendations is desirable and possible. Currently, the standard of practice of cosmetic gynecology cannot be determined due to the absence of the documentation on safety and effectiveness. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be called cosmetic procedures, since it is a deceptive form of practice and marketing. Creating medical terminology trademarks and establishing a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical.

  1. Empowering parents for evidence-based fever management: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Monsma, Joy; Richerson, Julia; Sloand, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Many parents of young, febrile children lack evidence-based tools to manage fever (knowledge, skills, confidence, support), fear negative outcomes, and prioritize the reduction of fever over management of its source. This review examines the literature for evidence of factors that must be considered when designing effective fever management educational interventions for parents, especially those whose health literacy is low. A systematic search identified studies from 1980 to 2011 using the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Review, Web of Science, PsychInfo, Medline Plus, Joanna Briggs Institute, and Google Scholar. The most effective educational interventions are 1:1, multidimensional, structured, relevant, and reinforced over time. Parental culture, health literacy, knowledge deficits, and beliefs must be addressed by nurse practitioners (NPs) to maximize evidence-based behaviors. Parents often strive to do what is best for their child but may become overly protective and anxious when managing their child's fever. NPs have a prime opportunity to improve parents' fever management practices. An evidence-based toolkit, created with respect for those who may have low health literacy, will give parents tangible tools to help them provide safer and less costly care for their febrile child. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  3. Evidence based clinical assessment of child and adolescent social phobia: a critical review of rating scales.

    PubMed

    Tulbure, Bogdan T; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social anxiety scales for children and adolescents were identified. An overview about the scientific support accumulated by these scales is offered. Our main results are consistent with recent reviews that consider the Social Phobia and Anxiety Scale for Children (SPAI-C) and the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A) among the most pertinent and empirically supported measures of social anxiety for youngsters. However, after considering the existing evidence, we highly recommend another couple of scales that proved to be empirically supported (i.e., the Social Phobia Inventory-SPIN, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents-LSAS-CA).

  4. A review of evidence-based medicine for glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate use in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vangsness, C Thomas; Spiker, William; Erickson, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of disease-modifying treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) has become an important aspect of orthopaedic care. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the evidence for the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate for knee OA with the goal of elucidating their indications for clinical use. The published clinical studies of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate on OA are reviewed within the context of evidence-based medicine. Almost every included trial has found the safety of these compounds to be equal to placebo. In the literature satisfying our inclusion criteria, glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and chondroitin sulfate have individually shown inconsistent efficacy in decreasing OA pain and improving joint function. Many studies confirmed OA pain relief with glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate use. The excellent safety profile of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate therapy should be discussed with patients, and these supplements may serve a role as an initial treatment modality for many OA patients.

  5. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R.; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A.; Hammon, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture “self-identified” anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the “Outcomes 2010” consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a “multiple hit” hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response

  6. Proof of concept: Developing a peer reviewed, evidence-based, interactive e-learning programme.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Peter; Schoch, Monica; Black, Kirsten; Woods, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge and skill acquisition related to vascular access are traditionally individual institutional educational initiatives. Australia currently has no national evidence based education programme for renal nurses. A survey of Australian and New Zealand Nephrology Educators' conducted in 2009, identified the need for more effective and consistent delivery of clinical education for nurses using innovative, web-based approaches supporting the tenets of e-learning methodologies. This paper discusses the development, implementation and proposed evaluation of a peer reviewed Australasian e-learning programme on buttonhole cannulation. It will further highlight the benefits of inter-organisational partnerships and how these partnerships can facilitate positive change in teaching and learning practices. This project has unique characteristics that collectively provide value, distinction and innovation to nurses, patients and renal departments. As the e-learning programme was founded on a platform of evidence-based practice it is therefore easily transferable to an international context.

  7. Effectiveness of training in evidence-based medicine skills for healthcare professionals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Lars; Buhse, Susanne; Meyer, Gabriele

    2016-04-04

    Basic skills in evidence-based medicine (EbM) are indispensable for healthcare professionals to promote consumer-centred, evidence-based treatment. EbM training courses are complex interventions - a fact that has not been methodologically reflected by previous systematic reviews. This review evaluates the effects of EbM training for healthcare professionals as well as the quality of reporting of such training interventions. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ERIC, Campbell Library and PsycINFO up to 9/2014. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials as well as before-after trials were included. Authors were contacted in order to obtain missing data. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We reviewed 14.507 articles; n = 61 appeared potentially eligible; n = 13 involving 1,120 participants were included. EbM training shows some impact on knowledge and skills, whereas the impact on practical EbM application remains unclear. Risk of bias of included trials raises uncertainty about the effects. Description of complex interventions was poor. EbM training has some positive effects on knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals. Appropriate methods for development, piloting, evaluation, reporting and implementation of the training should be applied.

  8. Vulvar postoperative care, gestalt or evidence based medicine? A comprehensive systematic review.

    PubMed

    Altman, Alon D; Robinson, Christine

    2017-05-01

    This paper reviews all current literature for vulvar postoperative care, and forms a summary of evidence based practice. Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINHAL, Web of Science Core Collection, PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, clinicaltrials.gov and Medline databases were searched. Various combinations of key-terms were used to identify relevant articles. All identified primary research articles and review articles were then examined with their references in order to identify further relevant studies. The literature was examined within gynecology, gynecologic oncology, surgical oncology, urology, plastic surgery and dermatology. A total of 199 studies were reviewed and 80 were included in this paper. All relevant studies pertaining to the subject were included. Studies were excluded if there was no relevance to the review as deemed by both authors. There remains much room for improvement to minimize postoperative stay, decrease the chances of morbidity and improve patient outcome and satisfaction, while establishing standardized care pathways. Further research and clinical trials are needed in this area to help us to provide evidence-based care to our postoperative vulvar patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesizing gender based HIV interventions in Sub-Sahara Africa: a systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Small, Eusebius; Nikolova, Silviya P; Narendorf, Sarah C

    2013-11-01

    Gender is a critical component of HIV and sexual risk interventions. Examining the range, effectiveness and methodological rigor of studies that include a gender based component can inform current interventions and future directions for intervention research. This review investigated gender informed intervention studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa that measured an outcome related to HIV. We reviewed 311 articles, 41 of which met our inclusion criteria, resulting in 11 articles that described eight different studies used in the analyses. The findings demonstrated wide variations in the types of interventions from low intensity educational content to multi-component interventions. Study outcomes were categorized into biological outcomes, HIV risk, behavioral, violence and risk reduction. Most interventions showed positive effects, and although research methodologies varied considerably, longer interventions appeared to be more effective. More research, however, is needed to build the evidence base for effectiveness of gender-based programs in reducing HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. The Prone Position During Surgery and its Complications: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Melissa M.; Ho, Yik-Hong; Rozen, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in the prone position is often a necessity when access to posterior anatomic structures is required. However, many complications are known to be associated with this type of surgery, as physiologic changes occur with increased pressure to anterior structures. While several studies have discussed postoperative vision loss, much fewer studies with lower levels of evidence have addressed other complications. A systematic literature review was conducted using 2 different databases, and 53 papers were regarded as appropriate for inclusion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed. Thirteen complications were identified. Postoperative vision loss and cardiovascular complications, including hypovolemia and cardiac arrest, had the most number of studies and highest level of evidence. Careful planning for optimal positioning, padding, timing, as well as increased vigilance are evidence-based recommendations where operative prone positioning is required. PMID:25692433

  11. A systematic evidence review of school-based group contingency interventions for students with challenging behavior.

    PubMed

    Maggin, Daniel M; Johnson, Austin H; Chafouleas, Sandra M; Ruberto, Laura M; Berggren, Melissa

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize the research underlying group contingency interventions to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to support their use for managing the classroom behavior of students with behavioral difficulties. An application of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) procedures for evaluating single-subject research revealed that the research investigating group contingencies demonstrated sufficient rigor, evidence, and replication to label the intervention as evidence-based. These findings were further supported across five quantitative indices of treatment effect. The results associated with the application of the WWC procedures and quantitative evaluations were supplemented with additional systematic coding of methodological features and study characteristics to evaluate the populations and conditions under which the effects of the group contingency best generalize. Findings associated with this coding revealed that the lack of detailed reporting across studies limited our ability to determine for whom and under what conditions group contingencies are best suited.

  12. Evidence-based information needs of public health workers: a systematized review

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Walker, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study assessed public health workers’ evidence-based information needs, based on a review of the literature using a systematic search strategy. This study is based on a thesis project conducted as part of the author’s master’s in public health coursework and is considered a systematized review. Methods Four databases were searched for English-language articles published between 2005 and 2015: PubMed, Web of Science, Library Literature & Information Science Index, and Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA). Studies were excluded if there was no primary data collection, the population in the study was not identified as public health workers, “information” was not defined according to specific criteria, or evidence-based information and public health workers were not the major focus. Studies included in the final analysis underwent data extraction, critical appraisal using CASP and STROBE checklists, and thematic analysis. Results Thirty-three research studies were identified in the search, including twenty-one using quantitative methods and twelve using qualitative methods. Critical appraisal revealed many potential biases, particularly in the validity of research. Thematic analysis revealed five common themes: (1) definition of information needs, (2) current information-seeking behavior and use, (3) definition of evidence-based information, (4) barriers to information needs, and (5) public health–specific issues. Conclusions Recommendations are given for how librarians can increase the use of evidence-based information in public health research, practice, and policy making. Further research using rigorous methodologies and transparent reporting practices in a wider variety of settings is needed to further evaluate public health workers’ information needs. PMID:28096749

  13. Volume Overload in Heart Failure: An Evidence-Based Review of Strategies for Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brian A; Kalathiya, Rohan J; Kim, Daniel A; Zakaria, Sammy

    2015-09-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is the leading cause of hospital admission in the United States, with a high risk of readmission within 30 days. Most acute decompensated heart failure admissions are driven by congestive signs and symptoms resulting from fluid and sodium overload. We reviewed the evidence base addressing the management and prevention of fluid overload in heart failure, focusing on recent clinical trials. All the references in this review were obtained through PubMed and had at least 1 of the following key words: heart failure and volume overload, congestion, loop diuretics, thiazide diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, dopamine, cardiorenal syndrome, nesiritide, vasopressin antagonists, ultrafiltration, sodium restriction, fluid restriction, telemonitoring, and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. We also reviewed relevant references cited in the obtained articles, especially articles addressing methods of treating or preventing volume overload in patients with heart failure.

  14. An evidence based review of proton beam therapy: the report of ASTRO's emerging technology committee.

    PubMed

    Allen, Aaron M; Pawlicki, Todd; Dong, Lei; Fourkal, Eugene; Buyyounouski, Mark; Cengel, Keith; Plastaras, John; Bucci, Mary K; Yock, Torunn I; Bonilla, Luisa; Price, Robert; Harris, Eleanor E; Konski, Andre A

    2012-04-01

    Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a novel method for treating malignant disease with radiotherapy. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the state of the science of PBT and arrive at a recommendation for the use of PBT. The emerging technology committee of the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) routinely evaluates new modalities in radiotherapy and assesses the published evidence to determine recommendations for the society as a whole. In 2007, a Proton Task Force was assembled to evaluate the state of the art of PBT. This report reflects evidence collected up to November 2009. Data was reviewed for PBT in central nervous system tumors, gastrointestinal malignancies, lung, head and neck, prostate, and pediatric tumors. Current data do not provide sufficient evidence to recommend PBT in lung cancer, head and neck cancer, GI malignancies, and pediatric non-CNS malignancies. In hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer and there is evidence for the efficacy of PBT but no suggestion that it is superior to photon based approaches. In pediatric CNS malignancies PBT appears superior to photon approaches but more data is needed. In large ocular melanomas and chordomas, we believe that there is evidence for a benefit of PBT over photon approaches. PBT is an important new technology in radiotherapy. Current evidence provides a limited indication for PBT. More robust prospective clinical trials are needed to determine the appropriate clinical setting for PBT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Richness or Rigour? A Discussion of Systematic Reviews and Evidence-Based Policy in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Helen; Lloyd, Eva

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on the experiences of the Early Years Review Group, one of a number of education groups contracted to carry out systematic reviews for the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Coordinating (EPPI) Centre in the United Kingdom. The Early Years Review Group has carried out three systematic reviews: one…

  16. No evidence for thrombophilia in patients with retinal venous occlusion: a systematic GRADE-based review.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Heegaard, Steffen; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-02-01

    Retinal venous occlusion represents a common retinal disorder that untreated often leads to severely reduced vision. While general risk factors for vascular disease are known to increase the risk of an event, the role of thrombophilia is controversial. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for thrombophilia investigation in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion. Eligible studies were identified by a MESH-based search in PubMed 11-13 of March 2015. The level of evidence was stated according to the guidelines published by the GRADE working group using three levels for quality of evidence: high, moderate and low. A total of 118 studies relating to the study question were identified. After excluding case stories, commentaries, cross-sectional studies and reviews/expert opinions, 28 original papers and two meta-analyses were included in the final qualitative synthesis. The majority of studies were small case-control studies, and only one large cohort study was identified. No randomized controlled trials were retrieved. All the studies were categorized as low quality of evidence. Systematic thrombophilia screening in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion cannot be recommended.

  17. Real-time peer review: an innovative feature to an evidence-based practice conference.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Jonathan D; Phillips, Holly E; Kroth, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Many health sciences librarians as well as other professionals attend conferences on a regular basis. This study sought to link an innovative peer review process of presented research papers to long-term conference outcomes in the peer-reviewed professional journal literature. An evidence-based conference included a proof-of-concept study to gauge the long-term outcomes from research papers presented during the program. Real-time peer review recommendations from the conference were linked to final versions of articles published in the peer-reviewed literature. The real-time peer review feedback served as the basis for further mentoring to guide prospective authors toward publishing their research results. These efforts resulted in the publication of two of the four research papers in the peer-viewed literature. A third presented paper appeared in a blog because the authors wanted to disseminate their findings more quickly than through the journal literature. The presenters of the fourth paper never published their study. Real-time peer review from this study can be adapted to other professional conferences that include presented research papers.

  18. Real-Time Peer Review: An Innovative Feature to an Evidence-Based Practice Conference

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Holly E.; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Many health sciences librarians as well as other professionals attend conferences on a regular basis. This study sought to link an innovative peer review process of presented research papers to long-term conference outcomes in the peer-reviewed professional journal literature. An evidence-based conference included a proof-of-concept study to gauge the long-term outcomes from research papers presented during the program. Real-time peer review recommendations from the conference were linked to final versions of articles published in the peer-reviewed literature. The real-time peer review feedback served as the basis for further mentoring to guide prospective authors toward publishing their research results. These efforts resulted in the publication of two of the four research papers in the peer-viewed literature. A third presented paper appeared in a blog because the authors wanted to disseminate their findings more quickly than through the journal literature. The presenters of the fourth paper never published their study. Real-time peer review from this study can be adapted to other professional conferences that include presented research papers. PMID:24180649

  19. Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: updated review of the literature from 2003 through 2008.

    PubMed

    Cicerone, Keith D; Langenbahn, Donna M; Braden, Cynthia; Malec, James F; Kalmar, Kathleen; Fraas, Michael; Felicetti, Thomas; Laatsch, Linda; Harley, J Preston; Bergquist, Thomas; Azulay, Joanne; Cantor, Joshua; Ashman, Teresa

    2011-04-01

    To update our clinical recommendations for cognitive rehabilitation of people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke, based on a systematic review of the literature from 2003 through 2008. PubMed and Infotrieve literature searches were conducted using the terms attention, awareness, cognitive, communication, executive, language, memory, perception, problem solving, and/or reasoning combined with each of the following terms: rehabilitation, remediation, and training for articles published between 2003 and 2008. The task force initially identified citations for 198 published articles. One hundred forty-one articles were selected for inclusion after our initial screening. Twenty-nine studies were excluded after further detailed review. Excluded articles included 4 descriptive studies without data, 6 nontreatment studies, 7 experimental manipulations, 6 reviews, 1 single case study not related to TBI or stroke, 2 articles where the intervention was provided to caretakers, 1 article redacted by the journal, and 2 reanalyses of prior publications. We fully reviewed and evaluated 112 studies. Articles were assigned to 1 of 6 categories reflecting the primary area of intervention: attention; vision and visuospatial functioning; language and communication skills; memory; executive functioning, problem solving and awareness; and comprehensive-holistic cognitive rehabilitation. Articles were abstracted and levels of evidence determined using specific criteria. Of the 112 studies, 14 were rated as class I, 5 as class Ia, 11 as class II, and 82 as class III. Evidence within each area of intervention was synthesized and recommendations for Practice Standards, Practice Guidelines, and Practice Options were made. There is substantial evidence to support interventions for attention, memory, social communication skills, executive function, and for comprehensive-holistic neuropsychologic rehabilitation after TBI. Evidence supports visuospatial rehabilitation after right

  20. Non-Respiratory Indications for Polysomnography and Related Procedures in Children: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Kotagal, Suresh; Nichols, Cynthia D.; Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M.; Marcus, Carole L.; Witmans, Manisha B.; Kirk, Valerie G.; D'Andrea, Lynn A.; Hoban, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This evidence-based review provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the literature regarding the utility of polysomnography for the evaluation of non-respiratory sleep disorders in children including hypersomnias, parasomnias, sleep-related movement disorders, and sleep in other special populations. Methods: A task force of pediatric sleep medicine experts performed a systematic review of the literature regarding the use of polysomnography for non-respiratory sleep disorders in children. They identified and graded 76 papers as evidence. Results: The main results include (1) polysomnography combined with the multiple sleep latency test is useful for evaluating disorders of excessive somnolence to objectively quantify sleepiness. The results have to be interpreted with consideration of the pubertal stage and regularity of the sleep patterns of the child; (2) polysomnography is indicated in children with parasomnias or sleep related movement disorders who have a high likelihood of having obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); (3) polysomnography is not routinely indicated in children with enuresis unless there is a high likelihood of OSA; (4) polysomnography can be helpful in evaluating children with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and when periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is suspected. Conclusions: These findings suggest that, in children with non-respiratory sleep disorders, polysomnography should be a part of a comprehensive sleep evaluation in selected circumstances to determine the nature of the events in more detail or when the suspicion of OSA is relatively high. Citation: Kotagal S; Nichols CD; Grigg-Damberger MM; Marcus CL; Witmans MB; Kirk VG; D'Andrea LA; Hoban TF. Non-respiratory indications for polysomnography and related procedures in children: an evidence-based review. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1451-1466. PMID:23115394

  1. [A Review and Recommendations of Evidence-Based Treatments for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder].

    PubMed

    Skarphedinsson, Gudmundur; Lauth, Bertrand; Njardvik, Urður; Ivarsson, Tord

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent obsessions and compulsions. In this review we depict evidence-based treatments for pediatric OCD patients. We searched PubMed for relevant publications including randomized controlled trials, reviews, and expert guidelines. Substantial evidence for cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) among treatment-naïve patients shows that both treatments are effective. CBT is significantly more effective than SSRI based on head-to-head trials. The evidence for CBT- or SSRI-resistant patients is limited but indicates that CBT and SSRI are effective treatments for CBT non-responders while a combination of CBT and SSRI is the most effective treatment for SSRI non-responders with no prior exposure to CBT. The current data support clinical guidelines indicating that when CBT expertise is present, one can successfully treat patients with CBT. CBT is also as effective as SSRI in non-responders after 14 weeks of CBT. The results did not indicate that combined treatment of CBT and SSRI is more effective than CBT delivered by experts. However, combined treatment is more effective than SSRI in SSRI non-responders. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, children and adolescents, treatment, Cognitive behavior therapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotics, treatment-resistant, treatment-refractory. Correspondence: Guðmundur Skarphedinsson, gudmundur.skarphedinsson@r-bup.no.

  2. Are mindfulness-based interventions effective for substance use disorders? A systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Alberto; Serretti, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are increasingly suggested as therapeutic approaches for effecting substance use and misuse (SUM). The aim of this article is to review current evidence on the therapeutic efficacy of MBIs for SUM. A literature search was undertaken using four electronic databases and references of retrieved articles. The search included articles written in English published up to December 2011. Quality of included trials was assessed. In total, 24 studies were included, three of which were based on secondary analyses of previously investigated samples. Current evidence suggests that MBIs can reduce the consumption of several substances including alcohol, cocaine, amphetamines, marijuana, cigarettes, and opiates to a significantly greater extent than waitlist controls, non-specific educational support groups, and some specific control groups. Some preliminary evidence also suggests that MBIs are associated with a reduction in craving as well as increased mindfulness. The limited generalizability of the reviewed findings is noted (i.e., small sample size, lack of methodological details, and the lack of consistently replicated findings). More rigorous and larger randomized controlled studies are warranted.

  3. [Evidence-based treatments in the rehabilitation of patients with depression--a literature review].

    PubMed

    Dirmaier, Jörg; Krattenmacher, Thomas; Watzke, Birgit; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger; Barghaan, Dina

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of guidelines has increased continuously. This development also occurs in the field of rehabilitative health care, where process guidelines are being designed for various indicational groups to ensure quality standards and improvements. The primary goal of this paper is to collect and evaluate the evidence for various treatment options for depressive disorders in order to establish a basis for the current development of a process guideline for the rehabilitation of patients with depressive disorders. In order to identify evidence based treatment elements, first a comprehensive investigation of national and international guidelines was conducted. Thirteen selected guidelines were then assessed with regard to aspects of methodological quality and evidence-based treatment elements. In a further step, literature searches were conducted for residual treatment elements, which were identified on the basis of the Classification of Therapeutic Services (KTL) 2007. For the literature search, a hierarchical approach was chosen: At first, meta-analyses and systematic reviews were viewed. In case when there was still a lack of evidence for specific, potentially relevant treatment elements, the search was expanded to the level of primary studies. All selected reviews and primary studies then underwent a standardized assessment especially regarding methodological quality and evidence grades were allocated to treatments. Thereby, the following treatment elements with an adequate level of evidence were identified: Psychotherapeutic interventions, marital/couples/family therapy and counselling, inclusion of family members, psycho education and exercise, problem solving therapy, guided self-help, and behavioural activation treatments. On the basis of this complementary literature search, various other evident interventions could be identified within the following areas: relaxation techniques, improvement of social competence, occupational therapy, art

  4. Vitrectomy for primary symptomatic vitreous opacities: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, T; Jalil, A; Antoniou, Y; Bishop, P N; Vallejo-Garcia, J L; Patton, N

    2016-01-01

    Floaters are a common ocular condition which form as a consequence of aging changes in the vitreous. Although in most patients the symptoms are minimal, they can cause significant impairment in vision-related quality of life in a small population of patients. Recently there has been an increase in awareness of the visual disability caused by floaters, and the evidence-base for treatment of this condition using small-gauge vitrectomy has increased. In this review, we define the term ‘floaters' as symptomatic vitreous opacities (SVO). We suggest a classification dependent on the presence or absence of posterior vitreous detachment and discuss their pathogenesis and natural history. We review their impact on patients' quality of life related to visual function. We review the psychological factors that may have a role in some patients who appear to be affected by SVO to the extent that they pursue all options including surgery with all its attendant risks. We summarise the available evidence-base of treatment options available for SVO with special emphasis on the safety and efficacy of vitrectomy for this condition. PMID:26939559

  5. Treatment for unicameral bone cysts in long bones: an evidence based review

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Sandra; Chundamala, Josie; Yandow, Suzanne; Wright, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform an evidence based review for treatment of unicameral bone cysts. A search of MEDLINE (1966 to 2009) was conducted and the studies were classified according to levels of evidence. This review includes only comparative Level I-III studies. The systematic review identified 16 studies. There is one level I study, one level II study and the remaining 14 studies are level III. Seven of the sixteen studies had statistically different results: three studies indicated that steroid injection was superior to bone marrow injection or curettage and bone grafting; one study indicated that cannulated screws were superior to steroid injections; one study indicated resection and myoplasty was superior to steroid injection; one study indicated a combination of steroid, demineralized bone matrix and bone marrow aspirate, and curettage and bone grafting were superior to steroid injection; and one study indicated that curettage and bone grafting was superior to non-operative immobilization. Based on one Level I study, including a limited number of individuals, steroid injection seems to be superior to bone marrow injection. As steroid injections have already demonstrated superiority over bone marrow injections in a randomized clinical trial, the next step would be a prospective trial comparing steroid injections with other treatments. PMID:21808696

  6. A review of evidence-based practice, nursing research and reflection: levelling the hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Mantzoukas, Stefanos

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the evidence-based practice movement, the hierarchy of evidence and the relationship between evidence-based practice and reflective practice. Evidence-based practice is equated with effective decision making, with avoidance of habitual practice and with enhanced clinical performance. The hierarchy of evidence has promoted randomized control trials as the most valid source of evidence. However, this is problematic for practitioners as randomized control trials overlook certain types of knowledge that, through the process of reflection, provide useful information for individualized and effective practice. A literature search was undertaken using CINAHL, medline and Ovid electronic databases in early 2006. The search terms used were: evidence-based practice, research evidence, evidence for practice, qualitative research, reflective practice, reflection and evidence. Other sources included handpicking of books on evidence-based practice, reflection and research. Only material written in English was included. The hierarchy of evidence that has promoted randomized control trials as the most valid form of evidence may actually impede the use of most effective treatment because of practical, political/ideological and epistemological contradictions and limitations. Furthermore, evidence-based practice appears to share very similar definitions, aims and procedures with reflective practice. Hence, it appears that the evidence-based practice movement may benefit much more from the use of reflection on practice, rather than the use of the hierarchical structure of evidence. Evidence-based practice is necessary for nursing, but its' effective implementation may be hindered by the hierarchy of evidence. Furthermore, evidence-based practice and reflection are both processes that share very similar aims and procedures. Therefore, to enable the implementation of best evidence in practice, the hierarchy of evidence might need to be abandoned and reflection to

  7. Contemplative Education: A Systematic, Evidence-Based Review of the Effect of Meditation Interventions in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Lea; Barsky, Adam; Ridd, Amanda; Allen, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Schools need reliable evidence about the outcomes of meditation programs before they consider if and how such programmes can influence learning agendas, curriculum and timetables. This paper reviewed evidence from 15 peer-reviewed studies of school meditation programmes with respect to three student outcomes: well-being, social competence and…

  8. Contemplative Education: A Systematic, Evidence-Based Review of the Effect of Meditation Interventions in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Lea; Barsky, Adam; Ridd, Amanda; Allen, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Schools need reliable evidence about the outcomes of meditation programs before they consider if and how such programmes can influence learning agendas, curriculum and timetables. This paper reviewed evidence from 15 peer-reviewed studies of school meditation programmes with respect to three student outcomes: well-being, social competence and…

  9. Epidemiological evidence relating snus to health--an updated review based on recent publications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter N

    2013-12-06

    An earlier review summarized evidence relating use of snus (Swedish-type moist snuff) to health and to initiation and cessation of smoking. This update considers the effect recent publications on snus use and health have on the overall evidence. The additional evidence extends the list of neoplastic conditions unassociated with snus use (oropharynx, oesophagus, stomach, lung) to include colorectal cancer and acoustic neuroma, and further undermines the weakly-based argument that snus use increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, although there is a report of poorer cancer survival in users. It remains undemonstrated that "snuff-dipper's lesion" increases risk of oral cancer, and recent publications add to the evidence that snus use has no effect on periodontitis or dental caries. Although onset of acute myocardial infarction is not adversely associated with snus use, there is some evidence of an association with reduced survival. Whether this is a direct effect of snus use or a result of confounding by socioeconomic status or other factors requires further investigation, as does a report of an increased risk of heart failure in snus users. Even if some adverse health effects of snus use do exist, it remains clear that they are far less than those of smoking.

  10. Epidemiological evidence relating snus to health – an updated review based on recent publications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An earlier review summarized evidence relating use of snus (Swedish-type moist snuff) to health and to initiation and cessation of smoking. This update considers the effect recent publications on snus use and health have on the overall evidence. The additional evidence extends the list of neoplastic conditions unassociated with snus use (oropharynx, oesophagus, stomach, lung) to include colorectal cancer and acoustic neuroma, and further undermines the weakly-based argument that snus use increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, although there is a report of poorer cancer survival in users. It remains undemonstrated that “snuff-dipper’s lesion” increases risk of oral cancer, and recent publications add to the evidence that snus use has no effect on periodontitis or dental caries. Although onset of acute myocardial infarction is not adversely associated with snus use, there is some evidence of an association with reduced survival. Whether this is a direct effect of snus use or a result of confounding by socioeconomic status or other factors requires further investigation, as does a report of an increased risk of heart failure in snus users. Even if some adverse health effects of snus use do exist, it remains clear that they are far less than those of smoking. PMID:24314326

  11. An Evidence-based Approach to the Medical Management of Fibroids: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Chantal B; Cayton, Kamaria C; Chuong, Farah S; Holthouser, Kristine; Arian, Sara E; Abraham, Tara; Segars, James H

    2016-03-01

    Fibroids are the most common tumor of the female reproductive tract, but approved medical treatments are limited. Patients demand uterine-sparing treatments which preserve fertility and avoid surgery. We systematically reviewed PubMed and Cochrane databases from January 1985 to November 2015 for evidence-based medical therapies for fibroids in the context of disease prevention, treatment of early disease, treatment of symptomatic disease, and preoperative management. We identified 2182 studies, of which 52 studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Published data affirm the efficacy of multiple agents, which are promising avenues for the development of medical alternatives to surgery.

  12. Development of an evidence-based guideline for supervisor training in promoting mental health: literature review.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2011-01-01

    To review published studies to assess the effects of supervisor training on the mental health of subordinate workers, and thereby develop an evidence-based guideline for supervisor training in promoting workers' mental health. Seven studies that assessed the effect of supervisor training, whose outcomes included psychological stress responses of (subordinate) employees, were retrieved for assessment from PubMed, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, the Web of Science, and Ichushi-Web. An additional five studies were also reviewed for discussion on the content and types of training. Providing supervisors with necessary skills and information on mental health, including relevant occupational stressors, has a favorable effect on workers' mental health, at least in the short term. The subject populations had a background of requiring mental health measures. The effect of the training varied depending on the participation rate of supervisors, suggesting that the overall effect on an organization may be limited without a certain extent of participation by supervisors. There is no evidence of a long-term (over 1 yr) effect of supervisor training, and the effect of education on the supervisors' knowledge and behavior tends to be lost after 6 mo. The current evidence indicates that the following items should be taken into consideration for the development of a guideline for supervisor training: identification of high-priority populations requiring education, development of a strategy to improve the participation rate in education, inclusion of occupational stressors as well as basic information in workplace mental health teaching materials, and regular repetition of the program.

  13. Managing Workplace Violence With Evidence-Based Interventions: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel Johann Solorzano

    2016-09-01

    Workplace violence in health care settings is an occupational issue concerning nurses and other health care professionals. Patient aggression against nurses is often the most common form of violence in clinical settings, occurring in emergency departments, inpatient psychiatric settings, and nursing homes. Physical and verbal assaults are the major forms of workplace violence encountered by nurses. Current research has identified staff, environmental, and patient risk factors as the major precursors of workplace violence initiated by patients. Nurses often experience significant physical and psychological negative consequences after an episode of workplace violence. A review of the evidence was conducted to identify current evidence-based interventions that can help nurses minimize the incidence of workplace violence. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 31-36.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Evidence-based review of therapeutic plasma exchange in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Chhibber, Vishesh; Weinstein, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Several neurologic disorders have been treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). Case reports, case series, and clinical trials have published results regarding the outcomes in such patients. The data gathered have been used to formulate evidence-based guidelines, which can be used to guide therapy in patients with these neurological disorders. Adequately designed and powered randomized controlled trials have proven the efficacy of TPE in some disease entities, while other diseases are lacking such data. In the latter, decisions for the use of TPE must be made using the limited published data available. In this review, we discuss the published evidence regarding the use of TPE in neurological disorders, focusing on the most recent guidelines published by the American Society of Apheresis in 2010 and the American Academy of Neurology in 2011.

  15. Non-Traditional Systemic Treatments for Diabetic Retinopathy: An
Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Rafael; Ballarini, Stefania; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ji, Linong; Haller, Hermann; Zimmet, Paul; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid escalation in the global prevalence diabetes, with more than 30% being afflicted with diabetic retinopathy (DR), means it is likely that associated vision-threatening conditions will also rise substantially. This means that new therapeutic approaches need to be found that go beyond the current standards of diabetic care, and which are effective in the early stages of the disease. In recent decades several new pharmacological agents have been investigated for their effectiveness in preventing the appearance and progression of DR or in reversing DR; some with limited success while others appear promising. This up-to-date critical review of non-traditional systemic treatments for DR is based on the published evidence in MEDLINE spanning 1980-December 2014. It discusses a number of therapeutic options, paying particular attention to the mechanisms of action and the clinical evidence for the use of renin-angiotensin system blockade, fenofibrate and calcium dobesilate monohydrate in DR. PMID:25989912

  16. GRADE in Systematic Reviews of Acupuncture for Stroke Rehabilitation: Recommendations based on High-Quality Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhang; Xue-Ting, Liu; De-Ying, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated acupuncture’s effectiveness in stroke rehabilitation. The current study reviews the quality of evidence in SRs of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation, and rates the strength of recommendation for its use based on this evidence using the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluations) approach. A comprehensive literature search was performed using multiple databases (e.g., Medline, Embase) with advanced search strategies. Two authors independently selected articles, collected data, and assessed the methodological quality of each identified SR according to AMSTAR (a measurement tool to assess systematic reviews) and OQAQ (Oxman and Guyatt’s overview quality assessment questionnaire). Outcomes related to stroke rehabilitation were evaluated. SRs of high methodological quality (AMSTAR score ≥9 and OQAQ score ≥7) were graded using GRADE. Ultimately, acupuncture yields benefits in stroke rehabilitation (neurological function improvement: RR = 1.34; swallowing improvement: RR = 1.61, 1.49, 1.07; disability: SMD = 0.49 or 0.07). Poor evidentiary quality and insufficient information about harm led to weak recommendations. In conclusion, acupuncture may improve stroke rehabilitation, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for acupuncture’s usage in this context. PMID:26560971

  17. Low level laser therapy and hair regrowth: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Schachner, Lawrence A; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2016-02-01

    Despite the current treatment options for different types of alopecia, there is a need for more effective management options. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was evaluated for stimulating hair growth. Here, we reviewed the current evidence on the LLLT effects with an evidence-based approach, focusing more on randomized controlled studies by critically evaluating them. In order to investigate whether in individuals presenting with hair loss (male pattern hair loss (MPHL), female pattern hair loss (FPHL), alopecia areata (AA), and chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA)) LLLT is effective for hair regrowth, several databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database were searched using the following keywords: Alopecia, Hair loss, Hair growth, Low level laser therapy, Low level light therapy, Low energy laser irradiation, and Photobiomodulation. From the searches, 21 relevant studies were summarized in this review including 2 in vitro, 7 animal, and 12 clinical studies. Among clinical studies, only five were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which evaluated LLLT effect on male and female pattern hair loss. The RCTs were critically appraised using the created checklist according to the Critical Appraisal for Therapy Articles Worksheet created by the Center of Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford. The results demonstrated that all the performed RCTs have moderate to high quality of evidence. However, only one out of five studies performed intention-to-treat analysis, and only another study reported the method of randomization and subsequent concealment of allocation clearly; all other studies did not include this very important information in their reports. None of these studies reported the treatment effect of factors such as number needed to treat. Based on this review on all the available evidence about effect of LLLT in alopecia, we found that the FDA-cleared LLLT devices are both safe and effective in patients with MPHL and FPHL

  18. [Evidence-based and promising interventions to prevent sexually transmitted diseases: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Kersaudy-Rahib, Delphine; Clément, Juliette; Lamboy, Béatrice; Lydié, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in France over the past decade. The prevention and control of STDs are a major focus of the 2010-2014 national strategic plan on HIV and STDs. This paper reviews the current knowledge of evidence-based programs aimed at preventing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The study used a standard protocol to identify and review the literature and to classify the selected interventions. Twenty-seven interventions were found to have an impact on STD prevention. The study also found that most of the interventions were aimed at adolescents and were implemented in schools. This study aims to improve current interventions in this area and to promote the development and implementation of new programs.

  19. Ethical practice of evidence-based medicine: A review for plastic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Rajeev B.

    2013-01-01

    Last decade has witnessed a spurt in articles focused on the topic of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and medical ethics. These articles are not only educative, but draw attention to the changing scenario of medical practice. Surgeons seem a bit less attentive to practice of EBM, more so in the developing world. The theme is now percolating in our realm for demonstrable incorporation of EBM in our practice, which is allegorical of a good physician and is also likely to become demanding legally. In practicing EBM, several conflicts may arise with the ethical vows of medicine. However, majority of these conflicting issues have germinated from a capitalistic approach to medical practice, where the fear of extraneous compulsions dictating prescriptions and procedures in the garb of ‘evidence-based practice’ conflicts ethical behaviour. This review shall appraise the reader with important definitions of medical ethics, EBM and how to incorporate best evidence into ones practice. While, EBM brings objectivity to treatment to derive measurable outcomes it should not become regimented or metamorphose as a pseudonym for defensive medicine to escalate treatment costs. EBM also has several limitations one of which is to place the onus on the practicing physician to search for the best evidence and the other is the resource constraint of practice in the developing world. How a plastic surgery practice could be made to conform to evidence based (EB) procedures is proposed as insufficient surgical skills can pose a serious threat to not only the practice of EB procedures, but to ethical responsibilities as well. In conclusion, it is necessary to incorporate ethical temperance into EB procedures to withstand societal, peer and legal pressures of current times. PMID:23960301

  20. Breaking Bad News: An Evidence-Based Review of Communication Models for Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Meridith; Keefe, Joanna; Miller, Lindsay; Overcash, Janine

    2017-10-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is a stressful, difficult, and life-altering event. Breaking bad news is distressing to patients and families and is often uncomfortable for the nurse delivering it. Evidence-based communication models have been developed and adapted for use in clinical practice to assist nurses with breaking bad news.

. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on breaking bad news and to review the utility of the SPIKES and PEWTER evidence-based communication models for oncology nurses.
. Perceptions of breaking bad news from the nurse and patient perspectives, as well as barriers and consequences to effective communication, will be presented. Clinical examples of possible situations of breaking bad news will demonstrate how to use the SPIKES and PEWTER models of communication when disclosing bad news to patients and their families.
. By using the evidence-based communication strategies depicted in this article, oncology nurses can support the delivery of bad news and maintain communication with their patients and their patients' families in an effective and productive manner.

  1. Systematic Review of Cyberbullying Interventions for Youth and Parents With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Elizabeth; Kelly, Stephanie; Militello, Lisa K

    2017-08-31

    Cyberbullying is a new risk factor for the well-being of pediatric populations. Consequences of cyberbullying include both physical and mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, and somatic concerns. Adolescents who have been victims of cyberbullying and developed secondary symptoms are often recommended to visit a healthcare provider to obtain effective, evidence-based treatment. To date, no interventions exist in the healthcare setting for adolescents who are victims of cyberbullying. The purpose of this project is to review interventional studies on cyberbullying that have components for adolescents who have been involved with cyberbullying and their parents and to provide recommendations on effective intervention components with the goal of guiding clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted using the Institute of Medicine guidelines. A comprehensive electronic literature search was completed targeting interventions of cyberbullying in any setting. No date limits were used. Literature was searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Education Information Resource Center (ERIC), and PsycINFO databases. The following search terms were applied "cyberbullying" + "intervention" or "treatment" or "therapy" or "program." Only articles with a pediatric population were selected for review. Seventeen cyberbullying intervention programs in 23 articles were found to meet the search criteria. The most frequently used intervention components included education on cyberbullying for the adolescent, coping skills, empathy training, communication and social skills, and digital citizenship. Parent education on cyberbullying was also found to be important and was included in programs with significant outcomes. As youth present to healthcare providers with symptoms related to cyberbullying, effective interventions are needed to guide evidence-based practice. This review

  2. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Leguminosae): an evidence-based systematic review by the natural standard research collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Basch, Ethan; Burke, Dilys; Cheung, Lisa; Ernst, Edzard; Giese, Nicole; Foppa, Ivo; Hammerness, Paul; Hashmi, Sadaf; Kuo, Grace; Miranda, Michelle; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Smith, Michael; Sollars, David; Tanguay-Colucci, Shaina; Vijayan, Nazhiyath; Weissner, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology and dosing.

  3. Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.): an evidence-based systematic review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Brendler, Thomas; Gruenwald, Joerg; Kligler, Benjamin; Keifer, David; Abrams, Tracee Rae; Woods, Jen; Boon, Heather; Kirkwood, Catherine DeFranco; Hackman, Dana A; Basch, Ethan; Lafferty, Heather J

    2005-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetic/dynamics, interactions, adverse effect, toxicology, and dosing.

  4. Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens DC): an evidence-based systematic review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Brendler, Thomas; Gruenwald, Joerg; Ulbricht, Catherine; Basch, Ethan

    2006-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interaction, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  5. An evidence-based systematic review of gymnema (Gymnema sylvestre R. Br.) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Abrams, Tracee Rae; Basch, Ethan; Davies-Heerema, Theresa; Foppa, Ivo; Hammerness, Paul; Rusie, Erica; Tanguay-Colucci, Shaina; Taylor, Sarah; Ulbricht, Catherine; Varghese, Minney; Weissner, Wendy; Woods, Jen

    2011-09-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of gymnema (Gymnema sylvestre R. Br.), including written and statistical analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  6. Use of Information-Seeking Strategies for Developing Systematic Reviews and Engaging in Evidence-Based Practice: The Application of Traditional and Comprehensive Pearl Growing--A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Ralf W.; Wendt, Oliver; Bhavnani, Suresh; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Background: Efficient library searches for research evidence are critical to practitioners who wish to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) as well as researchers who seek to develop systematic reviews. Aims: This review will propose the benefits of the search technique "Pearl Growing" ("Traditional Pearl Growing") as well…

  7. Use of Information-Seeking Strategies for Developing Systematic Reviews and Engaging in Evidence-Based Practice: The Application of Traditional and Comprehensive Pearl Growing--A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Ralf W.; Wendt, Oliver; Bhavnani, Suresh; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Background: Efficient library searches for research evidence are critical to practitioners who wish to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) as well as researchers who seek to develop systematic reviews. Aims: This review will propose the benefits of the search technique "Pearl Growing" ("Traditional Pearl Growing") as well…

  8. Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Mueller, R S

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses and quality of enrolment of study subjects), benefit (improvement in skin lesions or pruritus scores) and harm (type, severity and frequency of adverse drug events) of the various interventions. Meta-analysis of pooled results was not possible because of heterogeneity of the drugs evaluated. Forty trials enrolling 1607 dogs were identified. There is good evidence for recommending the use of oral glucocorticoids and cyclosporin for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis, and fair evidence for using topical triamcinolone spray, topical tacrolimus lotion, oral pentoxifylline or oral misoprostol. Insufficient evidence is available for or against recommending the prescription of oral first- and second-generation type-1 histamine receptor antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, cyproheptadine, aspirin, Chinese herbal therapy, an homeopathic complex remedy, ascorbic acid, AHR-13268, papaverine, immune-modulating antibiotics or tranilast and topical pramoxine or capsaicin. Finally, there is fair evidence against recommending the use of oral arofylline, leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists.

  9. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. Methods The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Results Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Conclusion Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying

  10. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos; Patelarou, Athina; Laliotis, Aggelos; Wan, Andrew C; Matalliotakis, Michail; Tsiou, Chrysoula; Patelarou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying form some hours to even months was

  11. Framework of policy recommendations for implementation of evidence-based practice: a systematic scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Guyatt, Gordon H; Vermeulen, Hester

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based practice (EBP) may help improve healthcare quality. However, not all healthcare professionals and managers use EBP in their daily practice. We systematically reviewed the literature to summarise self-reported appreciation of EBP and organisational infrastructure solutions proposed to promote EBP. Design Systematic review. Two investigators independently performed the systematic reviewing process. Information sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched for publications between 2000 and 2011. Eligibility criteria for included studies Reviews and surveys of EBP attitude, knowledge, awareness, skills, barriers and facilitators among managers, doctors and nurses in clinical settings. Results We found 31 surveys of fairly good quality. General attitude towards EBP was welcoming. Respondents perceived several barriers, but also many facilitators for EBP implementation. Solutions were proposed at various organisational levels, including (inter)national associations and hospital management promoting EBP, pregraduate and postgraduate education, as well as individual support by EBP mentors on the wards to move EBP from the classroom to the bedside. Conclusions More than 20 years after its introduction, the EBP paradigm has been embraced by healthcare professionals as an important means to improve quality of patient care, but its implementation is still deficient. Policy exerted at microlevel , middlelevel and macrolevel, and supported by professional, educational and managerial role models, may further facilitate EBP. PMID:23355664

  12. Research review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C; Odgers, Candice L; Slutske, Wendy S; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to the conduct disorder diagnostic protocol: a childhood-limited subtype, family psychiatric history, callous-unemotional traits, female-specific criteria, preschool-specific criteria, early substance use, and biomarkers from genetics, neuroimaging, and physiology research. This article reviews the evidence for these and other potential changes to the conduct disorder diagnosis. We report that although there is a great deal of exciting research into each of the topics, very little of it provides the precise sort of evidence base required to justify any alteration to the DSM-V. We outline specific research questions and study designs needed to build the lacking evidence base for or against proposed changes to DSM-V conduct disorder.

