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Sample records for evidence-based nursing

  1. Historical perspectives on evidence-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Beyea, Suzanne C; Slattery, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The authors of this article offer a review and historical perspective on research utilization and evidence-based practice in nursing. They present the evolution of research utilization to the more contemporary framework of evidence-based nursing practice. The authors address the role of qualitative research in the context of evidence-based practice. Finally, some approaches and resources for learning more about the fundamentals of evidence-based healthcare are provided.

  2. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  3. [A new vision of nursing: the evolution and development of evidence-based nursing].

    PubMed

    Chiang, Li-Chi

    2014-08-01

    The concept and principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM), first introduced in 1996 in the UK and Canada, have greatly impacted healthcare worldwide. Evidence-based care is a new approach to healthcare that works to reduce the gap between evidence and practice in order to further the scientific credentials and practices of the nursing profession. The revolution in healthcare has perhaps most noticeably impacted the nursing sciences. Today, new methodologies are increasingly synthesizing knowledge, while expanded access to publication resources is creating a new era in evidence-based nursing. Therefore, we expect to see in Taiwan the increased sharing of innovative implementations of evidence-based nursing practice and promotion campaigns and the exploration of a new evidence-based nursing paradigm for incorporating evidence-based concepts into the policymaking process, nursing practice, and nursing education. All scientists in clinical care, education, and research are responsible to establish scientific nursing knowledge in support of the evidence-based nursing practice.

  4. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  5. Beyond evidence-based nursing: tools for practice.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2008-05-01

    This commentary shares my views of evidence-based nursing as a framework for practice, pointing out its limitations and identifying a wider base of appraisal tools required for making good clinical decisions. As the principles of evidence-based nursing take an increasingly greater hold on nursing education, policy and management, it is important to consider the range of other decision-making tools which are subordinated by this approach. This article summarizes nursing's simultaneous reliance on and critique of evidence-based practice (EBP) in a context of inadequate critical reasoning. It then provides an exemplar of the limitations of evidence-based practice and offers an alternative view of important precepts of decision-making. I identify means by which nurses can develop skills to engage in informed and robust critique of practices and their underpinning rationale. Nurses need to be able to locate and assess useful and reliable information for decision-making. This skill is based on a range of tools which include, but also go beyond EBP including: information literacy, humanities, social sciences, public health, statistics, marketing, ethics and much more. This essay prompts nursing managers to reflect upon whether a flurried enthusiasm to adopt EBP neglects other important decision-making skills which provide an even stronger foundation for robust nursing decisions.

  6. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An information technology infrastructure to enable evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Pochciol, Joan M; Warren, Joan I

    2009-01-01

    The movement toward evidence-based practice (EBP) poses new organizational challenges to provide the necessary infrastructure to promote effective nursing interventions based on the best available evidence. The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort between nursing and library services to provide readily accessible information at the bedside to support nurses using the best available evidence. In collaboration with nursing, the Health Services Librarian created an information resource titled "Research-based Nursing Practice: Finding the Evidence," which enables nursing staff to access the resources at the bedside without having to perform lengthy searches. Every known resource that will educate nurses in defining EBP to providing them with the links to Web sites, published articles, and all the information resources is included in the tool. Much has been written about building the organizational infrastructure to promote EBP and finding the filtered, synthesized research evidence, but to our knowledge, little has been published on building the information technology infrastructure, which will give nurses real-time access at the point-of-care to the research evidence. The research-based nursing practice system is helping bridge the gap between evidence-based resources and practice by compiling the literature in one place and making it easily and readily accessible.

  9. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Nursing Pain Management Practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. Aims This study aimed to (a) modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and (b) describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via electronic medical system. Design and Setting A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Methods Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May of 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. Results The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. Conclusions The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  10. Synthesis of qualitative research and evidence-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Kate

    Evidence-based nursing is central to nursing practice. Systematic reviews have played a key part in providing evidence for decision making in nursing. Traditionally, these have consisted of syntheses of randomised controlled trials. New approaches to combining research include the synthesis of qualitative research. This article discusses the development of research synthesis as a method for creating evidence of effectiveness identified in quantitative research; more effective use of primary data; enhancing the generalizability of qualitative research; the identification of future nursing research topics.

  11. The History of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mackey, April; Bassendowski, Sandra

    Beginning with Florence Nightingale in the 1800s and evolving again within the medical community, evidence-based practice continues to advance along with the nursing discipline. Evidence-based practice is foundational to undergraduate and graduate nursing education and is a way for the nursing discipline to minimize the theory to practice gap. This article discusses the concept of evidence-based practice from a historical perspective as it relates to nursing in the educational and practice domains. The concept evidence-based practice is defined, and the similarities and differences to evidence-based medicine are discussed. It is crucial that registered nurses be proactive in their quest for research knowledge, so the gap between theory and practice continues to close. Utilizing nursing best practice guidelines, reviewing and implementing applicable research evidence, and taking advantage of technological advances are all ways in which nursing can move forward as a well-informed discipline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses working in community settings and their strategies to mentor student nurses to develop evidence-based practice: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne Mary; Mallion, Jaimee

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how community nurses apply the best available evidence to their practice, and how they mentor student nurses to conceptualize and implement evidence-based practice in community settings. In the UK, the expansion of health-care provision in the community has supported the development of highly skilled community nurses. However, there is limited literature regarding the strategies used by community nurses to implement evidence-based practice and mentor student nurses to conceptualize evidence-based practice in community placements. An exploratory qualitative approach applying inductive reasoning to focus group data was used. As a result, nurses working for a community NHS Foundation Trust in South England with a mentor qualification were invited to participate in one of the seven focus groups, 33 nurses participated. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. The themes discussed in this paper are: 'our practice is evidence-based' as guidelines and policies provided structure, but occasionally stifled autonomous clinical decision-making, and 'time' as a barrier and facilitator to mentoring student nurses in community settings. In conclusion, nurses need to develop the ability to incorporate patients' needs and wishes within evidence-based care. Time was a facilitator for some community mentors, but protected time is required to complete the necessary practice documentation of student nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice at Finnish university hospitals: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Hannele; Stevens, Kathleen R; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice at Finnish university hospitals. Although systematic implementation of evidence-based practice is essential to effectively improving patient outcomes and value of care, nurses do not consistently use evidence in practice. Uptake is hampered by lack of nurses' individual and organizational readiness for evidence-based practice. Although nurses' evidence-based practice competencies have been widely studied in countries leading the evidence-based practice movement, less is known about nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice in the non-English-speaking world. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design. The study was conducted in November-December 2014 in every university hospital in Finland with a convenience sample (n = 943) of practicing nurses. The electronic survey data were collected using the Stevens' Evidence-Based Practice Readiness Inventory, which was translated into Finnish according to standardized guidelines for translation of research instruments. The data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Nurses reported low to moderate levels of self-efficacy and low levels of evidence-based practice knowledge. A statistically significant, direct correlation was found between nurses' self-efficacy in employing evidence-based practice and their actual evidence-based practice knowledge level. Several statistically significant differences were found between nurses' socio-demographic variables and nurses' self-efficacy in employing evidence-based practice, and actual and perceived evidence-based practice knowledge. Finnish nurses at university hospitals are not ready for evidence-based practice. Although nurses are familiar with the concept of evidence-based practice, they lack the evidence-based practice knowledge and self-efficacy in employing evidence-based practice required for integrating best evidence into clinical care delivery. © 2016 John Wiley

  14. A Quantitative Analysis of Evidence-Based Testing Practices in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is evidence-based testing practices in nursing education. Specifically, this research study explored the implementation of evidence-based testing practices between nursing faculty of various experience levels. While the significance of evidence-based testing in nursing education is well documented, little is known…

  15. Information literacy for evidence-based practice in perianesthesia nurses: readiness for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jacqueline

    2010-04-01

    Information literacy, the recognition of information required, and the development of skills for locating, evaluating, and effectively using relevant evidence is needed for evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this study was to examine perianesthesia nurses' perception of searching skills and access to evidence sources. The design was a descriptive, exploratory survey. The sample consisted of ASPAN members (n = 64) and nonmembers (n = 64). The Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice instrument was used. Findings were that ASPAN members read more journal articles, were more proficient with computers, and used Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) more frequently than nonmembers. The three top barriers to use of research were: lack of understanding of organization or structure of electronic databases, lack of skills to critique and/or synthesize the literature, and difficulty in accessing research materials. In conclusion, education is needed for critiquing literature and understanding electronic databases and research articles to promote EBP in perianesthesia areas. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The state of readiness for evidence-based practice among nurses: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Hannele; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-04-01

    To review factors related to nurses' individual readiness for evidence-based practice and to determine the current state of nurses' evidence-based practice competencies. An integrative review study. Thirty-seven (37) primary research studies on nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice, of which 30 were descriptive cross-sectional surveys, 5 were pretest-posttest studies, and one study each was an experimental pilot study and a descriptive qualitative study. Included studies were published from the beginning of 2004 through end of January 2015. The integrative review study used thematic synthesis, in which the quantitative studies were analyzed deductively and the qualitative studies inductively. Outcomes related to nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice were grouped according to the four main themes that emerged from the thematic synthesis: (1) nurses' familiarity with evidence-based practice (EBP); (2) nurses' attitudes toward and beliefs about evidence-based practice; (3) nurses' evidence-based practice knowledge and skills; and (4) nurses' use of research in practice. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated with Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools. Although nurses were familiar with, had positive attitudes toward, and believed in the value of EBP in improving care quality and patient outcomes, they perceived their own evidence-based practice knowledge and skills insufficient for employing evidence-based practice, and did not use best evidence in practice. The vast majority (81%) of included studies were descriptive cross-sectional surveys, 84% used a non-probability sampling method, sample sizes were small, and response rates low. Most included studies were of modest quality. More robust, theoretically-based and psychometrically sound nursing research studies are needed to test and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to advance nurses' evidence-based practice competencies, especially teaching them

  17. Determining registered nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Linda; Ghosh, Yashowanto

    2008-01-01

    As health care systems worldwide move toward instituting evidence-based practice (EBP), its implementation can be challenging. Conducting a baseline assessment to determine nurses' readiness for EBP presents opportunities to plan strategies before implementation. Although a growing body of research literature is focused on implementing EBP, little attention has been paid to assessing nurses' readiness for EBP. The purpose of this study was to assess registered nurses' readiness for EBP in a moderate-sized acute care hospital in the Midwestern United States before implementation of a hospital-wide nursing EBP initiative. A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was used; 121 registered nurses completed the survey. The participants (n= 121) completed the 64-item Nurses' Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice Survey that allowed measurement of information needs, knowledge and skills, culture, and attitudes. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a post hoc analysis. The majority (72.5%) of respondents indicated that when they needed information, they consulted colleagues and peers rather than using journals and books; 24% of nurses surveyed used the health database, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The respondents perceived their EBP knowledge level as moderate. Cultural EBP scores were moderate, with unit scores being higher than organizational scores. The nurses' attitudes toward EBP were positive. The post hoc analysis showed many significant correlations. Nurses have access to technological resources and perceive that they have the ability to engage in basic information gathering but not in higher level evidence gathering. The elements important to EBP such as a workplace culture and positive attitudes are present and can be built upon. A "site-specific" baseline assessment provides direction in planning EBP initiatives. The Nurses' Readiness for EBP Survey is a streamlined tool with established reliability and

  18. Evidence-based policy: implications for nursing and policy involvement.

    PubMed

    Hewison, Alistair

    2008-11-01

    Evidence-based policy making is espoused as a central feature of government in the United Kingdom. However, an expectation that this will improve the quality of policy produced and provide a path to increased involvement of nurses in the policy process is misplaced. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that the emphasis on evidence-based policy is problematic and cannot be regarded as a "new model" of policy making. Also, it could deflect attention from more practical approaches to policy involvement on the part of nurses. Policy development activities, acquisition of skills in policy analysis, and other forms of involvement are needed if nurses are to move along the continuum from policy literacy, through policy acumen, to policy competence. This involves taking a critical stance on the notion of evidence-based policy.

  19. Taking Root: a grounded theory on evidence-based nursing implementation in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Broome, M E; Feng, S; Hu, Y

    2018-06-01

    Evidence-based nursing is widely recognized as the critical foundation for quality care. To develop a middle-range theory on the process of evidence-based nursing implementation in Chinese context. A grounded theory study using unstructured in-depth individual interviews was conducted with 56 participants who were involved in 24 evidence-based nursing implementation projects in Mainland China from September 2015 to September 2016. A middle-range grounded theory of 'Taking Root' was developed. The theory describes the evidence implementation process consisting of four components (driving forces, process, outcome, sustainment/regression), three approaches (top-down, bottom-up and outside-in), four implementation strategies (patient-centred, nurses at the heart of change, reaching agreement, collaboration) and two patterns (transformational and adaptive implementation). Certain perspectives may have not been captured, as the retrospective nature of the interviewing technique did not allow for 'real-time' assessment of the actual implementation process. The transferability of the findings requires further exploration as few participants with negative experiences were recruited. This is the first study that explored evidence-based implementation process, strategies, approaches and patterns in the Chinese nursing practice context to inform international nursing and health policymaking. The theory of Taking Root described various approaches to evidence implementation and how the implementation can be transformational for the nurses and the setting in which they work. Nursing educators, managers and researchers should work together to improve nurses' readiness for evidence implementation. Healthcare systems need to optimize internal mechanisms and external collaborations to promote nursing practice in line with evidence and achieve clinical outcomes and sustainability. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Development of a competency framework for evidence-based practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kat; Trevena, Lyndal; Waters, Donna

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of competence in evidence-based practice (EBP) remains challenging to many educators and academics due to the lack of explicit competency criteria. Much uncertainty exists about what specific EBP competencies nurses should meet and how these should be measured. The objectives of this study are to develop a competency framework for measuring evidence-based knowledge and skills in nursing and to elicit the views of health educators/researchers about elements within the framework. A descriptive survey design with questionnaire. Between August and December 2013, forty-two health academics/educators, clinicians; and researchers from the medical and nursing schools at the University of Sydney and the Nurse Teacher's Society in Australia were invited to comment on proposed elements for measuring evidence-based knowledge and skills. The EBP competency framework was designed to measure nurses' knowledge and skills for using evidence in practice. Participants were invited to rate their agreement on the structure and relevance of the framework and to state their opinion about the measurement criteria for evidence-based nursing practice. Participant agreement on the structure and relevance of the framework was substantial, ICC: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, P<0.0001. Qualitative analysis of two open-ended survey questions revealed three common themes in participants' opinion of the competency elements: (1) a useful EBP framework; (2) varying expectations of EBP competence; and (3) challenges to EBP implementation. The findings of this study suggested that the EBP competency framework is of credible value for facilitating evidence-based practice education and research in nursing. However, there remains some uncertainty and disagreement about the levels of EBP competence required for nurses. These challenges further implicate the need for setting a reasonable competency benchmark with a broader group of stakeholders in nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  1. Embedding evidence-based practice among nursing undergraduates: Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    André, Beate; Aune, Anne G; Brænd, Jorunn A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based practice is currently one of the most important developments in health care. Research in nursing science is rapidly growing; however, translating the knowledge based on this research into clinical practice is often hampered, and may be dependent on reflective skills. The aim of this study was to see how undergraduate nursing students in nursing should increase their skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice through participation in clinical research projects. A qualitative approach was used in collecting and analyzing the data. Students participated in a pilot clinical research project and a received guidance related to their bachelor thesis. After the project was completed, all students filled in a questionnaire. The students' motivation to participate in this study was reported to be high, but they reported low knowledge related to evidence-based practice. All students reported that their attitude towards evidence-based practice changed in a positive direction during their participation in the project. Evidence-based practice influenced nursing practices by putting more focus on critical thinking, increasing pride and giving a sense of ownership in the clinical field. The curricula and the pedagogical perspectives in nursing education can influence the attitude towards evidence-based practice and skills among nursing bachelor students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence based practice beliefs and implementation among nurses: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and being able to see the value of evidence-based practice for patients have been reported as important for the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses. The aim of this study was to map self-reported beliefs towards EBP and EBP implementation among nurses, and to investigate whether there was a positive correlation between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Method We carried out a cross-sectional study among 356 nurses at a specialist hospital for the treatment of cancer in Norway. The Norwegian translations of the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale and the Evidence-based Practice Implementation Scale were used. Results In total, 185 nurses participated in the study (response rate 52%). The results showed that nurses were positive towards evidence-based practice, but only practised it to a small extent. There was a positive correlation (r) between beliefs towards evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice (r = 0.59, p = 0.001). There was a statistical significant positive, but moderate correlation between all the four subscales of the EBP Beliefs Scale (beliefs related to: 1) knowledge, 2) resources, 3) the value of EBP and 4) difficulty and time) and the EBP Implementation Scale, with the highest correlation observed for beliefs related to knowledge (r = 0.38, p < .0001). Participants who had learned about evidence-based practice had significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants who were unfamiliar with evidence-based practice. Those involved in evidence-based practice working groups also reported significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants not involved in these groups. Conclusion This study shows that nurses have a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice, but practise it to a lesser extent. There was a positive correlation between

  3. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application.

  4. Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change.

  5. Creating infrastructure supportive of evidence-based nursing practice: leadership strategies.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Robin P

    2007-01-01

    Nursing leadership is the cornerstone of successful evidence-based practice (EBP) programs within health care organizations. The key to success is a strategic approach to building an EBP infrastructure, with allocation of appropriate human and material resources. This article indicates the organizational infrastructure that enables evidence-based nursing practice and strategies for leaders to enhance evidence-based practice using "the conceptual model for considering the determinants of diffusion, dissemination, and implementation of innovations in health service delivery and organization." Enabling EBP within organizations is important for promoting positive outcomes for nurses and patients. Fostering EBP is not a static or immediate outcome, but a long-term developmental process within organizations. Implementation requires multiple strategies to cultivate a culture of inquiry where nurses generate and answer important questions to guide practice. Organizations that can enable the culture and build infrastructure to help nurses develop EBP competencies will produce a professional environment that will result in both personal growth for their staff and improvements in quality that would not otherwise be possible.

  6. Evidence-based human resource management: a study of nurse leaders' resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2009-05-01

    The aims were to illustrate how the RAFAELA system can be used to facilitate evidence-based human resource management. The theoretical framework of the RAFAELA system is based on a holistic view of humankind and a view of leadership founded on human resource management. Nine wards from three central hospitals in Finland participated in the study. The data, stemming from 2006-2007, were taken from the critical indicators (ward-related and nursing intensity information) for national benchmarking used in the RAFAELA system. The data were analysed descriptively. The daily nursing resources per classified patient ratio is a more specific method of measurement than the nurse-to-patient ratio. For four wards, the nursing intensity per nurse surpassed the optimal level 34% to 62.2% of days. Resource allocation was clearly improved in that a better balance between patients' care needs and available nursing resources was maintained. The RAFAELA system provides a rational, systematic and objective foundation for evidence-based human resource management. Data from a systematic use of the RAFAELA system offer objective facts and motives for evidence-based decision making in human resource management, and will therefore enhance the nurse leaders' evidence and scientific based way of working.

  7. Using evidence-based leadership initiatives to create a healthy nursing work environment.

    PubMed

    Nayback-Beebe, Ann M; Forsythe, Tanya; Funari, Tamara; Mayfield, Marie; Thoms, William; Smith, Kimberly K; Bradstreet, Harry; Scott, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to create a healthy nursing work environment in a military hospital Intermediate Care Unit (IMCU), a facility-level Evidence Based Practice working group composed of nursing.Stakeholders brainstormed and piloted several unit-level evidence-based leadership initiatives to improve the IMCU nursing work environment. These initiatives were guided by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments which encompass: (1) skilled communication, (2) true collaboration, (3) effective decision making, (4) appropriate staffing, (5) meaningful recognition, and (6) authentic leadership. Interim findings suggest implementation of these six evidence-based, relationship-centered principals, when combined with IMCU nurses' clinical expertise, management experience, and personal values and preferences, improved staff morale, decreased staff absenteeism, promoted a healthy nursing work environment, and improved patient care.

  8. Exploring the contribution of the Clinical Librarian to facilitating evidence-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Tod, Angela M; Bond, Beverly; Leonard, Niamh; Gilsenan, Irene J; Palfreyman, Simon

    2007-04-01

    To examine the potential role of the Clinical Librarian in facilitating evidence-based practice of nurses in acute hospital settings and develop a model for the role. There is a growing policy and professional expectation that nurses will seek out and apply evidence in their clinical practice. Studies have demonstrated that nurses experience barriers in working with an evidence-based approach. The role of Clinical Librarian has been used in other countries and within medicine to overcome some of the barriers to evidence-based practice. There are limitations in the previous work in terms of rigour of evaluation, scope of the Clinical Librarian role and application to nursing in a UK setting. A qualitative consultation of 72 nurses in acute care settings. Six consultation group interviews of between 4-19 participants. Written records were recorded by the scribe. Content analysis was undertaken to identify the range and frequency of comments. Clinical questions currently go unanswered because of barriers of time, skills deficits and access to resources. Literature searching, skills training and evidence dissemination were the main areas of work the staff requested that a Clinical Librarian should undertake. It was anticipated that the Clinical Librarian could interact and work productively with nursing staff with a limited but regular presence on the ward. Interim communication could be via e-mail, phone and written suggestions and requests for work. It was seen to be vital that the Clinical Librarian worked in partnership with staff to build evidence-based practice capacity and ensure clinical relevance of the work. This study has generated the first model for the Clinical Librarian role with an emphasis on nursing. It is derived from the views of clinical nurses. Recommendations are made for the implementation and evaluation of such a role. The Clinical Librarian could be an invaluable support to promoting evidence-based nursing.

  9. Promoting Evidence-Based Practice at a Primary Stroke Center: A Nurse Education Strategy.

    PubMed

    Case, Christina Anne

    Promoting a culture of evidence-based practice within a health care facility is a priority for health care leaders and nursing professionals; however, tangible methods to promote translation of evidence to bedside practice are lacking. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to design and implement a nursing education intervention demonstrating to the bedside nurse how current evidence-based guidelines are used when creating standardized stroke order sets at a primary stroke center, thereby increasing confidence in the use of standardized order sets at the point of care and supporting evidence-based culture within the health care facility. This educational intervention took place at a 286-bed community hospital certified by the Joint Commission as a primary stroke center. Bedside registered nurse (RN) staff from 4 units received a poster presentation linking the American Heart Association's and American Stroke Association's current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to standardized stroke order sets and bedside nursing care. The 90-second oral poster presentation was delivered by a graduate nursing student during preshift huddle. The poster and supplemental materials remained in the unit break room for 1 week for RN viewing. After the pilot unit, a pdf of the poster was also delivered via an e-mail attachment to all RNs on the participating unit. A preintervention online survey measured nurses' self-perceived likelihood of performing an ordered intervention based on whether they were confident the order was evidence based. The preintervention survey also measured nurses' self-reported confidence in their ability to explain how the standardized order sets are derived from current evidence. The postintervention online survey again measured nurses' self-reported confidence level. However, the postintervention survey was modified midway through data collection, allowing for the final 20 survey respondents to retrospectively rate their confidence

  10. Improving evidence based practice in postgraduate nursing programs: A systematic review: Bridging the evidence practice gap (BRIDGE project).

    PubMed

    Hickman, Louise D; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Phillips, Jane; Rao, Angela; Newton, Phillip J; Jackson, Debra; Ferguson, Caleb

    2018-04-01

    The nursing profession has a significant evidence to practice gap in an increasingly complex and dynamic health care environment. To evaluate effectiveness of teaching and learning strategies related to a capstone project within a Masters of Nursing program that encourage the development of evidence based practice capabilities. Systematic review that conforms to the PRISMA statement. Master's Nursing programs that include elements of a capstone project within a university setting. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC and PsycInfo were used to search for RCT's or quasi experimental studies conducted between 1979 and 9 June 2017, published in a peer reviewed journal in English. Of 1592 studies, no RCT's specifically addressed the development of evidence based practice capabilities within the university teaching environment. Five quasi-experimental studies integrated blended learning, guided design processes, small group work, role play and structured debate into Masters of Nursing research courses. All five studies demonstrated some improvements in evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation, with three out of five studies demonstrating significant improvements. There is a paucity of empirical evidence supporting the best strategies to use in developing evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills for Master's Nursing students. As a profession, nursing requires methodologically robust studies that are discipline specific to identify the best approaches for developing evidence-based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills within the university teaching environment. Provision of these strategies will enable the nursing profession to integrate the best empirical evidence into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011. We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3

  12. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2012-02-15

    Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011.We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations.  We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. We included one study from the USA (re-analysed as

  13. An evidence-based solution for minimizing stress and anger in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2007-12-01

    Manifestations of stress and anger are becoming more evident in society. Anger, an emotion associated with stress, often affects other aspects of everyday life, including the workplace and the educational setting. Stress and irrational anger in nursing students presents a potential teaching-learning problem that requires innovative evidence-based solutions. In this article, anger in nursing students is discussed, and background information on the topic is provided. Common sources and manifestations of anger in nursing students are presented, and one evidence-based solution--mindfulness-based-stress reduction--is discussed.

  14. Evidence-Based Teaching Practice in Nursing Education: Faculty Perspectives and Practices.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan K; Brockway, Christine; Rierson, Cindy L; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This national online study was conducted to describe nursing faculty perspectives and practices about evidence-based teaching practice (EBTP). Professional standards for nurse educator practice stress the importance of EBTP; however, the use of evidence by faculty in curriculum design, evaluation and educational measurement, and program development has not been reported. Nurse administrators of accredited nursing programs in the United States (N = 1,586) were emailed information about the study, including the research consent form and anonymous survey link, and invited to forward information to nursing faculty. Respondents (551 faculty and nurse administrators) described the importance of EBTP in nursing education, used multiple sources of evidence in their faculty responsibilities, and identified factors that influence their ability to use EBTP. EBTP in nursing education requires sustained institutional, administrative, and collegial support to promote faculty effectiveness and student learning.

  15. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action.

  16. Collaborating across services to advance evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Deborah J; Richard, Maggie L; Ceniceros, Xochitl; Blaize, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Military medical treatment facilities offer a unique environment in which to develop a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP). Distinctive issues arise in the context of changed patient care demographics because of a war-injured population. These issues offer an opportunity to enhance the quality of care through the use and adaptation of research findings in this special nursing environment. In addition, the colocation of two military medical centers offers the prospect of collaborative efforts to create a regional culture for nursing EBP. The purposes of this study were to describe the processes of a collaborative project to train nurses in EBP and to share resources in developing and implementing evidence-based clinical nursing guidelines in two large military medical centers in the Northeastern United States and to discuss the collective efforts of nurse researchers, leadership, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses in each hospital to facilitate the EBP process. A description of the organizational structure and the climate for EBP of each facility is provided followed by discussion of training efforts and the inculcation of an organizational culture for EBP. Contextual barriers and facilitators were encountered throughout the project. The two nurse researchers leading the projects were able to overcome the barriers and capitalize on opportunities to promote EBP. Three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were developed at each facility and are currently in various stages of implementation. Despite the barriers, EBP continues to be at the forefront of military nursing practice in the U.S. National Capital Region. Clear communication and regular meetings were essential to the success of the collaborative project within and between the two military hospitals. Military-specific barriers to EBP included high team attrition and turnover because of the war mission and the usual high staff turnover at military hospitals. Military facilitators included a

  17. The effectiveness of evidence-based nursing on development of nursing students' critical thinking: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chuyun; Li, Yufeng; Geng, Dongrong; Zhang, Hui; Jin, Changde

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the effectiveness of evidence-based nursing (EBN) on the development of critical thinking for nursing students. A systematic literature review of original studies on randomized controlled trials was conducted. The relevant randomized controlled trials were retrieved from multiple electronic databases including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Chinese BioMed Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and WanFang Database. In order to make a systematic evaluation, studies were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, and then according to extracted data and assessed quality. The data extraction was completed by two independent reviewers, and the methodological quality assessment was completed by another two reviewers. All of the data was analyzed by the software RevMan5.3. A total of nine studies with 1079 nursing students were chosen in this systematic literature review. The result of this meta-analysis showed that the effectiveness of evidence-based nursing was superior to that of traditional teaching on nursing students' critical thinking. The results of this meta-analysis indicate that evidence-based nursing could help nursing students to promote their development of critical thinking. More researches with higher quality and larger sample size can be analyzed in the further. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Measuring Clinical Decision Support Influence on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Susan; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    To measure the effect of clinical decision support (CDS) on oncology nurse evidence-based practice (EBP).
. Longitudinal cluster-randomized design.
. Four distinctly separate oncology clinics associated with an academic medical center.
. The study sample was comprised of randomly selected data elements from the nursing documentation software. The data elements were patient-reported symptoms and the associated nurse interventions. The total sample observations were 600, derived from a baseline, posteducation, and postintervention sample of 200 each (100 in the intervention group and 100 in the control group for each sample).
. The cluster design was used to support randomization of the study intervention at the clinic level rather than the individual participant level to reduce possible diffusion of the study intervention. An elongated data collection cycle (11 weeks) controlled for temporary increases in nurse EBP related to the education or CDS intervention.
. The dependent variable was the nurse evidence-based documentation rate, calculated from the nurse-documented interventions. The independent variable was the CDS added to the nursing documentation software.
. The average EBP rate at baseline for the control and intervention groups was 27%. After education, the average EBP rate increased to 37%, and then decreased to 26% in the postintervention sample. Mixed-model linear statistical analysis revealed no significant interaction of group by sample. The CDS intervention did not result in an increase in nurse EBP.
. EBP education increased nurse EBP documentation rates significantly but only temporarily. Nurses may have used evidence in practice but may not have documented their interventions.
. More research is needed to understand the complex relationship between CDS, nursing practice, and nursing EBP intervention documentation. CDS may have a different effect on nurse EBP, physician EBP, and other medical professional EBP.

  19. Evidence-Based Practice in Forensic Mental Health Nursing: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Byrt, Richard; Spencer-Stiles, Theresa A; Ismail, Ismail

    2018-06-15

    Literature searches of databases, particularly CINAHL, using key phrases were undertaken. Some authors argue that there is a lack of evidence in forensic mental health (FMH) nursing, with few randomized controlled trials and other methods providing definitive, generalizable evidence. However, literature searches revealed randomized controlled trials of relevance to FMH nursing, many qualitative studies by FMH nurses, and arguments for clinical experience and knowledge of service users, and the latter's views, as sources of evidence. Research findings can be applied to practice, both directly and indirectly. Examples are given of ways that evidence can be used to inform FMH nursing interventions related to therapeutic ward environments, including communication, therapeutic relationships, preventing retraumatization, and enabling physical health. The complex nature of "evidence" is considered in relation to risk assessment and management. FMH nursing can be based on a wide range of sources of evidence. The types of evidence used in practice depend on individual service users' needs and views. In evaluating evidence, it is necessary to be aware of its complex, diverse nature. A distinction can be made between definitive, widely generalizable research findings and evidence with limited generalizability, requiring FMH nurses' judgments about whether it is applicable to their own area of practice. Recommendations for related education and research are made.

  20. Nursing Librarians Cultivating Evidence-Based Practice Through an Asynchronous Online Course.

    PubMed

    Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay

    2017-09-01

    In response to a request from the Nursing Shared Governance Evidence-Based Practice Council, librarians created an online evidence-based practice (EBP) continuing education course for clinical nurses. The curriculum was adapted from a previously created face-to-face course and was offered online through a learning management system. Although many nurses registered for the course, only a small sample was able to complete all modules. Feedback revealed that nurses appreciated the ease of online use, but they experienced technical barriers. Overall, nurses completing the course agreed that all learning objectives were met. An online asynchronous course for nurses is a viable option for teaching EBP, but hospital computer limitations must be taken into account to allow for participants' full immersion into the material. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(9):420-424. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. A university and health care organization partnership to prepare nurses for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Missal, Bernita; Schafer, Beth Kaiser; Halm, Margo A; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2010-08-01

    This article describes a partnership model between a university and health care organizations for teaching graduate nursing research from a framework of evidence-based practice. Nurses from health care organizations identified topics for graduate students to search the literature and synthesize evidence for guiding nursing practice. Nurse educators mentored graduate students in conducting critical appraisals of the literature. Students learned how to search for the evidence, summarize the existing research findings, and translate the findings into practice recommendations. Through presenting and discussing their findings with key stakeholders, students learned how nurses planned to integrate the evidence into practice. Nurses used the evidence-based results to improve their practice in the two partner hospitals. The partnership stimulated action for further inquiry into best practices.

  2. Developing an evidence-based list of journals for nursing

    PubMed Central

    Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Kennedy, Joy C.; Allen, Margaret (Peg)

    2014-01-01

    The Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section (NAHRS) of the Medical Library Association created the 2012 NAHRS Selected List of Nursing Journals to assist librarians with collection development and to provide nurses and librarians with data on nursing and interdisciplinary journals to assist their decisions about where to submit articles for publication. This list is a continuation and expansion of a list initially known as the Key Nursing Journals list. It compares database coverage and full-text options for each title and includes an analysis of the number of evidence-based, research, and continuing education articles. PMID:24860267

  3. Effectiveness of an Evidence-Based Practice Nurse Mentor Training Program.

    PubMed

    Spiva, LeeAnna; Hart, Patricia L; Patrick, Sara; Waggoner, Jessica; Jackson, Charon; Threatt, Jamie L

    2017-06-01

    Multiple reasons are cited for why nurses do not incorporate evidence into clinical practice, including lack of knowledge and skills, training, time, and organizational support. To investigate the effectiveness of a mentor training program on mentors' perceptions of knowledge, attitude, skill, and confidence levels, and organizational readiness related to evidence-based practice (EBP) and research utilization; and to investigate the effectiveness of creating a formalized structure to enculturate EBP in order to prepare nurses to incorporate EBP into clinical practice on nurses' perceptions of knowledge, attitude, skill levels, barriers, nursing leadership, and organizational support related to EBP and research utilization. A two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental, interventional design was used. A convenience sample of 66 mentors and 367 nurses working at a five hospital integrated healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States participated. Nurse mentors' knowledge, attitude, skill level, and organizational readiness related to EBP, t = -8.64, p < .001, and confidence, t = -6.36, p < .001, improved after training. Nurses' knowledge, attitude, and skill level related to EBP, t = -19.12, p < .001, and barriers to research utilization, t = 20.86, p < .001, EBP work environment t = -20.18, p < .001, and EBP nurse leadership, t = -16.50, p < .001, improved after a formalized structure was implemented. EBP mentors are effective in educating and supporting nurses in evidence-based care. Leaders should use a multifaceted approach to build and sustain EBP, including developing a critical mass of EBP mentors to work with point of care staff. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Professional values and competencies as explanatory factors for the use of evidence-based practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Skela-Savič, Brigita; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Pesjak, Katja

    2017-08-01

    To establish the connection between values, competencies, selected job characteristics and evidence-based practice use. Nurses rarely apply evidence-based practice in everyday work. A recent body of research has looked at various variables explaining the use of evidence-based practice, but not values and competencies. A cross-sectional, non-experimental quantitative explorative research design. Standardized instruments were used (Nurse Professional Values Scale-R, Nurse Competence Scale, Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation Scale). The sample included 780 nurses from 20 Slovenian hospitals. The data were collected in 2015. The study identifies two new variables contributing to a better understanding of beliefs on and implementation of evidence-based practice, thus broadening the existing research evidence. These are the values of activism and professionalism and competencies aimed at the development and professionalization of nursing. Values of caring, trust and justice and competencies expected in everyday practice do not influence the beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice. Respondents ascribed less importance to values connected with activism and professionalism and competencies connected with the development of professionalism. Nurses agree that evidence-based practice is useful in their clinical work, but they lack the knowledge to implement it in practice. Evidence-based practice implementation in nursing practice is low. Study results stress the importance of increasing the knowledge and skills on professional values of activism and professionalism and competencies connected to nursing development. The study expands the current understanding of evidence-based practice use and provides invaluable insight for nursing managers, higher education managers and the national nursing association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Promotion of Evidence-Based Nursing by Polish and foreign nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Wasowska, Iga; Repka, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the review was to obtain information on specific activities undertaken by professional nursing organizations, in order to promote and develop Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN). The foreign organizations featured in the study actively promote EBN within their countries of origin. This activity is currently focused on the structural and financial measures (focused on extrinsic factors). Some organizations are lobbying governments for grants and general support, in order to further their use and development of EBN. Educational activities are still ongoing, which include the creation of the creation of new guidelines and publishing research in journals, along with the organization of periodic conferences. Polish Nurses Association was the only one not involved in any structural and financial activities.

  6. Evidence-based practice beliefs and behaviors of nurses providing cancer pain management: a mixed-methods approach.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Linda H; Meins, Alexa R; Mitchell, Pamela H; Voss, Joachim; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-03-01

    To describe evidence-based practice (EBP) beliefs and behaviors of nurses who provide cancer pain management. Descriptive, cross-sectional with a mixed-methods approach. Two inpatient oncology units in the Pacific Northwest. 40 RNs.
 Data collected by interviews and web-based surveys. EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, evidence-based pain management. Nurses agreed with the positive aspects of EBP and their implementation ability, although implementation level was low. They were satisfied with their pain management practices. Oncology nursing certification was associated with innovativeness, and innovativeness was associated with EBP beliefs. Themes identified were (a) limited definition of EBP, (b) varied evidence-based pain management decision making, (c) limited identification of evidence-based pain management practices, and (d) integration of nonpharmacologic interventions into patient care. Nurses' low level of EBP implementation in the context of pain management was explained by their trust that standards of care and medical orders were evidence-based. Nurses' EBP beliefs and behaviors should be considered when developing strategies for sustaining evidence-based pain management practices. Implementation of the EBP process by nurses may not be realistic in the inpatient setting; therefore, hospital pain management policies need to be evidence-based and reinforced with nurses.

  7. Relationships between evidence-based practice, quality improvement and clinical error experience of nurses in Korean hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee-In; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated individual and work-related factors associated with nurses' perceptions of evidence-based practice (EBP) and quality improvement (QI), and the relationships between evidence-based practice, quality improvement and clinical errors. Understanding the factors affecting evidence-based practice and quality improvement activities and their relationships with clinical errors is important for designing strategies to promote evidence-based practice, quality improvement and patient safety. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 594 nurses in two Korean teaching hospitals using the evidence-based practice Questionnaire and quality improvement scale developed in this study. Four hundred and forty-three nurses (74.6%) returned the completed survey. Nurses' ages and educational levels were significantly associated with evidence-based practice scores whereas age and job position were associated with quality improvement scores. There were positive, moderate correlations between evidence-based practice and quality improvement scores. Nurses who had not made any clinical errors during the past 12 months had significantly higher quality improvement skills scores than those who had. The findings indicated the necessity of educational support regarding evidence-based practice and quality improvement for younger staff nurses who have no master degrees. Enhancing quality improvement skills may reduce clinical errors. Nurse managers should consider the characteristics of their staff when implementing educational and clinical strategies for evidence-based practice and quality improvement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Personal choice or evidence-based nursing intervention: nurses' decision-making about influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Lori M; Tucker, Sharon J; Ofstead, Cori L; Poland, Gregory A

    2010-06-01

    Nursing interventions are actions taken by nurses to enhance patient outcomes. Little is known about nursing interventions such as influenza vaccination in which the nurse's decision to adopt a health behavior impacts patient outcomes. There is strong evidence that immunization of health care workers (HCWs) against influenza is effective in preventing the spread of this disease and lowers mortality among patients. Yet, worldwide influenza vaccination rates among HCWs are low, with nurse vaccination rates among the lowest. To understand the factors influencing nurses' decision-making about personally receiving immunization against influenza. A qualitative descriptive design in which data were collected using semistructured interviews was used. Participants were 14 RNs who indicated on a prior survey that they were uncertain about, or would not receive an influenza vaccine during the next vaccination season. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The overarching theme is that influenza immunization is a low priority for nurses. Subthemes include a sense of good health, skepticism of the vaccine's value, fear of vaccine side effects, hand washing as prevention, and inconvenient immunization locations. The nurse participants in this study viewed influenza vaccination as a personal health choice, not as an evidence-based nursing intervention. As a result, the decision to decline influenza vaccination was made in the context of personal health choice and/or risk of injury or illness to the nurse. Patient safety outcomes were not expressed as a factor in making the decision to decline influenza vaccination.

  9. Evidence-based Nursing Education - a Systematic Review of Empirical Research

    PubMed Central

    Reiber, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The project „Evidence-based Nursing Education – Preparatory Stage“, funded by the Landesstiftung Baden-Württemberg within the programme Impulsfinanzierung Forschung (Funding to Stimulate Research), aims to collect information on current research concerned with nursing education and to process existing data. The results of empirical research which has already been carried out were systematically evaluated with aim of identifying further topics, fields and matters of interest for empirical research in nursing education. In the course of the project, the available empirical studies on nursing education were scientifically analysed and systematised. The over-arching aim of the evidence-based training approach – which extends beyond the aims of this project - is the conception, organisation and evaluation of vocational training and educational processes in the caring professions on the basis of empirical data. The following contribution first provides a systematic, theoretical link to the over-arching reference framework, as the evidence-based approach is adapted from thematically related specialist fields. The research design of the project is oriented towards criteria introduced from a selection of studies and carries out a two-stage systematic review of the selected studies. As a result, the current status of research in nursing education, as well as its organisation and structure, and questions relating to specialist training and comparative education are introduced and discussed. Finally, the empirical research on nursing training is critically appraised as a complementary element in educational theory/psychology of learning and in the ethical tradition of research. This contribution aims, on the one hand, to derive and describe the methods used, and to introduce the steps followed in gathering and evaluating the data. On the other hand, it is intended to give a systematic overview of empirical research work in nursing education. In order to preserve a

  10. Exploring Nurse Manager Support of Evidence-Based Practice: Clinical Nurse Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Caramanica, Laura; Spiva, LeeAnna

    2018-05-01

    The study identifies what constitutes nurse manager (NM) support and other resources that enable clinical nurses (CNs) to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Clinical nurses report that NM support enables them to use EBP but what constitutes NM support is still unclear. Nurse managers, CNs, and EBP mentors received specialized education and use a team approach for EBP. Data were collected preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention from observations, interviews, journaling, and surveys. Results demonstrate how NMs can perform their role responsibilities and still engage CNs to develop a spirit of inquiry, seek answers to their clinical questions using EBP, and advance their clinical performance to improve patient outcomes. Four NM supportive behaviors emerged: cultivating a shared EBP vision, ensuring use of EBP, communicating the value of EBP, and providing resources for EBP. Through education and support, NMs describe supportive behaviors necessary for the successful conduction of EBP by CNs.

  11. Basic nursing care: The most provided, the least evidence based - A discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Hamers, Jan P H; Metzelthin, Silke F; Ettema, Roelof; Heinen, Maud; de Man-Van Ginkel, Janneke M; Vermeulen, Hester; Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2018-06-01

    To describe and discuss the "Basic Care Revisited" (BCR) research programme, a collaborative initiative that contributes to evidence-based basic nursing care and raises awareness about the importance of basic nursing care activities. While basic nursing care serves nearly all people at some point in their lifetime, it is poorly informed by evidence. There is a need to prioritise and evaluate basic nursing care activities to improve patient outcomes and improve the quality of care. Discussion paper METHOD: The discussion presented in this paper is based on nursing literature and theory and supported by the authors' clinical and research experiences. We present the developmental process and content of a research programme called "Basic Care Revisited" (BCR) as a solution to move forward and improve basic nursing care. To prioritise basic nursing care, we propose a research programme entitled "Basic Care Revisited" that aims to create awareness and expand knowledge on evidence-based basic nursing care by addressing four basic nursing care themes (bathing and dressing, communication, mobility, and nutrition) in different settings. The paper discusses a pathway to create a sustainable and productive research collaborative on basic nursing care and addresses issues to build research capacity. Revaluation of these important nursing activities will not only positively influence patient outcomes, but also have an impact on staff outcomes and organisational outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum.

  13. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eui Geum

    2016-06-01

    As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR), a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Linking economics and quality: developing an evidence-based nurse staffing tool.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E Faye; Frith, Karen H; Caspers, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The evidence linking nurse staffing with patient outcomes has been established; however, incorporating the evidence into practice is lagging. This article describes a practice/academic collaborative initiated to promote the translation of staffing research into decision-making through the development of an evidence-based staffing tool. Reports of previous research on nurse staffing and patient and financial outcomes are summarized, and aspects of the 2 phases of the collaborative to date are discussed. In the initial phase, a pilot research study on nurse staffing and patient outcomes in medical-surgical units support previous findings that higher nurse staffing results in positive patient outcomes. The focus in the current phase is expansion of the pilot research and the development of a decision-making staffing tool based on the additional staffing research. Identifying the critical data elements and sources of the data are major challenges to achieving the project objectives. Other challenges are maintaining interest and creating wide-spread understanding of the importance of nurse managers having access to timely, useable information. The success of the collaborative is due to the commitment and participation of leaders from various disciplines in both organizations.

  15. Polish nurses' perceived barriers in using evidence-based practice in pain management.

    PubMed

    Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, W; Dąbrowski, S; Gutysz-Wojnicka, A; Basiński, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to present current practices, perceived barriers and perceived facilitators of Polish nurses in using EBP in the assessment and management of acute pain during the postoperative period in elderly patients. Advances in the study of pain and the methods for its relief since the late 1980s have led to a rise in the role of the nurse in pain management and monitoring. The application of evidence-based practice associated with acute pain is on the increase in the world at large. Eleven hospitals participated in this study. The project involved 1300 nurses working on surgical hospital wards. In this study, case study research and qualitative content analysis were used. The study was conducted using a dedicated questionnaire. Access to journals on evidence-based practice on the assessment and management of pain in elderly patients was assessed as less important by the respondents. Knowledge drawn from the media, scientific and medical journals was assessed by the respondents as unsatisfactory. The greatest barrier to nurses was the fact that scientific articles were published in English. Nurses' awareness of evidence-based practice increases with their education. Among the key problems are the lack of available professional publications in Polish literature, ignorance of English, shortage of time and lack of support from chief physicians of the ward. There is a need for the introduction of innovative strategies of teaching and approaches to the problem of evidence-based practice in approach to pain management in elder people among the Polish nurses. It is necessary to promote these issues in Polish scientific literature. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  16. Evidence-based practice and research utilization activities among rural nurses.

    PubMed

    Olade, Rosaline A

    2004-01-01

    To identify the extent to which rural nurses utilize evidence-based practice guidelines from scientific research in their practice; to describe both previous and current research utilization activities in which they have participated, and to identify the specific barriers they face in their practice settings. Data for this descriptive study were collected through questionnaires with open-ended questions focused on (a) current utilization of nursing research findings, (b) previous involvement in nursing research activities, and (c) participation in medical research activities. The participants were 106 nurses from various practice areas in six rural counties of a southwestern state in the United States. Results revealed that only 20.8% of the participants stated they were currently involved in research utilization, and they were mostly nurses with bachelor's degrees. The two most common areas of current research utilization were pain management and pressure ulcer prevention and management. Barriers to research utilization, such as rural isolation and lack of nursing research consultants, were identified. The types of research utilization activities identified by these nurses indicate how much the facilities in which these nurses work in the rural areas are striving with the utilization of available scientific evidence. Rural nurses face unique barriers related to situational and geographic factors, with implications for nursing administrators, researchers, and educators.