  13. Research Review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2009-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to the conduct disorder diagnostic protocol: a childhood-limited subtype, family psychiatric history, callous-unemotional traits, female-specific criteria, preschool-specific criteria, early substance use, and biomarkers from genetics, neuroimaging, and physiology research. This article reviews the evidence for these and other potential changes to the conduct disorder diagnosis. We report that although there is a great deal of exciting research into each of the topics, very little of it provides the precise sort of evidence base required to justify any alteration to the DSM-V. We outline specific research questions and study designs needed to build the lacking evidence base for or against proposed changes to DSM-V conduct disorder. PMID:18181878

  14. How are "teaching the teachers" courses in evidence based medicine evaluated? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Teaching of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become widespread in medical education. Teaching the teachers (TTT) courses address the increased teaching demand and the need to improve effectiveness of EBM teaching. We conducted a systematic review of assessment tools for EBM TTT courses. To summarise and appraise existing assessment methods for teaching the teachers courses in EBM by a systematic review. Methods We searched PubMed, BioMed, EmBase, Cochrane and Eric databases without language restrictions and included articles that assessed its participants. Study selection and data extraction were conducted independently by two reviewers. Results Of 1230 potentially relevant studies, five papers met the selection criteria. There were no specific assessment tools for evaluating effectiveness of EBM TTT courses. Some of the material available might be useful in initiating the development of such an assessment tool. Conclusion There is a need for the development of educationally sound assessment tools for teaching the teachers courses in EBM, without which it would be impossible to ascertain if such courses have the desired effect. PMID:20920240

  15. Practice Parameter: Evaluation of the child with microcephaly (an evidence-based review)

    PubMed Central

    Ashwal, Stephen; Michelson, David; Plawner, Lauren; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To make evidence-based recommendations concerning the evaluation of the child with microcephaly. Methods: Relevant literature was reviewed, abstracted, and classified. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered scheme of evidence classification. Results: Microcephaly is an important neurologic sign but there is nonuniformity in its definition and evaluation. Microcephaly may result from any insult that disturbs early brain growth and can be seen in association with hundreds of genetic syndromes. Annually, approximately 25,000 infants in the United States will be diagnosed with microcephaly (head circumference <−2 SD). Few data are available to inform evidence-based recommendations regarding diagnostic testing. The yield of neuroimaging ranges from 43% to 80%. Genetic etiologies have been reported in 15.5% to 53.3%. The prevalence of metabolic disorders is unknown but is estimated to be 1%. Children with severe microcephaly (head circumference <−3 SD) are more likely (∼80%) to have imaging abnormalities and more severe developmental impairments than those with milder microcephaly (−2 to −3 SD; ∼40%). Coexistent conditions include epilepsy (∼40%), cerebral palsy (∼20%), mental retardation (∼50%), and ophthalmologic disorders (∼20% to ∼50%). Recommendations: Neuroimaging may be considered useful in identifying structural causes in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly (Level C). Targeted and specific genetic testing may be considered in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly who has clinical or imaging abnormalities that suggest a specific diagnosis or who shows no evidence of an acquired or environmental etiology (Level C). Screening for coexistent conditions such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and sensory deficits may also be considered (Level C). Further study is needed regarding the yield of diagnostic testing in children with microcephaly. GLOSSARY CP = cerebral palsy; GDD = global developmental delay; HC = head

  16. A 'reluctant' critical review: 'Manual for evidence-based clinical practice (2015)'.

    PubMed

    Seshia, Shashi S

    2015-12-01

    The Users' Guides to the Medical Literature Manual has been a major influence on the teaching and practice of health care globally. The 3rd edition of the multi-authored Manual was reviewed using the principles outlined in Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) texts. One 'clinical scenario' was selected for critical appraisal, as were several chapters; objectivity was enhanced by citing references to support opinions. RESULTS (SUMMARY OF THE APPRAISAL): (1) Strengths: Clinical pearls, too numerous to list. (i) evidence is never enough to drive clinical decision making; (ii) do not rush to adopt new interventions; and (iii) question efficacy data based only on surrogate markers. (2) Weaknesses: The Manual shares shortcomings of textbooks discussed by Straus et al.: (i) references may not be current, important ones may be excluded and citations may be selective; (ii) often, opinion-based; and (iii) delays between revisions. (3) Notable omissions: Little or no discussion of: (i) important segments of the population: those <18 years of age, >65 years of age and those with multimorbidity; (ii) surgical disciplines; (iii) Greenhalgh et al.'s essay on EBM; (iv) alternate views on the hierarchy of evidence; and (vi) critical thinking. (4) Additional issues: (i) Omission of important references on dabigatran (clinical scenario: chapter 13.1); (ii) authors' advice (Chapter 13.3) to 'bypass the discussion section of published research'; and (iii) the advocacy of pre-appraised sources of evidence and network meta-analysis without warnings about limitations, are critiqued. The Manual has several clinical pearls but readers should also be aware of shortcomings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evidence-based neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius N.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Ammar, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Medical evidence is obtainable from approaches, which might be descriptive, analytic and integrative and ranked into levels of evidence, graded according to quality and summarized into strengths of recommendation. Sources of evidence range from expert opinions through well-randomized control trials to meta-analyses. The conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions related to the care of individual patients defines the concept of evidence-based neurosurgery (EBN). We reviewed reference books of clinical epidemiology, evidence-based practice and other previously related articles addressing principles of evidence-based practice in neurosurgery. Based on existing theories and models and our cumulative years of experience and expertise conducting research and promoting EBN, we have synthesized and presented a holistic overview of the concept of EBN. We have also underscored the importance of clinical research and its relationship to EBN. Useful electronic resources are provided. The concept of critical appraisal is introduced. PMID:27356649

  18. The benefits of breakfast cereal consumption: a systematic review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Williams, Peter G

    2014-09-01

    There have been no comprehensive reviews of the relation of breakfast cereal consumption to nutrition and health. This systematic review of all articles on breakfast cereals to October 2013 in the Scopus and Medline databases identified 232 articles with outcomes related to nutrient intake, weight, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, digestive health, dental and mental health, and cognition. Sufficient evidence was available to develop 21 summary evidence statements, ranked from A (can be trusted to guide practice) to D (weak and must be applied with caution). Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with diets higher in vitamins and minerals and lower in fat (grade B) but is not associated with increased intakes of total energy or sodium (grade C) or risk of dental caries (grade B). Most studies on the nutritional impact are cross-sectional, with very few intervention studies, so breakfast cereal consumption may be a marker of an overall healthy lifestyle. Oat-, barley-, or psyllium-based cereals can help lower cholesterol concentrations (grade A), and high-fiber, wheat-based cereals can improve bowel function (grade A). Regular breakfast cereal consumption is associated with a lower body mass index and less risk of being overweight or obese (grade B). Presweetened breakfast cereals do not increase the risk of overweight and obesity in children (grade C). Whole-grain or high-fiber breakfast cereals are associated with a lower risk of diabetes (grade B) and cardiovascular disease (grade C). There is emerging evidence of associations with feelings of greater well-being and a lower risk of hypertension (grade D), but more research is required. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. The Effects of Preexercise Caffeinated Coffee Ingestion on Endurance Performance: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Simon; Straight, Chad R; Lewis, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    Endurance athletes commonly ingest caffeine as a means to enhance training intensity and competitive performance. A widely-used source of caffeine is coffee, however conflicting evidence exists regarding the efficacy of coffee in improving endurance performance. In this context, the aims of this evidence-based review were threefold: 1) to evaluate the effects of preexercise coffee on endurance performance, 2) to evaluate the effects of coffee on perceived exertion during endurance performance, and 3) to translate the research into usable information for athletes to make an informed decision regarding the intake of caffeine via coffee as a potential ergogenic aid. Searches of three major databases were performed using terms caffeine and coffee, or coffee-caffeine, and endurance, or aerobic. Included studies (n = 9) evaluated the effects of caffeinated coffee on human subjects, provided the caffeine dose administered, administered caffeine ≥ 45 min before testing, and included a measure of endurance performance (e.g., time trial). Significant improvements in endurance performance were observed in five of nine studies, which were on average 24.2% over controls for time to exhaustion trials, and 3.1% for time to completion trials. Three of six studies found that coffee reduced perceived exertion during performance measures significantly more than control conditions (p < .05). Based on the reviewed studies there is moderate evidence supporting the use of coffee as an ergogenic aid to improve performance in endurance cycling and running. Coffee providing 3-8.1 mg/kg (1.36-3.68 mg/lb) of caffeine may be used as a safe alternative to anhydrous caffeine to improve endurance performance.

  20. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base1234

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    There have been no comprehensive reviews of the relation of breakfast cereal consumption to nutrition and health. This systematic review of all articles on breakfast cereals to October 2013 in the Scopus and Medline databases identified 232 articles with outcomes related to nutrient intake, weight, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, digestive health, dental and mental health, and cognition. Sufficient evidence was available to develop 21 summary evidence statements, ranked from A (can be trusted to guide practice) to D (weak and must be applied with caution). Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with diets higher in vitamins and minerals and lower in fat (grade B) but is not associated with increased intakes of total energy or sodium (grade C) or risk of dental caries (grade B). Most studies on the nutritional impact are cross-sectional, with very few intervention studies, so breakfast cereal consumption may be a marker of an overall healthy lifestyle. Oat-, barley-, or psyllium-based cereals can help lower cholesterol concentrations (grade A), and high-fiber, wheat-based cereals can improve bowel function (grade A). Regular breakfast cereal consumption is associated with a lower body mass index and less risk of being overweight or obese (grade B). Presweetened breakfast cereals do not increase the risk of overweight and obesity in children (grade C). Whole-grain or high-fiber breakfast cereals are associated with a lower risk of diabetes (grade B) and cardiovascular disease (grade C). There is emerging evidence of associations with feelings of greater well-being and a lower risk of hypertension (grade D), but more research is required. PMID:25225349

  1. An evidence-based review of aging of the body systems following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Eng, Janice J.; Miller, William C.; Sakakibara, Brodie M.

    2011-01-01

    Study design Systematic review. Objective To systematically review evidence on aging of the body systems after spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting Toronto, Ontario and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO), were searched for studies published between 1980 and 2009. The search was augmented by reviewing the reference lists of relevant papers. Non-intervention studies that were longitudinal or cross-sectional with able-bodied (AB) controls that were at minimum matched on chronological age were included for review. Levels of evidence were assigned to the study design using a modified Sackett scale. Results Of the 74 studies selected for inclusion, 16 were longitudinal in design. The hypothesis that SCI represents a model for premature aging is supported by a large proportion of level 5 evidence for the cardiovascular and endocrine systems, level 2, 4 and 5 evidence for the musculoskeletal system, and limited level 5 evidence for the immune system. Only a few level 4 and 5 studies for the respiratory system were found. The evidence on the genitourinary system, gastrointestinal system, and for skin and subcutaneous tissues provide level 4 and 5 evidence that premature aging may not be occurring. The evidence on the nervous system does not provide evidence of premature aging as a result of SCI. Conclusions Premature aging appears to occur in some systems after SCI. Additional longitudinal studies are required to confirm these findings. Sponsorship Rick Hansen Institute; Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation. PMID:21151191

  2. The current evidence base for the clinical nurse leader: a narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The clinical nurse leader (CNL) is a relatively new nursing role, introduced in 2003 through the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). A narrative review of the extant CNL literature was conducted with the aim of comprehensively summarizing the broad and methodologically diverse CNL evidence base. The review included 25 implementation reports, 1 CNL job analysis, 7 qualitative and/or survey studies, and 3 quantitative studies. All CNL implementation reports and studies described improved care quality outcomes after introduction of the role into a care delivery microsystem. Despite preliminary evidence supporting the CNL as an innovative new nursing role capable of consistently improving care quality wherever it is implemented, CNLs are still struggling to define the role to themselves and to the health care spectrum at large. Although the AACN CNL White Paper provides a concise model for CNL educational curriculum and end competencies, there is a compelling need for further research to substantively delineate the CNL role in practice, define care delivery structures and processes that influence CNL integration, and develop indicators capable of capturing CNL-specific contributions to improved care quality.

  3. Evidence-Based Practice in Educational Research: A Critical Realist Critique of Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Sue

    2005-01-01

    The paper argues that a critical realist perspective can contribute to a critique of evidence-based practice, while at the same time not abandoning the idea of evidence altogether. The paper is structured around a number of related themes: the sociopolitics of "evidence-based"; epistemological roots and a critical realist critique; the debate in…

  4. A review of enteral strategies in infant short bowel syndrome: evidence-based or NICU culture?

    PubMed

    Miller, Malki; Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad

    2013-05-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is an increasingly common condition encountered across neonatal intensive care units. Improvements in parenteral nutrition (PN), neonatal intensive care and surgical techniques, in addition to an improved understanding of SBS pathophysiology, have contributed in equal parts to the survival of this fragile subset of infants. Prevention of intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD) and promotion of intestinal adaptation are primary goals of all involved in the care of these patients. While enteral nutritional and pharmacological strategies are necessary to achieve these goals, there remains great variability in the application of therapeutic strategies in units that are not necessarily evidence-based. A search of major English language medical databases (SCOPUS, Index Medicus, Medline, and the Cochrane database) was conducted for the key words short bowel syndrome, medical management, nutritional management and intestinal adaptation. All pharmacological and nutritional agents encountered in the literature search were classified based on their effects on absorptive capacity, intestinal adaptation and bowel motility that are the three major strategies employed in the management of SBS. The Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) classification for levels of evidence was used to develop grades of clinical recommendation for each variable studied. We reviewed various medications used and nutritional strategies included soluble fiber, enteral fat, glutamine, probiotics and sodium supplementation. Most interventions have scientific rationale but little evidence to support their role in the management of infant SBS. While some of these agents symptomatically improve diarrhea, they can adversely influence pancreatico-biliary function or actually impair intestinal adaptation. Surgical anatomy and liver function are two important variables that should determine the selection of pharmacological and nutritional interventions. There is

  5. Perils of paediatric anaesthesia and novel molecular approaches: An evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Anand, Smriti; Gupta, Hemant

    2015-05-01

    Evolution of anaesthesia has been largely helped by progress of evidence-based medicine. In spite of many advancements in anaesthesia techniques and availability of newer and safer drugs, much more needs to be explored scientifically for the development of anaesthesia. Over the last few years, the notion that the actions of the anaesthesiologist have only immediate or short-term consequences has largely been challenged. Evidences accumulated in the recent years have shown that anaesthesia exposure may have long-term consequences particularly in the extremes of ages. However, most of the studies conducted so far are in vitro or animal studies, the results of which have been extrapolated to humans. There have been confounding evidences linking anaesthesia exposure in the developing brain with poor neurocognitive outcome. The results of animal studies and human retrospective studies have raised concern over the potential detrimental effects of general anaesthetics on the developing brain. The purpose of this review is to highlight the long-term perils of anaesthesia in the very young and the potential of improving anaesthesia delivery with the novel molecular approaches.

  6. An evidence-based review of parental presence during anesthesia induction and parent/child anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chundamala, Josie; Wright, James G; Kemp, Sheelagh M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this evidence-based review was to examine the effect of parental presence during anesthesia induction on parents' and children's anxiety. MEDLINE (1950 to 2008) and EMBASE (1980 to 2008) were searched. Studies were restricted to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative studies only (levels of evidence I-III). Fourteen studies that provided level II or level III evidence were included (nine RCTs, four prospective comparative studies, and one retrospective comparative study). Of the 10 studies that evaluated parents' anxiety, most did not find parental presence to be more effective than no parental presence, midazolam, or parental presence plus midazolam. Of the 11 studies that examined children's anxiety, most did not find parental presence to be more effective than no parental presence, midazolam, parental presence plus midazolam, or parental presence plus a video game. Contrary to popular belief, in most cases parental presence does not appear to alleviate parents' or children's anxiety. In the rare instances when it does seem to diminish parents' or children's anxiety, premedicating children with midazolam has shown to be a viable alternative. Other anxiety-reducing solutions, such as distracting children with video games, should also be considered.

  7. Antidotes and treatments for chemical warfare/terrorism agents: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G C; Condurache, C T

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of antidotes used or recommended for the potential chemical warfare agents of most concern. Chemical warfare agents considered include cyanide, vesicants, pulmonary irritants such as chlorine and phosgene, and nerve agents. The strength of evidence for most antidotes is weak, highlighting the need for additional research in this area.

  8. A review and practical application of evidence based medicine (EBM): Testicular adrenal rest tumour

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, Medical practice is largely based on the best available evidence. However, the evidence may not always be readily available and clinician and/or other health allied professionals may need to learn how to search for it. This article gives highlights on the very vast and growing subject of evidence based medicine (EBM), followed by a practical application of searching for it in the real life, in a situation when the available evidence is limited. PMID:27493342

  9. Effectiveness of sport-based HIV prevention interventions: a systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Z A; Spencer, T S; Ross, D A

    2013-03-01

    Interest in sport as a tool for behavioral HIV prevention has grown substantially in the past decade. With dozens of organisations now using sport-based HIV prevention (SBHP) approaches and upcoming randomized controlled trials in South Africa and Zimbabwe, there is a pressing need to synthesize previous evaluation findings and identify gaps in existing research. A systematic review on the effectiveness of SBHP interventions was carried out, identifying both published and unpublished studies on SBHP interventions that measured effectiveness quantitatively. Study quality was scored using an adapted Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects meta-analyses were carried out across studies for effects on six categories of HIV-related outcomes. The review identified 952 publications, 21 of which met inclusion criteria. No randomised controlled trials on SBHP interventions and no studies assessing biological outcomes were identified. Mean study quality score was 5.1 (SD 3.1) out of 20 points. Overall strong evidence was observed for positive effects on HIV-related knowledge (RR = 1.26, 95 % CI = 1.15-1.37), stigma (RR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.24), self-efficacy (RR = 1.22, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.41), reported communication (RR = 1.24, 95 % CI = 1.06-1.41), and reported recent condom use (RR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.00-1.59). Generally, the review found encouraging evidence for some short-term effects but relied predominantly on low-quality studies. More rigorous research on SBHP is needed to objectively assess effectiveness. Randomised controlled trials could play an important role in guiding policies, strategies, and funding related to SBHP.

  10. Evidence-Based Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jennifer; Vollenweider, Daniela; Galusca, Dragos; Smith, Thomas J.; Pronovost, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last 20 years, multiple interventions to better integrate palliative care and intensive care unit (ICU) care have been evaluated. This systematic review summarizes these studies and their outcomes. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science; performed a search of articles published by opinion leaders in the field; and reviewed hand-search articles as of August 13, 2012. The terms “palliative care” and “intensive care unit” were mapped to MeSH subject headings and “exploded.” We included trials of adult patients that evaluated an ICU intervention and addressed Robert Wood Johnson group-identified domains of high-quality end-of-life care in the ICU. We excluded case series, editorials, and review articles. We compared two types of interventions, integrative and consultative, focusing on the outcomes of patient and family satisfaction, mortality, and ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), because these were most prevalent among studies. Results: Our search strategy yielded 3328 references, of which we included 37 publications detailing 30 unique interventions. Interventions and outcome measures were heterogeneous, and many studies were underpowered and/or subject to multiple biases. Most of the interventions resulted in a decrease in hospital and ICU LOS. Few interventions significantly affected satisfaction. With one exception, the interventions decreased or had no effect on mortality. There was no evidence of harm from any intervention. Conclusions: Heterogeneity of interventions made comparison of ICU-based palliative care interventions difficult. However, existing evidence suggests proactive palliative care in the ICU, using either consultative or integrative palliative care interventions, decrease hospital and ICU LOS, do not affect satisfaction, and either decrease or do not affect mortality. PMID:24517300

  11. The Effects of Oral-Motor Exercises on Swallowing in Children: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this unregistered evidence-based systematic review was to determine the state and quality of evidence on the effects of oral motor exercises (OME) on swallowing physiology, pulmonary health, functional swallowing outcomes, and drooling management in children with swallowing disorders. Method: A systematic search of 20 electronic…

  12. The Effects of Oral-Motor Exercises on Swallowing in Children: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this unregistered evidence-based systematic review was to determine the state and quality of evidence on the effects of oral motor exercises (OME) on swallowing physiology, pulmonary health, functional swallowing outcomes, and drooling management in children with swallowing disorders. Method: A systematic search of 20 electronic…

  13. Effect of Evidence-Based Practice Programs on Individual Barriers of Workforce Nurses: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Middlebrooks, Reginald; Carter-Templeton, Heather; Mund, Angela R

    2016-09-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effect of Evidence-Based Practice on Individual Barriers of Workforce Nurses: An Integrative Review" found on pages 398-406, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until August 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Identify individual barriers in the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) by nurses

  14. Complementary & alternative management of Parkinson's disease: an evidence-based review of eastern influenced practices.

    PubMed

    Bega, Danny; Zadikoff, Cindy

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to be lower in Asia compared to the Western world. It is unclear if this is related to the ubiquitous use of traditional medicine in Eastern healthcare, but the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities in countries like Korea may be as high as 76%. Among patients with PD, herbal medicines, health supplement foods, and acupuncture are interventions which are increasingly used throughout the world. Countries like Korea, China, India, and Japan have long embraced and incorporated traditional medicine into modern management of conditions such as PD, but research into various CAM modalities remains in its infancy limiting evidence-based recommendations for many treatments. We reviewed the literature on CAM treatments for PD, focusing on mind-body interventions and natural products. Based on evidence limited to randomized-controlled trials we found that mind-body interventions are generally effective forms of physical activity that are likely to foster good adherence and may reduce disability associated with PD. Based on the current data, modalities like Tai Chi and dance are safe and beneficial in PD, but better studies are needed to assess the effects of other frequently used modalities such as yoga and acupuncture. Furthermore, despite centuries of experience using medicinal herbs and plants in Eastern countries, and despite substantial preclinical data on the beneficial effects of nutritional antioxidants as neuroprotective agents in PD, there is insufficient clinical evidence that any vitamin, food additive, or supplement, can improve motor function or delay disease progression in PD.

  15. Where are the systematic reviews in transfusion medicine? A study of the transfusion evidence base.

    PubMed

    Dorée, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon; Brunskill, Susan J; Hopewell, Sally; Hyde, Chris J; Murphy, Mike F

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion medicine has become a large and complex specialty. Although there are now systematic reviews covering many aspects of transfusion, these span a large number of clinical areas and are published across more than a hundred different medical journals, making it difficult for transfusion medicine practitioners and researchers to keep abreast of the current high-level evidence. In response to this problem, NHS Blood and Transplant's Systematic Review Initiative (SRI) has produced a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in transfusion medicine. A systematic search (to December 2009) and screening procedure were followed by the appraisal of systematic reviews according to predefined inclusion criteria. The 340 eligible systematic reviews were mapped to 10 transfusion intervention groups and 14 topic groups within clinical medicine. Trends in the systematic review literature were examined and gaps in the literature described. The spread of systematic reviews across clinical areas was found to be very uneven, with some areas underreviewed and others with multiple systematic reviews on the same topic, making the identification of the best evidence for current transfusion practice a continuing challenge. References and links to all systematic reviews included in this overview can be freely accessed via the SRI's new online database, the Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionguidelines.org). Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Different Service Delivery Models on Communication Outcomes for Elementary School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirrin, Frank M.; Schooling, Tracy L.; Nelson, Nickola W.; Diehl, Sylvia F.; Flynn, Perry F.; Staskowski, Maureen; Torrey, T. Zoann; Adamczyk, Deborah F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to conduct an evidence-based systematic review (EBSR) of peer-reviewed articles from the last 30 years about the effect of different service delivery models on speech-language intervention outcomes for elementary school-age students. Method: A computer search of electronic databases was conducted to…

  17. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Different Service Delivery Models on Communication Outcomes for Elementary School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirrin, Frank M.; Schooling, Tracy L.; Nelson, Nickola W.; Diehl, Sylvia F.; Flynn, Perry F.; Staskowski, Maureen; Torrey, T. Zoann; Adamczyk, Deborah F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to conduct an evidence-based systematic review (EBSR) of peer-reviewed articles from the last 30 years about the effect of different service delivery models on speech-language intervention outcomes for elementary school-age students. Method: A computer search of electronic databases was conducted to…

  18. A review of evidence-based practices for management of the second stage of labor.

    PubMed

    Kopas, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Management of the second stage of labor often follows tradition-based routines rather than evidence-based practices. This review of second-stage labor care practices discusses risk factors for perineal trauma and prolonged second stage and scrutinizes a variety of care practices including positions, styles of pushing, use of epidural analgesia, and perineal support techniques. Current evidence for management of the second stage of labor supports the practices of delayed pushing, spontaneous (nondirected) pushing, and maternal choice of positions. Perineal compresses, perineal massage with a lubricant, and controlling the rate of fetal extension during crowning may prevent severe perineal trauma at birth. Supine positioning is not recommended. Upright positions and directed pushing can shorten the time from onset of second stage to birth and may be indicated in certain situations, although directed pushing has some associated risks. If the fetus is in the occiput posterior position, immediate pushing is not recommended, and manual rotation can be effective in correcting the malposition. Women should be informed of the potential effects of epidural analgesia on labor progress. Consultation and intervention to expedite birth may be indicated when birth is not imminent after 2 hours of active pushing, or 4 hours complete dilatation, for nulliparous women; or one hour of pushing, or 2 hours complete dilatation, for multiparous women. Each woman should be individually assessed and apprised of the potential risks to her and her fetus of a prolonged second stage of labor, and some women may choose to continue pushing beyond these time limits.

  19. Evidence-based measures to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Daniele Cristina; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify evidence-based care to prevent CLABSI among adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. Method: systematic review conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf and Cochrane Studies addressing care and maintenance of central venous catheters, published from January 2011 to July 2014 were searched. The 34 studies identified were organized in an instrument and assessed by using the classification provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Results: the studies presented care bundles including elements such as hand hygiene and maximal barrier precautions; multidimensional programs and strategies such as impregnated catheters and bandages and the involvement of facilities in and commitment of staff to preventing infections. Conclusions: care bundles coupled with education and the commitment of both staff and institutions is a strategy that can contribute to decreased rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections among adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units. PMID:27598378

  20. Contemporary surgical management of advanced end stage emphysema: an evidence based review.

    PubMed

    Sachithanandan, Anand; Badmanaban, Balaji

    2012-06-01

    Emphysema is a progressive unrelenting component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a major source of mortality and morbidity globally. The prevalence of moderate to severe emphysema is approximately 5% in Malaysia and likely to increase in the future. Hence advanced emphysema will emerge as a leading cause of hospital admission and a major consumer of healthcare resources in this country in the future. Patients with advanced disease have a poor quality of life and reduced survival. Medical therapy has been largely ineffective for many patients however certain subgroups have disease amenable to surgical palliation. Effective surgical therapies include lung volume reduction surgery, lung transplantation and bullectomy. This article is a comprehensive evidence based review of the literature evaluating the rationale, efficacy, safety and limitations of surgery for advanced emphysema highlighting the importance of meticulous patient selection and local factors relevant to Malaysia.

  1. Disseminating evidence-based practices in substance abuse treatment: a review with suggestions.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R; Sorensen, James L; Selzer, Jeffrey A; Brigham, Gregory S

    2006-07-01

    Although substance abuse professionals are generally open to new and better therapeutic methods, most evidence-based treatments do not easily find their way into practice. Natural diffusion processes for innovations in substance abuse treatments are relatively informal and have yielded a widely acknowledged gap between science and community practice. This review focuses on methods for effectively disseminating new treatment methods into practice. Therapist manuals and one-time workshops are in themselves relatively ineffective in helping practitioners gain proficiency in new clinical approaches. Individual performance feedback and coaching improve the acquisition of clinical skills. Specific incentives for implementation may also be needed to encourage treatment providers, programs, and systems to adopt new approaches.

  2. Nasal irrigation: From empiricism to evidence-based medicine. A review.

    PubMed

    Bastier, P-L; Lechot, A; Bordenave, L; Durand, M; de Gabory, L

    2015-11-01

    Nasal irrigation plays a non-negligible role in the treatment of numerous sinonasal pathologies and postoperative care. There is, however, a wide variety of protocols. The present review of the evidence-based literature sought objective arguments for optimization and efficacy. It emerged that large-volume low-pressure nasal douche optimizes the distribution and cleansing power of the irrigation solution in the nasal cavity. Ionic composition and pH also influence mucociliary clearance and epithelium trophicity. Seawater is less rich in sodium ions and richer in bicarbonates, potassium, calcium and magnesium than is isotonic normal saline, while alkaline pH and elevated calcium concentration optimized ciliary motility in vitro. Bicarbonates reduce secretion viscosity. Potassium and magnesium promote healing and limit local inflammation. These results show that the efficacy of nasal irrigation is multifactorial. Large-volume low-pressure nasal irrigation using undiluted seawater seems, in the present state of knowledge, to be the most effective protocol.

  3. Vital pulp therapy using calcium-enriched mixture: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, casecontrol studies have revealed that the treatment outcomes of root canal therapy (RCT) are generally favorable; however, the overall epidemiological success rate of RCT in the general population is relatively low. On the other hand, vitality of dental pulp is a key factor in the long-term prognosis of permanent teeth; in recent years, vital pulp therapy (VPT) has received significant consideration as it has been revealed that the inflamed pulp has the potential to heal. In this review article, the current best evidence with regard to VPT using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in human permanent/primary teeth is discussed. A strategy based on a search using keywords for CEM cement as well as VPT was applied. PMID:23716958

  4. Assessing the Rationale and Effectiveness of Frozen Plasma Transfusions: An Evidence-based Review.

    PubMed

    Tinmouth, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Frozen plasma is a commonly used blood product. The primary indications for frozen plasma are the treatment and prevention of bleeding in patients with prolonged coagulation tests. However, there is a lack of well-conducted clinical trials to determine the appropriate indications for frozen plasma. The rationale and evidence for frozen plasma transfusions are reviewed, including the evidence or lack of evidence supporting common indications. Targeting indications in which frozen plasma transfusions are clearly not beneficial as supported by the current evidence provides an opportunity to improve the current use of frozen plasma and reduce adverse transfusion events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence and Recommendations for Imaging Liver Fat in Children, Based upon Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Awai, Hannah I.; Newton, Kimberly P.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Behling, Cynthia; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Fatty liver is a common problem in children, and increases their risk for cirrhosis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Liver biopsy is the clinical standard for diagnosing and grading fatty liver. However, non-invasive imaging modalities are needed to assess liver fat in children. We performed a systematic review of studies that evaluated imaging of liver fat in children. Methods We searched PubMed for original research articles in peer-reviewed journals from January 1, 1982 through December 31, 2012 using the key words “imaging liver fat.” Studies included those in English, and those performed in children from birth to 18 y of age. To be eligible for inclusion, studies were required to measure hepatic steatosis via an imaging modality and a quantitative comparator as the reference standard. Results We analyzed 9 studies comprising 610 children; 4 studies assessed ultrasonography and 5 assessed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasonography was used in the diagnosis of fatty liver with positive predictive values of 47–62%. There was not a consistent relationship between ultrasound steatosis score and the reference measurement of hepatic steatosis. Liver fat as measurements by MRI or by spectroscopy varied with the methodologies used. Liver fat measurements by MRI correlated with results from histologic analyses, but sample size did not allow for assessment of diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions Available evidence does not support the use of ultrasonography for the diagnosis or grading of fatty liver in children. Although MRI is a promising approach, the data are insufficient to make evidence-based recommendations regarding its use in children for assessment of hepatic steatosis. PMID:24090729

  6. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; Myers, Jonathan; Guazzi, Marco

    2010-02-01

    There is an increasing recognition of the potential value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Key CPX characteristics in these patients include: (1) a diminished aerobic capacity; (2) an abnormally elevated minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship; and (3) an abnormally diminished partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide. Given the burgeoning number of original research investigations utilizing CPX in patients with PH, a summation of the presently available body of literature seems timely. A literature search was conducted in pubmed using "cardiopulmonary exercise testing" and "pulmonary arterial hypertension" as key phrases. Only studies conducting exercise testing with simultaneous ventilatory expired gas analysis in subjects with a confirmed diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension were included. Twenty-three investigations were included in this review. Nineteen of the investigations assessed cohorts with resting pulmonary arterial hypertension as the sole diagnosis. Two investigations assessed subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension: one assessed subjects with pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension, and another included groups with exercise-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and resting pulmonary arterial hypertension. Collectively, these investigations indicate variables obtained from CPX: (1) reflect varying degrees of PH severity; (2) positively respond to several pharmacologic and surgical interventions; and (3) may provide prognostic value. Currently, CPX is not widely utilized in patients with PH. Although more research is required in a number of areas, the present evidence-based review indicates this exercise testing technique may provide valuable information in the PH population.

  7. An evidence-based review of enhanced recovery interventions in knee replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, S; Nizam, I; Haddad, FS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Total knee replacement (TKR) is a very common surgical procedure. Improved pain management techniques, surgical practices and the introduction of novel interventions have enhanced the patient’s postoperative experience after TKR. Safe, efficient pathways are needed to address the increasing need for knee arthroplasty in the UK. Enhanced recovery programmes can help to reduce hospital stays following knee replacements while maintaining patient safety and satisfaction. This review outlines common evidence-based pre, intra and postoperative interventions in use in enhanced recovery protocols following TKR. Methods A thorough literature search of the electronic healthcare databases (MEDLINE®, Embase™ and the Cochrane Library) was conducted to identify articles and studies concerned with enhanced recovery and fast track pathways for TKR. Results A literature review revealed several non-operative and operative interventions that are effective in enhanced recovery following TKR including preoperative patient education, pre-emptive and local infiltration analgesia, preoperative nutrition, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, pulsed electromagnetic fields, perioperative rehabilitation, modern wound dressings, different standard surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgery and computer assisted surgery. Conclusions Enhanced recovery programmes require a multidisciplinary team of dedicated professionals, principally involving preoperative education, multimodal pain control and accelerated rehabilitation; this will be boosted if combined with minimally invasive surgery. The current economic climate and restricted healthcare budget further necessitate brief hospitalisation while minimising costs. These non-operative interventions are the way forward to achieve such requirements. PMID:24025284

  8. Nonconvulsive seizures in patients presenting with altered mental status: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zehtabchi, Shahriar; Abdel Baki, Samah G; Malhotra, Shweta; Grant, Arthur C

    2011-10-01

    Definitive diagnosis of nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) can be made only by electroencephalography, and delay in diagnosis can increase morbidity, resource utilization, and length of hospitalization. We performed an evidence-based literature review to estimate the prevalence of NCS in patients with altered mental status (AMS) of unknown cause. PUBMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other resources were searched for studies that included AMS and seizure as topics. The resulting 276 articles were screened for predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, leaving 5 studies enrolling 478 patients for review. The prevalence of NCS in patients with AMS ranged from 8 to 30% (overall prevalence of 21.5%, 95% CI: 18-25%), suggesting that the prevalence of NCS is sufficiently high to consider routine use of urgent electroencephalography in such patients. However, methodological weaknesses limit the generalizability of the results. A large, prospective study enrolling and screening for NCS in all patients who present with acute AMS is needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Benefits and risks of antipsychotic polypharmacy: an evidence-based review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tranulis, Constantin; Skalli, Leila; Lalonde, Pierre; Nicole, Luc; Stip, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Combination antipsychotic prescription is an increasingly common practice in clinical psychiatry. This clinical practice is at odds with clinical guidelines promoting antipsychotic monotherapy. Moreover, there has been increased concern over the safety profile of atypical antipsychotics in the last 10-15 years. We reviewed the literature on antipsychotic combinations with a focus on safety and efficacy. Multiple electronic database searches were complemented by relevant bibliography cross-checking and expert discussions. The review showed a literature that is dominated by case reports and uncontrolled studies. Polypharmacy was unequally studied, with some recent combinations (i.e. clozapine and risperidone) being extensively, albeit inconclusively, studied and other more commonly used combinations (first- with second-generation agents) receiving little attention. From an evidence-based perspective, further trials of antipsychotic association of sufficient power to address safety issues are needed before recommending any antipsychotic combination. Particular weaknesses of the present literature are low number of participants, lack of adequate control of confounding variables, short duration of experimental follow-up and inadequate monitoring of potential adverse effects.

  10. Prevention and health promotion and evidence-based fields of nursing - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsson, Susan; Lindberg, Malou

    2007-08-01

    This paper summarizes the evidence constituting the foundation for preventive and health promotive work performed by nurses in primary care. This is a systematic literature review in six scientific databases. Forty original articles and 16 literature reviews met the inclusion criteria. After both authors independently read the articles, 25 were excluded and 15 included. One article was judged to be of high quality, five of medium quality and 10 of low quality. The articles of high and medium quality focused on alcohol counselling, coronary heart disease and diabetes. Of the 16 literature reviews from the Cochrane Library, 10 were found to be relevant and presented evidence. The subjects included smoking cessation, breast-feeding, prevention of falls among the elderly, asthma in children, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Few studies in the area of prevention and health promotion are of adequate scientific quality, resulting in limited evidence for the effects of interventions.

  11. Executive Summary of Respiratory Indications for Polysomnography in Children: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Merrill S.; Nichols, Cynthia D.; Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M.; Marcus, Carole L.; Witmans, Manisha B.; Kirk, Valerie G.; D'Andrea, Lynn A.; Hoban, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This comprehensive, evidence-based review provides a systematic analysis of the literature regarding the validity, reliability, and clinical utility of polysomnography for characterizing breathing during sleep in children. Findings serve as the foundation of practice parameters regarding respiratory indications for polysomnography in children. Methods: A task force of content experts performed a systematic review of the relevant literature and graded the evidence using a standardized grading system. Two hundred forty-three evidentiary papers were reviewed, summarized, and graded. The analysis addressed the operating characteristics of polysomnography as a diagnostic procedure in children and identified strengths and limitations of polysomnography for evaluation of respiratory function during sleep. Results: The analysis documents strong face validity and content validity, moderately strong convergent validity when comparing respiratory findings with a variety of relevant independent measures, moderate-to-strong test-retest validity, and limited data supporting discriminant validity for characterizing breathing during sleep in children. The analysis documents moderate-to-strong test-retest reliability and interscorer reliability based on limited data. The data indicate particularly strong clinical utility in children with suspected sleep related breathing disorders and obesity, evolving metabolic syndrome, neurological, neurodevelopmental, or genetic disorders, and children with craniofacial syndromes. Specific consideration was given to clinical utility of polysomnography prior to adenotonsillectomy (AT) for confirmation of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The most relevant findings include: (1) recognition that clinical history and examination are often poor predictors of respiratory polygraphic findings, (2) preoperative polysomnography is helpful in predicting risk for perioperative complications, and (3) preoperative polysomnography is often helpful

  12. Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Physical Conditions: A Narrative Review Evaluating Levels of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Linda E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for treating symptoms of a wide range of medical conditions has proliferated in recent decades. Mindfulness is the cultivation of nonjudgmental awareness in the present moment. It is both a practice and a way of being in the world. Mindfulness is purposefully cultivated in a range of structured interventions, the most popular of which is mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), followed by mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). This paper begins with a discussion of the phenomenological experience of coping with a chronic and potentially life-threatening illness, followed by a theoretical discussion of the application of mindfulness in these situations. The literature evaluating MBIs within medical conditions is then comprehensively reviewed, applying a levels of evidence rating framework within each major condition. The bulk of the research looked at diagnoses of cancer, pain conditions (chronic pain, low back pain, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis), cardiovascular disease, diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and irritable bowel syndrome. Most outcomes assessed are psychological in nature and show substantial benefit, although some physical and disease-related parameters have also been evaluated. The field would benefit from more adequately powered randomized controlled trials utilizing active comparison groups and assessing the moderating role of patient characteristics and program “dose” in determining outcomes. PMID:23762768

  13. Methodological overview of systematic reviews to establish the evidence base for emergency general surgery.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The evidence for treatment decision-making in emergency general surgery has not been summarized previously. The aim of this overview was to review the quantity and quality of systematic review evidence for the most common emergency surgical conditions. Systematic reviews of the most common conditions requiring unplanned admission and treatment managed by general surgeons were eligible for inclusion. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched to April 2014. The number and type (randomized or non-randomized) of included studies and patients were extracted and summarized. The total number of unique studies was recorded for each condition. The nature of the interventions (surgical, non-surgical invasive or non-invasive) was documented. The quality of reviews was assessed using the AMSTAR checklist. The 106 included reviews focused mainly on bowel conditions (42), appendicitis (40) and gallstone disease (17). Fifty-one (48·1 per cent) included RCTs alone, 79 (74·5 per cent) included at least one RCT and 25 (23·6 per cent) summarized non-randomized evidence alone. Reviews included 727 unique studies, of which 30·3 per cent were RCTs. Sixty-five reviews compared different types of surgical intervention and 27 summarized trials of surgical versus non-surgical interventions. Fifty-seven reviews (53·8 per cent) were rated as low risk of bias. This overview of reviews highlights the need for more and better research in this field. © 2017 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

  14. Effective audit in general practice: a method for systematically developing audit protocols containing evidence-based review criteria.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, R C; Khunti, K; Baker, R; Lakhani, M

    1997-01-01

    Though many general practitioners (GPs) now take part in audit, there is still concern about the extent to which participation in audit leads to improvements in practice. Improved methods are needed for the incorporation of research evidence into criteria for use in audit. In this paper, a six-stage systematic method is described for developing audit protocols containing prioritized evidence-based criteria. The stages are: selection of a topic, identification of key elements of care, focused literature reviews, prioritization of the criteria on the strength of the evidence and impact on outcome, preparation of full documentation, and peer review. PMID:9519525

  15. Imiglucerase in the management of Gaucher disease type 1: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Serratrice, Christine; Carballo, Sebastian; Serratrice, Jacques; Stirnemann, Jérome

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gaucher disease is the first lysosomal disease to benefit from enzyme replacement therapy, thus serving as model for numerous other lysosomal diseases. Alglucerase was the first glucocerebrosidase purified from placental extracts, and this was then replaced by imiglucerase – a Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived glucocerebrosidase. Aim The aim was to review the evidence underlying the use of imiglucerase in Gaucher disease type 1 Evidence review Data from clinical trials and Gaucher Registries were analyzed. Conclusion Imiglucerase has been prescribed and found to have an excellent efficacy and safety profile. We report herein the evidence-based data published for 26 years justifying the use of imiglucerase. PMID:27790078

  16. Population-based smoking cessation strategies: a summary of a select group of evidence-based reviews.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this report was to provide the Ministry of Health Promotion (MHP) with a summary of existing evidence-based reviews of the clinical and economic outcomes of population-based smoking cessation strategies. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Ontario, linked to approximately 13,000 avoidable premature deaths annually - the vast majority of these are attributable to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive lung disease. (1) In Ontario, tobacco related health care costs amount to $6.1 billion annually, or about $502 per person (including non-smokers) and account for 1.4% of the provincial domestic product. (2) In 2007, there were approximately 1.7 to 1.9 million smokers in Ontario with two-thirds of these intending to quit in the next six months and one-third wanting to quit within 30 days. (3) In 2007/2008, Ontario invested $15 million in cessation programs, services and training. (4) In June 2009, the Ministry of Health Promotion (MHP) requested that MAS provide a summary of the evidence base surrounding population-based smoking cessation strategies. PROJECT SCOPE: The MAS and the MHP agreed that the project would consist of a clinical and economic summary of the evidence surrounding nine population-based strategies for smoking cessation including: Mass media interventionsTelephone counsellingPost-secondary smoking cessation programs (colleges/universities)Community-wide stop-smoking contests (i.e. Quit and Win)Community interventionsPhysician advice to quitNursing interventions for smoking cessationHospital-based interventions for smoking cessationPharmacotherapies for smoking cessation, specifically:Nicotine replacement therapiesAntidepressantsAnxiolytic drugsOpioid antagonistsClonidineNicotine receptor partial agonistsReviews examining interventions for Cut Down to Quit (CDTQ) or harm reduction were not included in this review. In addition, reviews examining individual-level smoking cessation

  17. Systematic review and evidence integration for literature-based environmental health science assessments.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Andrew A; Boyles, Abee L; Wolfe, Mary S; Bucher, John R; Thayer, Kristina A

    2014-07-01

    Systematic-review methodologies provide objectivity and transparency to the process of collecting and synthesizing scientific evidence in reaching conclusions on specific research questions. There is increasing interest in applying these procedures to address environmental health questions. The goal was to develop a systematic-review framework to address environmental health questions by extending approaches developed for clinical medicine to handle the breadth of data relevant to environmental health sciences (e.g., human, animal, and mechanistic studies). The Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) adapted guidance from authorities on systematic-review and sought advice during development of the OHAT Approach through consultation with technical experts in systematic review and human health assessments, as well as scientific advisory groups and the public. The method was refined by considering expert and public comments and through application to case studies. Here we present a seven-step framework for systematic review and evidence integration for reaching hazard identification conclusions: 1) problem formulation and protocol development, 2) search for and select studies for inclusion, 3) extract data from studies, 4) assess the quality or risk of bias of individual studies, 5) rate the confidence in the body of evidence, 6) translate the confidence ratings into levels of evidence, and 7) integrate the information from different evidence streams (human, animal, and "other relevant data" including mechanistic or in vitro studies) to develop hazard identification conclusions. The principles of systematic review can be successfully applied to environmental health questions to provide greater objectivity and transparency to the process of developing conclusions.

  18. Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comprehensive Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Connie; Odom, Samuel L.; Hume, Kara A.; Cox, Ann W.; Fettig, Angel; Kucharczyk, Suzanne; Brock, Matthew E.; Plavnick, Joshua B.; Fleury, Veronica P.; Schultz, Tia R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify evidenced-based, focused intervention practices for children and youth with autism spectrum disorder. This study was an extension and elaboration of a previous evidence-based practice review reported by Odom et al. ("Prev Sch Fail" 54:275-282, 2010b, doi:10.?1080/?1045988100378550?6). In the…

  19. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Communication Treatments for Individuals with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Frymark, Tobi; Venedictov, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and summarize the research evidence related to the treatment of individuals with right hemisphere communication disorders. Method: A comprehensive search of the literature using key words related to right hemisphere brain damage and communication treatment was conducted in 27 databases (e.g.,…

  20. A Systematic Evidence Review of School-Based Group Contingency Interventions for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Johnson, Austin H.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Ruberto, Laura M.; Berggren, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize the research underlying group contingency interventions to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to support their use for managing the classroom behavior of students with behavioral difficulties. An application of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) procedures for evaluating single-subject…

  1. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Communication Treatments for Individuals with Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Frymark, Tobi; Venedictov, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and summarize the research evidence related to the treatment of individuals with right hemisphere communication disorders. Method: A comprehensive search of the literature using key words related to right hemisphere brain damage and communication treatment was conducted in 27 databases (e.g.,…

  2. Effectiveness of Occupation-Based Interventions to Improve Areas of Occupation and Social Participation After Stroke: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Chuh, Adrianna; Floyd, Tracy; McInnis, Karen; Williams, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This evidence-based review examined the evidence supporting the use of occupation-based interventions to improve areas of occupation and social participation poststroke. A total of 39 studies met the inclusion criteria and were critically evaluated. Most of the literature targeted activity of daily living (ADL)–based interventions and collectively provided strong evidence for the use of occupation-based interventions to improve ADL performance. The evidence related to instrumental ADLs was much more disparate, with limited evidence to support the use of virtual reality interventions and emerging evidence to support driver education programs to improve occupational performance poststroke. Only 6 studies addressed leisure, social participation, or rest and sleep, with sufficient evidence to support only leisure-based interventions. The implications of this review for research, education, and practice in occupational therapy are also discussed. PMID:25553745

  3. Action observation for upper limb function after stroke: evidence-based review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyeongMi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to suggest evidenced information about action observation to improve upper limb function after stroke. [Methods] A systematic review of randomized controlled trials involving adults aged 18 years or over and including descriptions of action observation for improving upper limb function was undertaken. Electronic databases were searched, including MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro (the Physiotherapy Evidence Database), for articles published between 2000 to 2014. Following completion of the searches, two reviewers independently assessed the trials and extracted data using a data extraction form. The same two reviewers independently documented the methodological quality of the trials by using the PEDro scale. [Results] Five randomized controlled trials were ultimately included in this review, and four of them (80%) reported statistically significant effects for motor recovery of upper limb using action observation intervention in between groups. [Conclusion] This review of the literature presents evidence attesting to the benefits conferred on stroke patints resulting from participation in an action observation intervention. The body of literature in this field is growing steadily. Further work needs to be done to evaluate the evidence for different conditions after stroke and different duration of intervention. PMID:26644700

  4. Methodological quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Riera, Rachel; Torloni, Maria Regina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal. METHOD: All systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in the last five years in the Brazilian Journal of Evidence-based Health were retrieved. Two independent reviewers critically assessed the methodological quality of reviews and trials using AMSTAR and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Table, respectively. RESULTS: Systematic reviews and clinical trials accounted for less than 10% of the 61 original studies on women's health published in the São Paulo Medical Journal over the last five years. All five reviews were considered to be of moderate quality; the worst domains were publication bias and the appropriate use of study quality in formulating conclusions. All three clinical trials were judged to have a high risk of bias. The participant blinding, personnel and outcome assessors and allocation concealment domains had the worst scores. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based journal are of low to moderate quality. The quality of these types of studies needs improvement. PMID:23778332

  5. Evidence-based practice in physiotherapy: a systematic review of barriers, enablers and interventions.

    PubMed

    Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2014-09-01

    Despite clear benefits of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) approach to ensuring quality and consistency of care, its uptake within physiotherapy has been inconsistent. Synthesise the findings of research into EBP barriers, facilitators and interventions in physiotherapy and identify methods of enhancing adoption and implementation. Literature concerning physiotherapists' practice between 2000 and 2012 was systematically searched using: Academic Search Complete, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, American Psychological Association databases, Medline, Journal Storage, and Science Direct. Reference lists were searched to identify additional studies. Thirty-two studies, focusing either on physiotherapists' EBP knowledge, attitudes or implementation, or EBP interventions in physiotherapy were included. One author undertook all data extraction and a second author reviewed to ensure consistency and rigour. Synthesis was organised around the themes of EBP barriers/enablers, attitudes, knowledge/skills, use and interventions. Many physiotherapists hold positive attitudes towards EBP. However, this does not necessarily translate into consistent, high-quality EBP. Many barriers to EBP implementation are apparent, including: lack of time and skills, and misperceptions of EBP. Only studies published in the English language, in peer-reviewed journals were included, thereby introducing possible publication bias. Furthermore, narrative synthesis may be subject to greater confirmation bias. There is no "one-size fits all" approach to enhancing EBP implementation; assessing organisational culture prior to designing interventions is crucial. Although some interventions appear promising, further research is required to explore the most effective methods of supporting physiotherapists' adoption of EBP. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Systematic Review of Postgraduate Teaching in Evidence-Based Medicine and Critical Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coomarasamy, Aravinthan; Taylor, Rod; Khan, Khalid S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of evidence-based medicine and critical appraisal teaching at the postgraduate level. Conducts a comprehensive search and identifies 17 studies. Shows a significant improvement in knowledge but not in attitude, skills, or behavior. (Author/KHR)

  7. Risk factors for sports concussion: an evidence-based systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Shameemah; Fie, Sarah Mc; Patricios, Jon; Posthumus, Michael; September, Alison V

    2014-01-01

    Concussion is a common sports injury with approximately 1.6-3.8 million sport-related concussions reported in the USA annually. Identifying risk factors may help in preventing these injuries. This systematic review aims to identify such risk factors. Three electronic databases; ScienceDirect, PubMed and SpringerLink, were searched using the keywords 'RISK FACTORS' or 'PREDISPOSITION' in conjunction with 'SPORT' and 'CONCUSSION'. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 628 identified titles were independently analysed by two of the authors to a final list of 86 articles. Only articles with a level of evidence of I, II and III were included according to robust study design and data analysis. The level of certainty for each risk factor was determined. A high level of certainty for increased risk of a subsequent concussion in athletes sustaining more than one previous concussion was reported in 10 of 13 studies. Further, a high level of certainty was assigned to match play with all 29 studies reporting an increased concussion risk during matches. All other risk factors were evaluated as having a low level of certainty. Although several risk factors were identified from the appraised studies, prospective cohort studies, larger sample sizes, consistent and robust measures of risk should be employed in future research.

  8. Perioperative outcomes and type of anesthesia in hip surgical patients: An evidence based review.

    PubMed

    Opperer, Mathias; Danninger, Thomas; Stundner, Ottokar; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2014-07-18

    Over the last decades the demand for hip surgery, be it elective or in a traumatic setting, has greatly increased and is projected to expand even further. Concurrent with demographic changes the affected population is burdened by an increase in average comorbidity and serious complications. It has been suggested that the choice of anesthesia not only affects the surgery setting but also the perioperative outcome as a whole. Therefore different approaches and anesthetic techniques have been developed to offer individual anesthetic and analgesic care to hip surgery patients. Recent studies on comparative effectiveness utilizing population based data have given us a novel insight on anesthetic practice and outcome, showing favorable results in the usage of regional vs general anesthesia. In this review we aim to give an overview of anesthetic techniques in use for hip surgery and their impact on perioperative outcome. While there still remains a scarcity of data investigating perioperative outcomes and anesthesia, most studies concur on a positive outcome in overall mortality, thromboembolic events, blood loss and transfusion requirements when comparing regional to general anesthesia. Much of the currently available evidence suggests that a comprehensive medical approach with emphasis on regional anesthesia can prove beneficial to patients and the health care system.

  9. The science and practice of micronutrient supplementations in nutritional anemia: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Mike, Leigh Ann

    2014-08-01

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia, affecting millions of people in all age groups worldwide. While inadequate access to food and nutrients can lead to anemia, patients with certain health status or medical conditions are also at increased risk of developing nutritional anemia. Iron, cobalamin, and folate are the most recognized micronutrients that are vital for the generation of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency is associated with insufficient production of hemoglobin. Deficiency of cobalamin or folate leads to impaired synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, and cell division. Recent research has demonstrated that the status of copper and zinc in the body can significantly affect iron absorption and utilization. With an increasing number of patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedures, more cases of anemia associated with copper and zinc deficiencies have also emerged. The intestinal absorption of these 5 critical micronutrients are highly regulated and mediated by specific apical transport mechanisms in the enterocytes. Health conditions that persistently alter the histology of the upper intestinal architecture, expression, or function of these substrate-specific transporters, or the normal digestion and flow of these key micronutrients, can lead to nutritional anemia. The focus of this article is to review the science of intestinal micronutrient absorption, discuss the clinical assessment of micronutrient deficiencies in relation to anemia, and suggest an effective treatment plan and monitoring strategies using an evidence-based approach.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatments: Are we getting evidence based - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Lisotti, Andrea; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Virgilio, Clara; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The continued need to develop less invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. These include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, EUS-guided necrosectomy, EUS-guided cholangiography and biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatography and pancreatic duct drainage, EUS-guided gallbladder drainage, EUS-guided drainage of abdominal and pelvic fluid collections, EUS-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS-guided pancreatic cyst ablation, EUS-guided vascular interventions, EUS-guided delivery of antitumoral agents and EUS-guided fiducial placement and brachytherapy. However these procedures are technically challenging and require expertise in both EUS and interventional endoscopy, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and gastrointestinal stenting. We undertook a systematic review to record the entire body of literature accumulated over the past 2 decades on EUS-guided interventions with the objective of performing a critical appraisal of published articles, based on the classification of studies according to levels of evidence, in order to assess the scientific progress made in this field. PMID:25024600

  11. Treatment of melasma with topical agents, peels and lasers: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Shelly; Pandya, Amit G

    2013-10-01

    Melasma is an acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation occurring on the face and predominantly affecting women of childbearing age. It is a chronic, often relapsing condition with a negative impact on quality of life. Current treatments for melasma are unsatisfactory. The aim of this article was to conduct an evidence-based review of interventions available for the treatment of melasma. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed and the keywords 'melasma' or 'chloasma' in the title. The search was further refined by using a filter for 'controlled clinical trials' and 'randomized controlled trial'. The included studies were used to develop recommendations for treatment. The electronic search yielded a total of 80 citations. Forty studies were included in this review, which had a total of 2,912 participants. Three different therapeutic modalities were investigated-topical agents, chemical peels, and laser and light therapies. Topical depigmenting agents were found to be the most effective in treating moderate-to-severe melasma, with combination therapies, such as triple-combination therapy (hydroquinone, tretinoin, and fluocinolone acetonide), yielding the best results. Chemical peels as well as laser and light therapies were found to have moderate benefit but more studies are needed to determine their efficacy and long-term safety. Adverse events associated with treatment were mild and short-lasting and included skin irritation, dryness, burning, and erythema. The data could not be statistically pooled because of the heterogeneity of treatments and lack of consistency across study designs. Topical combination therapies were found to be more effective than monotherapy. Triple combination therapy was found to be the most effective, but approximately 40 % of patients develop erythema and peeling. Chemical peels and laser and light therapies produced mixed results, with increased risk of irritation and subsequent hyperpigmentation, particularly in darker

  12. [Based on evidence to establish reporting guidelines for TCM-featured acupuncture systematic reviews/Meta-analysis: a methodology discussion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Yang, Ke-Hu; Guo, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Existing reporting guidelines for systematic reviews/Meta-analysis (SRs/MAs) cannot meet the requirements of clinical practice and scientific research, so based on evidence, methods and thoughts on establishing reporting guidelines for TCM-featured acupuncture systematic reviews/Meta-analysis were proposed. Through literature analysis, according to evidence-based principle, preliminary ideas on methodology of establishing reporting guidelines for TCM-featured acupuncture systematic reviews /Meta-analysis were proposed. With consensus as one main research method, it was proposed that in the consensus that was selected and established by experts, the pro- portion of Chinese scholars should be increased to fully declare the opinions of Chinese acupuncturists, and by verification of practice and application, the reporting guidelines for TCM-featured acupuncture systematic reviews/Meta-analysis can be finally made.

  13. Facebook apps for smoking cessation: a review of content and adherence to evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Megan A; Cobb, Caroline O; Abroms, Lorien; Graham, Amanda L

    2014-09-09

    Facebook is the most popular social network site, with over 1 billion users globally. There are millions of apps available within Facebook, many of which address health and health behavior change. Facebook may represent a promising channel to reach smokers with cessation interventions via apps. To date, there have been no published reports about Facebook apps for smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to review the features and functionality of Facebook apps for smoking cessation and to determine the extent to which they adhere to evidence-based guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment. In August 2013, we searched Facebook and three top Internet search engines using smoking cessation keywords to identify relevant Facebook apps. Resultant apps were screened for eligibility (smoking cessation-related, English language, and functioning). Eligible apps were reviewed by 2 independent coders using a standardized coding scheme. Coding included content features (interactive, informational, and social) and adherence to an established 20-item index (possible score 0-40) derived from the US Public Health Service's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence. We screened 22 apps for eligibility; of these, 12 underwent full coding. Only 9 apps were available on Facebook. Facebook apps fell into three broad categories: public pledge to quit (n=3), quit-date-based calculator/tracker (n=4), or a multicomponent quit smoking program (n=2). All apps incorporated interactive, informational, and social features except for two quit-date-based calculator/trackers apps (lacked informational component). All apps allowed app-related posting within Facebook (ie, on self/other Facebook profile), and four had a within-app "community" feature to enable app users to communicate with each other. Adherence index summary scores among Facebook apps were low overall (mean 15.1, SD 7.8, range 7-30), with multicomponent apps scoring the highest. There are few

  14. Facebook Apps for Smoking Cessation: A Review of Content and Adherence to Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Facebook is the most popular social network site, with over 1 billion users globally. There are millions of apps available within Facebook, many of which address health and health behavior change. Facebook may represent a promising channel to reach smokers with cessation interventions via apps. To date, there have been no published reports about Facebook apps for smoking cessation. Objective The purpose of this study was to review the features and functionality of Facebook apps for smoking cessation and to determine the extent to which they adhere to evidence-based guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment. Methods In August 2013, we searched Facebook and three top Internet search engines using smoking cessation keywords to identify relevant Facebook apps. Resultant apps were screened for eligibility (smoking cessation-related, English language, and functioning). Eligible apps were reviewed by 2 independent coders using a standardized coding scheme. Coding included content features (interactive, informational, and social) and adherence to an established 20-item index (possible score 0-40) derived from the US Public Health Service’s Clinical Practice Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence. Results We screened 22 apps for eligibility; of these, 12 underwent full coding. Only 9 apps were available on Facebook. Facebook apps fell into three broad categories: public pledge to quit (n=3), quit-date–based calculator/tracker (n=4), or a multicomponent quit smoking program (n=2). All apps incorporated interactive, informational, and social features except for two quit-date–based calculator/trackers apps (lacked informational component). All apps allowed app-related posting within Facebook (ie, on self/other Facebook profile), and four had a within-app “community” feature to enable app users to communicate with each other. Adherence index summary scores among Facebook apps were low overall (mean 15.1, SD 7.8, range 7-30), with

  15. Evidence based mental healthcare and service innovation: review of concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kouimtsidis, Ch; John-Smith, St; Kemp, P; Ikkos, G

    2013-01-01

    Health provision systems in the developed western nations are currently facing major financial challenges. In order to meet these challenges, a number of new approaches used to assist the provision of health have been introduced, including the practice of health professionals. These approaches utilize specific methods of data capture and summarization such as: evidence based medicine (EBM) and practice guidelines. Evidence is generated from systematic clinical research as well as reported clinical experience and individually case based empirical evidence. All types of research though (quantitative or qualitative) have limitations. Similarly all types of evidence have advantages and disadvantages and can be complimentary to each other. Evidencebased individual decision (EBID) making is the commonest evidence-based medicine as practiced by the individual clinician in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It involves integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research. However this sort of evidence-based medicine, focuses excessively on the individual (potentially at the expense of others) in a system with limited budgets. Evidence-based guidelines (EBG) also support the practice of evidence-based medicine but at the organizational or institutional level. The main aim is to identify which interventions, over a range of patients, work best and which is cost-effective in order to guide service development and provision at a strategic level. Doing this effectively is a scientific and statistical skill in itself and the quality of guidelines is based primarily on the quality research evidence. It is important to note that lack of systematic evidence to support an intervention does not automatically mean that an intervention must instantly be abandoned. It is also important that guidelines are understood for what they are, i.e. not rules, or complete statements of knowledge. EBM will

  16. An evidence-based review on the validity of the Kaltenborn rule as applied to the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Corlia; Sole, Gisela; Krause, Maria W; Nel, Mariette

    2007-02-01

    Kaltenborn's convex-concave rule is a familiar concept in joint treatment techniques and arthrokinematics. Recent investigations on the glenohumeral joint appear to question this rule and thus accepted practice guidelines. An evidence-based systematic review was conducted to summarize and interpret the evidence on the direction of the accessory gliding movement of the head of the humerus (HOH) on the glenoid during physiological shoulder movement. Five hundred and eighty-one citations were screened. Data from 30 studies were summarized in five evidence tables with good inter-extracter agreement. The quality of the clinical trials rated a mean score of 51.27% according to the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale (inter-rater agreement: kappa=-0.6111). Heterogeneity among studies precluded a quantitative meta-analysis. Weighting of the evidence according to Elwood;s classification and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research classification guidelines indicated that evidence was weak and limited. Poor methodological quality, weak evidence, heterogeneity and inconsistent findings among the reviewed studies regarding the direction of translation of the HOH on the glenoid, precluded the drawing of any firm conclusions from this review. Evidence, however, indicated that not only the passive, but also the active and control subsystems of the shoulder may need to be considered when determining the direction of the translational gliding of the HOH. The indirect method, using Kaltenborn's convex-concave rule as applied to the glenohumeral joint, may therefore need to be reconsidered.

  17. Reviewing the development, evidence base, and application of the revised dengue case classification

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, O; Farrar, J; Lum, L; Martinez, E; San Martin, J L; Ehrenberg, J; Velayudhan, R; Kroeger, A

    2012-01-01

    With the example of dengue, an evidence-based approach to prospectively develop a case classification is described, gathering evidence for identifying strength and weaknesses of the existing model, collecting new data describing the disease as it occurs globally, further developing a new model that can be applied in practice and field testing the newly developed model in comparison to the previous model. For each step in this process, the highest available level of evidence has been applied. This process has been initiated by the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and WHO’s Department for Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD), developing the following for dengue. Since the early 1970s, dengue has been classified into dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever grades I and II and dengue shock syndrome grades III and IV (DF/DHF/DSS). However, in recent years, a growing number of dengue clinicians have questioned the shortcomings of this scheme. The issues have revolved around the complexity of confirming DHF in clinical practice, misclassifying severe cases as DF, and the emphasis on haemorrhage rather than plasma leakage as the underlying problem in most severe dengue cases. Step 1: A systematic literature review highlighted the shortcomings of the DF/DHF/DSS scheme: (1) difficulties in applying the criteria for DHF/DSS; (2) the tourniquet test has a low sensitivity for distinguishing between DHF and DF; and (3) most DHF criteria had a large variability in frequency of occurrence. Step 2: An analysis of regional and national dengue guidelines and their application in the clinical practice showed a need to re-evaluate and standardize guidelines as the actual ones showed a large variation of definitions, an inconsistent application by medical staff, and a lack of diagnostic facilities necessary for the DHF diagnosis in frontline services. Step 3: A prospective cohort study in seven countries

  18. State of the evidence on simulation-based training for laparoscopic surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zendejas, Benjamin; Brydges, Ryan; Hamstra, Stanley J; Cook, David A

    2013-04-01

    Summarize the outcomes and best practices of simulation training for laparoscopic surgery. Simulation-based training for laparoscopic surgery has become a mainstay of surgical training. Much new evidence has accrued since previous reviews were published. We systematically searched the literature through May 2011 for studies evaluating simulation, in comparison with no intervention or an alternate training activity, for training health professionals in laparoscopic surgery. Outcomes were classified as satisfaction, skills (in a test setting) of time (to perform the task), process (eg, performance rating), product (eg, knot strength), and behaviors when caring for patients. We used random effects to pool effect sizes. From 10,903 articles screened, we identified 219 eligible studies enrolling 7138 trainees, including 91 (42%) randomized trials. For comparisons with no intervention (n = 151 studies), pooled effect size (ES) favored simulation for outcomes of knowledge (1.18; N = 9 studies), skills time (1.13; N = 89), skills process (1.23; N = 114), skills product (1.09; N = 7), behavior time (1.15; N = 7), behavior process (1.22; N = 15), and patient effects (1.28; N = 1), all P < 0.05. When compared with nonsimulation instruction (n = 3 studies), results significantly favored simulation for outcomes of skills time (ES, 0.75) and skills process (ES, 0.54). Comparisons between different simulation interventions (n = 79 studies) clarified best practices. For example, in comparison with virtual reality, box trainers have similar effects for process skills outcomes and seem to be superior for outcomes of satisfaction and skills time. Simulation-based laparoscopic surgery training of health professionals has large benefits when compared with no intervention and is moderately more effective than nonsimulation instruction.

  19. Diagnosing Appendicitis: Evidence-Based Review of the Diagnostic Approach in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Shogilev, Daniel J.; Duus, Nicolaj; Odom, Stephen R.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery. However, the diagnosis is often challenging and the decision to operate, observe or further work-up a patient is often unclear. The utility of clinical scoring systems (namely the Alvarado score), laboratory markers, and the development of novel markers in the diagnosis of appendicitis remains controversial. This article presents an update on the diagnostic approach to appendicitis through an evidence-based review. Methods We performed a broad Medline search of radiological imaging, the Alvarado score, common laboratory markers, and novel markers in patients with suspected appendicitis. Results Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate mode of imaging for suspected cases of appendicitis, but the associated increase in radiation exposure is problematic. The Alvarado score is a clinical scoring system that is used to predict the likelihood of appendicitis based on signs, symptoms and laboratory data. It can help risk stratify patients with suspected appendicitis and potentially decrease the use of CT imaging in patients with certain Alvarado scores. White blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), granulocyte count and proportion of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are frequently elevated in patients with appendicitis, but are insufficient on their own as a diagnostic modality. When multiple markers are used in combination their diagnostic utility is greatly increased. Several novel markers have been proposed to aid in the diagnosis of appendicitis; however, while promising, most are only in the preliminary stages of being studied. Conclusion While CT is the most accurate mode of imaging in suspected appendicitis, the accompanying radiation is a concern. Ultrasound may help in the diagnosis while decreasing the need for CT in certain circumstances. The Alvarado Score has good diagnostic utility at specific cutoff points. Laboratory markers have very limited

  20. The Navigation Guide—Evidence-Based Medicine Meets Environmental Health: Systematic Review of Nonhuman Evidence for PFOA Effects on Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Juleen; Sutton, Patrice; Johnson, Paula I.; Atchley, Dylan S.; Sen, Saunak; Robinson, Karen A.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Woodruff, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In contrast to current methods of expert-based narrative review, the Navigation Guide is a systematic and transparent method for synthesizing environmental health research from multiple evidence streams. The Navigation Guide was developed to effectively and efficiently translate the available scientific evidence into timely prevention-oriented action. Objectives: We applied the Navigation Guide systematic review method to answer the question “Does fetal developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or its salts affect fetal growth in animals ?” and to rate the strength of the experimental animal evidence. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature, applied prespecified criteria to the search results to identify relevant studies, extracted data from studies, obtained additional information from study authors, conducted meta-analyses, and rated the overall quality and strength of the evidence. Results: Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. From the meta-analysis of eight mouse gavage data sets, we estimated that exposure of pregnant mice to increasing concentrations of PFOA was associated with a change in mean pup birth weight of –0.023 g (95% CI: –0.029, –0.016) per 1-unit increase in dose (milligrams per kilogram body weight per day). The evidence, consisting of 15 mammalian and 6 nonmammalian studies, was rated as “moderate” and “low” quality, respectively. Conclusion: Based on this first application of the Navigation Guide methodology, we found sufficient evidence that fetal developmental exposure to PFOA reduces fetal growth in animals. Citation: Koustas E, Lam J, Sutton P, Johnson PI, Atchley DS, Sen S, Robinson KA, Axelrad DA, Woodruff TJ. 2014. The Navigation Guide—evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: systematic review of nonhuman evidence for PFOA effects on fetal growth. Environ Health Perspect 122:1015–1027; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307177 PMID:24968374

  1. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Oral Motor Interventions on Feeding and Swallowing in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an evidence-based systematic review and provide an estimate of the effects of oral motor interventions (OMIs) on feeding/swallowing outcomes (both physiological and functional) and pulmonary health in preterm infants. Method: A systematic search of the literature published from 1960 to 2007 was conducted. Articles meeting the…

  2. Graduate Medical Education Training in Clinical Epidemiology, Critical Appraisal, and Evidence-Based Medicine: A Critical Review of Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    A study systematically reviewed published literature on graduate medical-education curricula in clinical epidemiology, critical appraisal, and evidence-based medicine (EBM). The 18 reports found in the search provide useful guidelines for medical educators but many suffer from incomplete descriptions and inadequate curriculum evaluations.…

  3. Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Children and Adolescents: An Evidence-Based Medicine Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Scott N.; March, John S.; Brent, David; Albano, Anne Marie; Weersing, V. Robin; Curry, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the cognitive-behavioral treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety and depressive disorders within the conceptual framework of evidence-based medicine. Method: The psychiatric and psychological literature was systematically searched for controlled trials applying cognitive-behavioral treatment to…

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Children and Adolescents: An Evidence-Based Medicine Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Scott N.; March, John S.; Brent, David; Albano, Anne Marie; Weersing, V. Robin; Curry, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the cognitive-behavioral treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety and depressive disorders within the conceptual framework of evidence-based medicine. Method: The psychiatric and psychological literature was systematically searched for controlled trials applying cognitive-behavioral treatment to…

  5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Oral Motor Interventions on Feeding and Swallowing in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan; Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an evidence-based systematic review and provide an estimate of the effects of oral motor interventions (OMIs) on feeding/swallowing outcomes (both physiological and functional) and pulmonary health in preterm infants. Method: A systematic search of the literature published from 1960 to 2007 was conducted. Articles meeting the…

  6. An evidence-based systematic review of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Costa, Dawn; Giese, Nicole; Isaac, Richard; Liu, Angela; Liu, Yanze; Osho, Olufemi; Poon, Linda; Rusie, Erica; Stock, Tera; Weissner, Wendy; Windsor, Regina C

    2013-12-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration consolidates the safety and efficacy data available in the scientific literature using a validated, reproducible grading rationale. This article includes written and statistical analysis of clinical trials, plus a compilation of expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  7. An evidence-based systematic review of tongkat ali (Eurycoma longifolia) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Conquer, Julie; Flanagan, Kelly; Isaac, Richard; Rusie, Erica; Windsor, Regina C

    2013-03-01

    An evidence-based systematic review of tongkat ali (Eurycoma longifolia) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration consolidates the safety and efficacy data available in the scientific literature using a validated, reproducible grading rationale. This article includes written and statistical analysis of clinical trials, plus a compilation of expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  8. Instruments for evaluating education in evidence-based practice: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shaneyfelt, Terrence; Baum, Karyn D; Bell, Douglas; Feldstein, David; Houston, Thomas K; Kaatz, Scott; Whelan, Chad; Green, Michael

    2006-09-06

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the integration of the best research evidence with patients' values and clinical circumstances in clinical decision making. Teaching of EBP should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. To appraise, summarize, and describe currently available EBP teaching evaluation instruments. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, HAPI, and ERIC databases; reference lists of retrieved articles; EBP Internet sites; and 8 education journals from 1980 through April 2006. For inclusion, studies had to report an instrument evaluating EBP, contain sufficient description to permit analysis, and present quantitative results of administering the instrument. Two raters independently abstracted information on the development, format, learner levels, evaluation domains, feasibility, reliability, and validity of the EBP evaluation instruments from each article. We defined 3 levels of instruments based on the type, extent, methods, and results of psychometric testing and suitability for different evaluation purposes. Of 347 articles identified, 115 were included, representing 104 unique instruments. The instruments were most commonly administered to medical students and postgraduate trainees and evaluated EBP skills. Among EBP skills, acquiring evidence and appraising evidence were most commonly evaluated, but newer instruments evaluated asking answerable questions and applying evidence to individual patients. Most behavior instruments measured the performance of EBP steps in practice but newer instruments documented the performance of evidence-based clinical maneuvers or patient-level outcomes. At least 1 type of validity evidence was demonstrated for 53% of instruments, but 3 or more types of validity evidence were established for only 10%. High-quality instruments were identified for evaluating the EBP competence of individual trainees, determining the effectiveness of EBP curricula, and assessing EBP behaviors with objective

  9. Environmental risk factors for autism: an evidence-based review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Velthorst, Eva; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    According to recent evidence, up to 40-50% of variance in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) liability might be determined by environmental factors. In the present paper, we conducted a review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of environmental risk factors for ASD. We assessed each review for quality of evidence and provided a brief overview of putative mechanisms of environmental risk factors for ASD. Current evidence suggests that several environmental factors including vaccination, maternal smoking, thimerosal exposure, and most likely assisted reproductive technologies are unrelated to risk of ASD. On the contrary, advanced parental age is associated with higher risk of ASD. Birth complications that are associated with trauma or ischemia and hypoxia have also shown strong links to ASD, whereas other pregnancy-related factors such as maternal obesity, maternal diabetes, and caesarian section have shown a less strong (but significant) association with risk of ASD. The reviews on nutritional elements have been inconclusive about the detrimental effects of deficiency in folic acid and omega 3, but vitamin D seems to be deficient in patients with ASD. The studies on toxic elements have been largely limited by their design, but there is enough evidence for the association between some heavy metals (most important inorganic mercury and lead) and ASD that warrants further investigation. Mechanisms of the association between environmental factors and ASD are debated but might include non-causative association (including confounding), gene-related effect, oxidative stress, inflammation, hypoxia/ischemia, endocrine disruption, neurotransmitter alterations, and interference with signaling pathways. Compared to genetic studies of ASD, studies of environmental risk factors are in their infancy and have significant methodological limitations. Future studies of ASD risk factors would benefit from a developmental psychopathology approach, prospective design, precise exposure

  10. Primary hip replacement prostheses and their evidence base: systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kynaston-Pearson, F; Ashmore, A M; Malak, T T; Rombach, I; Taylor, A; Beard, D; Arden, N K; Price, A; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Judge, A; Carr, A J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which prostheses with no readily available evidence to support their use are being implanted in primary total hip arthroplasty. Design Systematic review of the literature. Data sources The 9th annual report of the National Joint Registry of England and Wales (NJR) was analysed to identify prostheses with an Orthopaedic Data Evaluation Panel rating of “unclassified” or “pre-entry” used in primary total hip arthroplasty in 2011. A systematic review of those prostheses was carried out using PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, OVID, and Google databases. Study selection Prostheses used in primary total hip arthroplasty as published in the NJR’s 9th annual report were analysed. Only literature that included the name of the prosthesis was included. Literature yielded in the search results was excluded if it reported animal, non-orthopaedic, non-total hip arthroplasty, or non-device related studies. Results The systematic review found that 24% (57/235) of all hip replacement implants available to surgeons in the UK have no evidence for their clinical effectiveness. It also shows that 10 617 (7.8%) of the 136 593 components used in primary hip replacements in 2011 were implanted without readily identifiable evidence of clinical effectiveness. These comprised 157 cemented stems (0.5% of 34 655 implanted), 936 (2.8% of 33 367) uncemented stems, 1732 (7.1% of 24 349) cemented cups, and 7577 (17.1% of 44 222) uncemented cups. Conclusions This study shows that a considerable proportion of prostheses available to orthopaedic surgeons have no readily available evidence of clinical effectiveness to support their use. Concern exists about the current system of device regulation, and the need for a revised process for introducing new orthopaedic devices is highlighted. PMID:24355538

  11. Hip and spine surgery is of questionable value in spina bifida: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Wright, James G

    2011-05-01

    Although many children with spina bifida and associated scoliosis or dislocated hips undergo spine or hip surgery, the benefits are uncertain. The purpose was to perform an evidence-based review on the benefits and risks of surgery for dislocated hips and scoliosis in spina bifida. I performed a Medline(®) and Embase(®) search from 1950 to 2009 for Level I to Level III studies investigating the benefits and risks of surgery for scoliosis and hip dislocation in patients with spina bifida. When available, I extracted types of surgery, complication rates, functional outcomes of seating, walking, and overall physical function. All treatment recommendations received a Grade of Recommendation: Grade A (consistent Level I studies); Grade B (consistent Level II and III studies); Grade C (consistent level IV and V studies); or Grade I (insufficient or contradictory studies). Combined anterior and posterior surgery had lower rates of nonunion for scoliosis. Although there may be some benefit in seating, overall physical function measured in a different and nonstandardized fashion was not much changed and major complication rates, including nonunion and infections for scoliosis surgery, exceed 50% in several studies. For dislocated hips, the impact on walking ability appears related to contracture (not dislocation). Surgery for hip dislocation did not improve walking ability. The literature provides no guidance on the best treatment for unilateral dislocation. The benefits of scoliosis surgery are uncertain (Grade I). Spine surgery, if performed, should be anterior and posterior (Grade B). An all-pedicle approach for scoliosis surgery may be effective (Level I). Hip reduction surgery did not improve walking (Grade B) but may be appropriate in low-level unilateral dislocation (Level I).

  12. Evidence-based practices to increase hand hygiene compliance in health care facilities: An integrated review.

    PubMed

    Neo, Jun Rong Jeffrey; Sagha-Zadeh, Rana; Vielemeyer, Ole; Franklin, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) in health care facilities is a key component to reduce pathogen transmission and nosocomial infections. However, most HH interventions (HHI) have not been sustainable. This review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of recently published evidence-based HHI designed to improve HH compliance (HHC) that will enable health care providers to make informed choices when allocating limited resources to improve HHC and patient safety. The Medline electronic database (using PubMed) was used to identify relevant studies. English language articles that included hand hygiene interventions and related terms combined with health care environments or related terms were included. Seventy-three studies that met the inclusion criteria were summarized. Interventions were categorized as improving awareness with education, facility design, and planning, unit-level protocols and procedures, hospital-wide programs, and multimodal interventions. Past successful HHIs may not be as effective when applied to other health care environments. HH education should be interactive and engaging. Electronic monitoring and reminders should be implemented in phases to ensure cost-effectiveness. To create hospitalwide programs that engage end users, policy makers should draw expertise from interdisciplinary fields. Before implementing the various components of multimodal interventions, health care practitioners should identify and examine HH difficulties unique to their organizations. Future research should seek to achieve the following: replicate successful HHI in other health care environments, develop reliable HHC monitoring tools, understand caregiver-patient-family interactions, examine ways (eg, hospital leadership, financial support, and strategies from public health and infection prevention initiatives) to sustain HHC, and use simulated lab environments to refine study designs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  13. Inferior angle of scapula fractures: a review of literature and evidence-based treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela C; Phadnis, Joideep; Eardley-Harris, Nathan; Ranawat, Vijai S; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-07-01

    Inferior angle of scapula (IAS) fractures are rare, with very few cases reported. They typically present with pain, loss of shoulder motion, and scapula winging. Operative and nonoperative treatments have been trialed with varying success. The aim of this study was to gather data relating to IAS fractures to develop evidence-based treatment guidelines as none are currently available. A search was conducted of the PubMed and Google Scholar databases to identify cases of IAS fractures. Data collected about each case included age and gender of the patient, mechanism of injury, fracture displacement, treatment, and outcome. The authors report 2 additional IAS fracture cases. Ten cases were identified for inclusion in this study, 8 from the literature and 2 described by the authors. Of the 10 cases, 7 described displaced IAS fractures and 3 described undisplaced fractures. All displaced fractures treated nonoperatively resulted in a painful nonunion. All that underwent operative fixation, whether acutely or after failed nonoperative treatment, had resolution of pain and a good functional outcome. All undisplaced fractures were treated nonoperatively; 1 had persisting pain. Surgical exploration identified the fracture fragment attached to serratus anterior in 2 cases and attached to both serratus anterior and latissimus dorsi in 2 cases. There are limited data available about IAS factures. From the cases reviewed, treatment recommendations include the following: (1) displaced IAS fractures should undergo operative fixation to prevent the development of a painful nonunion; (2) suture repair provides adequate fixation; and (3) undisplaced fractures have a variable outcome when treated nonoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence used in model-based economic evaluations for evaluating pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jaime L; Cooper, Chris; Buchanan, James

    2015-11-11

    Decision models can be used to conduct economic evaluations of new pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests to ensure they offer value for money to healthcare systems. These models require a great deal of evidence, yet research suggests the evidence used is diverse and of uncertain quality. By conducting a systematic review, we aim to investigate the test-related evidence used to inform decision models developed for the economic evaluation of genetic tests. We will search electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and NHS EEDs to identify model-based economic evaluations of pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests. The search will not be limited by language or date. Title and abstract screening will be conducted independently by 2 reviewers, with screening of full texts and data extraction conducted by 1 reviewer, and checked by another. Characteristics of the decision problem, the decision model and the test evidence used to inform the model will be extracted. Specifically, we will identify the reported evidence sources for the test-related evidence used, describe the study design and how the evidence was identified. A checklist developed specifically for decision analytic models will be used to critically appraise the models described in these studies. Variations in the test evidence used in the decision models will be explored across the included studies, and we will identify gaps in the evidence in terms of both quantity and quality. The findings of this work will be disseminated via a peer-reviewed journal publication and at national and international conferences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. The Navigation Guide - evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: systematic review of nonhuman evidence for PFOA effects on fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Koustas, Erica; Lam, Juleen; Sutton, Patrice; Johnson, Paula I; Atchley, Dylan S; Sen, Saunak; Robinson, Karen A; Axelrad, Daniel A; Woodruff, Tracey J

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to current methods of expert-based narrative review, the Navigation Guide is a systematic and transparent method for synthesizing environmental health research from multiple evidence streams. The Navigation Guide was developed to effectively and efficiently translate the available scientific evidence into timely prevention-oriented action. We applied the Navigation Guide systematic review method to answer the question "Does fetal developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or its salts affect fetal growth in animals ?" and to rate the strength of the experimental animal evidence. We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature, applied prespecified criteria to the search results to identify relevant studies, extracted data from studies, obtained additional information from study authors, conducted meta-analyses, and rated the overall quality and strength of the evidence. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. From the meta-analysis of eight mouse gavage data sets, we estimated that exposure of pregnant mice to increasing concentrations of PFOA was associated with a change in mean pup birth weight of -0.023 g (95% CI: -0.029, -0.016) per 1-unit increase in dose (milligrams per kilogram body weight per day). The evidence, consisting of 15 mammalian and 6 nonmammalian studies, was rated as "moderate" and "low" quality, respectively. Based on this first application of the Navigation Guide methodology, we found sufficient evidence that fetal developmental exposure to PFOA reduces fetal growth in animals.

  16. Rail-suicide prevention: Systematic literature review of evidence-based activities.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emma; Kolves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2017-09-01

    Rail-related suicide is a relatively rare but extremely lethal method of suicide that can have far-reaching consequences. The aim of the systematic literature review was to analyze the existing literature on the effectiveness of rail-suicide prevention activities. Databases used were Scopus, Medline, and ProQuest. The search terms used were "suicid*," "prevent*," "rail*," or "train." English-language studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 1 January 1990 and 30 April 2015 that presented an overview of rail-related suicide prevention activities and included an analysis of effectiveness were used. We retrieved 1,229 results in the original search with nine papers presenting empirical evidence. Three studies in the review analyzed the effectiveness of platform screen doors and another three analyzed the installation of blue lights, two papers analyzed the effectiveness of suicide pits, and one included the influence of media reporting guidelines. Platform screen doors, suicide pits, blue lights, and improved media guidelines all have the potential to reduce rail-related suicide events and deaths. The review was restricted to English-language peer-reviewed papers published within the chosen time period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. The Navigation Guide—Evidence-Based Medicine Meets Environmental Health: Systematic Review of Human Evidence for PFOA Effects on Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Patrice; Atchley, Dylan S.; Koustas, Erica; Lam, Juleen; Sen, Saunak; Robinson, Karen A.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Woodruff, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Navigation Guide methodology was developed to meet the need for a robust method of systematic and transparent research synthesis in environmental health science. We conducted a case study systematic review to support proof of concept of the method. Objective: We applied the Navigation Guide systematic review methodology to determine whether developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affects fetal growth in humans. Methods: We applied the first 3 steps of the Navigation Guide methodology to human epidemiological data: 1) specify the study question, 2) select the evidence, and 3) rate the quality and strength of the evidence. We developed a protocol, conducted a comprehensive search of the literature, and identified relevant studies using prespecified criteria. We evaluated each study for risk of bias and conducted meta-analyses on a subset of studies. We rated quality and strength of the entire body of human evidence. Results: We identified 18 human studies that met our inclusion criteria, and 9 of these were combined through meta-analysis. Through meta-analysis, we estimated that a 1-ng/mL increase in serum or plasma PFOA was associated with a –18.9 g (95% CI: –29.8, –7.9) difference in birth weight. We concluded that the risk of bias across studies was low, and we assigned a “moderate” quality rating to the overall body of human evidence. Conclusion: On the basis of this first application of the Navigation Guide systematic review methodology, we concluded that there is “sufficient” human evidence that developmental exposure to PFOA reduces fetal growth. Citation: Johnson PI, Sutton P, Atchley DS, Koustas E, Lam J, Sen S, Robinson KA, Axelrad DA, Woodruff TJ. 2014. The Navigation Guide—evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: systematic review of human evidence for PFOA effects on fetal growth. Environ Health Perspect 122:1028–1039; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307893 PMID:24968388

  18. Reviewed evidence about the safety of the daily use of alcohol-based mouthrinses.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Celso Augusto; Villoria, Germano Eduardo Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Current scientific knowledge provides clear evidence that alcohol-based mouthwashes can be beneficial in a daily oral health routine, including dental hygiene and plaque control. Several issues are worth discussing, in spite of the wealth of supporting evidence. Despite some undesirable effects to some people, like burning sensation, and some contraindications, like the use by infants, alcohol addicts and patients with mucosal injuries, there is no reason to avoid the use of alcohol-containing mouthwashes as long as they are used following proper guidance by dental professionals and the manufacturers' instructions. The alleged correlation between oral cancer and alcohol-based mouthrinses presents so little, weak, inconsistent and even contradictory evidence in the literature that any kind of risk warning to patients would be uncalled for. Antimicrobial mouthrinses are safe and effective in reducing plaque and gingivitis, and should be part of a comprehensive oral health care regimen that includes brushing, flossing and rinsing to prevent or minimize periodontal disease.