  17. Evidence-Based Nursing of the 3C Therapeutic Regimen for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianya; Zou, Ling

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the efficacy of the 3C therapeutic regimen for type 1 diabetes. Thirty-nine patients with type 1 diabetes, who were hospitalized from January 2013 to April 2014, were included to receive 3C therapeutic regimen. Evidence-based nursing was performed in the treatment period and the efficacy was observed 6 days after therapy. Six days after the administration of the 3C therapeutic regimen, the fasting glucose levels in all 39 patients were controlled to be 4.4-6.0 mmol/L and 2h-postprandial glucose levels to be 4.4-7.8 mmol/L. Three patients had a glucose level <3.9 mmol/L, which was corrected after adjusting the dose of insulin infusion. Evidence-based nursing was provided in the treatment period and no nursing-associated complication occurred. All patients were satisfied with the nursing service. The efficacy of the 3C therapeutic regimen for type 1 diabetes is satisfactory. The evidence-based nursing can help to ensure the efficacy and improve the quality of nursing service.

  18. Introducing research and evidence-based practice for nurses Jeremy Jolley Introducing research and evidence-based practice for nurses Pearson Education £19.99 168 9780273719168 0273719165 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2011-04-15

    EVIDENCE BASED practice is an increasingly hot topic and this book is timely because of both the move towards an all-graduate profession and the increase in the use of evidence in nursing. Nurses need to understand the relationship between research, evidence and practice and then to be able to use that understanding to provide the best possible care for the patient.

  19. [Obstacles perceived by nurses for evidence-based practice: a qualitative study].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Inmaculada; López-Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L

    2013-01-01

    To examine the obstacles perceived by nurses to implement an evidence-based clinical practice. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews conducted in 2010-2011 including 11 nurses purposively selected from public hospitals and community centres in Jaén and Córdoba (Spain). A content analysis was performed, using Miles and Huberman as a reference and comprising the following steps: data reduction, data presentation, and data conclusion/verification. Data saturation was reached in these categories (obstacles). The obstacles perceived by nurses to introduce an evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) were grouped into 3 major categories: obstacles related with professionals (routine-based practice, unwilling and stagnant attitudes, and lack of training in EBCP), obstacles related to the social context (reluctance from other professionals and from patients or families), and obstacles related to the organization (obsolete cultures that do not promote innovation in nursing care). This study highlights the persistence of various factors that hinder the use of research findings in clinical practice. The results underline the need to change the culture of healthcare organizations, to motivate professionals, and to break some of the resistance attitudes that hinder the implementation of evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nurse Practice: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonkaitis, Catherine F.

    2018-01-01

    School nurses report that evidence-based practice (EBP) is not a part of their daily practice, and most have had no formal education regarding EBP or its implementation. The purpose of this review is to identify what strategies might be effective to educate school nurses about EBP as a first step toward establishing EBP in school nurse practice.…

  1. Pressure ulcers: implementation of evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Heather F; Bradley, Chris; Whytock, Sandra; Handfield, Shannon; van der Wal, Rena; Gundry, Sharon

    2005-03-01

    A 2-year project was carried out to evaluate the use of multi-component, computer-assisted strategies for implementing clinical practice guidelines. This paper describes the implementation of the project and lessons learned. The evaluation and outcomes of implementing clinical practice guidelines to prevent and treat pressure ulcers will be reported in a separate paper. The prevalence and incidence rates of pressure ulcers, coupled with the cost of treatment, constitute a substantial burden for our health care system. It is estimated that treating a pressure ulcer can increase nursing time up to 50%, and that treatment costs per ulcer can range from US$10,000 to $86,000, with median costs of $27,000. Although evidence-based guidelines for prevention and optimum treatment of pressure ulcers have been developed, there is little empirical evidence about the effectiveness of implementation strategies. The study was conducted across the continuum of care (primary, secondary and tertiary) in a Canadian urban Health Region involving seven health care organizations (acute, home and extended care). Trained surveyors (Registered Nurses) determined the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers among patients in these organizations. The use of a computerized decision-support system assisted staff to select optimal, evidence-based care strategies, record information and analyse individual and aggregate data. Evaluation indicated an increase in knowledge relating to pressure ulcer prevention, treatment strategies, resources required, and the role of the interdisciplinary team. Lack of visible senior nurse leadership; time required to acquire computer skills and to implement new guidelines; and difficulties with the computer system were identified as barriers. There is a need for a comprehensive, supported and sustained approach to implementation of evidence-based practice for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, greater understanding of organization-specific barriers, and

  2. Nurses' perceptions of evidence-based practice: a quantitative study at a teaching hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Ebrahim; Baratimarnani, Ahmad; Goharinezhad, Salime; Kalhor, Rohollah; Azmal, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care and the best decision that leads to quality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to measure the practice, attitude and knowledge/skill of evidence-based practice of nurses in a teaching hospital in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011.The study sample was composed of 195 nurses who were working at the Fatemeh Zahra Hospital affiliated to Bushehr University of Medical Sciences (BPUMS). The survey instrument was a questionnaire based on Upton and Upton study. This tool measures Nurses' perceptions in the three sub-scales of practice, attitude and knowledge/skill of evidence-based practice. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to analyze the data. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between subscales. The overall mean score of the evidence-based practice in this study was 4.48±1.26 from 7, and the three subscales of practice, attitude and knowledge/skill in evidence-based practice were, 4.58±1.24, 4.57±1.35 and 4.39±1.20, respectively. There was a strong relationship between knowledge and performance subscale (r=0.73,p<0.01). Findings of the study indicate that more training and education are required for evidence-based nursing. Successful implementation of evidence-based nursing depends on organizational plans and empowerment programs in hospitals. Hence, hospital managers should formulate a comprehensive strategy for improving EBP.

  3. Hospital nurses' information retrieval behaviours in relation to evidence based nursing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alving, Berit Elisabeth; Christensen, Janne Buck; Thrysøe, Lars

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide an overview of the information retrieval behaviour of clinical nurses, in terms of the use of databases and other information resources and their frequency of use. Systematic searches carried out in five databases and handsearching were used to identify the studies from 2010 to 2016, with a populations, exposures and outcomes (PEO) search strategy, focusing on the question: In which databases or other information resources do hospital nurses search for evidence based information, and how often? Of 5272 titles retrieved based on the search strategy, only nine studies fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. The studies are from the United States, Canada, Taiwan and Nigeria. The results show that hospital nurses' primary choice of source for evidence based information is Google and peers, while bibliographic databases such as PubMed are secondary choices. Data on frequency are only included in four of the studies, and data are heterogenous. The reasons for choosing Google and peers are primarily lack of time; lack of information; lack of retrieval skills; or lack of training in database searching. Only a few studies are published on clinical nurses' retrieval behaviours, and more studies are needed from Europe and Australia. © 2018 Health Libraries Group.

  4. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  5. Implementation and outcomes of an evidence-based precepting program for burn nurses.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Johnnie R; Valdez-Delgado, Krystal K; Caldwell, Nicole W; Yoder, Linda H; Hayes, Elizabeth J; Barba, Michaèl G; Greeley, Hope L; Mitchell, Colleen; Mann-Salinas, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-01

    There is significant nationwide interest in transitioning new and new-to-specialty nurses into practice, especially in burn care. Lack of a structured transition program in our Burn Center was recognized as a contributing factor for nursing dissatisfaction and increased turnover compared to other hospital units. Employee evaluations exposed a need for more didactic instruction, hands-on learning, and preceptor support. The goal of this project was to implement an evidence-based transition to practice program specific to the burn specialty. The Iowa Model of Evidence-based Practice served as the model for this project. A working group was formed consisting of nurse scientists, clinical nurse leaders, clinical nurse specialists, lead preceptors, staff nurse preceptors and wound care coordinators. A systematic review of the literature was conducted focusing on nurse transition; preceptor development and transitioning nurse training programs with competency assessment, ongoing multifaceted evaluation and retention strategies were created. The evidence-based Vermont Nurses in Partnership (VNIP) Clinical Transition Framework was selected and subsequent education was provided to all Burn Center leaders and staff. Benchmarks for basic knowledge assessment (BKAT) and burn wound care were established among current staff by work site and education level to help evaluate transitioning nurses. Policies were modified to count each preceptor/transitioning nurse dyad as half an employee on the schedule. Multiple high-fidelity simulation scenarios were created to expand hands-on opportunities. From September 2012-December 2013, 110 (57% acute care nursing) Burn Center staff attended the VNIP Clinical Coaching Course, to include 34 interdisciplinary staff (rehabilitation, education, respiratory therapy, and outpatient clinic staff) and 100% of identified preceptors (n=33). A total of 30 new nurses participated in the transition program: 26 (87%) completed, 3 (10%) did not complete

  6. Factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice among nurses: a self-report survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health authorities in several countries have decided that the health care services should be evidence-based. Recent research indicates that evidence-based practice may be more successfully implemented if the interventions overcome identified barriers. Aims The present study aimed to examine factors influencing the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses in a large Norwegian university hospital. Methods Cross-sectional data was collected from 407 nurses during the period November 8 to December 3, 2010, using the Norwegian version of Developing Evidence-based Practice questionnaire (DEBP). The DEBP included data on various sources of information used for support in practice, on potential barriers for evidence-based practice, and on self-reported skills on managing research-based evidence. The DEBP was translated into Norwegian in accordance with standardized guidelines for translation and cultural adaptation. Results Nurses largely used experienced-based knowledge collected from their own observations, colleagues and other collaborators for support in practice. Evidence from research was seldom used. The greatest barriers were lack of time and lack of skills to find and manage research evidence. The nurse’s age, the number of years of nursing practice, and the number of years since obtaining the last health professional degree influenced the use of sources of knowledge and self-reported barriers. Self-reported skills in finding, reviewing and using different sources of evidence were positively associated with the use of research evidence and inversely related to barriers in use of research evidence. Conclusion Skills in evidence-based practice seem to reduce barriers to using research evidence and to increase use of research evidence in clinical practice. PMID:23092366

  7. Using knowledge as the basis for evidence-based practice in primary care nurses.

    PubMed

    Bennasar-Veny, M; Gonzalez-Torrente, S; De Pedro-Gomez, J; Morales-Asencio, J M; Pericas-Beltran, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perception of primary care nurses regarding the need and use of knowledge from research, as a basis for evidence-based practice in their workplace. Additionally, the study aimed to determine which factors might hinder or enable implementation into daily practice. Evidence-based practice involves integrating best results in research with clinical experience, which enables us to provide a higher quality of care, as well as to optimize the care given. International studies show that nurses feel that there are still many barriers that hinder their doing research and incorporating new findings into clinical practice; although in the field of primary care, few studies have been carried out. This descriptive qualitative study design used focus groups to collect data. This study was carried out in Spanish primary care centres. Forty-six registered nurses took part in this study and were divided into five focus groups. Three significant themes emerged: awareness of the need to use research, nurses as knowledge-generation agents and motivation to use research despite barriers. A limited number of participants and a convenience sample were used. Nurses recognize that professional health care must be based on evidence obtained from daily work - both originated by their colleagues and by themselves - and they are willing to work on it although they perceive a lack of competence for this purpose and demand support from their institutions. Primary care institutions should empower nursing coordinators as leaders of evidence-based practice and implicate clinical nurses from the beginning on the implementation of guidelines. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Tools for evidence-based vascular nursing practice: Achieving information literacy for lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Jodi; Walsh, M Eileen

    2017-12-01

    Information literacy is essential in facilitating evidence-based practice (EBP) activities. In vascular nursing, the implementation of EBP is of utmost importance. Best practice grounded in research evidence can contribute to improved patient care outcomes for individuals with vascular disease. The following paper discusses information literacy competencies for nurses to develop in the context of EBP, with an emphasis on formulating a clinical question and searching for evidence. Relevant health science information resources are described, including their value and purpose in the 6S model of evidence. Also discussed are practical and supportive solutions with proven effectiveness in ensuring nurses' success with EBP. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Teaching evidence-based practice: developing a curriculum model to foster evidence-based practice in undergraduate student nurses.

    PubMed

    Finotto, Stefano; Carpanoni, Marika; Turroni, Elena Casadei; Camellini, Riccarda; Mecugni, Daniela

    2013-09-01

    For the nature of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and its relevance to nursing, the skills that it requires should be a component in the basic Nursing degree courses. For this reason, the EBP process should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students' independence and ability to self-learning. the aim of this study is to describe the perception that newly graduated nurses have relative to the benefits of the skills learned during the laboratory's three-year EBP in consideration of the construction of the thesis, the research of evidence and usefulness of the EBP process for the development of their professional career. A descriptive study with a sample of 300 newly graduated nurses from the Degree Course in Nursing of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, venue of Reggio Emilia. The data collection instrument was an anonymous questionnaire. It was possible to answer through a 10 Likert scale. The sample considers effective the research of evidence carried out (mean 6, SD 2), related to the problems of patients (mean 7, SD 2); the sample considered the skills acquired during the laboratory's three-year EBP to be useful for career development (mean 7, SD 2). the decision to include the laboratory's three-year EBP in the curriculum of the Nursing degree promotes the development of skills relating to the use of the EBP process, competence that in the literature is indicated as one of the core competencies that all health professionals should develop and maintain throughout their professional career. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrative review of implementation strategies for translation of research-based evidence by nurses.

    PubMed

    Wuchner, Staci S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize and critique experimental and/or quasi-experimental research that has evaluated implementation strategies for translation of research-based evidence into nursing practice. Successfully implementing evidence-based research can improve patient outcomes. Identifying successful implementation strategies is imperative to move research-based evidence into practice. As implementation science gains popularity, it is imperative to understand the strategies that most effectively translate research-based evidence into practice. The review used the CINAHL and MEDLINE (Ovid) databases. Articles were included if they were experimental and/or quasi-experimental research designs, were written in English, and measured nursing compliance to translation of research-based evidence. An independent review was performed to select and critique the included articles. A wide array of interventions were completed, including visual cues, audit and feedback, educational meetings and materials, reminders, outreach, and leadership involvement. Because of the complex multimodal nature of the interventions and the variety of research topics, comparison across interventions was difficult. Many difficulties exist in determining what implementation strategies are most effective for translation of research-based evidence into practice by nurses. With these limited findings, further research is warranted to determine which implementation strategies most successfully translate research-based evidence into practice.

  11. Breaking Bad News: An Evidence-Based Review of Communication Models for Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Meridith; Keefe, Joanna; Miller, Lindsay; Overcash, Janine

    2017-10-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is a stressful, difficult, and life-altering event. Breaking bad news is distressing to patients and families and is often uncomfortable for the nurse delivering it. Evidence-based communication models have been developed and adapted for use in clinical practice to assist nurses with breaking bad news.

. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on breaking bad news and to review the utility of the SPIKES and PEWTER evidence-based communication models for oncology nurses.
. Perceptions of breaking bad news from the nurse and patient perspectives, as well as barriers and consequences to effective communication, will be presented. Clinical examples of possible situations of breaking bad news will demonstrate how to use the SPIKES and PEWTER models of communication when disclosing bad news to patients and their families.
. By using the evidence-based communication strategies depicted in this article, oncology nurses can support the delivery of bad news and maintain communication with their patients and their patients' families in an effective and productive manner.

  12. Development and evaluation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) filters and related databases*

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Mary A.; Krieger, Mary M.; Meyer, Geralyn A.; Spasser, Mark A.; Cvitan, Tome; Reese, Cordie G.; Carlson, Judith H.; Perry, Anne G.; McNary, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Difficulties encountered in the retrieval of evidence-based nursing (EBN) literature and recognition of terminology, research focus, and design differences between evidence-based medicine and nursing led to the realization that nursing needs its own filter strategies for evidence-based practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of filters that facilitate evidence-based nursing searches. Methods: An inductive, multistep methodology was employed. A sleep search strategy was developed for uniform application to all filters for filter development and evaluation purposes. An EBN matrix was next developed as a framework to illustrate conceptually the placement of nursing-sensitive filters along two axes: horizontally, an adapted nursing process, and vertically, levels of evidence. Nursing diagnosis, patient outcomes, and primary data filters were developed recursively. Through an interface with the PubMed search engine, the EBN matrix filters were inserted into a database that executes filter searches, retrieves citations, and stores and updates retrieved citations sets hourly. For evaluation purposes, the filters were subjected to sensitivity and specificity analyses and retrieval set comparisons. Once the evaluation was complete, hyperlinks providing access to any one or a combination of completed filters to the EBN matrix were created. Subject searches on any topic may be applied to the filters, which interface with PubMed. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for the combined nursing diagnosis and primary data filter were 64% and 99%, respectively; for the patient outcomes filter, the results were 75% and 71%, respectively. Comparisons were made between the EBN matrix filters (nursing diagnosis and primary data) and PubMed's Clinical Queries (diagnosis and sensitivity) filters. Additional comparisons examined publication types and indexing differences. Review articles accounted for the majority of the publication type differences

  13. Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. Results We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. Conclusions The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system. PMID:22844649

  15. Home care nurses' knowledge of evidence-based education topics for management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Colleen; Apostolidis, Beka; Lachapelle, Leeanne; Fortinsky, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We primarily sought to evaluate home care nurses' knowledge of evidence-based education topics in managing heart failure (HF). Moreover, we wanted to determine if differences were evident in nurses' knowledge based on education and work experience, and to identify home care nurses' specific educational needs. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Home care nurses (n = 94) were recruited from 4 home care agencies. A previously published 20-item HF knowledge questionnaire was administered to participants, and an open-ended question determined participants' need for further HF-related education. Home care nurses' scores demonstrated a 78.9% knowledge level in overall HF education principles. The mean HF knowledge score was 15.78 (SD, ±1.69) out of a possible 20 points. Nurses scored lowest on knowledge related to asymptomatic hypotension (24.5% answered correctly), daily weight monitoring (26.6% answered correctly), and transient dizziness (30.9% answered correctly). Nurses requested further information on all HF topics addressed in the survey as well as on psychosocial issues, research evidence, and more information from other healthcare providers. Our findings suggest that home care nurses may not be sufficiently knowledgeable in evidence-based education topics for managing HF. The results help confirm the need to develop educational programs for home care nurses in managing HF, which may lead to improved quality of patient education. Further research is needed to address specific deficits in the knowledge of home care nurses, and to determine if HF educational programs for nurses would enhance and sustain nurses' knowledge of HF management education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of an education intervention to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice: A single-blind randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Hannele; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Stevens, Kathleen R

    2016-08-01

    Nurses' lack of readiness for evidence-based practice slows down the uptake, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based practice which is of international concern as it impedes attainment of the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice. To evaluate the effectiveness of an Advanced Practice Nurse-delivered education program to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice at a university hospital. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with repeated measures design, with measures completed during spring and fall 2015, before the education program (T0), within 1week after (T1), 8weeks after (T2), and 4months after completion of education interventions (T3). One large university hospital system in Finland, consisting of 15 acute care hospitals. The required sample size, calculated by a priori power analysis and including a 20% estimated attrition rate, called for 85 nurse participants to be recruited. Nurses working in different professional nursing roles and care settings were randomly allocated into two groups: intervention (evidence-based practice education, N=43) and control (research utilization education, N=34). The nurse participants received live 4-h education sessions on the basic principles of evidence-based practice (intervention group) and on the principles of research utilization (control group). The intervention group also received a web-based interactive evidence-based practice education module with a booster mentoring intervention. Readiness for evidence-based practice data, previous experience with evidence-based practice, and participant demographics were collected using the Stevens' EBP Readiness Inventory. Nurses' confidence in employing evidence-based practice and actual evidence-based practice knowledge were lower at T0, compared with the post-education scores, specifically at T1. The improvement

  17. Bedside, classroom and bench: collaborative strategies to generate evidence-based knowledge for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Charlotte A; Warren, Judith J; Delaney, Connie

    2005-12-01

    The rise of evidence-base practice (EBP) as a standard for care delivery is rapidly emerging as a global phenomenon that is transcending political, economic and geographic boundaries. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) addresses the growing body of nursing knowledge supported by different levels of evidence for best practices in nursing care. Across all health care, including nursing, we face the challenge of how to most effectively close the gap between what is known and what is practiced. There is extensive literature on the barriers and difficulties of translating research findings into practical application. While the literature refers to this challenge as the "Bench to Bedside" lag, this paper presents three collaborative strategies that aim to minimize this gap. The Bedside strategy proposes to use the data generated from care delivery and captured in the massive data repositories of electronic health record (EHR) systems as empirical evidence that can be analysed to discover and then inform best practice. In the Classroom strategy, we present a description for how evidence-based nursing knowledge is taught in a baccalaureate nursing program. And finally, the Bench strategy describes applied informatics in converting paper-based EBN protocols into the workflow of clinical information systems. Protocols are translated into reference and executable knowledge with the goal of placing the latest scientific knowledge at the fingertips of front line clinicians. In all three strategies, information technology (IT) is presented as the underlying tool that makes this rapid translation of nursing knowledge into practice and education feasible.

  18. Readiness for evidence-based practice: information literacy needs of nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Annelle; Pierce, Susan; Pravikoff, Diane

    2004-01-01

    In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowledge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Information literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for the basic nurse. As such, information literacy is an essential component in the application of EBP. The importance of developing information literacy skills is enhancement of the nurse's ability to use current best available research literature in the conduct of EBP with subsequent improvement in nursing sensitive patient outcomes. This study describes the level of nurses' information literacy knowledge and gaps in their skills for identifying, accessing, retrieving, evaluating and utilizing research evidence to provide best care for patients. The value of this study is to increase awareness among nurse administrators, educators, and clinicians of the need for information literacy education to enable evidence-based nursing practice and to guide development of supportive curricula and professional continuing education.

  19. Evidence-based nursing leadership: Evaluation of a Joint Academic-Service Journal Club.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joanne R; Thompson, Diane; Hobbs, Terry; Niemeyer-Hackett, Nancy Lee; Elpers, Susan

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the importance of evidence-based nursing leadership in the development and evaluation of a joint academic-service nursing leadership journal club. The use of scientific evidence and the embracing of an environment of continuous learning are essential to quality practice; however, nursing leadership has been slow to apply evidence-based practice to their own work. A noontime monthly meeting schedule, incentivized by lunch, was organized as a nursing leadership journal club. Articles were selected and reviewed monthly, and the process was formally evaluated using a written evaluation at the end of year 1. Eighteen articles were appraised by the group with 6 topics identified. Positive results included increased knowledge, competence of the leader, and attainment of goals. Recommendations include revision of goals, plans to share leadership of the group, development of a rigorous evaluation of outcomes, and dissemination of findings. The journal club was valuable in increasing awareness of nursing leadership research, promoting leadership development, and improving competence in the performance of research appraisals. Process improvement and further study are needed to increase understanding regarding the benefits of leadership journal clubs.

  20. Evidence-based practice and related information literacy skills of nurses in Singapore: an exploratory case study.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Intan Azura; Majid, Shaheen; Foo, Schubert; Zhang, Xue; Theng, Yin-Leng; Chang, Yun-Ke; Luyt, Brendan

    2012-03-01

    Increased demand for medical or healthcare services has meant that nurses are to take on a more proactive and independent role intending to patients, providing basic treatment and deciding relevant clinical practice. This, in turn, translates into the need for nurses to be able to translate research and evidence into their practice more efficiently and effectively. Hence, competencies in looking for, evaluating, synthesizing and applying documented information or evidence-based practice becomes crucial. This article presents a quantitative study that involved more than 300 nurses from a large government hospital in Singapore. A self-reporting questionnaire was developed to collect data pertaining to evidence-based practice and activities, including those that demonstrate information literacy competencies. Results seem to suggest that the nurses preferred to use print and human information sources compared to electronic information sources; were not proactive in looking up research or evidence-based information and, instead, preferred such information to be fed to them; and that they perceived they lacked the ability to evaluate research papers or effectively search electronic information related to nursing or evidence-based practice. It was also found that more than 80% of the nurses have not had any training related to evidence-based practice.

  1. The Influence of Social Capital on Nurse-Perceived Evidence-Based Practice Implementation in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji In; Lee, Eunjoo

    2017-05-01

    To examine the relationship between evidence-based practice (EBP) adoption and social capital in nurses and to determine how social capital affected EBP adoption in South Korea. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used. In total, 432 registered nurses from two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in South Korea completed the questionnaire, which included demographic items, the Developing Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire, and the Social Capital Outcomes for Nurses scale. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression to identify the predictors of EBP adoption. Nurses with higher social capital scores reported fewer perceived barriers to finding and reviewing evidence, and changing practice. Higher social capital scores were associated with higher levels of perceived facilitators of EBP adoption and skills appraisal in finding and reviewing evidence. Social capital was a significant predictor of EBP adoption. Nurses with greater opportunities to exchange and communicate their ideas freely are more likely to accept new evidence through diverse channels and trust-based relationships between nurses, which allows healthcare organizations to promote innovations such as EBP adoption. Therefore, social capital in nurses could serve as a driving force for EBP adoption and should provide a healthy foundation for changes in patient care practices. Nurses with higher social capital are tending to adopt EBP willingly. High trust enables nurses to facilitate and support change in practice. Therefore, to improve EBP adoption in patient care, it needs to be monitored that relationships between nurses are carefully structured and that they foster mutual interaction. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice among community health nurses: A cross-sectional descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Pellaux, Victoria; Verloo, Henk

    2018-03-08

    To describe beliefs about evidence-based practice and record levels of implementation among community health nurses working independently and in community healthcare centres in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. In many settings, evidence-based practice is considered a key means of delivering better and secure health care. However, there is a paucity of published studies on the implementation of evidence-based practice in community health care. Cross-sectional descriptive study (n = 100). Beliefs about evidence-based practice and levels of implementation were measured using validated scales developed by Melnyk et al. (Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 5, 2008, 208). Information on respondents' sociodemographic and professional characteristics was collected. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The final response rate was 32.3% (n = 100). More than half of respondents had previously heard about evidence-based practice; most believed in the value of using evidence to guide their practice and were prepared to improve their skills to be able to do so. However, the rate of implementation of evidence-based practice in daily practice in the 8 weeks before the survey was poor. Statistically significant positive associations were found between beliefs about evidence-based practice and how respondents had heard about it and between implementation rates and whether they had heard about evidence-based practice and how they had done so. Evidence-based practices requiring scientific knowledge and skills were implemented less frequently. Greater professional community healthcare experience and management roles did not increase implementation of evidence-based practice. The systematic implementation of evidence-based practice by community health nurses working independently and in healthcare centres in Valais was rare, despite their positive beliefs about it. These results revealed the level of implementation of evidence-based practice by

  3. Evidence-based nursing: a stereotyped view of quantitative and experimental research could work against professional autonomy and authority.

    PubMed

    Bonell, C

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, there have been calls within the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) for evidence-based health care. These resonate with long-standing calls for nursing to become a research-based profession. Evidence-based practice could enable nurses to demonstrate their unique contribution to health care outcomes, and support their seeking greater professionalization, in terms of enhanced authority and autonomy. Nursing's professionalization project, and, within this, various practices comprising the 'new nursing', whilst sometimes not delivering all that was hoped of them, have been important in developing certain conditions conducive to developing evidence-based practice, notably a critical perspective on practice and a reluctance merely to follow physicians' orders. However, nursing has often been hesitant in its adoption of quantitative and experimental research. This hesitancy, it is argued, has been influenced by the propounding by some authors within the new nursing of a stereotyped view of quantitative/experimental methods which equates them with a number of methodological and philosophical points which are deemed, by at least some of these authors, as inimical to, or problematic within, nursing research. It is argued that, not only is the logic on which the various stereotyped views are based flawed, but further, that the wider influence of these viewpoints on nurses could lead to a greater marginalization of nurses in research and evidence-based practice initiatives, thus perhaps leading to evidence-based nursing being led by other groups. In the longer term, this might result in a form of evidence-based nursing emphasizing routinization, thus--ironically--working against strategies of professional authority and autonomy embedded in the new nursing. Nursing research should instead follow the example of nurse researchers who already embrace multiple methods. While the paper describes United Kingdom experiences and debates, points raised about

  4. A Cross-sectional Study on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice in the Contemporary Hospital Setting: Implications for Nurses in Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Rose Bovino, Leonie; Aquila, Anne M; Bartos, Susan; McCurry, Tina; Cunningham, C Elizabeth; Lane, Todd; Rogucki, Nicole; DosSantos, Jamie; Moody, Danielle; Mealia-Ospina, Karen; Pust-Marcone, Jancee; Quiles, Jonathan

    Evidence indicates that nurses inconsistently engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). This cross-sectional study of 402 nurses at a medical-surgical hospital identifies strategies for augmenting EBP. Nurses' EBP beliefs scores were higher than their EBP implementation scores. Those with baccalaureate/postgraduate degrees had higher EBP beliefs and implementation scores than those with associate degrees or diplomas. Bedside or direct care nurses were less likely to have baccalaureate/higher degrees and had lower EBP beliefs and implementation scores than did those nurses not serving in direct care roles.

  5. Registered nurses' experiences with an evidence-based home care pathway for myocardial infarction clients.

    PubMed

    Young, W; McShane, J; O'Connor, T; Rewa, G; Goodman, S; Jaglal, S B; Cash, L; Coyte, P

    2004-01-01

    To obtain home health nurses' comments on an evidence-based care pathway for post myocardial infarction. A qualitative design was used. Culturally diverse, lower income area of a large city. All home health nurses from one nursing agency who participated in a comparative study on the impact of the evidence-based care pathway. The largest number of comments made by the nurses were related to the beneficial impact of the pathway on the provision of quality nursing care and on increased job satisfaction. The home health nurses reported that the pathway increased clients' knowledge of medications and diet. In addition, they commented that they were able to use the pathway effectively because of the training they received from the inpatient cardiac nurses. This qualitative study demonstrates the benefits of investing in the implementation of best practice guidelines by home health nurses. However, nursing associations, such as the Canadian Community Health Nurses Initiatives Group, will need to continue to champion for additional funds to support the additional expenses incurred.

  6. Strategies to promote practice nurse capacity to deliver evidence-based care: An example from sexual healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dadich, Ann; Abbott, Penny; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is pivotal to effective patient care. However, its translation into practice remains limited. Given the central role of primary care in many healthcare systems, it is important to identify strategies that bolster clinician-capacity to promote evidence-based care. The purpose of this paper is to identify strategies to increase Practice Nurse capacity to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare within general practice. A survey of 217 Practice Nurses in an Australian state and ten respondent-interviews regarding two resources to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare - namely, a clinical aide and online training. The perceived impact of both resources was determined by views on relevance and design - particularly for the clinical aide. Resource-use was influenced by role and responsibilities within the workplace, accessibility, and support from patients and colleagues. This is the first Australian study to reveal strategies to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare among Practice Nurses. The findings provide a platform for future research on knowledge translation processes, particularly among clinicians who might be disengaged from sexual healthcare. Given the benefits of evidence-based practices, it is important that managers recognize their role, and the role of their services, in promoting these. Without explicit support for evidence-based care and recognition of the Practice Nurse role in such care, knowledge translation is likely to be limited. Knowledge translation among Practice Nurses can be facilitated by: resources-deemed informative, relevant, and user-friendly, as well as support from patients, colleagues, and their workplace.

  7. Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Canada, Amanda N

    2016-04-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice," found on pages 161-168, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until March 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. • Describe the key components and characteristics related to evidence-based

  8. Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition Alexander Mary Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition 625pp Elsevier 9781416064107 1416064109 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-11-03

    This book considers all aspects of infusion therapy and provides a solid evidence base. Its 30 chapters are well organised into six sections covering physiological considerations, infusion therapies and nursing practice.

  9. Evidence-based nursing outputs and hot spot analysis of the last 5 years in mainland China: Results of a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junqiang; Liu, Xinjuan; Zhang, Wei; Xing, Yana; Cho, Sang Wouk; Hao, Yufang

    2018-04-01

    Evidence-based nursing has been highlighted and highly developed in recent decades in mainland China. Nevertheless, little is known about its overall development. To gain insights on the overall development of evidence-based nursing in the most recent 5 years and to inform future evidence-based nursing research in mainland China. Four Chinese and four English databases were searched with the search terms "evidence-based practice," "nurse or nursing," and "China or Chinese" from 2012 to 2016. Bibliometric and co-word cluster analysis were conducted with the final included publications. A total of 9036 papers published by 13 808 authors in 606 journals were included. Publication numbers were increasing. None of the top ten journals publishing evidence-based nursing papers were core nursing journals. The research hot spots on evidence-based nursing in the recent five years were cardiovascular disease, mental health, and complication prevention. However, little attention has been paid to education for evidence-based nursing. Evidence-based nursing has penetrated into various nursing branches in mainland China and become a well-recognized and relatively mature research domain. More importance should be attached to the study design, methodological, and reporting quality of evidence-based nursing projects. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Creating a nursing strategic planning framework based on evidence.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lorie K; Fischer, Brenda

    2011-03-01

    This article describes an evidence-informed strategic planning process and framework used by a Magnet-recognized public health system in California. This article includes (1) an overview of the organization and its strategic planning process, (2) the structure created within nursing for collaborative strategic planning and decision making, (3) the strategic planning framework developed based on the organization's balanced scorecard domains and the new Magnet model, and (4) the process undertaken to develop the nursing strategic priorities. Outcomes associated with the structure, process, and key initiatives are discussed throughout the article. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation in Doctor of Nursing Practice Students.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Joanne K

    2017-10-01

    Doctors of Nursing Practice focus on leadership in evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is influenced by one's beliefs in and implementation of EBP. Little is known to date about the EBP beliefs and implementation of Doctor of Nursing Practice students and outcomes of Doctor of Nursing Practice education. Guided by the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model, the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs (EBPB) and Implementation (EBPI) tools were used to assess the impact of EBP as a program pillar, curricular thread, and content area on EBPB and EBPI of Doctor of Nursing Practice-Family Nurse Practitioner students. Five cohorts who completed the same curriculum were studied. Fifty-four of the 89 students across the five cohorts began and completed the study. Paired t-test for group effects showed statistical significance from pre- to post-measure in students overall EBPB, t = 4.4 (52), p < .001, and EBPI, t = 8.4 (52), p < .001. A large effect size of .75 standard deviation (SD) gain above the mean for EBPB, and a very large effect size of 1 SD gain above the mean for EBPI were observed. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that all cohorts made gains across the curriculum. Effect sizes for EBPB ranged from .25 to 1 SD above the mean, and .75 to 1.5 for EBPI. DNP students who are educated to be EBP leaders must have a curriculum that supports them in the knowledge and skill-set needed to translate evidence into practice. The ARCC Model can guide faculty in EBP curriculum development. EBPB and EBPI are valid and reliable measures to assess for gains across a curriculum. Through educational outcomes, educators can assess desired student outcomes for EBP across a curriculum and can build an evidence base for ongoing curriculum development. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. [Bibliometric analysis of scientific articles on evidence-based nursing of burn in the mainland of China].

    PubMed

    Yue, L Q; Pi, X Q; Fan, X G

    2016-07-20

    To analyze the current research status of evidence-based nursing of burn in the mainland of China, in order to provide basis for the improvement of scientificity of burn nursing practice. Chinese scientific articles on evidence-based nursing of burn in the mainland of China published from January 1997 to December 2015 were retrieved from Chinese Biology Medicine disc, Chinese Journals Full-text Database, Wanfang Database, and VIP Database. From the results retrieved, date with regard to publication year, region of affiliation of the first author, journal distribution, literature type, literature quality assessment, topic of evidence-based research, fund program support, implementation of evidence-based practice steps, and language and quantity of reference. Data were processed with Microsoft Excel software. A total of 50 articles conforming to the criteria were retrieved. (1) Articles about evidence-based nursing of burn arose in 2004. Compared with that in the previous year, there was no obvious increase in the number of relevant articles in each year from 2004 to 2011. The number of literature in 2012 was obviously increased than that in each year from 2004 to 2011, while the number of literature in each year from 2012 to 2015 was not obviously increased compared with that in the previous year. (2) The regions of affiliation of the first author were distributed in 13 provinces, 3 minority autonomous regions, and 3 municipalities, with the largest distribution in East China, and Northwest China and Southwest China in the follow. (3) The articles were published in 32 domestic journals, with 9 (28.12%) nursing journals, 5 (15.62%) burn medical related journals, and 18 (56.25%) other journals. Twenty (40%) articles were published in Source Journal for Chinese Scientific and Technical Papers. (4) Regarding the literature type, 31 (62%) articles dealt with clinical experiences, 17 (34%) articles dealt with scientific research, and 2 (4%) articles dealt with case report

  13. Relationships between duration of practice, educational level, and perception of barriers to implement evidence-based practice among critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carswella

    2015-12-01

    Globally, a greater emphasis has been placed on the delivery of safe, patient-centered, evidence-based nursing care. As point-of-care providers, critical care nurses play a key role in ensuring that patients receive the safest, most effective treatment available. In order to deliver scientific-based care, critical care nurses must stay abreast of the current trends, as well as engage in the evidence-based practice process. This study aimed to describe research activities, to identify barriers to implement evidence-based practice and to explore professional factors related to the use of evidence-based practice among critical care nurses at three teaching hospitals in south-eastern United States. A survey design and convenience sampling method was used. A sample of 30 critical care staff nurses participated in the study. A 61-item online questionnaire composed of a demographic survey - BARRIERS scale - and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire was used. Simple descriptive statistics, Pearson's product moment correlations, and independent-sample t test procedures were used to analyze the data. Critical care nurses' reported positive attitudes, but viewed knowledge and use of evidence-based practice less favorably. These results may indicate that having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice does not necessarily translate to knowledge and use of the evidence-based practice process in clinical practice. An unwillingness to change and time constraints were identified as the top barriers to use evidence-based practice in this study. Perceptions of barriers to use evidence-based practice were higher in those critical care nurses who had less practical experience and educational preparation. The results suggest that critical care nurses possess the foundation to engage in the evidence-based practice process; however, their knowledge, practice, and attitudes just need to be cultivated and strengthened. Understanding the nurses' professional factors, current use

  14. Building Capacity for Evidence-Based Practice: Understanding How Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) Source Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Leah; Neumeier, Melanie

    2018-03-23

    In Canada, all nurses are required to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) as an entry-to-practice competency; however, there is little research that examines Licensed Practical Nurses' (LPNs') information seeking behaviors or preferred sources of knowledge to conduct EBP. Due to the differences in education and roles of LPNs and Registered Nurses (RNs), it is both necessary and important to gain an understanding of how LPNs utilize evidence in their unique nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate how LPNs source knowledge for their nursing practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of LPNs from Alberta, Canada asked participants to rank sources of knowledge that inform their practice. Responses were correlated with age and years of practice. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there were significant mean differences between average scores and place of employment. LPN participants used similar sources of knowledge as RNs. The top source of knowledge for both RNs and LPNs was the information they learn about each individual client and the least utilized sources of knowledge were articles published in nursing, medical, and research journals, tradition, and popular media. This finding is consistent with previous studies on RNs that found nurses do not often access current research evidence to inform their practice. Since relatively few LPNs access nursing and research journals, it is important to tailor EBP education information to the workplace context. Future avenues of research might explore the potential of using in-services and webinars to disseminate information and skills training on EBP to the LPNs, as this was a popular source of practice knowledge. © 2018 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  15. Oncology nurses and the experience of participation in an evidence-based practice project.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Mary; Frederickson, Keville

    2014-07-01

    To illuminate the experiences of oncology nurses who participated in an evidence-based practice (EBP) project in an institution with an EBP organizational structure. A descriptive phenomenologic approach and in-depth interviews with each participant. An oncology-focused academic medical center with an established organizational infrastructure for EBP. 12 RNs working in an oncology setting who participated in an EBP project. Descriptive, qualitative phenomenologic approach through use of interviews and analysis of interview text. Four essential themes (i.e., support, challenges, evolution, and empowerment) and 11 subthemes emerged that reflected nurses' professional and personal growth, as well as the creation of a culture of EBP in the workplace. The participants described the EBP project as a positive, empowering personal and professional evolutionary experience with supports and challenges that resulted in improvements in patient care. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first qualitative study to demonstrate improved nursing outcomes (e.g., professional growth, improved nursing performance) and nurses' perception of improved patient outcomes (e.g., ongoing healthcare collaboration, evidence-based changes in practice).

  16. Clinician adoption patterns and patient outcome results in use of evidence-based nursing plans of care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Youn; Lang, Norma M; Berg, Karen; Weaver, Charlotte; Murphy, Judy; Ela, Sue

    2007-10-11

    Delivery of safe, effective and appropriate health care is an imperative facing health care organizations globally. While many initiatives have been launched in a number of countries to address this need from a medical perspective, a similar focus for generating evidence-based nursing knowledge has been missing. This paper reports on a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) research initiative that adds nursing knowledge into computerized care protocols. Here, a brief overview of the study's aims, purpose and methodology is presented as well as results of data analysis and lessons learned. The research team examined nurses' adoption patterns of EBP recommendations with respect to activity tolerance using four-month patient data collected from a pilot hospital. Study findings indicate a need for more focus on the system design and implementation process with the next rollout phase to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

  17. Optimizing nursing care by integrating theory-driven evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Pipe, Teri Britt

    2007-01-01

    An emerging challenge for nursing leadership is how to convey the importance of both evidence-based practice (EBP) and theory-driven care in ensuring patient safety and optimizing outcomes. This article describes a specific example of a leadership strategy based on Rosswurm and Larrabee's model for change to EBP, which was effective in aligning the processes of EBP and theory-driven care.

  18. Factors influencing the implementation of evidence in Chinese nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Broome, Marion E; Feng, Sheng; Hu, Yan

    2017-12-01

    To explore the influencing factors from staff nurses, nurse managers, nursing directors and a physician involved in nursing evidence implementation in Mainland China. Although the need for evidence-based nursing is well recognised, continuous efforts are needed to strive for closing the gap from evidence to action. Previous studies have explored influencing factors from individual and organisational perspectives in Western countries. However, it remains unclear what the influences (i.e., context and culture) in the developing countries as China. A grounded theory design using in-depth individual interviews was conducted. Interviews with 56 participants from 24 evidence-based nursing implementation projects were conducted in Mainland China. Constant comparative analysis was used to discover the concepts describing the influencing factors during the implementation process. Factors that influenced implementation of evidence-based practice in the Chinese context were identified. These included the leaders of the projects, the nature of the evidence, practising nurses, patients involved in the projects, the system where the projects were implemented, as well as the influence from outside of the system. A variety of factors influencing evidence implementation in Chinese nursing context were identified and further explored from the perspective of different project leaders and culture influence. There is apparently a strong demand for a supportive system, targeted strategies to facilitate various evidence implementations and integrated core elements of evidence-based practice at the point care. The blurred boundaries and complexity of influencing factors call for a systematic and dynamic perspective during implementation. The competitive priorities emphasise the importance of integration between clinical nursing care and evidence-based practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Supporting evidence-based practice for nurses through information technologies.

    PubMed

    Doran, Diane M; Haynes, R Brian; Kushniruk, André; Straus, Sharon; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Hall, Linda McGillis; Dubrowski, Adam; Di Pietro, Tammie; Newman, Kristine; Almost, Joan; Nguyen, Ha; Carryer, Jennifer; Jedras, Dawn

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the usability of mobile information terminals, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) or Tablet personal computers, to improve access to information resources for nurses and to explore the relationship between PDA or Tablet-supported information resources and outcomes. The authors evaluated an initiative of the Nursing Secretariat, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, which provided nurses with PDAs and Tablet PCs, to enable Internet access to information resources. Nurses had access to drug and medical reference information, best practice guidelines (BPGs), and to abstracts of recent research studies. The authors took place over a 12-month period. Diffusion of Innovation theory and the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) model guided the selection of variables for study. A longitudinal design involving questionnaires was used to evaluate the impact of the mobile technologies on barriers to research utilization, perceived quality of care, and on nurses' job satisfaction. The setting was 29 acute care, long-term care, home care, and correctional organizations in Ontario, Canada. The sample consisted of 488 frontline-nurses. Nurses most frequently consulted drug and medical reference information, Google, and Nursing PLUS. Overall, nurses were most satisfied with the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) BPGs and rated the RNAO BPGs as the easiest resource to use. Among the PDA and Tablet users, there was a significant improvement in research awareness/values, and in communication of research. There was also, for the PDA users only, a significant improvement over time in perceived quality of care and job satisfaction, but primarily in long-term care settings. It is feasible to provide nurses with access to evidence-based practice resources via mobile information technologies to reduce the barriers to research utilization.

  20. The impact of research education on student nurse attitude, skill and uptake of evidence-based practice: a descriptive longitudinal survey.

    PubMed

    Leach, Matthew J; Hofmeyer, Anne; Bobridge, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    To measure the impact of an undergraduate research education program on the attitude, skill and uptake of evidence-based practice among undergraduate student nurses. The contribution of evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making, quality of care and patient outcomes is well-documented. One approach to improving evidence-based practice uptake in clinical practice is through the provision of undergraduate research education; notwithstanding, the impact of research training on nursing practice is poorly established. Descriptive longitudinal survey. Three hundred and fifty four third-year nursing students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing program of a large Australian University were invited. Pre- (Phase 1) and post-completion (Phase 2) of a 16-week research education program, participants were asked to complete the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude and Utilization Survey; an 82-item online questionnaire measuring attitudes, skills and use of evidence-based practice, and barriers and facilitators of evidence-based practice uptake. The survey was completed by 84 (24%) participants in Phase 1 and 33 (39% of Phase 1) participants in Phase 2. Program exposure resulted in a significant improvement in median skill and use subscores, but not median attitude subscore. Participants perceived inadequate skills in the interpretation, appraisal and application of research findings to clinical practice as being less of a barrier to evidence-based practice uptake posteducation, and access to online critical appraisal tools as being significantly more useful in facilitating evidence-based practice uptake posteducation. The findings suggest that undergraduate research education may have a significant effect on nursing students' research skills and use of evidence-based practice, and minimise barriers to evidence-based practice uptake posteducation. Undergraduate research education may play an important role in improving student nurse uptake of evidence-based practice; whether

  1. Sources of Knowledge and Barriers of Implementing Evidence-Based Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2017-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the sources of knowledge for nursing practices and to identify the barriers of using "evidence-based practice" (EBP). Descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 164 Saudi mental health nurses by completing the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The most frequently used sources of knowledge were relied on social interactions and the nurses' own experiences, while the least frequently used sources were external sources of knowledge and research evidences. Insufficient time to find research reports, difficulty in understanding research reports, and insufficient resources for evidences were the barriers of using EBP. The organizations should encourage using EBP by providing adequate time, resources, knowledge, and skills for mental health nurses through conducting workshops and mentoring. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The National Nursing Assistant Survey: Improving the Evidence Base for Policy Initiatives to Strengthen the Certified Nursing Assistant Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squillace, Marie R.; Remsburg, Robin E.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Bercovitz, Anita; Rosenoff, Emily; Han, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study introduces the first National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a major advance in the data available about certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and a rich resource for evidence-based policy, practice, and applied research initiatives. We highlight potential uses of this new survey using select population estimates as examples of…

  3. Developing a nursing personnel policy to address body art using an evidence-based model.

    PubMed

    Dorwart, Shawna D; Kuntz, Sandra W; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2010-12-01

    An increase in the prevalence of body art as a form of self-expression has motivated health care organizations to develop policies addressing nursing personnel's body art. A systematic review of literature on body art was completed and a telephone survey of 15 hospitals was conducted to query existing policy statements addressing nursing personnel's body art. The literature established no prevalence of body art among nurses or effect of nurses' body art. Of the 13 hospitals (86%) that shared their policy on body art, none provided a rationale or references to support their existing policies. A lack of published evidence identifying the effect of body art among nurses shifts the burden of determining care outcomes to the leadership of individual hospitals. Further research on patients' perception of nursing personnel with visible body art, using an evidence-based model, is recommended. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Developing an evidence-based curriculum designed to help psychiatric nurses learn to use computers and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Jakobsson, Tiina; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the systematic process in which an evidence-based approach was used to develop a curriculum designed to support the computer and Internet skills of nurses in psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The pressure on organizations to have skilled and motivated nurses who use modern information and communication technology in health care organizations has increased due to rapid technology development at the international and national levels. However, less frequently has the development of those computer education curricula been based on evidence-based knowledge. First, we identified psychiatric nurses' learning experiences and barriers to computer use by examining written essays. Second, nurses' computer skills were surveyed. Last, evidence from the literature was scrutinized to find effective methods that can be used to teach and learn computer use in health care. This information was integrated and used for the development process of an education curriculum designed to support nurses' computer and Internet skills.

  5. Pilot study for evidence-based nursing management: improving the levels of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to leave among nurses in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arslan Yurumezoglu, Havva; Kocaman, Gulseren

    2012-06-01

    Because of the nursing shortage problem, an important goal for nurse managers is preventing nurses from leaving the organization. This study analyzed the effect of evidence-based nursing management practices on nurses' levels of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to leave using the Promoting Action Research Implementation in Health Service framework as a guide. This study employed a single-group, quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test design with repeated measures. Data were collected using the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Organizational Commitment Scale. The study was conducted at a 127-bed private, accredited hospital. The sample was composed of 58 nurses who participated in all three measurements. Data analysis was conducted using repeated-measures anova and the Cochrane Q-test. An improvement was observed in the nurses' intrinsic, extrinsic, and total satisfaction levels, and in the degree of normative commitment. Nurse managers stated that they benefited from this study. In order to find effective and long-lasting solutions to the nursing shortage problem, evidence-based recommendations should be used in nursing management. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Shared decision making in chronic care in the context of evidence based practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Friesen-Storms, Jolanda H H M; Bours, Gerrie J J W; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna J H M

    2015-01-01

    In the decision-making environment of evidence-based practice, the following three sources of information must be integrated: research evidence of the intervention, clinical expertise, and the patient's values. In reality, evidence-based practice usually focuses on research evidence (which may be translated into clinical practice guidelines) and clinical expertise without considering the individual patient's values. The shared decision-making model seems to be helpful in the integration of the individual patient's values in evidence-based practice. We aim to discuss the relevance of shared decision making in chronic care and to suggest how it can be integrated with evidence-based practice in nursing. We start by describing the following three possible approaches to guide the decision-making process: the paternalistic approach, the informed approach, and the shared decision-making approach. Implementation of shared decision making has gained considerable interest in cases lacking a strong best-treatment recommendation, and when the available treatment options are equivalent to some extent. We discuss that in chronic care it is important to always invite the patient to participate in the decision-making process. We delineate the following six attributes of health care interventions in chronic care that influence the degree of shared decision making: the level of research evidence, the number of available intervention options, the burden of side effects, the impact on lifestyle, the patient group values, and the impact on resources. Furthermore, the patient's willingness to participate in shared decision making, the clinical expertise of the nurse, and the context in which the decision making takes place affect the shared decision-making process. A knowledgeable and skilled nurse with a positive attitude towards shared decision making—integrated with evidence-based practice—can facilitate the shared decision-making process. We conclude that nurses as well as other

  7. From Caterpillars to Butterflies: Engaging Nurse Leaders in Evidence-Based Practice Reform.

    PubMed

    Sanares-Carreon, Dolora

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) occurs when the integration of best evidence is brought to the bedside to ground patient care decisions. Barriers to EBP have lingered for years and held unabated. The experiences of an academic medical center offer fresh perspectives in devolving the accountability for EBP where care is provided and received by patients. More specifically, the initiative is a focused engagement of nurse leaders in administrative positions for energizing bedside nurses to reform the enculturation of EBP. The goal is not to control but to explore approaches of handling the barriers with a complexity mindset amidst uncertainties. Nurses' collective engagement is envisioned to spark or refine creative ideas that will steer and account for EBP outcomes. The flight of the butterfly is used as a metaphor; hence, the title for the Monarch Moments Initiative.

  8. Nursing staff's experiences of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room-An interview study.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Fredrika; Olausson, Sepideh; Fridh, Isabell; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-12-01

    It has been known for centuries that environment in healthcare has an impact, but despite this, environment has been overshadowed by technological and medical progress, especially in intensive care. Evidence-based design is a concept concerning integrating knowledge from various research disciplines and its application to healing environments. The aim was to explore the experiences of nursing staff of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room. Interviews were carried out with eight critical care nurses and five assistant nurses and then subjected to qualitative content analysis. The experience of working in an evidence-based designed intensive care unit patient room was that the room stimulates alertness and promotes wellbeing in the nursing staff, fostering their caring activities but also that the interior design of the medical and technical equipment challenges nursing actions. The room explored in this study had been rebuilt in order to create and evaluate a healing environment. This study showed that the new environment had a great impact on the caring staffs' wellbeing and their caring behaviour. At a time when turnover in nurses is high and sick leave is increasing, these findings show the importance of interior design ofintensive care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice (EBP): how nurse academics facilitate EBP use in theory and practice across Australian undergraduate programmes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-09-01

    This paper is drawn from a grounded theory study that aimed to investigate processes undertaken by academics when integrating evidence-based practice into undergraduate curricula. This paper focuses on how nurse academics facilitated students to apply evidence-based practice in theory and practice. Facilitating undergraduate nursing students to develop skills within an evidence-based practice framework is vital to achieving evidence-based care. Studies on evidence-based practice conducted globally suggests that there is a need to investigate approaches used by nurse academics in facilitating students' understanding and use of evidence-based practice during their nurse education. Employing constructivist grounded theory approach, 23 nurse academics across Australian universities were interviewed and nine observed during their teaching. Some study participants shared their unit guides to enrich analysis. Data analysis was performed by following Charmaz's approach of coding procedures; as a result, four categories were constructed. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice. Findings revealed that most academics-assisted students to use evidence in academic-related activities. Recognising the importance of evidence-based practice in practice, some also expected students to apply evidence-based practice during clinical experiences. However, the level of students' appreciation for evidence-based practice during clinical experiences was unknown to participants and was influenced by practice-related barriers. Acknowledging these challenges, academics were engaged in dialogue with students and suggested the need for academia-practice collaboration in combating the cited barriers. Ensuring academics are supported to emphasise clinical application of evidence-based practice requires strategies at school and practice levels. Faculty development, engagement of clinical nurses with evidence-based practice, supportive

  10. Developing information literacy: a key to evidence-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Shorten, A; Wallace, M C; Crookes, P A

    2001-06-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a curriculum-integrated programme designed to help students develop an awareness of the nursing literature, the skills to locate and retrieve it, and skills required in its evaluation; in other words'information literacy'. Positive changes in student performance on objective measures of information-literacy skills were revealed as well as a significant increase in the levels of confidence of the student in performing those skills. Students who had undertaken the information-literacy programme ('programme' students) performed better on a range of objective measures of information literacy, as well as reporting higher levels of confidence in these skills, than students who had not participated in the programme ('non-programme' students). Evaluation of this programme provides evidence of the potential usefulness of a curriculum-integrated approach for the development of information-literacy skills within nursing education. With these underlying skills, students will be better equipped to consolidate and extend their key information-literacy skills to include research appreciation and application. These are vital for effective lifelong learning and a prerequisite to evidence-based practice.

  11. Bringing values back into evidence-based nursing: the role of patients in resisting empiricism.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter; Morrow, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    We examine problems resulting from the narrow empirical focus associated with evidence-based nursing, including the deleterious influence of vested interests, disattention to patients' experiences, underestimation of the importance of social processes, lack of an individualized research perspective, marginalization of other forms of knowledge, and the undermining of patients' autonomy. Addressing each problem in turn, we argue that inclusion of patients at all stages of evidence-based practice can counter or ameliorate these problems. While we concede that patient involvement is not a complete solution to the problem of empiricism, it is the most effective means available to defend nursing values.

  12. Stuck in tradition-A qualitative study on barriers for implementation of evidence-based nutritional care perceived by nursing staff.

    PubMed

    O Connell, Malene Barfod; Jensen, Pia Søe; Andersen, Signe Lindgård; Fernbrant, Cecilia; Nørholm, Vibeke; Petersen, Helle Vendel

    2018-02-01

    To explore the barriers for nutritional care as perceived by nursing staff at an acute orthopaedic ward, aiming to implement evidence-based nutritional care. Previous studies indicate that nurses recognise nutritional care as important, but interventions are often lacking. These studies show that a range of barriers influence the attempt to optimise nutritional care. Before the implementation of evidence-based nutritional care, we examined barriers for nutritional care among the nursing staff. Qualitative study. Four focus groups with thirteen members of the nursing staff were interviewed between October 2013-June 2014. The interview guide was designed according to the Theoretical Domains Framework. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three main categories emerged: lacking common practice, failing to initiate treatment and struggling with existing resources. The nursing staff was lacking both knowledge and common practice regarding nutritional care. They felt they protected patient autonomy by accepting patient's reluctance to eat or getting a feeding tube. The lack of nutritional focus from doctors decreased the nursing staffs focus leading to nonoptimal nutritional treatment. Competing priorities, physical setting and limited nutritional supplements were believed to hinder nutritional care. The results suggest that nutritional care is in a transitional state from experience- to evidence-based practice. Barriers for nutritional care are grounded in lack of knowledge among nursing staff and insufficient collaboration between nursing staff and the doctors. There is a need for nutritional education for the nursing staff and better support from the organisation to help nursing staff provide evidence-based nutritional care. This study contributes with valuable knowledge before the implementation of evidence-based nutritional care. The study provides an understanding of barriers for nutritional care and presents explanations to why

  13. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  14. [Evidence-based practice competence in undergraduate Nursing Degree students].

    PubMed

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Molina-Salas, Yolanda; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) learning has become a key issue for nurses. An EPB subject was included in the 4(th) year in the new syllabus of the Nursing Degree at University of Murcia (UM). To know the competence level in EBP of undergraduate nursing students at UM and compare the results between all four years. Observational descriptive study with a cross-sectional approach. undergraduate nursing students from all four years at Nursing Degree at the Faculty of Social and Healthcare Science at UM in the year 2013-14. EBP evaluation of competence of the nursing students consisted of attitude, skills and knowledge on EBP. A validated questionnaire, the EBP-COQ, was used. The scale range is 1 point «lowest level» to 5 points «higher level».The SPSS 21.0 program has been used to carry out descriptive and bivariate analyses. 144 students were included, 76.4% was female, and the median age was 23 years, 84.7% attended more than 75% class hours. The mean differences in the questionnaire between first and fourth years were 0.58 points in attitude, 0.60 in skills, 1.6 in knowledge and 0.83 in global competence in EBP. Significant differences in mean scores between the fourth and the remaining years in the global competence in EBP were observed, as well as in the three dimensions (p <0.05). The undergraduate-nursing students studied here have acquired an appropriate competence level in EBP, with a gradual increase by year. The biggest increase was in the fourth year students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Introducing Research and Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses Jolley Jeremy Introducing Research and Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses 168pp Pearson Education 9780273719168 0273719165 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2011-01-12

    This is a curious book of contradictions. On the one hand, it is easy to read, there is good use of humour and it offers sound advice. On the other, its title refers to evidence-based practice for nurses, but there is only one chapter devoted to it.

  16. Korean Nursing Students' Acquisition of Evidence-Based Practice and Critical Thinking Skills.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Suk; Kim, Eun Joo; Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Geun Myun; Baek, Hee Chong

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential for enhancing nurses' quality of care. We identified Korean nursing students' practices, attitudes, and knowledge concerning EBP, as well as their critical thinking disposition (CTD). The EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) was administered to a convenience sample of 266 nursing students recruited from four nursing schools in Seoul and its metropolitan area. Average EBPQ and CTD total scores were 4.69 ± 0.64 and 3.56 ± 0.32, respectively. Students who were ages ⩾23 years, male, and satisfied with their major demonstrated higher EBPQ and CTD scores. EBPQ scores were significantly correlated with CTD scores (r = .459, p < .01), and CTD was an explanatory factor of EBP (adjusted R 2 = 0.200). It is necessary to develop comprehensive teaching strategies to help nursing students improve their CTD and information utilization skills, as well as integrate EBP in undergraduate programs to enhance nurses' EBP abilities. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):21-27.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Clinician Adoption Patterns and Patient Outcome Results in Use of Evidence-Based Nursing Plans of Care

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Youn; Lang, Norma M.; Berg, Karen; Weaver, Charlotte; Murphy, Judy; Ela, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of safe, effective and appropriate health care is an imperative facing health care organizations globally. While many initiatives have been launched in a number of countries to address this need from a medical perspective, a similar focus for generating evidence-based nursing knowledge has been missing [1]. This paper reports on a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) research initiative that adds nursing knowledge into computerized care protocols. Here, a brief overview of the study’s aims, purpose and methodology is presented as well as results of data analysis and lessons learned. The research team examined nurses’ adoption patterns of EBP recommendations with respect to activity tolerance using four-month patient data collected from a pilot hospital. Study findings indicate a need for more focus on the system design and implementation process with the next rollout phase to promote evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:18693871

  18. Evidence-based practice knowledge, attitudes, and practice of online graduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn; Rice, Jan

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in evidence-based practice (EBP) knowledge, attitudes, and practice of nursing students before and after completing an online, graduate level, introductory research/EBP course. A prospective one-group pretest-posttest design. A private university in the Midwestern, USA. Sixty-three online nurse practitioner students in Master's program. A convenient sample of online graduate nursing students who enrolled in the research/EBP course was invited to participate in the study. Study outcomes were measured using the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ) before and after completing the course. Descriptive statistics and paired-Samples t-test was used to assess the mean differences between pre-and post-test scores. Overall, students' post-test EBP scores were significantly improved over pre-test scores, t(63)=-9.034, p<0.001). Statistically significant differences were found for practice of EBP mean scores t(63)=-12.78, p=0.001). No significant differences were found between pre and post-tests on knowledge and attitudes toward EBP scores. Most frequently cited barriers to EBP were lack of understanding of statistics, interpretation of findings, lack of time, and lack of library resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards evidence-based management: creating an informative database of nursing-sensitive indicators.

    PubMed

    Patrician, Patricia A; Loan, Lori; McCarthy, Mary; Brosch, Laura R; Davey, Kimberly S

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the creation, evolution, and implementation of a database of nursing-sensitive and potentially nursing-sensitive indicators, the Military Nursing Outcomes Database (MilNOD). It discusses data quality, utility, and lessons learned. Prospective data collected each shift include direct staff hours by levels (i.e., registered nurse, other licensed and unlicensed providers), staff categories (i.e., military, civilian, contract, and reservist), patient census, acuity, and admissions, discharges, and transfers. Retrospective adverse event data (falls, medication errors, and needle-stick injuries) were collected from existing records. Annual patient satisfaction, nurse work environment, and pressure ulcer and restraint prevalence surveys were conducted. The MilNOD contains shift level data from 56 units in 13 military hospitals and is used to target areas for managerial and clinical performance improvement. This methodology can be modified for use in other healthcare systems. As standard tools for evidence-based management, databases such as MilNOD allow nurse leaders to track the status of nursing and adverse events in their facilities. No claim to original US government works.

  20. NICU nurse educators: what evidence supports your teaching strategies?

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2013-01-01

    One of our roles as nurse educators is to teach best practices related to patient care. However, have you ever stopped to think about what evidence supports your teaching strategies? Just as our patients deserve care that is based on the best available evidence, our learners also deserve education that is based on evidence.1-3 With so many advances in knowledge, technology, and even life itself, it is interesting that education has changed very little over the past 100 years. A study among 946 nurse educators documented that most teach the way they were taught.4 In addition, even after learning new strategies, educators often continue teaching in the manner they are most comfortable. However, this trend is beginning to change. Nurse educators are becoming increasingly aware of and willing to try new and innovative teaching strategies. Educators are also seeking out evidence-based teaching strategies and are becoming more involved in nursing education research.

  1. An exploration of the roles of nurse managers in evidence-based practice implementation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joyce E; Nutley, Sandra M; Davies, Huw T O

    2011-12-01

    Internationally, nurses face ongoing difficulties in making a reality of evidence-based practice. Existing studies suggest that nurse managers (NMs) should play a key role in leading and facilitating evidence-based practice, but the nature of this role has not yet been fully explored or articulated. This is one of the first studies to investigate the roles of NMs in evidence-based practice implementation. METHODOLOGY AND METHODS: Using a case study approach the study explores five propositions in relation to the NMs' potential evidence-based practice role and the extent to which their attitudes, knowledge, and skills support such a role. In doing so, it draws on interviews (n= 51), documentary analysis and observational data. Data analysis reveals that the role of NMs in facilitating evidence-based practice is under-articulated, largely passive and currently limited by competing demands. Progress in implementing evidence-based practice in the case study sites is largely explained by factors other than the role played by NMs. As such, the findings expose significant discrepancies between NMs' actual roles and those espoused in the literature as being necessary. Contextual factors are important and it is clear that the role of the contemporary NM places considerable emphasis on management and administration to the detriment of clinical practice concerns. The study reveals that NMs are only involved in evidence-based practice implementation in a passive role, not the full engagement described in the literature as being necessary. This study adds previously lacking detail of the roles of NMs. It elucidates why exhortations to NMs to become more involved in evidence-based practice implementation are ineffective without action to address the problems identified. Copyright ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Can Nursing Students Practice What Is Preached? Factors Impacting Graduating Nurses' Abilities and Achievement to Apply Evidence-Based Practices.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Ian R; Giles, Tracey M

    2017-04-01

    In order to meet national Australian nursing registration requisites, nurses need to meet competency requirements for evidence-based practices (EBPs). A hypothetical model was formulated to explore factors that influenced Australian nursing students' ability and achievement to understand and employ EBPs related to health care provision. A nonexperimental, descriptive survey method was used to identify self-reported EBP efficacy estimates of 375 completing undergraduate nursing students. Factors influencing participants' self-rated EBP abilities were validated by Rasch analysis and then modeled using the partial least squares analysis (PLS Path) program. Graduating nursing students' ability to understand and apply EBPs for clinical improvement can be directly and indirectly predicted by eight variables including their understanding in the analysis, critique and synthesis of clinically based nursing research, their ability to communicate research to others and whether they had actually witnessed other staff delivering EBP. Forty-one percent of the variance in the nursing students' self-rated EBP efficacy scores is able to be accounted for by this model. Previous exposure to EBP studies facilitates participants' confidence with EBP, particularly with concurrent clinical EBP experiences. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Approaches, knowledge and capabilities of nurses and physicians regarding evidence-based clinical practice in the Imbadura province (Ecuador)].

    PubMed

    Molina Mula, Jesús; Muñoz Navarro, Paulina; Vaca Auz, Janeth; Cabascango Cabascango, Carmita; Cabascango Cabascango, Katty

    2015-01-01

    The research raises the need to increase understanding of organizational and personal factors that influence the attitude and aptitude of each professional, with respect to evidence-based clinical practice. The aim of this study is to describe the transfer of knowledge into clinical practice in hospital units in Imbabura (Ecuador) identifying the obstacles to implementing evidence-based clinical practice validated questionnaire EBPQ-19. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in hospitals of the Ministry of Public Health of Imbabura of Ecuador took place, including a total of 281 nurses and physicians. Nurses and physicians showed positive attitudes toward evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) and their use to support clinical decision-making. This research evidences perceptions of professionals on strategies for knowledge transfer and obstacles to carry it out. Significant differences between the perception of the use of EBCP strategies between nurses and physicians are observed. Physicians consider they use them frequently, while nurses acknowledge using them less (chi-square: 105.254, P=.018). In conclusion, we can say that these factors should be considered as necessary to improve the quality of care that is provided to users based on the best available evidence. It is necessary to start developing change interventions in this regard to remedy the current situation of clinical practice based not on evidence, but rather on experience only. Experimental studies demonstrating the effectiveness of strategies to eliminate barriers to scientific evidence-based clinical practice should be conducted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. ICU nurses' oral-care practices and the current best evidence.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser Ganz, Freda; Fink, Naomi Farkash; Raanan, Ofra; Asher, Miriam; Bruttin, Madeline; Nun, Maureen Ben; Benbinishty, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the oral-care practices of ICU nurses, to compare those practices with current evidence-based practice, and to determine if the use of evidence-based practice was associated with personal demographic or professional characteristics. A national survey of oral-care practices of ICU nurses was conducted using a convenience sample of 218 practicing ICU nurses in 2004-05. The survey instrument included questions about demographic and professional characteristics and a checklist of oral-care practices. Nurses rated their perceived level of priority concerning oral care on a scale from 0 to 100. A score was computed representing the sum of 14 items related to equipment, solutions, assessments, and techniques associated with the current best evidence. This score was then statistically analyzed using ANOVA to determine differences of EBP based on demographic and professional characteristics. The most commonly used equipment was gauze pads (84%), followed by tongue depressors (55%), and toothbrushes (34%). Chlorhexidine was the most common solution used (75%). Less than half (44%) reported brushing their patients' teeth. The majority performed an oral assessment before beginning oral care (71%); however, none could describe what assessment tool was used. Only 57% of nurses reported documenting their oral care. Nurses rated oral care of intubated patients with a priority of 67+/-27.1. Wide variations were noted within and between units in terms of which techniques, equipment, and solutions were used. No significant relationships were found between the use of an evidence-based protocol and demographic and professional characteristics or with the priority given to oral care. While nurses ranked oral care a high priority, many did not implement the latest evidence into their current practice. The level of research utilization was not related to personal or professional characteristics. Therefore attempts should be made to encourage all

  6. A systematic review of selected evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haobin; Williams, Beverly A; Fan, Lin

    2008-08-01

    Rapidly changing developments and expanding roles in healthcare environment requires professional nurses to develop critical thinking. Nursing education strives to facilitate students' critical thinking through the appropriate instructional approaches. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered approach to learning which enables the students to work cooperatively in small groups for seeking solutions to situations/problems. The systematic review was conducted to provide the available evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through PBL. The computerized searches from 1990-2006 in CINAHL, Proquest, Cochrane library, Pubmed etc were performed. All studies which addressed the differences in critical thinking among nursing students in PBL were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. As a result, only ten studies were retrieved, they were: one RCT with a Jadad quality score of 3, one nonrandomized control study, two quasi-experimental studies with non-controlled pretest-posttest design, and six descriptive studies. The available evidence in this review did not provide supportive evidence on developing nursing students' critical thinking through PBL. Clearly, there is a need for additional research with larger sample size and high quality to clarify the effects of PBL on critical thinking development within nursing educational context.

  7. Stroke unit Nurse Managers' views of individual and organizational factors liable to influence evidence-based practice: A survey.

    PubMed

    Drury, Peta; McInnes, Elizabeth; Hardy, Jennifer; Dale, Simeon; Middleton, Sandy

    2016-04-01

    The uptake of evidence into practice may be impeded or facilitated by individual and organizational factors within the local context. This study investigated Nurse Managers of New South Wales, Australia, stroke units (n = 19) in their views on: leadership ability (measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory), organizational learning (measured by the Organizational Learning Survey), attitudes and beliefs towards evidence-based practice (EBP) and readiness for change. Overall Nurse Managers reported high-level leadership skills and a culture of learning. Nurse Managers' attitude towards EBP was positive, although nursing colleague's attitudes were perceived as less positive. Nurse Managers agreed that implementing evidence in practice places additional demands on staff; and almost half (n = 9, 47%) reported that resources were not available for evidence implementation. The findings indicate that key persons responsible for evidence implementation are not allocated sufficient time to coordinate and implement guidelines into practice. The findings suggest that barriers to evidence uptake, including insufficient resources and time constraints, identified by Nurse Managers in this study are not likely to be unique to stroke units. Furthermore, Nurse Managers may be unable to address these organizational barriers (i.e. lack of resources) and thus provide all the components necessary to implement EBP. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Nurse-Led Interventions for Hypertension: A Scoping Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lori A; Bader, Susan Gerding; Opollo, Jackline G; Gray, Jennifer

    2018-06-14

    Hypertension is the leading preventable contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, affecting 1 billion people globally. Low- and middle-income countries have increasing rates of hypertension, much of it undiagnosed. The purpose of the project is to review studies of nurse-led hypertension interventions that have been implemented in East Africa and to inform hypertension interventions in low-resource settings. A scoping review was conducted following Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) format. An electronic search in six databases for citations was conducted by the medical librarian author. The parameters for this scoping review were nurse interventions related to hypertension in East Africa. Fourteen full-text articles were identified that met inclusion criteria. Nurse-led interventions for hypertension were found to increase access to care and be cost- effective. Medication Adherence Clubs were an innovative intervention that increased the retention of patients in care. This scoping review provides evidence from studies of nurse-led hypertension interventions in East Africa relevant to implementing or improving hypertension screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Nurses provide 80% of health care in East Africa, and nurse-led hypertension interventions are critically needed to ameliorate the significant hypertension-related increases in morbidity and mortality globally. © 2018 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  9. Changing Nephrology Nurses' Beliefs about the Value of Evidence-Based Practice and Their Ability to Implement in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Hain, Debra; Haras, Mary S

    2015-01-01

    A rapidly evolving healthcare environment demands sound research evidence to inform clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. Over the past several decades, nurses have generated new knowledge by conducting research studies, but it takes time for this evidence to be implemented in practice. As nurses strive to be leaders and active participants in healthcare redesign, it is essential that they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Professional nursing organizations can make substantial contributions to the move healthcare quality forward by providing EBP workshops similar to those conducted by the American Nephrology Nurses'Association.

  10. Just-in-Time Evidence-Based E-mail “Reminders” in Home Health Care: Impact on Nurse Practices

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Pezzin, Liliana E; McDonald, Margaret V; Feldman, Penny H; Peng, Timothy R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of two interventions designed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices by home health nurses caring for heart failure (HF) patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Information on nurse practices was abstracted from the clinical records of patients admitted between June 2000 and November 2001 to the care of 354 study nurses at a large, urban, nonprofit home care agency. Study Design The study employed a randomized design with nurses assigned to usual care or one of two intervention groups upon identification of an eligible patient. The basic intervention was a one-time e-mail reminder highlighting six HF-specific clinical recommendations. The augmented intervention consisted of the initial e-mail reminder supplemented by provider prompts, patient education material, and clinical nurse specialist outreach. Data Collection At each home health visit provided by a study nurse to an eligible HF patient during the 45-day follow-up period, a structured chart abstraction tool was used to collect information on whether the nurse provided the care practices highlighted in the e-mail reminder. Principal Findings Both the basic and the augmented interventions greatly increased the practice of evidence-based care, according to patient records, in the areas of patient assessment and instructions about HF disease management. While not all results were statistically significant at conventional levels, intervention effects were positive in virtually all cases and effect magnitudes frequently were large. Conclusions The results of this randomized trial strongly support the efficacy of just-in-time evidence-based reminders as a means of changing clinical practice among home health nurses who are geographically dispersed and spend much of their time in the field. PMID:15960694

  11. Towards evidence-based palliative care in nursing homes in Sweden: a qualitative study informed by the organizational readiness to change theory.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Per; Wallerstedt, Birgitta; Behm, Lina; Ahlström, Gerd

    2018-01-04

    Sweden has a policy of supporting older people to live a normal life at home for as long as possible. Therefore, it is often the oldest, most frail people who move into nursing homes. Nursing home staff are expected to meet the existential needs of the residents, yet conversations about death and dying tend to cause emotional strain. This study explores organizational readiness to implement palliative care based on evidence-based guidelines in nursing homes in Sweden. The aim was to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based palliative care in nursing homes. Interviews were carried out with 20 managers from 20 nursing homes in two municipalities who had participated along with staff members in seminars aimed at conveying knowledge and skills of relevance for providing evidence-based palliative care. Two managers responsible for all elderly care in each municipality were also interviewed. The questions were informed by the theory of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC). ORC was also used as a framework to analyze the data by means of categorizing barriers and facilitators for implementing evidence-based palliative care. Analysis of the data yielded ten factors (i.e., sub-categories) acting as facilitators and/or barriers. Four factors constituted barriers: the staff's beliefs in their capabilities to face dying residents, their attitudes to changes at work as well as the resources and time required. Five factors functioned as either facilitators or barriers because there was considerable variation with regard to the staff's competence and confidence, motivation, and attitudes to work in general, as well as the managers' plans and decisional latitude concerning efforts to develop evidence-based palliative care. Leadership was a facilitator to implementing evidence-based palliative care. There is a limited organizational readiness to develop evidence-based palliative care as a result of variation in the nursing home staff's change efficacy

  12. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice in Relation to a Clinical Nursing Ladder System: A National Survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Chiehfeng; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lo, Heng-Lien; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies have investigated its correlation with a clinical nursing ladder system. The current national study evaluates whether EBP implementation has been incorporated into the clinical ladder system. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted nationwide of registered nurses among regional hospitals of Taiwan in January to April 2011. Subjects were categorized into beginning nurses (N1 and N2) and advanced nurses (N3 and N4) by the clinical ladder system. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to adjust for possible confounding demographic factors. Results Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 4,206 nurses, including 2,028 N1, 1,595 N2, 412 N3, and 171 N4 nurses. Advanced nurses were more aware of EBP than beginning nurses (p < 0.001; 90.7% vs. 78.0%). In addition, advanced nurses were more likely to hold positive beliefs about and attitudes toward EBP (p < 0.001) and possessed more sufficient knowledge of and skills in EBP (p < 0.001). Furthermore, they more often implemented EBP principles (p < 0.001) and accessed online evidence-based retrieval databases (p < 0.001). The most common motivation for using online databases was self-learning for advanced nurses and positional promotion for beginning nurses. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed advanced nurses were more aware of EBP, had higher knowledge and skills of EBP, and more often implemented EBP than beginning nurses. Linking Evidence to Action The awareness of, beliefs in, attitudes toward, knowledge of, skills in, and behaviors of EBP among advanced nurses were better than those among beginning nurses. The data indicate that a clinical ladder system can serve as a useful means to enhance EBP implementation. PMID:25588625

  13. Specialized nursing practice for chronic disease management in the primary care setting: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    1) based on moderate quality evidence, with consistent results among a subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes based on low quality evidence. Model 2 showed an overall improvement in appropriate process measures, disease-specific measures, and patient satisfaction based on low to moderate quality evidence. There was low quality evidence that nurses working under Model 2 may reduce hospitalizations for patients with coronary artery disease. The specific role of the nurse in supplementing or substituting physician care was unclear, making it difficult to determine the impact on efficiency. Nurses with additional skills, training, or scope of practice may help improve the primary care of patients with chronic diseases. This review found that specialized nurses working on their own could achieve health outcomes that were similar to those of doctors. It also found that specialized nurses who worked with doctors could reduce hospital visits and improve certain patient outcomes related to diabetes, coronary artery disease, or heart failure. Patients who had nurse-led care were more satisfied and tended to receive more tests and medications. It is unclear whether specialized nurses improve quality of life or doctor workload.

  14. "Keeping on track"-Hospital nurses' struggles with maintaining workflow while seeking to integrate evidence-based practice into their daily work: A grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Renolen, Åste; Høye, Sevald; Hjälmhult, Esther; Danbolt, Lars Johan; Kirkevold, Marit

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is considered a foundation for the provision of quality care and one way to integrate scientific knowledge into clinical problem-solving. Despite the extensive amount of research that has been conducted to evaluate evidence-based practice implementation and research utilization, these practices have not been sufficiently incorporated into nursing practice. Thus, additional research regarding the challenges clinical nurses face when integrating evidence-based practice into their daily work and the manner in which these challenges are approached is needed. The aim of this study was to generate a theory about the general patterns of behaviour that are discovered when clinical nurses attempt to integrate evidence-based practice into their daily work. We used Glaser's classical grounded theory methodology to generate a substantive theory. The study was conducted in two different medical wards in a large Norwegian hospital. In one ward, nurses and nursing assistants were developing and implementing new evidence-based procedures, and in the other ward, evidence-based huddle boards for risk assessment were being implemented. A total of 54 registered nurses and 9 assistant nurses were observed during their patient care and daily activities. Of these individuals, thirteen registered nurses and five assistant nurses participated in focus groups. These participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data were collected during 90h of observation and 4 focus groups conducted from 2014 to 2015. Each focus group session included four to five participants and lasted between 55 and 65min. Data collection and analysis were performed concurrently, and the data were analysed using the constant comparative method. "Keeping on track" emerged as an explanatory theory for the processes through which the nurses handled their main concern: the risk of losing the workflow. The following three strategies were used by nurses when attempting to integrate evidence-based

  15. Integrating evidence-based practice into RN-to-BSN clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eui Geum; Kim, Sunah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sue; Cho, Eun Yong; Yoo, Ji-Soo; Kim, Hee Soon; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Mi Ae; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    This study examines the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into clinical practicum on EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization among Korean RN-to-BSN students. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-one students were recruited from a school of nursing in Korea. Evidence-based practice clinical practicum was composed of two consecutive programs during one semester. Lectures, individual mentoring on EBP practicum, small group, and wrap-up conferences were provided. Outcomes of EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization were analyzed using paired t tests for 74 final participants. Evidence-based practice efficacy scores increased significantly (p < 0.05), and the barriers to research utilization scores decreased significantly after the EBP clinical practicum. The results highlight the effectiveness of EBP education among RN-to-BSN students. These results may help health educators develop effective educational strategies to integrate EBP concepts into a clinical practicum. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Impact of Online Education on Nurses' Delivery of Smoking Cessation Interventions With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Bialous, Stella A; Sarna, Linda; Wells, Marjorie J; Brook, Jenny K; Kralikova, Eva; Pankova, Alexandra; Zatoński, Witold; Przewozniak, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Europe and worldwide. Nurses, if properly educated, can contribute to decreasing the burden of tobacco use in the region by helping smokers quit smoking. To assess: (a) the feasibility of an online program to educate nurses in Czech Republic and Poland on evidence-based smoking cessation interventions for patients and (b) self-reported changes in practices related to consistently (usually or always) providing smoking cessation interventions to smokers, before and 3 months after participation in the program. A prospective single-group pre-post design. A total of 280 nurses from Czech Republic and 156 from Poland completed baseline and follow-up surveys. At 3 months, nurses were significantly more likely to provide smoking cessation interventions to patients who smoke and refer patients for cessation services (p < .01). Nurses significantly improved their views about the importance of nursing involvement in tobacco control. Education about tobacco control can make a difference in clinical practice, but ongoing support is needed to maintain these changes. Health system changes can also facilitate the expectation that delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions should be routine nursing care. Educating nurses on cessation interventions and tobacco control is pivotal to decrease tobacco-related disparities, disease, and death. Online methods provide an accessible way to reach a large number of nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

  18. An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice: the model of the interrelationship of leadership, environments, and outcomes for nurse executives (MILE ONE).

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Jones, Dorothy A; Paulo, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Identifying and measuring success within the chief nurse executive (CNE) population have proven complex and challenging for nurse executive educators, policy makers, practitioners, researchers, theory developers, and their constituents. The model of the interrelationship of leadership, environments, and outcomes for nurse executives (MILE ONE) was developed using the concept of consilience (jumping together of ideas) toward limiting the ambiguity surrounding CNE success. The MILE ONE is unique in that it links existing evidence and identifies the continuous and dependent interrelationship among 3 content areas: (1) CNE; (2) nurses' professional practice and work environments; and (3) patient and organizational outcomes. The MILE ONE was developed to operationalize nurse executive influence, define measurement of CNE success, and provide a framework to articulate for patient, workforce, and organizational outcome improvement efforts. This article describes the MILE ONE and highlights the evidence base structure used in its development.

  19. Nurse clinic versus home delivery of evidence-based community leg ulcer care: A randomized health services trial

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Lorimer, Karen; VandenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Buchanan, Maureen; Wells, Phil S; Brandys, Tim; Pierscianowski, Tadeusz

    2008-01-01

    Background International studies report that nurse clinics improve healing rates for the leg ulcer population. However, these studies did not necessarily deliver similar standards of care based on evidence in the treatment venues (home and clinic). A rigorous evaluation of home versus clinic care is required to determine healing rates with equivalent care and establish the acceptability of clinic-delivered care. Methods Health Services RCT was conducted where mobile individuals were allocated to either home or nurse clinic for leg ulcer management. In both arms, care was delivered by specially trained nurses, following an evidence protocol. Primary outcome: 3-month healing rates. Secondary outcomes: durability of healing (recurrence), time free of ulcers, HRQL, satisfaction, resource use. Data were collected at base-line, every 3 months until healing occurred, with 1 year follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results 126 participants, 65 randomized to receive care in their homes, 61 to nurse-run clinics. No differences found between groups at baseline on socio-demographic, HRQL or clinical characteristics. mean age 69 years, 68% females, 84% English-speaking, half with previous episode of ulceration, 60% ulcers at inclusion < 5 cm2 for < 6 months. No differences in 3-month healing rates: clinic 58.3% compared to home care at 56.7% (p = 0.5) or in secondary outcomes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that organization of care not the setting where care is delivered influences healing rates. Key factors are a system that supports delivery of evidence-based recommendations with care being provided by a trained nursing team resulting in equivalent healing rates, HRQL whether care is delivered in the home or in a community nurse-led clinic. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System: NCT00656383 PMID:19036149

  20. A unique collaborative nursing evidence-based practice initiative using the Iowa model: a clinical nurse specialist, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse's success story.

    PubMed

    Krom, Zachary R; Batten, Janene; Bautista, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to share how the collaboration of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), a health science librarian, and a staff nurse can heighten staff nurses' awareness of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process. The staff nurse is expected to incorporate EBP into daily patient care. This expectation is fueled by the guidelines established by professional, accrediting, and regulatory bodies. Barriers to incorporating EBP into practice have been well documented in the literature. A CNS, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse collaborated to develop an EBP educational program for staff nurses. The staff nurse provides the real-time practice issues, the CNS gives extensive knowledge of translating research into practice, and the health science librarian is an expert at retrieving the information from the literature. The resulting collaboration at this academic medical center has increased staff nurse exposure to and knowledge about EBP principles and techniques. The collaborative relationship among the CNS, health science librarian, and staff nurse effectively addresses a variety of barriers to EBP. This successful collaborative approach can be utilized by other medical centers seeking to educate staff nurses about the EBP process.

  1. Information seeking and retrieval skills of nurses: Nurses readiness for evidence based practice in hospitals of a medical university in Iran.

    PubMed

    Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Khajouei, Reza; Ahmadian, Leila

    2015-08-01

    With the explosion of medical information, and emergence of evidence-based practice (EBP) in healthcare system, searching, retrieving and selecting information for clinical decision-making are becoming required skills for nurses. The aims of this study were to examine the use of different medical information resources by nurses and their information searching and retrieving skills in the context of EBP. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in four teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were collected from 182 nurses using a questionnaire in 2014. The nurses indicated that they use more human and printed resources than electronic resources to seek information (mean=2.83, SD=1.5; mean=2.77, SD=1.07; and mean=2.13, SD=0.88, respectively). To search online resources, the nurses use quick/basic search features more frequently (mean=2.45, SD=1.15) than other search features such as advanced search, index browsing and MeSH term searching. (1.74≤mean≤2.30, SD=1.01). At least 80% of the nurses were not aware of the purpose or function of search operators such as Boolean and proximity operators. In response to the question measuring skills of the nurses in developing an effective search statement by using Boolean operators, only 20% of them selected the more appropriate statement, using some synonyms of the concepts in a given subject. The study showed that the information seeking and retrieval skills of the nurses were poor and there were clear deficits in the use of updated information resources. To compensate their EBP incompetency, nurses may resort to human resources. In order to use the latest up to date evidence independently, nurses need to improve their information literacy. To reach this goal, clinical librarians, health information specialists, nursing faculties, and clinical nurse educators and mentors can play key roles by providing educational programs. Providing access to online resources in clinical wards can also encourage nurses to learn and use

  2. Assessment of nurses' knowledge on evidence-based preventive practices for pressure ulcer risk reduction in patients with impaired mobility.

    PubMed

    Akese, M I; Adejumo, P O; Ilesanmi, R E; Obilor, H N

    2014-09-01

    The increase in the prevalence of pressure ulcer among patients with impaired physical mobility has currently been associated with nurses' inadequate knowledge of preventive interventions. To assess nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors and evidence-based preventive practices. This descriptive study was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital Maiduguri (UMTH), Borno State, Nigeria. Total sampling technique was utilized in the recruitment of the study participants. An adapted 75-item-pressure ulcer questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. The hypotheses on nurses' knowledge were tested at 0.05 level of significance using Chi square test. A total of 219 nurses participated in this study with response rate of 68.0%. The nurses' years of professional practice ranged from 1 to 35 years with a mean of 11.7 (± 7.8) years. Approximately, 73% of the nurses demonstrated a low level of knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, 69.4% demonstrated an average level of knowledge of risk factors and 79.9% demonstrated high level of knowledge of preventive practices. The relationship between nurses' knowledge of risk factors and knowledge of preventive practices (p = 0.37) was not significant. Nurses demonstrated a knowledge deficit in core areas on pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors' assessment and evidence-based preventive practices. In order to address this dearth, there is a need to institute an educational-based practice-guideline on pressure ulcer prevention for nurses.

  3. Evidence for the Existing American Nurses Association-Recognized Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Sevinc; Linch, Graciele C. F.; Keenan, Gail M.; Stifter, Janet; McKinney, Dawn; Fahey, Linda; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Yao, Yingwei; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    records (n = 12), and secondary use of electronic health record data (n = 19). Conclusions Findings reveal that the number of standardized nursing terminology publications increased primarily since 2000 with most focusing on North American Nursing Diagnosis-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcome Classification. The majority of the studies were descriptive, qualitative, or correlational designs that provide a strong base for understanding the validity and reliability of the concepts underlying the standardized nursing terminologies. There is evidence supporting the successful integration and use in electronic health records for two standardized nursing terminology sets: (1) the North American Nursing Diagnosis-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcome Classification set; and (2) the Omaha System set. Researchers, however, should continue to strengthen standardized nursing terminology study designs to promote continuous improvement of the standardized nursing terminologies and use in clinical practice. PMID:24412062

  4. Team based learning in nursing and midwifery higher education; a systematic review of the evidence for change.

    PubMed

    Dearnley, Chris; Rhodes, Christine; Roberts, Peter; Williams, Pam; Prenton, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the evidence in relation to the experiences and outcomes of students on nursing and/or midwifery higher education programmes, who experience team based learning. To examine the relationship between team based learning and attainment for nursing and midwifery students in professional higher education. To examine the relationship between team based learning and student satisfaction for nurses and midwifery students in higher education. To identify and report examples of good practice in the implementation of team based learning in Nursing and Midwifery higher education. A systematic Review of the literature was undertaken. The population were nurses and midwives studying on higher education pre and post registration professional programmes. The intervention was learning and teaching activities based on a team-based learning approach. Data sources included CINAHL and MEDLINE. ERIC and Index to Theses were also searched. International research papers published in English between 2011 and 2017 that met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Papers that met the criteria were subjected to quality appraisal and agreement amongst authors for inclusion in the review. A total of sixteen papers were reviewed and four themes emerged for discussion. These were Student Engagement, Student Satisfaction, Attainment and Practice Development and Transformational Teaching and Learning. There is a tentative, though growing body of evidence to support TBL as a strategy that can impact on student engagement, student satisfaction, attainment, practice development and transformative teaching and learning. The literature indicates that implementing TBL within the curriculum is not without challenge and requires a sustained and structured approach. Staff and students need to understand the processes involved, and why they should be adhered to, in the pursuit of enhanced student experiences and outcomes for nurses and midwives in Higher Education

  5. Nursing and midwifery use, perceptions and barriers to evidence-based practice: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Fry, Margaret; Attawet, Jutharat

    2018-03-01

    The study aimed to explore how nurses and midwives obtain, use and embed evidence in everyday practice. The study design was cross-sectional survey method. The setting was one local health district in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. All nurses and midwives working within the local health district, with access to an email account, were invited to participate in the study. An online survey questionnaire was distributed to explore how evidence is obtained, used and embedded within the clinical setting. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages). Pearson's Chi-square tests were used for comparison between groups. There were 204 survey respondents. The findings identified that the majority (n = 157; 76.96%) of respondents obtained evidence primarily from clinical practice guidelines. The majority (n = 149; 73.04%) of respondents reportedly searched databases and used evidence related to general clinical practice. There was a statistical difference (χ = 17.069; df = 8; P = 0.029) when comparing leadership positions and other registered practitioner groups in the frequency of searching for evidence. Most respondents (n = 138; 67.65%) were confident in their ability to change practice on the basis of available evidence. Thematic analysis identified four barriers to sustaining evidence-based practice, which included: the need for time; the need for organizational and management support; the need for educational opportunities and challenges to accessing evidence. The study provided an understanding of how nurses and midwives obtain, use and embed evidence into everyday practice. More importantly, the role of leadership is significant to support a process of knowledge generation, research translation and the implementation of evidence into clinical settings.

  6. Virtual Simulations: A Creative, Evidence-Based Approach to Develop and Educate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The use of virtual simulations in nursing is an innovative strategy that is increasing in application. There are several terms related to virtual simulation; although some are used interchangeably, the meanings are not the same. This article presents examples of virtual simulation, virtual worlds, and virtual patients in continuing education, staff development, and academic nursing education. Virtual simulations in nursing use technology to provide safe, as realistic as possible clinical practice for nurses and nursing students. Virtual simulations are useful for learning new skills; practicing a skill that puts content, high-order thinking, and psychomotor elements together; skill competency learning; and assessment for low-volume, high-risk skills. The purpose of this article is to describe the related terms, examples, uses, theoretical frameworks, challenges, and evidence related to virtual simulations in nursing.

  7. A failed model-based attempt to implement an evidence-based nursing guideline for fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Semin-Goossens, Astrid; van der Helm, Jelle M J; Bossuyt, Patrick M M

    2003-01-01

    An evidence-based nursing guideline had been locally developed in 1993 to reduce fall incidence rates, creating a 30% reduction. Implementation had failed though. Between 1999 and 2001 the guideline was updated. A multifaceted intervention was chosen based on a model for implementing change. The study was performed in 2 wards. All recommendations of Grol's 5-step implementation model were followed. The aim was a reduction of 30% in fall incidence within a year. Data on falls were extracted from nursing records and Incidence Report Forms (IRFs). In a pilot study an average of 9 falls per 1000 patients per day had been recorded in the department of internal medicine and 16 in the neurology ward. Given the desired reduction of 30%, the target averages were 6 and 11 falls respectively. During the intervention year the average incidences were 8 and 13 falls (95% CI: 6-11 and 10-15). There was a changeable pattern over time without any declining trend. The percentage filled in IRFs varied strongly, with an average of 52% in the department of internal medicine and 60% in the neurology department. There has been no durable decrease in monthly falls despite the use of a model-based procedure for implementing change. Neither did we observe any improvement in filling in IRFs. It can be questioned if the nurses themselves did experience patient falls to be troublesome enough. Investigating this is difficult though. Although the most successful strategy still appears to be changing attitudes of nurses in order to increase fall prevention, there is no clear strategy on how to create this successfully.