  19. Effectiveness of virtual reality rehabilitation for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: an updated evidence-based systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ravi, D K; Kumar, N; Singhi, P

    2017-09-01

    The use of virtual reality systems in the motor rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy is new, and thus the scientific evidence for its effectiveness needs to be evaluated through a systematic review. To provide updated evidence-based guidance for virtual reality rehabilitation in sensory and functional motor skills of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. PubMed, PEDro, Web of Science, OTseeker, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library were searched from their earliest records up to 1 June, 2016. Two reviewers applied the population intervention comparison outcome (PICO) question to screen the studies for this review. Information on study design, subjects, intervention, outcome measures and efficacy results were extracted into a pilot-tested form. Method quality was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Downs and Black checklist. Thirty-one studies included 369 participants in total. Best evidence synthesis was applied to summarize the outcomes, which were grouped according to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Moderate evidence was found for balance and overall motor development. The evidence is still limited for other motor skills. This review uncovered additional literature showing moderate evidence that virtual reality rehabilitation is a promising intervention to improve balance and motor skills in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. The technique is growing, so long-term follow-up and further research are required to determine its exact place in the management of cerebral palsy. Systematic review registration number PROSPERO 2015:CRD42015026048. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adalimumab in ankylosing spondylitis: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, Stephanie; Ackermann, Christoph; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease that has prominent effects on the spine and peripheral joints. In addition, extraarticular manifestations such as enthesitis and acute anterior uveitis may be clinically important. In recent years, the therapy of AS has changed, largely due to the introduction of inhibitors of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Adalimumab, a human monoclonal antibody specifically for TNF, is the most recent of the TNF blocking agents that have been approved for the treatment of active, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID)-refractory patients with AS. Aims: To evaluate the evidence for the therapeutic value of adalimumab in ankylosing spondylitis. Evidence review: There is clear evidence that adalimumab, administered 40 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks, substantially improves the signs and symptoms of NSAID-refractory, active AS when compared with placebo treatment. There is ample evidence that adalimumab causes significant improvements in physical health status and overall AS-specific, health-related quality of life and physical functioning, which consequently leads to better work productivity. There is substantial evidence that adalimumab improves spinal and sacroiliac joint inflammation in AS patients. Initial results from clinical trials suggest that there is no increased risk of serious infections or malignancies in adalimumab-treated patients with AS. The most common adverse events were injection-site reactions. Limited economic evidence suggests that adalimumab 40 mg may be cost effective when used according to current valid treatment guidelines. Place in therapy: Adalimumab is an effective treatment for patients with active AS. PMID:21221193

  1. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Cognitive Interventions for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Tammy; Bourgeois, Michelle; Pimentel, Jane; Qualls, Constance Dean; Hickey, Ellen; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the current state of research evidence related to cognitive interventions for individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementias. Method: A systematic search of the literature was conducted across 27 electronic databases based on a set of a priori questions, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and search parameters. Studies…

  2. Reviewing Evidence-Based Practice for Pupils with Dyslexia and Literacy Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Yvonne; Stuart, Morag

    2013-01-01

    There is now a strong evidence base from theory and research providing a "template" to inform practice at Wave 2, guiding the design and implementation of time-limited effective early intervention programmes for pupils identified as "at risk" of reading difficulties following initial literacy instruction (Rose, 2009). In…

  3. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Cognitive Interventions for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Tammy; Bourgeois, Michelle; Pimentel, Jane; Qualls, Constance Dean; Hickey, Ellen; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the current state of research evidence related to cognitive interventions for individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementias. Method: A systematic search of the literature was conducted across 27 electronic databases based on a set of a priori questions, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and search parameters. Studies…

  4. The Use of Biological Meshes in Diaphragmatic Defects - An Evidence-Based Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-Alexander; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of meshes for hiatal hernia repair has emerged in the era of laparoscopic surgery, although sporadic cases of mesh augmentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture have been reported. The indications for biologic meshes in diaphragmatic repair are ill defined. This systematic review aims to investigate the available evidence on the role of biologic meshes in diaphragmatic rupture and hiatal hernia repair. Limited data from sporadic case reports and case series have demonstrated that repair of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with biologic mesh is safe technique in both the acute or chronic setting. High level evidence demonstrates short-term benefits of biologic mesh augmentation in hiatal hernia repair over primary repair, although adequate long-term data are not currently available. Long-term follow-up data suggest no benefit of hiatal hernia repair using porcine small intestine submucosa over suture repair. The effectiveness of different biologic mesh materials on hernia recurrence requires further investigation.

  5. Evidence-based assessment of proton-pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vinayak; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease continues to be issue especially due to its high prevalence in the developing world. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection associated duodenal ulcers should undergo eradication therapy. There are many regimens offered for H. pylori eradication which include triple, quadruple, or sequential therapy regimens. The central aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for H. pylori therapy from a meta-analytical outlook. The consequence of the dose, type of proton-pump inhibitor, and the length of the treatment will be debated. The most important risk factor for eradication failure is resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole. PMID:25356018

  6. An evidence based review of the assessment and management of penetrating neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Burgess, C A; Dale, O T; Almeyda, R; Corbridge, R J

    2012-02-01

    Although relatively uncommon, penetrating neck trauma has the potential for serious morbidity and an estimated mortality of up to 6%. The assessment and management of patients who have sustained a penetrating neck injury has historically been an issue surrounded by significant controversy. OBJECTIVES OF REVIEW: To assess recent evidence relating to the assessment and management of penetrating neck trauma, highlighting areas of controversy with an overall aim of formulating clinical guidelines according to a care pathway format. Structured, non-systematic review of recent medical literature. An electronic literature search was performed in May 2011. The Medline database was searched using the Medical Subject Headings terms 'neck injuries' and 'wounds, penetrating' in conjunction with the terms 'assessment' or 'management'. Embase was searched with the terms 'penetrating trauma' and 'neck injury', also in conjunction with the terms 'assessment' and 'management'. Results were limited to articles published in English from 1990 to the present day. Abstracts were reviewed by the first three authors to select full-text articles for further critical appraisal. The references and citation links of these articles were hand-searched to identify further articles of relevance. 147 relevant articles were identified by the electronic literature search, comprising case series, case reports and reviews. 33 were initially selected for further evaluation. Although controversy continues to surround the management of penetrating neck trauma, the role of selective non-operative management and the utility of CT angiography to investigate potential vascular injuries appears to be increasingly accepted. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Evidence-Based Rationale for Ankle Cartilage Allograft Replacement: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pierce; Lee, Daniel K

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of ankle arthritis remains controversial. Ankle cartilage allograft replacement is a novel and complex procedure. Many clinical studies have shown some level of promise, as well complications. We performed a systematic review of the clinical outcomes to describe and assess the different techniques and clinical outcomes for ankle cartilage allograft replacement. We performed a review of the published studies using MEDLINE(®) by way of PubMed(®) and Google Scholar(®) from January 2000 through October 2014, ranging from case reports to clinical studies. The inclusion criteria consisted of ankle cartilage allograft procedures with objective findings and clinical outcome scoring and complication and fusion rates and excluded nonallograft synthetic graft techniques, bone substitutes or expanders, review reports, and technique instructional manuals. Evidence with the combination of objective findings and clinical outcomes for all 3 type of allograft replacement (osteochondral, unipolar, and bipolar) is lacking. Several techniques for cartilage fixation have been described, including absorbable and metallic fixation. Most of the studies reported many occurrences and a variety of complications. A myriad of techniques for ankle cartilage allograft replacement exists. The results from the present systematic review of the published studies appear promising; however, the lack of statistical power and inconsistent documentation made it difficult to determine the superiority of any one intervention compared with another for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

  8. Evidence-Based Medicine: Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew K; Most, Sam P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly prominent in the climate of modern day healthcare. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the integration of the best available evidence with clinical experience and expertise to help guide clinical decision-making. The essential tenets of evidence-based medicine can be applied to both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Current outcome measures in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty, including objective, subjective, and clinician-reported measures, is summarized and the current data is reviewed.

  9. Effectiveness, safety and costs of orphan drugs: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Matthew J; Heneghan, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several orphan drugs have been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) over the past two decades. However, the drugs are expensive, and in some instances, the evidence for effectiveness is not convincing at the time of regulatory approval. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of orphan drugs that have been granted marketing licenses in Europe, determine the annual costs of each drug, compare the costs of branded orphan drugs against their generic equivalents, and explore any relationships between orphan drug disease prevalence and annual costs. Methods We searched the EMA database to identify orphan drugs granted marketing authorisation up to April 2014. Electronic searches were also conducted in PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar, to assess data on effectiveness, safety and annual costs. 2 reviewers independently evaluated the levels and quality of evidence, and extracted data. Results We identified 74 orphan drugs, with 54 (73%) demonstrating moderate quality of evidence. 85% showed significant clinical effects, but serious adverse events were reported in 86.5%. Their annual costs were between £726 and £378 000. There was a significant inverse relationship between disease prevalence and annual costs (p=0.01); this was largely due to the influence of the ultra-orphan diseases. We could not determine whether the balance between effectiveness and safety influenced annual costs. For 10 drugs where generic alternatives were available, the branded drugs were 1.4 to 82 000 times more expensive. Conclusions The available evidence suggests that there is inconsistency in the quality of evidence of approved orphan drugs, and there is no clear mechanism for determining their prices. In some cases, far cheaper generic agents appear to be available. A more robust, transparent and standard mechanism for determining annual costs is imperative. PMID:26109112

  10. Effectiveness, safety and costs of orphan drugs: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Matthew J; Heneghan, Carl J

    2015-06-24

    Several orphan drugs have been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) over the past two decades. However, the drugs are expensive, and in some instances, the evidence for effectiveness is not convincing at the time of regulatory approval. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of orphan drugs that have been granted marketing licenses in Europe, determine the annual costs of each drug, compare the costs of branded orphan drugs against their generic equivalents, and explore any relationships between orphan drug disease prevalence and annual costs. We searched the EMA database to identify orphan drugs granted marketing authorisation up to April 2014. Electronic searches were also conducted in PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar, to assess data on effectiveness, safety and annual costs. 2 reviewers independently evaluated the levels and quality of evidence, and extracted data. We identified 74 orphan drugs, with 54 (73%) demonstrating moderate quality of evidence. 85% showed significant clinical effects, but serious adverse events were reported in 86.5%. Their annual costs were between £726 and £378,000. There was a significant inverse relationship between disease prevalence and annual costs (p = 0.01); this was largely due to the influence of the ultra-orphan diseases. We could not determine whether the balance between effectiveness and safety influenced annual costs. For 10 drugs where generic alternatives were available, the branded drugs were 1.4 to 82,000 times more expensive. The available evidence suggests that there is inconsistency in the quality of evidence of approved orphan drugs, and there is no clear mechanism for determining their prices. In some cases, far cheaper generic agents appear to be available. A more robust, transparent and standard mechanism for determining annual costs is imperative. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Lenalidomide in multiple myeloma: an evidence-based review of its role in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Paul; Mitsiades, Constantine; Laubach, Jacob; Schlossman, Robert; Ghobrial, Irene; Hideshima, Teru; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a relatively common and incurable hematological malignancy. Currently, there is no single standard therapy, with choice of treatment dependent on individual patient factors. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with potent antitumor, antiangiogenic, immunomodulatory, and proapoptotic activity in MM. Aims: To evaluate the evidence for the use of lenalidomide in its current indication in relapsed or refractory MM, and additionally its investigational use for the treatment of newly diagnosed MM. Evidence review: In patients with relapsed and refractory MM, adding lenalidomide to high-dose dexamethasone significantly improves response rates and time-to-progression, relative to high-dose dexamethasone alone. This translates into a significant extension of overall survival (with a median extension of 9.1 months in a pivotal phase III study). Outcome is independent of patient age, number of previous therapies, type of previous therapy (including thalidomide or autologous stem cell transplantation), renal impairment, and β2-microglobulin level. Evidence suggests that combining lenalidomide with low-dose dexamethasone improves outcomes in patients with newly diagnosed disease and is superior to lenalidomide combined with high-dose dexamethasone. Myelosuppression is the predominant toxicity observed, although some studies have shown high incidences of venous thromboembolism in the absence of prophylactic antithrombotic anticoagulation therapy. There is currently only limited evidence regarding the health economics of lenalidomide. Role in therapy: The encouraging results obtained with lenalidomide alone and in combination with dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory MM have led to its adoption as a recommended therapy in patients who have received at least one prior treatment. Emerging evidence supports the ongoing investigation of lenalidomide in combination with low-dose dexamethasone, and in other combinations

  12. Overcoming access barriers to health services through membership-based microfinance organizations: a review of evidence from South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somen; Annear, Peter Leslie

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the poor to overcome the barriers to accessing health services. Membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes can improve health outcomes for the poor. This study reviewed the evidence published between 1993 and 2013 on the role of membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes in improving health outcomes for the poor in South Asia. A total of 661 papers were identified and 26 selected for inclusion, based on the relevance and rigour of the research methods. Of these 26, five were evidence reviews. Of the remaining 21 papers, 12 were from India, seven from Bangladesh, and one each from Sri Lanka and Indonesia. Three papers addressed more than one theme. Five key themes emerged from the review: (i) the impact of microfinance programmes on the social and economic situation of the poor; (ii) the impact of microfinance programmes on community health; (iii) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on raising client awareness; (iv) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on financing health care; and (v) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on affordable health-care products and services. The review provides new evidence on the pathways through which microfinance helps to improve population health and value for money for such programmes. Among countries with large populations in the informal sector, there is a strong case for policy-makers to support these groups in providing access to life-saving health care among the poor. PMID:25685728

  13. Overcoming access barriers to health services through membership-based microfinance organizations: a review of evidence from South Asia.

    PubMed

    Saha, Somen; Annear, Peter Leslie

    2014-06-30

    It is a challenge for the poor to overcome the barriers to accessing health services. Membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes can improve health outcomes for the poor. This study reviewed the evidence published between 1993 and 2013 on the role of membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes in improving health outcomes for the poor in South Asia. A total of 661 papers were identified and 26 selected for inclusion, based on the relevance and rigour of the research methods. Of these 26, five were evidence reviews. Of the remaining 21 papers, 12 were from India, seven from Bangladesh, and one each from Sri Lanka and Indonesia. Three papers addressed more than one theme. Five key themes emerged from the review: (i) the impact of microfinance programmes on the social and economic situation of the poor; (ii) the impact of microfinance programmes on community health; (iii) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on raising client awareness; (iv) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on financing health care; and (v) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on affordable health-care products and services. The review provides new evidence on the pathways through which microfinance helps to improve population health and value for money for such programmes. Among countries with large populations in the informal sector, there is a strong case for policy-makers to support these groups in providing access to life-saving health care among the poor.

  14. Systematic review of level 1 evidence for laparoscopic pediatric surgery: do our procedures comply with the requirements of evidence-based medicine?

    PubMed

    Dingemann, Jens; Ure, Benno M

    2013-12-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have evolved quickly in recent years and are regarded as standard procedures in pediatric surgery today. However, most studies comparing laparoscopic operations with the corresponding open procedure do not reach a high level of evidence according to the criteria of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. For evidence Level 1a, a meta-analysis (MA) of different randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is required. For evidence Level 1b, at least one RCT is required. The aim of our study was to evaluate the availability of Level 1 studies comparing laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation in pediatric surgery. Systematic review of clinical Level 1 studies using PubMed. All MA and RCT were identified and individually reviewed. Only studies comparing pediatric laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation were included. RCTs included in MA were only individually analyzed if they focused on additional endpoints. Endpoints of the study were advantages and disadvantages of laparoscopy compared with the open operation. A total of 20 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria (9 MA and 11 RCT). Studies providing evidence Level 1a were identified for five types of laparoscopic procedures (laparoscopic appendectomy, inguinal hernia repair, orchidopexy, pyloromyotomy, and varicocelectomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1b were identified for two types of laparoscopic procedures (fundoplication and pyeloplasty). The advantages of laparoscopy were less wound infections, ileus and postoperative pain (appendectomy), less retching (fundoplication), lower incidence of metachronous inguinal hernia, shorter hospital stay (appendectomy, orchiopexy, and pyeloplasty), and shorter time to full feeds (pyloromyotomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1 are only available for seven laparoscopic procedures in pediatric surgery. Effort has to be made to extend the existing Level 1 evidence and to gain high level evidence for further

  15. Desvenlafaxine in major depressive disorder: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel Z; Massey, Suena H

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Desvenlafaxine, the active metabolite of venlafaxine, is a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) recently approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. It is one of only three medications in this class available in the United States. Aims: The objective of this article is to review the published evidence for the safety and efficacy of desvenlafaxine, and to compare it to other antidepressants to delineate its role in the treatment of depression. Evidence review: At the recommended dose of 50 mg per day the rate of response and remission was similar to other SNRIs, as was the adverse effect profile. The rate of discontinuation was no greater than placebo, and a discontinuation syndrome was not observed at this dose. Higher doses were not associated with greater efficacy, but they did lead to more side effects, and the use of a taper prior to discontinuation. The most common side effects reported were insomnia, somnolence, dizziness, and nausea. Some subjects experienced clinically significant blood pressure elevation. Place in therapy: Like duloxetine, desvenlafaxine inhibits the reuptake of both norepinephrine and serotonin at the starting dose. Dual reuptake inhibitors have been shown to have small but statistically significantly greater rates of response and remission compared to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and they have also shown early promise in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Desvenlafaxine may prove to be a valuable treatment option by expanding the limited number of available dual reuptake inhibitors. PMID:20694066

  16. Evidence-based psychological interventions for adult survivors of torture and trauma: a 30-year review.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Colleen A; Kaplan, Ida

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we review research evidence on psychosocial interventions for adult survivors of torture and trauma. We identified 40 studies from 1980 to 2010 that investigated interventions for adult survivors of torture and trauma. Population subtypes include resettled refugees, asylum seekers, displaced persons, and persons resident in their country of origin. Settings include specialized services for torture and trauma, specialized tertiary referral clinics, community settings, university settings, as well as psychiatric and multidisciplinary mental health services. Interventions were delivered as individual or group treatments and lasted from a single session to 19 years duration. The studies employed randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized comparison studies and single cohort follow-up studies. In all, 36 of the 40 studies (90%) demonstrated significant improvements on at least one outcome indicator after an intervention. Most studies (60%) included participants who had high levels of posttraumatic stress symptomatology. Improvements in symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms were found following a range of interventions. Little evidence was available with regard to the effect on treatment outcomes of the amount, type, or length of treatment, the influence of patient characteristics, maintenance of treatment effects, and treatment outcomes other than psychiatric symptomatology. The review highlights the need for more carefully designed research that addresses the shortcomings of current studies and that integrates the experience of expert practitioners.

  17. Preventing trachoma through environmental sanitation: a review of the evidence base.

    PubMed Central

    Prüss, A.; Mariotti, S. P.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the available evidence for the associations between environmental sanitation and transmission of trachoma was undertaken with a view to identifying preventive interventions. The WHO Global Alliance for the Elimination of Trachoma by the Year 2020 (GET2020) has adopted the "SAFE" strategy, consisting of four components: Surgery, Antibiotic treatment, promotion of Facial cleanliness and initiation of Environmental changes. This review of 19 studies selected from the 39 conducted in different parts of the world shows that there is clear evidence to support the recommendation of facial cleanliness and environmental improvements (i.e. the F and E components of the SAFE strategy) to prevent trachoma. Person-to-person contact and flies appear to constitute the major transmission pathways. Improvement of personal and community hygiene has great potential for a sustainable reduction in trachoma transmission. Controlled clinical trials are needed to estimate the relative contribution of various elements to the risk of transmission of trachoma and the effectiveness of different interventions. These could show the relative attributable risks and effectiveness of interventions to achieve improvement of personal hygiene and fly control by environmental improvements, alone or in combination, and with or without antibiotic treatment. PMID:10743299

  18. Preventing trachoma through environmental sanitation: a review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Prüss, A; Mariotti, S P

    2000-01-01

    A review of the available evidence for the associations between environmental sanitation and transmission of trachoma was undertaken with a view to identifying preventive interventions. The WHO Global Alliance for the Elimination of Trachoma by the Year 2020 (GET2020) has adopted the "SAFE" strategy, consisting of four components: Surgery, Antibiotic treatment, promotion of Facial cleanliness and initiation of Environmental changes. This review of 19 studies selected from the 39 conducted in different parts of the world shows that there is clear evidence to support the recommendation of facial cleanliness and environmental improvements (i.e. the F and E components of the SAFE strategy) to prevent trachoma. Person-to-person contact and flies appear to constitute the major transmission pathways. Improvement of personal and community hygiene has great potential for a sustainable reduction in trachoma transmission. Controlled clinical trials are needed to estimate the relative contribution of various elements to the risk of transmission of trachoma and the effectiveness of different interventions. These could show the relative attributable risks and effectiveness of interventions to achieve improvement of personal hygiene and fly control by environmental improvements, alone or in combination, and with or without antibiotic treatment.

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Rabito, Matthew J.; Kaye, Alan David

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) plays a significant role in many aspects of healthcare worldwide, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). This review describes some of the challenges of CAM in terms of scientific research. Biologically-based therapies, mind-body therapies, manipulative and body-based therapies, whole medical systems, and energy medicine are reviewed in detail with regard to cardiovascular risk factors and mediation or modulation of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. CAM use among patients with CVD is prevalent and in many instances provides positive and significant effects, with biologically-based and mind-body therapies being the most commonly used treatment modalities. More rigorous research to determine the precise physiologic effects and long-term benefits on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with CAM usage, as well as more open lines of communication between patients and physicians regarding CAM use, is essential when determining optimal treatment plans. PMID:23710229

  20. Iloperidone in the treatment of schizophrenia: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, Fernanda S; Wiens, Astrid; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating mental disorder that affects the patient’s and their family’s quality of life, as well as financial costs and health care settings. Despite the variety of available antipsychotics, optimal treatment outcomes are not always achieved. Novel drugs, such as iloperidone, can provide more effective, tolerable and safer strategies. Aim To review the evidence for the clinical impact of iloperidone on the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. Evidence review Clinical trials, observational studies and meta-analyses reached a common consensus that iloperidone is as effective as haloperidol, risperidone and ziprasidone in reducing schizophrenia symptoms. Similar amounts of adverse events and discontinuations were observed with iloperidone compared to placebo and active treatments. Common adverse events are mild and include dizziness, hypotension, dry mouth and weight gain. Iloperidone can induce extension of QTc interval, and clinicians should be aware of its contraindications. In long-term trials, iloperidone also showed promising safety and tolerability profiles. The low propensity to cause akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), increased prolactin levels or changes to metabolic laboratory parameters support its use in practice. Results showed that iloperidone prevents relapse in stabilized patients, with a time to relapse superior to placebo and similar to haloperidol. Patients using a prior antipsychotic (eg, risperidone and aripiprazole) can easily switch to iloperidone with no serious impact on safety or efficacy. However, the acquisition costs of iloperidone may hamper its use. Further evidence comparing iloperidone with other antipsychotics, and pharmacoeconomic studies would be welcome. Place in therapy Considering just the clinical profile of iloperidone, it represents a promising drug for treating schizophrenia, particularly in patients who are intolerant to previous antipsychotics, as well as being

  1. Evidence based review of type 2 diabetes prevention and management in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    Afable, Aimee; Karingula, Nidhi Shree

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the newest approaches to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) prevention and control in the developing world context. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of published studies of diabetes prevention and control programs in low and middle-income countries, as defined by the World Bank. We searched PubMed using Medical Subject Headings terms. Studies needed to satisfy four criteria: (1) Must be experimental; (2) Must include patients with T2DM or focusing on prevention of T2DM; (3) Must have a lifestyle intervention component; (4) Must be written in English; and (5) Must have measurable outcomes related to diabetes. RESULTS: A total of 66 studies from 20 developing countries were gathered with publication dates through September 2014. India contributed the largest number of trials (11/66). Of the total 66 studies reviewed, all but 3 studies reported evidence of favorable outcomes in the prevention and control of type 2 diabetes. The overwhelming majority of studies reported on diabetes management (56/66), and among these more than half were structured lifestyle education programs. The evidence suggests that lifestyle education led by allied health professionals (nurses, pharmacists) were as effective as those led by physicians or a team of clinicians. The remaining diabetes management interventions focused on diet or exercise, but the evidence to recommend one approach over another was weak. CONCLUSION: Large experimental diabetes prevention/control studies of dietary and exercise interventions are lacking particularly those that consider quality rather than quantity of carbohydrates and alternative exercise. PMID:27226816

  2. Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications. PMID:17549209

  3. Informing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for children with cerebral palsy at risk of osteoporosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Darcy; Switzer, Lauren; Agarwal, Payal; Wong, Charles; Sochett, Etienne; Stevenson, Richard; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Smile, Sharon; Young, Elizabeth; Huber, Joelene; Milo-Manson, Golda; Kuwaik, Ghassan Abu; Gaebler, Deborah

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to inform evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and low bone mineral density (BMD). A computer-assisted literature search was focused on low BMD in children with CP, and was limited to the following interventions: weight-bearing activities, bisphosphonate use, and vitamin D or calcium supplementation. Articles were classified according to American Academy of Neurology guidelines and recommendation classifications were given based on the evidence for the intervention increasing BMD and decreasing fragility fractures. Studies were included if they were English-language full-text studies, focused on children with CP, and included at least 10 participants receiving the studied interventions. Twenty-one articles underwent full-text review and data abstraction, including seven studies of weight-bearing activities, five studies of vitamin D or calcium supplementation, and nine studies of bisphosphonates administration. Overall, the evidence that bisphosphonates administration increases BMD was assessed as level B (probable) while the evidence that vitamin D or calcium supplementation does so was assessed as level C (possible); there was insufficient evidence to suggest that weight-bearing activities are an effective intervention to improve BMD. The evidence that bisphosphonates help to prevent fragility fractures was assessed as level C (possible); there was inadequate evidence to support the use of weight-bearing activities or vitamin D or calcium supplementation to decrease fragility fractures. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were created outlining the suggested role of weight-bearing activities, vitamin D and calcium supplementation, and bisphosphonate use for children with CP with low BMD at risk of fragility fractures. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Developing an evidence base of best practices for integrating computerized systems into the exam room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal R; Vichich, Jennifer; Lang, Ian; Lin, Jessica; Zheng, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of health information technology systems, electronic health records in particular, is changing the nature of how clinicians interact with patients. Lack of knowledge remains on how best to integrate such systems in the exam room. The purpose of this systematic review was to (1) distill "best" behavioral and communication practices recommended in the literature for clinicians when interacting with patients in the presence of computerized systems during a clinical encounter, (2) weigh the evidence of each recommendation, and (3) rank evidence-based recommendations for electronic health record communication training initiatives for clinicians. We conducted a literature search of 6 databases, resulting in 52 articles included in the analysis. We extracted information such as study setting, research design, sample, findings, and implications. Recommendations were distilled based on consistent support for behavioral and communication practices across studies. Eight behavioral and communication practices received strong support of evidence in the literature and included specific aspects of using computerized systems to facilitate conversation and transparency in the exam room, such as spatial (re)organization of the exam room, maintaining nonverbal communication, and specific techniques that integrate the computerized system into the visit and engage the patient. Four practices, although patient-centered, have received insufficient evidence to date. We developed an evidence base of best practices for clinicians to maintain patient-centered communications in the presence of computerized systems in the exam room. Further work includes development and empirical evaluation of evidence-based guidelines to better integrate computerized systems into clinical care.

  5. Thymic epithelial neoplasms: a review of current concepts using an evidence-based pathology approach.

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, Alberto M; McKenna, Robert J; Gupta, Ruta

    2008-06-01

    Evidence-based pathology promotes the critical evaluation of current clinical information and the development of evidence-based diagnostic and prognostic guidelines. No randomized clinical trials of patients who have thymomas or thymic carcinomas are available to evaluate the validity of the current World Health Organization (WHO) histologic classification or the widely used Masaoka staging system. A meta-analysis of over 2000 thymoma patients estimated that only three WHO histologic types of thymomas are associated with significant survival differences. Prospective randomized clinical trials and an international registry of patients who have Thymic epithelial neoplasms are needed to stratify patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy, postoperative radiation therapy, and other nonsurgical modalities.

  6. Systematic, Evidence-Based Review of Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Fitness Effects on Cognition in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W; Scudder, Mark R; DeLuca, John

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is highly prevalent, disabling, and poorly-managed in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence suggests that exercise might have beneficial effects on cognition in this population. The current systematic, evidence-based review examined the existing literature on exercise, physical activity, and physical fitness effects on cognition in MS to accurately describe the current status of the field, offer recommendations for clinicians, and identify study-specific and participant-specific characteristics for providing future direction for ongoing MS research. We performed an open-dated search of Medline, PsychInfo, and CINAHL in December 2015. The search strategy involved using the terms 'exercise' OR 'physical activity' OR 'physical fitness' OR 'aerobic' OR 'resistance' OR 'balance' OR 'walking' OR 'yoga' OR 'training' OR 'rehabilitation' AND 'multiple sclerosis'. Articles were eliminated from the systematic review if it was a review article, theoretical paper, or textbook chapter; did not involve persons with MS; involved only persons with pediatric-onset MS; did not involve neuropsychological outcomes; did not include empirical data to evaluate outcomes; involved pharmacological interventions; or was not available in English. The selected articles were first classified as examining exercise, physical activity, or physical fitness, and were then randomly assigned to 2 independent reviewers who rated each article for level of evidence based on American Academy of Neurology criteria. Reviewers further completed a table to characterize important elements of each study (i.e., intervention characteristics), the cognitive domain(s) that were targeted, participant-specific characteristics, outcome measures, and study results. The present review resulted in 26 studies on the effects of exercise, physical activity, and physical fitness on cognition in persons with MS. This included 1 Class I study, 3 Class II studies, 8 Class III studies, and

  7. [Methods of evidence mapping. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Schmucker, C; Motschall, E; Antes, G; Meerpohl, J J

    2013-10-01

    Evidence mapping is an increasingly popular approach to systematically evaluate published research. While there are methodological standards for systematic reviews, discrepancies exist between the terminology and methods used within evidence mapping. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the methodology and terminology used in evidence mapping and to demonstrate the continuum between evidence mapping and traditional systematic reviews. A systematic literature search was conducted in 10 databases in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the state of the research standards for evidence mapping. In addition, websites of institutions which are already conducting evidence mapping were searched. The included study pool (n = 12) shows that the terms 'evidence map' and 'scoping review' are widely used within evidence mapping. Evidence maps are an approach to depict both the number and characteristics of studies in tabular form that exist as well as evidence gaps based on primary studies and systematic reviews of broad clinical questions. Scoping reviews also summarize the literature in a tabular form but also give a descriptive narrative summary of the results. A quality assessment of the studies is generally not included. Evidence mapping allows the identification of research gaps. This aspect is particularly important for interventions which are used without sufficient evidence. In contrast, systematic reviews are mainly used to estimate effects for interventions and evaluate whether the included studies are reliable.

  8. Quality of life assessment in domestic dogs: An evidence-based rapid review.

    PubMed

    Belshaw, Z; Asher, L; Harvey, N D; Dean, R S

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of quality of life (QoL) is an important, increasingly popular outcome measure in veterinary research and practice, particularly in dogs. In humans, QoL is commonly assessed by self-reporting and since this is not possible for animals, it is crucial that instruments designed to measure QoL are tested for reliability and validity. Using a systematic, replicable literature search strategy, the aim of this study was to find published, peer-reviewed instruments for QoL assessment in dogs and to assess the quality of these. CAB Abstracts and PubMed were searched in July 2013 using terms relevant to dogs, wellbeing and QoL. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. When instruments were not published in full, authors were contacted to obtain them. Criteria were applied to assess the quality, validity and reliability of the 52 instruments obtained. Twenty-seven additional instruments used in peer-reviewed publications were not included because they had not been fully described in the publication or were not provided by authors upon request. Most of the instruments reviewed (48/52) were disease-specific rather than generic. Only four publications provided a definition of QoL or wellbeing. Only 11/52 instruments demonstrated evidence of assessing reliability or validity, and the quality of these instruments was variable. Many novel, unvalidated instruments have been generated and applied as clinical outcomes before it was known whether they measured QoL. This rapid review can be used to identify currently available and validated canine QoL instruments, and to assess the validity and quality of new or existing instruments.

  9. Quality of life assessment in domestic dogs: An evidence-based rapid review

    PubMed Central

    Belshaw, Z.; Asher, L.; Harvey, N.D.; Dean, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of quality of life (QoL) is an important, increasingly popular outcome measure in veterinary research and practice, particularly in dogs. In humans, QoL is commonly assessed by self-reporting and since this is not possible for animals, it is crucial that instruments designed to measure QoL are tested for reliability and validity. Using a systematic, replicable literature search strategy, the aim of this study was to find published, peer-reviewed instruments for QoL assessment in dogs and to assess the quality of these. CAB Abstracts and PubMed were searched in July 2013 using terms relevant to dogs, wellbeing and QoL. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. When instruments were not published in full, authors were contacted to obtain them. Criteria were applied to assess the quality, validity and reliability of the 52 instruments obtained. Twenty-seven additional instruments used in peer-reviewed publications were not included because they had not been fully described in the publication or were not provided by authors upon request. Most of the instruments reviewed (48/52) were disease-specific rather than generic. Only four publications provided a definition of QoL or wellbeing. Only 11/52 instruments demonstrated evidence of assessing reliability or validity, and the quality of these instruments was variable. Many novel, unvalidated instruments have been generated and applied as clinical outcomes before it was known whether they measured QoL. This rapid review can be used to identify currently available and validated canine QoL instruments, and to assess the validity and quality of new or existing instruments. PMID:26358965

  10. Evaluating the evidence for evidence-based medicine: are randomized clinical trials less flawed than other forms of peer-reviewed medical research?

    PubMed

    Steen, R Grant; Dager, Stephen R

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine considers randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to be the strongest form of evidence for clinical decision making. To test the hypothesis that RCTs have fewer methodological flaws than non-RCTs, limitations of 17,591 RCTs and 39,029 non-RCTs were characterized. Panels of experts assembled to write meta-analyses evaluated this literature to determine which articles should be included in 316 meta-analytic reviews. Overall, 38.7% of RCTs evaluated were excluded from review for an identified flaw. Commonly identified flaws in RCTs were as follows: insufficient data provided to evaluate the study (9.6% of 17,591 RCTs); inadequate randomization (9.0%); inadequate blinding (4.9%); and duplicative publication (4.4%). Overall, 20.2% of all published medical research has an identified methodological flaw, with RCTs having as many limitations as non-RCTs.

  11. Class II Division 1: An Evidence- Based Review of Management and Treatment Timing in the Growing Patient.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sophy K; Forde, Katherine E; Spencer, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Class II division 1 malocclusion is common and various methods have been suggested for successful treatment in the growing patient. A number of recent high-quality studies have been undertaken to assess the efficacy of these treatments. We aim to outline the existing best evidence that supports current practice, with a review of the effect of treatment timing on outcome. This will provide a sound evidence-base for General Dental Practitioners for assessing, advising and referring young patients for treatment. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: General Dental Practitioners should understand the management options and optimal time for treating growing patients with a Class II division 1 malocclusion.

  12. An Evidence-Based Systematic Review of Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa, Actaea racemosa) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Windsor, Regina C

    2014-08-25

    ABSTRACT An evidence-based systematic review of black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa, Actaea racemosa) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration consolidates the safety and efficacy data available in the scientific literature using a validated, reproducible grading rationale. This article includes written and statistical analysis of clinical trials, plus a compilation of expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing.

  13. Child Disaster Mental Health Services: a Review of the System of Care, Assessment Approaches, and Evidence Base for Intervention.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Several decades of research have informed our knowledge of children's reactions to disasters and the factors that influence their reactions. This article describes the system of care for child disaster mental health services using population risk to determine needed services and a stepped care approach built on assessment and monitoring to advance children to appropriate services. To assess the evidence base for disaster interventions, recent reviews of numerous child disaster mental health interventions are summarized.

  14. Approved and investigational uses of modafinil : an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raminder

    2008-01-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting agent that is pharmacologically different from other stimulants. It has been investigated in healthy volunteers, and in individuals with clinical disorders associated with excessive sleepiness, fatigue, impaired cognition and other symptoms. This review examines the use of modafinil in clinical practice based on the results of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials available in the English language in the MEDLINE database. In sleep-deprived individuals, modafinil improves mood, fatigue, sleepiness and cognition to a similar extent as caffeine but has a longer duration of action. Evidence for improved cognition in non-sleep-deprived healthy volunteers is controversial.Modafinil improves excessive sleepiness and illness severity in all three disorders for which it has been approved by the US FDA, i.e. narcolepsy, shift-work sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea with residual excessive sleepiness despite optimal use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However, its effects on safety on the job and on morbidities associated with these disorders have not been ascertained. Continued use of CPAP in obstructive sleep apnoea is essential. Modafinil does not benefit cataplexy.In very small, short-term trials, modafinil improved excessive sleepiness in patients with myotonic dystrophy. It was efficacious in fairly large studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, and was as efficacious as methylphenidate in a small trial, but has not been approved by the FDA, in part because of its serious dermatological toxicity. In a trial of 21 non-concurrent subjects, with 2-week treatment periods, modafinil was as effective as dexamfetamine in adult ADHD. Modafinil was helpful for depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder in a trial that excluded patients with stimulant-induced mania. A single dose of modafinil may hasten recovery from general anaesthesia after day surgery. A

  15. The review of new evidence 5 years later: SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP).

    PubMed

    Jobli, Edessa C; Gardner, Stephen E; Hodgson, Anna B; Essex, Alyson

    2015-02-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) decided that NREPP should offer a second review option for interventions that have already been reviewed and included in the registry for 5 years. Principals from 135 such interventions were invited to participate in a second review, and an exploratory study of the Principals' responses to this invitation was conducted. The study used a mixed-method approach, quantitatively describing characteristics of Principals and their interventions and qualitatively summarizing feedback from phone interviews with a convenience sample of Principals participating in a second review. Of the Principals invited, 21% accepted a second review, 24% were interested but unable or not ready to submit materials, and 56% did not accept or did not respond. Mental health treatment interventions were more likely to undergo a second review, and substance abuse treatment interventions were less likely. Similar percentages of interventions undergoing a second review had received funding from the National Institutes of Health (86%) and had been evaluated in a comparative effectiveness research study (79%). Overall ratings for interventions improved in each second review completed. The interviewed Principals perceived potentially lower ratings as the only risk in participating in a second review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management in the nursing profession: an evidence based literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, C; Griffiths, P

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management for nurses was assessed through a systematic review. Seven randomised controlled trials and three prospective cohort studies assessing the effectiveness of a stress management programmes were identified and reviewed. The quality of research identified was weak. There is more evidence for the effectiveness of programmes based on providing personal support than environmental management to reduce stressors. However, since the number and quality of studies is low, the question as to which, if any, approach is more effective cannot be answered definitively. Further research is required before clear recommendations for the use of particular interventions for nursing work related stress can be made. PMID:12499451

  17. Evidence based review of the impact of image enhanced endoscopy in the diagnosis of gastric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ikram; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death. Advanced stages of gastric cancers generally have grim prognosis. But, good prognosis can be achieved if such cancers are detected, diagnosed and resected at early stages. However, early gastric cancers and its precursors often produce only subtle mucosal changes and therefore quite commonly remain elusive at the conventional examination with white light endoscopy. Image-enhanced endoscopy makes mucosal lesions more conspicuous and can therefore potentially yield earlier and more accurate diagnoses. Recent years have seen growing work of research in support of various types of image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) techniques (e.g., dye-chromoendoscopy; magnification endoscopy; narrow-band imaging; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement; and I-SCAN) for a variety of gastric pathologies. In this review, we will examine the evidence for the utilization of various IEE techniques in the diagnosis of gastric disorders. PMID:28042388

  18. An Evidence-Based Review of Fat Modifying Supplemental Weight Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Egras, Amy M.; Hamilton, William R.; Lenz, Thomas L.; Monaghan, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To review the literature on fat modifying dietary supplements commonly used for weight loss. Methods. Recently published randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified in PubMed, MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar using the search terms dietary supplement, herbal, weight loss, obesity, and individual supplement names. Discussion. Data for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), Garcinia cambogia, chitosan, pyruvate, Irvingia gabonensis, and chia seed for weight loss were identified. CLA, chitosan, pyruvate, and Irvingia gabonensis appeared to be effective in weight loss via fat modifying mechanisms. However, the data on the use of these products is limited. Conclusion. Many obese people use dietary supplements for weight loss. To date, there is little clinical evidence to support their use. More data is necessary to determine the efficacy and safety of these supplements. Healthcare providers should assist patients in weighing the risks and benefits of dietary supplement use for weight loss. PMID:20847896

  19. Optimum utilization of cholecystokinin cholescintigraphy (CCK-HIDA) in clinical practice: an evidence based review.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Bryan K

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains one of the most commonly performed operations in the United States. Of the cholecystectomies performed, approximately 30% are carried out for a diagnosis of gallbladder dyskinesia, for which diagnosis is based on a reduced gallbladder ejection fraction as determined by a sincalide (cholecystokinin) stimulated hepatobiliary iminodiacetic scan (CCK-HIDA). Despite the widespread acceptance of this practice standardization of the test methodology and high quality data indicating efficacy of cholecystectomy in the treatment of this condition are lacking. This manuscript reviews this problem in detail based on the current available literature.