  8. Clinical nurse specialist practice domains and evidence-based practice competencies: a matrix of influence.

    PubMed

    Kring, Daria L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe master's-level evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies as determined by a national consensus panel and present an EBP matrix that illustrates the influence that the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice can have on driving EBP change. Evidence-based practice is a growing and necessary paradigm for nursing care. The ACE Star Model conceptualizes the knowledge transformation that must occur in an EBP environment as 5 distinct points: discovery, summary, translation, integration, and evaluation. Master's-level EBP competencies based on these 5 steps were established by a national consensus panel. The CNS's practice can be organized around 5 domains: expert practitioner, researcher, consultant, educator, and leader. The master's-level EBP competencies can be transposed on a crosswalk of the ACE Star Model and the 5 CNS practice domains to form a matrix representing the influence that CNSs can have over the EBP process. Each competency falls well within the practice domains of the CNS, making the CNS an ideal person to lead the EBP movement forward, providing tangible outcomes to further demonstrate the need for the CNS role.

  9. The effect of integrating constructivist and evidence-based practice on baccalaureate nursing student's cognitive load and learning performance in a research course.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling; Huang, Tzu-Hsin

    2016-07-01

    Baccalaureate nursing students perceive research as unattractive, doubt the value of nursing research, and do not appreciate the link of research with practice. No studies have examined students' cognitive load during an evidence-based practice research course versus a traditional research course. To assess the effect of integrating constructivist theories and evidence-based practice on student cognitive load and learning performance in a research course. A true experimental study. A Registered Nurse-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Six classes of second-year students. Students were randomly allocated to the control group (two classes) or the experimental group (two classes) using cluster randomization. The control group underwent "traditional research"; the experimental group experienced "integrating evidence-based practice into research." Instruments for outcome assessment include the Cognitive Load Scale, cognitive test, team critique paper, and qualitative feedback on course satisfaction. The between-subjects effects were compared by Analysis of Covariance. The experimental group had significantly higher mental load (8.74 vs. 7.27, p<.001), mental effort (11.07 vs. 10.07, p=.009), mental efficiency (0.33 vs. -0.31, p<.001), and research knowledge (70.61 vs. 44.92, p<.001) than the control group. The experimental group had better critique paper scores in introduction (92.80%), literature review (91.70%), and assignment requirement and writing (89.40%). Some experimental learners expressed satisfaction with learning evidence-based practice (17.78%) and critiquing a research article (7.78%). Integrating evidence-based practice into a research course not only improved the research knowledge of baccalaureate nursing students, but also increased their mental load, mental effort, and mental efficiency. Additional studies may track learners' responses to different learning systems using the developed instrument to measure the three types of cognitive load

  10. Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses and Healthcare Professionals (Third edition) Barker Janet Linsley Paul Kane Ros Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses and Healthcare Professionals (Third edition) 240pp £22.99 Sage 9781473925038 1473925037 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-11-16

    This book provides a complete primer on the subject of evidence-based practice in health care. As an introductory single textbook, it is especially useful for nurses undertaking academic study, or who are new to the subject.

  11. The context & clinical evidence for common nursing practices during labor.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the context and current evidence for common nursing care practices during labor and birth. Although many nursing interventions during labor and birth are based on physician orders, there are a number of care processes that are mainly within the realm of nursing practice. In many cases, particularly in community hospitals, routine physician orders for intrapartum care provide wide latitude for nurses in how they ultimately carry out those orders. An important consideration of common nursing practices during labor is the context or practice model in which those practices occur. Nursing practice is not the same in all clinical environments. Intrapartum nursing practice consists of an assortment of different roles depending on the circumstances, hospital setting, and context in which it takes place. A variety of intrapartum nursing practice models have evolved as a result and in response to the range of sizes, locations, and provider practice styles found in hospitals providing obstetric services. A summary of intrapartum nursing models is presented. The evidence is reviewed for the three most common clinical practices for which nurses have primary responsibility in most settings and that comprise the majority of their time in caring for women during labor: (1) maternal-fetal assessment, (2) management of oxytocin infusions, and (3) second-stage care. Evidence exists for these nursing interventions that can be used to promote maternal-fetal well-being, minimize risk, and enhance patient safety.

  12. An Adaptation of the Original Fresno Test to Measure Evidence-Based Practice Competence in Pediatric Bedside Nurses.

    PubMed

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha; Kimble, Laura P; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Sudia, Tanya; Codone, Susan

    2018-06-01

    Instruments used to assess evidence-based practice (EBP) competence in nurses have been subjective, unreliable, or invalid. The Fresno test was identified as the only instrument to measure all the steps of EBP with supportive reliability and validity data. However, the items and psychometric properties of the original Fresno test are only relevant to measure EBP with medical residents. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the adapted Fresno test for pediatric nurses, and provide preliminary validity and reliability data for its use with Bachelor of Science in Nursing-prepared pediatric bedside nurses. General adaptations were made to the original instrument's case studies, item content, wording, and format to meet the needs of a pediatric nursing sample. The scoring rubric was also modified to complement changes made to the instrument. Content and face validity, and intrarater reliability of the adapted Fresno test were assessed during a mixed-methods pilot study conducted from October to December 2013 with 29 Bachelor of Science in Nursing-prepared pediatric nurses. Validity data provided evidence for good content and face validity. Intrarater reliability estimates were high. The adapted Fresno test presented here appears to be a valid and reliable assessment of EBP competence in Bachelor of Science in Nursing-prepared pediatric nurses. However, further testing of this instrument is warranted using a larger sample of pediatric nurses in diverse settings. This instrument can be a starting point for evaluating the impact of EBP competence on patient outcomes. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Strategies from bedside nurse perspectives in conducting evidence-based practice projects to improve care.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Susan T; Zarnowsky, Colleen D; Green, Renee C; Lim, Mei-Lin Chen; Holtzer, Brenda M; Ely, Elizabeth A

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the bedside nurses' perspectives on their experience with conducting an evidence based practice project. This is especially important in the climate of hospitals working to achieve Magnet Recognition. The facilitators and barriers to project design and completion are discussed in detail. Strategies to overcome barriers are presented. Facilitators for bedside nurses include motivation and professional development. Most common barriers were lack of time and limited knowledge about the process. Interventions aimed at research utilization can be successful when mindful of commonly understood barriers to project completion with steps taken to resolve those barriers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Musical Memories: translating evidence-based gerontological nursing into a children's picture book.

    PubMed

    Gerdner, Linda A; Buckwalter, Kathleen C

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often cared for within multigenerational families. More specifically, 26% of family caregivers have children younger than 18 living with them. This article describes an innovative model for translation of an evidence-based intervention into an engaging, realistic picture book that serves as a teaching tool for children and their families. The book, Musical Memories, focuses on the relationship between a granddaughter and her grandmother who has AD. The story applies basic principles of the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold model to explain the underlying cause of grandmother's behaviors and models the evidence-based guideline "Individualized Music for Elders with Dementia" to empower the granddaughter in maintaining a relationship with her grandmother. Musical Memories is intended to serve as a valuable resource for families and the gerontological nurses who serve them. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The place of knowledge and evidence in the context of Australian general practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane; Field, John; Cant, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the place of knowledge and evidence in the context of Australian general practice nursing. General practice nursing is a rapidly developing area of specialized nursing in Australia. The provision of primary care services in Australia rests largely with medical general practitioners who employ nurses in a small business model. A statistical research design was used that included a validated instrument: the developing evidence-based practice questionnaire (Gerrish et al. 2007). A total of 1,800 Victorian practice nurses were surveyed with a return of 590 completed questionnaires, equaling a response rate of 33%. Lack of time to access knowledge for practice was a barrier for participants in this study. In-service education and training opportunities were ranked as the number one source of knowledge for general practice nurses. Experiential learning and interactions with clients, peers, medical practitioners, and specialist nurses were also considered very important sources of knowledge. Research journals were ranked much lower than experiential learning and personal interactions. Participants assessed their own skills at sourcing and translating evidence into practice knowledge as low. Younger general practice nurses were more likely than older nurses to assess themselves as competent at using the library and Internet to locate evidence. The predominantly oral culture of nursing needs to be identified and incorporated into methods for disseminating evidence from research findings in order to increase the knowledge base of Australian general practice nurses. Findings from this study will be significant for policy makers and funders of Australian nursing in general practice. The establishment of a career structure for general practice nurses that includes salaried positions for clinical nurse specialists would assist in the translation of evidence into knowledge for utilization at the point of care.

  16. Facilitating the implementation of evidence- based practice through contextual support and nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Kueny, Angela; Shever, Leah L; Lehan Mackin, Melissa; Titler, Marita G

    2015-01-01

    Nurse managers (NMs) play an important role promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) on clinical units within hospitals. However, there is a dearth of research focused on NM perspectives about institutional contextual factors to support the goal of EBP on the clinical unit. The purpose of this article is to identify contextual factors described by NMs to drive change and facilitate EBP at the unit level, comparing and contrasting these perspectives across nursing units. This study employed a qualitative descriptive design using interviews with nine NMs who were participating in a large effectiveness study. To stratify the sample, NMs were selected from nursing units designated as high or low performing based on implementation of EBP interventions, scores on the Meyer and Goes research use scale, and fall rates. Descriptive content analysis was used to identify themes that reflect the complex nature of infrastructure described by NMs and contextual influences that supported or hindered their promotion of EBP on the clinical unit. NMs perceived workplace culture, structure, and resources as facilitators or barriers to empowering nurses under their supervision to use EBP and drive change. A workplace culture that provides clear communication of EBP goals or regulatory changes, direct contact with CEOs, and clear expectations supported NMs in their promotion of EBP on their units. High-performing unit NMs described a structure that included nursing-specific committees, allowing nurses to drive change and EBP from within the unit. NMs from high-performing units were more likely to articulate internal resources, such as quality-monitoring departments, as critical to the implementation of EBP on their units. This study contributes to a deeper understanding of institutional contextual factors that can be used to support NMs in their efforts to drive EBP changes at the unit level.

  17. Nursing unit leaders' influence on the long-term sustainability of evidence-based practice improvements.

    PubMed

    Fleiszer, Andrea R; Semenic, Sonia E; Ritchie, Judith A; Richer, Marie-Claire; Denis, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    To describe how actions of nursing unit leaders influenced the long-term sustainability of a best practice guidelines (BPG) program on inpatient units. Several factors influence the initial implementation of evidence-based practice improvements in nursing, with leadership recognized as essential. However, there is limited knowledge about enduring change, including how frontline nursing leaders influence the sustainability of practice improvements over the long term. A qualitative descriptive case study included 39 in-depth interviews, observations, and document reviews. Four embedded nursing unit subcases had differing levels of program sustainability at 7 years (average) following implementation. Higher levels of BPG sustainability occurred on units where formal leadership teams used an integrated set of strategies and activities. Two key strategies were maintaining priorities and reinforcing expectations. The coordinated use of six activities (e.g., discussing, evaluating, integrating) promoted the continuation of BPG practices among staff. These leadership processes, fostering exchange and learning, contributed to sustainability-promoting environments characterized by teamwork and accountability. Unit leaders are required to strategically orchestrate several overlapping and synergistic efforts to achieve long-term sustainability of BPG-based practice improvements. As part of managing overall unit performance, unit leaders may influence practice improvement sustainability by aligning vision, strategies, and activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effectiveness of an Online Educational Module in Improving Evidence-Based Practice Skills of Practicing Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lora

    2017-10-01

    Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) at the bedside has been difficult to achieve. Significant gaps between current research and actual practice have been identified and must be addressed in effort to increase utilization of EBP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an online EBP educational intervention and to examine the relationship between educational preparation and years of nursing experience on nurses' practice, attitudes, and knowledge and skills of EBP. An experimental pretest-posttest design study with three randomized groups utilizing the EBPQ instrument was conducted. No significant differences were noted in EBPQ subscale scores of practice, attitude, or knowledge and skills from pre- to posttest. In addition, no statistical difference in EBPQ subscale scores regarding educational preparation or years of experience were noted. While nurses report positive attitudes toward EBP, their perceptions of practice and knowledge and skills score much lower. Educational interventions are needed for practicing nurses to overcome this knowledge deficit to successfully implement EBP. However, the use of online, independent, computer-based learning modules, while cost-efficient and offer several benefits when educating nurses, may not necessarily be the most effective method for teaching EBP knowledge and skills to practicing nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Evaluation Criteria for Nursing Student Application of Evidence-Based Practice: A Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Lina; Linden, Lois

    2016-06-01

    Core clinical evaluation criteria do not exist for measuring prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students' application of evidence-based practice (EBP) during direct care assignments. The study objective was to achieve consensus among EBP nursing experts to create clinical criteria for faculty to use in evaluating students' application of EBP principles. A three-round Delphi method was used. Experts were invited to participate in Web-based surveys. Data were analyzed using qualitative coding and categorizing. Quantitative analyses were descriptive calculations for rating and ranking. Expert consensus occurred in the Delphi rounds. The study provides a set of 10 core clinical evaluation criteria for faculty evaluating students' progression toward competency in their application of EBP. A baccalaureate program curriculum requiring the use of Bostwick's EBP Core Clinical Evaluation Criteria will provide a clear definition for understanding basic core EBP competence as expected for the assessment of student learning. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):336-341.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing: A rapid evidence assessment.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Cadorin, Lucia; Barisone, Michela; Bressan, Valentina; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Timmins, Fiona; Watson, Roger; Sasso, Loredana

    2018-02-01

    Paediatric nurses often face complex situations requiring decisions that sometimes clash with their own values and beliefs, or with the needs of the children they care for and their families. Paediatric nurses often use new technology that changes the way they provide care, but also reduces their direct interaction with the child. This may generate ethical issues, which nurses should be able to address in the full respect of the child. Research question and objectives: The purpose of this review is to describe the main ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing. Our research question was, 'What are the most common ethical dimensions and competences related to paediatric nursing?' A rapid evidence assessment. According to the principles of the rapid evidence assessment, we searched the PubMed, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases for papers published between January 2001 and March 2015. These papers were then independently read by two researchers and analysed according to the inclusion criteria. Ethical considerations: Since this was a rapid evidence assessment, no approval from the ethics committee was required. Ten papers met our inclusion criteria. Ethical issues in paediatric nursing were grouped into three areas: (a) ethical issues in paediatric care, (b) social responsibility and (c) decision-making process. Few studies investigate the ethical dimensions and aspects of paediatric nursing, and they are mainly qualitative studies conducted in critical care settings based on nurses' perceptions and experiences. Paediatric nurses require specific educational interventions to help them resolve ethical issues, contribute to the decision-making process and fulfil their role as advocates of a vulnerable population (i.e. sick children and their families). Further research is needed to investigate how paediatric nurses can improve the involvement of children and their families in decision-making processes related to their care plan.

  1. Information literacy as the foundation for evidence-based practice in graduate nursing education: a curriculum-integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan; Rosenfeld, Peri; Haber, Judith

    2003-01-01

    As part of a system-wide initiative to advance evidence-based practice among clinicians, graduate students, and educators, the New York University Division of Nursing embarked on a curricular initiative to integrate components of information literacy in all core courses of the master's program. Increasing competency in information literacy is the foundation for evidence-based practice and provides nursing professionals with the skills to be literate consumers of information in an electronic environment. Competency in information literacy includes an understanding of the architecture of information and the scholarly process; the ability to navigate among a variety of print and electronic tools to effectively access, search, and critically evaluate appropriate resources; synthesize accumulated information into an existing body of knowledge; communicate research results clearly and effectively; and appreciate the social issues and ethical concerns related to the provision, dissemination, and sharing of information. In collaboration with the New York University Division of Libraries' Health Sciences Librarian, instructional modules in information literacy relevant to each of the 5 core nursing master's courses were developed, complemented by a Web-based tutorial: http://library.nyu.edu/research/health/tutorial. The Web site is multifaceted, with fundamentals for the beginner, as well as more complex content for the advanced user. Course assignments were designed to promote specific competencies in information literacy and strategies for evaluating the strength of the evidence found. A survey of information literacy competencies, which assessed students' knowledge, misconceptions, and use of electronic information resources, was administered when students entered the program and at 1-year intervals thereafter.

  2. Evaluation of musculoskeletal pain management practices in rural nursing homes compared with evidence-based criteria.

    PubMed

    Decker, Sheila A; Culp, Kennith R; Cacchione, Pamela Z

    2009-06-01

    Chronic pain, mainly associated with musculoskeletal diagnoses, is inadequately and often inappropriately treated in nursing home residents. The purpose of this descriptive study is to identify the musculoskeletal diagnoses associated with pain and to compare pain management of a sample of nursing home residents with the 1998 evidence-based guideline proposed by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). The sample consists of 215 residents from 13 rural Iowa nursing home homes. The residents answered a series of face-to-face questions that addressed the presence/absence of pain and completed the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Data on pain were abstracted from the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Analyses included descriptive statistics, cross tabulations, and one-way analysis of variance. Residents' responses to the face-to-face pain questions yielded higher rates of pain compared with the MDS pain data. Resident records showed that acetaminophen was the most frequently administered analgesic medication (30.9%). Propoxyphene, not an AGS-recommended opioid, was also prescribed for 23 residents (10.7%). Of the 70 residents (32.6%) expressing daily pain, 23 (32.9%) received no scheduled or pro re nata analgesics. There was no significant difference between MMSE scores and number of scheduled analgesics. Additionally, residents' self-reported use of topical agents was not documented in the charts. The findings suggest that the 1998 AGS evidence-based guideline for the management of chronic pain is inconsistently implemented.

  3. Organizational Strategies for Building Capacity in Evidence-Based Oncology Nursing Practice: A Case Report of an Australian Tertiary Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Bowers, Alison; Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2017-03-01

    The ever-increasing cancer care demand has posed a challenge for oncology nurses to deliver evidence-based, innovative care. Despite efforts to promote evidence-based practice, barriers remain and executives find it difficult to implement evidence-based practice efficiently. Using the successful experience of an Australian tertiary cancer center, this paper depicts 4 effective strategies for facilitating evidence-based practice at the organizational level-the Embedded Scholar: Enabler, Enactor, and Engagement (4 Es) Model-includes a 12-week evidence-based practice program that prioritizes relevant research proposed by clinical staff and endorses high-quality, evidence-based point-of-care resources. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An empowerment framework for nursing leadership development: supporting evidence.

    PubMed

    Macphee, Maura; Skelton-Green, Judith; Bouthillette, France; Suryaprakash, Nitya

    2012-01-01

    This article is a report on a descriptive study of nurse leaders' perspectives of the outcomes of a formal leadership programme. Effective nurse leaders are necessary to address complex issues associated with healthcare systems reforms. Little is known about the types of leadership development programmes that most effectively prepare nurse leaders for healthcare challenges. When nurse leaders use structural and psychological empowerment strategies, the results are safer work environments and better nurse outcomes. The leadership development programme associated with this study is based on a unifying theoretical empowerment framework to empower nurse leaders and enable them to empower others. Twenty seven front-line and mid-level nurse leaders with variable years of experience were interviewed for 1 year after participating in a formal leadership development programme. Data were gathered in 2008-2009 from four programme cohorts. Four researchers independently developed code categories and themes using qualitative content analysis. Evidence of leadership development programme empowerment included nurse leader reports of increased self-confidence with respect to carrying out their roles and responsibilities; positive changes in their leadership styles; and perceptions of staff recognition of positive stylistic changes. Regardless of years of experience, mid-level leaders had a broader appreciation of practice environment issues than front-line leaders. Time for reflection was valuable to all participants, and front-line leaders, in particular, appreciated the time to discuss nurse-specific issues with their colleagues. This study provides evidence that a theoretical empowerment framework and strategies can empower nurse leaders, potentially resulting in staff empowerment. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. An evidence-based approach to nurses week celebrations.

    PubMed

    Hensinger, Barbara; Parry, Juanita; Calarco, Margaret M; Fuhrmann, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    It is time to examine nurses week investments. With expenses increasingly scrutinized, healthcare leaders require data-driven decisions. Managing by instinct and intuition is both inadequate and reckless. This survey of 727 registered nurses identifies celebratory options for nurses week that nurses find meaningful. Knowing what registered nurses value will guide approaches to an effective nurses week activity planning.

  6. The effect of a multifaceted evidence-based practice programme for nurses on knowledge, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Wieke E; Keers, Joost C; Kuipers, Ruud; Nieweg, Roos M B; de Groot, Martijn

    2018-04-01

    The Dutch professional nursing standard of 2012 stipulates that Dutch nursing practices are to be evidence-based. Not all practicing nurses can satisfy these requirements, therefore, an educational programme about Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) was developed for a Dutch teaching hospital. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of a six month in-house EBP programme on knowledge, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers of nurses (four European Credits equals two US Credit Hours). A multiple-cohort study was conducted with a pre-post-test design. In the period of 2011-2015, a total of 58 nurses (9 cohorts) followed the programme. Baseline and follow-up assessments consisted of three questionnaires each: the Dutch Modified Fresno, the two subscales of the McColl questionnaire, and the BARRIER scale to assess knowledge and skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers, respectively. Fifty nurses completed both assessments. The results demonstrated that actual knowledge and skills significantly increased by approximately 40%. Self-perceived knowledge increased significantly, while attitudes towards EBP remained (moderately) positive. Perceived barriers did not notably change except for the Research subscale which received many "no opinion" responses prior to the programme but fewer afterwards. Our multifaceted in-house EBP programme led to a significant improvement of approximately 40% in EBP knowledge and skills of participating nurses. Most nurses who followed the EBP programme are currently applying their knowledge and skills in practice. Managerial support and allocated time for EBP are important facilitators for its implementation. Furthermore, to maintain and expand nurses' EBP knowledge and skills and translate them into practice, follow-up interventions, such as journal clubs, may well be beneficial. Based on the positive results of our programme, we will implement it throughout the hospital with an emphasis on training more groups of nurses. Copyright

  7. Nurses' knowledge of evidence-based guidelines for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critical care areas: a pre and post test design.

    PubMed

    Meherali, Salima Moez; Parpio, Yasmin; Ali, Tazeen S; Javed, Fawad

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common hospital acquired pneumonia in ventilated patients. VAP is associated with increased morbidity, mortality duration of hospitalization and cost of treatment. Critical care nurses are usually unaware of evidence based preventive guidelines for VAP, resulting in negative impact on all aspects of patient care. This study investigated the impact of a 5-hour teaching module on nurses' knowledge to practice evidence based guidelines for the prevention of VAP. This study was conducted at a private tertiary care teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Single group pre-test design was used. Forty nurses were included in the study. The knowledge of nurses was assessed before, immediately after and 4 weeks after the intervention. The final sample (n=40) was selected on the basis of the set inclusion criteria. The demographic data sheet was used to collect relevant information about the participants. Knowledge was assessed through a self-developed validated tool, consisting of multiple choice questions. The difference in knowledge was analysed through repeated measures of analysis of variance. The mean scores at 3 time points were compared using the Tukey's multiple comparison procedure. Knowledge scores of participants increased significantly after the educational intervention in the first post-test; however, there was a decline in the score in post-test 2. the 5-hour teaching module significantly enhanced nurses' knowledge towards evidence based guidelines for the prevention of VAP. Further research is needed to assess the impact of training on nursing practice and to explore factors affecting attitudinal change.

  8. Supporting influenza vaccination intent among nurses: effects of leadership and attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Paparone, Pamela

    2015-03-01

    The leadership styles of healthcare organizations and the attitudes of nurses toward the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) were examined to provide a predictor of influenza vaccination intent (VI) and improve the current inadequate vaccination rate among nurses. Influenza is a costly and potentially serious disease. The United States has set a benchmark of a 90% influenza vaccination rate among healthcare personnel by 2020. A sample of 354 registered nurses completed a survey assessing demographic data, the leadership styles of their organization, their attitudes toward EBP, and their VI. A significant positive correlation was found between transformational leadership and VI, but not between transactional leadership and VI. Attitudes toward EBP correlated weakly, but insignificantly, with VI. Transformational leadership can predict and positively influence vaccination rates among nurses, thus decreasing vaccine preventable illness and improving patient outcomes.

  9. Flipping the Classroom without Flipping Out the Students: Working with an Instructional Designer in an Undergraduate Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Yui; Azaiza, Khitam; Salani, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom approach is an innovative teaching method to promote students' active learning. It has been used in nursing education and has showed positive results. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of developing a flipped classroom approach for an undergraduate evidence-based nursing practice course and discuss…

  10. [Miraculous low carbohydrate or carbophobic diets: evidence-based nursing perspective].

    PubMed

    Casado Dones, María José; Fraile Villar, María Isabel; Juárez Bonilla, Mónica; Moreno González, Cristina; Martín Rodríguez, María

    2016-01-01

    Given the obesity epidemic in Western society today, as well as its influence on population's health as a risk factor for the most pressing health problems, diet treatment to control overweight ought to be considered as a priority in the specialized and primary health nursing care. A review of some supposedly miraculous diets, based on drastic reduction of consumed carbohydrates, as well as the available scientific evidence show that such diets pose a health hazard besides being ineffective to control excess weight in the short- and long-term. The negative consequences of a reduction of the percentage of consumed carbohydrates, thus resulting in an increase of proteins in the diet are set forth. Besides, suitable recommendations for patients to get loss weight are presented in an effective and safe manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. An Evidence-Based Project Demonstrating Increased School Immunization Compliance Following a School Nurse-Initiated Vaccine Compliance Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swallow, Wendy; Roberts, Jill C.

    2016-01-01

    During the 2012-2013 school year, only 66% of students at a Northern Indiana High School were in compliance with school immunization requirements. We report here successful implementation of evidence-based, time, and cost-effective methods aimed at increasing school immunization compliance. A three-stage strategy initiated by the school nurse was…

  12. A Computer-Based Nursing Diagnosis Consultant

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven

    1984-01-01

    This consultant permits a nurse to enter patient signs and symptoms which are then interpreted by the system in order to relate them to well-established nursing-related dysfunctional patterns. The system attempts to confirm the pattern by soliciting additional patient information from the nurse. This process provides an educational prompt to the nurse, and the suggestions of the system also provide a clinical support tool that can be of practical value. As our testing hones the system and subtlety is added to the weighing of the evidence the nurse provides, it is expected that this tool will be a useful adjunct to computer-based nursing services in support of health care. This Nursing Diagnosis Consultant is yet another element in the COMMES family of consultants for health professionals.

  13. What is the impact of professional nursing on patients' outcomes globally? An overview of research evidence.

    PubMed

    Coster, Samantha; Watkins, Mary; Norman, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Nursing is an integral part of all healthcare services, and has the potential of having a wide and enduring impact on health outcomes for a global ageing population. Over time nurses have developed new roles and assumed greater responsibilities. It is increasingly important to demonstrate the safety and overall impact of nurses' practice through research, to support the case for greater investment and development of nursing services around the world. To provide an overview of existing research evidence on the impact of nursing on patient outcomes, identify gaps in evidence, and point to future priorities for global research. Specifically to address two questions: what is the evidence that nursing contributes to improving the health and well-being of populations?; and where should research activity be focused to strengthen the evidence base for the impact of nursing? A search of the literature from 1996 using CINAHL, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and the NICE evidence databases using the key words: nursing, nurse led, nursing interventions and patient outcomes. Initial analysis of the retrieved citations to reveal clusters of evidence of nursing impact in clinical areas which had been subject to systematic/integrative reviews or meta-analyses. Further analysis of these reviews to provide an overview of the research evidence for nurses' contributions to healthcare to inform discussion on future research agendas. We use the terms low, moderate and high quality evidence to reflect the assessments made by the review authors whose work is presented throughout. Analysis of 61 reviews, including ten Cochrane reviews and two scoping/selective reviews to provide a summary of the research evidence for nurses' contributions to healthcare in the following areas of practice: nursing in acute care settings; nurses' involvement in public health; the contribution of specialist nurse and nurse-led services to the management of chronic disease; comparison of care

  14. Moderating effects of nurses' organizational justice between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Lack of existing literature on the correlation among organizational justice, organizational support, and organizational citizenship behaviors has created a research gap in previous evidence-based practice (EBP) studies on nursing personnel. To investigate whether organizational justice among nurses has a moderating effect between their organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors in order to bridge such a gap of existing literature with the EBP study on nursing personnel. Nursing staff of one large and influential hospital in Taiwan was surveyed. Four hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 386 were collected with a valid response rate of 96.50%. SPSS 17.0 and Amos 17.0 statistical software packages were used for data analysis. Nurses' organizational support positively influences their organizational citizenship behaviors, and their organizational justice perception has a positive moderating effect between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors. Results call hospitals' attention to the type of individual behaviors that may improve organizational performance. When nursing staff perceive fair and impartial treatment by the organization and supportive emotional attachment, behaviors beneficial for the organization are expressed in return. Subjective perceptions of nursing staff play an important role in organizational exchange relationship; the higher the degree of nursing staff's perceived organizational justice, the higher the degree of their organizational support, perception, and exhibition of organizational citizenship behaviors such as altruistic behavior and dedication to the work. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Psychometric analysis of two new scales: the evidence-based practice nursing leadership and work environment scales.

    PubMed

    Pryse, Yvette; McDaniel, Anna; Schafer, John

    2014-08-01

    Those in nursing have been charged with practicing to the full extent of their education and training by the Institute of Medicine. Therefore, evidence-based practice (EBP) has never been more important to nursing than in the current healthcare environment. Frequently the burden of EBP is the responsibility of the bedside practitioner, but has been found to be a process that requires leadership and organizational support. A key underlying component of a strong EBP environment includes effective communications and collaboration among staff and nursing leadership. Developing measurement tools that examine the milieu and nursing leadership in which the staff nurse practices is an important component of understanding the factors that support or hinder EBP. The aim of this study is to report on the development and analysis of two new scales designed to explore leadership and organizational support for EBP. The EBP Nursing Leadership Scale (10 items) examines the staff nurses perception of support provided by the nurse manager for EBP, and the EBP Work Environment Scale (8 items) examines organizational support for EBP. Staff nurses who worked at least .5 FTE in direct patient care, from two inner city hospitals (n = 422) completed the scales. The scales were evaluated for internal consistency reliability with the Cronbach alpha technique, content validity using a panel of experts, and construct validity by The content validity index computed from expert rankings was .78 to 1.0 with an average of.96. Cronbach's alpha was .96 (n = 422) for the EBP Nursing Leadership Scale and .86 (n = 422) for the EBP Work Environment Scale. Factor analysis confirmed that each scale measured a unidimensional construct (p < .000). The EBP Nursing Leadership Scale and the EBP Work Environment Scale are psychometrically sound instruments to examine organizational influences on EBP. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses and allied healthcare providers in the Valais hospital, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is upheld as a means for patients to receive the most efficient care in a given context. Despite the available evidence and positive beliefs about it, implementing EBP as standard daily practice still faces many obstacles. This study investigated the beliefs about and implementation of EBP among nurses and allied healthcare providers (AHP) in 9 acute care hospitals in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted. The target population was composed of 1899 nurses and 126 AHPs. Beliefs about and implementation of EBP were measured using EBP-Beliefs and EBP-Implementation scales of Melnyk et al. The initial sample consisted in 491 participants (overall response rate 24.2%): 421 nurses (22.4% response rate) and 78 AHPs (61.9% response rate). The final sample, composed only of those who declared previous exposure to EBP, included 391 participants (329 nurses and 62 AHPs). Overall, participants had positive attitudes towards EBP and were willing to increase their knowledge to guide practice. However, they acknowledged poor implementation of EBP in daily practice. A significantly higher level of EBP implementation was declared by those formally trained in it (P = 0.006) and by those occupying more senior professional functions (P = 0.004). EBP-Belief scores predicted 13% of the variance in the EBP-Implementation scores (R 2  = 0.13). EBP is poorly implemented despite positive beliefs about it. Continuing education and support on EBP would help to ensure that patients receive the best available care based on high-quality evidence, patient needs, clinical expertise, and a fair distribution of healthcare resources. This study's results will be used to guide institutional strategy to increase the use of EBP in daily practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: using evidence-based knowledge to guide the advanced practice nurse in developing formal policy and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Christopher T; Quinn, Lisa D; Bryant, Lesley G; Lyons, Ann A; Kleinpell, Ruth M

    2011-01-01

    To provide advanced practice nurses (APNs) with the best available evidence for implementation of policies and procedures to allow family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the acute care environment. A comprehensive review of research-based articles from Ebsco Host, CINAHL, Pre-CINAHL, and Medline Plus, as well as statement alerts from nursing credentialing bodies, and practice guidelines were reviewed. Kolcaba's Theory of Comfort and Lewin's Three Step Change Theory provide a framework for implementation of formal policies and procedures. Best available evidence showed more support in favor of allowing families at the bedside during CPR. Implementation of policies and procedures allowing family presence enables facilities to change and grow in a holistic and family-oriented atmosphere. With this evidence-based knowledge the APN will be able to disseminate information to facilitate collaborative change in current practices surrounding staff education, decision making, and self-governance. The APN can then address controversial changes when developing formal policies and procedures, which will increase patient satisfaction and outcomes. ©2010 The Author Journal compilation ©2010 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. The use of evidenced-based information by nurses and midwives to inform practice.

    PubMed

    Veeramah, Ven

    2016-02-01

    To examine the implementation of evidence-based information by nurses and midwives to inform their practice. It is widely recognised that the main benefits of using evidence-based information are to improve and update clinical practice and to enhance the quality of care and outcomes for patients. However, despite a large body of research showing that nurses and midwives have positive attitudes towards evidence-based practice , its implementation remains a considerable and significant challenge. This was a cross-sectional on-line survey. A self-completed questionnaire was used to collect data from a convenience sample of 386 nursing and midwifery diplomates and graduates from June-December 2013. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 44·6%. The majority of respondents expressed very positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and nearly everyone felt that this should become an important part of daily practice. A significant number stated that they have regular access to research through a number of relevant databases and the Internet at their place of work and evidence-based guidelines relevant to their speciality were also available. The two top barriers perceived by respondents were lack of time to search for relevant evidence-based information and being able to make time during working hours to look for new information. The most popular strategy suggested was to ensure evidence-based information is readily available in a form which nurses and midwives can easily understand the implications for their practice. Health services and government agencies should make a concerted effort to make time for nurses and midwives to access, appraise and use evidence-based information to inform practice. More resources including protected time should be made available to support nurses and midwives to use evidence-based information to improve the quality of care provided. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evidence-based characteristics of nurse-managed health centers for quality and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jeana; Zabler, Bev; Baisch, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    There are approximately 250 nurse-managed health centers (NMHC) in the United States, but there are few consistent descriptions of their functions and even fewer reports of their outcomes. Because NMHCs have been identified as a unique and effectual health care delivery care model (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act), a description of their characteristics and a framework for outcome evaluation are required for their continued evolution and expansion. This study identifies the principal characteristics of U.S. NMHCs described in the professional literature through an integrative review and classifies these characteristics through a multistage qualitative analysis in relation to Donabedian's structure-process-outcomes model, a well-established model for evaluating quality in health care. This study yielded an evidence-based definition of NMHCs that is more reflective of current NMHC practice across settings and recognizes the full scope of nursing practice that is considered one solution to the health care crisis in the country. Using the results from this study, NMHCs will be able to structure self-evaluations of quality care and compare their quality related to structure, processes, and outcomes with other primary health care delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Electronic Knowledge-Based Nursing Content and Decision-Support on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Based Nursing (KBN) innovation, a customized design featuring actionable EB recommendations embedded into policy and the content and CDS tools in the...will have a positive effect on nursing knowledge, use of evidence-based practices, and the achievement of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes at

  1. A multi-institutional study of the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Daphne C

    2018-03-01

    To examine perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based practice among nurses working in psychiatric, geriatric, hospital and community settings in The Bahamas. It is evident from previous studies that a number of factors exist which either obstruct or promote the utilisation of research evidence in nursing practice. Identifying these factors is vital to the successful uptake of evidence-based practice in nursing. Descriptive, comparative study. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. A stratified random sample (n = 100) of registered nurses participated; 5-point Likert-like scales were used to examine nurses' perceptions of barriers and facilitators of evidence-based practice. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic characteristics and to compare responses of nurses. Participants were predominantly female (98.4%), in the 25 to <35 years age group (45.9%). Of nurses surveyed, 72.1% had never tried to implement evidence-based practice previously. The greatest barriers identified were as follows: "Inadequate resources for implementing research findings" (85.2%; n = 52) and "Inadequate training in research methods" (83.6%; n = 51). The top facilitators identified were as follows: "Training in research methods" (88.5%; n = 54) and "Organisational policies and protocols that are evidence-based" (86.9%; n = 53). Nurses generally expressed that they required additional training in research and evidence-based practice concepts. Although some nurses had a desire to implement evidence-based practice to provide quality care and improve patient outcomes, many expressed that they lacked the required resources. The study draws attention to the need for prioritisation of evidence-based practice both at institutional and governmental levels. Successful adoption of evidence-based practice implies combined efforts of nurses, healthcare providers and policymakers. Further research is needed to determine the best

  2. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  3. Pressure damage prevention: basing practice on evidence.

    PubMed

    Parker, K; Morgan, L; Clayton, J; Gerrish, K; Nolan, M

    As part of an initiative to develop evidence-based practice at the Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, a three-part project was undertaken. The aims were to identify barriers to using research in nursing, establish a baseline of nurses' knowledge and its influence on their practice in one essential area of nursing care--pressure damage prevention--and develop a strategy for change which took account of the findings from the first two parts of the project. In this article, the authors describe the second part of the project which examined nursing knowledge and practice with reference to the management of pressure damage prevention. The findings are discussed and the authors recommend that nurses integrate into their practice evidence from sources such as systematic reviews.

  4. [To know to change: the nurses of the Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland (IOSI) and their relationship with the Evidence Based Practise (EBP) and Nursing Research].

    PubMed

    Valcarenghi, Dario; Pedrazzani, Carla; Bianchi, Monica

    2013-01-01

    To promote the development of a culture and a professional practice based on "evidence of effectiveness", the IOSI Nursing Officer instituted a specific Unit which decided to establish its own lines of action based on the results of an internal investigation conducted among nurses employed within IOSI, with reference to the model of action research. In July 2010, a semi-structured questionnaire self compiled was sent to all nurses to find out their opinions and experiences on EBP and nursing research, to recognize their proposals, and willingness to be part of an internal network. 63 out of 98 questionnaire were filled in. Several nurses have knowledge and experience in these fields, but change their professional behavior especially under pressure from the external environment, rather than by autonomous choice. They consider EBP substantially useful, but difficult to implement especially without their direct involvement. Two third of the sample have felt the need of EBP during their professional activity and there is a general willingness to develop nursing research (56%) and/or play an active role of "referent" on these issues within own Unit (35%). The survey showed that at IOSI there is a favorable substrate for EBP and nursing research (for basic knowledge and availability). The data collected have served to define internal lines of action in a narrow relationship with the clinical areas, according to the model of action research. It is a process that requires vision, coordinated efforts, perseverance and time.

  5. Evaluation of a program to increase evidence-based practice change.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, June H; Sions, Jacqueline; Fanning, Mary; Withrow, Mary Lynne; Ferretti, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    The study evaluated a nursing research program designed to achieve systematic evidence-based practice change. Specifically, change in nurse attitudes about use of research and research conduct, practice change projects, and nurse participation in research-related activities were evaluated. Evidence indicates that successful evidence-based practice change in an organization requires senior leadership support and a systematic program for practice change. Evaluation of program effectiveness provides evidence about opportunities for further improvement. Quantitative evaluation used a pretest-posttest design. The site was an academic medical center in rural West Virginia. Participants were registered nurses from all inpatients units, perioperative services, and emergency departments. Surveys used Alcock et al's Staff Nurses and Research Activities scale. Descriptive evaluation included the number of nurses who attended the workshop, practice change projects, scholarly products disseminated, and outcome of a Magnet review. First, knowledge about the availability of support services increased between 1999 and 2002 and was associated with higher attitude scores about research and research utilization. Second, registered nurses who reported participating in research-related activities had more positive scores on all attitudes than registered nurses who reported not participating. Nurse leaders may improve participation and attitudes about research and research utilization by internally marketing the support available for research-related activities.

  6. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    PubMed

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center.

  7. Moving an Evidence-Based Policy Agenda Forward: Leadership Tips From the Field.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Teresa

    2018-05-01

    Advancing evidence-based policy change is a leadership challenge that nurses should embrace. Key tips to ensure that evidence-based policy changes are successful at the individual, community, and population levels are offered to help nurses through the change process. The public trust in the nursing profession is a leverage point that should be used to advance the use of evidence, expedite change, and improve health for students and across communities.

  8. The catcher in the why: developing an evidence-based approach to the organization, delivery and evaluation of pre-registration nurse educational programmes.

    PubMed

    Warne, T; Holland, K; McAndrew, S

    2011-03-01

    Changes to the pedagogy of pre-registration nurse education and training have become a global phenomenon. However, the evidence base to inform responses to these changes and the impact on nursing practice is limited. This paper explores the outcomes of an innovative approach aimed at ensuring responses to these drivers for change, particularly in curriculum development, the organisation, management and delivery of programmes and the enhancement of the student experience, are evidence based. This paper reports on an organisational change project undertaken in a School of Nursing in the North West of England, UK. The project involved 12 interrelated work streams used to explore aspects of the student journey from recruitment through progression to eventual employment. An evidence base was developed through a methodological bricolage that drew upon a robust and authentic mixture of systematic literature reviews, contemporaneous analysis of educational practice and evaluation of the student experience. This was used to underpin the decision making processes required to promote innovation in programme design, to increase the involvement of students in the facilitation and evaluation of their learning experiences, and helped shape the organisational changes required for embedding an evidenced-based culture in the School. Consistent and transformational leadership has been key to the project's success in communicating and managing the changes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Skills and attributes required by clinical nurse specialists to promote evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T Diane; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to describe the challenges that clinical nurse specialists (CNS) face in their role and to examine how CNSs describe the skills and attributes that are needed to promote the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in their workplaces. This article is based on findings from a dissertation regarding how CNSs promote EBP in a western Canadian province. A sequential explanatory participant selection mixed-methods design was used for this study. The study took place in a western Canadian province that has a population of 1 million people, with 42.7% of the population residing in the 2 largest cities. The sample was drawn from a provincial registered nurse database. The sample for the survey was 23, and for the interviews, there were 11 participants. The telephone survey contained 113 questions grouped into several subcategories. SPSS 18 was used to analyze the survey data. The semistructured interviews were conducted face to face, transcribed, and reviewed for recurrent themes. Interpretive description was used to analyze the themes. The major challenges faced by CNSs are role strain, lack of support and resources, and role ambiguity. The skills and attributes required to be a CNS are graduate preparation, clinical expertise, and people/communication skills. Clinical nurse specialists can improve patient outcomes by promoting EBP; to do so, they need to work in supportive contexts that give those in the CNS role a set of clear role expectations. There are challenges faced by CNSs in Canada, and there is a need to strengthen the CNS's role by standardizing the regulatory requirements at a national level.

  10. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798.

  11. Developing an evidence-based nursing protocol on wound drain management for total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Lap Fung

    2015-05-01

    Although various drains have long been used for many years in total joint replacement, there is a paucity of evidence for the benefit of drain applications. Evidence suggests inconsistent practice in the use of drainage systems, whether intermittently applying suction or free of suction in the application of drainage systems, as well as the optimal timing for wound drain removal. It aimed to perform a systematic review to develop an evidence-based nursing protocol to manage wound drainage following total joint arthroplasty. A comprehensive systematic review of available evidence up to 2013. Searches of the EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, Medline electronic databases and an internet search by Yahoo and Google engine returned 2840 records, of which 11 met the inclusion criteria for this review. A further two papers were obtained through scanning the reference lists of those articles included from the initial literature search. Different clamping times were retrieved from the literature. A protocol was adapted for clinical application according to the summary of the retrieved information. It is suggested that clamping is performed 1 h after the insertion of suction drains post-operatively in the operating theatre. Wound drains should be clamped for 1 h if blood loss is more than 600 ml in 6 h in first 24 h. Wound drains should be clamped for 1 h if blood loss is more than 800 ml in 8 h thereafter. It is suggested that the drainage reservoir bottle should be mark and findings recorded in line with the principle of drain clamping. This means that the amount of drainage is measured and recorded every 6 h in first 24 h and every 8 h thereafter. It is suggested that wound drains should be remove before 48 h after TJR. If blood loss is less than 50 ml in past 6 h or less than 70 ml in past 8 h, the drain should be remove and the wound site should be monitored closely. This paper has guided nurses to develop an evidence-based protocol to improve patient care on wound drain

  12. Applications of Information Technology in Nursing During 2005-15: Evidence from Iran.

    PubMed

    Meraji, Marziye; Ramazan Ghorbani, Nahid; Mahmoodian, Sanaz; Samadbeik, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    In this ever-changing health care environment, nurses employ technologies and information systems to accomplish the intentions of the practice of nursing. Information technology supports the basic and advanced nursing practices in all settings. This review provides evidence about applications of information technology in Iranian nursing. We systematically searched all papers about applications of information technology in nursing in Iran that were indexed in SID, Magiran, Iran medex, PubMed and scopus databases. This study indicated that 12 (%52) studies used information technologies in the nursing education domain. Also, in 6 (%26) studies telenursing was used for patient care. 3 (13%) of the articles were related to the impact of the use of computer-based information system on nursing practice. In 2 (%9) papers the researchers developed computerized software for nursing processes. The results of this study indicate the use of information technology in nearly every aspect of nursing in Iran.

  13. Development and evaluation of online evidence based guideline bank system.

    PubMed

    Park, Myonghwa

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the online evidence-based nursing practice guideline bank system to support the best evidence-based decision in the clinical and community practice settings. The main homepage consisted of seven modules for introduction of site, EBN, guideline bank, guideline development, guideline review, related sites, and community. The major contents in the guidelines were purpose, developer, intended audience, method of development, target population, testing, knowledge components, and evaluation. Electronic versions of the guidelines were displayed by XML, PDF, and PDA versions. The system usability were evaluated by general users, guideline developers, and guideline reviewers on the web and the results showed high scores of satisfaction. This online evidence-based guideline bank system could support nurses' best and cost-effective clinical decision using the sharable standardized guidelines with education module of evidence based nursing.

  14. Today's challenge, tomorrow's excellence: the practice of evidence-based education.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Roberta J; Records, Kathie

    2008-08-01

    Nurse educators are being challenged to maintain quality in light of increasing numbers of students, declining numbers of experienced faculty, societal mandates, and rapid changes in health care. The scholarship underlying the practice of nursing education, or evidence-based education, must continue to be explored through the design, testing, and refinement of education strategies from nursing and other disciplines. The involvement of every educator in this process will help create institutional valuing that serves to retain inquisitive and reflective educators in academic settings, while expanding evidence-based education in nursing. This article describes a literature review of the scholarship of nursing education practice and suggests approaches to generate a dynamic explosion of growth in nursing education to inform our students, promote optimal client health outcomes, and challenge each of us to reach higher levels of excellence in the practice of nursing education.

  15. Exploring an asset-based approach to nursing.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather

    This article explores a different perspective on perceived "failings" in the nursing profession. It takes learning from an asset-based community development approach called Connecting Communities to find out whether the problems and solutions that we observe in vulnerable communities can help us better understand what might be happening in the nursing community. The ideas presented are evidence-based community development theories that are currently used across the world and are now influencing the commissioning for health improvement/health inequalities.