  20. The scale of the evidence base on the health effects of conventional yogurt consumption: findings of a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Julie M.; Brown, Sam; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Eales, Jacqualyn F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The health effects of conventional yogurt have been investigated for over a century; however, few systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the extent of the health benefits of yogurt. Objective: The aim of this scoping review was to assess the volume of available evidence on the health effects of conventional yogurt. Methods: The review was guided by a protocol agreed a priori and informed by an extensive literature search conducted in November 2013. Randomized controlled trials were selected and categorized according to the eligibility criteria established in the protocol. Results: 213 studies were identified as relevant to the scoping question. The number of eligible studies identified for each outcome were: bone health (14 studies), weight management and nutrition related health outcomes (81 studies), metabolic health (6 studies); cardiovascular health (57 studies); gastrointestinal health (24 studies); cancer (39 studies); diabetes (13 studies), Parkinson's disease risk (3 studies), all-cause mortality (3 studies), skin complaints (3 studies), respiratory complaints (3 studies), joint pain/function (2 studies); the remaining 8 studies reported a variety of other outcomes. For studies of a similar design and which assessed the same outcomes in similar population groups, we report the potential for the combining of data across studies in systematic reviews. Conclusions: This scoping review has revealed the extensive evidence base for many outcomes which could be the focus of systematic reviews exploring the health effects of conventional yogurt consumption. PMID:26578956

  1. Health professionals' views on the barriers and enablers to evidence-based practice for acute stroke care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baatiema, Leonard; Otim, Michael E; Mnatzaganian, George; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Coombes, Judith; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-06-05

    Adoption of contemporary evidence-based guidelines for acute stroke management is often delayed due to a range of key enablers and barriers. Recent reviews on such barriers focus mainly on specific acute stroke therapies or generalised stroke care guidelines. This review examined the overall barriers and enablers, as perceived by health professionals which affect how evidence-based practice guidelines (stroke unit care, thrombolysis administration, aspirin usage and decompressive surgery) for acute stroke care are adopted in hospital settings. A systematic search of databases was conducted using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine Database from 1990 to 2016. The population of interest included health professionals working clinically or in roles responsible for acute stroke care. There were no restrictions to the study designs. A quality appraisal tool for qualitative studies by the Joanna Briggs Institute and another for quantitative studies by the Centre for Evidence-Based Management were used in the present study. A recent checklist to classify barriers and enablers to health professionals' adherence to evidence-based practice was also used. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria out of a total of 9832 search results. The main barriers or enablers identified included poor organisational or institutional level support, health professionals' limited skills or competence to use a particular therapy, low level of awareness, familiarity or confidence in the effectiveness of a particular evidence-based therapy, limited medical facilities to support evidence uptake, inadequate peer support among health professionals', complex nature of some stroke care therapies or guidelines and patient level barriers. Despite considerable evidence supporting various specific therapies for stroke care, uptake of these therapies is compromised by barriers across

  2. Evidence-based treatments for female pattern hair loss: a summary of a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z; Carter, B

    2012-11-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) or androgenic alopecia is the most common type of hair loss affecting women with reduced hair density and can have a serious psychological impact. It is characterized by progressive replacement of slow cycling terminal hair follicles by miniaturized, rapidly cycling vellus hair follicles. The frontal hair line may or may not be preserved. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence for the effectiveness and safety of the treatments available for FPHL. Searches included: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO, LILACS and several ongoing trials registries (October 2011). Randomized controlled trials in women with FPHL were identified. Twenty-two trials, comprising 2349 participants, were included. A range of interventions was evaluated, with 10 studies examining varying concentrations of minoxidil. Pooled data from four studies indicated that a greater proportion of participants treated with minoxidil reported a moderate increase in their hair regrowth compared with placebo (relative risk 1·86, 95% confidence interval 1·42-2·43). There was no difference between the number of adverse events experienced in the twice daily minoxidil and the placebo intervention groups, except for a reported increase with minoxidil 5% twice daily. Single studies accounted for most of the other comparisons, which were assessed as either having high risk of bias and/or they did not address the prespecified outcomes for this review and provided limited evidence of either the effectiveness or safety of these interventions. Further well-designed, adequately powered randomized controlled trials investigating other treatment options are still required. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Evidence based management of polyps of the gall bladder: A systematic review of the risk factors of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikita R; Gillis, Amy; Smoothey, Craig O; Awan, Faisal N; Ridgway, Paul F

    2016-10-01

    There are no evidence-based guidelines to dictate when Gallbladder Polyps (GBPs) of varying sizes should be resected. To identify factors that accurately predict malignant disease in GBP; to provide an evidence-based algorithm for management. A systematic review following PRISMA guidelines was performed using terms "gallbladder polyps" AND "polypoid lesion of gallbladder", from January 1993 and September 2013. Inclusion criteria required histopathological report or follow-up of 2 years. RTI-IB tool was used for quality analysis. Correlation with GBP size and malignant potential was analysed using Euclidean distance; a logistics mixed effects model was used for assessing independent risk factors for malignancy. Fifty-three articles were included in review. Data from 21 studies was pooled for analysis. Optimum size cut-off for resection of GBPs was 10 mm. Probability of malignancy is approximately zero at size <4.15 mm. Patient age >50 years, sessile and single polyps were independent risk factors for malignancy. For polyps sized 4 mm-10 mm, a risk assessment model was formulated. This review and analysis has provided an evidence-based algorithm for the management of GBPs. Longitudinal studies are needed to better understand the behaviour of polyps <10 mm, that are not at a high risk of malignancy, but may change over time. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interventions to Reduce Perceived Stress Among Graduate Students: A Systematic Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Susan B; Vermeesch, Amber L; Scott, Jane G

    2017-08-10

    Stress is a part of daily life for graduate students, including graduate nursing students. Contemporary graduate nursing students are facing unprecedented challenges to meet rigorous academic standards as they prepare for their advanced professional role to meet the demands of the nation's complex and ever-changing healthcare system. Empowering graduate nursing students to ease their perceived stress and minimize undesirable health effects may benefit their capacity to adapt and successfully manage perceived stress in their future healthcare role. To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the existing evidence with the aim of identifying evidence-based self-care interventions for coping with perceived stress. We conducted a systematic review, searching CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycINFO, and MEDLINE. Inclusion criteria included self-care, graduate students, perceived stress as measured by Perceived Stress Scale, quantitative analysis, conducted within the United States, English language, and peer reviewed. Two authors completed an asynchronous review of the articles, and one expert evidence-based practice mentor and one wellness expert conducted rigorous appraisal of the eight identified studies. Evidence was evaluated and synthesized, and recommendations for practice were determined. Eight studies meeting the criteria for this systematic review were critically appraised. The interventions varied from a stress management course to mind-body-stress-reduction (MBSR) techniques, such as yoga, breath work, meditation, and mindfulness. All studies measured the outcome of stress with the Perceived Stress Scale. Each study demonstrated a reduction in perceived stress postintervention. Most effective self-care MBSR interventions include (a) a didactic component, (b) a guided MBSR practice session, and (c) homework. Consideration should be given to a trained or certified MBSR instructor to teach the intervention. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Evidence-based measures to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Perin, Daniele Cristina; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal

    2016-09-01

    to identify evidence-based care to prevent CLABSI among adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. systematic review conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf and Cochrane Studies addressing care and maintenance of central venous catheters, published from January 2011 to July 2014 were searched. The 34 studies identified were organized in an instrument and assessed by using the classification provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute. the studies presented care bundles including elements such as hand hygiene and maximal barrier precautions; multidimensional programs and strategies such as impregnated catheters and bandages and the involvement of facilities in and commitment of staff to preventing infections. care bundles coupled with education and the commitment of both staff and institutions is a strategy that can contribute to decreased rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections among adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units. identificar evidências de cuidados para prevenção de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateter venoso central em pacientes adultos em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva. revisão Sistemática realizada por meio de busca nas bases de dados Pubmed, Scopus, Cinahl, Web of Science, Lilacs, Bdenf e Cochrane. Foram buscadas pesquisas com cuidados com a cateterização e manutenção do cateter venoso central, publicados de janeiro de 2011 a julho de 2014. Os 34 estudos incluídos foram organizados em um instrumento e avaliados por meio da classificação do The Joanna Briggs Institute. os estudos apresentaram bundles de cuidados com elementos como a higiene das mãos e precauções máximas de barreira; programas multidimensionais e estratégias como cateteres e curativos impregnados e o envolvimento da instituição e engajamento da equipe nos esforços para prevenção de infecção. os cuidados no formato de bundles aliados com a educação e engajamento da equipe e

  6. A Narrative Review of Evidence-Based Preventive Options for Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Starling, Amaal J; Vargas, Bert B

    2015-10-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating disorder that affects 2 % of the global population and imparts a significant societal and economic impact. The cornerstones of chronic migraine management include making an accurate diagnosis, patient education, treatment of comorbid conditions, and selection of an appropriate, evidence-based acute and preventive treatment regimen. Although it is common to treat chronic migraine with preventive medications effective for episodic migraine, a number of treatment options exist with specific evidence for effectiveness in chronic migraine. Currently, onabotulinumtoxinA injections are the only FDA-approved preventive treatment for chronic migraine. A number of non-medication treatment options including occipital nerve and supraorbital nerve stimulation have shown promise as effective prevention for patients either unable to tolerate or unable to obtain relief from oral medications, but more research is necessary.

  7. Evolution of laparoscopy in colorectal surgery: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Alexander Emmanuel; Wong, Mark Te Ching; Tang, Choong Leong

    2014-01-01

    Open surgery for colorectal disease has progressed significantly over the past century from humble beginnings to form the mainstay of treatment for colorectal cancer and a number of benign conditions. Following the introduction of laparoscopic abdominal surgery, the next stage in the evolution of the specialty began in the 1990s with the first laparoscopic colonic resection. Following some early concerns regarding its safety and oncological efficacy during the latter part of that decade, laparoscopic colorectal surgery rapidly came into mainstream use in the early part of the current century with evidence supporting its use being made available from large scale randomised controlled trials. This article provides an evidence-based summary of this evolutionary process as it relates to both benign and malignant colorectal disease, as well as discussion of the next phase of new technologies such as robotic surgery. PMID:24803804

  8. Evidence-based review of diabetic macular edema management: Consensus statement on Indian treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Aurora, Ajay; Chhablani, Jay; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Kumar, Atul; Raman, Rajiv; Nagpal, Manish; Narayanan, Raja; Natarajan, Sundaram; Ramasamay, Kim; Tyagi, Mudit; Verma, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the current evidence and design a diabetic macular edema (DME) management guideline specific for India. The published DME guidelines from different organizations and publications were weighed against the practice trends in India. This included the recently approved drugs. DME management consisted of control of diabetes and other associated systemic conditions, such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and specific therapy to reduce macular edema. Quantification of macular edema is precisely made with the optical coherence tomography and treatment options include retinal laser, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and implantable dexamethasone. Specific use of these modalities depends on the presenting vision and extent of macular involvement. Invariable eyes with center-involving macular edema benefit from intravitreal anti-VEGF or dexamethasone implant therapy, and eyes with macular edema not involving the macula center benefit from retinal laser. The results are illustrated with adequate case studies and frequently asked questions. This guideline prepared on the current published evidence is meant as a guideline for the treating physicians. PMID:26953019

  9. The pharmacological treatment for uremic restless legs syndrome: evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Márcio Moysés; Conti, Cristiane Fiquene; Valbuza, Juliana Spelta; de Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2010-07-30

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common and often misdiagnosed entity among the general population and it may be more common among dialysis patients, with an estimated prevalence of 6.6 to 21.5%. The treatment for uremic RLS has been controversial and therefore a systematic synthesis of the evidence is needed in order to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of treatments for uremic RLS. This was a systematic review of randomized or quasi-randomized double-blind trials on treatments for uremic RLS. The outcomes considered were relief of RLS symptoms marked on a validated scale, subjective sleep quality, sleep quality measured using night polysomnography and actigraphy, quality of life measured subjectively, and adverse events associated with these treatments. Six eligible clinical trials were included. The results from subjective analyses in these studies were divergent, although objective analyses in one trial showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in periodic leg movement while asleep in the treatment group. No combined analysis (meta-analysis) was performed. The most common adverse event seen was gastrointestinal symptoms. Only a few therapeutic trials on patients with uremia with RLS have been published, and there is insufficient scientific evidence to favor any specific therapeutic regimen for uremic-associated RLS. Therapy using levodopa, dopaminergic agonists, anticonvulsants, and clonidine tend to be effective, but further studies are needed.

  10. A Review of Evidence-Based Care of Symptomatic Trichomoniasis and Asymptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis Infections.

    PubMed

    Meites, Elissa; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hobbs, Marcia M; Kissinger, Patricia; Nyirjesy, Paul; Schwebke, Jane R; Secor, W Evan; Sobel, Jack D; Workowski, Kimberly A

    2015-12-15

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 3.7 million women and men in the United States. Health disparities are prominent in the epidemiology of this infection, which affects 11% of women aged ≥40 years and a disproportionately high percentage of black women. Particularly high prevalences have been identified among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients and incarcerated individuals. This article reviews and updates scientific evidence in key topic areas used for the development of the 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current evidence is presented regarding conditions associated with Trichomonas vaginalis infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pregnancy complications such as preterm birth. Nucleic acid amplification tests and point-of-care tests are newly available diagnostic methods that can be conducted on a variety of specimens, potentially allowing highly sensitive testing and screening of both women and men at risk for infection. Usually, trichomoniasis can be cured with single-dose therapy of an appropriate nitroimidazole antibiotic, but women who are also infected with HIV should receive therapy for 7 days. Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging concern.

  11. A Review of Evidence-Based Care of Symptomatic Trichomoniasis and Asymptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meites, Elissa; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Kissinger, Patricia; Nyirjesy, Paul; Schwebke, Jane R.; Secor, W. Evan; Sobel, Jack D.; Workowski, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 3.7 million women and men in the United States. Health disparities are prominent in the epidemiology of this infection, which affects 11% of women aged ≥40 years and a disproportionately high percentage of black women. Particularly high prevalences have been identified among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients and incarcerated individuals. This article reviews and updates scientific evidence in key topic areas used for the development of the 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current evidence is presented regarding conditions associated with Trichomonas vaginalis infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pregnancy complications such as preterm birth. Nucleic acid amplification tests and point-of-care tests are newly available diagnostic methods that can be conducted on a variety of specimens, potentially allowing highly sensitive testing and screening of both women and men at risk for infection. Usually, trichomoniasis can be cured with single-dose therapy of an appropriate nitroimidazole antibiotic, but women who are also infected with HIV should receive therapy for 7 days. Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging concern. PMID:26602621

  12. Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of semantic feature analysis: an evidence-based systematic review.

    PubMed

    Maddy, K M; Capilouto, G J; McComas, K L

    2014-06-01

    This review examines the effectiveness of semantic feature analysis as an intervention to improve naming abilities for persons with aphasia. A systematic search of the literature identified 11 studies that met the pre-determined inclusion criteria. Two independent raters evaluated each study for methodological quality and assigned appropriate levels of evidence using the Single Case Experimental Design scale. To determine clinical effectiveness, effect sizes using Cohen's d were calculated if sufficient data were available. Alternatively, percent of non-overlapping data was calculated. Results indicated that methodologically sound research has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of semantic feature analysis for persons with aphasia using single subject research designs. When using Cohen's d, the majority of participants showed a small effect size. However, when percent of non-overlapping data was calculated, a large treatment effect was present for the majority of participants. Semantic feature analysis was an effective intervention for improving confrontational naming for the majority of participants included in the current review. Further research is warranted to examine generalization effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Literature review of evidence based physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

    PubMed

    Hg Beurskens, Carien; Al Burgers-Bots, Ingrid; W Kroon, Dineke; Ab Oostendorp, Rob

    2004-01-01

    A variety of physiotherapeutic approaches have been tried out during the past 25 years to alleviate the plight of patients with peripheral facial nerve paresis. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis. Trials were identified by computerised searches of biomedical databases, reference lists, and by contacting investigators. Selection criteria were randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy for the improvement of sequelae of facial nerve paresis, comparing the treatment with either another intervention or no intervention. Two reviewers independently assessed the trials using the PEDro scale. Two physiotherapy randomised controlled studies were identified. Interventions used for treatment of patients with facial nerve paresis in the included studies were relaxation, biofeedback and exercise therapy. Neither of the two randomised controlled studies showed scientific evidence of a physiotherapeutic approach in comparison with a control group. Both studies described benefits of the interventions. Further randomised controlled studies are required to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

  15. Using problem-based learning in the clinical setting to improve nursing students' critical thinking: an evidence review.

    PubMed

    Oja, Kenneth J

    2011-03-01

    In preparation for the progressive nature of today's acute care hospital environments and the requirements for safe and effective patient care, it is essential that nursing students learn how to think critically. Problem-based learning is a method of education designed to encourage critical thinking. This article examines the evidence regarding the use of problem-based learning to improve critical thinking. A review of published literature was conducted using the CINAHL, ERIC, PsychInfo, and PubMed databases with the keywords nursing, problem-based learning, and critical thinking. Although the evidence is still accumulating, the studies reviewed indicate a positive relationship between problem-based learning and improved critical thinking in nursing students. There is a need for more rigorous research on the use of problem-based learning to examine the effects on critical thinking. Until this occurs, nursing instructors must rely on the extant evidence to guide their practice or continue to use the traditional model of clinical nursing education.

  16. A systematic review of selected evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haobin; Williams, Beverly A; Fan, Lin

    2008-08-01

    Rapidly changing developments and expanding roles in healthcare environment requires professional nurses to develop critical thinking. Nursing education strives to facilitate students' critical thinking through the appropriate instructional approaches. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered approach to learning which enables the students to work cooperatively in small groups for seeking solutions to situations/problems. The systematic review was conducted to provide the available evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through PBL. The computerized searches from 1990-2006 in CINAHL, Proquest, Cochrane library, Pubmed etc were performed. All studies which addressed the differences in critical thinking among nursing students in PBL were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. As a result, only ten studies were retrieved, they were: one RCT with a Jadad quality score of 3, one nonrandomized control study, two quasi-experimental studies with non-controlled pretest-posttest design, and six descriptive studies. The available evidence in this review did not provide supportive evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through PBL. Clearly, there is a need for additional research with larger sample size and high quality to clarify the effects of PBL on critical thinking development within nursing educational context.

  17. Reviewing the Evidence Base for the Children and Young People Safety Thermometer (CYPST): A Mixed Studies Review.

    PubMed

    Aston, Lydia; Eyre, Caron; McLoughlin, Michelle; Shaw, Rachel

    2016-01-11

    The objective was to identify evidence to support use of specific harms for the development of a children and young people's safety thermometer (CYPST). We searched PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library post-1999 for studies in pediatric settings about pain, skin integrity, extravasation injury, and use of pediatric early warning scores (PEWS). Following screening, nine relevant articles were included. Convergent synthesis methods were used drawing on thematic analysis to combine findings from studies using a range of methods (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods). A review of PEWS was identified so other studies on this issue were excluded. No relevant studies about extravasation injury were identified. The synthesized results therefore focused on pain and skin integrity. Measurement and perception of pain were complex and not always carried out according to best practice. Skin abrasions were common and mostly associated with device related injuries. The findings demonstrate a need for further work on perceptions of pain and effective communication of concerns about pain between parents and nursing staff. Strategies for reducing device-related injuries warrant further research focusing on prevention. Together with the review of PEWS, these synthesized findings support the inclusion of pain, skin integrity, and PEWS in the CYPST.

  18. Reviewing the Evidence Base for the Children and Young People Safety Thermometer (CYPST): A Mixed Studies Review

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Lydia; Eyre, Caron; McLoughlin, Michelle; Shaw, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to identify evidence to support use of specific harms for the development of a children and young people’s safety thermometer (CYPST). We searched PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library post-1999 for studies in pediatric settings about pain, skin integrity, extravasation injury, and use of pediatric early warning scores (PEWS). Following screening, nine relevant articles were included. Convergent synthesis methods were used drawing on thematic analysis to combine findings from studies using a range of methods (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods). A review of PEWS was identified so other studies on this issue were excluded. No relevant studies about extravasation injury were identified. The synthesized results therefore focused on pain and skin integrity. Measurement and perception of pain were complex and not always carried out according to best practice. Skin abrasions were common and mostly associated with device related injuries. The findings demonstrate a need for further work on perceptions of pain and effective communication of concerns about pain between parents and nursing staff. Strategies for reducing device-related injuries warrant further research focusing on prevention. Together with the review of PEWS, these synthesized findings support the inclusion of pain, skin integrity, and PEWS in the CYPST. PMID:27417596

  19. Asthma in the workplace: a case-based discussion and review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, David; Barber, Chris; Walker, Samantha; Scott, Alister

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between asthma and the workplace is important to consider in all cases of adult asthma. Early identification of a cause in the workplace offers an opportunity to improve asthma control significantly and reduce the need for long-term medication if further exposures to the cause can be avoided. This typical but fictitious case is designed to give the reader clinical information in the order this would normally be received in clinical practice, with a real-time commentary about management decisions. Pertinent recent guidance is cited to stress the importance of evidence-based practice.

  20. Do evidence based interventions for chronic fatigue syndrome improve sleep? A systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Russell, Charlotte; Kyle, Simon D; Wearden, Alison J

    2017-06-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) are recommended evidence based treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), with research supporting their effectiveness in reducing fatigue and functional impairment. However, little research has focussed on the effect of these treatments on sleep, despite high reported sleep disturbance in CFS. Using a narrative synthesis approach, we aimed to 1) systematically identify and summarise the current evidence for the effectiveness of CBT and GET in improving sleep; 2) consider factors influencing treatment effectiveness, including incorporation of sleep management techniques; and 3) consider the appropriateness of sleep outcome measures used within evaluations. Studies evaluating CBT and/or GET for CFS, and including a sleep outcome were eligible for inclusion. Eight studies were identified. We found that GET interventions can improve sleep but this effect is inconsistent across studies. For CBT the evidence is limited with only one of two evaluations demonstrating sleep-related improvements. We conclude from existing research that we know little about the effects of including sleep management components within CBT and GET interventions. We suggest that future research should explore the effectiveness of sleep components within interventions, and sleep specific interventions, using comprehensive outcome measures that fully capture the range of sleep difficulties experienced in CFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL(©)): streamlining the systematic review process and creating utility for evidence-based health care.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Cindy; Boyd, Courtney; Jain, Shamini; Khorsan, Raheleh; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-11-02

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are widely recognized as the best means of synthesizing clinical research. However, traditional approaches can be costly and time-consuming and can be subject to selection and judgment bias. It can also be difficult to interpret the results of a SR in a meaningful way in order to make research recommendations, clinical or policy decisions, or practice guidelines. Samueli Institute has developed the Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL) SR process to address these issues. REAL provides up-to-date, rigorous, high quality SR information on health care practices, products, or programs in a streamlined, efficient and reliable manner. This process is a component of the Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH™) program developed by Samueli Institute, which aims at answering the question of "What works?" in health care. The REAL process (1) tailors a standardized search strategy to a specific and relevant research question developed with various stakeholders to survey the available literature; (2) evaluates the quantity and quality of the literature using structured tools and rulebooks to ensure objectivity, reliability and reproducibility of reviewer ratings in an independent fashion and; (3) obtains formalized, balanced input from trained subject matter experts on the implications of the evidence for future research and current practice. Online tools and quality assurance processes are utilized for each step of the review to ensure a rapid, rigorous, reliable, transparent and reproducible SR process. The REAL is a rapid SR process developed to streamline and aid in the rigorous and reliable evaluation and review of claims in health care in order to make evidence-based, informed decisions, and has been used by a variety of organizations aiming to gain insight into "what works" in health care. Using the REAL system allows for the facilitation of recommendations on appropriate next steps in policy, funding

  2. The need for evidence-based research ethics: a review of the substance abuse literature.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily E; DuBois, James M

    2007-01-12

    Participants in substance abuse research may be vulnerable for multiple reasons. International research ethics guidelines and policy statements require that researchers provide extra protections when conducting research with vulnerable subjects, but it is uncertain which measures best protect vulnerable individuals. Concerns about vulnerability have been translated into only the vaguest regulatory requirements, and very little empirical data exist to guide researchers and ethics review committee members who want to protect participants. This article reviews two bodies of substance abuse research ethics literature. First, "normative" articles, that is, articles that discuss ethical issues that may arise in substance abuse research, are discussed. The resulting taxonomy of ethical issues then guides a review of empirical studies on issues like the informed consent process and the use of financial incentives in substance abuse research. While the ethical issues in substance abuse research are numerous and well-documented, the evidentiary base for addressing these issues is inadequate. If any one major theme emerged from the existing studies, it is that many well-intentioned, protectionist concerns--about recruitment incentives, consent comprehension, and drug administration studies--are not supported by empirical data. While these findings are at best tentative, they suggest how research on research ethics might ultimately benefit participants.

  3. Evidence-based biosafety: a review of the principles and effectiveness of microbiological containment measures.

    PubMed

    Kimman, Tjeerd G; Smit, Eric; Klein, Michèl R

    2008-07-01

    We examined the available evidence on the effectiveness of measures aimed at protecting humans and the environment against the risks of working with genetically modified microorganisms (GMOs) and with non-GMO pathogenic microorganisms. A few principles and methods underlie the current biosafety practice: risk assessment, biological containment, concentration and enclosure, exposure minimization, physical containment, and hazard minimization. Many of the current practices are based on experience and expert judgment. The effectiveness of biosafety measures may be evaluated at the level of single containment equipment items and procedures, at the level of the laboratory as a whole, or at the clinical-epidemiological level. Data on the containment effectiveness of equipment and laboratories are scarce and fragmented. Laboratory-acquired infections (LAIs) are therefore important for evaluating the effectiveness of biosafety. For the majority of LAIs there appears to be no direct cause, suggesting that failures of biosafety were not noticed or that containment may have been insufficient. The number of reported laboratory accidents associated with GMOs is substantially lower than that of those associated with non-GMOs. It is unknown to what extent specific measures contribute to the overall level of biosafety. We therefore recommend that the evidence base of biosafety practice be strengthened.

  4. Evidence-Based Biosafety: a Review of the Principles and Effectiveness of Microbiological Containment Measures

    PubMed Central

    Kimman, Tjeerd G.; Smit, Eric; Klein, Michèl R.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the available evidence on the effectiveness of measures aimed at protecting humans and the environment against the risks of working with genetically modified microorganisms (GMOs) and with non-GMO pathogenic microorganisms. A few principles and methods underlie the current biosafety practice: risk assessment, biological containment, concentration and enclosure, exposure minimization, physical containment, and hazard minimization. Many of the current practices are based on experience and expert judgment. The effectiveness of biosafety measures may be evaluated at the level of single containment equipment items and procedures, at the level of the laboratory as a whole, or at the clinical-epidemiological level. Data on the containment effectiveness of equipment and laboratories are scarce and fragmented. Laboratory-acquired infections (LAIs) are therefore important for evaluating the effectiveness of biosafety. For the majority of LAIs there appears to be no direct cause, suggesting that failures of biosafety were not noticed or that containment may have been insufficient. The number of reported laboratory accidents associated with GMOs is substantially lower than that of those associated with non-GMOs. It is unknown to what extent specific measures contribute to the overall level of biosafety. We therefore recommend that the evidence base of biosafety practice be strengthened. PMID:18625678

  5. Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Nan M; Spross, Judith A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the barriers and facilitators to evidence-based practice (EBP) using Shortell's framework for continuous quality improvement (CQI). EBP is typically undertaken to improve practice. Although there have been many studies focused on the barriers and facilitators to adopting EBP, these have not been tied explicitly to CQI frameworks. CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Medline, Psych Info, ABI/Inform and LISTA databases were searched using the keywords: nurses, information literacy, access to information, sources of knowledge, decision making, research utilization, information seeking behaviour and nursing practice, evidence-based practice. Shortell's framework was used to organize the barriers and facilitators. Across the articles, the most common barriers were lack of time and lack of autonomy to change practice which falls within the strategic and cultural dimensions in Shortell's framework. Barriers and facilitators to EBP adoption occur at the individual and institutional levels. Solutions to the barriers need to be directed to the dimension where the barrier occurs, while recognizing that multidimensional approaches are essential to the success of overcoming these barriers. The findings of the present study can help nurses identify barriers and implement strategies to promote EBP as part of CQI. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Evidence-Based Carotid Interventions for Stroke Prevention: State-of-the-art Review.

    PubMed

    Morris, Dylan R; Ayabe, Kengo; Inoue, Takashi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Bulbulia, Richard; Halliday, Alison; Goto, Shinya

    2017-04-03

    Carotid artery stenosis is responsible for between 10-20% of all ischaemic strokes. Interventions, such as carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting, effectively reduce the risk of stroke in selected individuals. This review describes the history of carotid interventions, and summarises reliable evidence on the safety and efficacy of these interventions gained from large randomised clinical trials.Early trials comparing carotid endarterectomy to medical therapy alone in symptomatic patients, and asymptomatic patients, demonstrated that endarterectomy halved the risk of stroke and perioperative death in these two unique populations. The absolute risk reduction was smaller in the asymptomatic carotid trials, consistent with their lower absolute stroke risk. More recent trials in symptomatic patients, suggest that carotid stenting has similar long term durability to carotid endarterectomy, but possibly has higher procedural hazards dominated by non-disabling strokes. The Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-2, along with individual patient data meta-analysis of all asymptomatic trials, will provide reliable evidence for the choice of intervention in asymptomatic patients in whom a decision has been made for carotid revascularisation. Given improvements in effective cardiovascular medical therapy, in particular lipid-lowering medications, there is renewed uncertainty as to whether carotid interventions still provide meaningful net reductions in stroke risk in asymptomatic populations. Four large trials in Europe and the US are currently underway, and are expected to report long-term results in the next decade.It is essential that surgeons, interventionalists, and physicians continue to randomise large numbers of patients from around the world to clarify current uncertainty around the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

  7. Testosterone and prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of pathogenesis and oncologic risk.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jason E; Billups, Kevin L; Partin, Alan W

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone plays a central role in male development and health. Likewise, androgen deficiency, or hypogonadism, is associated with a variety of symptoms including decreased energy, diminished libido and erectile dysfunction, among others. Male androgen levels steadily decline with age, and, in a subset of symptomatic older men, can result in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Over the last decade, increased awareness of hypogonadism among patients and providers has led to a significant rise in the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism, and especially in LOH. Accompanying the rise in TRT are concerns of potential adverse effects, including cardiovascular risks and the promotion of prostate cancer. The 'androgen hypothesis' asserts that prostate cancer development and progression is driven by androgens, and thus TRT has the theoretical potential to drive prostate cancer development and progression. In this review, we examine existing data surrounding testosterone and prostate cancer. There is significant evidence that androgens promote prostate cancer in experimental systems. However, there is no clear evidence that elevations in endogenous testosterone levels promote the development of prostate cancer in humans. As a result of experimental and historical data on the progression of prostate cancer following TRT, there has been widespread belief that TRT will promote disease progression in prostate cancer patients. Despite these fears, there are a growing number of studies demonstrating no increase in prostate cancer incidence among men on TRT. Furthermore, in studies involving a small number of patients, there has been no discernable increase in disease progression in prostate cancer patients on TRT. While data from large, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are absent, TRT in select prostate cancer patients is likely safe. In the end, the use of TRT in prostate cancer patients is still considered experimental and should only be offered

  8. Testosterone and prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of pathogenesis and oncologic risk

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jason E.; Billups, Kevin L.; Partin, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone plays a central role in male development and health. Likewise, androgen deficiency, or hypogonadism, is associated with a variety of symptoms including decreased energy, diminished libido and erectile dysfunction, among others. Male androgen levels steadily decline with age, and, in a subset of symptomatic older men, can result in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Over the last decade, increased awareness of hypogonadism among patients and providers has led to a significant rise in the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for hypogonadism, and especially in LOH. Accompanying the rise in TRT are concerns of potential adverse effects, including cardiovascular risks and the promotion of prostate cancer. The ‘androgen hypothesis’ asserts that prostate cancer development and progression is driven by androgens, and thus TRT has the theoretical potential to drive prostate cancer development and progression. In this review, we examine existing data surrounding testosterone and prostate cancer. There is significant evidence that androgens promote prostate cancer in experimental systems. However, there is no clear evidence that elevations in endogenous testosterone levels promote the development of prostate cancer in humans. As a result of experimental and historical data on the progression of prostate cancer following TRT, there has been widespread belief that TRT will promote disease progression in prostate cancer patients. Despite these fears, there are a growing number of studies demonstrating no increase in prostate cancer incidence among men on TRT. Furthermore, in studies involving a small number of patients, there has been no discernable increase in disease progression in prostate cancer patients on TRT. While data from large, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are absent, TRT in select prostate cancer patients is likely safe. In the end, the use of TRT in prostate cancer patients is still considered experimental and should only be

  9. Intentional burn injury: an evidence-based, clinical and forensic review.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Adam R; Donne, Jeremy; Wilson, Diana; Dunn, Kenneth W

    2004-11-01

    Burn injury can be inflicted intentionally either by one person to another whenever one has the ability to physically control the other, or it can be self-inflicted. There is scant evidential basis for much that is written about and practiced in the evaluation and care of patients that have sustained intentional burn injuries. Yet this is an area in which medical personnel must necessarily be trained in both the therapeutic and forensic aspects of a complex problem. Failure to appreciate the complexity of medical and forensic interactions may have far reaching effects. A missed diagnosis can result in inappropriate medical care, on-going abuse and future fatality. Inept management can result on the one hand, in blame levelled inappropriately placing incomparable strain on family units and innocent parties, and on the other, allow abusers to continue unchecked. This is the first review on the subject in which lawyers and doctors collaborate to produce a holistic approach to this subject. In it we describe the legal considerations that medical staff must appreciate when approaching patients who may have suffered intentional burns. We analyse the various scenarios in which intentional burning can be found and challenge the clinical dogma with much of the management of paediatric inflicted burns has become imbued. We suggest a rational and balanced approach to all intentional burn injuries-especially when children are involved. In the light of current case law in which dogmatic medical evidence has been implicated in wrongful convictions for child abuse in the UK, it is imperative that medical professionals gather evidence carefully and completely and apply it with logic and impartiality. This paper will aid clinicians who may not be experienced in dealing with burn injuries, but find themselves in the position of seeing a burn acutely, to avoid common mistakes.

  10. Evaluation of distal symmetric polyneuropathy: the role of laboratory and genetic testing (an evidence-based review).

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gronseth, G S; Franklin, G; Carter, G T; Kinsella, L J; Cohen, J A; Asbury, A K; Szigeti, K; Lupski, J R; Latov, N; Lewis, R A; Low, P A; Fisher, M A; Herrmann, D; Howard, J F; Lauria, G; Miller, R G; Polydefkis, M; Sumner, A J

    2009-01-01

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of laboratory and genetic tests for the assessment of DSP. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. (1) Screening laboratory tests may be considered for all patients with polyneuropathy (Level C). Those tests that provide the highest yield of abnormality are blood glucose, serum B(12) with metabolites (methylmalonic acid with or without homocysteine), and serum protein immunofixation electrophoresis (Level C). If there is no definite evidence of diabetes mellitus by routine testing of blood glucose, testing for impaired glucose tolerance may be considered in distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy (Level C). (2) Genetic testing is established as useful for the accurate diagnosis and classification of hereditary neuropathies (Level A). Genetic testing may be considered in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level C). Initial genetic testing should be guided by the clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and electrodiagnostic (EDX) features and should focus on the most common abnormalities, which are CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion, Cx32 (GJB1), and MFN2 mutation screening. There is insufficient evidence to determine the usefulness of routine genetic testing in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who do not exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level U).

  11. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases: Evidence based literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Bhatti, Owais; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Advances in genetics and immunology have contributed to the current understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). METHODS: The current opinion on the pathogenesis of IBD suggests that genetically susceptible individuals develop intolerance to dysregulated gut microflora (dysbiosis) and chronic inflammation develops as a result of environmental insults. Environmental exposures are innumerable with varying effects during the life course of individuals with IBD. Studying the relationship between environmental factors and IBD may provide the missing link to increasing our understanding of the etiology and increased incidence of IBD in recent years with implications for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Environmental factors are heterogeneous and genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, or dysbiosis do not lead to the development of IBD in isolation. RESULTS: Current challenges in the study of environmental factors and IBD are how to effectively translate promising results from experimental studies to humans in order to develop models that incorporate the complex interactions between the environment, genetics, immunology, and gut microbiota, and limited high quality interventional studies assessing the effect of modifying environmental factors on the natural history and patient outcomes in IBD. CONCLUSION: This article critically reviews the current evidence on environmental risk factors for IBD and proposes directions for future research. PMID:27468219

  12. Exercise-associated collapse: an evidence-based review and primer for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Chad A; O'Connor, Francis G; Noakes, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Exercise-associated collapse (EAC) commonly occurs after the completion of endurance running events. EAC is a collapse in conscious athletes who are unable to stand or walk unaided as a result of light headedness, faintness and dizziness or syncope causing a collapse that occurs after completion of an exertional event. Although EAC is perhaps the most common aetiology confronted by the medical provider attending to collapsed athletes in a finish-line tent, providers must first maintain vigilance for other potential life-threatening aetiologies that cause collapse, such as cardiac arrest, exertional heat stroke or exercise-associated hyponatraemia. Previously, it has been believed that dehydration and hyperthermia were primary causes of EAC. On review of the evidence, EAC is now believed to be principally the result of transient postural hypotension caused by lower extremity pooling of blood once the athlete stops running and the resultant impairment of cardiac baroreflexes. Once life-threatening aetiologies are ruled out, treatment of EAC is symptomatic and involves oral hydration and a Trendelenburg position - total body cooling, intravenous hydration or advanced therapies is generally not needed.

  13. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases: Evidence based literature review.

    PubMed

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Bhatti, Owais; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-07-21

    Advances in genetics and immunology have contributed to the current understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The current opinion on the pathogenesis of IBD suggests that genetically susceptible individuals develop intolerance to dysregulated gut microflora (dysbiosis) and chronic inflammation develops as a result of environmental insults. Environmental exposures are innumerable with varying effects during the life course of individuals with IBD. Studying the relationship between environmental factors and IBD may provide the missing link to increasing our understanding of the etiology and increased incidence of IBD in recent years with implications for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Environmental factors are heterogeneous and genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, or dysbiosis do not lead to the development of IBD in isolation. Current challenges in the study of environmental factors and IBD are how to effectively translate promising results from experimental studies to humans in order to develop models that incorporate the complex interactions between the environment, genetics, immunology, and gut microbiota, and limited high quality interventional studies assessing the effect of modifying environmental factors on the natural history and patient outcomes in IBD. This article critically reviews the current evidence on environmental risk factors for IBD and proposes directions for future research.

  14. The evidence-base for elevated vacuum in lower limb prosthetics: Literature review and professional feedback.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, H; Lemaire, E D; Eshraghi, A

    2016-08-01

    An optimal suspension system can improve comfort and quality of life in people with limb loss. To guide practice on prosthetic vacuum suspension systems, assessment of the current evidence and professional opinion are required. PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were explored to find related articles. Search terms were amputees, artificial limb, prosthetic suspension, prosthetic liner, vacuum, and prosthesis. The results were refined by vacuum socket or vacuum assisted suspension or sub-atmospheric suspension. Study design, research instrument, sample size, and outcome measures were reviewed. An online questionnaire was also designed and distributed worldwide among professionals and prosthetists (www.ispoint.org, OANDP-L, LinkedIn, personal email). 26 articles were published from 2001 to March 2016. The number of participants averaged 7 (SD=4) for transtibial and 6 (SD=6) for transfemoral amputees. Most studies evaluated the short-term effects of vacuum systems by measuring stump volume changes, gait parameters, pistoning, interface pressures, satisfaction, balance, and wound healing. 155 professionals replied to the questionnaire and supported results from the literature. Elevated vacuum systems may have some advantages over the other suspension systems, but may not be appropriate for all people with limb loss. Elevated vacuum suspension could improve comfort and quality of life for people with limb loss. However, future investigations with larger sample sizes are needed to provide strong statistical conclusions and to evaluate long-term effects of these systems. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Robotic versus Open Thyroidectomy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shirley Yuk Wah; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2016-01-01

    While open thyroidectomy (OT) is advocated as the gold standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer, the contemporary use of robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is often controversial. Although RT combines the unique benefits of the surgical robot and remote access thyroidectomy, its applicability on cancer patients is challenged by the questionable oncological benefits and safety. This review aims to analyze the current literature evidence in comparing RT to OT on thyroid cancers for their perioperative and oncological outcomes. To date, no randomized controlled trial is available in comparing RT to OT. All published studies are nonrandomized or retrospective comparisons. Current data suggests that RT compares less favorably than OT for longer operative time, higher cost, and possibly inferior oncological control with lower number of central lymph nodes retrieved. In terms of morbidity, quality of life outcomes, and short-term recurrence rates, RT and OT are comparable. While conventional OT continues to be appropriate for most thyroid cancers, RT should better be continued by expert surgeons on selected patients who have low-risk thyroid cancers and have high expectations on cosmetic outcomes. Future research should embark on prospective randomized studies for unbiased comparisons. Long-term follow-up studies are also needed to evaluate outcomes on recurrence and survival. PMID:27069476

  16. Efficacy of Individual Computer-Based Auditory Training for People with Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Henshaw, Helen; Ferguson, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. Objective This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406) evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training to improve speech intelligibility, cognition and communication abilities in adults with hearing loss, with or without hearing aids or cochlear implants. Methods A systematic search of eight databases and key journals identified 229 articles published since 1996, 13 of which met the inclusion criteria. Data were independently extracted and reviewed by the two authors. Study quality was assessed using ten pre-defined scientific and intervention-specific measures. Results Auditory training resulted in improved performance for trained tasks in 9/10 articles that reported on-task outcomes. Although significant generalisation of learning was shown to untrained measures of speech intelligibility (11/13 articles), cognition (1/1 articles) and self-reported hearing abilities (1/2 articles), improvements were small and not robust. Where reported, compliance with computer-based auditory training was high, and retention of learning was shown at post-training follow-ups. Published evidence was of very-low to moderate study quality. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that published evidence for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training for adults with hearing loss is not robust and therefore cannot be reliably used to guide intervention at this time. We identify a need for high-quality evidence to further examine the efficacy of computer-based auditory training for people with hearing loss. PMID:23675431

  17. An evidence-based review on the influence of aging with a spinal cord injury on subjective quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Hitzig, Sander L.; Miller, William C.; Eng, Janice J.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives To identify changes in subjective quality of life (QoL) as one ages with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting Vancouver, Canada. Methods Electronic databases were searched for studies reporting on age-related QoL changes over time. Data from relevant studies were transcribed into data extraction forms and analyzed by years post-injury (YPI) and chronologic age. Each study was assigned a level of evidence based on a modified Sackett scale. Results Twenty-one studies, each with a low level of evidence, were included for review. The results indicated that regardless of chronologic age, individuals with relatively new SCI have the potential to improve their QoL. Among individuals with advanced YPI, overall QoL is consistently reported as good or excellent over time, however, with variations in different QoL domains. Conclusion The QoL of individuals aging with a SCI has the potential to improve, and remain high and stable over time. Since the identified studies provide low levels of evidence, more longitudinal research with greater methodological and measurement rigour is needed to corroborate the findings and conclusions of this review. Sponsorship The Rick Hansen Institute and the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation. PMID:22450883

  18. Bipolar disorder and violent crime: new evidence from population-based longitudinal studies and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Seena; Lichtenstein, Paul; Grann, Martin; Goodwin, Guy M; Långström, Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Although bipolar disorder is associated with various adverse health outcomes, the relationship with violent crime is uncertain. To determine the risk of violent crime in bipolar disorder and to contextualize the findings with a systematic review. Longitudinal investigations using general population and unaffected sibling control individuals. Population-based registers of hospital discharge diagnoses, sociodemographic information, and violent crime in Sweden from January 1, 1973, through December 31, 2004. Individuals with 2 or more discharge diagnoses of bipolar disorder (n = 3743), general population controls (n = 37 429), and unaffected full siblings of individuals with bipolar disorder (n = 4059). Violent crime (actions resulting in convictions for homicide, assault, robbery, arson, any sexual offense, illegal threats, or intimidation). During follow-up, 314 individuals with bipolar disorder (8.4%) committed violent crime compared with 1312 general population controls (3.5%) (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-2.6). The risk was mostly confined to patients with substance abuse comorbidity (adjusted odds ratio, 6.4; 95% confidence interval, 5.1-8.1). The risk increase was minimal in patients without substance abuse comorbidity (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.5), which was further attenuated when unaffected full siblings of individuals with bipolar disorder were used as controls (1.1; 0.7-1.6). We found no differences in rates of violent crime by clinical subgroups (manic vs depressive or psychotic vs nonpsychotic). The systematic review identified 8 previous studies (n = 6383), with high heterogeneity between studies. Odds ratio for violence risk ranged from 2 to 9. Although current guidelines for the management of individuals with bipolar disorder do not recommend routine risk assessment for violence, this assertion may need review in patients with comorbid substance abuse.

  19. Management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An evidence-based clinical practice review

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P; Candia, Roberto; Zapata, Rodrigo; Muñoz, Cristián; Arancibia, Juan P; Poniachik, Jaime; Soza, Alejandro; Fuster, Francisco; Brahm, Javier; Sanhueza, Edgar; Contreras, Jorge; Cuellar, M Carolina; Arrese, Marco; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To build a consensus among Chilean specialists on the appropriate management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in clinical practice. METHODS: NAFLD has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The optimal treatment for NAFLD has not been established due to a lack of evidence-based recommendations. An expert panel of members of the Chilean Gastroenterological Society and the Chilean Hepatology Association conducted a structured analysis of the current literature on NAFLD therapy. The quality of the evidence and the level of recommendations supporting each statement were assessed according to the recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force. A modified three-round Delphi technique was used to reach a consensus among the experts. RESULTS: A group of thirteen experts was established. The survey included 17 open-ended questions that were distributed among the experts, who assessed the articles associated with each question. The levels of agreement achieved by the panel were 93.8% in the first round and 100% in the second and third rounds. The final recommendations support the indication of lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise, for all patients with NAFLD. Proven pharmacological therapies include only vitamin E and pioglitazone, which can be used in nondiabetic patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (the progressive form of NAFLD), although the long-term safety and efficacy of these therapies have not yet been established. CONCLUSION: Current NAFLD management is rapidly evolving, and new pathophysiology-based therapies are expected to be introduced in the near future. All NAFLD patients should be evaluated using a three-focused approach that considers the risks of liver disease, diabetes and cardiovascular events. PMID:25232252

  20. Evidence-based hydro- and balneotherapy in Hungary—a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, T.; Bálint, G.; Prohászka, Z.; Géher, P.; Tefner, I. K.

    2014-04-01

    Balneotherapy is appreciated as a traditional treatment modality in medicine. Hungary is rich in thermal mineral waters. Balneotherapy has been in extensive use for centuries and its effects have been studied in detail. Here, we present a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials conducted with Hungarian thermal mineral waters, the findings of which have been published by Hungarian authors in English. The 122 studies identified in different databases include 18 clinical trials. Five of these evaluated the effect of hydro- and balneotherapy on chronic low back pain, four on osteoarthritis of the knee, and two on osteoarthritis of the hand. One of the remaining seven trials evaluated balneotherapy in chronic inflammatory pelvic diseases, while six studies explored its effect on various laboratory parameters. Out of the 18 studies, 9 met the predefined criteria for meta-analysis. The results confirmed the beneficial effect of balneotherapy on pain with weight bearing and at rest in patients with degenerative joint and spinal diseases. A similar effect has been found in chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. The review also revealed that balneotherapy has some beneficial effects on antioxidant status, and on metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Based on the results, we conclude that balneotherapy with Hungarian thermal-mineral waters is an effective remedy for lower back pain, as well as for knee and hand osteoarthritis.

  1. Applicability and feasibility of systematic review for performing evidence-based risk assessment in food and feed safety.

    PubMed

    Aiassa, E; Higgins, J P T; Frampton, G K; Greiner, M; Afonso, A; Amzal, B; Deeks, J; Dorne, J-L; Glanville, J; Lövei, G L; Nienstedt, K; O'connor, A M; Pullin, A S; Rajić, A; Verloo, D

    2015-01-01

    Food and feed safety risk assessment uses multi-parameter models to evaluate the likelihood of adverse events associated with exposure to hazards in human health, plant health, animal health, animal welfare, and the environment. Systematic review and meta-analysis are established methods for answering questions in health care, and can be implemented to minimize biases in food and feed safety risk assessment. However, no methodological frameworks exist for refining risk assessment multi-parameter models into questions suitable for systematic review, and use of meta-analysis to estimate all parameters required by a risk model may not be always feasible. This paper describes novel approaches for determining question suitability and for prioritizing questions for systematic review in this area. Risk assessment questions that aim to estimate a parameter are likely to be suitable for systematic review. Such questions can be structured by their "key elements" [e.g., for intervention questions, the population(s), intervention(s), comparator(s), and outcome(s)]. Prioritization of questions to be addressed by systematic review relies on the likely impact and related uncertainty of individual parameters in the risk model. This approach to planning and prioritizing systematic review seems to have useful implications for producing evidence-based food and feed safety risk assessment.

  2. [Observational studies in the era of evidence based medicine: short review on their relevance, taxonomy and designs].

    PubMed

    Fronteira, Ines

    2013-01-01

    In this review of the literature, we distinguish between experimental and observational studies, highlighting the importance that the later have gained in the era of evidence-based medicine. We further analyze the value of observational studies in light of experimental studies. We present a taxonomy for observational studies based on units of observation and measurement (cross-sectional or longitudinal). We distinguish between descriptive studies and analytical studies. Then, and given its specificity, we define and present a classification for ecological studies. We define and consider the advantages and disadvantages of cross-sectional, case control and cohort studies. We analyze the strength of the evidence given by each study design. We finished by examining what should guide the choice of a study design.

  3. Development of an evidence-based framework of factors contributing to patient safety incidents in hospital settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Giles, Sally J; Sirriyeh, Reema; Watt, Ian S; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this systematic review was to develop a ‘contributory factors framework’ from a synthesis of empirical work which summarises factors contributing to patient safety incidents in hospital settings. Design A mixed-methods systematic review of the literature was conducted. Data sources Electronic databases (Medline, PsycInfo, ISI Web of knowledge, CINAHL and EMBASE), article reference lists, patient safety websites, registered study databases and author contacts. Eligibility criteria Studies were included that reported data from primary research in secondary care aiming to identify the contributory factors to error or threats to patient safety. Results 1502 potential articles were identified. 95 papers (representing 83 studies) which met the inclusion criteria were included, and 1676 contributory factors extracted. Initial coding of contributory factors by two independent reviewers resulted in 20 domains (eg, team factors, supervision and leadership). Each contributory factor was then coded by two reviewers to one of these 20 domains. The majority of studies identified active failures (errors and violations) as factors contributing to patient safety incidents. Individual factors, communication, and equipment and supplies were the other most frequently reported factors within the existing evidence base. Conclusions This review has culminated in an empirically based framework of the factors contributing to patient safety incidents. This framework has the potential to be applied across hospital settings to improve the identification and prevention of factors that cause harm to patients. PMID:22421911

  4. [Musculoskeletal chronic pain: Latin-American expert panel review based on scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    Angulo, J; González, R; Hernández, L; Hernández-Ortiz, A; Jaque, J; Lara-Solares, A; Robles San Roman, M; Vacas, J

    2011-08-01

    Based on the continual medical education, in the first trimester of 2010 an expert in pain meeting has being made at Mexico City. The priority of the research was on educate residents of medical school or at their post graduate years, and the priority was on investigate of how our residents use adequate pain medication. In that first meeting at Mexico City, from different countries, the agreement was on inadequate use of pain treatment caused from inadequate education of the proper indication of drugs and other therapies for muscle skeletal pain. We decided to make a Latin American expert recommendation in chronic muscle pain where we include: epidemiological and socioeconomic pain data, actual classification of NSAIDs, pharmacological and other treatment in pain, and side effects of most popular drugs with actual recommendations. We include Medline guides, reviews, randomized studies and meta-analysis from 2001 to 2010.

  5. A Systematic Review of Evidence-Based Community Pharmacy Services Aimed at the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Sabater-Galindo, Marta; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Rotta, Inajara; Hossain, Lutfun N; Durks, Desire; Franco-Trigo, Lucia; Lopes, Livia A; Correr, Cassyano J; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and has a substantial impact on people's health and quality of life. CVD also causes an increased use of health care resources and services, representing a significant proportion of health care expenditure. Integrating evidence-based community pharmacy services is seen as an asset to reduce the burden of CVD on individuals and the health care system. To (a) identify community pharmacy evidence-based services designed to help prevent CVD and (b) provide fundamental information that is needed to assess their potential adaptation to other community pharmacy settings. This review used the DEPICT database, which includes 488 randomized controlled trials (RCT) that address the evaluation of pharmacy services. Articles reviewing these RCTs were identified for the DEPICT database through a systematic search of the following databases: MEDLINE, Scopus, SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online), and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals). The DEPICT database was reviewed to identify evidence-based services delivered in the community pharmacy setting with the purpose of preventing CVD. An evidence-based service was defined as a service that has been shown to have a positive effect (compared with usual care) in a high-quality RCT. From each evidence-based service, fundamental information was retrieved to facilitate adaptation to other community pharmacy settings. From the DEPICT database, 14 evidence-based community pharmacy services that addressed the prevention of CVD were identified. All services, except 1, targeted populations with a mean age above 60 years. Pharmacy services encompassed a wide range of practical applications or techniques that can be classified into 3 groups: activities directed at patients, activities directed at health care professionals, and assessments to gather patient-related information in order to support the previous activities. This review provides pharmacy service

  6. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kleinpell, Ruth M; Ely, E Wesley; Grabenkort, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Advanced practitioners including nurse practitioners and physician assistants are contributing to care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit through their participation on the multidisciplinary team and in collaborative physician practice roles. However, the impact of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit setting is not well known. To identify published literature on the role of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in acute and critical care settings; to review the literature using nonquantitative methods and provide a summary of the results to date incorporating studies assessing the impact and outcomes of nurse practitioner and physician assistant providers in the intensive care unit; and to identify implications for critical care practice. We conducted a systematic search of the English-language literature of publications on nurse practitioners and physician assistants utilizing Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases from 1996 through August 2007. None. Over 145 articles were reviewed on the role of the nurse practitioner and physician assistant in acute and critical care settings. A total of 31 research studies focused on the role and impact of these practitioners in the care of acute and critically ill patients. Of those, 20 were focused on nurse practitioner care, six focused on both nurse practitioner and physician assistant care, and five were focused on physician assistant care in acute and critical care settings. Fourteen focused on intensive care unit care, and 17 focused on acute care including emergency room, trauma, and management of patients with specific acute care conditions such as stroke, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Most studies used retrospective or prospective study designs and nonprobability sampling techniques. Only two randomized control trials were identified. The majority examined the impact of care on patient

  7. An emerging evidence base for PET-CT in the management of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Gill; Fayter, Debra; Lewis-Light, Kate; Chisholm, Julia; McHugh, Kieran; Levine, Daniel; Jenney, Meriel; Mandeville, Henry; Gatz, Suzanne; Phillips, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) management depends on risk stratification at diagnosis and treatment response. Assessment methods include CT, MRI, bone scintigraphy, histological analysis and bone marrow biopsy. Advanced functional imaging (FI) has potential to improve staging accuracy and management strategies. Methods and analysis We conducted a systematic review (PROSPERO 2013:CRD42013006128) of diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness of FI in histologically proven paediatric RMS. PRISMA guidance was followed. We searched 10 databases to November 2013. Studies with ≥10 patients with RMS which compared positron emission tomography (PET), PET-CT or diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI to conventional imaging at any treatment stage were included. Study quality was assessed. Limited, heterogeneous effectiveness data required narrative synthesis, illustrated by plotting sensitivity and specificity in receiver operating curve (ROC) space. Results Eight studies (six PET-CT, two PET) with 272 RMS patients in total were included. No DWI-MRI studies met inclusion criteria. Pooled estimates were not calculated due to sparseness of data. Limited evidence indicated initial PET-CT results were predictive of survival. PET-CT changed management of 7/40 patients. Nodal involvement PET-CT: sensitivity ranged from 80% to 100%; specificity from 89% to 100%. Distant metastatic involvement: PET-CT sensitivity ranged from 95% to 100%; specificity from 80% to100%. Data on metastases in different sites were sparse. Limited data were found on outcome prediction by PET-CT response. Dissemination and ethics PET/PET-CT may increase initial staging accuracy in paediatric RMS, specifically in the detection of nodal involvement and distant metastatic spread. There is a need to further assess PET-CT for this population, ideally in a representative, unbiased and transparently selected cohort of patients. PMID:25573522

  8. Evidence-based mapping of design heterogeneity prior to meta-analysis: a systematic review and evidence synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of design heterogeneity conducted prior to meta-analysis is infrequently reported; it is often presented post hoc to explain statistical heterogeneity. However, design heterogeneity determines the mix of included studies and how they are analyzed in a meta-analysis, which in turn can importantly influence the results. The goal of this work is to introduce ways to improve the assessment and reporting of design heterogeneity prior to statistical summarization of epidemiologic studies. Methods In this paper, we use an assessment of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) as an example to show how a technique called ‘evidence mapping’ can be used to organize studies and evaluate design heterogeneity prior to meta-analysis.. Employing a systematic and reproducible approach, we evaluated the following elements across 11 selected cohort studies: variation in definitions of SSB, T2D, and co-variables, design features and population characteristics associated with specific definitions of SSB, and diversity in modeling strategies. Results Evidence mapping strategies effectively organized complex data and clearly depicted design heterogeneity. For example, across 11 studies of SSB and T2D, 7 measured diet only once (with 7 to 16 years of disease follow-up), 5 included primarily low SSB consumers, and 3 defined the study variable (SSB) as consumption of either sugar or artificially-sweetened beverages. This exercise also identified diversity in analysis strategies, such as adjustment for 11 to 17 co-variables and a large degree of fluctuation in SSB-T2D risk estimates depending on variables selected for multivariable models (2 to 95% change in the risk estimate from the age-adjusted model). Conclusions Meta-analysis seeks to understand heterogeneity in addition to computing a summary risk estimate. This strategy effectively documents design heterogeneity, thus improving the practice of meta-analysis by aiding in: 1) protocol and

  9. Is Performance Feedback for Educators an Evidence-Based Practice? A Systematic Review and Evaluation Based on Single-Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Lindsay M.; Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Maggin, Daniel M.; Sanetti, Lisa M. H.; Johnson, Austin H.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal levels of treatment fidelity, a critical moderator of intervention effectiveness, are often difficult to sustain in applied settings. It is unknown whether performance feedback, a widely researched method for increasing educators' treatment fidelity, is an evidence-based practice. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current…

  10. Is Performance Feedback for Educators an Evidence-Based Practice? A Systematic Review and Evaluation Based on Single-Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Lindsay M.; Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Maggin, Daniel M.; Sanetti, Lisa M. H.; Johnson, Austin H.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal levels of treatment fidelity, a critical moderator of intervention effectiveness, are often difficult to sustain in applied settings. It is unknown whether performance feedback, a widely researched method for increasing educators' treatment fidelity, is an evidence-based practice. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current…

  11. [Process-based approach neuropsychological assessment: review of the evidence and proposal for improvement of dementia screening tools].

    PubMed

    Diaz-Orueta, U; Blanco-Campal, A; Burke, T

    2017-06-01

    A detailed neuropsychological assessment plays an important role in the diagnostic process of mild cognitive impairment. However, available brief cognitive screening tests for this clinical population are administered and interpreted based mainly, or exclusively, on total achievement scores. This score based approach can lead to erroneous clinical interpretations unless we also pay attention to the test taking behaviour or to the type of errors committed during the test performance. The goals of the current review are to present the grounds for the process-based approach to neuropsychological assessment, to offer a brief review of the evidence obtained so far regarding its usefulness, and to show the results of a systematic review of existing screening and neuropsychological assessment tools, some of which were already created and/or modified using this approach, and others that may benefit in their screening properties if they underwent modifications according to a process-based approach. It is expected that, in a relatively short period of time, process-based approach versions of screening tools will be available. These modified versions will not alter substantially the standard administration procedure, but will provide a way for scoring and interpretation that goes beyond total scores. This will allow clarifying with higher accuracy the underlying cognitive components involved in the successful or unsuccessful performance in cognitive tasks, and thus will facilitate an early diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.

  12. Latitude affects Morningness-Eveningness: evidence for the environment hypothesis based on a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Randler, Christoph; Rahafar, Arash

    2017-01-03

    Morningness-eveningness (M/E) is an individual trait related to a person's sleep-wake cycle and preference for morning or evening hours. The "environment hypothesis" suggests that M/E is dependent on environmental factors, such as latitude, mean average temperature and photoperiod. We here analyzed a large number of datasets to assess this effect based on a systematic review. Data were from a total of 87 datasets and 35,589 individuals based on 28 countries. Partial correlations correcting for age revealed significant relationships between M/E and latitude, mean yearly temperature, photoperiod and sunset. Evening orientation was related to higher latitude, longer days and later sunset. Morning orientation was related to higher average temperatures. Percentage of females and sunrise time had no significant influence. These variables (sunset, temperature, photoperiod) were then input in a general linear model. The full model showed an influence of age and of sunset on CSM scores, but not of photoperiod and average temperature. Sunset, therefore, seems to be the most important statistical predictor for the observed latitudinal gradient.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells form a population of self-renewing, multipotent cells that can be isolated from several tissues. Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated that the administration of exogenous MSC could prevent renal injury and could promote renal recovery through a series of complex mechanisms, in particular via immunomodulation of the immune system and release of paracrine factors and microvesicles. Due to their therapeutic potentials, MSC are being evaluated as a possible player in treatment of human kidney disease, and an increasing number of clinical trials to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in various kidney diseases have been proposed. In the present review, we will summarize the current knowledge on MSC infusion to treat acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and kidney transplantation. The data obtained from these clinical trials will provide further insight into safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in renal pathologies and allow the design of consensus protocol for clinical purpose. PMID:27721835

  14. Latitude affects Morningness-Eveningness: evidence for the environment hypothesis based on a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Randler, Christoph; Rahafar, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Morningness-eveningness (M/E) is an individual trait related to a person’s sleep-wake cycle and preference for morning or evening hours. The “environment hypothesis” suggests that M/E is dependent on environmental factors, such as latitude, mean average temperature and photoperiod. We here analyzed a large number of datasets to assess this effect based on a systematic review. Data were from a total of 87 datasets and 35,589 individuals based on 28 countries. Partial correlations correcting for age revealed significant relationships between M/E and latitude, mean yearly temperature, photoperiod and sunset. Evening orientation was related to higher latitude, longer days and later sunset. Morning orientation was related to higher average temperatures. Percentage of females and sunrise time had no significant influence. These variables (sunset, temperature, photoperiod) were then input in a general linear model. The full model showed an influence of age and of sunset on CSM scores, but not of photoperiod and average temperature. Sunset, therefore, seems to be the most important statistical predictor for the observed latitudinal gradient. PMID:28045131

  15. Improving Medication Adherence and Health Outcomes in Older Adults: An Evidence-Based Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Murray, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor medication adherence is a major public health problem in older adults often resulting in negative health outcomes. Objective The objective of this review was to provide an updated summary of evidence from randomized controlled studies to determine whether interventions aimed at improving medication adherence also improve the health outcomes of older adults residing in community-based settings. Methods Articles that assessed medication adherence interventions and related health outcomes in elderly individuals were identified through searches of MEDLINE (1970–June 2016), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (through to June 2016), and Google Scholar. Across the 12 included studies, interventions were grouped into three main categories: behavioral/educational (n = 3), pharmacist-led (n = 7), and reminder/simplification (n = 2). Results Among the behavioral/educational intervention studies, two showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, whereas one found no changes in adherence or health outcomes. Among the pharmacist-led studies, three showed improvements in both adherence and related health outcomes, while three reported no changes in adherence or health outcomes. One found an improvement in adherence but not health outcomes. Among the reminder/simplification studies, both studies reported improvements in adherence without a significant impact on related health outcomes. Conclusion This evidence-based review of medication adherence interventions in older adults revealed promising strategies in the larger context of a largely mixed body of literature. Future patient-centered and multidisciplinary interventions should be developed and tested using evidence-based principles to improve medication adherence and health outcomes in older adults. PMID:28074410

  16. Systematic Review: Generating Evidence-Based Guidelines on the Concurrent Use of Dietary Antioxidants and Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Akiko; Alladin, Karen P.; Igbokwe, Obianuju; White, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The risk–benefit ratio for concurrent use of dietary antioxidants with chemotherapy or radiation therapy is a controversial topic. In this review, the medical literature on concurrent antioxidant use with chemotherapy or radiotherapy was assessed and further steps for generating evidence-based guidelines are suggested. The clinical cancer research community should cooperate and focus new studies on the use of a specific combination of antioxidant and chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and determine optimal doses for a specific cancer setting. Mechanistic studies on the interaction between antioxidants and conventional cancer therapy could lead to novel biomarkers for assessing dose adequacy. PMID:22085269

  17. Subclassification of small bowel Crohn's disease using magnetic resonance enterography: a review using evidence-based medicine methodology.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D J; Smyth, A E; McEvoy, S H; Gibson, D J; Doherty, G A; Malone, D E

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has a growing role in imaging small bowel Crohn's disease (SBCD), both in diagnosis and assessment of treatment response. Certain SBCD phenotypes respond well to biologic therapy and others require surgery; MRE has an expanding role in triaging these patients. In this review, we evaluate the MRE signs that subclassify SBCD using evidence-based medicine (EBM) methodology and provide a structured approach to MRE interpretation. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Christine S; Huang, William W

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous warts are highly prevalent lesions caused by the infection of keratinocytes by different types of human papillomaviruses. Although cutaneous warts are capable of resolving spontaneously, these infections can persist for long periods of time by evading the host immune system, and, as a result, many patients choose to seek treatment. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier that is approved as a topical cream for the treatment of anogenital warts by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts has not been well established. The purpose of this article is to systematically review the published literature regarding the efficacy of imiquimod in the treatment of cutaneous warts, and to evaluate the quality and outcomes of these studies. A literature search was performed through clinical queries PubMed (National Library of Medicine) database and the Cochrane database. All completed studies written in English and published through May 2014 were considered. Studies evaluating the use of imiquimod for anogenital warts were excluded. There were no other restrictions based on patient age, sex, ethnicity, or skin type. The studies were evaluated and assessed based on study design, patient population, treatment regimen, clinical outcome, and adverse events. A total of 393 records were identified in the initial search; 23 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and included in the review. Of these studies, six publications reported on immunocompromised individuals only. The highest quality study identified was a grade B, level 3 case-control cohort study in which patients with multiple warts had certain warts treated with imiquimod and others left untreated to serve as a control. The remaining studies identified were level 4 non-controlled case series (grade C) and level 5 case reports (grade D). In immunocompetent patients enrolled in non-controlled studies, the combined rate of patients achieving

  19. Brief report: incidence, etiology, risk factors, and outcome of hospital-acquired fever: a systematic, evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Daniel R; Flanders, Scott A; Beck, James M; Saint, Sanjay

    2006-11-01

    Temperature is universally measured in the hospitalized patient, but the literature on hospital-acquired fever has not been systematically reviewed. This systematic review is intended to provide clinicians with an overview of the incidence, etiology, and outcome of hospital-acquired fever. We searched MEDLINE (1970 to 2005), EMBASE (1988 to 2004), and Web of Knowledge. References of all included articles were reviewed. Articles that focused on children, fever in the developing world, classic fever of unknown origin, or specialized patient populations were excluded. Articles were reviewed independently by 2 authors before inclusion; a third author acted as arbiter. Of over 1,000 studies reviewed, 7 met the criteria for inclusion. The incidence of hospital-acquired fever ranged from 2% to 17%. The etiology of fever was infection in 37% to 74%. Rates of antibiotic use for patients with a noninfectious cause of fever ranged from 29% to 55% for a mean duration of 6.6 to 9.6 days. Studies varied widely in their methodology and the patient population studied. Limited information is available to guide an evidence-based approach to hospital-acquired fever. We propose criteria to help standardize future studies of this important clinical situation.

  20. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods for systematically reviewing complex multicomponent health care interventions.

    PubMed

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Chang, Christine; Viswanathan, Meera; Glick, Susan; Treadwell, Jonathan; Umscheid, Craig A; Whitlock, Evelyn; Fu, Rongwei; Berliner, Elise; Paynter, Robin; Anderson, Johanna; Motu'apuaka, Pua; Trikalinos, Tom

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods white paper was to outline approaches to conducting systematic reviews of complex multicomponent health care interventions. We performed a literature scan and conducted semistructured interviews with international experts who conduct research or systematic reviews of complex multicomponent interventions (CMCIs) or organizational leaders who implement CMCIs in health care. Challenges identified include lack of consistent terminology for such interventions (eg, complex, multicomponent, multidimensional, multifactorial); a wide range of approaches used to frame the review, from grouping interventions by common features to using more theoretical approaches; decisions regarding whether and how to quantitatively analyze the interventions, from holistic to individual component analytic approaches; and incomplete and inconsistent reporting of elements critical to understanding the success and impact of multicomponent interventions, such as methods used for implementation the context in which interventions are implemented. We provide a framework for the spectrum of conceptual and analytic approaches to synthesizing studies of multicomponent interventions and an initial list of critical reporting elements for such studies. This information is intended to help systematic reviewers understand the options and tradeoffs available for such reviews. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NASA 2010 Pharmacology Evidence Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine reviewed NASA's Human Research Program Evidence in assessing the Pharmacology risk identified in NASA's Human Research Program Requirements Document (PRD). Since this review there was a major reorganization of the Pharmacology discipline within the HRP, as well as a re-evaluation of the Pharmacology evidence. This panel is being asked to review the latest version of the Pharmacology Evidence Report. Specifically, this panel will: (1) Appraise the descriptions of the human health-related risk in the HRP PRD. (2) Assess the relevance and comprehensiveness of the evidence in identifying potential threats to long-term space missions. (3) Assess the associated gaps in knowledge and identify additional areas for research as necessary.

  2. Exploring the Evidence Base for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Ménière's Syndrome—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew F.; Xing, Mei; Morgan, Ken; Brettle, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Ménière's syndrome is a long-term, progressive disease that damages the balance and hearing parts of the inner ear. To address the paucity of information on which evidence-based treatment decisions should be made, a systematic review of acupuncture for Ménière's syndrome was undertaken. The method used was a systematic review of English and Chinese literature, from six databases for randomized, non-randomized and observational studies. All studies were critically appraised and a narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review (9 in English and 18 in Chinese languages): three randomized controlled trials, three non-randomized controlled studies and four pre-test, post-test designs. All but one of the studies was conducted in China. The studies covered body acupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, fluid acupuncture point injection and moxibustion. The studies were of varying quality. The weight of evidence, across all study types, is of beneficial effect from acupuncture, for those in an acute phase or those who have had Ménière's syndrome for a number of years. The review reinforces the importance of searching for studies from English and Chinese literature. The transferability of the findings from China to a Western context needs confirmation. Further research is also needed to clarify questions around the appropriate frequency and number of treatment/courses of acupuncture. The weight of evidence suggests a potential benefit of acupuncture for persons with Ménière's disease, including those in an acute phase and reinforces the importance of searching for published studies in the Chinese language. PMID:19505974

  3. Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction

    PubMed Central

    Morters, Michelle K; Restif, Olivier; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Wood, James L N; Conlan, Andrew J K

    2013-01-01

    Control measures for canine rabies include vaccination and reducing population density through culling or sterilization. Despite the evidence that culling fails to control canine rabies, efforts to reduce canine population density continue in many parts of the world. The rationale for reducing population density is that rabies transmission is density-dependent, with disease incidence increasing directly with host density. This may be based, in part, on an incomplete interpretation of historical field data for wildlife, with important implications for disease control in dog populations. Here, we examine historical and more recent field data, in the context of host ecology and epidemic theory, to understand better the role of density in rabies transmission and the reasons why culling fails to control rabies. We conclude that the relationship between host density, disease incidence and other factors is complex and may differ between species. This highlights the difficulties of interpreting field data and the constraints of extrapolations between species, particularly in terms of control policies. We also propose that the complex interactions between dogs and people may render culling of free-roaming dogs ineffective irrespective of the relationship between host density and disease incidence. We conclude that vaccination is the most effective means to control rabies in all species. PMID:23004351

  4. Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction.

    PubMed

    Morters, Michelle K; Restif, Olivier; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Wood, James L N; Conlan, Andrew J K

    2013-01-01

    Control measures for canine rabies include vaccination and reducing population density through culling or sterilization. Despite the evidence that culling fails to control canine rabies, efforts to reduce canine population density continue in many parts of the world. The rationale for reducing population density is that rabies transmission is density-dependent, with disease incidence increasing directly with host density. This may be based, in part, on an incomplete interpretation of historical field data for wildlife, with important implications for disease control in dog populations. Here, we examine historical and more recent field data, in the context of host ecology and epidemic theory, to understand better the role of density in rabies transmission and the reasons why culling fails to control rabies. We conclude that the relationship between host density, disease incidence and other factors is complex and may differ between species. This highlights the difficulties of interpreting field data and the constraints of extrapolations between species, particularly in terms of control policies. We also propose that the complex interactions between dogs and people may render culling of free-roaming dogs ineffective irrespective of the relationship between host density and disease incidence. We conclude that vaccination is the most effective means to control rabies in all species.

  5. A systematic review of validity evidence for checklists versus global rating scales in simulation-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Ilgen, Jonathan S; Ma, Irene W Y; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-02-01

    The relative advantages and disadvantages of checklists and global rating scales (GRSs) have long been debated. To compare the merits of these scale types, we conducted a systematic review of the validity evidence for checklists and GRSs in the context of simulation-based assessment of health professionals. We conducted a systematic review of multiple databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus to February 2013. We selected studies that used both a GRS and checklist in the simulation-based assessment of health professionals. Reviewers working in duplicate evaluated five domains of validity evidence, including correlation between scales and reliability. We collected information about raters, instrument characteristics, assessment context, and task. We pooled reliability and correlation coefficients using random-effects meta-analysis. We found 45 studies that used a checklist and GRS in simulation-based assessment. All studies included physicians or physicians in training; one study also included nurse anaesthetists. Topics of assessment included open and laparoscopic surgery (n = 22), endoscopy (n = 8), resuscitation (n = 7) and anaesthesiology (n = 4). The pooled GRS-checklist correlation was 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.81, n = 16 studies). Inter-rater reliability was similar between scales (GRS 0.78, 95% CI 0.71-0.83, n = 23; checklist 0.81, 95% CI 0.75-0.85, n = 21), whereas GRS inter-item reliabilities (0.92, 95% CI 0.84-0.95, n = 6) and inter-station reliabilities (0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.85, n = 10) were higher than those for checklists (0.66, 95% CI 0-0.84, n = 4 and 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.77, n = 10, respectively). Content evidence for GRSs usually referenced previously reported instruments (n = 33), whereas content evidence for checklists usually described expert consensus (n = 26). Checklists and GRSs usually had similar evidence for relations to other variables. Checklist inter-rater reliability and trainee

  6. Palliative Surgery for Advanced Cancer: Identifying Evidence-Based Criteria for Patient Selection: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Foster, Deshka; Shaikh, Mohammad F; Gleeson, Elizabeth; Babcock, Blake D; Ringold, Daniel; Bowne, Wilbur B

    2016-01-01

    Criteria for selecting patients with advanced cancer for palliative surgery (PS) remains poorly defined. Decision making for PS requires realistic treatment goals with well-defined criteria. Here we discuss a 71-year-old Jehovah's Witness with advanced stage renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who presented with profound anemia due to intractable bleeding from gastric metastasis. After repeated attempts with endoscopic and angiographic management, she underwent surgical palliation. Through this case, we developed 10-item evidence-based criteria for selecting patients for PS. The study objective was to provide a review of pertinent literature for PS and identify evidence-based criteria for patient selection. These criteria were relevant for selecting this patient with metastatic RCC and may prove beneficial for selecting advanced cancer patients for PS. A MEDLINE search revealed 175 publications relevant to PS. Among these, 17 articles defining patient selection criteria (PSC) were reviewed. A frequency-based analysis of each criterion was performed. Another search returned 30 cases of RCC gastric metastases from 25 published reports. Outcome analysis was determined by the Kaplan-Meier actuarial method. Ten criteria were identified: symptom control, prognosis, preoperative performance status, quality of life (QoL), tumor burden amenable to palliation, procedure-related morbidity and mortality, feasibility of nonsurgical therapies, anticipated hospitalization, requirement for additional palliation, and cost. This patient met all inclusion criteria and underwent a successful gastrectomy. Median survival for patients with RCC gastric metastasis was 20 months. This report illustrates an example of implementation of evidence-based criteria for selecting advanced cancer patients for PS. Validation of these criteria is warranted.

  7. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  8. Evaluation of distal symmetric polyneuropathy: the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy (an evidence-based review).

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gronseth, G S; Franklin, G; Carter, G T; Kinsella, L J; Cohen, J A; Asbury, A K; Szigeti, K; Lupski, J R; Latov, N; Lewis, R A; Low, P A; Fisher, M A; Herrmann, D; Howard, J F; Lauria, G; Miller, R G; Polydefkis, M; Sumner, A J

    2009-01-01

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy for the assessment of polyneuropathy. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. (1) Autonomic testing may be considered in the evaluation of patients with polyneuropathy to document autonomic nervous system dysfunction (Level B). Such testing should be considered especially for the evaluation of suspected autonomic neuropathy (Level B) and distal small fiber sensory polyneuropathy (SFSN) (Level C). A battery of validated tests is recommended to achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy (Level B). (2) Nerve biopsy is generally accepted as useful in the evaluation of certain neuropathies as in patients with suspected amyloid neuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex due to vasculitis, or with atypical forms of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, the literature is insufficient to provide a recommendation regarding when a nerve biopsy may be useful in the evaluation of DSP (Level U). (3) Skin biopsy is a validated technique for determining intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and may be considered for the diagnosis of DSP, particularly SFSN (Level C). There is a need for additional prospective studies to define more exact guidelines for the evaluation of polyneuropathy.

  9. The Diffusion of Evidence-Based Practice: Reviewing the Evidence-Based Practice Networks in the United States and German-Speaking Countries.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Christian; Lawson, Thomas R; Pankofer, Sabine; Maragkos, Markos; Kollar, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has had a major influence on U.S. social work while it has rarely been adapted in German-speaking countries. This study investigates how knowledge about EBP is diffused within and across geographical contexts. Network analysis methods reveals different diffusion patterns and provide reasons for these differences. For example, the U.S. discourse is self-contained and based on a more homogeneous knowledge base, while the German discourse is more heterogeneous and focuses on a notion of reflexive professionalism. The different conceptual influences within the U.S. and German discourses are discussed in light of future directions of disciplinary social work.

  10. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  11. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  12. Methods of Evidence-Based Anatomy: a guide to conducting systematic reviews and meta-analysis of anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-Based Anatomy (EBA) is the concept of applying evidence-based principles and research methods to the anatomical sciences. While narrative reviews are common in the anatomical sciences, true systematic reviews (SR) and meta-analysis (MA) are only beginning to grow in popularity. In order to enhance the quality of future EBA studies, and ensure the clinical reliability of their results, a uniform methodology is needed. In this paper, we present a step-by-step methodological guide for performing SRs and MAs of anatomical studies. We address the EBA-specific challenges in each step of the SR and MA process, and discuss methods and strategies to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, we discuss in detail the statistical methods used in MA of anatomical data, including multi-categorical and single-categorical pooled prevalence estimates, as well as pooled means of one group. Lastly, we discuss the major limitations of EBA, including the lack of a proper quality assessment tool for anatomical studies. The methods described in this paper present a uniform road map for future EBA studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. An evidence-based review of the resting electrocardiogram as a screening technique for heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ashley, E A; Raxwal, V; Froelicher, V

    2001-01-01

    Given renewed interest in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, we comprehensively reviewed the utility of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for screening considering the seminal epidemiologic studies. It appears that conventional risk factors relate to long-term risk, while ECG abnormalities are better predictors of short-term risk. For individual ECG abnormalities as well as for pooled categories of ECG abnormalities, the sensitivity of the ECG for future events was too low for it to be practical as a screening tool. This almost certainly relates to the low prevalence of these abnormalities. However, all ECG abnormalities increase with age and pre-test risk. Also screening with the ECG is of minimal cost and likely to decrease further as stand-alone machines are replaced by integration into personal computers (PC). Another potential impact on performing screening ECGs would be distribution and availability of digitized ECG data via the World Wide Web. For clinical utility of ECG data, comparison with previous ECGs can be critical but is currently limited. PC based ECG systems could very easily replace many of the ECG machines in use that only have paper output. PC-ECG systems would also permit interaction with computerized medical information systems, facilitate emailing and faxing of ECGs as well as storage at a centralized web-server. Web-enabled ECG recorders similar to the new generation of home appliances could follow this quick PC solution. A serious goal for the medical industry should be to end the morass of proprietary ECG digital formats and follow a standardized format. This could lead to a network of web-servers from which every patient's ECGs would be available. Such a situation could have a dramatic effect on the advisability of performing screening ECGs. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  14. Risk Factors for Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome in Active Individuals: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Zachary K; Anderson, Dustin; Games, Kenneth E; Eberman, Lindsey E

    2016-12-01

    Reference/Citation: Hamstra-Wright KL, Bliven KC, Bay C. Risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome in physically active individuals such as runners and military personnel: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med. 2015;49(6):362-369. What factors put physically active individuals at risk to develop medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS)? The authors performed a literature search of CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and MEDLINE from each database's inception to July 2013. The following key words were used together or in combination: armed forces, athlete, conditioning, disorder predictor, exercise, medial tibial stress syndrome, militaries, MTSS, military, military personnel, physically active, predictor, recruit, risk, risk characteristic, risk factor, run, shin pain, shin splints, and vulnerability factor. Studies were included in this systematic review based on the following criteria: original research that (1) investigated risk factors associated with MTSS, (2) compared physically active individuals with and without MTSS, (3) was printed in English, and (4) was accessible in full text in peer-reviewed journals. Two authors independently screened titles or abstracts (or both) of studies to identify inclusion criteria and quality. If the article met the inclusion criteria, the authors extracted demographic information, study design and duration, participant selection, MTSS diagnosis, investigated risk factors, mean difference, clinical importance, effect size, odds ratio, and any other data deemed relevant. After the data extraction was complete, the authors compared findings for accuracy and completeness. When the mean and standard deviation of a particular risk factor were reported 3 or more times, that risk factor was included in the meta-analysis. In addition, the methodologic quality was assessed with an adapted checklist developed by previous researchers. The checklist contained 5 categories: study objective

  15. Review: Evidence-based Clinical Research of Anti-obesity Supplements in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yasueda, Asuka; Ito, Toshinori; Maeda, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically throughout the world, and weight reduction through lifestyle management is urgently warranted. At present, numerous supplements advertised for their anti-overweight property are available in the Japanese market, but most of these lack proper evidence. Thus, we investigated dietary supplements that have been tested in clinical trials. Search Strategy: We researched anti-obesity supplements in the Japanese market using the google search engine in Japanese with the key terms “anti-obesity supplements,” ”diet supplements,” and “weight reduction supplements.” Results: We listed 49 companies that supply anti-obesity supplements. Of these, 11 had published clinical evidence of the anti-obesity efficacy of their supplements. These products contain the following active ingredients: Angelica keiskei, bofu-tsusho-san, capsaishin, DHA/EPA, forskohlii, garcinia cambogia, lactoferrin, L-carnitine, oligonol, tea catechin, and yeast hydrolysate. Conclusion: We obtained 11 supplements for which clinical evidence was published in medical journals in English. We also found 10 products for which clinical or animal evidence was published in Japanese. We expect that many companies will produce evidence of the efficacy of their products in the near future, thereby validating the use of dietary anti-obesity supplements in Japan. PMID:26005506

  16. Follow-up for cervical cancer: a Program in Evidence-Based Care systematic review and clinical practice guideline update

    PubMed Central

    Elit, L.; Kennedy, E.B.; Fyles, A.; Metser, U.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Program in Evidence-based Care (pebc) of Cancer Care Ontario published a guideline on the follow-up of cervical cancer. In 2014, the pebc undertook an update of the systematic review and clinical practice guideline for women in this target population. Methods The literature from 2007 to August 2014 was searched using medline and embase [extended to 2000 for studies of human papillomavirus (hpv) dna testing]. Outcomes of interest were measures of survival, diagnostic accuracy, and quality of life. A working group evaluated the need for changes to the earlier guidelines and incorporated comments and feedback from internal and external reviewers. Results One systematic review and six individual studies were included. The working group concluded that the new evidence did not warrant changes to the 2009 recommendations, although hpv dna testing was added as a potentially more sensitive method of detecting recurrence in patients treated with radiotherapy. Comments from internal and external reviewers were incorporated. Recommendations Summary Follow-up care after primary treatment should be conducted and coordinated by a physician experienced in the surveillance of cancer patients. A reasonable follow-up strategy involves visits every 3–4 months within the first 2 years, and every 6–12 months during years 3–5. Visits should include a patient history and complete physical examination, with elicitation of relevant symptoms. Vaginal vault cytology examination should not be performed more frequently than annually. Combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography, other imaging, and biomarker evaluation are not advocated; hpv dna testing could be useful as a method of detection of recurrence after radiotherapy. General recommendations for follow-up after 5 years are also provided. PMID:27122975

  17. The academic, economic and societal impacts of Open Access: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Jonathan P.; Waldner, François; Jacques, Damien C.; Masuzzo, Paola; Collister, Lauren B.; Hartgerink, Chris. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing debates surrounding Open Access to the scholarly literature are multifaceted and complicated by disparate and often polarised viewpoints from engaged stakeholders. At the current stage, Open Access has become such a global issue that it is critical for all involved in scholarly publishing, including policymakers, publishers, research funders, governments, learned societies, librarians, and academic communities, to be well-informed on the history, benefits, and pitfalls of Open Access. In spite of this, there is a general lack of consensus regarding the potential pros and cons of Open Access at multiple levels. This review aims to be a resource for current knowledge on the impacts of Open Access by synthesizing important research in three major areas: academic, economic and societal. While there is clearly much scope for additional research, several key trends are identified, including a broad citation advantage for researchers who publish openly, as well as additional benefits to the non-academic dissemination of their work. The economic impact of Open Access is less well-understood, although it is clear that access to the research literature is key for innovative enterprises, and a range of governmental and non-governmental services. Furthermore, Open Access has the potential to save both publishers and research funders considerable amounts of financial resources, and can provide some economic benefits to traditionally subscription-based journals. The societal impact of Open Access is strong, in particular for advancing citizen science initiatives, and leveling the playing field for researchers in developing countries. Open Access supersedes all potential alternative modes of access to the scholarly literature through enabling unrestricted re-use, and long-term stability independent of financial constraints of traditional publishers that impede knowledge sharing. However, Open Access has the potential to become unsustainable for research communities if

  18. The academic, economic and societal impacts of Open Access: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Jonathan P; Waldner, François; Jacques, Damien C; Masuzzo, Paola; Collister, Lauren B; Hartgerink, Chris H J

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing debates surrounding Open Access to the scholarly literature are multifaceted and complicated by disparate and often polarised viewpoints from engaged stakeholders. At the current stage, Open Access has become such a global issue that it is critical for all involved in scholarly publishing, including policymakers, publishers, research funders, governments, learned societies, librarians, and academic communities, to be well-informed on the history, benefits, and pitfalls of Open Access. In spite of this, there is a general lack of consensus regarding the potential pros and cons of Open Access at multiple levels. This review aims to be a resource for current knowledge on the impacts of Open Access by synthesizing important research in three major areas: academic, economic and societal. While there is clearly much scope for additional research, several key trends are identified, including a broad citation advantage for researchers who publish openly, as well as additional benefits to the non-academic dissemination of their work. The economic impact of Open Access is less well-understood, although it is clear that access to the research literature is key for innovative enterprises, and a range of governmental and non-governmental services. Furthermore, Open Access has the potential to save both publishers and research funders considerable amounts of financial resources, and can provide some economic benefits to traditionally subscription-based journals. The societal impact of Open Access is strong, in particular for advancing citizen science initiatives, and leveling the playing field for researchers in developing countries. Open Access supersedes all potential alternative modes of access to the scholarly literature through enabling unrestricted re-use, and long-term stability independent of financial constraints of traditional publishers that impede knowledge sharing. However, Open Access has the potential to become unsustainable for research communities if

  19. Review of the evidence base for treatment of childhood psychopathology: internalizing disorders.

    PubMed

    Compton, Scott N; Burns, Barbara J; Helen, L Egger; Robertson, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    This article reviews the empirical literature on psychosocial, psychopharmacological, and adjunctive treatments for children between the ages of 6 and 12 with internalizing disorders. The aim of this review was to identify interventions that have potential to prevent substance use disorders in adolescence by treating internalizing disorders in childhood. Results suggest that a variety of behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, and pharmacological interventions are effective in reducing symptoms of childhood depression, phobias, and anxiety disorders. None of the studies reviewed included substance abuse outcomes. Thus, little can be said about the relationship between early treatment and the prevention of later substance use. The importance of evaluating the generalizability of research-supported interventions to community settings is highlighted and recommendations for future research are offered.

  20. The Therapeutic Use of Analgesics in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis: A Literature Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farnad; Motavaf, Mahsa; Safari, Saeid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pain management in cirrhotic patients is a major clinical challenge for medical professionals. Unfortunately there are no concrete guidelines available regarding the administration of analgesics in patients with liver cirrhosis. In this review we aimed to summarize the available literature and suggest appropriate evidence-based recommendations regarding to administration of these drugs. Evidence Acquisition: An indexed MEDLINE search was conducted in July 2014, using keywords “analgesics”, “hepatic impairment”, “cirrhosis”, “acetaminophen or paracetamol”, “NSAIDs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs”, “opioid” for the period of 2004 to 2014. All randomized clinical trials, case series, case report and meta-analysis studies with the above mentioned contents were included in review process. In addition, unpublished information from the Food and Drug Administration are included as well. Results: Paracetamol is safe in patients with chronic liver disease but a reduced dose of 2-3 g/d is recommended for long-term use. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are best avoided because of risk of renal impairment, hepatorenal syndrome, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Most opioids can have deleterious effects in patients with cirrhosis. They have an increased risk of toxicity and hepatic encephalopathy. They should be administrated with lower and less frequent dosing in these patients and be avoided in patients with a history of encephalopathy or addiction to any substance. Conclusions: No evidence-based guidelines exist on the use of analgesics in patients with liver disease and cirrhosis. As a result pain management in these patients generates considerable misconception among health care professionals, leading under-treatment of pain in this population. Providing concrete guidelines toward the administration of these agents will lead to more efficient and safer pain management in this setting. PMID:25477978

  1. Driving and Low Vision: An Evidence-Based Review of Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, J. Graham; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Russell-Minda, Elizabeth; Evans, Mal

    2008-01-01

    This systematic review of the effectiveness of driver rehabilitation interventions found that driver training programs enhance driving skills and awareness, but further research is needed to determine their effectiveness in improving driving performance of drivers with low vision. More research is also needed to determine the effectiveness of low…

  2. Evidence-Based Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients. PMID:28096722

  3. Evidence-Based Bundles and Cesarean Delivery Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ebony B; Temming, Lorene A; Fowler, Susan; Eppes, Catherine; Gross, Gilad; Srinivas, Sindhu K; Macones, George A; Colditz, Graham A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the association of implementation of evidence-based bundles with surgical site infection rates after cesarean delivery. We searched MEDLINE through PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing evidence-based infection prevention bundles for cesarean delivery, defined as implementation of three or more processes proven to prevent surgical site infection such as chlorhexidine skin preparation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and hair clipping, with usual care. The primary outcome was overall surgical site infection, defined using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. Secondary outcomes were superficial or deep surgical site infection and endometritis. Quality of studies and heterogeneity were assessed using validated measures. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs were calculated using random-effects models. Numbers needed to treat were estimated for outcomes with significant reduction. We found no randomized controlled trials. Fourteen preintervention and postintervention studies met inclusion criteria. Eight were full-text articles, and six were published abstracts. Quality of most of the primary studies was adequate with regard to the intervention, but modest in terms of implementation. The rate of surgical site infection was significantly lower after implementing an evidence-based bundle (14 studies: pooled rates 6.2% baseline compared with 2.0% intervention, pooled RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.25-0.43, number needed to treat=24). Evidence-based bundles were also associated with a lower rate of superficial or deep surgical site infection (six studies: pooled rate 5.9% baseline compared with 1.1% intervention, pooled RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.12-0.32, number needed to treat=21). The rate of endometritis was low at baseline and not significantly different after

  4. An evidence-based review on the use of corticosteroids in peri-operative and critical care.

    PubMed

    Han, Yin-Yi; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2002-06-01

    With complex and extensive pharmacological effects, corticosteroids are widely used in many clinical situations. A survey conducted to define the role of corticosteroids in various settings of peri-operative and critical care gave strong evidence to support that the use of corticosteroid is absolutely indicated in patients with adrenal insufficiency, asthma, anaphylaxis, acute spinal cord injury, and increased ICP resulting from brain tumors. As the benefits of corticosteroids are much in evidence, their uses are recommended to extend to postoperative antiemesis, acute respiratory failure (such as ARDS, COPD, and fat embolism), increased ICP associated with brain abscess, thyroid storm, and refractory hypothermia. Beneficial effect could be expected in septic shock with high-dose corticosteroids. Despite extensive reports on their versatile usefulness, evidence-based review did not recommend the use of corticosteroids in increased ICP associated with traumatic head injury and cerebral infarct, cardiac arrest, post-extubation airway edema, and aspiration pneumonia due to poor effectiveness let alone further worsening of the conditions. Great caution must be taken in clinical situations where administration of corticosteroids is considered contraindicated such as systemic fungal infection, hypersensitivity to the drug, intramuscular injection in idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura, vaccination with live virus.