  16. Transforming the image of nursing: the evidence for assurance.

    PubMed

    Wocial, Lucia D; Sego, Kelly; Rager, Carrie; Laubersheimer, Shellee; Everett, Linda Q

    2014-01-01

    A nurse's uniform influences perceptions about nursing practice and thus contributes significantly to the overall image of a nurse. A nurse's uniform also can represent the brand of an organization, the tangible and intangible attributes that distinguish an organization from its competitors. The rebranding of a major health care system provided a unique opportunity to refine the "image of nurses" within the organization. This article describes the planning, evidence gathering, and implementation of a major initiative to promote professional nursing practice.

  17. The influence of workplace culture on nurses' learning experiences: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kate; White, Sarahlouise; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A healthy workplace culture enables nurses to experience valuable learning in the workplace. Learning in the workplace enables the provision of evidence-based and continuously improving safe patient care, which is central to achieving good patient outcomes. Therefore, nurses need to learn within a workplace that supports the implementation of evidence-based, professional practice and enables the best patient outcomes; the influence of workplace culture may play a role in this. The purpose of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the best available qualitative evidence to understand both the nurses' learning experiences within the workplace and the factors within the workplace culture that influence those learning experiences. Registered and enrolled nurses regulated by a nursing and midwifery board and/or recognized health practitioner regulation agency (or their international equivalent). This review considered studies that described two phenomena of interest: the nurses' learning experience, either within an acute healthcare workplace or a workplace-related learning environment and the influence of workplace culture on the nurses' learning experience (within the workplace or workplace-related learning environment). This review considered studies that included nurses working in an acute healthcare organization within a Western culture. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative evidence and included the following research designs: phenomenological, grounded theory and critical theory. Published and unpublished studies in English from 1980 to 2013 were identified using a three-step search strategy, searching various databases, and included hand searching of the reference lists within articles selected for appraisal. For studies meeting the inclusion criteria, methodological quality was assessed using a standardized checklist from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Qualitative data

  18. Experience of adapting and implementing an evidence-based nursing guideline for prevention of diaper dermatitis in a paediatric oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, Anelise; Choquette, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Diaper dermatitis is one of the most common skin problems in children often caused by irritants that promote skin breakdown, such as moisture and faecal enzymes. It has been estimated that the incidence of diaper dermatitis is as high as 50% in children receiving chemotherapy. The scientific literature suggests a variety of preventative measures, but only a minority are systematically tested and supported by clinical evidence. The purpose of this paper is to adapt and implement a skincare guideline to better prevent diaper dermatitis in the paediatric oncology population. The Knowledge to Action process was used to guide the adaptation and implementation of the new guideline. As part of this process, different tools were used to identify and review selected knowledge (Appraisal of Guidelines Research Evaluation instrument), to tailor and adapt knowledge to the local context (ADAPTE process), to implement interventions (Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario toolkit) and to evaluate outcomes (qualitative analysis). The main outcomes measured included implementation of the guideline and nursing practice change. The guideline was successfully implemented as reported by nurses in focus group sessions and as measured by changes in nursing documentation. The implementation of the guideline was successful on the account of the interplay of three core elements: The level and nature of the evidence; the context in which the research was placed; the method in which the process was facilitated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  19. Australian nursing and midwifery educators delivering evidence-based education in Tanzania: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gower, Shelley; van den Akker, Jose; Jones, Mark; Dantas, Jaya A R; Duggan, Ravani

    2016-05-01

    Since 2011, Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators have been providing evidence-based continuing education to Tanzanian health professionals. Despite thorough preparation before departure, differences in local resource levels and available facilities have necessitated impromptu adaptation of curriculum content and delivery methods to ensure an effective program was delivered. This study explored the personal, cultural and teaching strategies utilised by Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators in Tanzania and examined if the transferability of education packages was influenced by the educators' cultural competence. Using a qualitative exploratory approach, data was collected from 15 Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators using a demographic survey and in-depth individual semi-structured interviews. The core themes identified from the analysis were Determination to learn, Assessing needs, Communication skills and Greater understanding. These findings are described using the conceptual framework of Campinha-Bacote's The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services. With appropriate levels of cultural competence, international health professionals can be effective at providing ongoing professional development to colleagues in developing country contexts, which may help address difficulties with retention and motivation of staff. It is essential that prior to departure cultural competence training is provided to educators to enhance their teaching capacity and effectiveness in international settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Online biostatistics: evidence-based curriculum for master's nursing education.

    PubMed

    Shillam, Casey R; Ho, Grace; Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne

    2014-04-01

    Rapid changes in health care delivery require nurses to attain advanced knowledge, skills, and attitudes in biostatistics to provide high-quality, safe patient care. Advances in educational technologies support the delivery of graduate nursing education in online formats. Given the diversity of learning styles among graduate nursing students and the specific challenges in delivering biostatistics content in traditional formats, it is vital to include different delivery formats to engage and meet the learning needs of graduate nursing students who take biostatistics courses online. This article describes the pioneering approach of one graduate nursing program to implementing best practices for delivering an online biostatistics course to help master's-prepared nurses attain both statistical literacy and statistical communication skills. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Knowledge translation strategies for enhancing nurses' evidence-informed decision making: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Yost, Jennifer; Thompson, David; Ganann, Rebecca; Aloweni, Fazila; Newman, Kristine; McKibbon, Ann; Dobbins, Maureen; Ciliska, Donna

    2014-06-01

    , or outcomes. A focused review could assist in determining which strategies can be recommended for enhancing EIDM knowledge, skills, and behaviours among nurses in tertiary care. © 2014 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Nursing journal clubs and the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Cheryl; Albert, Nancy M; Rice, Karen L; Bautista, Cynthia; Close, Jackie; Foster, Jan; Timmerman, Gayle M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the clinical nurse specialist's role in developing and implementing a journal club. Tools for critiquing clinical and research articles with an application of each are provided. The journal club provides a forum through which nurses maintain their knowledge base about clinically relevant topics and developments in their specific clinical discipline, analyze and synthesize the relevant scientific literature as evidence, and engage in informal discussions about evidence-based and best practices. The value of journal clubs includes nursing staff education, review of and support for evidence-based practice, promotion of nursing research, and fostering of organization-wide nursing practice changes. The process for establishing a journal club and suggested appraisal tools are discussed. In addition, strategies for overcoming barriers to the implementation of a journal club are outlined. Suggested article review questions and a reporting format for clinical and research articles are provided with examples from 2 articles. Finally, a glossary of terms commonly used by research scientists and manuscript writers are listed and additional resources provided. The clinical nurse specialist's role in developing and implementing a journal club will be facilitated through the use of this article. Enhanced nursing staff education, evidence-based practice, organization-wide nursing practice changes, and nursing research may be conducted following the implementation of a nursing journal club.

  3. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Management of Child Anxiety in a Rural Primary Care Clinic With the Evidence-Based COPE Program.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Jessica L; Lusk, Pamela; Melnyk, Bernadette M

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is the most common mental health disorder in children. Many communities have shortages of mental health providers, and the majority of children with anxiety are not receiving the evidence-based treatment they need. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and effects of a brief seven-session cognitive behavioral skills-building intervention, Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment (COPE), which was delivered to anxious children by a pediatric nurse practitioner in a primary care setting. A pre-experimental, one-group, pretest and post-test design was used. Children who participated had a significant decrease in anxiety symptoms (13.88 points, SD = 17.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.13-28.89), as well as an increase in knowledge of cognitive-behavioral coping skills (M = 11.38, CI = 5.99-8.26, p = .00) and improved functioning (at school and at home). Evaluations by parents and children were positive. COPE is a promising evidence-based intervention for children with anxiety with feasible delivery by pediatric nurse practitioners in primary care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Computer-based nursing documentation in nursing homes: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Qiu, Yiyu; Crookes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The burden of paper-based nursing documentation has led to increasing complaints and decreasing job satisfaction amongst aged-care workers in Australian nursing homes. The automation of nursing documentation has been identified as one of the possible strategies to address this issue. A major obstacle to the introduction of IT solutions, however, has been a prevailing doubt concerning the ability and/or the willingness of aged-care workers to accept such innovation. This research investigates the attitudes of aged-care workers towards adopting IT innovation. Questionnaire survey were conducted in 13 nursing homes around the Illawarra and Sydney regions in Australia. The survey found that an unexpected 89.3% of participants supported the strategy of introducing electronic nursing documentation systems into residential aged-care facilities. 94.3% of them would use such a system depending on circumstances. Despite a shortage of computers in the workplace, which is a major barrier, this research provides strong evidence that care workers in residential aged-care facilities are willing to accept electronic nursing documentation practice and the uptake of information technology in residential aged-care is feasible in Australia.

  5. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practice to Directors of Nursing by an Outreach Campaign in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Chiehfeng; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Directors of nursing (DONs) have an important influence in the dissemination of evidence-based practice (EBP) in hospital settings. The current study examined how the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of DONs changed when EBP was implemented during a 5-year, nationwide promotional campaign providing EBP-related information resources and promotional activities in regional hospitals in Taiwan. Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys for a nationwide representative sample of DONs were conducted in 2007, 2009, and 2011 to examine views related to EBP, including changes in beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviors, and barriers. This study enrolled 267 DONs in 2007, 257 in 2009, and 287 in 2011. During the study period, DONs' EBP knowledge and skills increased, but their beliefs and attitudes did not significantly change. Furthermore, the use of Internet-based resources, including web portals, electronic textbooks, electronic journals, and evidence-based online databases, increased. Most barriers significantly declined after the intervention. DONs' knowledge, skills, and behaviors regarding EBP increased after the multifaceted intervention. The data suggest this outreach program is useful in disseminating EBP implementation to DONs. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management in the nursing profession: an evidence based literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, C; Griffiths, P

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management for nurses was assessed through a systematic review. Seven randomised controlled trials and three prospective cohort studies assessing the effectiveness of a stress management programmes were identified and reviewed. The quality of research identified was weak. There is more evidence for the effectiveness of programmes based on providing personal support than environmental management to reduce stressors. However, since the number and quality of studies is low, the question as to which, if any, approach is more effective cannot be answered definitively. Further research is required before clear recommendations for the use of particular interventions for nursing work related stress can be made. PMID:12499451

  7. Systematic review of the evidence related to mandated nurse staffing ratios in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Olley, Richard; Edwards, Ian; Avery, Mark; Cooper, Helen

    2018-04-17

    Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate and summarise available research on nurse staffing methods and relate these to outcomes under three overarching themes of: (1) management of clinical risk, quality and safety; (2) development of a new or innovative staffing methodology; and (3) equity of nursing workload. Methods The PRISMA method was used. Relevant articles were located by searching via the Griffith University Library electronic catalogue, including articles on PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Medline. Only English language publications published between 1 January 2010 and 30 April 2016 focusing on methodologies in acute hospital in-patient units were included in the present review. Results Two of the four staffing methods were found to have evidenced-based articles from empirical studies within the parameters set for inclusion. Of the four staffing methodologies searched, supply and demand returned 10 studies and staffing ratios returned 11. Conclusions There is a need to develop an evidence-based nurse-sensitive outcomes measure upon which staffing for safety, quality and workplace equity, as well as an instrument that reliability and validly projects nurse staffing requirements in a variety of clinical settings. Nurse-sensitive indicators reflect elements of patient care that are directly affected by nursing practice In addition, these measures must take into account patient satisfaction, workload and staffing, clinical risks and other measures of the quality and safety of care and nurses' work satisfaction. i. What is known about the topic? Nurse staffing is a controversial topic that has significant patient safety, quality of care, human resources and financial implications. In acute care services, nursing accounts for approximately 70% of salaries and wages paid by health services budgets, and evidence as to the efficacy and effectiveness of any staffing methodology is required

  8. Nursing students' knowledge and attitude on pressure ulcer prevention evidence-based guidelines: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Valentina; Comparcini, Dania; Flacco, Maria Elena; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2015-04-01

    Pressure ulcers still remain a significant problem in many healthcare settings. Poor knowledge and negative attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention could undesirably affect preventive care strategies. To assess both knowledge and attitudes among nursing students on Pressure Ulcer Prevention Evidence-Based Guidelines. A multicenter cross-sectional survey was carried out from December 2012 to August 2013. The study was carried out in seven Italian nursing schools. We involved a convenience sample of nursing students (n=742) METHODS: Data were collected using two validated questionnaires to assess students' knowledge and attitudes on pressure ulcer prevention. The overall Knowledge and Attitude scores were 51.1% (13.3/26) and 76.7% (39.9/52), respectively. We found a weak correlation between total Knowledge scores and total Attitude scores (rho=0.13, p<0.001). We also observed that nursing students' year of education, training experience and number of department frequented during their clinical placement were significantly related to both the Knowledge and the Attitude total scores (p<0.05). Nursing students' knowledge on pressure ulcer prevention was relatively low. However, we observed an association between a high level of education/training experience and higher knowledge scores. Most of the participants showed high attitude scores. These results suggest that positive attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention may contribute to the compliance with the guidelines in clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A theory-based approach to nursing shared governance.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Bogue, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of nursing uses a general definition of shared governance. The discipline's lack of a specified theory with precepts and propositions contributes to persistent barriers in progress toward building evidence-based knowledge through systematic study. The purposes of this article were to describe the development and elements of a program theory approach for nursing shared governance implementation and to recommend further testing. Five studies using multiple methods are described using a structured framework. The studies led to the use of Lipsey's method of theory development for program implementation to develop a theory for shared governance for nursing. Nine competencies were verified to define nursing practice council effectiveness. Other findings reveal that nurse empowerment results from alignment between the competencies of self- directed work teams and the competencies of organizational leaders. Implementation of GEMS theory based nursing shared governance can advance goals at the individual, unit, department, and organization level. Advancing professional nursing practice requires that nursing concepts are systematically studied and then formalized for implementation. This article describes the development of a theoretical foundation for the systematic study and implementation of nursing shared governance. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A systematic review of the literature to support an evidence-based precepting program.

    PubMed

    Mann-Salinas, Elizabeth; Hayes, Elizabeth; Robbins, Johnnie; Sabido, Jean; Feider, Laura; Allen, David; Yoder, Linda

    2014-05-01

    To provide a systematic review of the literature regarding development of an evidence-based Precepting Program for nurses transitioning to burn specialty practice. Burned patients are admitted to specialty Burn Centers where highly complex nursing care is provided. Successful orientation and integration into such a specialized work environment is a fundamental component of a nurse's ability to provide safe and holistic patient care. A systematic review of the literature was performed for the period 1995-2011 using electronic databases within PUBMED and Ovid search engines. Databases included Medline, CINHAL, ProQuest for Dissertations and Thesis, and Cochran Collaboration using key search terms: preceptor, preceptee, preceptorship, precept*, nurs*, critical care, personality types, competency-based education, and learning styles. Nurses graded the level and quality of evidence of the included articles using a modified 7-level rating system and the Johns Hopkins Nursing Quality of Evidence Appraisal during journal-club meetings. A total of 43 articles related to competency (n=8), knowledge acquisition and personality characteristics (n=8), learning style (n=5), preceptor development (n=7), and Precepting Programs (n=14). A significant clinical gap existed between the scientific evidence and actual precepting practice of experienced nurses at the Burn Center. Based on this extensive review of the literature, it was determined that a sufficient evidence base existed for development of an evidence-based Precepting Program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of clinical nurse specialists on clinical pathways in the application of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Gurzick, Martha; Kesten, Karen S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to address the call for evidence-based practice through the development of clinical pathways and to assert the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) as a champion in clinical pathway implementation. In the current health care system, providing quality of care while maintaining cost-effectiveness is an ever-growing battle that institutions face. The CNS's role is central to meeting these demands. An extensive literature review has been conducted to validate the use of clinical pathways as a means of improving patient outcomes. This literature also suggests that clinical pathways must be developed, implemented, and evaluated utilizing validated methods including the use of best practice standards. Execution of clinical pathways should include a clinical expert, who has the ability to look at the system as a whole and can facilitate learning and change by employing a multitude of competencies while maintaining a sphere of influence over patient and families, nurses, and the system. The CNS plays a pivotal role in influencing effective clinical pathway development, implementation, utilization, and ongoing evaluation to ensure improved patient outcomes and reduced costs. This article expands upon the call for evidence-based practice through the utilization of clinical pathways to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs and stresses the importance of the CNS as a primary figure for ensuring proper pathway development, implementation, and ongoing evaluation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of nursing documentation: Paper-based health records versus electronic-based health records.

    PubMed

    Akhu-Zaheya, Laila; Al-Maaitah, Rowaida; Bany Hani, Salam

    2018-02-01

    To assess and compare the quality of paper-based and electronic-based health records. The comparison examined three criteria: content, documentation process and structure. Nursing documentation is a significant indicator of the quality of patient care delivery. It can be either paper-based or organised within the system known as the electronic health records. Nursing documentation must be completed at the highest standards, to ensure the safety and quality of healthcare services. However, the evidence is not clear on which one of the two forms of documentation (paper-based versus electronic health records is more qualified. A retrospective, descriptive, comparative design was used to address the study's purposes. A convenient number of patients' records, from two public hospitals, were audited using the Cat-ch-Ing audit instrument. The sample size consisted of 434 records for both paper-based health records and electronic health records from medical and surgical wards. Electronic health records were better than paper-based health records in terms of process and structure. In terms of quantity and quality content, paper-based records were better than electronic health records. The study affirmed the poor quality of nursing documentation and lack of nurses' knowledge and skills in the nursing process and its application in both paper-based and electronic-based systems. Both forms of documentation revealed drawbacks in terms of content, process and structure. This study provided important information, which can guide policymakers and administrators in identifying effective strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of nursing documentation. Policies and actions to ensure quality nursing documentation at the national level should focus on improving nursing knowledge, competencies, practice in nursing process, enhancing the work environment and nursing workload, as well as strengthening the capacity building of nursing practice to improve the quality of nursing care and

  13. Experiences of nursing students of Evidence-Based Practice Education according to Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Model: A Directed Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pashaeypoor, Shahzad; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Rassouli, Maryam; Alavi Majd, Hamid

    2017-10-01

    Evidence based practice (EBP) education is essential in promoting of clinical care, but an effective educational strategy for teaching EBP in nursing faculties is not available. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nursing students of EBP Education according to Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Model. This qualitative study was carried out using a directed content analysis method and purposeful sampling. Data were collected until saturation by fourteen semi-structured face-to-face individual interviews and two focus group discussions with nursing students from two nursing faculties in Tehran, Iran. Rogers' Model was used in this study. Data were classified into five themes and 11 categories according to the Rogers's Model. Themes and main categories were knowledge (educational enrichment, new strategy for education), persuasion (internalization of education, improvement of motivation), decision (acceptance, use in the future), implementation (objectivity, consolidation of learning) and confirmation (learning and teaching, achieving a goal, self-confidence). EBP Education, based on the teaching strategy of Rogers's Model, leads to an improved EBP learning. All the necessary steps for a better education of it are included in this educational approach which can be used to teach any new subject like EBP.

  14. Medical Evidence Influence on Inpatients and Nurses Pain Ratings Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Samolsky Dekel, Boaz Gedaliahu; Gori, Alberto; Vasarri, Alessio; Sorella, Maria Cristina; Di Nino, Gianfranco; Melotti, Rita Maria

    2016-01-01

    Biased pain evaluation due to automated heuristics driven by symptom uncertainty may undermine pain treatment; medical evidence moderators are thought to play a role in such circumstances. We explored, in this cross-sectional survey, the effect of such moderators (e.g., nurse awareness of patients' pain experience and treatment) on the agreement between n = 862 inpatients' self-reported pain and n = 115 nurses' pain ratings using a numerical rating scale. We assessed the mean of absolute difference, agreement (κ-statistics), and correlation (Spearman rank) of inpatients and nurses' pain ratings and analyzed congruence categories' (CCs: underestimation, congruence, and overestimation) proportions and dependence upon pain categories for each medical evidence moderator (χ 2 analysis). Pain ratings agreement and correlation were limited; the CCs proportions were further modulated by the studied moderators. Medical evidence promoted in nurses overestimation of low and underestimation of high inpatients' self-reported pain. Knowledge of the negative influence of automated heuristics driven by symptoms uncertainty and medical-evidence moderators on pain evaluation may render pain assessment more accurate. PMID:27445633

  15. Adaptation and Evaluation of Online Self-learning Modules to Teach Critical Appraisal and Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: An International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Johanne; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Buteau, Rose-Anne; Azizah, Ginette Mbourou; Jetté, Sylvie; Lampron, Amélie; Simonyan, David; Asua, José; Reviriego, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare professionals need to update their knowledge and acquire skills to continually inform their practice based on scientific evidence. This study was designed to evaluate online self-learning modules on critical appraisal skills to promote the use of research in clinical practice among nurses from Quebec (Canada) and the Basque Country (Spain). The teaching material was developed in Quebec and adapted to the Basque Country as part of an international collaboration project. A prospective pre-post study was conducted with 36 nurses from Quebec and 47 from the Basque Country. Assessment comprised the administration of questionnaires before and after the course in order to explore the main intervention outcomes: knowledge acquisition and self-learning readiness. Satisfaction was also measured at the end of the course. Two of the three research hypotheses were confirmed: (1) participants significantly improved their overall knowledge score after the educational intervention; and (2) they were, in general, satisfied with the course, giving it a rating of seven out of 10. Participants also reported a greater readiness for self-directed learning after the course, but this result was not significant in Quebec. The study provides unique knowledge on the cultural adaptation of online self-learning modules for teaching nurses about critical appraisal skills and evidence-based practice.

  16. Managing Workplace Violence With Evidence-Based Interventions: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel Johann Solorzano

    2016-09-01

    Workplace violence in health care settings is an occupational issue concerning nurses and other health care professionals. Patient aggression against nurses is often the most common form of violence in clinical settings, occurring in emergency departments, inpatient psychiatric settings, and nursing homes. Physical and verbal assaults are the major forms of workplace violence encountered by nurses. Current research has identified staff, environmental, and patient risk factors as the major precursors of workplace violence initiated by patients. Nurses often experience significant physical and psychological negative consequences after an episode of workplace violence. A review of the evidence was conducted to identify current evidence-based interventions that can help nurses minimize the incidence of workplace violence. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 31-36.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. From the Children’s Oncology Group: Evidence-based recommendations for PEG-asparaginase nurse monitoring, hypersensitivity reaction management, and patient/family education

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Deborah; Winchester, Kari; Towerman, Alison; Gettinger, Katie; Carey, Christina; Timmermann, Karen; Langley, Rachel; Browne, Emily

    2017-01-01

    PEG-aspariginase is a backbone chemotherapy agent in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and in some non-Hodgkin lymphoma therapies. Nurses lack standardized guidelines for monitoring patients receiving PEG-asparaginase and for educating patients/families about hypersensitivity reaction risks. An electronic search of six databases using publication years 2000–2015 and multiple professional organizations and clinical resources was conducted. Evidence sources were reviewed for topic applicability. Each of the final 23 sources was appraised by two team members. The GRADE system was used to assign a quality and strength rating for each recommendation. Multiple recommendations were developed: four relating to nurse monitoring of patients during and after drug administration, eight guiding hypersensitivity reaction management, and four concerning patient/family educational content. These strong recommendations were based on moderate, low, or very-low quality evidence. Several recommendations relied upon generalized drug hypersensitivity guidelines. Additional research is needed to safely guide PEG-asparaginase monitoring, hypersensitivity reaction management and patient/family education. Nurses administering PEG-asparaginase play a critical role in the early identification and management of hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:28602129

  18. Simulation-based training for nurses: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hegland, Pål A; Aarlie, Hege; Strømme, Hilde; Jamtvedt, Gro

    2017-07-01

    Simulation-based training is a widespread strategy to improve health-care quality. However, its effect on registered nurses has previously not been established in systematic reviews. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate effect of simulation-based training on nurses' skills and knowledge. We searched CDSR, DARE, HTA, CENTRAL, CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, and SveMed+ for randomised controlled trials (RCT) evaluating effect of simulation-based training among nurses. Searches were completed in December 2016. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and full-text, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We compared simulation-based training to other learning strategies, high-fidelity simulation to other simulation strategies, and different organisation of simulation training. Data were analysed through meta-analysis and narrative syntheses. GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence. Fifteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. For the comparison of simulation-based training to other learning strategies on nurses' skills, six studies in the meta-analysis showed a significant, but small effect in favour of simulation (SMD -1.09, CI -1.72 to -0.47). There was large heterogeneity (I 2 85%). For the other comparisons, there was large between-study variation in results. The quality of evidence for all comparisons was graded as low. The effect of simulation-based training varies substantially between studies. Our meta-analysis showed a significant effect of simulation training compared to other learning strategies, but the quality of evidence was low indicating uncertainty. Other comparisons showed inconsistency in results. Based on our findings simulation training appears to be an effective strategy to improve nurses' skills, but further good-quality RCTs with adequate sample sizes are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of team-based learning in a second year undergraduate pre-registration nursing course on evidence-informed decision making.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jenny

    2016-11-01

    More engaging teaching and learning strategies are needed to teach research-related courses to pre-registration nursing students. Team-based learning was implemented within a second year pre-registration nursing evidence-informed decision making course. Results from a questionnaire survey indicated that 70% believed team-based learning was appropriate for the course, 60% that it was an effective and motivating learning strategy, and 54% recommended using team-based learning in other courses. The results from ten student interviews illustrated the positive way in which team-based learning was perceived, and how the students thought it contributed to their learning. Test results were improved with an increase in the numbers of students achieving 70% or higher; and higher scores for students in the lowest quartile. Team-based learning was shown to be an effective strategy that preserved the benefits of small group teaching with large student groups. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sustaining Nurse-Led Task-Shifting Strategies for Hypertension Control: A Concept Mapping Study to Inform Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Sarah; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Gyamfi, Joyce; Quakyi, Nana Kofi; Ntim, Micheal; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2017-10-01

    The use of task-shifting is an increasingly widespread delivery approach for health interventions targeting prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension in adults living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Addressing a gap in the literature, this research examined the sustainability of an ongoing task-shifting strategy for hypertension (TASSH) from the perspectives of community health nurses (CHNs) implementing the program. We used concept-mapping, a mixed-methods participatory approach to understand CHNs' perceptions of barriers and enablers to sustaining a task-shifting program. Participants responded to focal prompts, eliciting statements regarding perceived barriers and enablers to sustaining TASSH, and then rated these ideas based on importance to the research questions and feasibility to address. Twenty-eight community health nurses (21 women, 7 men) from the Ashanti region of Ghana completed the concept-mapping process. Factors influencing sustainability were grouped into five categories: Limited Drug Supply, Financial Support, Provision of Primary Health Care, Personnel Training, and Patient-Provider Communication. The limited supply of antihypertensive medication was considered by CHNs as the most important item to address, while providing training for intervention personnel was considered most feasible to address. This study's findings highlight the importance of examining nurses' perceptions of factors likely to influence the sustainability of evidence-based, task-shifting interventions. Nurses' perceptions can guide the widespread uptake and dissemination of these interventions in resource-limited settings. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Exploring the evidence in pediatric hematology and oncology nursing through the "article of the month".

    PubMed

    Linder, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    As the scope of pediatric hematology and oncology nursing expands, nurses are challenged with staying current in the evidence guiding their practice. Nurse-reported barriers to accessing and utilizing research include lack of time as well as difficulty in accessing, understanding, and synthesizing findings. Journal clubs provide a process to guide nurses in the review of current literature related to their practice and promote utilization of research and evidence-based practice among nurses. This article describes the transition of an in-person journal club to an electronically delivered "Article of the Month." The "Article of the Month" is offered six times each year and is posted on the service line's password-protected intranet website. Oversight of the "Article of the Month" is provided by the service line clinical nurse specialist who selects articles based on an annual learning needs assessment and develops a quiz to assess learning and promote critical thinking among nursing staff. Outcomes include anecdotal reports of increased staff confidence in managing emergent patient care needs and greater appreciation of nursing care issues for children with cancer. Areas for future development include exploring options for increasing in-person discussion of issues addressed in the "Article of the Month" among staff members, extending the "Article of the Month" to nurses in other service areas who care for children with cancer, and increasing staff participation in article selection and quiz item development. An ultimate goal is to develop formal evaluation strategies to link this educational strategy to clinical outcomes.

  2. Lost in transformation? Reviving ethics of care in hospital cultures of evidence-based healthcare.

    PubMed

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente

    2017-07-01

    Drawing on previous empirical research, we provide an exemplary narrative to illustrate how patients have experienced hospital care organized according to evidence-based fast-track programmes. The aim of this paper was to analyse and discuss if and how it is possible to include patients' individual perspectives in an evidence-based practice as seen from the point of view of nursing theory. The paper highlights two conflicting courses of development. One is a course of standardization founded on evidence-based recommendations, which specify a set of rules that the patient must follow rigorously. The other is a course of democratization based on patients' involvement in care. Referring to the analysis of the narrative, we argue that, in the current implementation of evidence-based practice, the proposed involvement of patients resembles empty rhetoric. We argue that the principles and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as 'one best way'. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today's evidence practice as the fundamental values of nursing may potentially bridge conflicts between evidence-based practice and the ideals of patient participation thus preventing a practice of 'McNursing'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    PubMed

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  4. Outcomes From the First Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare Invitational Expert Forum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Gallagher-Ford, Lynn; Zellefrow, Cindy; Tucker, Sharon; Van Dromme, Laurel; Thomas, Bindu Koshy

    2018-02-01

    Even though multiple positive outcomes are the result of evidence-based care, including improvements in healthcare quality, safety, and costs, it is not consistently delivered by clinicians in healthcare systems throughout the world. In an attempt to accelerate the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) across the United States, an invitational Interprofessional National EBP Forum to determine major priorities for the advancement of EBP was held during the launch of the newly established Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Interprofessional leaders from national organizations and federal agencies across the United States were invited to participate in the Forum. A pre-Forum survey was disseminated to participants to assess their perceptions of the state of EBP and actions necessary to speed the translation of research into real-world clinical settings. Findings from a pre-Forum survey (n = 47) indicated ongoing low implementation of EBP in U.S. healthcare settings. These findings were shared with leaders from 45 organizations and agencies who attended the Forum. Breakout groups on practice, education, implementation science, and policy discussed the findings and responded to a set of standardized questions. High-priority action tactics were identified, including the need for: (a) enhanced reimbursement for EBP, (b) more interprofessional education and skills building in EBP, and (c) leaders to prioritize EBP and fuel it with resources. The delivery of and reimbursement for evidence-based care must become a high national priority. Academic faculty across all healthcare disciplines need to teach EBP, healthcare systems must invest in EBP resources, and payers must attach reimbursement to care that is evidence-based. An action collaborative of the participating organizations has been formed to accelerate EBP across the United States to achieve the

  5. [Evidence based practice of nurses working in university hospitals in the French speaking part of Switzerland: a descriptive and correlational study

    PubMed

    Gentizon, Jenny; Borrero, Patricia; Vincent-Suter, Sonja; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Morin, Diane; Eicher, Manuela

    2016-12-01

    Introduction : evidence-based practice (EBP) is too scarcely applied in nursing and is a key contemporary challenge for the discipline. Method and objective : This descriptive and correlational study invited 221 nurses working in three different clinical settings of university hospitals in Switzerland. The objective of this study was to describe their level of knowledge, beliefs and implementation of EBP. Results : of the 221 nurses in this study, only 67 were familiar EBP (30%). These demonstrate favorable beliefs and attitudes towards EBP, but indicate a lack of skills and knowledge to implement it. Compared to both internal medicine and geriatric nurses clinical nurse specialists (ISC) were significantly more familiar with EBP and its implementation. Results also indicate that positive nurses’ beliefs and attitudes toward EBP are predictive of better implementation in clinical practice. Discussion and Conclusion : as demonstrated in other studies, our results show that knowledge about EBP is not that widespread and its implementation remains a challenge even in university hospitals. Future work could include testing EBP implementation strategies to overcome the barriers identified.

  6. Promoting evidence-based practice: managing change in the assessment of pressure damage risk.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, K; Clayton, J; Nolan, M; Parker, K; Morgan, L

    1999-11-01

    This study set out to facilitate the development of evidence-based practice in the assessment of pressure damage risk to patients within a large acute hospital. The importance of nursing practice being based on the best available evidence is emphasized in recent health policy. Meeting this objective is not easy as both individual and organizational factors create barriers to the implementation of research findings and the achievement of change. The study was based on an action research model. It comprised three stages: a review of the research evidence; a survey of qualified nurses' knowledge of risk assessment of pressure damage and an audit of record keeping, and a multifaceted approach to achieving change in which researchers, managers, practitioners and clinical nurse specialists worked together collaboratively. The findings from the survey and audit indicated a shortfall in nurses' knowledge of risk assessment of pressure damage and in their record keeping. The researchers, with the help of the clinical nurse specialist, built upon these findings by assisting practitioners and managers to take ownership of the need to base practice on the appropriate evidence. Achieving evidence-based practice is a complex undertaking that requires the development of an evaluative culture and a commitment by practitioners and managers to change practice. Researchers can play a valuable role in facilitating this process.

  7. [Glocalization: the outlook for Taiwan evidence based health care].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiehfeng

    2014-12-01

    Public attention to evidence-based health care (EBHC) has increased significantly in recent years. Key problems related to applying EBHC in current healthcare practice include the timely update of up-to-date knowledge and skills and the methodology used to implement EBHC in clinical settings. EBHC has been introduced to the Taiwan healthcare system for the past two decades. The annual EBM (Evidence based medicine) National Competition is a unique and important EBHC activity in Taiwan. EBHC has been promoted widely in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other professions, and EBHC-related organizations such as the Taiwan Evidence Based Medicine Association (TEBMA), and Taiwan Evidence Based Nursing Association (TEBNA), have increased in number and grown in membership. In addition to domestic developments, Taiwan is also actively involved in global organizations, such as the Cochrane Collaboration, East Asian Cochrane Alliance (EACA), and the International Society for Evidence Based Health Care (ISEHC). In Taiwan, most medical professionals work cooperatively to promote EBHC, which facilitates the gradual improvement of healthcare quality.

  8. How do nurse academics value and engage with evidence-based practice across Australia: Findings from a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2016-06-01

    Integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into undergraduate education and preparing future nurses to embrace EBP in clinical practice becomes paramount in today's complex and evolving healthcare environment. The role that EBP plays in the practical lives of nursing students will depend on the degree to which it is promoted by academics, how it is incorporated into courses and its application to clinical setting. Hence, nursing academics play a crucial role in influencing its integration into curricula. Drawn from a larger doctoral study, this paper presents findings discussing how nurse academics value and engage with EBP. Grounded theory was employed to explore processes used by nursing academics while incorporating EBP into teaching and learning practices. Twenty-three academics across Australian universities were interviewed. Nine were also observed while teaching undergraduate students. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. In keeping with the tenets of grounded theory, data collection and analysis continued until theoretical saturation was reached. In total, four categories emerged. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Valuing and Engaging with EBP. How nursing academics valued and engaged with EBP was closely associated with meanings they constructed around understanding it, attitudes and commitment to implementation while teaching and working clinically. Different opinions also existed in regard to what actually constituted EBP. However, they engaged with and valued EBP by keeping themselves up-to-date, being involved in research activities, using evidence in teaching, therefore leading by example. Participants identified a number of barriers influencing their engagement with EBP including heavy workloads, limited time, lack of commitment within their schools, lack of confidence with teaching EBP, and complexity of EBP application. Faculty clinical practice, committed academics, workload

  9. Nursing Fatigue: An Evidence-Based Practice Review for Oncology Nurses
.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Jordan

    2015-12-01

    Nursing fatigue is a current and well-researched topic. Many negative outcomes and consequences exist for patients and nurses that have been linked to nursing fatigue. Medical errors are one such consequence, and these errors have become one of the top three preventable deaths in the United States. Oncology nurses are not immune to fatigue, and the consequences of their fatigue can be much more harmful to patients.

  10. Cochrane pregnancy and childbirth database: resource for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Callister, L C; Hobbins-Garbett, D

    2000-01-01

    The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth database is an ongoing meta-analysis of evidence documenting effective health care practices for childbearing women and their neonates. It is proving invaluable to nurse educators, researchers, clinicians, and administrators working in a variety of health care delivery settings. Evidence-based nursing practice that is safe and effective can enhance rather than overpower pivotal and celebratory life events such as childbirth.

  11. Adaptation of evidence-based guideline recommendations to address urinary incontinence in nursing home residents according to the ADAPTE-process.

    PubMed

    Hoedl, Manuela; Schoberer, Daniela; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2018-04-27

    To adapt international guideline recommendations for the conservative management of urinary incontinence (UI), defined as any involuntary loss of urine, in Austrian nursing home residents following the ADAPTE-process. Many international guidelines for managing UI are available. Nevertheless, the international recommendations have not yet been adapted to address the Austrian nursing home context. This crucial adaptation process will enhance the acceptance and applicability of the recommendations as well as encourage adherence among Austrian nurses and nursing home residents. This study is a methodological study based on the ADAPTE-process, including a systematic search, quality appraisal of the guidelines using the Appraisal of Clinical Guidelines for REsearch & Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument as well as an external review by means of a Delphi technique. The guidelines had to be topic-relevant, published within the last 3 years and achieve a rigor of development score of 80% using the AGREE II instrument. We searched international guideline databases to identify adequate guidelines. Two raters assessed the quality of each guideline, ascertaining that it fulfilled the inclusion criteria using the AGREE II instrument. We translated the identified recommendations into German and externally reviewed for their applicability in the Austrian context. We identified 1,612 hits in 10 databases. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we assessed five international clinical guidelines for quality using the AGREE II instrument. One clinical guideline fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This clinical guideline contains 116 recommendations, of which 29 were applicable in the Austrian nursing home setting. We identified only one suitable guideline, possibly due to the stringent nature of the inclusion criteria. However, following low-quality guidelines may result in the use of recommendations that are not based on evidence and, therefore, may lead to suboptimal nursing

  12. Developing the Evidence Base in Pediatric Oncology Nursing Practice for Promoting Health-Related Quality of Life in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann; Conte, Teresa M; Hudson, Melissa M; Ruble, Kathy; Herth, Kaye; Shad, Aziza; Canino, Alyssa

    Research has shown that self-esteem and hopefulness are positively related among female childhood cancer survivors (CCS) and contribute to their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). HRQOL remains a significant outcome of treatment for CCS. This study examined the relationships among self-esteem, hopefulness, and HRQOL in young adult female CCS to inform the development of evidence-based practice guidelines for pediatric oncology nursing practice. An online survey was conducted with a sample of young adult female CCS from 58 treatment centers across the United States at 4 time points: at baseline and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after initial measurement time. The relationships between self-esteem, hopefulness, and HRQOL were statistically significant (Time 1, P = .05; Times 2, 3, and 4, P = .01) across all measurement times. These findings identify hopefulness and self-esteem as determinants of HRQOL and suggest that caring practices among pediatric oncology nurses that support psychosocial adjustment through promoting self-esteem and hopefulness have the potential to support HRQOL among young adult female CCS. These outcomes support the development of evidence-based practice guidelines to influence HRQOL outcomes among these survivors.

  13. Critical Appraisal Tools and Reporting Guidelines for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Robin K; Sharifi, Claire

    2017-12-01

    Nurses engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) have two important sets of tools: Critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines. Critical appraisal tools facilitate the appraisal process and guide a consumer of evidence through an objective, analytical, evaluation process. Reporting guidelines, checklists of items that should be included in a publication or report, ensure that the project or guidelines are reported on with clarity, completeness, and transparency. The primary purpose of this paper is to help nurses understand the difference between critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines. A secondary purpose is to help nurses locate the appropriate tool for the appraisal or reporting of evidence. A systematic search was conducted to find commonly used critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines for EBP in nursing. This article serves as a resource to help nurse navigate the often-overwhelming terrain of critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines, and will help both novice and experienced consumers of evidence more easily select the appropriate tool(s) to use for critical appraisal and reporting of evidence. Having the skills to select the appropriate tool or guideline is an essential part of meeting EBP competencies for both practicing registered nurses and advanced practice nurses (Melnyk & Gallagher-Ford, 2015; Melnyk, Gallagher-Ford, & Fineout-Overholt, 2017). Nine commonly used critical appraisal tools and eight reporting guidelines were found and are described in this manuscript. Specific steps for selecting an appropriate tool as well as examples of each tool's use in a publication are provided. Practicing registered nurses and advance practice nurses must be able to critically appraise and disseminate evidence in order to meet EBP competencies. This article is a resource for understanding the difference between critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines, and identifying and accessing appropriate tools or guidelines. © 2017

  14. Evidence-Based Practice in the United States: Challenges, Progress, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly

    2016-01-01

    Scientific literature demonstrates that advances in evidence-based nursing have improved systems of care and women’s health outcomes. Experts agree that nurses worldwide can play a key role in building such evidence and working with interdisciplinary health care teams and systems to accelerate its implementation. PMID:26473771

  15. The role of organizational context and individual nurse characteristics in explaining variation in use of information technologies in evidence based practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is growing awareness of the role of information technology in evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of organizational context and nurse characteristics in explaining variation in nurses’ use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) and mobile Tablet PCs for accessing evidence-based information. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) model provided the framework for studying the impact of providing nurses with PDA-supported, evidence-based practice resources, and for studying the organizational, technological, and human resource variables that impact nurses’ use patterns. Methods A survey design was used, involving baseline and follow-up questionnaires. The setting included 24 organizations representing three sectors: hospitals, long-term care (LTC) facilities, and community organizations (home care and public health). The sample consisted of 710 participants (response rate 58%) at Time 1, and 469 for whom both Time 1 and Time 2 follow-up data were obtained (response rate 66%). A hierarchical regression model (HLM) was used to evaluate the effect of predictors from all levels simultaneously. Results The Chi square result indicated PDA users reported using their device more frequently than Tablet PC users (p = 0.001). Frequency of device use was explained by ‘breadth of device functions’ and PDA versus Tablet PC. Frequency of Best Practice Guideline use was explained by ‘willingness to implement research,’ ‘structural and electronic resources,’ ‘organizational slack time,’ ‘breadth of device functions’ (positive effects), and ‘slack staff’ (negative effect). Frequency of Nursing Plus database use was explained by ‘culture,’ ‘structural and electronic resources,’ and ‘breadth of device functions’ (positive effects), and ‘slack staff’ (negative). ‘Organizational culture’ (positive), ‘breadth of device functions’ (positive), and

  16. Implementation of an Evidence-Based Seizure Algorithm in Intellectual Disability Nursing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auberry, Kathy; Cullen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of the Surrogate Decision-Making Self Efficacy Scale (Lopez, 2009a), this study sought to determine whether nurses working in the field of intellectual disability (ID) experience increased confidence when they implemented the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) Seizure Algorithm during telephone triage. The…

  17. [Precision Nursing: Individual-Based Knowledge Translation].

    PubMed

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-12-01

    U.S. President Obama announced a new era of precision medicine in the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). This initiative aims to accelerate the progress of personalized medicine in light of individual requirements for prevention and treatment in order to improve the state of individual and public health. The recent and dramatic development of large-scale biologic databases (such as the human genome sequence), powerful methods for characterizing patients (such as genomics, microbiome, diverse biomarkers, and even pharmacogenomics), and computational tools for analyzing big data are maximizing the potential benefits of precision medicine. Nursing science should follow and keep pace with this trend in order to develop empirical knowledge and expertise in the area of personalized nursing care. Nursing scientists must encourage, examine, and put into practice innovative research on precision nursing in order to provide evidence-based guidance to clinical practice. The applications in personalized precision nursing care include: explanations of personalized information such as the results of genetic testing; patient advocacy and support; anticipation of results and treatment; ongoing chronic monitoring; and support for shared decision-making throughout the disease trajectory. Further, attention must focus on the family and the ethical implications of taking a personalized approach to care. Nurses will need to embrace the paradigm shift to precision nursing and work collaboratively across disciplines to provide the optimal personalized care to patients. If realized, the full potential of precision nursing will provide the best chance for good health for all.

  18. Autonomy, evidence and intuition: nurses and decision-making.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine how nurses represent professional clinical decision-making processes, and to determine what light Jamous and Peloille's 'Indeterminacy/Technicality ratio' concept can shed on these representations. Classic definitions of professional work feature autonomy of decision-making and control over the field of work. Sociologists Jamous and Peloille have described professional work as being high in 'indeterminacy' (the use of tacit judgements) relative to technicality (activity able to be codified). The rise of the evidence-based practice movement has been seen as increasing the realm of technical decision-making in healthcare, and it is relevant to analyse nurses' professional discourse and study how they respond to this increase. Three focus groups with qualified nurses attending post-qualifying courses at a London university were held in 2008. Participants were asked to talk about influences on their decision-making. The discussions were tape-recorded, transcribed and subjected to discourse analysis. Participants described their decision-making as influenced by both indeterminate and technical features. They acknowledged useful influences from both domains, but pointed to their personal 'experience' as the final arbiter of decision-making. Their accounts of decision-making created a sense of professional autonomy while at the same time protecting it against external critique. Pre- and post-registration nurse education could encourage robust discussion of the definition and roles of 'irrational' aspects of decision-making and how these might be understood as components of credible professional practice.

  19. Effectiveness of the implementation of an evidence-based nursing model using participatory action research in oncohematology: research protocol.

    PubMed

    Abad-Corpa, Eva; Meseguer-Liza, Cristobal; Martínez-Corbalán, José Tomás; Zárate-Riscal, Lourdes; Caravaca-Hernández, Amor; Paredes-Sidrach de Cardona, Antonio; Carrillo-Alcaraz, Andrés; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Cabrero-García, Julio

    2010-08-01

    To generate changes in nursing practice introducing an evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) model through a participatory process. To evaluate the effectiveness of the changes in terms of nurse-sensitive outcome (NSO). For international nursing science, it is necessary to explore the reasons for supporting EBCP and evaluate the real repercussions and effectiveness. A mixed methods study with a sequential transformative design will be conducted in the bone marrow transplant unit of a tertiary-level Spanish hospital, in two time periods >12 months (date of approval of the protocol: 2006). To evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention, we will use a prospective quasi-experimental design with two non-equivalent and non-concurrent groups. NSO and patient health data will be collected: (a) impact of psycho-social adjustment; (b) patient satisfaction; (c) symptom control; (d) adverse effects. All patients admitted during the period of time will be included, and all staff working on the unit during a participatory action research (PAR). The PAR design will be adopted from a constructivist paradigm perspective, following Checkland's "Soft Systems" theoretical model. Qualitative techniques will be used: 2-hour group meetings with nursing professionals, to be recorded and transcribed. Field diaries (participants and researchers) will be drawn up and data analysis will be carried out by content analysis. PAR is a rigorous research method for introducing changes into practice to improve NSO.

  20. The Impact of Electronic Knowledge-Based Nursing Content and Decision-Support on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1...the impact of an electronic innovation must include a description of the sociotechnical context as well as the process and outcome metrics for...dissemination, will have a positive effect on nursing knowledge, use of evidence-based practices, and the achievement of nurse-sensitive patient outcomes

  1. An evidence-based model for enriching academic nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail A; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Greenhouse, Pamela

    2006-12-01

    The challenge of developing contemporary nurse leaders for today and tomorrow is compounded not only by the faculty shortage but also by limited faculty expertise in healthcare administration. The authors describe an effective academic-service partnership designed to ground future nursing leaders in the knowledge, skills, and abilities essential for success.

  2. Implementing evidence in an onco-haematology nursing unit: a process of change using participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Abad-Corpa, Eva; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Cabrero-García, Julio; Meseguer-Liza, Cristobal; Zárate-Riscal, Carmen Lourdes; Carrillo-Alcaraz, Andrés; Martínez-Corbalán, José Tomás; Caravaca-Hernández, Amor

    2013-03-01

    findings throw light on the process of change in the healthcare sector. The results are useful to modify nursing practice based on evidence. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  3. Understanding New Types of Evidence Ready for Translation into Nursing Informatics.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are the primary deliverers of patient care and observers of patient side effects to medications. The primary objective of this tutorial is to bring the participants up to date in genomic applications for nursing from birth until death. A secondary objective is to define at least 17 pharmacogenomics evidence guidelines ready for implementation into the Electronic Health Record. The target audience are nurses in practice, implementers of EHRs, nursing in leadership and policy-making positions, those focused on defining new areas for nursing research, and educators who are in need of defining criteria for integrating genomics into nursing education.

  4. Leading change: evidence-based transition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brennan; Allen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a framework for evidence-based transition of patient populations within an acute care pediatric institution. Transition within a hospital is foreseeable, given the ever-changing needs of the patients within an evolving healthcare system. These changes include moving patient populations because of expansion, renovation, or cohorting similar patient diagnoses to provide care across a continuum. Over the past 1 to 2 years, Children's Health Children's Medical Center Dallas has experienced a wide variety of transition. To provide a smooth transition for patients and families into new care areas resulting in a healthy work environment for all team members. The planning phase for patient population moves, and transition should address key aspects to include physical location and care flow, supplies and equipment, staffing model and human resources (HR), education and orientation, change process and integrating teams, and family preparation. It is imperative to consider these aspects in order for transitions within a healthcare system to be successful. During a time of such transitions, the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is a highly valuable team member offering a unique perspective and methodological approach, which is central to the new initiative's overall success. The themes addressed in this article on evidence-based transition are organized according to the CNS spheres of influence: system/organization, patient/family, and nursing. An evidence-based transition plan was developed and implemented successfully with the support from the CNS for 3 patient populations. Organizational leadership gained an increased awareness of the CNS role at the conclusion of each successful transition. The CNS plays a pivotal role as clinical experts and proponents of evidence-based practice and effects change in the system/organization, nursing, and patient/family spheres of influence. While transitions can be a source of stress for leaders

  5. Adaptation and validation of the Evidence-Based Practice Belief and Implementation scales for French-speaking Swiss nurses and allied healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate two psychometric properties of the French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales, namely their internal consistency and construct validity. The Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales developed by Melnyk et al. are recognised as valid, reliable instruments in English. However, no psychometric validation for their French versions existed. Secondary analysis of a cross sectional survey. Source data came from a cross-sectional descriptive study sample of 382 nurses and other allied healthcare providers. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency, and principal axis factor analysis and varimax rotation were computed to determine construct validity. The French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales showed excellent reliability, with Cronbach's alphas close to the scores established by Melnyk et al.'s original versions. Principal axis factor analysis showed medium-to-high factor loading scores without obtaining collinearity. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 16-item Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs scale resulted in a four-factor loading structure. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 17-item Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale revealed a two-factor loading structure. Further research should attempt to understand why the French Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale showed a two-factor loading structure but Melnyk et al.'s original has only one. The French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales can both be considered valid and reliable instruments for measuring Evidence-Based Practice beliefs and implementation. The results suggest that the French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales are valid and reliable and can therefore be used to

  6. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  7. Assessment of oral mucositis in adult and pediatric oncology patients: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Farrington, Michele; Cullen, Laura; Dawson, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent side effect of cancer treatment and can lead to delayed treatment, reduced treatment dosage, altered nutrition, dehydration, infections, xerostomia, pain, and higher healthcare costs. Mucositis is defined as "inflammatory lesions of the oral and/or gastrointestinal tract caused by high-dose cancer therapies. Alimentary tract mucositis refers to the expression of mucosal injury across the continuum of oral and gastrointestinal mucosa, from the mouth to the anus" (Peterson, Bensadoun, & Roila, 2008, p. ii122). Evidence demonstrates that oral mucositis is quite distressing for patients. In addition, the majority of oncology nurses are unaware of available guidelines related to the care of oral mucositis. A multidisciplinary Oral Mucositis Committee was formed by the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics to develop evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies for adult and pediatric oncology patients experiencing oral mucositis. The first step was implementing an evidence-based nursing oral assessment. The Iowa Model was used to guide this evidence-based practice initiative. The Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) is reliable and valid, feasible, and sensitive to changing conditions. The OAG was piloted on an Adult Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit leading to modification and adaptation. The pilot evaluation found 87% of patients had an abnormal oral assessment involving all categories in the tool. Nursing questionnaires showed that staff (8/23; 35% response) felt they were able to identify at risk patients using the OAG (3.3; 1-4 scale), and the tool accurately identifies mucosal changes (2.9; 1-4 scale). A knowledge assessment found nurses correctly identified OAG components 63% of the time. Unlike results from a national survey, most University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics nurses (63%) were aware of national guidelines for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. Developing an evidence-based nursing policy and updating

  8. The research evidence published in high impact nursing journals between 2000 and 2006: a quantitative content analysis.

    PubMed

    Mantzoukas, Stefanos

    2009-04-01

    Evidence-based practice has become an imperative for efficient, effective and safe practice. Furthermore, evidences emerging from published research are considered as valid knowledge sources to guiding practice. The aim of this paper is to review all research articles published in the top 10 general nursing journals for the years 2000-2006 to identify the methodologies used, the types of evidence these studies produced and the issues upon which they endeavored. Quantitative content analysis was implemented to study all published research papers of the top 10 general nursing journals for the years 2000-2006. The top 10 general nursing journals were included in the study. The abstracts of all research articles were analysed with regards the methodologies of enquiry, the types of evidence produced and the issues of study they endeavored upon. Percentages were developed as to enable conclusions to be drawn. The results for the category methodologies used were 7% experimental, 6% quasi-experimental, 39% non-experimental, 2% ethnographical studies, 7% phenomenological, 4% grounded theory, 1% action research, 1% case study, 15% unspecified, 5.5% other, 0.5% meta-synthesis, 2% meta-analysis, 5% literature reviews and 3% secondary analysis. For the category types of evidence were 4% hypothesis/theory testing, 11% evaluative, 5% comparative, 2% correlational, 46% descriptive, 5% interpretative and 27% exploratory. For the category issues of study were 45% practice/clinical, 8% educational, 11% professional, 3% spiritual/ethical/metaphysical, 26% health promotion and 7% managerial/policy. Published studies can provide adequate evidences for practice if nursing journals conceptualise evidence emerging from non-experimental and qualitative studies as relevant types of evidences for practice and develop appropriate mechanisms for assessing their validity. Also, nursing journals need to increase and encourage the publication of studies that implement RCT methodology, systematic

  9. Comparison of manual versus automated data collection method for an evidence-based nursing practice study.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M D; Jordan, T R; Welle, T

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and improve the use of automated data collection procedures for nursing research and quality assurance. A descriptive, correlational study analyzed 44 orthopedic surgical patients who were part of an evidence-based practice (EBP) project examining post-operative oxygen therapy at a Midwestern hospital. The automation work attempted to replicate a manually-collected data set from the EBP project. Automation was successful in replicating data collection for study data elements that were available in the clinical data repository. The automation procedures identified 32 "false negative" patients who met the inclusion criteria described in the EBP project but were not selected during the manual data collection. Automating data collection for certain data elements, such as oxygen saturation, proved challenging because of workflow and practice variations and the reliance on disparate sources for data abstraction. Automation also revealed instances of human error including computational and transcription errors as well as incomplete selection of eligible patients. Automated data collection for analysis of nursing-specific phenomenon is potentially superior to manual data collection methods. Creation of automated reports and analysis may require initial up-front investment with collaboration between clinicians, researchers and information technology specialists who can manage the ambiguities and challenges of research and quality assurance work in healthcare.

  10. Nursing leadership at the crossroads: evidence-based practice 'Matching Michigan-minimizing catheter related blood stream infections'(*).

    PubMed

    Goeschel, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    a highly successful intervention to reduce infections in intensive care units (ICUs) is now being widely replicated and involved significant nursing leadership. The objective of this manuscript is to describe briefly the intervention, and more explicitly the implications for nursing leadership as quality improvement and patient safety become global healthcare priorities. collaborative cohort study in over 100 ICUs in the United States to implement and evaluate interventions to improve patients' safety. conceptual model aimed at improving clinicians' use of five evidence-based recommendations to reduce rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections rates, with measurement and feedback of infection rates. one hundred and three ICUs contributed 1981 ICU-months of data representing 375,757 catheter-days. The median rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection per 1000 catheter-days decreased from 2.7 infections at baseline to 0 at 3 months after implementation of the study intervention (P ≤ 0·002), and the mean rate per 1000 catheter-days decreased from 7.7 at baseline to 1.4 at 16-18 months of follow-up (P < 0·002). During the sustainability period, the mean bloodstream infection rate did not significantly change from the initial 18 month postimplementation period (-1%, 95% confidence interval -9% to 7%). Eighty seven percent of the original study participants had data available for the sustainability study. broad use of this intervention with achievement of similar results could substantially reduce the morbidity and costs associated with catheter-related bloodstream infections. the initial Michigan study and the follow-up analysis, that demonstrated sustained improvements, are leading to similar projects in other countries, include the Matching Michigan project in England. Discussing not only the technical components of the program, but also the nursing leadership aspects may assist nurses just embarking on this work.

  11. Effectiveness of an evidence-based practice (EBP) course on the EBP competence of undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; López-Iborra, Lidón; Armero Barranco, David; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-03-01

    International nursing institutions and experts recommend evidence-based practice (EBP) as a core component of the curriculum for nurses. However, the impact of EBP training on the competence of undergraduate nursing students remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of an EBP course on the EBP competence undergraduate nursing students'. Quasi-experimental study carried out in non-randomized intervention and control groups. The study was conducted in a Spanish public university in 2010. Out of 420 second- and third-year nursing students, 75 were enrolled in the EBP course, forming the intervention group, and 73 were not enrolled in this course were recruited as controls. The educational intervention was a 15-week course designed to teach EBP competence. The EBP Competence Questionnaire (EBP-COQ) was administered before and after the intervention. Repeated-measure ANOVA was used to compare intervention and control group scores before and at two months after the 15-week intervention period. At 2months after the EBP course, mean EBP-COQ scores of the intervention group were significantly improved versus baseline in attitude (4.28 vs. 3.33), knowledge (3.92 vs. 2.82) and skills (4.01 vs. 2.75) dimensions, whereas little change was observed in control group scores over the same time period. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant effect of Time ×Group interaction on global competence and all three EBP-COQ dimensions. Undergraduate nursing students experience positive changes in EBP competence, knowledge, skills, and attitude as the result of a 15-week educational intervention on EBP. This EBP course may provide nursing school educators and policymakers with a useful model for integrating EBP teaching within the nursing curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategies for innovative energy-based nursing practice: the Healing Touch program.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mari

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share professional knowledge, practice, and educational opportunities related to energy-based nursing in order to broaden and improve the delivery of health care services. The holistic, theory-based approach places a patient's perceived needs first, and cares for the human body as well as the spirit. Energy medicine is an intricate part of the patient's expectation for health care. Watson's transpersonal-caring-healing model is explored (Watson, 1999). This model expands the view of the person to one that embodies energy that is comprised of spirit, a universal mind, and consciousness. The North American Nurses Diagnosis Association (NANDA) recognizes energy therapy as an intervention representing a specific theory: human energy field theory (HEFT). This therapy is related to the approved nursing diagnosis of energy field disturbance 1.8 (NANDA, 1995/1996). Healing touch (HT) is an energy-based therapeutic approach to healing that emphasizes caring for the whole person based on the HEFT. It is used in the nursing profession to influence changes in the human energy system; HT affects physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual health. The nursing process is evident throughout the curriculum. Nurse researchers report positive patients outcomes. The holistic nursing concept of energetic healing returns nurse professionals to the essence of nursing. Spinal cord injury (SCI) nurses will benefit by increasing their knowledge and awareness of energy therapy to increase patient satisfaction and improve outcomes for persons with SCI.

  13. Turning Knowledge Into Action at the Point-of-Care: The Collective Experience of Nurses Facilitating the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dogherty, Elizabeth J; Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Vandyk, Amanda Digel; Keeping-Burke, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Facilitation is considered a way of enabling clinicians to implement evidence into practice by problem solving and providing support. Practice development is a well-established movement in the United Kingdom that incorporates the use of facilitators, but in Canada, the role is more obtuse. Few investigations have observed the process of facilitation as described by individuals experienced in guideline implementation in North America. AimTo describe the tacit knowledge regarding facilitation embedded in the experiences of nurses implementing evidence into practice. Methods: Twenty nurses from across Canada were purposively selected to attend an interactive knowledge translation symposium to examine what has worked and what has not in implementing evidence in practice. This study is an additional in-depth analysis of data collected at the symposium that focuses on facilitation as an intervention to enhance evidence uptake. Critical incident technique was used to elicit examples to examine the nurses’ facilitation experiences. Participants shared their experiences with one another and completed initial data analysis and coding collaboratively. The data were further thematically analyzed using the qualitative inductive approach of constant comparison. Results: A number of factors emerged at various levels associated with the successes and failures of participants’ efforts to facilitate evidence-based practice. Successful implementation related to: (a) focus on a priority issue, (b) relevant evidence, (c) development of strategic partnerships, (d) the use of multiple strategies to effect change, and (e) facilitator characteristics and approach. Negative factors influencing the process were: (a) poor engagement or ownership, (b) resource deficits, (c) conflict, (d) contextual issues, and (e) lack of evaluation and sustainability. Conclusions: Factors at the individual, environmental, organizational, and cultural level influence facilitation of evidence-based

  14. Competition, information, and quality: Evidence from nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Economic theory suggests that competition and information can both be important for product quality, and yet evidence on how they may interact to affect quality is sparse. This paper estimates the impact of competition between nursing homes on their quality, and how this impact varies when consumers have better access to information. The effect of competition is identified using exogenous variation in the geographical proximity of nursing homes to their potential consumers. The change in information transparency is captured by the launch of the Five-Star Quality Rating System in 2009, which improved access to the quality information of nursing homes. We find that while the effect of competition on nursing home quality is generally rather limited, this effect becomes significantly stronger with increased information transparency. The results suggest that regulations on public quality reporting and on market structure are policy complements, and should be considered jointly to best improve quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Building the capacity for evidence-based clinical nursing leadership: the role of executive co-coaching and group clinical supervision for quality patient services.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Jo; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2007-03-01

    The general aims of this article were to facilitate primary care nurses (District Nurse Team Leaders) to link management and leadership theories with clinical practice and to improve the quality of the service provided to their patients. The specific aim was to identify, create and evaluate effective processes for collaborative working so that the nurses' capacity for clinical decision-making could be improved. This article, part of a doctoral study on Clinical Leadership in Nursing, has wider application in the workplace of the future where professional standards based on collaboration will be more critical in a world of work that will be increasingly complex and uncertain. This article heralds the type of research and development activities that the nursing and midwifery professions should give premier attention to, particularly given the recent developments within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. The implications of: Agenda for Change, the Knowledge and Skills Framework, 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say' and the recent proposals from the article 'Modernising Nursing Career', to name but a few, are the key influences impacting on and demanding new ways of clinical supervision for nurses and midwives to improve the quality of patient management and services. The overall approach was based on an action research using a collaborative enquiry within a case study. This was facilitated by a process of executive co-coaching for focused group clinical supervision sessions involving six district nurses as co-researchers and two professional doctoral candidates as the main researchers. The enquiry conducted over a period of two and a half years used evidence-based management and leadership interventions to assist the participants to develop 'actionable knowledge'. Group clinical supervision was not practised in this study as a form of 'therapy' but as a focus for the development of actionable knowledge, knowledge needed for effective clinical management and

  16. [Constipation in cancer patients. Evidence for nursing interventions and promotion of physical activity].

    PubMed

    Ramacciati, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Constipation is one of the most frequent problems in cancer patients. Preventing and managing this problem requires tests to prove the efficacy of the method. The aim of this study was to identify the evidence for nursing intervention aimed at promoting physical activity. The author consulted various databases ((PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library) in July 2010, to identify studies regarding physical exercise and evacuation and found that, although physical activity is considered useful for preventing stipsis, only a few randomized studied sustain this theory. Current nursing practice is based on the opinion of experts regarding the need to encourage physical activity.

  17. Patient safety competencies in undergraduate nursing students: a rapid evidence assessment.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Monica; Bressan, Valentina; Cadorin, Lucia; Pagnucci, Nicola; Tolotti, Angela; Valcarenghi, Dario; Watson, Roger; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Sasso, Loredana

    2016-12-01

    To identify patient safety competencies, and determine the clinical learning environments that facilitate the development of patient safety competencies in nursing students. Patient safety in nursing education is of key importance for health professional environments, settings and care systems. To be effective, safe nursing practice requires a good integration between increasing knowledge and the different clinical practice settings. Nurse educators have the responsibility to develop effective learning processes and ensure patient safety. Rapid Evidence Assessment. MEDLINE, CINAHL, SCOPUS and ERIC were searched, yielding 500 citations published between 1 January 2004-30 September 2014. Following the Rapid Evidence Assessment process, 17 studies were included in this review. Hawker's (2002) quality assessment tool was used to assess the quality of the selected studies. Undergraduate nursing students need to develop competencies to ensure patient safety. The quality of the pedagogical atmosphere in the clinical setting has an important impact on the students' overall level of competence. Active student engagement in clinical processes stimulates their critical reasoning, improves interpersonal communication and facilitates adequate supervision and feedback. Few studies describe the nursing students' patient safety competencies and exactly what they need to learn. In addition, studies describe only briefly which clinical learning environments facilitate the development of patient safety competencies in nursing students. Further research is needed to identify additional pedagogical strategies and the specific characteristics of the clinical learning environments that encourage the development of nursing students' patient safety competencies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Humor as a facilitative style in problem-based learning environments for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Seanna; Hofmeyer, Anne

    2007-05-01

    Although the nursing and education literature confirm that humor has a role to play in the learning experience, there is little evidence available about the impact and the challenges of using humor to facilitate group process and learning in problem-based learning environments for nursing students. In this paper, we explore humor as a style of communication in PBL environments using examples from the classroom. We then propose a range of strategies to build capacity in PBL tutors and to infuse humor into the PBL classroom such as: acceptance that fun and humor are components of the ground rules in the group; appropriate humor and boundaries; mutual story sharing; and creative activities to moderate stress and build coping strategies to thrive in clinical practice. It is timely for nurse academics and researchers to examine the contribution of humor as a facilitative communication style in the PBL environment. Findings could inform evidence-based teaching of nursing students and foster life-long learning and communication skills.

  19. Effectiveness of a Technology-Based Intervention to Teach Evidence-Based Practice: The EBR Tool.

    PubMed

    Long, JoAnn D; Gannaway, Paula; Ford, Cindy; Doumit, Rita; Zeeni, Nadine; Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Milane, Aline; Byers, Beverly; Harrison, LaNell; Hatch, Daniel; Brown, Justin; Proper, Sharlan; White, Patricia; Song, Huaxin

    2016-02-01

    As the world becomes increasingly digital, advances in technology have changed how students access evidence-based information. Research suggests that students overestimate their ability to locate quality online research and lack the skills needed to evaluate the scientific literature. Clinical nurses report relying on personal experience to answer clinical questions rather than searching evidence-based sources. To address the problem, a web-based, evidence-based research (EBR) tool that is usable from a computer, smartphone, or iPad was developed and tested. The purpose of the EBR tool is to guide students through the basic steps needed to locate and critically appraise the online scientific literature while linking users to quality electronic resources to support evidence-based practice (EBP). Testing of the tool took place in a mixed-method, quasi-experimental, and two-population randomized controlled trial (RCT) design in a U.S. and Middle East university. A statistically significant improvement in overall research skills was supported in the quasi-experimental nursing student group and RCT nutrition student group using the EBR tool. A statistically significant proportional difference was supported in the RCT nutrition and PharmD intervention groups in participants' ability to distinguish the credibility of online source materials compared with controls. The majority of participants could correctly apply PICOTS to a case study when using the tool. The data from this preliminary study suggests that the EBR tool enhanced student overall research skills and selected EBP skills while generating data for assessment of learning outcomes. The EBR tool places evidence-based resources at the fingertips of users by addressing some of the most commonly cited barriers to research utilization while exposing users to information and online literacy standards of practice, meeting a growing need within nursing curricula. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Knowledge of Evidence-Based Urinary Catheter Care Practice Recommendations Among Healthcare Workers in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Saint, Sanjay; Galecki, Andrzej; Chen, Shu; Krein, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the knowledge of recommended urinary catheter care practices among nursing home (NH) healthcare workers (HCWs) in Southeast Michigan. Design A self-administered survey. Setting Seven nursing homes in Southeast Michigan. Participants Three hundred and fifty-six healthcare workers. Methods An anonymous, self-administered survey of HCWs (nurses & nurse aides) in seven NHs in 2006. The survey included questions about respondent characteristics and knowledge about indications, care, and personal hygiene pertaining to urinary catheters. The association of knowledge measures with occupation (nurses vs. aides) was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 356 of 440 HCWs (81%) responded. Over 90% of HCWs were aware of measures such as cleaning around the catheter daily, glove use, and hand hygiene with catheter manipulation. They were less aware of research-proven recommendations of not disconnecting the catheter from its bag (59% nurses vs. 30% aides, P < .001), not routinely irrigating the catheter (48% nurses vs. 8% aides, P < .001), and hand hygiene even after casual contact (60% nurses vs. 69% aides, P = .07). HCWs were also unaware of recommendations regarding alcohol-based handrub (27% nurses & 32% aides with correct responses, P = .38). HCWs reported sources, both informal (such as nurse supervisors) and formal (in-services), of knowledge about catheter care. Conclusion Wide discrepancies remain between research-proven recommendations pertaining to urinary catheter care and HCWs' knowledge. Nurses and aides differ in their knowledge of recommendations against harmful practices, such as disconnecting the catheter from the bag and routinely irrigating catheters. Further research should focus on strategies to enhance dissemination of proven infection control practices in NHs. PMID:20662957

  1. Re-reading nursing and re-writing practice: towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate.

    PubMed

    Allen, Davina

    2004-12-01

    This article examines field studies of nursing work published in the English language between 1993 and 2003 as the first step towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate. A decade of ethnographic research reveals that, contrary to contemporary theories which promote an image of nursing work centred on individualised unmediated caring relationships, in real-life practice the core nursing contribution is that of the healthcare mediator. Eight bundles of activity that comprise this intermediary role are described utilising evidence from the literature. The mismatch between nursing's culture and ideals and the structure and constraints of the work setting is a chronic source of practitioner dissatisfaction. It is argued that the profession has little to gain by pursuing an agenda of holistic patient care centred on emotional intimacy and that an alternative occupational mandate focused on the healthcare mediator function might make for more humane health services and a more viable professional future.

  2. Barriers and facilitators to the use of evidence-based best practices.

    PubMed

    Leasure, A Renee; Stirlen, Joan; Thompson, Charleen

    2008-01-01

    The continued use of healthcare interventions without an evidence base increases healthcare costs without positively impacting patient care outcomes. Reports disseminated by bodies such as the Institute of Medicine and initiatives such as the Institute for Health Care Improvement's 5 Million Lives Campaign have increased emphasis on improving outcomes. Results of a descriptive correlational study indicated that 64% of the nurses surveyed read 7 or more specialty journals, 53% read 1 or more general nursing journal, 20% did not regularly read any professional journal, and none of the nurses surveyed read a journal that was primarily dedicated to the publication of original research. Almost half of the nurses indicated that the hospital library was the nearest location to conduct searches, and 34% indicated that they did not know what literature-searching capabilities were available to them. Although knowledge in itself is not sufficient for behavior change, it is an essential prerequisite. Regular reading of journals either through personal subscriptions or access through facility libraries can encourage the adoption of new evidence through lifelong learning. Modeling and skill building in use of readily available Internet resources can serve as a mechanism to increase awareness of and skill in accessing current information. Evidence-based changes can then be empirically examined, implemented, and evaluated in examining nursing's contribution to the daily operation of the healthcare organization.

  3. Comparison of Manual Versus Automated Data Collection Method for an Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Study

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, M.D.; Jordan, T.R.; Welle, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate and improve the use of automated data collection procedures for nursing research and quality assurance. Methods A descriptive, correlational study analyzed 44 orthopedic surgical patients who were part of an evidence-based practice (EBP) project examining post-operative oxygen therapy at a Midwestern hospital. The automation work attempted to replicate a manually-collected data set from the EBP project. Results Automation was successful in replicating data collection for study data elements that were available in the clinical data repository. The automation procedures identified 32 “false negative” patients who met the inclusion criteria described in the EBP project but were not selected during the manual data collection. Automating data collection for certain data elements, such as oxygen saturation, proved challenging because of workflow and practice variations and the reliance on disparate sources for data abstraction. Automation also revealed instances of human error including computational and transcription errors as well as incomplete selection of eligible patients. Conclusion Automated data collection for analysis of nursing-specific phenomenon is potentially superior to manual data collection methods. Creation of automated reports and analysis may require initial up-front investment with collaboration between clinicians, researchers and information technology specialists who can manage the ambiguities and challenges of research and quality assurance work in healthcare. PMID:23650488

  4. Pedagogical strategies to teach bachelor students evidence-based practice: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aglen, B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review international scientific articles about pedagogical strategies to teach nursing students at bachelor degree evidence-based practice (EBP). A literature review including peer reviewed, original, empirical articles describing pedagogical interventions aimed at teaching bachelor's degree nursing students EBP in the period 2004-2014. Theories of discretion, knowledge transfer and cognitive maturity development are used as analytical perspectives. The main challenge teaching evidence based practice is that the students fail to see how research findings contribute to nursing practice. The pedagogical strategies described are student active learning methods to teach the students information literacy and research topics. Information literacy is mainly taught according to the stages of EBP. These stages focus on how to elaborate evidence from research findings for implementation into nursing practice. The articles reviewed mainly use qualitative, descriptive designs and formative evaluations of the pedagogical interventions. Although a considerable effort in teaching information literacy and research topics, nursing students still struggle to see the relevance evidence for nursing practice. Before being introduced to information literacy and research topics, students need insight into knowledge transfer and their own epistemic assumptions. Knowledge transfer related to clinical problems should be the learning situations prioritized when teaching EBP at bachelor level. Theoretical perspectives of cognitive maturity development, knowledge transfer and discretion in professional practice give alternative ways of designing pedagogical strategies for EBP. More research is needed to develop and test pedagogical strategies for EBP in light of these theories. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Strategic Communication Intervention to Stimulate Interest in Research and Evidence-Based Practice: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study With Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Morténius, Helena; Hildingh, Cathrine; Fridlund, Bengt

    2016-02-01

    Bridging the research-practice gap is a challenge for health care. Fostering awareness of and interest in research and development (R & D) can serve as a platform to help nurses and others bridge this gap. Strategic communication is an interdisciplinary field that has been used to achieve long-term interest in adopting and applying R & D in primary care. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a strategic communication intervention on long-term interest in R & D among primary care staff members (PCSMs) in general and registered nurses (RNs) in particular. This prospective intervention study included all members of the PCSMs, including RNs, in a Swedish primary care area. The interest of PCSMs in R & D was measured on two occasions, at 7 and 12 years, using both bivariate and multivariate tests. A total of 99.5% of RNs gained awareness of R & D after the first 7 years of intervention versus 95% of the remaining PCSMs (p = .004). A comparison of the two measurements ascertained stability and improvement of interest in R & D among RNs, compared with all other PCSMs (odds ratio 1.81; confidence interval 1.08-3.06). Moreover, the RNs who did become interested in R & D also demonstrated increased intention to adopt innovative thinking in their work over time (p = .005). RNs play an important role in reducing the gap between theory and practice. Strategic communication was a significant tool for inspiring interest in R & D. Application of this platform to generate interest in R & D is a unique intervention and should be recognized for future interventions in primary care. Positive attitudes toward R & D may reinforce the use of evidence-based practice in health care, thereby making a long-term contribution to the patient benefit. © 2015 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  6. Exploring nursing educators' use of theory and methods in search for evidence based credibility in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Beccaria, Lisa; Kek, Megan Y C A; Huijser, Henk

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a review of nursing education literature is employed to ascertain the extent to which nursing educators apply theory to their research, as well as the types of theory they employ. In addition, the use of research methodologies in the nursing education literature is explored. An integrative review. A systematic search was conducted for English-language, peer reviewed publications of any research design via Academic Search Complete, Science Direct, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition databases from 2001 to 2016, of which 140 were reviewed. The findings suggest that within current nursing education literature the scholarship of discovery, and the exploration of epistemologies other than nursing, in particular as they relate to teaching and learning, shows significant potential for expansion and diversification. The analysis highlights opportunities for nursing educators to incorporate broader theoretical, pedagogical, methodological and philosophical perspectives within teaching and the scholarship of teaching. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of evidence on the nurse-patient relationship in psychiatric wards through a mixed method design: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Suárez-Pérez, Raquel; Leyva-Moral, Juan M; Aceña-Domínguez, Rosa; Carreras-Salvador, Regina; Roldán-Merino, Juan F; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Montesó-Curto, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses are aware of the importance of the therapeutic relationship in psychiatric units. Nevertheless, a review of the scientific evidence indicates that theoretical knowledge alone is insufficient to establish an adequate therapeutic alliance. Therefore, strategies are required to promote changes to enhance the establishment of the working relationship. The aims of the study are to generate changes in how nurses establish the therapeutic relationship in acute psychiatric units, based on participative action research and to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of evidence through this method. The study will use a mixed method design. Qualitative methodology, through participative action research, will be employed to implement scientific evidence on the therapeutic relationship. A quasi-experimental, one-group, pre-test/post-test design will also be used to quantitatively measure the effectiveness of the implementation of the evidence. Participants will consist of nurses and patients from two psychiatric units in Barcelona. Nurses will be selected by theoretical sampling, and patients assigned to each nurses will be selected by consecutive sampling. Qualitative data will be gathered through discussion groups and field diaries. Quantitative data will be collected through the Working Alliance Inventory and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Qualitative data will be analysed through the technique of content analysis and quantitative data through descriptive and inferential statistics. This study will help to understand the process of change in a nursing team working in an inpatient psychiatric ward and will allow nurses to generate knowledge, identify difficulties, and establish strategies to implement change, as well as to assess whether the quality of the care they provide shows a qualitative improvement.

  8. What counts as effective communication in nursing? Evidence from nurse educators' and clinicians' feedback on nurse interactions with simulated patients.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Sally; Manias, Elizabeth; Elder, Catherine; Pill, John; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; McNamara, Tim; Webb, Gillian; McColl, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    To examine the feedback given by nurse educators and clinicians on the quality of communication skills of nurses in interactions with simulated patients. The quality of communication in interactions between nurses and patients has a major influence on patient outcomes. To support the development of effective nursing communication in clinical practice, a good understanding of what constitutes effective communication is helpful. An exploratory design was used involving individual interviews, focus groups and written notes from participants and field notes from researchers to investigate perspectives on nurse-patient communication. Focus groups and individual interviews were held between August 2010-September 2011 with a purposive sample of 15 nurse educators and clinicians who observed videos of interactions between nurses and simulated patients. These participants were asked to give oral feedback on the quality and content of these interactions. Verbatim transcriptions were undertaken of all data collected. All written notes and field notes were also transcribed. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Four major themes related to nurse-patient communication were derived from the educators' and clinicians' feedback: approach to patients and patient care, manner towards patients, techniques used for interacting with patients and generic aspects of communication. This study has added to previous research by contributing grounded evidence from a group of nurse educators and clinicians on the aspects of communication that are relevant for effective nurse-patient interactions in clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  10. Handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae: effects of evidence-based clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Margary; Bogren, Agneta; Hagman, Sari; Nazar, Isabel; Nilsson, Katarina; Nordin, Karin; Valfridsson, Berit Sunde; Söderlund, Mona; Nordström, Gun

    2006-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of implemented evidence-based clinical guidelines by means of surveying the frequency of thrombophlebitis, nurses' care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae. Peripheral intravenous cannulae are frequently used for vascular access and, thereby, the patients will be exposed to local and systemic infectious complications. Evidence-based knowledge of how to prevent these complications and how to care for patients with peripheral intravenous cannula is therefore of great importance. Deficient care, handling and documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae have previously been reported. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a group of nurses at three wards at a university hospital before and after the implementation of the evidence-based guidelines. A structured observation protocol was used to review the frequency of thrombophlebitis, the nurses' care, handling and the documentation of peripheral intravenous cannulae in the patient's record. A total of 107 and 99 cannulae respectively were observed before and after the implementation of the guidelines. The frequency of peripheral intravenous cannulae without signs of thrombophlebitis increased by 21% (P < 0.01) and the use of cannula size 0.8 mm increased by 22% (P < 0.001). Nurses' documentation of peripheral intravenous cannula improved significantly (P < 0.001). We conclude that implementation of the guidelines resulted in significant improvements by means of decreased frequency of signs of thrombophlebitis, increased application of smaller cannula size (0.8 mm), as well as of the nurses' documentation in the patient's record. Further efforts to ameliorate care and handling of peripheral intravenous cannulae are needed. This can be done by means of increasing nurses' knowledge and recurrent quality reviews. Well-informed patients can also be more involved in the care than is common today.

  11. Intramuscular injection technique: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Ogston-Tuck, Sherri

    2014-09-30

    Intramuscular injections require a thorough and meticulous approach to patient assessment and injection technique. This article, the second in a series of two, reviews the evidence base to inform safer practice and to consider the evidence for nursing practice in this area. A framework for safe practice is included, identifying important points for safe technique, patient care and clinical decision making. It also highlights the ongoing debate in selection of intramuscular injection sites, predominately the ventrogluteal and dorsogluteal muscles.

  12. Nutrition and dementia care: developing an evidence-based model for nutritional care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jane L; Holmes, Joanne; Brooks, Cindy

    2017-02-14

    There is a growing volume of research to offer improvements in nutritional care for people with dementia living in nursing homes. Whilst a number of interventions have been identified to support food and drink intake, there has been no systematic research to understand the factors for improving nutritional care from the perspectives of all those delivering care in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to develop a research informed model for understanding the complex nutritional problems associated with eating and drinking for people with dementia. We conducted nine focus groups and five semi-structured interviews with those involved or who have a level of responsibility for providing food and drink and nutritional care in nursing homes (nurses, care workers, catering assistants, dietitians, speech and language therapists) and family carers. The resulting conceptual model was developed by eliciting care-related processes, thus supporting credibility from the perspective of the end-users. The seven identified domain areas were person-centred nutritional care (the overarching theme); availability of food and drink; tools, resources and environment; relationship to others when eating and drinking; participation in activities; consistency of care and provision of information. This collaboratively developed, person-centred model can support the design of new education and training tools and be readily translated into existing programmes. Further research is needed to evaluate whether these evidence-informed approaches have been implemented successfully and adopted into practice and policy contexts and can demonstrate effectiveness for people living with dementia.

  13. Relationship between nurses' leadership styles and power bases.

    PubMed

    García García, Inmaculada; Santa-Bárbara, Emilio Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study aimed to empirically evidence the relationship between the power bases of the leader and the leadership styles of nurses. The random sample consisted of 204 nursing professionals from a public hospital. The following measurement instruments were used: the SBDQ (Supervisory Behavior Description Questionnaire) to identify leadership styles and the Power Perception Profile to determine the types of power used by leaders. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were used. Based on the results, two relationships proposed by the SLT (Situational Leadership Theory) were verified: between coercive power and S1 leadership style (telling), and between referent power and S3 leadership style (participating). In other cases, results have been opposite to expectations: the use of power proposed by the model decreases the probability of performing the prescribed leadership style.

  14. Evidence-based transition to practice: developing a model for North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mary P; Roth, Joyce W; Jenkins, Pamela R

    2011-01-01

    To enhance patient safety and increase retention of new nurses, structures and processes should be developed to ensure that newly licensed nurses are afforded the opportunity to gain confidence and competence as they enter the workforce. This commentary provides an overview of the work performed to date in North Carolina to build an evidence-based transition-to-practice model.

  15. Promoting evidence-based childhood fever management through a peer education programme based on the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Helen; Walsh, Anne; Courtney, Mary; Monaghan, Sarah; Wilson, Jenny; Young, Jeanine

    2007-10-01

    This study examined effectiveness of a theoretically based education programme in reducing inappropriate antipyretic use in fever management. Paediatric nurses' inconsistent, ritualistic antipyretic use in fever management is influenced by many factors including inconsistent beliefs and parental requests. Determinants of antipyretic administration, identified by the theory of planned behaviour, were belief-based attitudes and subjective norms. A quasi-experiment explored group effects of a peer education programme, based on the theory of planned behaviour, on factors influencing paediatric nurses' antipyretic administration. Surveys and chart audits collected data from medical wards at experimental and control hospitals one month pre and one and four months postpeer education programme. All nurses employed in targeted wards were eligible to participate in surveys and all eligible charts were audited. The peer education programme consisted of four one-hour sessions targeting evidence-based knowledge, myths and misconceptions, normative, attitudinal and control influences over and rehearsal of evidence-based fever management. All nurses in experimental hospital targeted wards were eligible to attend. Peer education and support facilitated session information reaching those unable to attend sessions. Two-way univariate anovas explored between subject, experimental and control group and within subject factors, pre, post and latency data. Significant interactions in normative influence (p = 0.01) and intentions (p = 0.01), a significant main group effect in control influence (p = 0.01) and a significant main effect between audit data across time points (p = 0.03) highlight peer education programme effectiveness in behaviour change. Normative, control and intention changes postpeer education programme were maintained in latency data; mean temperature was not. The peer education programme, based on a behaviour change theory, initiated and maintained evidence-based

  16. Conceptualising a model to guide nursing and midwifery in the community guided by an evidence review.

    PubMed

    Leahy-Warren, Patricia; Mulcahy, Helen; Benefield, Lazelle; Bradley, Colin; Coffey, Alice; Donohoe, Ann; Fitzgerald, Serena; Frawley, Tim; Healy, Elizabeth; Healy, Maria; Kelly, Marcella; McCarthy, Bernard; McLoughlin, Kathleen; Meagher, Catherine; O'Connell, Rhona; O'Mahony, Aoife; Paul, Gillian; Phelan, Amanda; Stokes, Diarmuid; Walsh, Jessica; Savage, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Successful models of nursing and midwifery in the community delivering healthcare throughout the lifespan and across a health and illness continuum are limited, yet necessary to guide global health services. Primary and community health services are the typical points of access for most people and the location where most care is delivered. The scope of primary healthcare is complex and multifaceted and therefore requires a practice framework with sound conceptual and theoretical underpinnings. The aim of this paper is to present a conceptual model informed by a scoping evidence review of the literature. A scoping evidence review of the literature was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement. Databases included CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and SocINDEX using the EBSCO platform and the Cochrane Library using the keywords: model, nursing, midwifery, community, primary care. Grey literature for selected countries was searched using the Google 'advanced' search interface. Data extraction and quality appraisal for both empirical and grey literature were conducted independently by two reviewers. From 127 empirical and 24 non-empirical papers, data extraction parameters, in addition to the usual methodological features, included: the nature of nursing and midwifery; the population group; interventions and main outcomes; components of effective nursing and midwifery outcomes. The evidence was categorised into six broad areas and subsequently synthesised into four themes. These were not mutually exclusive: (1) Integrated and Collaborative Care; (2) Organisation and Delivery of Nursing and Midwifery Care in the Community; (3) Adjuncts to Nursing Care and (4) Overarching Conceptual Model. It is the latter theme that is the focus of this paper. In essence, the model depicts a person/client on a lifespan and preventative-curative trajectory. The health related needs of the client, commensurate with their point

  17. Emotional competencies in geriatric nursing: empirical evidence from a computer based large scale assessment calibration study.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and their relation to the care process, and are rarely conclusive with respect to nursing behavior in practice. To test the status of emotion-related skills as a facet of client-directed geriatric nursing competence, 402 final-year nursing students from 24 German schools responded to a 62-item computer-based test. 14 items were developed to represent emotion-related affordances. Multi-dimensional IRT modeling was employed to assess a potential subdomain structure. Emotion-related test items did not form a separate subdomain, and were found to be discriminating across the whole competence continuum. Tasks concerning emotion work and empathy are reliable indicators for various levels of client-directed nursing competence. Claims for a distinct emotion-related competence in geriatric nursing, however, appear excessive with a process-oriented perspective.

  18. Nurses' decision making in heart failure management based on heart failure certification status.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Bena, James F; Buxbaum, Denise; Martensen, Linda; Morrison, Shannon L; Prasun, Marilyn A; Stamp, Kelly D

    Research findings on the value of nurse certification were based on subjective perceptions or biased by correlations of certification status and global clinical factors. In heart failure, the value of certification is unknown. Examine the value of certification based nurses' decision-making. Cross-sectional study of nurses who completed heart failure clinical vignettes that reflected decision-making in clinical heart failure scenarios. Statistical tests included multivariable linear, logistic and proportional odds logistic regression models. Of nurses (N = 605), 29.1% were heart failure certified, 35.0% were certified in another specialty/job role and 35.9% were not certified. In multivariable modeling, nurses certified in heart failure (versus not heart failure certified) had higher clinical vignette scores (p = 0.002), reflecting higher evidence-based decision making; nurses with another specialty/role certification (versus no certification) did not (p = 0.62). Heart failure certification, but not in other specialty/job roles was associated with decisions that reflected delivery of high-quality care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence-based practice, step by step: critical appraisal of the evidence: part II: digging deeper--examining the "keeper" studies.

    PubMed

    Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Stillwell, Susan B; Williamson, Kathleen M

    2010-09-01

    This is the sixth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we've scheduled "Chat with the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. Details about how to participate in the next call will be published with November's Evidence-Based Practice, Step by Step.

  20. Multisite Studies Demonstrate Positive Relationship Between Practice Environments and Smoking Cessation Counseling Evidence-Based Practices.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Robin; Byon, Ha Do; Storkman Wolf, Emily; Johantgen, Meg

    2018-06-01

    High-quality smoking cessation counseling guidelines for people who use tobacco are not fully integrated in acute-care services presenting missed opportunities to improve health outcomes. The role of the practice environment on enhancing or inhibiting guideline use is unknown. To examine the relationship between the nurse practice environment and nurses' use of smoking cessation counseling practices, and to evaluate the effect of the individual nurse and organization characteristics on nurse smoking cessation counseling practices. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of survey data from two multisite studies. The sample included responses from registered nurses (N = 844) in 45 hospitals (22 rural hospitals from the Eastern United States and 23 Magnet hospitals across the United States). Linear mixed model was used to adjust intradependency among the responses of individual nurses nested within hospitals. Data were abstracted from survey responses including nurse characteristics, the Smoking Cessation Counseling Scale (SCCS), and the Practice Environment Scale-Nursing Work Index (PES). Increasing positive relationships exist between PES and SCCS total and subscales scores. Also, SCCS total scores were significantly related with favorable PES total scores (SCCS score difference of 0.26 between favorable and unfavorable PES scores, SE = .08, p = .002) controlling for other covariates. Non-White respondents (vs. White) demonstrated a positive association with SCCS total scores (difference of .18, SE = .07, p = .010), but not in advanced counseling. Nurse practice environments are positively associated with the use of evidence-based smoking cessation practices by nurses. As practice environments become more favorable, higher level counseling practices occur more often. Healthcare leaders should focus on enhancing the practice environment using a quality improvement approach and framework for evidence translation. Quality improvement initiatives should be prioritized in

  1. Expanding the Parameters for Excellence in Patient Assignments: Is Leveraging an Evidence-Data-Based Acuity Methodology Realistic?

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel; Kerfoot, Karlene

    2016-01-01

    Finding the balance of equitable assignments continues to be a challenge for health care organizations seeking to leverage evidence-based leadership practices. Ratios and subjective acuity strategies for nurse-patient staffing continue to be the dominant approach in health care organizations. In addition to ratio-based assignments and acuity-based assignment models driven by financial targets, more emphasis on using evidence-based leadership strategies to manage and create science for effective staffing is needed. In particular, nurse leaders are challenged to increase the sophistication of management of patient turnover (admissions, discharges, and transfers) and integrate tools from Lean methodologies and quality management strategies to determine the effectiveness of nurse-patient staffing.

  2. Integrating the fundamentals of care framework in baccalaureate nursing education: An example from a nursing school in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Laugesen, Britt; Bahnsen, Iben Bøgh; Jørgensen, Lone; Sørensen, Ingrid Maria; Grønkjaer, Mette; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2018-06-01

    To describe and discuss the process of integrating the Fundamentals of Care framework in a baccalaureate nursing education at a School of Nursing in Denmark. Nursing education plays an essential role in educating nurses to work within healthcare systems in which a demanding workload on nurses results in fundamental nursing care being left undone. Newly graduated nurses often lack knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of delivering fundamental care in clinical practice. To develop nursing students' understanding of fundamental nursing, the conceptual Fundamentals of Care framework has been integrated in nursing education at a School of Nursing in Denmark. Discursive paper using an adjusted descriptive case study design for describing and discussing the process of integrating the conceptual Fundamentals of Care Framework in nursing education. The process of integrating the Fundamentals of Care framework is illuminated through a description of the context, in which the process occurs including the faculty members, lectures, case-based work and simulation laboratory in nursing education. Based on this description, opportunities such as supporting a holistic approach to an evidence-based integrative patient care and challenges such as scepticism among the faculty are discussed. It is suggested how integration of Fundamentals of Care Framework in lectures, case-based work and simulation laboratory can make fundamental nursing care more explicit in nursing education, support critical thinking and underline the relevance of evidence-based practice. The process relies on a supportive context, a well-informed and engaged faculty, and continuous reflections on how the conceptual framework can be integrated. Integrating the Fundamentals of Care framework can support nursing students' critical thinking and reflection on what fundamental nursing care is and requires and eventually educate nurses in providing evidence-based fundamental nursing care. © 2018 John Wiley

  3. Evidence-based use of electronic clinical tracking systems in advanced practice registered nurse education: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, M Laurie; Smith, Lynette S; Brooks, Andrea F

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, the federal government has mandated healthcare providers to incorporate electronic health records into practice by 2015. This technological update in healthcare documentation has generated a need for advanced practice RN programs to incorporate information technology into education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties created core competencies to guide program standards for advanced practice RN education. One core competency is Technology and Information Literacy. Educational programs are moving toward the utilization of electronic clinical tracking systems to capture students' clinical encounter data. The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate current research on advanced practice RN students' documentation of clinical encounters utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems to meet advanced practice RN curriculum outcome goals in information technology as defined by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. The state of the science depicts student' and faculty attitudes, preferences, opinions, and data collections of students' clinical encounters. Although electronic clinical tracking systems were utilized to track students' clinical encounters, these systems have not been evaluated for meeting information technology core competency standards. Educational programs are utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems with limited evidence-based literature evaluating the ability of these systems to meet the core competencies in advanced practice RN programs.