  5. The health and social effects of drinking water-based infusions of kava: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Madronio, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    To review the evidence on the health and social effects of drinking kava; a water-based infusion of the roots of the kava plant. Included all empirical studies of the effects of kava published 1987-2008 reporting health and social outcomes. Evidence appraised on study design (level of evidence) and standard epidemiological criteria for causality. Causality indicated: scaly skin rash, weight loss, raised Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase liver enzyme levels, nausea, loss of appetite or indigestion; Association indicated but causality unclear: red sore eyes, impotence or loss of sexual drive, self-reported poor health, raised cholesterol, and loss of time and money, low motivation and 'slow/lazy' days following use, reduced alcohol consumption and related violence; Association hypothesised: fits or seizures, Melioidosis, Ischaemic Heart Disease, protective effects for cancer; No association indicated: cognitive performance; No association suggested: cognitive impairment, liver toxicity or permanent liver damage, other pneumonia; No association hypothesised: hallucinations. The health and social implications of chronic kava drinking can be significant for individuals and communities, although most effects of even heavy consumption appear to be reversible when consumption is stopped. An Australia-wide ban on commercial importation of kava has been in place since mid-2007, but there is no published literature to date on the impact of the ban. © 2010 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Pegfilgrastim-Induced Bone Pain: A Review on Incidence, Risk Factors, and Evidence-Based Management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Donald C; Pellegrino, Annie E

    2017-09-01

    To review the incidence, risk factors, and management of pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain (PIBP). PubMed was searched from 1980 to March 31, 2017, using the terms pegfilgrastim and bone pain. English-language, human studies and reviews assessing the incidence, risk factors, and management of PIBP were incorporated. A total of 3 randomized, prospective studies and 2 retrospective studies evaluated pharmacological management of PIBP. Naproxen compared with placebo demonstrated a reduction in the degree, incidence, and duration of bone pain secondary to pegfilgrastim. Loratadine was not effective in reducing the incidence of bone pain prophylactically, but a retrospective study evaluating dual antihistamine blockade with loratadine and famotidine demonstrated a decreased incidence in bone pain when administered before pegfilgrastim. Naproxen is effective at managing PIBP. Although commonly used, antihistamines have a paucity of data supporting their use. Dose reductions of pegfilgrastim and opioids may also be potential management options; however, data supporting these treatment modalities are scarce.

  7. Acute perioperative pain in neonates: An evidence-based review of neurophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Khanna, Puneet; Ray, Bikash Ranjan; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Bajpai, Minu

    2014-03-01

    Current literature lacks systematic data on acute perioperative pain management in neonates and mainly focuses only on procedural pain management. In the current review, the neurophysiological basis of neonatal pain perception and the role of different analgesic drugs and techniques in perioperative pain management in neonates are systematically reviewed. Intravenous opioids such as morphine or fentanyl as either intermittent bolus or continuous infusion remain the most common modality for the treatment of perioperative pain. Paracetamol has a promising role in decreasing opioid requirement. However, routine use of ketorolac or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not usually recommended. Epidural analgesia is safe in experienced hands and provides several benefits over systemic opioids such as early extubation and early return of bowel function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Evidence-based review of the use of the pulmonary artery catheter: impact data and complications

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) was introduced in 1971 for the assessment of heart function at the bedside. Since then it has generated much enthusiasm and controversy regarding the benefits and potential harms caused by this invasive form of hemodynamic monitoring. This review discusses all clinical studies conducted during the past 30 years, in intensive care unit settings or post mortem, on the impact of the PAC on outcomes and complications resulting from the procedure. Although most of the historical observational studies and randomized clinical trials also looked at PAC-related complications among their end-points, we opted to review the data under two main topics: the impact of PAC on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness, and the major complications related to the use of the PAC. PMID:17164020

  9. Inflammatory bowel diseases and human reproduction: A comprehensive evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Stefano; Sereni, Giuliana; Falbo, Angela; Beltrami, Marina; Lombardini, Silvia; Boni, Maria Chiara; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Sassatelli, Romano; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) on human reproduction, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies (articles and/or abstracts) without limits for English language. We searched on Medline (through PubMed), the Institute for Scientific Information, the Web of Science and the websites for the registration of controlled trials (http://controlled-trials.com/). Bibliographies of retrieved articles, books, expert opinion review articles and reviewed bibliographies from subject experts were manually searched. Titles and abstracts were screened initially, and potential relevant articles were identified and reviewed. Whenever possible, data were analyzed by comparing IBD patients vs healthy controls, and patients with active IBDs vs those with disease in remission. The effects of IBDs on female fertility, fertility in infertile couples, pregnancy and male infertility were examined separately. Patients with IBDs in remission have normal fertility. At the moment, there is no established guideline for the preservation of fertility in women with IBD undergoing surgery. Further data are needed regarding guidelines for the management of these patients. Data regarding IBDs and infertility are currently completely lacking. Considering the prevalence of intestinal pathology in young adults of childbearing age, this field is of great scientific and clinical interest, opening up important future perspectives. Another important and as yet unexplored point is the response to treatments for infertility in patients with IBDs. In particular, the question is whether the reproductive outcomes (clinical and biological) can be influenced by the IBD of one of the partners. The goals for successful reproductive outcomes in IBD population are correct counseling and disease remission. IBDs significantly affect several reproductive aspects of human (female, male, couple) reproduction. Further data are needed to develop guidelines

  10. Evidence-based review of clinical studies on pharmacology (non-anesthetic studies).

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    We have divided the analysis of pharmacology studies into studies on local anesthetics and studies on all other pharmacologic agents. This division reflects the large number of studies focusing on methods for obtaining effective anesthesia in patients and permits an independent focus on those clinical studies evaluating nonanesthetic drugs. In this section, we review that alternative class of agents, with an emphasis this year on clinical studies evaluating oral analgesics.

  11. Thrombin use in surgery: an evidence-based review of its clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Sung W; Lew, Wesley K; Weaver, Fred A

    2010-01-01

    When surgical ligation of bleeding fails, or is not possible, surgeons rely on a number of hemostatic aids, including thrombin. This review discusses the history, pharmacology and clinical application of thrombin as a surgical hemostat. The initial thrombin was bovine in origin, but its use has been complicated by the formation of antibodies that cross-react with human coagulation factors. This has been associated with life-threatening bleeding and in some circumstances anaphylaxis and death. Human thrombin, isolated from pooled plasma of donors, was developed in an effort to minimize these risks, but its downsides are its limited availability and the potential for transmitting blood-borne pathogens. Recently a recombinant thrombin has been developed, and approved for use by the FDA. It has the advantage of being minimally antigenic and devoid of the risk of viral transmission. Thrombin is often used in conjunction with other hemostatic aids, including absorbable agents such as Gelfoam, and with fibrinogen in fibrin glues. The last part of this review will discuss these agents in detail, and review their clinical applications. PMID:22282693

  12. Psychotropic Medications in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review and Synthesis for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Matthew; Beaulieu, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review, rating and synthesis of the empirical evidence for the use of psychotropic medications in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirty-three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in peer-reviewed journals qualified for inclusion and were coded and analyzed using a systematic evaluative…

  13. Psychotropic Medications in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review and Synthesis for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Matthew; Beaulieu, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review, rating and synthesis of the empirical evidence for the use of psychotropic medications in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirty-three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in peer-reviewed journals qualified for inclusion and were coded and analyzed using a systematic evaluative…

  14. Instructional practices for evidence-based practice with pre-registration allied health students: a review of recent research and developments.

    PubMed

    Hitch, Danielle; Nicola-Richmond, Kelli

    2016-07-28

    The aim of this study is to update a previous review published in this journal on the effectiveness of teaching and assessment interventions for evidence based practice in health professions, and to determine the extent to which the five recommendations made from that review have been implemented. The Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method was used to synthesise all published evidence from 2011 to 2015, which addressed instructional practices used for evidence based practice with pre-registration allied health students. Seventeen articles were found to meet the inclusion criteria, and were analysed for both their individual rigour and relationship to the five recommendations. The evidence reviewed in this study was diverse in both its geographical setting and the allied health disciplines represented. Most of the evidence used less rigorous methods, and the evidence base is generally exploratory in nature. To date, the five recommendations regarding instructional practices in this area have been implemented to varying degrees. Many current practices promote social negotiation, collaborative decision-making and collaborative learning, so the social constructivist approach is being adopted. However, the prior knowledge of students is not being assessed as a basis for scaffolding, communication of evidence based practice to varying audiences is rarely addressed and the role of clinicians in the learning of evidence based practice knowledge, skills, beliefs and attitudes remains limited.

  15. [Evidence based medicine].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is a systematic method employed to secure the best scientific available evidence when making clinical decisions. Several steps are taken in these process, describing a clinical scenario, formulating a specific clinical question, searching the literature for the pertinent studies, selecting the relevant articles using rules of evidence, understanding and calculating measures of effect, and finally incorporating the evidence and patients preferences in the clinical decision process.

  16. A qualitative review of sports concussion education: prime time for evidence-based knowledge translation.

    PubMed

    Mrazik, Martin; Dennison, Christopher R; Brooks, Brian L; Yeates, Keith Owen; Babul, Shelina; Naidu, Dhiren

    2015-12-01

    Educating athletes, coaches, parents and healthcare providers about concussion management is a public health priority. There is an abundance of information on sports concussions supported by position statements from governing sport and medical organisations. Yet surveys of athletes, parents, coaches and healthcare providers continue to identify multiple barriers to the successful management of sports concussion. To date, efforts to provide education using empirically sound methodologies are lacking. To provide a comprehensive review of scientific research on concussion education efforts and make recommendations for enhancing these efforts. Qualitative literature review of sports concussion education. Databases including PubMed, Sport Discus and MEDLINE were searched using standardised terms, alone and in combination, including 'concussion', 'sport', 'knowledge', 'education' and 'outcome'. Studies measuring the success of education interventions suggest that simply presenting available information may help to increase knowledge about concussions, but it does not produce long-term changes in behaviour among athletes. Currently, no empirical reviews have evaluated the success of commercially available sports concussion applications. The most successful education efforts have taken steps to ensure materials are user-friendly, interactive, utilise more than one modality to present information and are embedded in mandated training programmes or support legislation. Psychosocial theory-driven methods used to understand and improve 'buy in' from intended audiences have shown promise in changing behaviour. More deliberate and methodologically sound steps must be taken to optimise education and knowledge translation efforts in sports concussion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: critical review and evidence base.

    PubMed

    Feinman, Richard D; Pogozelski, Wendy K; Astrup, Arne; Bernstein, Richard K; Fine, Eugene J; Westman, Eric C; Accurso, Anthony; Frassetto, Lynda; Gower, Barbara A; McFarlane, Samy I; Nielsen, Jörgen Vesti; Krarup, Thure; Saslow, Laura; Roth, Karl S; Vernon, Mary C; Volek, Jeff S; Wilshire, Gilbert B; Dahlqvist, Annika; Sundberg, Ralf; Childers, Ann; Morrison, Katharine; Manninen, Anssi H; Dashti, Hussain M; Wood, Richard J; Wortman, Jay; Worm, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science. The seriousness of diabetes requires that we evaluate all of the evidence that is available. The 12 points are sufficiently compelling that we feel that the burden of proof rests with those who are opposed.

  18. Evidence-based interventions in primary care following acute coronary syndrome in Australia and New Zealand: a systematic scoping review.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Manavi M; Woods, John A; Dronavalli, Mithilesh; Hamilton, Sandra J; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-11-09

    Coronary artery disease has a significant disease burden, but there are many known barriers to management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). General practitioners (GPs) bear considerable responsibility for post-discharge management of ACS in Australia and New Zealand (NZ), but knowledge about the extent and efficacy of such management is limited. This systematic review summarises published evidence from Australia and New Zealand regarding management in primary care after discharge following ACS. A search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL-Plus and PSYCINFO databases in August 2015 was supplemented by citation screening and hand-searching. Literature was selected based on specified criteria, and assessed for quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Extracted data was related to evidence-based interventions specified by published guidelines. The search yielded 19 publications, most of which reported on quantitative and observational studies from Australia. The majority of studies scored at least 75 % on the MMAT. Diverse aspects of management by GPs are presented according to categories of evidence-based guidelines. Data suggests that GPs are more likely to prescribe ACS medications than to assist in lifestyle or psychological management. GP referral to cardiac rehabilitation varied, and one study showed an improvement in the number of ACS patients with documented ACS management plans. Few studies described successful interventions to improve GP management, though some quality improvement efforts through education and integration of care with hospitals were beneficial. Limited data was published about interventions effective in rural, minority, and Indigenous populations. Research reflects room for improvement in GP post-discharge ACS management, but little is known about effective methods for improvement. Additional research, both observational and interventional, would assist GPs in improving the quality of post-discharge ACS care.

  19. Complementary & Alternative Management of Parkinson’s Disease: An Evidence-Based Review of Eastern Influenced Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bega, Danny; Zadikoff, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) appears to be lower in Asia compared to the Western world. It is unclear if this is related to the ubiquitous use of traditional medicine in Eastern healthcare, but the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities in countries like Korea may be as high as 76%. Among patients with PD, herbal medicines, health supplement foods, and acupuncture are interventions which are increasingly used throughout the world. Countries like Korea, China, India, and Japan have long embraced and incorporated traditional medicine into modern management of conditions such as PD, but research into various CAM modalities remains in its infancy limiting evidence-based recommendations for many treatments. We reviewed the literature on CAM treatments for PD, focusing on mind-body interventions and natural products. Based on evidence limited to randomized-controlled trials we found that mind-body interventions are generally effective forms of physical activity that are likely to foster good adherence and may reduce disability associated with PD. Based on the current data, modalities like Tai Chi and dance are safe and beneficial in PD, but better studies are needed to assess the effects of other frequently used modalities such as yoga and acupuncture. Furthermore, despite centuries of experience using medicinal herbs and plants in Eastern countries, and despite substantial preclinical data on the beneficial effects of nutritional antioxidants as neuroprotective agents in PD, there is insufficient clinical evidence that any vitamin, food additive, or supplement, can improve motor function or delay disease progression in PD. PMID:25360229

  20. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  1. Mind-Body Exercises for Nurses with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Budhrani-Shani, Pinky; Berry, Donna L; Arcari, Patricia; Langevin, Helene; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) among nurses is a growing health concern. The multimodal nature of mind-body exercises has potential to impact physiological and psychological processes associated with chronic pain, affording possible advantages over conventional unimodal therapies. This paper summarizes the prevalence of and risk factors for CLBP among nurses, reviews the effectiveness in treating pain and disability of mind-body exercises (yoga and tai chi) for CLBP among the general and nursing population, and describes implications. Methods. Articles, published during or prior to 2015, were systematically identified through the PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect databases using the following search terms: nurses, mind-body, integrative, biopsychosocial, yoga, tai chi, back pain, and/or risk factors. Results. Prevalence estimates of CLBP among nurses ranged from 50% to 80%. Associated risk factors for CLBP included lifestyle and physical, psychological, psychosocial, and occupational factors. No published studies were identified that evaluated yoga or tai chi for nurses with CLBP. Studies in the general population suggested that these interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability and may improve factors/processes predictive of CLBP. Conclusion. This review suggests that evaluating the impact of multimodal interventions such as yoga and tai chi for nurses with CLBP warrants investigation.

  2. The Role of Photodynamic Therapy in Acne: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Boen, Monica; Brownell, Joshua; Patel, Priyanka; Tsoukas, Maria M

    2017-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent skin disorder that affects almost all adolescents and can persist into adulthood. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment for acne that involves the use of a photosensitizer in combination with a light source and oxygen. We performed a systematic review of the literature and critically evaluated the studies. Sixty-nine clinical trials, four case reports, and two retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria, and seven of the studies were high quality. The most common photosensitizers used were 5-aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinate, and both showed similar response. Red light was the most frequently used light source, followed by intense pulsed light, and showed comparable results. Inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions both responded to treatment, with inflammatory lesions showing greater clearance in most studies. Adverse events associated with PDT for acne were mild and included pain on illumination and post-procedural erythema and edema. PDT has been safely used in higher Fitzpatrick skin types (III-IV), although these patients had a higher risk of transient hyperpigmentation. This review supports PDT as an efficacious treatment for acne and a good adjunctive treatment for mild to severe acne, especially in patients who have not responded to topical therapy and oral antibacterials, and are not great candidates for isotretinoin. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the optimal photosensitizers, light sources, incubation times, and number of treatments for PDT use in acne.

  3. Mind-Body Exercises for Nurses with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, Patricia; Langevin, Helene; Wayne, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) among nurses is a growing health concern. The multimodal nature of mind-body exercises has potential to impact physiological and psychological processes associated with chronic pain, affording possible advantages over conventional unimodal therapies. This paper summarizes the prevalence of and risk factors for CLBP among nurses, reviews the effectiveness in treating pain and disability of mind-body exercises (yoga and tai chi) for CLBP among the general and nursing population, and describes implications. Methods. Articles, published during or prior to 2015, were systematically identified through the PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect databases using the following search terms: nurses, mind-body, integrative, biopsychosocial, yoga, tai chi, back pain, and/or risk factors. Results. Prevalence estimates of CLBP among nurses ranged from 50% to 80%. Associated risk factors for CLBP included lifestyle and physical, psychological, psychosocial, and occupational factors. No published studies were identified that evaluated yoga or tai chi for nurses with CLBP. Studies in the general population suggested that these interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability and may improve factors/processes predictive of CLBP. Conclusion. This review suggests that evaluating the impact of multimodal interventions such as yoga and tai chi for nurses with CLBP warrants investigation. PMID:27446610

  4. Social cognitive determinants of ecstasy use to target in evidence-based interventions: a meta-analytical review.

    PubMed

    Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kok, Gerjo; Abraham, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The health hazards and prevalence of ecstasy use have been documented in two decades of research, but no review reporting on potentially modifiable antecedents of use is available. The aim of this study was to integrate systematically research identifying cognitive correlates of ecstasy use. Such research has the potential to identify targets for evidence-based interventions designed to discourage use. The databases PsycINFO and MedLine were searched, inclusion criteria applied to resulting hits, and descendency and ancestry approaches applied to the selected publications. Reported associations between cognitive determinants, including intention to use and ecstasy use measures, were synthesized by calculating a weighted mean effect size, r. The pattern of associations lent support both to the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the expectancy approach as descriptions of potentially useful determinants. Attitudes were associated most strongly with intention and use, followed by subjective norm and perceived behavioural control. Consideration of the strength of associations and the potential modifiability of identified cognitions suggests that evidence-based interventions to discourage ecstasy use should target negative expectancies, perceived behavioural control and anticipated regret, and consider tailoring perceived behavioural control elements.

  5. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT with tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Treglia, G; Sadeghi, R; Del Sole, A; Giovanella, L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) is the most used positron emitter radiopharmaceutical worldwide. This glucose analogue allows to study the glucose metabolism which is often increased in many tumors. Nowadays the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using F-18-FDG in different tumors is well known. On the other hand, to date, there is an increasing interest for the use of PET tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology, because they allow to study different metabolic pathways or receptor expression. The aim of this review is to summarize the scientific literature about the diagnostic performance of PET/CT using tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology through an evidence-based approach. In particular, the results of meta-analyses (representing the highest level of evidence) on the diagnostic performance of PET tracers other than F-18-FDG in different tumors are described. Furthermore, recommendations for the use of different PET tracers in oncology are provided based on existing literature data.

  6. Training Therapists in Evidence-Based Practice: A Critical Review of Studies From a Systems-Contextual Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), a preferred psychological treatment approach, requires training of community providers. The systems-contextual (SC) perspective, a model for dissemination and implementation efforts, underscores the importance of the therapist, client, and organizational variables that influence training and consequent therapist uptake and adoption of EBP. This review critiques the extant research on training in EBP from an SC perspective. Findings suggest that therapist knowledge improves and attitudinal change occurs following training. However, change in therapist behaviors (e.g., adherence, competence, and skill) and client outcomes only occurs when training interventions address each level of the SC model and include active learning. Limitations as well as areas for future research are discussed. PMID:20877441

  7. Exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff impingement: a systematic review and a synthesized evidence-based rehabilitation protocol.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to evaluate the role of exercise in treating rotator cuff impingement and to synthesize a standard evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. Eleven randomized, controlled trials (level 1 and 2) evaluating the effect of exercise in the treatment of impingement were identified. Data regarding demographics, methodology, and outcomes of pain, range of motion, strength, and function were recorded. Individual components of each rehabilitation program were catalogued. Effectiveness was determined by statistical and clinical significance. Although many articles had methodologic concerns, the data demonstrate that exercise has statistically and clinically significant effects on pain reduction and improving function, but not on range of motion or strength. Manual therapy augments the effects of exercise, yet supervised exercise was not different than home exercise programs. Information regarding specific components of the exercise programs was synthesized into a gold standard rehabilitation protocol for future studies on the nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff impingement.

  8. Point-of-care blood glucose testing for diabetes care in hospitalized patients: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Rayman, Gerry

    2014-11-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes requires accurate near-patient glucose monitoring systems. In the past decade, point-of-care blood glucose monitoring devices have become the mainstay of near-patient glucose monitoring in hospitals across the world. In this article, we focus on its history, accuracy, clinical use, and cost-effectiveness. Point-of-care devices have evolved from 1.2 kg instruments with no informatics to handheld lightweight portable devices with advanced connectivity features. Their accuracy however remains a subject of debate, and new standards for their approval have now been issued by both the International Organization for Standardization and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. While their cost-effectiveness remains to be proved, their clinical value for managing inpatients with diabetes remains unchallenged. This evidence-based review provides an overall view of its use in the hospital setting.

  9. An Evidence-Based Review on Wound Healing Herbal Remedies From Reports of Traditional Persian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Falahatzadeh, Maryam; Raoofi, Elahe; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-06-20

    Research on wound healing agents is a developing area in biomedical sciences. Traditional Persian medicine is one of holistic systems of medicine providing valuable information on natural remedies. To collect the evidences for wound-healing medicaments from traditional Persian medicine sources, 5 main pharmaceutical manuscripts in addition to related contemporary reports from Scopus, PubMed, and ScienceDirect were studied. The underlying mechanisms were also saved and discussed. Totally, 65 herbs used in traditional Persian medicine for their wound healing properties was identified. Related anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and wound-healing activities of those remedies were studied. Forty remedies had at least one of those properties and 10 of the filtered plants possessed all effects. The medicinal plants used in wound healing treatment in traditional Persian medicine could be a good topic for further in vivo and clinical research. This might lead to development of effective products for wound treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Microbiota, gastrointestinal infections, low-grade inflammation, and antibiotic therapy in irritable bowel syndrome: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, M; Bielsa, M V; Carmona-Sánchez, R; Hernández, A; López-Colombo, A; López Vidal, Y; Peláez-Luna, M; Remes-Troche, J M; Tamayo, J L; Valdovinos, M A

    2014-01-01

    Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) prevalence, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), altered microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and antibiotic therapy in IBS are all controversial issues. To conduct an evidence-based review of these factors. A review of the literature was carried out up to July 2012, with the inclusion of additional articles as far as August 2013, all of which were analyzed through the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) system. 1.There is greater SIBO probability in IBS when breath tests are performed, but prevalence varies widely (2-84%). 2.The gut microbiota in individuals with IBS is different from that in healthy subjects, but a common characteristic present in all the patients has not been established. 3.The incidence and prevalence of PI-IBS varies from 9-10% and 3-17%, respectively, and the latter decreases over time. Bacterial etiology is the most frequent but post-viral and parasitic cases have been reported. 4.A sub-group of patients has increased enterochromaffin cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes, and mast cells in the intestinal mucosa, but no differences between PI-IBS and non-PI-IBS have been determined. 5.Methanogenic microbiota has been associated with IBS with constipation. 6.Rifaximin at doses of 400mg TID/10days or 550mg TID/14days is effective treatment for the majority of overall symptoms and abdominal bloating in IBS. Retreatment effectiveness appears to be similar to that of the first cycle. Further studies are required to determine the nature of the gut microbiota in IBS and the differences in low-grade inflammation between PI-IBS and non-PI-IBS. Rifaximin has shown itself to be effective treatment for IBS, regardless of prior factors. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic review: probiotics in the management of lower gastrointestinal symptoms in clinical practice – an evidence-based international guide

    PubMed Central

    Hungin, A P S; Mulligan, C; Pot, B; Whorwell, P; Agréus, L; Fracasso, P; Lionis, C; Mendive, J; Philippart de Foy, J-M; Rubin, G; Winchester, C; Wit, N

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEvidence suggests that the gut microbiota play an important role in gastrointestinal problems. AimTo give clinicians a practical reference guide on the role of specified probiotics in managing particular lower gastrointestinal symptoms/problems by means of a systematic review-based consensus. MethodsSystematic literature searching identified randomised, placebo-controlled trials in adults; evidence for each symptom/problem was graded and statements developed (consensus process; 10-member panel). As results cannot be generalised between different probiotics, individual probiotics were identified for each statement. ResultsThirty seven studies were included; mostly on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS; 19 studies; treatment responder rates: 18–80% (specific probiotics), 5–50% (placebo)] or antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD; 10 studies). Statements with 100% agreement and ‘high’ evidence levels indicated that: (i) specific probiotics help reduce overall symptom burden and abdominal pain in some IBS patients; (ii) in patients receiving antibiotics/Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, specified probiotics are helpful as adjuvants to prevent/reduce the duration/intensity of AAD; (iii) probiotics have favourable safety in patients in primary care. Items with 70–100% agreement and ‘moderate’ evidence were: (i) specific probiotics help relieve overall symptom burden in some patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS, and reduce bloating/distension and improve bowel movement frequency/consistency in some IBS patients and (ii) with some probiotics, improved symptoms have led to improvement in quality of life. ConclusionsSpecified probiotics can provide benefit in IBS and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea; relatively few studies in other indications suggested benefits warranting further research. This study provides practical guidance on which probiotic to select for a specific problem. PMID:23981066

  12. Informing evidence-based practice: a review of research analyzing adult protective services data.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Joy Swanson; Ramsey-Klawsnik, Holly; Schillerstrom, Jason E; Dayton, Carol; Mixson, Paula; Counihan, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The mission of Adult Protective Services (APS) is to protect older and vulnerable adults from abuse, neglect, and exploitation. The complexity of APS cases and the potential for life-changing interventions point to the need for research that examines and evaluates APS practices. A literature review identified 50 studies published during a 16-year period that used APS agencies, clients, data, or resources to test hypotheses regarding elder abuse. The analysis revealed promising efforts toward knowledge development about elder mistreatment and self-neglect. This article provides an overview of salient findings, notes the scarcity of studies that analyze the effectiveness of APS, and highlights the need for additional research. Lessons learned are described, and APS practitioners and researchers are urged to work collaboratively to develop key practice-related questions about APS processes and outcomes that can be tested with appropriate research methodologies.

  13. Practical use of opioids in cats: a state-of-the-art, evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Bortolami, Elisa; Love, Emma J

    2015-04-01

    Recent recognition of the need to improve pain management in cats has led to the investigation of the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of opioid analgesic drugs in this species. The results of these studies may be difficult to interpret because the effect of these drugs varies with dose, route of administration and the method used to assess them. As equipotency of different opioids is not known, it is hard to compare their effects. Animals do not verbalise the pain they feel and, in cats, it may be more difficult to recognise signs of pain in comparison with other species such as dogs. This article reviews the use of opioid analgesics in cats. It must be remembered that not all drugs are licensed for use in cats, and that marketing authorisations vary between different countries. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  14. Controlling Legionella in hospital drinking water: an evidence-based review of disinfection methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yusen E; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L

    2011-02-01

    Hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease is directly linked to the presence of Legionella in hospital drinking water. Disinfecting the drinking water system is an effective preventive measure. The efficacy of any disinfection measures should be validated in a stepwise fashion from laboratory assessment to a controlled multiple-hospital evaluation over a prolonged period of time. In this review, we evaluate systemic disinfection methods (copper-silver ionization, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ultraviolet light, and hyperchlorination), a focal disinfection method (point-of-use filtration), and short-term disinfection methods in outbreak situations (superheat-and-flush with or without hyperchlorination). The infection control practitioner should take the lead in selection of the disinfection system and the vendor. Formal appraisals by other hospitals with experience of the system under consideration is indicated. Routine performance of surveillance cultures of drinking water to detect Legionella and monitoring of disinfectant concentrations are necessary to ensure long-term efficacy.

  15. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in stroke: an evidence-based clinical review.

    PubMed

    Varsou, Ourania; Macleod, Mary Joan; Schwarzbauer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Stroke is a common condition that may lead to various degrees of neurological deficit and long-term disability. It has become increasingly recognized that cortical reorganization of neuronal networks plays a significant role in regaining function following a focal brain injury. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are still not fully understood. Resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging is a rapidly evolving scanning technique that has the potential to shed light into this neuronal rearrangement. A better understanding of the underlying neurological pathways may contribute to the development of targeted treatment that will promote repair and reduce poststroke deficit. The aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date summary of the available scientific data evaluating the clinical application of functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging among stroke survivors. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  16. Chromium picolinate intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based review by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R; Ellwood, Kathleen C

    2006-08-01

    The labeling of both health claims that meet significant scientific agreement (SSA) and qualified health claims on conventional foods and dietary supplements requires pre-market approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Approval by the FDA involves, in part, a thorough review of the scientific evidence to support an SSA or a qualified health claim. This article discusses FDA's evidence-based review of the scientific evidence on the role of chromium picolinate supplements in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Based on this evidence-based review, FDA issued a letter of enforcement discretion for one qualified health claim on chromium picolinate and risk of insulin resistance, a surrogate endpoint for type 2 diabetes. The agency concluded that the relationship between chromium picolinate intake and insulin resistance is highly uncertain.

  17. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-08-01

    The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, "evidence-based practice" and, "primary health care" combined with other terms, such as, "beliefs", "knowledge", "implementation", and "integration". We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished studies using Google Scholar, ProQuest, Mednar, and World

  18. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Background The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. Objective This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). Methods We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, “evidence-based practice” and, “primary health care” combined with other terms, such as, “beliefs”, “knowledge”, “implementation”, and “integration”. We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished

  19. Industry and evidence-based medicine: Believable or conflicted? A systematic review of the surgical literature.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Chris S; Fehlings, Michael G; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Hall, Hamilton; Wai, Eugene K; Fisher, Charles G

    2011-10-01

    Over the last few decades medical research and development has come to depend more heavily on the financial support of industry. However, there is concern that financial relations between the medical community and medical industry could unduly influence medical research and therefore patient care. Our objective was to determine whether conflict of interest owing to authors'/investigators' financial affiliation with industry associated with their academic research has been identified in the surgical literature. In particular, we sought to answer the following questions: What is the extent of such conflict of interest? Does conflict of interest bias the results of academic surgical research in favour of industry? What are the potential causes of this proindustry bias? We conducted a systematic review of the literature in May 2008 using the OVID SP search engine of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE and Health Technology Assessment. Quantitative studies that included a methods section and reported on conflict of interest as a result of industry funding in surgery-related research specifically were included in our analysis. The search identified 190 studies that met our criteria. Author/investigator conflict of interest owing to financial affiliation with industry associated with their academic research is well documented in the surgical literature. Six studies demonstrated that authors with such conflicts of interest were significantly more likely to report a positive outcome than authors without industry funding, which demonstrates a proindustry bias. Two studies found that the proindustry bias could not be explained by variations in study quality or sample size. The conflict of interest that exists when surgical research is sponsored by industry is a genuine concern.

  20. What is the evidence base for public involvement in health-care policy?: results of a systematic scoping review.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Annalijn; Morris, Zoë; Nolte, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Public involvement in health-care policy has been advocated as a means to enhance health system responsiveness, yet evidence for its impact has been difficult to ascertain. To review the peer-reviewed empirical evidence on outcomes of public involvement in health-care policy. We systematically searched PsychINFO and PubMed from November 2000 to April 2010 for empirical studies that reported on original research only; studies in languages other than English, German or French were excluded. Data were extracted using a standardized evidence table with a priori determined headings. Nineteen studies were identified as eligible for inclusion in our review. We found that sound empirical evidence of the outcomes of public involvement activities in health care remains underdeveloped. The concept and the indicators used to examine and determine outcomes remain poorly specified and inconsistent, as does the reporting of the evidence. There was some evidence for the developmental role of public involvement, such as enhancing awareness, understanding and competencies among lay participants. Evidence for instrumental benefits of public involvement initiatives was less well documented. Despite the growing body of work on public involvement in health-care policy, evidence of its impact remains scarce; thus, firm conclusions about involvement activities that are appropriate and effective for policy development are difficult to draw. However, focus on outcomes risks missing the normative argument that involving the public in the health-care policy process may be seen to be of intrinsic value. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evidence-based treatments for children with trauma-related psychopathology as a result of childhood maltreatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leenarts, Laura E W; Diehle, Julia; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Jansma, Elise P; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    2013-05-01

    This is a systematic review of evidence-based treatments for children exposed to childhood maltreatment. Because exposure to childhood maltreatment has been associated with a broad range of trauma-related psychopathology (e.g., PTSD, anxiety, suicidal ideation, substance abuse) and with aggressive and violent behavior, this review describes psychotherapeutic treatments which focus on former broad range of psychopathological outcomes. A total of 26 randomized controlled clinical trials and seven non-randomized controlled clinical trials published between 2000 and 2012 satisfied the inclusionary criteria and were included. These studies dealt with various kinds of samples, from sexually abused and maltreated children in child psychiatric outpatient clinics or in foster care to traumatized incarcerated boys. A total of 27 studies evaluated psychotherapeutic treatments which used trauma-focused cognitive, behavioral or cognitive-behavioral techniques; only two studies evaluated trauma-specific treatments for children and adolescents with comorbid aggressive or violent behavior; and four studies evaluated psychotherapeutic treatments that predominantly focused on other mental health problems than PTSD and used non-trauma focused cognitive, behavioral or cognitive-behavioral techniques. The results of this review suggest that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) is the best-supported treatment for children following childhood maltreatment. However, in line with increased interest in the diagnosis of complex PTSD and given the likely relationship between childhood maltreatment and aggressive and violent behavior, the authors suggest that clinical practice should address a phase-oriented approach. This review concludes with a discussion of future research directions and limitations.

  2. A critical review of the literature and an evidence-based approach for life-threatening hemorrhage in maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Shachika; Dagum, Alexander B

    2012-10-01

    Life-threatening facial hemorrhage in Maxillofacial Surgery (MFS) has an approximate incidence of 1% in the trauma patient and in elective surgery. The treatment of acute life-threatening hemorrhage in MFS to prevent hypovolemic shock or airway obstruction forms the basis of emergency care and necessitates the need for further analysis given the multitude of options proposed for treatment. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to formulate an evidence-based approach to the treatment of life-threatening hemorrhage in MFS. A comprehensive search of journal articles was performed using PubMed and Ovid databases. Keywords and phrases used were "life threatening facial hemorrhage," "life threatening facial bleeding," "external carotid artery ligation," and "external carotid artery embolization." Our search yielded 1441 articles. In an attempt to focus on hemorrhage exclusively from traumatic and operative events, articles that cited hematological disorders as the underlying cause of bleeding were excluded from the study. There were 40 articles which met the full inclusion criteria and form the basis of this systematic review. The articles were rated based on the level of evidence. There was 1 Level II, 21 Level III, 12 Level IV, and 6 Level V papers. Seven Level III evidence-based studies noted a high association between midface injuries, particularly Lefort III fractures and massive oronasal hemorrhage. One Level II study, 8 Level III studies, and 3 Level IV studies concluded that the internal maxillary artery was most frequently associated with intractable posttraumatic hemorrhage. One Level II, 16 Level III, 3 Level IV, and 3 Level V articles cited anterior and posterior nasal packing and conservative measures as the first attempt to manage traumatic hemorrhage. Subsequently, 8 Level III studies re-enforced the importance of temporary reduction of facial fractures as an effective means to control massive hemorrhage early in the algorithm. Seven Level

  3. Flexitarian Diets and Health: A Review of the Evidence-Based Literature.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Emma J

    2016-01-01

    A flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet (SVD) is one that is primarily vegetarian with the occasional inclusion of meat or fish. Of late, there appears to be an increasing movement toward this practice. There has not been a recent update on these diets from a health perspective. Using the National Centre for Biotechnology Information PubMed database, a search was made for all studies published between 2000 and 2016 that met defined inclusion criteria. A total of 25 studies were located with 12 focusing on body weight and diet quality. There was emerging evidence suggestive of benefits for body weight, improved markers of metabolic health, blood pressure, and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. SVD may also have a role to play in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease. Given that there is a higher tendency for females to be flexitarian yet males are more likely to overconsume meat, there is a clear need to communicate the potential health benefits of these diets to males.

  4. Flexitarian Diets and Health: A Review of the Evidence-Based Literature

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Emma J.

    2017-01-01

    A flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet (SVD) is one that is primarily vegetarian with the occasional inclusion of meat or fish. Of late, there appears to be an increasing movement toward this practice. There has not been a recent update on these diets from a health perspective. Using the National Centre for Biotechnology Information PubMed database, a search was made for all studies published between 2000 and 2016 that met defined inclusion criteria. A total of 25 studies were located with 12 focusing on body weight and diet quality. There was emerging evidence suggestive of benefits for body weight, improved markers of metabolic health, blood pressure, and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. SVD may also have a role to play in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s disease. Given that there is a higher tendency for females to be flexitarian yet males are more likely to overconsume meat, there is a clear need to communicate the potential health benefits of these diets to males. PMID:28111625

  5. Progress toward pharmacotherapies for cannabis-use disorder: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Jan; Pokorski, Izabella

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used and variably regulated drug in the world, with increasing trends of use being reported in the US, Australia, Asia, and Africa. Evidence has shown a decrease in the age of commencement of cannabis use in some developed countries and a prolongation of risk of initiation to cannabis use beyond adolescence among more recent users. Cannabis use is associated with numerous health risks and long-term morbidity, as well as risk of developing cannabis-use disorders. Cannabis users infrequently seek professional treatment, and normally do so after a decade of use. Cannabis-use disorders are currently treated using a selection of psychosocial interventions. Severity of withdrawal is a factor that increases the risk of relapse, and is the target of pharmacotherapy studies. Currently, there is no approved pharmacotherapy for cannabis-use disorders. A number of approaches have been examined, and trials are continuing to find a safe and effective medication with little abuse liability. PMID:27217809

  6. Management of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Musahl, Volker; Cowan, James B

    2016-05-01

    Isolated injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament are uncommon, are often caused by a posteriorly directed force to the proximal tibia, and result in abnormal knee kinematics and function. A thorough clinical evaluation, including history, physical examination, and imaging, is required to rule out a concomitant structural knee injury. No clear prognostic factors predict outcomes, and ideal management remains uncertain. Nonsurgical management is advocated for isolated grade I or II posterior cruciate ligament injuries or for grade III injuries in patients with mild symptoms or low activity demands. Surgical management is reserved for high-demand athletes or patients in whom nonsurgical management has been unsuccessful. Although biomechanical studies have identified differences between single-bundle, double-bundle, transtibial, and tibial inlay reconstruction techniques, the optimal surgical technique has not been established. No high-quality evidence is available regarding immobilization, weight-bearing, bracing, or rehabilitation protocols for patients treated either nonsurgically or surgically. Additional long-term clinical studies with homogeneous patient populations are needed to identify the ideal management of these injuries.

  7. Sugammadex as a reversal agent for neuromuscular block: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Stefan Josef; Fink, Heidrun

    2013-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first clinical representative of a new class of drugs called selective relaxant binding agents. It has revolutionized the way anesthesiologists think about drug reversal. Sugammadex selectively binds rocuronium or vecuronium, thereby reversing their neuromuscular blocking action. Due to its 1:1 binding of rocuronium or vecuronium, it is able to reverse any depth of neuromuscular block. So far, it has been approved for use in adult patients and for pediatric patients over 2 years. Since its approval in Europe, Japan, and Australia, further insight on its use in special patient populations and specific diseases have become available. Due to its pharmacodynamic profile, sugammadex, in combination with rocuronium, may have the potential to displace succinylcholine as the “gold standard” muscle relaxant for rapid sequence induction. The use of rocuronium or vecuronium, with the potential of reverse of their action with sugammadex, seems to be safe in patients with impaired neuromuscular transmission, ie, neuromuscular diseases, including myasthenia gravis. Data from long-term use of sugammadex is not yet available. Evidence suggesting an economic advantage of using sugammadex and justifying its relatively high cost for an anesthesia-related drug, is missing. PMID:24098155

  8. The use of prisms for vision rehabilitation after macular function loss: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Samuel N; Reyes, Sophia V; Sheng, Li

    2013-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of prisms used for redirection of incoming images towards the peripheral retina in cases with macular function loss. Meta-analysis of published work reporting outcomes from interventions using prisms was performed. The primary outcome measure selected for analysis was visual acuity (VA) used for viewing distance targets. Pooled data from 449 cases where prisms were prescribed for wearing in distance glasses were analysed. Visual acuity was better after using prisms (1.05 versus 0.89 logMAR units, p < 0.044). Mean effect size for improving VA was 79 bigger than the effect size calculated for the control group (0.158 versus 0.002). Most patients (76%) reported compliance with the therapy and also reported other benefits directly derived from the realized VA improvement. Published studies collectively offer positive evidence in support of using prisms for low vision rehabilitation after macular function loss. Further research is required to reach definitive binding conclusions. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  9. [Evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Saad, E D; Grunspun, H

    1996-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has been described as a new approach to teaching and practicing clinical medicine. Although the search for evidence is an established practice among physicians, what is being proposed is the systematic gathering and critical interpretation of data, which can then be used in the appropriate context. The main objective is to provide better care for patients. This is accomplished by transforming clinical problems in specific questions to be answered by searching the literature for the levels of evidence favoring the possible interventions for one particular case. This has to be done in a systematic and conscientious fashion. Through its method, evidence-based medicine places less value on clinical experience, the study understanding of pathophysiology, and common sense; instead, it emphasizes observation, levels of evidence, and critical interpretation of original literature. In this manner, evidence-based medicine may be seen by the authoritarian physician as a threat. Other obstacles to the acceptance of the method include lack of time and lack of familiarity with computers. One important limitation of evidence-based medicine is the incomplete or contradictory evidence available in many areas of clinical medicine, or the so-called "grey zones". We outline the main aspects of evidence-based medicine, expecting a growing interest among brazilian physicians for this useful clinical tool.