  4. Routines for change: how managers can use absorptive capacity to adopt and implement evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Innis, Jennifer; Berta, Whitney

    2016-09-01

    This paper uses the construct of absorptive capacity to understand how nurse managers can facilitate the adoption and use of evidence-based practice within health-care organisations. How health-care organisations adopt and implement innovations such as new evidence-based practices will depend on their absorptive, or learning, capacity. Absorptive capacity manifests as routines, which are the practices, procedures and customs that organisational members use to carry out work and to make work-related decisions. Using the construct of absorptive capacity as well as a recent literature review of how health-care organisations take on best practices, we illustrate how the uptake and use of new knowledge, such as evidence-based practices, can be facilitated through the use of routines. This paper highlights routines that nurse managers can use to foster environments where evidence-based practices can be readily identified, and strategies for facilitating their adoption and implementation. The construct of absorptive capacity and the use of routines can be used to examine the ways in which nurse managers can adopt, implement and evaluate the use of evidence-based practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. An Integrative Review of Engaging Clinical Nurses in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Scala, Elizabeth; Price, Carrie; Day, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To review the literature for best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. Review of the research and nonresearch papers published between 2005 and 2015 that answered the evidence-based practice (EBP) question: what are the best practices for engaging clinical nursing staff in nursing research? PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Joanna Briggs Institute, and Cochrane were searched using a combination of controlled vocabulary and key words. Nineteen papers that answered the EBP question were selected for review. It can be difficult to involve clinical nurses in research. There are multiple factors to consider when nursing leadership looks to engage clinical nurses in nursing research. Nurse leaders can take many approaches to engage clinical nurses in research. Each organization must perform its own assessment to identify areas of opportunity. Nursing leadership can take these areas of opportunity to structure a multifaceted approach to support clinical staff in the conduct and dissemination of nursing research. The evidence from this review offers EBP recommendations as well as reports on the gaps in the literature related to best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Lessons Learned From a System-wide Evidence-Based Practice Program Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-25

    Practice Program Implementation presented at/published to 20 17 Triscrvice Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Dissemination Course...34’ ~ ~ p : Nursing servrees staff of the 59 MDVI I c : lmplementmoo of an EBP program = Versus no program rmp[emenlation • Femim:l2~~s~ • rnamp...wid1 ~venous montif medin!f’ tD 21ow ample time for pogRe on peojects; • EmocGgc g~Sl’O<lts EBP medanioms tu nit pa;&e counc;is;, montif nursing

  7. Principles of strengths-based nursing leadership for strengths-based nursing care: a new paradigm for nursing and healthcare for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laurie N; Gottlieb, Bruce; Shamian, Judith

    2012-06-01

    The current healthcare system is slowly evolving into a new system built on a vision of health promotion, primary care and community-based home care, with hospitals still being a core pillar of the healthcare system but not its primary service. This transformation requires a new approach to practice, namely, Strengths-Based Nursing Care (SBC). SBC is about mobilizing, capitalizing and developing a person's strengths to promote health and facilitate healing. For nurses to practise SBNC requires strong nursing leadership that creates conditions to enable them to do so. Strengths-Based Nursing Leadership complements and acts in synergy with, SBNC. This paper describes eight principles of Strengths-Based Nursing Leadership to support SBNC.

  8. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Nurse manager succession planning: synthesis of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Titzer, Jennifer; Phillips, Tracy; Tooley, Stephanie; Hall, Norma; Shirey, Maria

    2013-10-01

    The literature supporting nurse manager succession planning is reviewed and synthesised to discover best practice for identifying and developing future nurse managers. Healthcare succession planning practices are lacking. Nurse managers are historically selected based on clinical skills and lack formal leadership preparation. A systematic literature search appraises and summarises the current literature supporting nurse manager succession planning. Multiple reviewers were used to increase the reliability and validity of article selection and analysis. New nurse managers require months to adapt to their positions. Deliberate nurse manager succession planning should be integrated in the organisation's strategic plan and provide a proactive method for identifying and developing potential leaders. Organisations that identify and develop internal human capital can improve role transition, reduce nurse manager turnover rates and decrease replacement costs. Despite the clear benefits of succession planning, studies show that resource allocation for proactive, deliberate development of current and future nurse leaders is lacking. Additionally, systematic evaluation of succession planning is limited. Deliberate succession planning efforts and appropriate resource allocation require strategic planning and evaluation methods. Detailed evaluation methods demonstrating a positive return on investment utilising a cost-benefit analysis and empirical outcomes are necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Adaptive Practice: Next Generation Evidence-Based Practice in Digital Environments.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in nursing is considered foundational to safe, competent care. To date, rigid traditional perceptions of what constitutes 'evidence' have constrained the recognition and use of practice-based evidence and the exploitation of novel forms of evidence from data rich environments. Advancements such as the conceptualization of clinical intelligence, the prevalence of increasingly sophisticated digital health information systems, and the advancement of the Big Data phenomenon have converged to generate a new contemporary context. In today's dynamic data-rich environments, clinicians have new sources of valid evidence, and need a new paradigm supporting clinical practice that is adaptive to information generated by diverse electronic sources. This opinion paper presents adaptive practice as the next generation of evidence-based practice in contemporary evidence-rich environments and provides recommendations for the next phase of evolution.

  11. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap: The Role of the Nurse Scientist.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M

    2015-11-01

    To describe the emerging role of the nurse scientist in health care organizations. Historical perspectives of the role are explored along with the roles of the nurse scientist, facilitators, barriers, and future implications. Relevant literature on evidence-based practice and research in health care organizations; nurse scientist role; interview with University of Colorado nurse scientist. The nurse scientist role is integral for expanding evidence-based decisions and nursing research. A research mentor is considered the most important facilitator for a successful nursing research program. Organizations should consider including the nurse scientist role to facilitate evidence-based practice and expand opportunities for nursing research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementing evidence-based practice during an economic downturn.

    PubMed

    Beck, Mary S; Staffileno, Beth A

    2012-01-01

    Building a sustainable evidence-based practice (EBP) infrastructure during times of financial constraints poses challenges for nurse leaders. To be successful, plans need to be creative and adaptive, while mindful of limited resources. This commentary describes change management strategies used to implement an EBP infrastructure at a hospital after organizational restructuring occurred.

  13. CE: Original Research: Exploring Clinicians' Perceptions About Sustaining an Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Porter, Rebecca B; Cullen, Laura; Farrington, Michele; Matthews, Grace; Tucker, Sharon

    2018-05-01

    : Purpose: This study aimed to address the knowledge gap between implementing and sustaining evidence-based fall prevention practices for hospitalized patients by exploring perspectives of the interprofessional health care team. A qualitative design was used to capture insights from clinicians across disciplines in a large midwestern academic medical center. Four homogenous semistructured focus groups and three individual interviews involving a total of 20 clinicians were conducted between October 2013 and March 2014. Audio-recorded data were transcribed and analyzed using inductive qualitative analysis. Two primary themes emerged from participants regarding the sustainability of an evidence-based fall prevention program: communication patterns within the interprofessional health care team and influences of hospital organizational practices and elements. Several subthemes also emerged. Participants gave nursing staff primary responsibility for fall risk assessment and prevention. Individual professional perceptions and practices, as well as organizational characteristics, affect the sustainability of evidence-based fall prevention practices. While all team members recognized patient falls as a significant quality and safety issue, most believed that direct care nurses hold primary responsibility for leading fall prevention efforts. The data support the importance of effective interprofessional team communication and organizational practices in sustaining an evidence-based fall prevention program across inpatient units. Furthermore, the data call into question the wisdom in labeling quality indicators as "nursing sensitive"; the evidence indicates that a team approach is best.

  14. Educating Nurses in the Design and Use of a Nursing Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Ruth H.

    1982-01-01

    The arrival of a computerized medical information system on the health care scene has created new performance demands on nurses. Not only must nurses be able to use the computer to document medical and nursing care, but they must be able to contribute to the overall design of the nursing data base. This paper describes how nurses must be educated to perform these new job responsibilities. Discussion will center on the educational process developed by the Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health to meet the needs of its nurses to design a nursing data base and learn the technical skill required to utilize a computerized medical information system. Recommendations are offered to the academic community charged with the formal education of nursing professionals and the staff development and continuing educational planners who share the accountability for educating the already licensed nurses.

  15. Development of a nursing handoff tool: a web-based application to enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Denise; Boomhower, Marc; Lancaster, Diane R; Antonelli, Mary; Kenyon, Mary Anne Murphy; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Dykes, Patricia C

    2010-11-13

    Dynamic and complex clinical environments present many challenges for effective communication among health care providers. The omission of accurate, timely, easily accessible vital information by health care providers significantly increases risk of patient harm and can have devastating consequences for patient care. An effective nursing handoff supports the standardized transfer of accurate, timely, critical patient information, as well as continuity of care and treatment, resulting in enhanced patient safety. The Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospital Healthcare Information Technology Innovation Program (HIP) is supporting the development of a web based nursing handoff tool (NHT). The goal of this project is to develop a "proof of concept" handoff application to be evaluated by nurses on the inpatient intermediate care units. The handoff tool would enable nurses to use existing knowledge of evidence-based handoff methodology in their everyday practice to improve patient care and safety. In this paper, we discuss the results of nursing focus groups designed to identify the current state of handoff practice as well as the functional and data element requirements of a web based Nursing Handoff Tool (NHT).

  16. Rituals in nursing: intramuscular injections.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Kathleen

    2014-12-01

    To consider to what extent intramuscular injection technique can be described to remain entrenched in ritualistic practice and how evidence-based practice should be considered and applied to the nursing practice of this essential skill. The notion of rituals within nursing and the value or futile impact they afford to this essential nursing skill will be critically reviewed. Discursive paper. Literature review from 2002-2013 to review the current position of intramuscular injection injections. Within the literature review, it became clear that there are several actions within the administration of an intramuscular injection that could be perceived as ritualistic and require consideration for contemporary nursing practice. The essential nursing skill of intramuscular injection often appears to fit into the description of a ritualised practice. By providing evidence-based care, nurses will find themselves empowered to make informed decisions based on clinical need and using their clinical judgement. For key learning, it will outline with rationale how site selection, needle selection, insertion technique and aspiration can be cited as examples of routinised or ritualistic practice and why these should be rejected in favour of an evidence-based approach. The effect on some student nurses of experiencing differing practices between what is taught at university and what is often seen in clinical practice will also be discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Learning Styles of Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Attitudes toward Theory-Based Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laschinger, Heather K.; Boss, Marvin K.

    1989-01-01

    The personal and environmental factors related to undergraduate and post-RN nursing students' attitudes toward theory-based nursing from Kolb's experiential learning theory perspective were investigated. Learning style and environmental press perceptions were found to be related to attitudes toward theory-based nursing. (Author/MLW)

  18. Making a Difference: Evidence Based Palliative Care Education for Neonatal Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pye, Sherry Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The death of a neonate is a life-changing and tragic experience for the individuals involved in the final moments of the infant's life. As the frontline provider in this clinical scenario, the bedside nurse supports the patient and family through their individual journey of loss. If the nurse does not possess the palliative care educational…

  19. Effects of nursing process-based simulation for maternal child emergency nursing care on knowledge, attitude, and skills in clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2016-02-01

    Since previous studies on simulation-based education have been focused on fundamental nursing skills for nursing students in South Korea, there is little research available that focuses on clinical nurses in simulation-based training. Further, there is a paucity of research literature related to the integration of the nursing process into simulation training particularly in the emergency nursing care of high-risk maternal and neonatal patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of nursing process-based simulation on knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care in clinical nurses in South Korea. Data were collected from 49 nurses, 25 in the experimental group and 24 in the control group, from August 13 to 14, 2013. This study was an equivalent control group pre- and post-test experimental design to compare the differences in knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care between the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group was trained by the nursing process-based simulation training program, while the control group received traditional methods of training for maternal and child emergency nursing care. The experimental group was more likely to improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for clinical judgment about maternal and child emergency nursing care than the control group. Among five stages of nursing process in simulation, the experimental group was more likely to improve clinical skills required for nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation than the control group. These results will provide valuable information on developing nursing process-based simulation training to improve clinical competency in nurses. Further research should be conducted to verify the effectiveness of nursing process-based simulation with more diverse nurse groups on more diverse subjects in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Gemba Boards to Facilitate Evidence-Based Practice in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Bourgault, Annette M; Upvall, Michele J; Graham, Alison

    2018-06-01

    Tradition-based practices lack supporting research evidence and may be harmful or ineffective. Engagement of key stakeholders is a critical step toward facilitating evidence-based practice change. Gemba , derived from Japanese, refers to the real place where work is done. Gemba boards (visual management tools) appear to be an innovative method to engage stakeholders and facilitate evidence-based practice. To explore the use of gemba boards and gemba huddles to facilitate practice change. Twenty-two critical care nurses participated in interviews in this qualitative, descriptive study. Thematic analysis was used to code and categorize interview data. Two researchers reached consensus on coding and derived themes. Data were managed with qualitative analysis software. The code gemba occurred most frequently; a secondary analysis was performed to explore its impact on practice change. Four themes were derived from the gemba code: (1) facilitation of staff, leadership, and interdisciplinary communication, (2) transparency of outcome data, (3) solicitation of staff ideas and feedback, and (4) dissemination of practice changes. Gemba boards and gemba huddles became part of the organizational culture for promoting and disseminating evidence-based practices. Unit-based, publicly located gemba boards and huddles have become key components of evidence-based practice culture. Gemba is both a tool and a process to engage team members and the public to generate clinical questions and to plan, implement, and evaluate practice changes. Future research on the effectiveness of gemba boards to facilitate evidence-based practice is warranted. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. Evidence-based nursing practice: both state of the art in general and specific to pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Buss, I C; Halfens, R J; Abu-Saad, H H; Kok, G

    1999-01-01

    The importance of research-based practice in nursing has been frequently stressed, and a number of nursing studies have been conducted whose results enable nursing to improve knowledge and practice. This study reports a literature review in which the current status of knowledge and research utilization with regard to pressure sores is described. This review first gives an overview of studies on knowledge utilization in general and shows that the spontaneous diffusion of knowledge is inappropriate. Furthermore, an overview of planned research utilization activities focusing on pressure sore prevention and treatment in nursing is presented. The results of these studies show that planned research utilization activities performed in individual organizations lead to positive outcomes in almost all cases. Therefore, it could be concluded that implementing planned research utilization activities in individual health care institutions seems to be an effective strategy to decrease pressure sore incidence and prevalence rates.

  2. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  3. Science-based occupations and the science curriculum: Concepts of evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikenhead, Glen S.

    2005-03-01

    What science-related knowledge is actually used by nurses in their day-to-day clinical reasoning when attending patients? The study investigated the knowledge-in-use of six acute-care nurses in a hospital surgical unit. It was found that the nurses mainly drew upon their professional knowledge of nursing and upon their procedural understanding that included a common core of concepts of evidence (concepts implicitly applied to the evaluation of data and the evaluation of evidence - the focus of this research). This core included validity triangulation, normalcy range, accuracy, and a general predilection for direct sensual access to a phenomenon over indirect machine-managed access. A cluster of emotion-related concepts of evidence (e.g. cultural sensitivity) was also discovered. These results add to a compendium of concepts of evidence published in the literature. Only a small proportion of nurses (one of the six nurses in the study) used canonical science content in their clinical reasoning, a result consistent with other research. This study also confirms earlier research on employees in science-rich workplaces in general, and on professional development programs for nurses specifically: canonical science content found in a typical science curriculum (e.g. high school physics) does not appear relevant to many nurses' knowledge-in-use. These findings support a curriculum policy that gives emphasis to students learning how to learn science content as required by an authentic everyday or workplace context, and to students learning concepts of evidence.

  4. Mary Seacole and claims of evidence-based practice and global influence.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the contribution of Mary Seacole to nursing and health care, notably in comparison with that of Florence Nightingale. Much information is available, in print and electronic, that presents Mary Seacole as a nurse, even as a pioneer nurse and leader in public health care. Her own memoir and copious primary sources, show rather than she was a businesswoman, who gave assistance during the Crimean War, mainly to officers. Florence Nightingale's role as the major founder of the nursing profession, a visionary of public health care and key player in advocating 'environmental' health, reflected in her own Notes on Nursing , is ignored or misconstrued. Discussion paper. British newspapers of 19th century and The Times digital archive; Australian and New Zealand newspaper archives, published memoirs, letters and biographies/autobiographies of Crimean War participants were the major sources. Careful examination of primary sources, notably digitized newspaper sources, British, Australian and New Zealand, show that the claims for Seacole's 'global influence' in nursing do not hold, while her use of 'practice-based evidence' might better be called self-assessment. Primary sources, moreover, show substantial evidence of Nightingale's contributions to nursing and health care, in Australia, New Zealand, the USA and many countries and the UK much material shows her influence also on hospital safety and health promotion.

  5. To embed or not to embed? A longitudinal study exploring the impact of curriculum design on the evidence-based practice profiles of UK pre-registration nursing students.

    PubMed

    Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Upton, Penney; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2017-11-01

    The use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is increasingly emphasized within healthcare. However, little research has focused on nurses' pre-registration training; particularly regarding the impact of curriculum-design on learning EBP. This study compared the impact of embedding EBP throughout the curriculum, with modular-based teaching, on pre-registration nursing students' EBP profiles. A longitudinal panel study. A convenience sample of fifty-six pre-registration nursing students (55.4% studying an embedded EBP-curriculum and 44.6% studying a modular EBP-curriculum), were recruited from a UK University between 2011 and 2014. Participants completed the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ) in the first, second and third year of their course. This questionnaire measures four EBP domains: frequency of use, attitude, knowledge and skills in retrieving and reviewing evidence, and knowledge and skills in applying and sharing evidence. Two-way mixed between-within Analyses of Variance revealed significant improvements across all domains, except attitude (which remained broadly positive across all years), for both curriculum-groups. No significant differences in this improvement were identified between the two curricula overall. However, the direction and rate of change of scores on the retrieving and applying subscales (but not frequency of use) for the two groups differed across time; specifically those on the embedded curriculum showed a dip in scores on these subscales in year 2. This appeared to be related to associated features of the course such as the timing of placements and delivery of theory. Taking a modular or embedded approach to EBP may have little impact on students' final EBP profiles. However, careful consideration should be given to the timing of related course features which may play a key role in students' perceptions of their knowledge and skills in its application. Further research should explore how curriculum-design might build on

  6. Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann B; Wang, Honghong; Burgess, Jane; Li, Xianhong; Danvers, Karina

    2013-04-01

    Adapting nursing interventions to suit the needs and culture of a new population (cultural adaptation) is an important early step in the process of implementation and dissemination. While the need for cultural adaptation is widely accepted, research-based strategies for doing so are not well articulated. Non-adherence to medications for chronic disease is a global problem and cultural adaptation of existing evidence-based interventions could be useful. This paper aims to describe the cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS and to offer recommendations for adaptation of interventions across cultures and borders. SITE: The intervention, which demonstrated efficacy in a randomized controlled trial in North America, was adapted for the cultural and social context of Hunan Province, in south central China. The adaptation process was undertaken by intervention stakeholders including the original intervention study team, the proposed adaptation team, and members of a Community Advisory Board, including people living with HIV/AIDS, family members, and health care workers at the target clinical sites. The adaptation process was driven by quantitative and qualitative data describing the new population and context and was guided by principles for cultural adaptation drawn from prevention science research. The primary adaptation to the intervention was the inclusion of family members in intervention activities, in response to the cultural and social importance of the family in rural China. In a pilot test of the adapted intervention, self-reported medication adherence improved significantly in the group receiving the intervention compared to the control group (p=0.01). Recommendations for cultural adaptation of nursing interventions include (1) involve stakeholders from the beginning; (2) assess the population, need, and context; (3) evaluate the intervention to be adapted with attention to

  7. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M.; Sauers, Eric L.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M.; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret (Peg); Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Hartman, Linda M.; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. Included Professions: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Approach: Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. Conclusions: EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession. PMID:17971887

  8. Development of a practice tool for community-based nurses: the Heart Failure Palliative Approach to Care (HeFPAC).

    PubMed

    Strachan, Patricia H; Joy, Cathy; Costigan, Jeannine; Carter, Nancy

    2014-04-01

    Patients living with advanced heart failure (HF) require a palliative approach to reduce suffering. Nurses have described significant knowledge gaps about the disease-specific palliative care (PC) needs of these patients. An intervention is required to facilitate appropriate end-of-life care for HF patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a user-friendly, evidence-informed HF-specific practice tool for community-based nurses to facilitate care and communication regarding a palliative approach to HF care. Guided by the Knowledge to Action framework, we identified key HF-specific issues related to advanced HF care provision within the context of a palliative approach to care. Informed by current evidence and subsequent iterative consultation with community-based and specialist PC and HF nurses, a pocket guide tool for community-based nurses was created. We developed the Heart Failure Palliative Approach to Care (HeFPAC) pocket guide to promote communication and a palliative approach to care for HF patients. The HeFPAC has potential to improve the quality of care and experiences for patients with advanced HF. It will be piloted in community-based practice and in a continuing education program for nurses. The HeFPAC pocket guide offers PC nurses a concise, evidence-informed and practical point-of care tool to communicate with other clinicians and patients about key HF issues that are associated with improving disease-specific HF palliative care and the quality of life of patients and their families. Pilot testing will offer insight as to its utility and potential for modification for national and international use.

  9. Integrating Web-based technology into distance education for nurses in China: computer and Internet access and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Cragg, C E Betty; Edwards, Nancy; Yue, Zhao; Xin, Song Li; Hui, Zou Dao

    2003-01-01

    To increase continuing education accessibility, nurses around the world are turning to Web-based instruction. However, for Internet education to be successful, particularly in developing countries, nurses must have access to computers and the Internet as well as positive attitudes toward this form of learning. As part of a distance education project for nurses of the Tianjin Municipality in China, a survey of nurses was conducted to examine their sources of professional knowledge as well as their computer and Internet access and attitudes. The attitudes of the nurses were generally positive, and there was evidence of rapidly increasing use of and access to computers and the Internet. This article reports the results of that survey and their implications for Web-based teaching of Chinese nurses.

  10. An Infrastructure to Advance the Scholarly Work of Staff Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Parkosewich, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional role of the acute care staff nurse is changing. The new norm establishes an expectation that staff nurses base their practice on best evidence. When evidence is lacking, nurses are charged with using the research process to generate and disseminate new knowledge. This article describes the critical forces behind the transformation of this role and the organizational mission, culture, and capacity required to support practice that is based on science. The vital role of senior nursing leaders, the nurse researcher, and the nursing research committee within the context of a collaborative governance structure is highlighted. Several well-known, evidence-based practice models are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of the infrastructure created by Yale-New Haven Hospital to advance the scholarly work of the nursing staff. PMID:23482435

  11. An evidence based approach to undergraduate physical assessment practicum course development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brenda; Nix, Elizabeth; Norman, Bilinda; McPike, H Dawn

    2014-05-01

    Physical assessment is an important component of professional nursing practice. New nurse graduates experience difficulty transitioning the traditional head to toe physical assessment into real world nursing practice. This study was conducted to provide current data concerning physical assessment competencies utilized consistently by registered nurses. This quantitative study used a 126 item survey mailed to 900 Registered Nurses. Participants used a Likert-type scale to report frequency of use for physical assessment competencies. Thirty seven competencies were determined to be essential components of the physical assessment, 18 were determined supplemental, and 71 were determined to be non-essential. Transition of the new graduate nurse into professional practice can be enhanced by focusing content in physical assessment practicum courses on the essential competencies of physical assessment. Faculty for the university has analyzed data from this study to support evidence based changes to the undergraduate nursing program physical assessment practicum course. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence on the validity and reliability of the German, French and Italian nursing home version of the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care instrument.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Schubert, Maria; Hamers, Jan P H; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René; Engberg, Sandra; Ausserhofer, Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    To develop and test psychometrically the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes instrument, providing initial evidence on the validity and reliability of the German, French and Italian-language versions. In the hospital setting, implicit rationing of nursing care is defined as the withholding of nursing activities due to lack of resources, such as staffing or time. No instrument existed to measure this concept in nursing homes. Cross-sectional study. We developed the instrument in three phases: (1) adaption and translation; (2) content validity testing; and (3) initial validity and reliability testing. For phase 3, we analysed survey data from 4748 care workers collected between May 2012-April 2013 from a randomly selected sample of 162 nursing homes in the German-, French- and Italian-speaking regions of Switzerland to provide evidence from response processes (e.g. missing), internal structure (exploratory factor analysis), inter-item inconsistencies (e.g. Cronbach's alpha) and interscorer differences (e.g. within-group agreement). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure with good fit statistics. Rationing of nursing care was structured in four domains: (1) activities of daily living; (2) caring, rehabilitation and monitoring; (3) documentation; and (4) social care. Items of the social care subscale showed lower content validity and more missing values than items of other subscales. First evidence indicates that the new instrument can be recommended for research and practice to measure implicit rationing of nursing care in nursing homes. Further refinements of single items are needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A nurse-facilitated depression screening program in an Army primary care clinic: an evidence-based project.

    PubMed

    Yackel, Edward E; McKennan, Madelyn S; Fox-Deise, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    Depression, sometimes with suicidal manifestations, is a medical condition commonly seen in primary care clinics. Routine screening for depression and suicidal ideation is recommended of all adult patients in the primary care setting because it offers depressed patients a greater chance of recovery and response to treatment, yet such screening often is overlooked or omitted. The purpose of this study was to develop, to implement, and to test the efficacy of a systematic depression screening process to increase the identification of depression in family members of active duty soldiers older than 18 years at a military family practice clinic located on an Army infantry post in the Pacific. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care was used to develop a practice guideline incorporating a decision algorithm for nurses to screen for depression. A pilot project to institute this change in practice was conducted, and outcomes were measured. Before implementation, approximately 100 patients were diagnosed with depression in each of the 3 months preceding the practice change. Approximately 130 patients a month were assigned a 311.0 Code 3 months after the practice change, and 140 patients per month received screenings and were assigned the correct International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision Code 311.0 at 1 year. The improved screening and coding for depression and suicidality added approximately 3 minutes to the patient screening process. The education of staff in the process of screening for depression and correct coding coupled with monitoring and staff feedback improved compliance with the identification and the documentation of patients with depression. Nurses were more likely than primary care providers to agree strongly that screening for depression enhances quality of care. Data gathered during this project support the integration of military and civilian nurse-facilitated screening for depression in the military primary care

  14. Use of a web-based education program improves nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Deloian, Barbara J; Lewin, Linda Orkin; O'Connor, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the baseline knowledge and knowledge gained of nurses, nursing students, midwives, and nurse practitioners who completed Breastfeeding Basics, an online educational program. This study reports on an anonymous evaluation of an online breastfeeding education program developed and maintained to promote evidence-based breastfeeding practice. Included in the study were 3736 nurses, 728 nurse practitioners/midwives, and 3106 nursing students from the United States who completed ≥ one pretest or posttest on the Breastfeeding Basics website between April 1999 and December 31, 2011. Baseline scores were analyzed to determine if nurses' baseline knowledge varied by selected demographic variables such as age, gender, professional level, personal or partner breastfeeding experience, and whether they were required to complete the website for a job or school requirement and to determine knowledge gaps. Pretest and posttest scores on all modules and in specific questions with low pretest scores were compared as a measure of knowledge gained. Lower median pretest scores were found in student nurses (71%), males (71%), those required to take the course (75%), and those without personal breastfeeding experience (72%). The modules with the lowest median pretest scores were Anatomy/Physiology (67%), Growth and Development of the Breastfed Infant (67%), the Breastfeeding Couple (73%), and the Term Infant with Problems (60%). Posttest scores in all modules increased significantly (p < .001). Breastfeeding Basics was used by a large number of nurses and nursing students. Gaps exist in nurses' breastfeeding knowledge. Knowledge improved in all areas based on comparison of pretest and posttest scores. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  15. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Demarré, Liesbet; Vanderwee, Katrien; Defloor, Tom; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2012-05-01

    To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. There is a lack of evidence on knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants towards pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes. A cross-sectional multi-centre study. A convenience sample of nine Belgian nursing homes, representing 18 wards was chosen in the study. In total, 145 nurses and nursing assistants were included. The compliance with the guidelines was evaluated in 615 residents, and data were collected using validated instruments. Fully compliant prevention was found in only 6·9% of the residents at risk. The mean knowledge score of the nurses was 29·3 vs. 28·7% for the nursing assistants. The overall attitude score was 74·5%, and attitude scores were significantly different between nurses and nursing assistants. Nurses showed to have a more positive attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention than nursing assistants, respectively 78·3 and 72·3%. A more positive attitude was a significant predictor of pressure ulcer prevention compliance with the guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. Knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention of both nurses and nursing assistants in nursing homes was low. Attitudes were a significant predictor of the application of fully compliant prevention in residents at risk. Pressure ulcer prevention is an important aspect in daily care for residents at risk in nursing homes. These insights will contribute to evidence-based practice in this area of care and will form the basis for the development of an education strategy for pressure ulcer prevention and management in nursing homes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Developing and implementing a complex Complementary and Alternative (CAM) nursing intervention for breast and gynecologic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy--report from the CONGO (complementary nursing in gynecologic oncology) study.

    PubMed

    Klafke, Nadja; Mahler, Cornelia; von Hagens, Cornelia; Blaser, Gisela; Bentner, Martina; Joos, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a complex nursing intervention including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for breast and gynecologic cancer patients during chemotherapy to improve quality of life. Data sources Theoretical framework and concepts, practical nursing knowledge, and evidence-based studies were compiled in interprofessional meetings. Data synthesis The final complex intervention consists of three autonomous, but interacting components: (1) CAM nursing package, (2) resource-oriented counseling, and (3) evidence-based information material on CAM. CAM interventions include acupressure, aromatherapy, compress, and massage, targeting 14 clinically relevant symptoms during chemotherapy. Participants receive these interventions during chemotherapy with instructions for self care. During a counseling interview, the patient's needs and preferences are assessed by trained nurses. Furthermore, participants are equipped with evidence-based information material (booklet and DVD). Prior to study start, nurses attended training modules for administering CAM therapies and for communicating and counseling within the salutogenic approach. It was possible to design a multimodal CAM nursing intervention based on a theoretical concept, evidence-based studies, and practical nursing experience targeting the prevention or relief of side-effects women suffer during chemotherapy. The systematic analysis of the CONGO study will contribute to evidence-based CAM nursing care within supportive cancer care. Oncology nurses play an important role in supportive CAM care of breast and gynecologic cancer patients in daily clinical practice. Within oncology outpatient services, the implementation of evidence-based CAM nursing interventions and counseling may contribute to understand the impact of nursing on patient quality of life and symptom relief. This can lead to a new understanding of the nurse's professional role.

  17. Striving for evidence-based practice innovations through a hybrid model journal club: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marian; Ice, Suzanna; Nakashima, Cathy Y; Cox, Lynn Annette; Morse, Elizabeth C; Philip, Ginu; Vuong, Ellen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot a "hybrid" style journal club and determine whether measurable effects could be detected over 8-weeks' time on evidence-based practice ability, desire, behaviors, use, and barriers. Journal clubs have been suggested as a method to increase nurses' confidence with using research evidence to guide practice. However, it is yet unknown how nurse educators can best implement effective programs for clinicians with varying schedules, education levels, and research skills. Thirty-six participants from one large urban United States hospital (72% registered nurses) were invited to access bi-weekly interdisciplinary journal club activities. Nurse educators created curriculum focused on clinical problem solving that was offered via in-person sessions or a social media site. A pretest-posttest no control group design was used to measure impacts of those engaged in journal club activities. Data were collected using a combination of validated evidence-based practice instruments and program participation records. A two-tailed paired t test showed significant increases over 8weeks' time in evidence-based practice use (p=.002) and behaviors (p=.007). Slight preference for in-person sessions was reported, although greater participation was reflected in online activities. Mean satisfaction ratings were high; however, attrition rates suggest that more is needed to maximize clinician engagement. A hybrid method using online and in-person sessions was feasible and adaptive for varying learning styles and work schedules. Positive changes in measurements were detected among journal club participants. Instruments were identified that may be useful for trialing similar programs intended to increase evidence-based practice self-efficacy, use, behaviors, and ability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Application of an Evidence-Based Clinical Nursing Path for Improving the Preoperative and Postoperative Quality of Care of Pediatric Retroperitoneal Neuroblastoma Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial at a Tertiary Medical Institution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Mo, Lin; Tang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong; Huang, Xiaoyan

    A clinical nursing path (CNP) that encourages patients and their families to become actively involved in healthcare decision-making processes may improve outcomes of pediatric retroperitoneal neuroblastoma (NB) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility and value of an evidence-based CNP provided to pediatric retroperitoneal NB patients undergoing resection surgery. One hundred twenty NB cases were assigned to a control group or a CNP group. The control group was provided with standard nursing care. The CNP group was provided with nursing care in accordance with an evidence-based CNP. The utility and value of the CNP were compared with standard nursing care. Outcome measures included rates of postoperative complications, lengths of hospital stay, and cost of hospitalization, as well as preoperative and postoperative quality of care and patient satisfaction with care. The rates of postoperative complications, length of preoperative hospitalization, total length of hospital stay, and costs of hospitalization were significantly lower for patients receiving the CNP compared with the control group. Preoperative and postoperative quality of care and patient satisfaction with care were significantly higher in patients receiving the CNP compared with the control group. Adoption of a CNP for preoperative and postoperative care of pediatric retroperitoneal NB patients undergoing resection surgery improves clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with care. A CNP can increase families' participation in a patient's recovery process, enhance nurses' understanding of the services they are providing, and improve the quality of healthcare received by patients.

  19. Evidence-based nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Mahatnirunkul, Suwat; Srikosai, Soontaree

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand. The initial draft, consisting of 12 categories with 37 subcategories, was then evaluated by experts in the US and Thailand. Hospital records were then utilized to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the indicators. The finalized instrument consisted of 11 categories with 43 items with a validity of .98 and internal consistency of .88. This is the first set of indicators developed to evaluate nursing-sensitivity for patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of depression in Thailand. Having nursing indicators for depressed patients provides nurses with concrete tools to evaluate their work with depressed patients, allowing these staff to assess their work in a very specific, methodical, and consistent manner. When problems are discovered, both the staff and administration can work to address these issues through training, procedural changes, and departmental shifts.

  20. Web-Based Evidence Based Practice Educational Intervention to Improve EBP Competence among BSN-Prepared Pediatric Bedside Nurses: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    For pediatric nurses, their competence in EBP is critical for providing high-quality care and maximizing patient outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess and refine a Web-based EBP educational intervention focused on improving EBP beliefs and competence in BSN-prepared pediatric bedside nurses, and to examine the feasibility,…

  1. The Effect of Pay-for-Performance in Nursing Homes: Evidence from State Medicaid Programs

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting—the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. Data Sources/Study Setting 2001–2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Study Design Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Principal Findings Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Conclusions Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. PMID:23398330

  2. The effect of pay-for-performance in nursing homes: evidence from state Medicaid programs.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting-the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. 2001-2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Where do all the undergraduate and new graduate nurses go and why? A search for empirical research evidence.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Lynda; Gallasch, Tamara; Yorkston, Emily; Stewart, Simon; Turner, Catherine

    To review the published scientific literature for studies quantifying or examining factors associated with the attrition of undergraduate nursing students in pre-registration programs and the retention of graduate nurses in the workforce. The following selection criteria were used to systematically search the literature: target populations were either students in pre-registration nursing programs or registered nurses in their graduate year; the studies were to be primary observational or analytical (cross-sectional, case-control or prospective cohort studies) in design; and outcome measures were attrition in undergraduate programs and/or retention of graduates within the workforce. Three authors guided by a standardised procedure performed data extraction and quality assessment independently. Synthesis of the data appears in text and tabular format. Due to the heterogenic nature of the study methods, meta-analysis was not possible. This review found only four studies that met all inclusion criteria. All four studies examined undergraduate attrition as an outcome with two studies reporting a range of 25-27% attrition within the first year. No studies were found that quantified or examined retention of new graduates as an outcome measure. Only two of the four studies followed cohorts of students prospectively and were able to provide a high level of evidence, although each of these studies was designed to assess specific exposures as potential predictors of attrition, rather than assess actual factors associated with students leaving their program. There is a paucity of research studies in the literature from which evidence quantifying attrition and retention and the reasons why students leave undergraduate nursing programs or new graduates leave the profession can be obtained. Clearly there is a need to systematically track undergraduates and new graduates to quantify and understand attrition, retention and workforce choices within the nursing profession and begin

  4. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Use of simulation-based learning in undergraduate nurse education: An umbrella systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cant, Robyn P; Cooper, Simon J

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a systematic review to appraise and review evidence on the impact of simulation-based education for undergraduate/pre-licensure nursing students, using existing reviews of literature. An umbrella review (review of reviews). Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHLPlus), PubMed, and Google Scholar. Reviews of literature conducted between 2010 and 2015 regarding simulation-based education for pre-licensure nursing students. The Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for conduct of an umbrella review was used to inform the review process. Twenty-five systematic reviews of literature were included, of which 14 were recent (2013-2015). Most described the level of evidence of component studies as a mix of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. The reviews measured around 14 different main outcome variables, thus limiting the number of primary studies that each individual review could pool to appraise. Many reviews agreed on the key learning outcome of knowledge acquisition, although no overall quantitative effect was derived. Three of four high-quality reviews found that simulation supported psychomotor development; a fourth found too few high quality studies to make a statistical comparison. Simulation statistically improved self-efficacy in pretest-posttest studies, and in experimental designs self-efficacy was superior to that of other teaching methods; lower level research designs limiting further comparison. The reviews commonly reported strong student satisfaction with simulation education and some reported improved confidence and/or critical thinking. This umbrella review took a global view of 25 reviews of simulation research in nursing education, comprising over 700 primary studies. To discern overall outcomes across reviews, statistical comparison of quantitative results (effect size) must be the key comparator. Simulation-based education contributes to students' learning in a number of ways when integrated into pre

  6. Evaluating Web-Based Nursing Education's Effects: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiwon; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether using web-based nursing educational programs increases a participant's knowledge and clinical performance. We performed a meta-analysis of studies published between January 2000 and July 2016 and identified through RISS, CINAHL, ProQuest Central, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PubMed. Eleven studies were eligible for inclusion in this analysis. The results of the meta-analysis demonstrated significant differences not only for the overall effect but also specifically for blended programs and short (2 weeks or 4 weeks) intervention periods. To present more evidence supporting the effectiveness of web-based nursing educational programs, further research is warranted.

  7. Six ways of experiencing information literacy in nursing: the findings of a phenomenographic study.

    PubMed

    Forster, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy plays a vital role in evidence-based practice in nursing. However there is currently little evidence to show how being information literate is actually experienced by nurses and therefore information literacy educational interventions are not genuinely evidence-based. Are they promoting the appropriate knowledge and skills to help nurses find and use the research evidence they need? To investigate how being information literate is experienced by nurses. To use the insights obtained to develop a description of the parameters of information literacy in nursing, including those of its role and value in evidence-based practice. Phenomenography. 41 UK nurses of varying experience, specialism and background. Open-ended interviews. 7 contexts in which information literacy is experienced, were mapped out and 6 representative ways of being an information literate nurse, in increasing levels of depth and sophistication, were described. These findings may form the basis of future evidence-based information literacy education programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards identifying nurse educator competencies required for simulation-based learning: A systemised rapid review and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Topping, Anne; Bøje, Rikke Buus; Rekola, Leena; Hartvigsen, Tina; Prescott, Stephen; Bland, Andrew; Hope, Angela; Haho, Paivi; Hannula, Leena

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a systemised rapid review and synthesis of the literature undertaken to identify competencies required by nurse educators to facilitate simulation-based learning (SBL). An international collaboration undertook a protocol-based search, retrieval and critical review. Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycInfo, ERIC, the Cochrane Library and Science Direct. The search was limited to articles published in English, 2002-2012. The search terms used: nurse*, learn*, facilitator, simula*, lecturer, competence, skill*, qualificat*, educator, health care, "patient simulation", "nursing education" and "faculty". The search yielded 2156 "hits", following a review of the abstracts, 72 full-text articles were extracted. These were screened against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria and nine articles were retained. Following critical appraisal, the articles were analyzed using an inductive approach to extract statements for categorization and synthesis as competency statements. This review confirmed that there was a modest amount of empirical evidence on which to base a competency framework. Those papers that provided descriptions of educator preparation identified simulation-based workshops, or experiential training, as the most common approaches for enhancing skills. SBL was not associated with any one theoretical perspective. Delivery of SBL appeared to demand competencies associated with planning and designing simulations, facilitating learning in "safe" environments, expert nursing knowledge based on credible clinical realism, reference to evidence-based knowledge and demonstration of professional values and identity. This review derived a preliminary competency framework. This needs further development as a model for educators delivering SBL as part of nursing curricula. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Vesicant extravasation part II: Evidence-based management and continuing controversies.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Rita; Engelking, Constance; Sauerland, Carmel; Corbi, Dominick

    2006-11-27

    To review the literature, synthesize current recommendations, and discuss remaining controversies regarding vesicant extravasation management. Published evidence-based reports, clinical articles, and anecdotal case reports about antineoplastic and nonantineoplastic vesicant agent management. Prevention of vesicant extravasation sequelae requires knowledge about vesicant extravasation manifestations and differentiation of vesicant extravasation from other local IV site reactions. When evidence is weak or missing, logical application of data-based or empirical management strategies is critical. Actions may include timely administration of subcutaneous or topical antidotes, comfort measures, and surgical interventions to minimize the extent of tissue damage and morbidity should extravasation occur. Vesicant extravasation and sequelae constitute a complex patient problem. Clinicians should strive to prevent extravasation or seek to minimize injury should it occur. To this end, clinicians must demonstrate awareness of its risks and use specialized knowledge when administering vesicant agents. Nurses who administer vesicant agents should understand the nursing and collaborative actions that should be taken to minimize patient morbidity, pain, and disability.

  10. Antipsychotic discontinuation syndromes: a narrative review of the evidence and its integration into Australian mental health nursing textbooks.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Carmela; Hamilton, Bridget

    2014-02-01

    In light of the high number of people discontinuing antipsychotics each year, it is essential that nurses develop a robust understanding of all aspects of the discontinuation experience. While there is a large body of published work documenting post-discontinuation relapse rates, less is known about other aspects of the discontinuation experience. This paper presents the results of a narrative review of international studies of antipsychotic discontinuation syndromes and their relevance to nursing practice. Four key mental health nursing textbooks used in student nurse education in Australia are examined to assess how this evidence has been incorporated into clinical recommendations. This review finds that the evidence for discontinuation syndromes could be more widely disseminated and applied than it is at present. Strikingly, this evidence has not been incorporated into key mental health nursing textbooks in Australia at all. Slow integration into nursing published work may be influenced by a number of clinical and research uncertainties. We consider the impact of this silence on key nursing roles of psycho-education and adverse event monitoring during antipsychotic discontinuation periods. Further robust research should be conducted into discontinuation syndromes as a matter of urgency. Given the high number of consumers potentially impacted upon by discontinuation syndromes, nurse authors and educators should consider revising key nursing textbooks to include the currently available information about discontinuation syndromes. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ) in an Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Beccaria, Lisa; Beccaria, Gavin; McCosker, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    It is crucial that nursing students develop skills and confidence in using Evidence-Based Practice principles early in their education. This should be assessed with valid tools however, to date, few measures have been developed and applied to the student population. To examine the structural validity of the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ), with an Australian online nursing student cohort. A cross-sectional study for constructing validity. Three hundred and forty-five undergraduate nursing students from an Australian regional university were recruited across two semesters. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was used to examine the structural validity. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was applied which resulted in a good fitting model, based on a revised 20-item tool. The S-EBPQ tool remains a psychometrically robust measure of evidence-based practice use, attitudes, and knowledge and skills and can be applied in an online Australian student context. The findings of this study provided further evidence of the reliability and four factor structure of the S-EBPQ. Opportunities for further refinement of the tool may result in improvements in structural validity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation of evidence-based practice across medical, nursing, pharmacological and allied healthcare professionals: a questionnaire survey in nationwide hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) is regarded as core competence to improve healthcare quality. In the current study, we investigated the EBP of six groups of professionals: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, technicians, and other allied healthcare personnel. Methods A structured questionnaire survey of regional hospitals throughout Taiwan was conducted by post in 2011. Questionnaires were mailed to all healthcare workers of 11 randomly selected hospitals. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors for implementing EBP. Results In total, 6,160 returned questionnaires, including 645 from physicians, 4,206 from nurses, 430 from pharmacists, 179 from physical therapists, 537 from technicians, and 163 from other allied healthcare professionals, were valid for the analysis. Physicians and pharmacists were more aware of EBP than were the other professional groups (p < 0.001). Positive attitudes toward and beliefs in EBP were significantly lower among nurses than in the other groups (p < 0.001). Physicians had more sufficient knowledge and skills of EBP than did the other professionals (p < 0.001); in addition, they implemented EBP for clinical decision-making more often and perceived fewer personal barriers to EBP (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that EBP implementation was associated with the following characteristics of participants: EBP training, having a faculty position, academic degree, one's profession, and perceptions (beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills and barriers). Conclusions This study depicts various levels of EBP implementation among medical, nursing, pharmacological, and allied healthcare personnel. There were significant differences in their implementation of EBP. We observed that certain factors were associated with EBP implementation, including personal backgrounds and perceptions toward EBP. The data suggest that strategies for

  13. Raising the Level of Awareness of Nurse-to-Nurse Lateral Violence in a Critical Access Hospital.

    PubMed

    Embree, Jennifer L; Bruner, Deborah A; White, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background/Significance of Problem. Nurse-to-nurse lateral violence (NNLV) has been internationally reported for greater than two decades and results in new nurse turnover and serious negative outcomes. Clinical Question/Project Objective. Will NNLV and cognitive rehearsal (CR) education result in a decrease in perceived nurse-to-nurse lateral violence in a critical access hospital (CAH)? The scope of this project was to determine perceived extent and increase awareness of NNLV through an educational project about NNLV and CR. Clinical Appraisal of Literature/Best Evidence. Trends of NNLV were assessed through an extensive literature review from Health Source, CINAHL, ProQuest Health, and Medical Complete. An educational forum about NNLV with CR was advocated for newly licensed nurses and current nurses (potential perpetrators of NNLV) with the goal of liberation of oppressed individuals. Integration into Practice/Discussion of Results. An interventional study with one group and pre-/postintervention was used to determine NNLV and CR education on perceived levels of lateral violence. Evidence-based measurement occurred through use of the Nurse Workplace Scale and the Silencing the Self-Work Scale. Outcomes were analyzed quantitatively through independent t-tests. Awareness of NNLV was increased. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practice/Implications. Organizations must learn to eliminate NNLV. With increased levels of awareness of NNLV, nurses requested additional assistance in dealing with inappropriate behavior.