  10. The Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments: A Review of Current Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing an urgent need for increased access to evidenced-based psychological treatments, public health authorities have recently allocated over $2 billion to better disseminate these interventions. In response, implementation of these programs has begun, some of it on a very large scale, with substantial implications for the science and…

  11. The Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments: A Review of Current Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing an urgent need for increased access to evidenced-based psychological treatments, public health authorities have recently allocated over $2 billion to better disseminate these interventions. In response, implementation of these programs has begun, some of it on a very large scale, with substantial implications for the science and…

  12. Nurse residency programs: an evidence-based review of theory, process, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwen; Hair, Carole; Todero, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nursing shortages exist worldwide while job stress, dissatisfaction, lack of peer support and limited professional opportunities still contribute to attrition. The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the quality of the science, report recommendations and lessons learned about implementing and evaluating nurse residency programs (NRPs) designed to improve new graduate transitioning. Databases were searched between 1980 and 2010 using five search terms: nurse, intern, extern, transition and residency programs. Twenty studies reporting programs for new RNs fit the inclusion criteria. Three major discoveries include: 1. Wide variation in content, teaching and learning strategies make comparison across programs difficult; 2. Lack of theory in designing the educational intervention has limited the selection and development of new instruments to measure program effectiveness; and 3. Well designed quasi-experimental studies are needed. As a major nursing education redesign, NRPs could be used to test the principles, concepts and strategies of organizational transformation and experiential-interactive learning theory. By focusing on fiscal outcomes, current administrators of NRPs are missing the opportunity to implement an organizational strategy that could improve workplace environments. Healthcare organizations need to envision NRPs as a demonstration of positive clinical learning environments that can enhance intra- and interprofessional education and practice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Management of high-risk Myeloma: an evidence-based review of treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Lehners, Nicola; Hayden, Patrick J; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Raab, Marc-Steffen

    2016-08-01

    Despite the progress made in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma over recent decades, a significant cohort with high-risk disease as defined by specific clinical and genetic criteria continue to respond poorly to standard treatment. These patients represent a particular challenge to the treating physician and require early identification as well as personalized treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss the prognostic impact of adverse clinical, radiological and genetic factors, evaluate available scoring systems and highlight key aspects of the therapeutic management of high-risk myeloma. MEDLINE and recent scientific meetings' databases were searched for the keywords 'high-risk' and 'multiple myeloma' and relevant studies relating to both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches were identified. Expert commentary: A case is made for intensive induction using combinations of novel agents, early high-dose therapy supported by autologous stem cell transplantation and the widespread use of maintenance therapies. Novel therapeutic options, especially in the field of immunotherapy, are currently explored in clinical trials and have the potential to further improve outcomes for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

  14. Interactions between drugs and drug-nutrient in enteral nutrition: a review based on evidences.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Silva, Renata; Rita Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) provides calories, macronutrients and micronutrients in adequate quantity and quality to meet the patient's needs. Some drugs when crushed and diluted may have their properties altered, including the reduction of bioavailability causing the reduction of the serum concentration of the drug; tube obstruction; drug-drug interaction or drug-nutrient interaction. The study was conducted through review of submitted articles in the databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL): MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, USA), Lilacs (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) PUBMED - NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and COCHRANE. For this survey, 42 articles were identified during database searching. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 08 articles were selected, obtained from the MEDLINE and Lilacs. Some interactions were found such as the aluminium hydroxide and lactulose with the enteral nutrition, which may result in a precipitation and reduction of drug bioavailability. Mineral oil will alter the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and reduces the tube light. Others results were found as phenytoin, warfarin, captopril and furosemide with enteral nutrition may reduce the maximum serum concentration. Drug interactions are more common in day-to-day activities than health professionals may suppose. Knowledge on the matter may also assist in reducing cases of obstruction of tubes, through which enteral nutrition and medications are administered. Thus, the multidisciplinary team, acting together, may have more beneficial effects to the patient. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Review of Select Practice Parameters, Evidence-Based Treatment Algorithms, and International Guidelines for Hereditary Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jaison; Zacharias, Jamie; Craig, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare bradykinin-mediated disease that is characterized by recurrent attacks of subcutaneous or submucosal edema, which can be life threatening. HAE affects all ethnic groups equally and does not differentiate between age, sex, or race. However, the availability of therapies varies amongst countries resulting in a lack of uniformity of care. Not only is there a disparity of medication availability, but since HAE is a rare disease, it is frequently overlooked and the diagnosis is missed. Even with diagnosis, treatment and management is often less than optimal. For these reasons, it is essential to have practice parameters and guidelines. In this chapter, we focus on recent guidelines. These guidelines deal with recognition, diagnosis, medical care, patient management, and assessment, all which are essential to provide optimal care to people with a rare and orphan disease. The intent of the guidelines, and thus this chapter, is to reduce morbidity and mortality, and restore a normal quality of life for the patient with HAE. We will review the guidelines from various regions of the world as well as international group recommendations. In addition, specific patient populations such as the pregnant, elderly, and juvenile require modified treatment regimens, and for this reason, we have included these data as well. The intent of this chapter is to aid the practitioner in holistic care of the patient with HAE in order to ultimately provide the best standard of care possible.

  16. The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seppi, Klaus; Weintraub, Daniel; Coelho, Miguel; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Fox, Susan H.; Katzenschlager, Regina; Hametner, Eva-Maria; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Goetz, Christopher G.; Sampaio, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force on Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Review of Treatments for Parkinson's Disease (PD) was first published in 2002 and was updated in 2005 to cover clinical trial data up to January 2004 with the focus on motor symptoms of PD. In this revised version the MDS task force decided it was necessary to extend the review to non-motor symptoms. The objective of this work was to update previous EBM reviews on treatments for PD with a focus on non-motor symptoms. Level-I (randomized controlled trial, RCT) reports of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for the non-motor symptoms of PD, published as full articles in English between January 2002 and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion and ranking followed the original program outline and adhered to EBM methodology. For efficacy conclusions, treatments were designated: efficacious, likely efficacious, unlikely efficacious, non-efficacious, or insufficient evidence. Safety data were catalogued and reviewed. Based on the combined efficacy and safety assessment, Implications for clinical practice were determined using the following designations: clinically useful, possibly useful, investigational, unlikely useful, and not useful. Fifty-four new studies qualified for efficacy review while several other studies covered safety issues. Updated and new efficacy conclusions were made for all indications. The treatments that are efficacious for the management of the different non-motor symptoms are as follows: pramipexole for the treatment of depressive symptoms, clozapine for the treatment of psychosis, rivastigmine for the treatment of dementia, and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and BTX-B as well as glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea. The practical implications for these treatments, except for glycopyrrolate, are that they are clinically useful. Since there is insufficient evidence of glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea exceeding 1 week, the

  17. Pancrelipase: an evidence-based review of its use for treating pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei; Oshida, Haruki; Muneyuki, Toshitaka; Kakei, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    2), and among elderly subjects. Finally, although there is currently limited clinical evidence, numerous extrapancreatic diseases and conditions that are highly prevalent in the general population may also be considered potential targets for PERT and related treatments.

  18. An evidence-based review of the genotoxic and reproductive effects of sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which is cytotoxic in nature, and at the molecular level, SM acts as DNA alkylating agent leading to genotoxic and reproductive effects. Mostly, the exposed areas of the body are the main targets for SM; however, it also adversely affects various tissues of the body and ultimately exhibits long-term complications including genotoxic and reproductive effects, even in the next generations. The effect of SM on reproductive system is the reason behind male infertility. The chronic genotoxic and reproductive complications of SM have been observed in the next generation, such as reproductive hormones disturbances, testicular atrophy, deficiency of sperm cells, retarded growth of sperm and male infertility. SM exerts toxic effects through various mechanisms causing reproductive dysfunction. The key mechanisms include DNA alkylation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) depletion. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such long-term effects of SM is still unclear. In general, DNA damage, cell death and defects in the cell membrane are frequently observed in SM-exposed individuals. SM can activate various cellular and molecular mechanisms related to oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory responses throughout the reproductive system, which can cause decreased spermatogenesis and impaired sperm quality via damage to tissue function and structure. Moreover, the toxic effects of SM on the reproductive system as well as the occurrence of male infertility among exposed war troopers in the late exposure phase is still uncertain. The chronic effects of SM exposure in parents can cause congenital defects in their children. In this review, we aimed to investigate chronic genotoxic and reproductive effects of SM and their molecular mechanisms in the next generations.

  19. Luliconazole for the treatment of fungal infections: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Deepshikha; Bharti, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Luliconazole is an imidazole antifungal agent with a unique structure, as the imidazole moiety is incorporated into the ketene dithioacetate structure. Luliconazole is the R-enantiomer, and has more potent antifungal activity than lanoconazole, which is a racemic mixture. In this review, we summarize the in vitro data, animal studies, and clinical trial data relating to the use of topical luliconazole. Preclinical studies have demonstrated excellent activity against dermatophytes. Further, in vitro/in vivo studies have also shown favorable activity against Candida albicans, Malassezia spp., and Aspergillus fumigatus. Luliconazole, although belonging to the azole group, has strong fungicidal activity against Trichophyton spp., similar to that of terbinafine. The strong clinical antifungal activity of luliconazole is possibly attributable to a combination of strong in vitro antifungal activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in the skin. Clinical trials have demonstrated its superiority over placebo in dermatophytosis, and its antifungal activity to be at par or even better than that of terbinafine. Application of luliconazole 1% cream once daily is effective even in short-term use (one week for tinea corporis/cruris and 2 weeks for tinea pedis). A Phase I/IIa study has shown excellent local tolerability and a lack of systemic side effects with use of topical luliconazole solution for onychomycosis. Further studies to evaluate its efficacy in onychomycosis are underway. Luliconazole 1% cream was approved in Japan in 2005 for the treatment of tinea infections. It has recently been approved by US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis. Topical luliconazole has a favorable safety profile, with only mild application site reactions reported occasionally. PMID:25285056

  20. Written action plans for asthma: an evidence-based review of the key components

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Powell, H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Written action plans for asthma facilitate the early detection and treatment of an asthma exacerbation. Several versions of action plans have been published but the key components have not been determined. A study was undertaken to determine the impact of individual components of written action plans on asthma health outcomes. Methods: Randomised controlled trials (n = 26) that evaluated asthma action plans as part of asthma self-management education were identified. Action plans were classified as being individualised and complete if they specified when and how to increase treatment (n = 17), and as incomplete (n = 4) or non-specific (n = 5) if they did not include these instructions. Results: For individualised complete written action plans the use of 2–4 action points and the use of both inhaled (ICS) and oral (OCS) corticosteroid consistently improved asthma outcomes. Action points based on personal best peak expiratory flow (PEF) consistently improved health outcomes while those based on percentage predicted PEF did not. The efficacy of incomplete action plans was inconclusive because of insufficient data. Non-specific action plans led to improvements in knowledge and symptoms. Conclusion: Individualised written action plans based on personal best PEF, using 2–4 action points, and recommending both ICS and OCS for treatment of exacerbations consistently improve asthma health outcomes. Other variations appear less beneficial or require further study. These observations provide a guide to the types of variations possible with written action plans, and strongly support the use of individualised complete written action plans. PMID:14760143

  1. A Guide to Writing a Qualitative Systematic Review Protocol to Enhance Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Health Care.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ashleigh; Hall, Helen; Copnell, Beverley

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative systematic review is a rapidly developing area of nursing research. In order to present trustworthy, high-quality recommendations, such reviews should be based on a review protocol to minimize bias and enhance transparency and reproducibility. Although there are a number of resources available to guide researchers in developing a quantitative review protocol, very few resources exist for qualitative reviews. To guide researchers through the process of developing a qualitative systematic review protocol, using an example review question. The key elements required in a systematic review protocol are discussed, with a focus on application to qualitative reviews: Development of a research question; formulation of key search terms and strategies; designing a multistage review process; critical appraisal of qualitative literature; development of data extraction techniques; and data synthesis. The paper highlights important considerations during the protocol development process, and uses a previously developed review question as a working example. This paper will assist novice researchers in developing a qualitative systematic review protocol. By providing a worked example of a protocol, the paper encourages the development of review protocols, enhancing the trustworthiness and value of the completed qualitative systematic review findings. Qualitative systematic reviews should be based on well planned, peer reviewed protocols to enhance the trustworthiness of results and thus their usefulness in clinical practice. Protocols should outline, in detail, the processes which will be used to undertake the review, including key search terms, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the methods used for critical appraisal, data extraction and data analysis to facilitate transparency of the review process. Additionally, journals should encourage and support the publication of review protocols, and should require reference to a protocol prior to publication of the

  2. Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Child and Adolescent Mental Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Novins, Douglas K.; Green, Amy E.; Legha, Rupinder K.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While there has been a dramatic increase in the number of evidence-based practices (EBPs) to improve child and adolescent mental health, the poor uptake of these EBPs has led to investigations of factors related to their successful dissemination and implementation. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify key findings from empirical studies examining the dissemination and implementation of EBPs for child and adolescent mental health. Method Out of 14,247 citations initially identified, 73 articles drawn from 44 studies met inclusion criteria. The articles were classified by implementation phase (exploration, preparation, implementation, and sustainment) and specific implementation factors examined. These factors were divided into outer (i.e., system level) and inner (i.e., organizational level) contexts. Results Few studies utilized true experimental designs; most were observational. Of the many inner context factors that were examined in these studies (e.g., provider characteristics, organizational resources, leadership), fidelity monitoring and supervision had the strongest empirical evidence. While the focus of fewer studies, implementation interventions focused on improving organizational climate and culture were associated with better intervention sustainment as well as child and adolescent outcomes. Outer contextual factors such as training and use of specific technologies to support intervention use were also important in facilitating the implementation process. Conclusions The further development and testing of dissemination and implementation strategies is needed in order to more efficiently move EBPs into usual care. PMID:24074468

  3. Timing for deep vein thrombosis chemoprophylaxis in traumatic brain injury: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Hiba; Dunham, C Michael; Malik, Rema J; Hileman, Barbara M

    2015-03-24

    Multiple studies have addressed deep vein thrombosis chemoprophylaxis timing in traumatic brain injuries. However, a precise time for safe and effective chemoprophylaxis is uncertain according to experts. A comprehensive literature review on brain injuries was performed to delineate temporal proportions for 1) spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) progression, 2) post-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion, and 3) post-chemoprophylaxis deep vein thrombosis. Twenty-three publications were found including more than 5,000 patients. Spontaneous ICH expansion at 24 hours was 14.8% in 1,437 patients from chemoprophylaxis studies and 29.9% in 1,257 patients not in chemoprophylaxis studies (P < 0.0001). With low-risk ICH (n = 136), 99% of spontaneous ICH expansion occurred within 48 hours. In moderate or high-risk ICH (n = 109), 18% of spontaneous ICH expansion occurred after day 3. If patients with pre-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion are included, the post-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion proportion was 5.6% in 1,258 patients with chemoprophylaxis on days 1 to 3 and was 1.5% in 401 with chemoprophylaxis after day 3 (P = 0.0116). If patients with pre-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion were excluded, the post-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion proportion was 3.1% in 1,570 patients with chemoprophylaxis on days 1 to 3 and was 2.8% in 582 with chemoprophylaxis after day 3 (P = 0.7769). In diffuse axonal injury (n = 188), the post-chemoprophylaxis ICH expansion proportion was 1.6% with chemoprophylaxis after day 3. The deep vein thrombosis proportions were as follows: chemoprophylaxis on days 1 to 3, 2.6% in 2,384 patients; chemoprophylaxis on days 4 or 5, 2.2% in 831; and chemoprophylaxis on day 8, 14.1% in 99 (P < 0.0001). Spontaneous ICH expansion proportions at 24 hours substantially vary between chemoprophylaxis and non-chemoprophylaxis studies. Chemoprophylaxis should not be given within 3 days of injury for moderate-risk or high-risk ICH. Chemoprophylaxis

  4. Instructional methods used by health sciences librarians to teach evidence-based practice (EBP): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Stephanie M; Dennison, Carolyn Ching; Farrell, Alison; Machel, Viola; Marton, Christine; O'Brien, Kelly K; Pannabecker, Virginia; Thuna, Mindy; Holyoke, Assako Nitta

    2016-07-01

    Librarians often teach evidence-based practice (EBP) within health sciences curricula. It is not known what teaching methods are most effective. A systematic review of the literature was conducted searching CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, LISTA, PubMed, Scopus, and others. Searches were completed through December 2014. No limits were applied. Hand searching of Medical Library Association annual meeting abstracts from 2009-2014 was also completed. Studies must be about EBP instruction by a librarian within undergraduate or graduate health sciences curricula and include skills assessment. Studies with no assessment, letters and comments, and veterinary education studies were excluded. Data extraction and critical appraisal were performed to determine the risk of bias of each study. Twenty-seven studies were included for analysis. Studies occurred in the United States (20), Canada (3), the United Kingdom (1), and Italy (1), with 22 in medicine and 5 in allied health. Teaching methods included lecture (20), small group or one-on-one instruction (16), computer lab practice (15), and online learning (6). Assessments were quizzes or tests, pretests and posttests, peer-review, search strategy evaluations, clinical scenario assignments, or a hybrid. Due to large variability across studies, meta-analysis was not conducted. Findings were weakly significant for positive change in search performance for most studies. Only one study compared teaching methods, and no one teaching method proved more effective. Future studies could conduct multisite interventions using randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trial study design and standardized assessment tools to measure outcomes.

  5. Role of Evidence-Based Reviews in Surgery in teaching critical appraisal skills and in journal clubs

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Negar; Dubois, Luc; McKenzie, Marg; Brown, Carl J.; MacLean, Anthony R.; McLeod, Robin S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-Based Reviews in Surgery (EBRS) is a program developed to teach critical appraisal skills to general surgeons and residents. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of EBRS by general surgery residents across Canada and to assess residents’ opinions regarding EBRS and journal clubs. Methods We surveyed postgraduate year 2–5 residents from 15 general surgery programs. Data are presented as percentages and means. Results A total of 231 residents (58%, mean 56% per program, range 0%–100%) responded: 172 (75%) residents indicated that they know about EBRS and that it is used in their programs. More than 75% of residents who use EBRS agreed or strongly agreed that the EBRS clinical and methodological articles and reviews are relevant. Only 55 residents (24%) indicated that they used EBRS online. Most residents (198 [86%]) attend journal clubs. The most common format is a mandatory meeting held at a special time every month with faculty members with epidemiological and clinical expertise. Residents stated that EBRS articles were used exclusively (13%) or in conjunction with other articles (57%) in their journal clubs. Most respondents (176 of 193 [91%]) stated that journal clubs are very or somewhat valuable to their education. Conclusion The EBRS program is widely used among general surgery residents across Canada. Although most residents who use EBRS rate it highly, a large proportion are unaware of EBRS online features. Thus, future efforts to increase awareness of EBRS online features and increase its accessibility are required. PMID:23883511

  6. Final year medical students' views on simulation-based teaching: a comparison with the Best Evidence Medical Education Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Paskins, Zoë; Peile, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is being increasingly used in medical education. The aim of this study was to explore in more depth the features of simulation-based teaching that undergraduate medical students value using the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) Systematic Review features that lead to effective learning as a framework. Thematic analysis of four semi-structured focus groups with final year medical students who had been taught acute care skills using a medium-fidelity whole-body simulator manikin (SimMan). Twelve key themes were identified, namely, feedback, integration into curriculum, learning style, learning environment, realism, teamwork, communication skills, confidence/increased self-efficacy, anxiety, performance, perceptions of foundation year 1 (FY1) and SimMan as a resource. Each theme is described with supporting quotes. Six of the ten features listed in the BEME review appeared to be of particular value to the medical students. This study provides a richer understanding of these features. In addition, new insights into the effect of simulation on confidence, anxiety and self-efficacy are discussed which may be affected by the 'performance' nature of simulation role-play. Students also contribute critical thought about the use of SimMan as a resource and provide novel ideas for reducing 'downtime'.

  7. Survey Instruments for Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes and Behaviour Related to Evidence-based Practice in Occupational Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Helen; Siegfried, Nandi; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, through a systematic review, assessment instruments for evidence-based practice (EBP). The specific objectives were to (1) identify survey instruments testing EBP knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour; (2) determine the attributes measured by each instrument; (3) evaluate the psychometric properties of the instruments; and (4) evaluate the methodological quality of the instruments. Using the Cochrane approach, searches were conducted in Pubmed, EBSCOHost and Scopus from inception to February 2014. Papers were screened by two independent assessors, and data were extracted by one researcher. Forty papers reporting 34 instruments met the inclusion criteria and were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most instruments measured EBP behaviour (n = 33) and attitudes (n = 21). This review provides a single source of information to enable researchers to select the most robust descriptive instruments to measure EBP learner attributes. Instruments used only with occupational therapists may have resulted in some instruments being missed. For further research, it is recommended that attention is given to developing objective instruments with a focus on knowledge and skills. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Current developments in natural orifices transluminal endoscopic surgery: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2010-01-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in recent years addressing the key obstacles to safe performance and introduction of human natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). Animal studies have focused on identifying optimal solutions to these obstacles, in particular methods of creating transluminal access, safe closure of the point of access, and development of a multitasking platform with dedicated instruments. Whether the performance data generated from these animal studies can be reproduced in humans has yet to be determined. Reports of human NOTES procedures are emerging, and the possibility of accomplishing human NOTES based on existing technology has been demonstrated. However, dedicated platforms and devices are still lacking to allow for pure NOTES procedures, and whether NOTES can deliver the postulated benefits of earlier recovery and improved cosmesis remains uncertain. PMID:20939107

  9. Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of Theoretical Assumptions and Effectiveness of Teaching and Assessment Interventions in Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Aliki; Saroyan, Alenoush; Dauphinee, W. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals are expected to use a systematic approach based on evidence, professional reasoning and client preferences in order to improve client outcomes. In other words, they are expected to work within an evidence-based practice (EBP) context. This expectation has had an impact on occupational therapy academic programs' mandates…

  10. A Squandered Opportunity?: A Review of SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices for Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Sheldon X.; Farabee, David

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the push for evidence-based programs has taken on unprecedented prominence in the fields of substance abuse and correctional treatment as a key determinant for intervention funding. The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), managed and funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services…

  11. Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of Theoretical Assumptions and Effectiveness of Teaching and Assessment Interventions in Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Aliki; Saroyan, Alenoush; Dauphinee, W. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals are expected to use a systematic approach based on evidence, professional reasoning and client preferences in order to improve client outcomes. In other words, they are expected to work within an evidence-based practice (EBP) context. This expectation has had an impact on occupational therapy academic programs' mandates…

  12. Family functioning in children and adolescents with spina bifida: an evidence-based review of research and interventions.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, Grayson N; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Coakley, Rachael Millstein; Greco, Joshua; Hagstrom, Jennifer

    2006-06-01

    Research on the adjustment of families of children with spina bifida is reviewed, with a focus on delineating the impact of spina bifida on family functioning, the strengths and weaknesses of past research, and the needs for future evidence-based research on family interventions with this population. PsychINFO and MEDLINE literature searches were used to identify studies of family functioning and family-based interventions for children with spina bifida. Identified studies were empirically evaluated for the presence or absence of key methodological or analytic criteria. Thirty-two studies of family functioning were identified from 25 separate research groups; most studies displayed significant methodological limitations. No published studies of interventions to promote adaptive family functioning were identified. Methodologically sound, longitudinal, and theory-driven studies of family functioning are needed, as are randomized family-based intervention trials to promote adaptive functioning and better psychosocial outcomes in families of children with spina bifida. Specific recommendations for future work as well as clinical implications are noted.

  13. Peripheral response to cervical or thoracic spinal manual therapy: an evidence-based review with meta analysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jennifer; Allen, Diane D; Pawlowsky, Sarah; Smoot, Betty

    2014-11-01

    Spinal manual therapy (SMT) is commonly used for treatment of musculoskeletal pain in the neck, upper back, or upper extremity. Some authors report a multi-system effect of SMT, including peripheral alterations in skin conductance and skin temperature, suggesting that SMT may initiate a sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response. The focus of this evidence-based review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the evidence of SNS responses and clinically relevant outcomes following SMT to the cervical or thoracic spine. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH USED THE TERMS: 'manual therapy', 'SMT', 'spinal manipulation', 'mobilization', 'SNS', 'autonomic nervous system', 'neurophysiology', 'hypoalgesia', 'pain pathophysiology', 'cervical vertebrae', 'thoracic vertebrae', 'upper extremity', and 'neurodynamic test'. Data were extracted and within-group and between-group effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of skin conductance, skin temperature, pain, and upper extremity range of motion (ROM) during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Eleven studies were identified. Statistically significant changes were seen with increased skin conductance, decreased skin temperature, decreased pain, and increased upper extremity ROM during ULNT. A mechanical stimulus at the cervical or thoracic spine can produce a SNS excitatory response (increased skin conductance and decreased skin temperature). Findings of reduced pain and increased ROM during ULNT provide support to the clinical relevance of SMT. This evidence points toward additional mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of SMT. The effect sizes are small to moderate and no long-term effects post-SMT were collected. Future research is needed to associate peripheral effects with a possible centrally-mediated response to SMT.

  14. Peripheral response to cervical or thoracic spinal manual therapy: an evidence-based review with meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jennifer; Allen, Diane D; Pawlowsky, Sarah; Smoot, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Spinal manual therapy (SMT) is commonly used for treatment of musculoskeletal pain in the neck, upper back, or upper extremity. Some authors report a multi-system effect of SMT, including peripheral alterations in skin conductance and skin temperature, suggesting that SMT may initiate a sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response. The focus of this evidence-based review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the evidence of SNS responses and clinically relevant outcomes following SMT to the cervical or thoracic spine. Methods: A systematic search used the terms: ‘manual therapy’, ‘SMT’, ‘spinal manipulation’, ‘mobilization’, ‘SNS’, ‘autonomic nervous system’, ‘neurophysiology’, ‘hypoalgesia’, ‘pain pathophysiology’, ‘cervical vertebrae’, ‘thoracic vertebrae’, ‘upper extremity’, and ‘neurodynamic test’. Data were extracted and within-group and between-group effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of skin conductance, skin temperature, pain, and upper extremity range of motion (ROM) during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Results: Eleven studies were identified. Statistically significant changes were seen with increased skin conductance, decreased skin temperature, decreased pain, and increased upper extremity ROM during ULNT. Discussion: A mechanical stimulus at the cervical or thoracic spine can produce a SNS excitatory response (increased skin conductance and decreased skin temperature). Findings of reduced pain and increased ROM during ULNT provide support to the clinical relevance of SMT. This evidence points toward additional mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of SMT. The effect sizes are small to moderate and no long-term effects post-SMT were collected. Future research is needed to associate peripheral effects with a possible centrally-mediated response to SMT. PMID:25395830

  15. Audit and review for evidence-based red cell wastage reduction measures.

    PubMed

    Smith, G A; Gopal-Patel, J; Joseph, J V; Hobson, A; Clarke, K

    2015-01-01

    Stocks of red blood cells (RBC) are held to ideally match supply and demand; hold too great a stock and unnecessary wastage occurs; too low a stock results in delay or lack of blood for the patient. Blood is a precious resource and its supply needs to be managed effectively. The aim was to identify how RBC units are wasted and propose laboratory-based reduction measures that would not compromise the clinical requirements of the patient. Wastage of RBC was investigated using a 'dashboard' query of a laboratory information management system. By employing service improvement tools, proposals were made to reduce unnecessary RBC waste while ensuring an adequate supply to the patient. The efficacy of those proposals was examined using the same dashboard to compare similar periods before and after their introduction. The reduction in RBC wastage for all groups during an eight month period (December to July) was from 6.4% (5.3% non-AB or B RhD-positive) pre-implementation to 4.4% (2.5% non-AB/B RhD-positive) post-implementation. Group O RhD-negative wastage reduced from 10.4% to 4.4% after introduction of waste-saving proposals. However, there was an increase in staff time required to introduce the changes and in associated Group and Screen testing (3.4 to 3.8 per unit issued). RBC wastage was significantly reduced (P<0.0001) by 32.8% (52%, non-AB/B RhD-positive), saving approximately 225 RBC units per annum. Financially, increased associated costs did not negate the savings made by the measures introduced.

  16. Role of tissue expansion in abdominal wall reconstruction: A systematic evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Kimberly E; Ozturk, Cemile Nurdan; Ozturk, Can; Laub, Peter; Aronoff, Nell; Gurunluoglu, Raffi

    2017-06-01

    Tissue expanders (TEs) can be used to assist primary closure of complicated hernias and large abdominal wall defects. However, there is no consensus regarding the optimal technique, use, or associated risk of TE in abdominal wall reconstruction. A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases was conducted to identify articles reporting abdominal wall reconstruction with TE techniques. English articles published between 1980 and 2016 were included on the basis of the following inclusion criteria: two-stage TE surgical technique, >3 cases, reporting of postoperative complications, hernia recurrence, and patient-based clinical data. Fourteen studies containing 103 patients (85 adults and 18 children) were identified for analysis. Most patients presented with a skin-grafted ventral hernia (n = 86). The etiology of the hernia was from trauma or prior abdominal surgery. The remaining patients had TE placed before organ transplantation (n = 12) or for congenital abdominal wall defects (n = 5). The location for expander placement was subcutaneous (n = 74), between the internal and external obliques (n = 26), posterior to the rectus sheath (n = 2), and intra-peritoneal (n = 1). Postoperative infections and implant-related problems were the most commonly reported complications after Stage I. The most common complication after Stage II was recurrent hernia, which was observed in 12 patients (11.7%). Five patients with TE died. Complications and mortality were more prevalent in children, immunosuppressed patients, and those with chronic illnesses. Tissue expansion for abdominal wall reconstruction can be successfully used for a variety of carefully selected patients with an acceptable complication and risk profile. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Designing Visual Aids That Promote Risk Literacy: A Systematic Review of Health Research and Evidence-Based Design Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Cokely, Edward T

    2017-06-01

    Background Effective risk communication is essential for informed decision making. Unfortunately, many people struggle to understand typical risk communications because they lack essential decision-making skills. Objective The aim of this study was to review the literature on the effect of numeracy on risk literacy, decision making, and health outcomes, and to evaluate the benefits of visual aids in risk communication. Method We present a conceptual framework describing the influence of numeracy on risk literacy, decision making, and health outcomes, followed by a systematic review of the benefits of visual aids in risk communication for people with different levels of numeracy and graph literacy. The systematic review covers scientific research published between January 1995 and April 2016, drawn from the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, Medline, and Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria were investigation of the effect of numeracy and/or graph literacy, and investigation of the effect of visual aids or comparison of their effect with that of numerical information. Thirty-six publications met the criteria, providing data on 27,885 diverse participants from 60 countries. Results Transparent visual aids robustly improved risk understanding in diverse individuals by encouraging thorough deliberation, enhancing cognitive self-assessment, and reducing conceptual biases in memory. Improvements in risk understanding consistently produced beneficial changes in attitudes, behavioral intentions, trust, and healthy behaviors. Visual aids were found to be particularly beneficial for vulnerable and less skilled individuals. Conclusion Well-designed visual aids tend to be highly effective tools for improving informed decision making among diverse decision makers. We identify five categories of practical, evidence-based guidelines for heuristic evaluation and design of effective visual aids.

  18. Everolimus in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Leonetti, Alessandro; Dallatomasina, Alice; Bersanelli, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, and its pathogenesis is strictly related to altered cellular response to hypoxia, in which mTOR signaling pathway is implicated. Everolimus, an mTOR serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, represents a therapeutic option for the treatment of advanced RCC. Aim The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of metastatic RCC with everolimus. Evidence review Everolimus was approved for second- and third-line therapy in patients with advanced RCC according to the results of a Phase III pivotal trial that demonstrated a benefit in median progression-free survival of ~2 months compared to placebo after failure of previous lines of therapy, of which at least one was an anti-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The role of this drug in first-line setting has been investigated in Phase II trials, with no significant clinical benefit, even in combination with bevacizumab. Everolimus activity in non-clear cell RCC is supported by two randomized Phase II trials that confirmed the benefit in second-line setting but not in first line. Recently, two randomized Phase III trials (METEOR and CheckMate 025) demonstrated the inferiority of everolimus in second-line setting compared to the TKI cabozantinib and to the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, respectively. Moreover, a recent Phase II study demonstrated a significant benefit for the second-line combination treatment with everolimus plus lenvatinib (a novel TKI) in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the single-agent everolimus. Basing on preclinical data, the main downstream effectors of mTOR cascade, S6RP and its phosphorylated form, could be good predictive biomarkers of response to everolimus. The safety profile of the drug is favorable, with a good cost-effectiveness compared to second-line sorafenib or axitinib, and no significant impact on the quality of life of treated

  19. Evidence-based medicine training in undergraduate medical education: a review and critique of the literature published 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Tannery, Nancy H; Chen, H Carrie; ten Cate, Olle; O'Brien, Bridget

    2013-07-01

    To characterize recent evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational interventions for medical students and suggest future directions for EBM education. The authors searched the MEDLINE, Scopus, Educational Resource Information Center, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews databases for English-language articles published between 2006 and 2011 that featured medical students and interventions addressing multiple EBM skills. They extracted data on learner and instructor characteristics, educational settings, teaching methods, and EBM skills covered. The 20 included articles described interventions delivered in 12 countries in classroom (75%), clinic (25%), and/or online (20%) environments. The majority (60%) focused on clinical students, whereas 30% targeted preclinical students and 10% included both. EBM skills addressed included recognizing a knowledge gap (20%), asking a clinical question (90%), searching for information (90%), appraising information (85%), applying information (65%), and evaluating practice change (5%). Physicians were most often identified as instructors (60%); co-teachers included librarians (20%), allied health professionals (10%), and faculty from other disciplines (10%). Many studies (60%) included interventions at multiple points during one year, but none were longitudinal across students' tenures. Teaching methods varied. Intervention efficacy could not be determined. Settings, learner levels and instructors, teaching methods, and covered skills differed across interventions. Authors writing about EBM interventions should include detailed descriptions and employ more rigorous research methods to allow others to draw conclusions about efficacy. When designing EBM interventions, educators should consider trends in medical education (e.g., online learning, interprofessional education) and in health care (e.g., patient-centered care, electronic health records).

  20. Student and educator experiences of maternal-child simulation-based learning: a systematic review of qualitative evidence protocol.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Karen; Marcellus, Lenora; Rivers, Julie; Gordon, Carol; Ryan, Maureen; Butcher, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this systematic review is to identify the appropriateness and meaningfulness of maternal-child simulation-based learning for undergraduate or pre-registration nursing students in educational settings to inform curriculum decision-making.1. What are the experiences of nursing or health professional students participating in undergraduate or pre-licensure maternal-child simulation-based learning in educational settings?2. What are the experiences of educators participating in undergraduate or pre-licensure maternal-child simulation-based learning in educational settings?3. What teaching and learning practices in maternal-child simulation-based learning are considered appropriate and meaningful by students and educators? Maternal-child care is one of the pillars of primary health care. Health promotion and illness/ injury prevention begin in the preconception period and continue through pregnancy, birth, the postpartum period and the childrearing years. Thus, lifelong wellness is promoted across the continuum of perinatal and pediatric care which influences family health and early child development. Registered nurses (RNs) are expected to have the knowledge and skills needed to provide evidence-based nursing with childbearing and child-rearing families to promote health and address health inequities in many settings, including inner city, rural, northern, indigenous and global communities. The Canadian Maternity Experiences survey and the Report by the Advisor on Healthy Children and Youth provide information on current shortages of perinatal and child health care providers and stress the importance of the role of nurses as providers of rural and remote care. From a global health perspective, continued concern with both perinatal and child health morbidities and mortalities highlight the importance of maintaining and strengthening the presence of maternal and child health learning opportunities within undergraduate nursing curriculum.Despite this

  1. Identification of Evidence-Based Interventions for Promoting HIV Medication Adherence: Findings from a Systematic Review of U.S.-Based Studies, 1996–2011

    PubMed Central

    Charania, Mahnaz R.; Marshall, Khiya J.; Crepaz, Nicole; Kay, Linda S.; Koenig, Linda J.; Weidle, Paul J.; Purcell, David W.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for increasing HIV medication adherence behavior or decreasing HIV viral load among persons living with HIV (PLWH). We conducted automated searches of electronic databases (i.e., MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL) and manual searches of journals, reference lists, and listservs. Interventions were eligible for the review if they were U.S.-based, published between 1996 and 2011, intended to improve HIV medication adherence behaviors of PLWH, evaluated the intervention using a comparison group, and reported outcome data on adherence behaviors or HIV viral load. Each intervention was evaluated on the quality of study design, implementation, analysis, and strength of findings. Of the 65 eligible interventions, 10 are EBIs. The remaining 55 interventions failed to meet the efficacy criteria primarily due to null findings, small sample sizes, or low retention rates. Research gaps and future directions for development of adherence EBIs are discussed. PMID:24043269

  2. How to prepare a systematic review of economic evaluations for informing evidence-based healthcare decisions: a five-step approach (part 1/3).

    PubMed

    van Mastrigt, Ghislaine A P G; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Arts, Jacobus J C; Broos, Pieter H; Kleijnen, Jos; Evers, Silvia M A A; Majoie, Marian H J M

    2016-12-01

    Systematic reviews of economic evaluations are useful for synthesizing economic evidence about health interventions and for informing evidence-based decisions. Areas covered: As there is no detailed description of the methods for performing a systematic review of economic evidence, this paper aims to provide an overview of state-of-the-art methodology. This is laid out in a 5-step approach, as follows: step 1) initiating a systematic review; step 2) identifying (full) economic evaluations; step 3) data extraction, risk of bias and transferability assessment; step 4) reporting results; step 5) discussion and interpretation of findings. Expert commentary: The paper aims to help inexperienced reviewers and clinical practice guideline developers, but also to be a resource for experts in the field who want to check on current methodological developments.

  3. Canagliflozin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Thomas; Bekiari, Eleni; Tsapas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Deciding on an optimal medication choice for type 2 diabetes is often challenging, due to the increasing number of treatment options. Canagliflozin is a novel glucose-lowering agent belonging to sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Aim The aim of this study was to examine and summarize the evidence based on the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin for type 2 diabetes. Evidence review Compared to placebo, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by ~0.6%–0.8%, respectively. Canagliflozin appears to be slightly more effective than dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in reducing HbA1c. It also has a favorable effect on body weight and blood pressure, both versus placebo and most active comparators. However, treatment with canagliflozin is associated with increased incidence of genital tract infections and osmotic diuresis-related adverse events. Based on short-term data, canagliflozin is not associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. Economic evaluation studies from various countries indicate that canagliflozin is a cost-effective option in dual- or triple-agent regimens. Place in therapy As monotherapy, canagliflozin could be used in patients for whom metformin is contraindicated or not tolerated. For patients on background treatment with metformin, canagliflozin appears to be superior to sulfonylureas with respect to body weight, blood pressure and risk for hypoglycemia, and to DPP-4 inhibitors in terms of lowering HbA1c, body weight, and blood pressure. Canagliflozin also seems to be cost-effective compared with sulfonylureas and DPP-4 inhibitors as add-on to metformin monotherapy, and compared with DPP-4 inhibitors as add-on to metformin and sulfonylurea. Conclusion Current evidence on intermediate efficacy outcomes, short-term safety and cost-effectiveness support the use of canagliflozin in patients on background treatment with metformin

  4. Is early feeding after major gastrointestinal surgery a fashion or an advance? Evidence-based review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shetty, Guruprasad S; Singh, Kailash; Ingle, Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Early enteral nutrition (EN) after major digestive surgery has been receiving increasing attention. Supporting evidence has not been clear. This evidence-based review traces the development of early EN and analyses whether it is indeed an advance. We performed a PubMed search in October 2009 with the key words enteral nutrition, early feeding, and gastrointestinal surgery. Our emphasis was on earliest studies documenting the benefits or adverse effects of EN, comparative studies, documenting the benefits or adverse effects of EN, comparative studies, and randomized controlled trials. Thirty-one results were returned from which 17 were included for evaluation (1979-2009). Fifteen papers concluded that early EN was beneficial. In general, patients put on early EN and immunonutrition postoperatively seemed to have decreased hospital stay, decreased complication rates, decreased treatment and hospital costs, and even decreased morbidity and mortality; however, judicious use has been suggested. One study did not recommend early enteral feeding in well-nourished patients at low risk of nutrition-related complications and another suggested that immunonutrition is not beneficial and should not be used routinely. Early EN has been safely given after major digestive surgery since 1979. It benefits patients undergoing major gastrointestinal (GI) surgeries, with reduction in perioperative infection, better maintainance of nitrogen balance, and shorter hospital stay. Early EN may be superior to total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, TPN is perhaps better tolerated in the immediate postoperative period. Early enteral immunonutrition should be used only in malnourished and in transfused patients. Early EN after major digestive surgery is an old advance that is now in fashion.

  5. The Navigation Guide - evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: systematic review of human evidence for PFOA effects on fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paula I; Sutton, Patrice; Atchley, Dylan S; Koustas, Erica; Lam, Juleen; Sen, Saunak; Robinson, Karen A; Axelrad, Daniel A; Woodruff, Tracey J

    2014-10-01

    The Navigation Guide methodology was developed to meet the need for a robust method of systematic and transparent research synthesis in environmental health science. We conducted a case study systematic review to support proof of concept of the method. We applied the Navigation Guide systematic review methodology to determine whether developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affects fetal growth in humans. We applied the first 3 steps of the Navigation Guide methodology to human epidemiological data: 1) specify the study question, 2) select the evidence, and 3) rate the quality and strength of the evidence. We developed a protocol, conducted a comprehensive search of the literature, and identified relevant studies using prespecified criteria. We evaluated each study for risk of bias and conducted meta-analyses on a subset of studies. We rated quality and strength of the entire body of human evidence. We identified 18 human studies that met our inclusion criteria, and 9 of these were combined through meta-analysis. Through meta-analysis, we estimated that a 1-ng/mL increase in serum or plasma PFOA was associated with a -18.9 g (95% CI: -29.8, -7.9) difference in birth weight. We concluded that the risk of bias across studies was low, and we assigned a "moderate" quality rating to the overall body of human evidence. On the basis of this first application of the Navigation Guide systematic review methodology, we concluded that there is "sufficient" human evidence that developmental exposure to PFOA reduces fetal growth.

  6. Metamizole/dipyrone for the relief of cancer pain: A systematic review and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Jan; Stamer, Ulrike M; Remi, Constanze; Voltz, Raymond; Bausewein, Claudia; Sabatowski, Rainer; Wirz, Stefan; Müller-Mundt, Gabriele; Simon, Steffen T; Pralong, Anne; Nauck, Friedemann; Follmann, Markus; Radbruch, Lukas; Meißner, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Dipyrone (metamizole) is one of the most widely used non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of cancer pain. Because evidence-based recommendations are not yet available, a systematic review was conducted for the German Guideline Program in Oncology to provide recommendations for the use of dipyrone in cancer pain. First, a systematic review for clinical trials assessing dipyrone in adult patients with cancer pain was conducted. Endpoints were pain intensity, opioid-sparing effects, safety, and quality of life. The search was performed in MedLine, Embase (via Ovid), and the Cochrane Library (1948-2013) and additional hand search was conducted. Finally, recommendations were developed and agreed in a formal structured consensus process by 53 representatives of scientific medical societies and 49 experts. Of 177 retrieved studies, 4 could be included (3 randomized controlled trials and 1 cohort study, n = 252 patients): dipyrone significantly decreased pain intensity compared to placebo, even if low doses (1.5-2 g/day) were used. Higher doses (3 × 2 g/day) were more effective than low doses (3 × 1 g/day), but equally effective as 60 mg oral morphine/day. Pain reduction of dipyrone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not differ significantly. Compared to placebo, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and morphine, the incidence of adverse effects was not increased. Dipyrone can be recommended for the treatment of cancer pain as an alternative to other non-opioids either alone or in combination with opioids. It can be preferred over non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs due to the presumably favorable side effect profile in long-term use, but comparative studies are not available for long-term use.

  7. Instructional methods used by health sciences librarians to teach evidence-based practice (EBP): a systematic review*†‡

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Dennison, Carolyn Ching; Farrell, Alison; Machel, Viola; Marton, Christine; O'Brien, Kelly K.; Pannabecker, Virginia; Thuna, Mindy; Holyoke, Assako Nitta

    2016-01-01

    Background Librarians often teach evidence-based practice (EBP) within health sciences curricula. It is not known what teaching methods are most effective. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted searching CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, LISTA, PubMed, Scopus, and others. Searches were completed through December 2014. No limits were applied. Hand searching of Medical Library Association annual meeting abstracts from 2009–2014 was also completed. Studies must be about EBP instruction by a librarian within undergraduate or graduate health sciences curricula and include skills assessment. Studies with no assessment, letters and comments, and veterinary education studies were excluded. Data extraction and critical appraisal were performed to determine the risk of bias of each study. Results Twenty-seven studies were included for analysis. Studies occurred in the United States (20), Canada (3), the United Kingdom (1), and Italy (1), with 22 in medicine and 5 in allied health. Teaching methods included lecture (20), small group or one-on-one instruction (16), computer lab practice (15), and online learning (6). Assessments were quizzes or tests, pretests and posttests, peer-review, search strategy evaluations, clinical scenario assignments, or a hybrid. Due to large variability across studies, meta-analysis was not conducted. Discussion Findings were weakly significant for positive change in search performance for most studies. Only one study compared teaching methods, and no one teaching method proved more effective. Future studies could conduct multisite interventions using randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trial study design and standardized assessment tools to measure outcomes. PMID:27366120

  8. Evidence-based use of electronic clinical tracking systems in advanced practice registered nurse education: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, M Laurie; Smith, Lynette S; Brooks, Andrea F

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, the federal government has mandated healthcare providers to incorporate electronic health records into practice by 2015. This technological update in healthcare documentation has generated a need for advanced practice RN programs to incorporate information technology into education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties created core competencies to guide program standards for advanced practice RN education. One core competency is Technology and Information Literacy. Educational programs are moving toward the utilization of electronic clinical tracking systems to capture students' clinical encounter data. The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate current research on advanced practice RN students' documentation of clinical encounters utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems to meet advanced practice RN curriculum outcome goals in information technology as defined by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. The state of the science depicts student' and faculty attitudes, preferences, opinions, and data collections of students' clinical encounters. Although electronic clinical tracking systems were utilized to track students' clinical encounters, these systems have not been evaluated for meeting information technology core competency standards. Educational programs are utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems with limited evidence-based literature evaluating the ability of these systems to meet the core competencies in advanced practice RN programs.

  9. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M.; Sauers, Eric L.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M.; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret (Peg); Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Hartman, Linda M.; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. Included Professions: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Approach: Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. Conclusions: EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession. PMID:17971887

  10. [Evidence-based physiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bender, Tamás

    2013-12-01

    This article on physiotherapy presents some current evidence stating the strengths and weaknesses of