  14. Raising the Level of Awareness of Nurse-to-Nurse Lateral Violence in a Critical Access Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Jennifer L.; Bruner, Deborah A.; White, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background/Significance of Problem. Nurse-to-nurse lateral violence (NNLV) has been internationally reported for greater than two decades and results in new nurse turnover and serious negative outcomes. Clinical Question/Project Objective. Will NNLV and cognitive rehearsal (CR) education result in a decrease in perceived nurse-to-nurse lateral violence in a critical access hospital (CAH)? The scope of this project was to determine perceived extent and increase awareness of NNLV through an educational project about NNLV and CR. Clinical Appraisal of Literature/Best Evidence. Trends of NNLV were assessed through an extensive literature review from Health Source, CINAHL, ProQuest Health, and Medical Complete. An educational forum about NNLV with CR was advocated for newly licensed nurses and current nurses (potential perpetrators of NNLV) with the goal of liberation of oppressed individuals. Integration into Practice/Discussion of Results. An interventional study with one group and pre-/postintervention was used to determine NNLV and CR education on perceived levels of lateral violence. Evidence-based measurement occurred through use of the Nurse Workplace Scale and the Silencing the Self-Work Scale. Outcomes were analyzed quantitatively through independent t-tests. Awareness of NNLV was increased. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practice/Implications. Organizations must learn to eliminate NNLV. With increased levels of awareness of NNLV, nurses requested additional assistance in dealing with inappropriate behavior. PMID:23991337

  15. Integrating nurse researchers in clinical practice - a challenging, but necessary task for nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kjerholt, Mette; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Thomsen, Thora Grothe

    2016-05-01

    To create awareness among nurse leaders, of what they may need to consider, when integrating nurse researchers as advanced nurse practitioners (ANP) at PhD-level among their staff. In a time of transition nurse leaders may be challenged by the change towards evidence-based clinical nursing, including integrating nurse researchers in ANP positions. A collective case study including three ANPs took place at a large regional hospital in Denmark. The cases were first analysed by focusing on the generic features, functions and skills of ANPs, and second by focusing on the approaches to evidence-based practice seen in the cases. Regardless of same position, formal level of research expertise and overall responsibility, different approaches related to each ANPs professional profile, interest, academic ambitions and personality were seen. Nurse leaders must ensure a process where the content and expectations of the particular role are mutually clarified and adjusted to the individual ANP and to the specific context, in order to create a harmonious match. In order to clarify expectations regarding the inclusion of nurse researchers as ANPs at PhD level, the paper provides firm recommendations that may guide the process. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Integrating nursing care into the Cochrane Collaboration].

    PubMed

    Pearson, Alan

    2012-12-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration holds a prominent position in Evidence-Based Practice. Since 2009, this organisation has created a specific area reserved for nursing care. Anyone needing nursing evidence, or wishing to produce some, can obtain useful resources from the Collaboration.

  17. Electronic access to scientific nursing knowledge: the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library.

    PubMed

    Graves, J R

    2001-02-01

    To inform oncology nurses about the electronic knowledge resources offered by the Sigma Theta Tau International Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library. Published articles and research studies. Clinical nursing research dissemination has been seriously affected by publication bias. The Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library has introduced both a new publishing paradigm for research and a new knowledge indexing strategy for improving electronic access to research knowledge (findings). The ability of oncology nursing to evolve, as an evidence-based practice, is largely dependent on access to research findings.

  18. Motivating nurses' organizational citizenship behaviors by customer-oriented perception for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching Sheng; Chang, Hae Ching

    2010-12-01

    There is a gap in the literature about the influence of customer-oriented perception on nursing personnel's organizational citizenship behaviors. Organizational citizenship behaviors are the type of contextual behaviors that are difficult to observe and measure as such behaviors are usually generated in quite subtle and unpredictable ways. This study tested the hypothesis: Customer-oriented perception is associated with increased organizational citizenship behaviors for nurses. If nursing personnel's customer-oriented perception can increase their willingness to display organizational citizenship behaviors, it may facilitate hospital operation and enhance organizational effectiveness. A cross-sectional design using a questionnaire survey of nurses in 10 medical centers was used. Five hundred copies of the questionnaire were distributed, and 232 effective copies were retrieved, with a valid response rate of 46.4%. Structural equation modeling was performed in SPSS 11.0 and Amos 7.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) statistical software packages. The main finding was that favorable customer-oriented perception is associated with increased organizational citizenship behaviors for nurses. Extensive training and customer-oriented performance evaluation are proposed in the hope of creating customer-oriented perception among nursing personnel and subsequently inspiring the display of organizational citizenship behaviors. ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. The evidence-based practice ideologies.

    PubMed

    Mantzoukas, Stefanos

    2007-10-01

    This paper puts forward the argument that there are various, competing, and antithetical evidence-based practice (EBP) definitions and acknowledges that the different EBP definitions are based on different epistemological perspectives. However, this is not enough to understand the way in which nurse professionals choose between the various EBP formations and consequently facilitate them in choosing the most appropriate for their needs. Therefore, the current article goes beyond and behind the various EBP epistemologies to identify how individuals choose an epistemology, which consequently will assist our understanding as to how an individual chooses a specific EBP formation. Individuals choose an epistemology on the mere belief that the specific epistemology offers the ideals or ideas of best explaining or interpreting daily reality. These ideals or ideas are termed by science, history, and politics as ideology. Similarly, individual practitioners choose or should choose between the different EBP formations based on their own personal ideology. Consequently, this article proceeds to analyse the various ideologies behind different EBP definitions as to conclude that there are two broad ideologies that inform the various EBP formations, namely the ideology of truth and the ideology of individual emancipation. These two ideologies are analysed and their connections to the various EBP formations are depicted. Eventually, the article concludes that the in-depth, critical, and intentional analysis by individual nurses of their own ideology will allow them to choose the EBP formation that is most appropriate and fitting for them, and their specific situation. Hence, the conscious analysis of individual ideology becomes the criterion for choosing between competing EBP formations and allows for best evidence to be implemented in practice. Therefore, the best way to teach EBP courses is by facilitating students to analyse their own ideology.

  20. Is There Evidence of Cream Skimming Among Nursing Homes Following the Publication of the Nursing Home Compare Report Card?

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Ladd, Heather; Weimer, David L.; Spector, William D.; Zinn, Jacqueline S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A national quality report card for nursing homes, Nursing Home Compare, has been published since 2002. It has been shown to have some, albeit limited, positive impact on quality of care. The objective of this study was to test empirically the hypothesis that nursing homes have responded to the publication of the report by adopting cream skimming admission policies. Design and Methods: The study included all non-Medicare newly admitted patients to all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes nationally during the 2001–2005 period. Using the Minimum Data Set data, we calculated for each quarter several admission cohort characteristics: average number of activity of daily living limitations and percent of residents admitted with pain, with pressure ulcers, with urinary incontinence, with diabetes, and with memory limitations. We tested whether residents admitted in the postpublication period were less frail and sick compared with residents admitted in the prepublication period by estimating fixed facility effects longitudinal regression models. Analyses were stratified by nursing home ownership, occupancy, reported quality ranking, chain affiliation, and region. Results: Evidence for cream skimming was found with respect to pain and, to a lesser degree, with respect to memory limitation but not with respect to the 4 other admission cohort characteristics. Implications: Despite the theoretical expectation, empirical evidence suggests only a limited degree of cream skimming. Further studies are required to investigate this phenomenon with respect to other admission cohort characteristics and with respect to post-acute patients. PMID:19491363

  1. Hospital-based perinatal nurses identify the need to improve nursing care of adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Wendy E; Davies, Barbara; Rashotte, Judy; Salvador, Anne; Trépanier, Marie-Josée

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether hospital-based perinatal nurses with expertise in adolescent mother-friendly care identify a need to improve inpatient nursing care of adolescent mothers and how well perinatal units support nurses' capacity to provide adolescent mother-friendly care. A key informant survey of nurses from eight perinatal units at three hospitals (four separate sites) in a Canadian city. Perinatal nurses expert in the care of adolescent mothers were identified by their managers and colleagues. These nurses and all perinatal clinical educators were invited to participate. Twenty-seven of 34 potential key informants completed the survey. Key informants rated their own skill in caring for adolescent mothers higher (median 8.0) than they rated the skill of other nurses (median 6.0) on their units. They attributed their expertise working with adolescent mothers to their clinical and life experiences and their ability to develop rapport with adolescents. A common reason for the assigned lower peer-group ratings was the judgmental manner in which some nurses care for adolescent mothers. Key informants also identified that hospital-based perinatal nurses lack adequate knowledge of community-based resources for adolescent mothers, educational programs related to adolescent mother-friendly care were insufficient, and policies to inform the nursing care of adolescent mothers were not available or known to them. A minority of perinatal nurses have expertise in adolescent mother-friendly care. There is a need for perinatal unit-level interventions to support the development of nurses' skills in caring for adolescent mothers and their knowledge of community-based resources. Peer mentoring and self-reflective practice are promising strategies. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  2. The nurse-family partnership: An evidence-based preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Olds, David L

    2006-01-01

    Pregnancy and the early years of the child's life offer an opportune time to prevent a host of adverse maternal, child, and family outcomes that are important in their own right, but that also reflect biological, behavioral, and social substrates in the child and family that affect family formation and future life trajectories. This article summarizes a 27-year program of research that has attempted to improve early maternal and child health and future life options with prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses. The program is designed for low-income mothers who have had no previous live births. The home-visiting nurses have three major goals: to improve the outcomes of pregnancy by helping women improve their prenatal health, to improve the child's health and development by helping parents provide more sensitive and competent care of the child, and to improve parental life course by helping parents plan future pregnancies, complete their education, and find work. The program has been tested in three separate large-scale, randomized controlled trials with different populations living in different contexts. Results from these trials indicate that the program has been successful in achieving two of its most important goals: (a) the improvement of parental care of the child as reflected in fewer injuries and ingestions that may be associated with child abuse and neglect and better infant emotional and language development; and (b) the improvement of maternal life course, reflected in fewer subsequent pregnancies, greater work-force participation, and reduced dependence on public assistance and food stamps. The impact on pregnancy outcomes is equivocal. In the first trial, the program also produced long-term effects on the number of arrests, convictions, emergent substance use, and promiscuous sexual activity of 15-year-old children whose nurse-visited mothers were low-income and unmarried when they registered in the study during pregnancy. In general, the impact of

  3. Achieving Full Scope of Practice Readiness Using Evidence for Psychotherapy Teaching in Web and Hybrid Approaches in Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kathleen T

    2018-01-01

    Radical changes in role, education, and practice have affected how education of advance practice nurses and practice deliverables occur. This article examines the effects of distance education upon the teaching/learning of psychotherapy in integrating Web-based technology and platforms. With the advent and proliferation of online programs of study, the question begs: How do distance-linked programs successfully introduce, practice, and supervise one-to-one and group psychotherapy training? By employing evidence-based education strategies, technology, and strong interpersonal skills and evidence-based therapies, a charter Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice program paved an innovative and successful path. In that program, they prepared their students for full scope of practice, upon graduation, inclusive of psychotherapy as well as the other highly demanding and compressed requirements of the 3-year program. This article explores that journey and its recommendations for application derived from this 2010 cohort. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hospice nurses' views on single nurse administration of controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vanessa; Middleton-Green, Laura; Carding, Sally; Perkins, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The involvement of two nurses to dispense and administer controlled drugs is routine practice in most clinical areas despite there being no legal or evidence-based rationale. Indeed, evidence suggests this practice enhances neither safety nor care. Registered nurses at two hospices agreed to change practice to single nurse dispensing and administration of controlled drugs (SNAD). Participants' views on SNAD were evaluated before and after implementation. The aim of this study was to explore the views and experiences of nurses who had implemented SNAD and to identify the views and concerns of those who had not yet experienced SNAD. Data was obtained through semi-structured interviews. Qualitative thematic analysis of interview transcripts identified three key themes: practice to enhance patient benefit and care; practice to enhance nursing care and satisfaction; and practice to enhance organisational safety. The findings have implications for the understanding of influences on medicines safety in clinical practice and for hospice policy makers.

  5. What do evidence-based secondary journals tell us about the publication of clinically important articles in primary healthcare journals?

    PubMed Central

    McKibbon, Kathleen Ann; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, Robert Brian

    2004-01-01

    Background We conducted this analysis to determine i) which journals publish high-quality, clinically relevant studies in internal medicine, general/family practice, general practice nursing, and mental health; and ii) the proportion of clinically relevant articles in each journal. Methods We performed an analytic survey of a hand search of 170 general medicine, general healthcare, and specialty journals for 2000. Research staff assessed individual articles by using explicit criteria for scientific merit for healthcare application. Practitioners assessed the clinical importance of these articles. Outcome measures were the number of high-quality, clinically relevant studies published in the 170 journal titles and how many of these were published in each of four discipline-specific, secondary "evidence-based" journals (ACP Journal Club for internal medicine and its subspecialties; Evidence-Based Medicine for general/family practice; Evidence-Based Nursing for general practice nursing; and Evidence-Based Mental Health for all aspects of mental health). Original studies and review articles were classified for purpose: therapy and prevention, screening and diagnosis, prognosis, etiology and harm, economics and cost, clinical prediction guides, and qualitative studies. Results We evaluated 60,352 articles from 170 journal titles. The pass criteria of high-quality methods and clinically relevant material were met by 3059 original articles and 1073 review articles. For ACP Journal Club (internal medicine), four titles supplied 56.5% of the articles and 27 titles supplied the other 43.5%. For Evidence-Based Medicine (general/family practice), five titles supplied 50.7% of the articles and 40 titles supplied the remaining 49.3%. For Evidence-Based Nursing (general practice nursing), seven titles supplied 51.0% of the articles and 34 additional titles supplied 49.0%. For Evidence-Based Mental Health (mental health), nine titles supplied 53.2% of the articles and 34 additional

  6. Problem-Based Learning for Didactic Presentation to Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Montenery, Susan

    2017-05-01

    Nursing judgment is an essential component in the delivery of safe, quality patient care. Nurses must have the knowledge and skills to question authority, make judgments, substantiate evidence, and advocate for the patient. Traditional pedagogy in content-laden courses remains primarily lecture based. Incorporating active strategies to strengthen professional practice is essential. A pilot study assessed senior baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of problem-based learning (PBL) and their readiness for self-directed learning. In addition, the authors analyzed the relationship between readiness for self-directed learning and course content mastery using PBL. Students completed the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale, the Problem-Based Learning Environment Inventory, and course content mastery exams. Students reported positive experiences with PBL and readiness for self-directed learning. Readiness for self-directed learning and 2 of 5 exam scores were inversely, significantly related. Students' perceptions of their readiness for self-directed learning did not always correspond with course content mastery. Specifically, some students who perceived themselves as ready for self-directed learning did not perform well on course content exams. This inverse relationship has not been reported by other researchers and brings an interesting perspective to student perceptions and actual performance. Four themes emerged from students' narrative responses: Prepared Me for Real Life Professional Situations, Stimulated My Critical Thinking, Promoted Independent Problem Solving, and Supported Learning Retention. PBL as a pedagogical approach provides opportunities for nursing students to explore their professional independence while attempting to master content.

  7. Nursing process in mental health: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana Paula Rigon Francischetti; Freitas, Maria Isabel Pedreira de; Lamas, José Luiz Tatagiba; Toledo, Vanessa Pellegrino

    2017-01-01

    to identify evidences from the literature on the application of nursing process in care developed by the nurse in mental health. integrative literature review between 1990 and 2013, in the PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and LILCACS bases. Descriptors: nursing processes, mental health, nursing care. 19 papers were identified. Limited and partial usage of the nursing process in care established by a therapeutic relationship that respects the patient's individuality. We observe care proposals systematized for patients that present pathological aspects in the limits between the physical and psychical, which might be a response to the influence of the practice based on evidences. it was found an antagonistic movement between care based on the relationship and located in the standardization of diagnoses that respond to physical malaise. A lack of evidence was verified for the usage of the nursing process in mental health, and we point at the necessity for the creation of new possibilities for dialogue between relational and biological perspectives.

  8. Assisting undergraduate nursing students to learn evidence-based practice through self-directed learning and workshop strategies during clinical practicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Tieying; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiaopan

    2012-07-01

    To equip undergraduate nursing students with basic knowledge and skills and foster positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP), a pilot learning program during their clinical practicum was developed in a teaching hospital in China. This article describes the specific learning process through which self-directed learning and workshop strategies were used, and a pre- and post-intervention survey were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning strategies. The findings show a significant improvement in their perceptions of EBP knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and behavior levels. Beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. Participants reported great satisfaction and have found this program helpful in promoting their analytical and problem-solving abilities, independent learning ability, and cooperative and communication abilities as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality Evaluation of Nursing Observation Based on a Survey of Nursing Documents Using NursingNAVI.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Inoue, Manami; Wako, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    We have identified three foci of the nursing observation and nursing action respectively. Using these frameworks, we have developed the structured knowledge model for a number of diseases and medical interventions. We developed this structure based NursingNAVI® contents collaborated with some quality centred hospitals. Authors analysed the nursing care documentations of post-gastrectomy patients in light of the standardized nursing care plan in the "NursingNAVI®" developed by ourselves and revealed the "failure to observe" and "failure to document", which leaded to the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. This phenomenon should have been avoided if nurses had employed a standardized nursing care plan. So, we developed thinking process support system for planning, delivering, recording and evaluating in daily nursing using NursingNAVI® contents. It is important to identify the problem of the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. We developed a survey tool of nursing documents using NursingNAVI® Content for quality evaluation of nursing observation. We recommended some hospitals to use this survey tool. Fifteen hospitals participated the survey using this tool. It is estimated that the volatilizing situation. A hospital which don't participate this survey, knew the result. So the hospital decided to use NursingNAVI® contents in HIS. It was suggested that the system has availability for nursing OJT and time reduction of planning and recording without volatilizing situation.

  10. Casemix and nursing.

    PubMed

    Diers, D

    1999-01-01

    The American Nurses' Association did not embrace the introduction of diagnosis related groups, believing they would not recognise nursing activity nor acuity and would bring about the economic demise of nursing. Australian nurses, by contrast, recognised the window of opportunity that the work towards Australian national diagnosis related groups and funding mechanisms provided to move nursing resources into the political and policy mainstream. This paper reviews the American and Australian nursing experience with casemix, acuity and cost weighting. It uses examples from more recent work to argue for the use of casemix information in new ways, for 'process improvement' or 'evidence-based management'. The paper concludes that the next great leap forward in casemix may require attention to building the information and human infrastructures, so that the valuable clinical-financial information produced by casemix-based information systems can truly inform management and policy.

  11. Did Your Evidence-Base Program Work? Share the News! CLUES #5/6: Assess and Alert.

    PubMed

    Yonkaitis, Catherine F; Maughan, Erin D

    2018-07-01

    The work of the school nurse does not end with the institution of an evidence-based intervention. The steps of EBP tell us that we must "Assess" the effectiveness of an intervention to determine if it is having the desired effect. When we find success in our EBP changes we must come full circle and share or "Alert" stakeholders and other school nurses by disseminating our work. School nurses can share their success through written and oral presentations to insure that we add to our collective school nursing knowledge.

  12. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Marcel; Reid, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently…

  13. Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program: An Innovative Model for Promoting Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Valerie; Arling, Greg; Lewis, Teresa; Abrahamson, Kathleen A.; Mueller, Christine; Edstrom, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program (PIPP) supports provider-initiated projects aimed at improving care quality and efficiency. PIPP moves beyond conventional pay for performance. It seeks to promote implementation of evidence-based practices, encourage innovation and risk taking, foster collaboration…

  14. Thinking like a nurse: a research-based model of clinical judgment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine A

    2006-06-01

    This article reviews the growing body of research on clinical judgment in nursing and presents an alternative model of clinical judgment based on these studies. Based on a review of nearly 200 studies, five conclusions can be drawn: (1) Clinical judgments are more influenced by what nurses bring to the situation than the objective data about the situation at hand; (2) Sound clinical judgment rests to some degree on knowing the patient and his or her typical pattern of responses, as well as an engagement with the patient and his or her concerns; (3) Clinical judgments are influenced by the context in which the situation occurs and the culture of the nursing care unit; (4) Nurses use a variety of reasoning patterns alone or in combination; and (5) Reflection on practice is often triggered by a breakdown in clinical judgment and is critical for the development of clinical knowledge and improvement in clinical reasoning. A model based on these general conclusions emphasizes the role of nurses' background, the context of the situation, and nurses' relationship with their patients as central to what nurses notice and how they interpret findings, respond, and reflect on their response.

  15. Implementation of a next-generation electronic nursing records system based on detailed clinical models and integration of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Yul Ha; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Chung, Eunja; Lee, Hyunsook

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the components of a next-generation electronic nursing records system ensuring full semantic interoperability and integrating evidence into the nursing records system. A next-generation electronic nursing records system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines was developed at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in 2013. This system has two components, a terminology server and a nursing documentation system. The terminology server manages nursing narratives generated from entity-attribute-value triplets of detailed clinical models using a natural language generation system. The nursing documentation system provides nurses with a set of nursing narratives arranged around the recommendations extracted from clinical practice guidelines. An electronic nursing records system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines was successfully implemented in a hospital in Korea. The next-generation electronic nursing records system can support nursing practice and nursing documentation, which in turn will improve data quality.

  16. The Omaha System as a Structured Instrument for Bridging Nursing Informatics With Public Health Nursing Education: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Eardley, Debra L; Krumwiede, Kelly A; Secginli, Selda; Garner, Linda; DeBlieck, Conni; Cosansu, Gulhan; Nahcivan, Nursen O

    2018-06-01

    Advancements in healthcare systems include adoption of health information technology to ensure healthcare quality. Educators are challenged to determine strategies to integrate health information technology into nursing curricula for building a nursing workforce competent with electronic health records, standardized terminology, evidence-based practice, and evaluation. Nursing informatics, a growing specialty field, comprises health information technology relative to the profession of nursing. It is essential to integrate nursing informatics across nursing curricula to effectively position competent graduates in technology-laden healthcare environments. Nurse scholars developed and evaluated a nursing informatics case study assignment used in undergraduate level public health nursing courses. The assignment included an unfolding scenario followed by electronic health record charting using standardized terminology to guide the nursing process. The assignment was delivered either online or in class. Seventy-two undergraduate students completed the assignment and a posttest. Fifty-one students completed a satisfaction survey. Results indicated that students who completed the assignment online demonstrated a higher level of content mastery than those who completed the assignment in class. Content mastery was based on posttest results, which evaluated students' electronic health record charting for the nursing assessment, evidence-based interventions, and evaluations. This innovative approach may be valuable to educators in response to the National Academy of Sciences recommendations for healthcare education reform.

  17. Mind-Body Exercises for Nurses with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Budhrani-Shani, Pinky; Berry, Donna L; Arcari, Patricia; Langevin, Helene; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) among nurses is a growing health concern. The multimodal nature of mind-body exercises has potential to impact physiological and psychological processes associated with chronic pain, affording possible advantages over conventional unimodal therapies. This paper summarizes the prevalence of and risk factors for CLBP among nurses, reviews the effectiveness in treating pain and disability of mind-body exercises (yoga and tai chi) for CLBP among the general and nursing population, and describes implications. Methods. Articles, published during or prior to 2015, were systematically identified through the PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect databases using the following search terms: nurses, mind-body, integrative, biopsychosocial, yoga, tai chi, back pain, and/or risk factors. Results. Prevalence estimates of CLBP among nurses ranged from 50% to 80%. Associated risk factors for CLBP included lifestyle and physical, psychological, psychosocial, and occupational factors. No published studies were identified that evaluated yoga or tai chi for nurses with CLBP. Studies in the general population suggested that these interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability and may improve factors/processes predictive of CLBP. Conclusion. This review suggests that evaluating the impact of multimodal interventions such as yoga and tai chi for nurses with CLBP warrants investigation.

  18. Inspiring undergraduates towards a career in community nursing.

    PubMed

    Cable, Clare; Dickson, Caroline; Morris, Gillian

    2015-10-01

    This article is based on the findings of a literature review commissioned by the Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland as part of its commitment to promote an evidence-based educational policy. An analysis of the literature suggests that there is potential to expand the provision of community placements beyond traditional clinical areas and these placements should be identified and overseen in collaboration with managers, mentors and higher education institutions to ensure a consistent approach and a positive learning experience. This may inspire undergraduate nurses to pursue a career in community nursing. Currently, there is little evidence to support models. High-quality evaluation research is required to ensure that new models are developed using a sound evidence base.

  19. A blueprint for genomic nursing science.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Bakos, Alexis D; Cashion, Ann K; Donaldson, Nancy; Feero, W Gregory; Feetham, Suzanne; Grady, Patricia A; Hinshaw, Ada Sue; Knebel, Ann R; Robinson, Nellie; Ropka, Mary E; Seibert, Diane; Stevens, Kathleen R; Tully, Lois A; Webb, Jo Ann

    2013-03-01

    This article reports on recommendations arising from an invitational workshop series held at the National Institutes of Health for the purposes of identifying critical genomics problems important to the health of the public that can be addressed through nursing science. The overall purpose of the Genomic Nursing State of the Science Initiative is to establish a nursing research blueprint based on gaps in the evidence and expert evaluation of the current state of the science and through public comment. A Genomic Nursing State of the Science Advisory Panel was convened in 2012 to develop the nursing research blueprint. The Advisory Panel, which met via two webinars and two in-person meetings, considered existing evidence from evidence reviews, testimony from key stakeholder groups, presentations from experts in research synthesis, and public comment. The genomic nursing science blueprint arising from the Genomic Nursing State of Science Advisory Panel focuses on biologic plausibility studies as well as interventions likely to improve a variety of outcomes (e.g., clinical, economic, environmental). It also includes all care settings and diverse populations. The focus is on (a) the client, defined as person, family, community, or population; (b) the context, targeting informatics support systems, capacity building, education, and environmental influences; and (c) cross-cutting themes. It was agreed that building capacity to measure the impact of nursing actions on costs, quality, and outcomes of patient care is a strategic and scientific priority if findings are to be synthesized and aggregated to inform practice and policy. The genomic nursing science blueprint provides the framework for furthering genomic nursing science to improve health outcomes. This blueprint is an independent recommendation of the Advisory Panel with input from the public and is not a policy statement of the National Institutes of Health or the federal government. This genomic nursing science

  20. A Blueprint for Genomic Nursing Science

    PubMed Central

    Calzone, Kathleen A.; Jenkins, Jean; Bakos, Alexis D.; Cashion, Ann; Donaldson, Nancy; Feero, Greg; Feetham, Suzanne; Grady, Patricia A.; Hinshaw, Ada Sue; Knebel, Ann R.; Robinson, Nellie; Ropka, Mary E.; Seibert, Diane; Stevens, Kathleen R.; Tully, Lois A.; Webb, Jo Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This article reports on recommendations arising from an invitational workshop series held at the National Institutes of Health for the purposes of identifying critical genomics problems important to the health of the public that can be addressed through nursing science. The overall purpose of the Genomic Nursing State of the Science Initiative is to establish a nursing research blueprint based on gaps in the evidence and expert evaluation of the current state of the science and through public comment. Organizing Constructs A Genomic Nursing State of the Science Advisory Panel was convened in 2012 to develop the nursing research blueprint. The Advisory Panel, which met via two webinars and two in-person meetings, considered existing evidence from evidence reviews, testimony from key stakeholder groups, presentations from experts in research synthesis, and public comment. Findings The genomic nursing science blueprint arising from the Genomic Nursing State of Science Advisory Panel focuses on biologic plausibility studies as well as interventions likely to improve a variety of outcomes (e.g., clinical, economic, environmental). It also includes all care settings and diverse populations. The focus is on (a) the client, defined as person, family, community, or population; (b) the context, targeting informatics support systems, capacity building, education, and environmental influences; and (c) cross-cutting themes. It was agreed that building capacity to measure the impact of nursing actions on costs, quality, and outcomes of patient care is a strategic and scientific priority if findings are to be synthesized and aggregated to inform practice and policy. Conclusions The genomic nursing science blueprint provides the framework for furthering genomic nursing science to improve health outcomes. This blueprint is an independent recommendation of the Advisory Panel with input from the public and is not a policy statement of the National Institutes of Health or the

  1. Implementation of a two-part unit-based multiple intervention: moving evidence-based practice into action.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Judy; Thomas, Margot; Grégoire, Diane; Ledoux, Sheila

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the impact of a 2-part unit-based multiple intervention on the use by pediatric critical care nurses of best practice guidelines for pressure-ulcer prevention. A total of 23 nurses participated in a repeated-measures design pre- and post-intervention to address 2 questions: Is there a difference in nurses' evidence-based practices following implementation of an educational intervention only versus implementation of both an educational and an innovative intervention? Are the changes sustained 6 months after completion of the intervention? A significant change occurred in the implementation of 2 of 11 recommended practices following both interventions: assessment of risk of pressure ulcers using an age-appropriate tool (p < or = 0.001), and the documentation of same (p < or = 0.001). These changes may have been sustained. The findings bring to light the real challenges encountered when attempting to implement and evaluate multiple knowledge translation strategies associated with complex best practice guidelines in clinical practice.

  2. 5-2-1-0 Activity and Nutrition Challenge for Elementary Students: New, Evidence-Based, Promising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Cynthia Miller

    2018-01-01

    Obesity prevention in youth is a health priority, and teaching healthy habits toward this end is one of a school nurse's many responsibilities. A school nurse developed and implemented a school-wide, 2-week-long Activity and Nutrition Challenge (ANC) using the evidence-based 5-2-1-0 initiative to prevent and fight childhood obesity. Despite…

  3. Using a pedagogical approach to integrate evidence-based teaching in an undergraduate women's health course.

    PubMed

    Dawley, Katy; Bloch, Joan Rosen; Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; McKeever, Amy; Scherzer, Gerri

    2011-06-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted as a foundation for nursing practice. However, the 2005 U.S. survey of nurses revealed that they do not have requisite skills for EBP. PURPOSE AND GOALS: To evaluate a pedagogical approach aimed at (1) fostering undergraduate nursing students EBP competencies, and (2) identifying gaps in the literature to direct future women's health research. A secondary analysis of data abstracted from required EBP clinical journals for an undergraduate women's health course in which students (n = 198) were asked to find evidence to answer their clinical questions. Content analysis was used to identify main themes of the topics of inquiry. Students identified 1,808 clinical questions and 30.3% (n = 547) of these could not be answered or supported by evidence in the literature. This assignment was an important teaching and assessment tool for EBP. Questions reflected critical thinking and quest for in-depth knowledge to support nursing practice. Some students lacked skills in searching databases and a significant number of knowledge gaps were identified that can direct women's health research. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Cognitive Continuum Theory in nursing decision-making.

    PubMed

    Cader, Raffik; Campbell, Steve; Watson, Don

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse and evaluate Cognitive Continuum Theory and to provide evidence for its relevance to nurses' decision-making. It is critical that theories used in nursing are evaluated to provide an understanding of their aims, concepts and usefulness. With the advent of evidence-based care, theories on decision-making have acquired increased significance. The criteria identified by Fawcett's framework has been used to analyse and evaluate Hammond's Cognitive Continuum Theory. Findings. There is empirical evidence to support many of the concepts and propositions of Cognitive Continuum Theory. The theory has been applied to the decision-making process of many professionals, including medical practitioners and nurses. Existing evidence suggests that Cognitive Continuum Theory can provide the framework to explain decision-making in nursing. Cognitive Continuum Theory has the potential to make major contributions towards understanding the decision-making process of nurses in the clinical environment. Knowledge of the theory in nursing practice has become crucial.

  6. Evidence-based health care: its place within clinical governance.

    PubMed

    McSherry, R; Haddock, J

    This article explores the principles of evidence-based practice and its role in achieving quality improvements within the clinical governance framework advocated by the recent White Papers 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Department of Health (DoH), 1997) and 'A First Class Service: Quality in the New NHS' (DoH, 1998a). Within these White Papers there is an emphasis on improving quality of care, treatment and services through employing the principles of clinical governance. A major feature of clinical governance is guaranteeing quality to the public and the NHS, and ensuring that clinical, managerial and educational practice is based on scientific evidence. This article also examines what evidence-based practice is and what processes are required to promote effective healthcare interventions. The authors also look at how clinical governance relates to other methods/systems involved in clinical effectiveness. Finally, the importance for nurses and other healthcare professionals of familiarizing themselves with the development of critical appraisal skills, and their implications for developing evidence-based practice, is emphasized.

  7. Development of an Evidence-Based List of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Medications and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa A; Stranz, Marc; Cook, Lynda S; Joseph, James M; Kokotis, Kathy; Sabatino-Holmes, Pam; Van Gosen, Lori

    Infiltration of a vesicant medication, defined as extravasation, may result in significant patient injuries. The first step in preventing extravasation is the identification and recognition of vesicant medications and solutions. Because there is no list of noncytotoxic vesicants as established by a professional organization, the Infusion Nurses Society, as the global authority in infusion nursing, identified the need to address this gap. A task force was formed for the purpose of creating an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications and solutions.

  8. Promoting cultures of thinking: transforming nursing education to transform nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Freed, Patricia E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary nursing education is highly invested in the development of the academic, critical, and empirical aspects of education that represent the science of nursing, and concomitantly less attentive to the development of the creative, interpersonal aspects of education typically associated with the art of nursing. This represents a reversal of historic patterns in nursing education, but the pendulum may have swung so far that there could be costs to nursing practice unless the creative, interpersonal aspects of education can be reclaimed and balanced. Ideas and suggestions regarding how nurse educators might foster the creation of cultures of thinking, which represent whole-brain, integrated teaching approaches that are based on emerging neurocognitive evidence, are discussed.

  9. Rectal suppository insertion: the reliability of the evidence as a basis for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Ann; Price, Lynda

    2007-01-01

    most manufacturers of suppositories, which involves the terms of their product licence. Hence, there is a potential for problems with legal liability should an untoward event arise. Inserting rectal suppositories, whether as a medication or to achieve bowel evacuation, is a very common healthcare practice. Currently, there is inconsistency and discrepancy in the correct method for this procedure in both nursing education and practice. This paper examines the reliability of existing evidence and shows the need for further work in order to provide a reliable evidence base for this commonplace clinical procedure.

  10. What deters nurses from participating in web-based graduate nursing programs?: A cross-sectional survey research study.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Suzanne H

    2016-01-01

    A graduate degree is required of nursing faculty in America. Because of the nursing faculty shortage, web-based graduate nursing programs are being offered to encourage nurses to return to school. The identification of deterrents to participating in these programs is an important step in increasing enrollment. To identify deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. Descriptive survey research. Louisiana Two hundred and eighty-one registered nurse members of the Louisiana Nurses' Association. The 54-item four-point Likert-type interval scale Deterrents to Participation in Web-Based Graduate Nursing Programs Survey Instrument was used. Data were collected over 8weeks using SurveyMonkey.com to administer the web survey tool to all members of the Louisiana State Nurses' Association. A factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution that explained 55.436% of the total variance in deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. The factors were labeled "concerns about quality, cost, and time," "concerns about access to resources: technological and personal," and "concerns about electronic mediated communication." Multiple regression analysis revealed an overall model of three predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs: no computer literacy, annual household income between 20,000 and 50,000 dollars, and having the current educational status of graduating from a diploma RN program. This model accounted for 21% of the variance in the deterrents to participation scores. Since these three significant predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs were identified, web-based nursing graduate program administrators might consider an outreach to RN diploma graduates in an effort to make them aware of available technology support programs to foster participation. Scholarships for lower income nursing students are recommended, and programs to support computer

  11. Nursing portal; a nursing informatics solution for iran, lessons learned from a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Reza; Masoori, Niloufar; Torabi, Mashaallah; Cheraghi, Mohammad A; Farzananejad, Ahmadreza; Azadmanjir, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    The nursing portal is an informatics solution in which services and capabilities supports the nursing staff in their practices and professional development with respect to the existing challenges for use of Internet by nurses at work. It can be considered as a creditable gateway for quick access to research-based evidence provided by reliable resources. Also it provide interactive virtual environment for knowledge exchange with experts or colleagues in different geographical area. Through a comparative study on specialized nursing portals in Iran and other three countries, the aim of this paper is defining desired content and structural specifications of nursing portals which support the practice of nurses in the workplace. Based on results of the present study, a set of recommendations provide for development of a comprehensive nursing portal in Iran.

  12. Nursing Portal; a Nursing Informatics Solution for Iran, Lessons Learned from a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza; Masoori, Niloufar; Torabi, Mashaallah; Cheraghi, Mohammad A.; farzananejad, Ahmadreza; Azadmanjir, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    The nursing portal is an informatics solution in which services and capabilities supports the nursing staff in their practices and professional development with respect to the existing challenges for use of Internet by nurses at work. It can be considered as a creditable gateway for quick access to research-based evidence provided by reliable resources. Also it provide interactive virtual environment for knowledge exchange with experts or colleagues in different geographical area. Through a comparative study on specialized nursing portals in Iran and other three countries, the aim of this paper is defining desired content and structural specifications of nursing portals which support the practice of nurses in the workplace. Based on results of the present study, a set of recommendations provide for development of a comprehensive nursing portal in Iran. PMID:24199117

  13. Designing nursing excellence through a National Quality Forum nurse scholar program.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Julie A; Brady-Schluttner, Katherine A; Attlesey-Pries, Jacqueline M; Twedell, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    Closing the knowledge gap for current practicing nurses in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) core competencies is critical to providing safe patient care. The National Quality Forum (NQF) nurse scholar program is one organization's journey to close the gap in the IOM core competencies in a large teaching organization. The NQF nurse scholar program is positioned to provide a plan to assist current nurses to accelerate their learning about quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and informatics, 3 of the core competencies identified by the IOM, and focus on application of skills to NQF nurse-sensitive measures. Curriculum outline, educational methodologies, administrative processes, and aims of the project are discussed.

  14. Mindfulness-based stress reduction: an intervention to enhance the effectiveness of nurses' coping with work-related stress.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah A

    2014-06-01

    This critical literature review explored the current state of the science regarding mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a potential intervention to improve the ability of nurses to effectively cope with stress. Literature sources include searches from EBSCOhost, Gale PowerSearch, ProQuest, PubMed Medline, Google Scholar, Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, and reference lists from relevant articles. Empirical evidence regarding utilizing MBSR with nurses and other healthcare professionals suggests several positive benefits including decreased stress, burnout, and anxiety; and increased empathy, focus, and mood. Nurse use of MBSR may be a key intervention to help improve nurses' ability to cope with stress and ultimately improve the quality of patient care provided. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  15. Health Professionals' Attitudes towards Evidence-Based Medicine and the Role of the Information Professional in Exploitation of the Research Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ruth A.; Rolinson, Janet; Urquhart, Christine J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 182 doctors, nurses, and allied professionals examined health professionals' awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Results show most health professionals wanted workplace access to resources, that doctors preferred to do their own searching, and that health professionals doubted librarians could find relevant articles, suggesting…

  16. CogChamps - a model of implementing evidence-based care in hospitals: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Travers, Catherine; Graham, Frederick; Henderson, Amanda; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2017-03-14

    Delirium and dementia (cognitive impairment; CI), are common in older hospital patients, and both are associated with serious adverse outcomes. Despite delirium often being preventable, it is frequently not recognized in hospital settings, which may be because hospital nurses have not received adequate education or training in recognizing or caring for those with CI. However, the most effective way of increasing nurses' awareness about delirium and dementia, and initiating regular patient screening and monitoring to guide best practices for these patients in hospital settings is not known. Hence this current project, conducted in 2015-2017, aims to redress this situation by implementing a multi-component non-pharmacological evidence-based intervention for patients with CI, through educating and mentoring hospital nurses to change their practice. The development of the practice change component is informed by recent findings from implementation science that focuses on facilitation as the active ingredient in knowledge uptake and utilization. This component focuses on educating and empowering experienced nurses to become Cognition Champions (CogChamps) across six wards in a large Australian tertiary referral hospital. The CogChamps will, in turn, educate other nursing team members to more effectively care for patients with CI. The hospital leadership team are supportive of the project and are directly involved in selecting the CogChamps. CogChamps will be provided with comprehensive education in evidence-based delirium assessment, prevention and management, and practice change management skills. They will receive continuing support from research and education staff about raising awareness, upskilling other staff in delirium assessment and in the adoption of best practices for preventing and managing delirium. Both qualitative and quantitative data are being collected at multiple time-points to evaluate process, impact and outcome, and to provide clarity regarding the

  17. Healthy work environments for the ageing nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the physical challenges that ageing nurses experience and the facility design features that can promote healthy work environments to motivate nurses to continue working. Older nurses are working longer and beyond the usual retirement age. They often experience chronic fatigue and the usual physical and cognitive changes associated with aging. Nursing is a physically demanding profession and many older nurses work in pain while providing direct patient care. The literature is replete with studies focusing on the organisational factors that retain older nurses, but little research addresses design factors that facilitate nurses working longer and more safely in direct patient care. Electronic databases in medicine, nursing, psychology, and architecture were searched and evidence-based, non-evidence-based, and review articles and government and organisational newsletters were evaluated. Hospital design can help address the physical work challenges that older nurses experience. Older nurses have a wealth of knowledge and expertise, and the design of nursing units can optimize their work experience. Nurse Managers must participate in design efforts and advocate designs that support aging nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Children's nursing research: toward development, drudgery or demise?

    PubMed

    Long, Tony

    This paper, based on a presentation to the UK Association of Chief Children's Nurses, is the author's personal reflection on the nature and future of children's nursing research. Key constitutive elements of this concept are considered to arrive at the conclusion that children's nursing research is research undertaken by children's nurses into questions of relevance to children's nursing practice and services, or wider issues in which children's nursing has a vital role. Three possible futures are presented, of which only the last is positive and desirable: development in line with the reality of practice and population needs. An integrated approach is necessary, with responsibilities both for those in positions of authority in the service and for researchers themselves. In particular, this partnership is essential for children's nursing to evidence the impact of research and for children and young people to reap the greatest benefit from evidence-based practice.

  19. The use of evidence-informed sustainability scenarios in the nursing curriculum: development and evaluation of teaching methods.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Janet; Grose, Jane; Doman, Maggie; Kelsey, Janet

    2014-04-01

    Climate change and resource scarcity pose challenges for healthcare in the future, yet there is little to raise awareness about these issues in the nursing curriculum and nurses are poorly equipped to practice in a changing climate. The aims of this paper are to describe how an evidence-informed 'sustainability and health' scenario based on two sustainability issues (resource depletion and waste management) was introduced into a nursing clinical skills session, and to report the evaluation of the session. Based on evidence from our own research on waste management, sustainable procurement and resource scarcity, a practical hands-on skill session was delivered to 30 second year student nurses as part of a scheduled clinical skills day. The session was observed by one of the facilitators and interactions recorded and this was followed by a brief questionnaire completed by participants. Observations of the group sessions and discussion found that students demonstrated limited knowledge about natural resources (such as oil) used in the production of items used in healthcare; they engaged in discussions following the use of Internet resources, and were able to segregate waste appropriately. Thirty (100%) students completed the evaluation questionnaire, found the resources used in the skill session helpful, and thought that the scenarios were realistic. Nineteen reported being more aware of peak oil; 30 were more aware of risks to patient experience and service delivery if resources become unavailable; 30 reported greater awareness of the management of waste in healthcare. Comments on the questionnaire indicated a high level of engagement and interest in the subject. The problem of climate change and resource scarcity can too easily be seen as a distant or intractable problem. However one way to make this topic real for students is through the use of clinically relevant scenarios in skill sessions. © 2013.

  20. Diffusion of pain management research into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dooks, P

    2001-04-01

    The promotion of evidence based practice is a challenge within nursing. Pain management is a prime example of this practice research gap. There is solid evidence for 20 years to promote positive change in our methods of pain management, yet outdated approaches are still amazingly evident. Even among oncology nurses, who place a high value on promoting patient comfort, there is a lack of evidence-based pain management. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory provides an interesting framework for examining the issues and possible solutions to this complex problem. Rogers' theory examines how changes diffuse through a social system over time and also exposes some of the barriers and facilitators to this process. The theory looks at adopters, the nature of the innovation, the social system, and communication patterns. Identifying the barriers of the past will help nursing to overcome these same barriers and increase the adoption of evidence-based pain management approaches in the future.

  1. Increasing utilization of Internet-based resources following efforts to promote evidence-based medicine: a national study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lo, Heng-Lien; Shih, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chiehfeng; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2013-01-07

    Since the beginning of 2007, the National Health Research Institutes has been promoting the dissemination of evidence-based medicine (EBM). The current study examined longitudinal trends of behaviors in how hospital-based physicians and nurses have searched for medical information during the spread of EBM. Cross-sectional postal questionnaire surveys were conducted in nationally representative regional hospitals of Taiwan thrice in 2007, 2009, and 2011. Demographic data were gathered concerning gender, age, working experience, teaching appointment, academic degree, and administrative position. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors and changes over time. Data from physicians and nurses were collected in 2007 (n = 1156), 2009 (n = 2975), and 2011 (n = 3999). There were significant increases in the use of four Internet-based resources - Web portals, online databases, electronic journals, and electronic books - across the three survey years among physicians and nurses (p < 0.001). Access to textbooks and printed journals, however, did not change over the 4-year study period. In addition, there were significant relationships between the usage of Internet-based resources and users' characteristics. Age and faculty position were important predictors in relation to the usage among physicians and nurses, while academic degree served as a critical factor among nurses only. Physicians and nurses used a variety of sources to look for medical information. There was a steady increase in use of Internet-based resources during the diffusion period of EBM. The findings highlight the importance of the Internet as a prominent source of medical information for main healthcare professionals.

  2. Mental Health Nursing in Greece: Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions in Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Prokofieva, Margarita; Koukia, Evmorfia; Dikeos, Dimitris

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions that were accordingly implemented during the care of inpatients with major depression in Greece. Twelve nurses working in three major psychiatric hospitals were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were used and audio-recorded data indicated that risk for suicide, social isolation, low self-esteem, sleep problems, and imbalanced nutrition are the nursing diagnoses most commonly reported. Establishing trust and rapport is the primary intervention, followed by specific interventions according to each diagnosis and the individualized care plan. The findings of the study also highlight the need for nursing training in order to teach nurses initial assessment procedures and appropriate evidence-based intervention techniques.

  3. Changing essay writing in undergraduate nursing education through action research: a Swedish example.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Febe; Lyckhage, Elisabeth Dahlborg

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of literature-based models for bachelor degree essays in Swedish undergraduate nursing education. Students' experiences in a course with literature-based models for bachelor degree essays are discussed. The ever-growing body of nursing research and specialized and complex health care practices make great demands on nursing education in terms of preparing students to be both skilled practitioners and users of research. Teaching to help students understand evidence-based practice is a challenge for nursing education. Action research was used to generate knowledge of and practical solutions to problems in everyday locations. Six models were developed: concept analysis, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of quantitative research, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of qualitative research, discourse analysis, analysis of narratives, and literature review. Action research was found to be a relevant procedure for changing ways of working with literature-based, bachelor degree essays. The models that were developed increased students' confidence in writing essays and preparedness for the nursing role.

  4. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-09-01

    Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checklist was designed and validated for assessing nurses' compliance with nursing process. A total of 300 nurses from various clinical settings of Tehran university of medical sciences were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequencies, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent samples t-tests. The compliance rate of nursing process indicators was 79.71 ± 0.87. Mean compliance scores did not significantly differ by education level and gender. However, overall compliance scores were correlated with nurses' age (r = 0.26, P = 0.001) and work experience (r = 0.273, P = 0.001). Nursing process indicators can be used to audit nursing care. Such audits can be used as quality assurance tools.

  5. Developing awareness of sustainability in nursing and midwifery using a scenario-based approach: Evidence from a pre and post educational intervention study.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Janet; Grose, Jane; Bradbury, Martyn; Kelsey, Janet

    2017-07-01

    The delivery of healthcare has an impact on the environment and contributes to climate change. As a consequence, the way in which nurses and midwives use and dispose of natural resources in clinical practice, and the subsequent impact on the environment, should be integral component of nursing and midwifery education. Opportunities need to be found to embed such issues into nursing curricula; thus bringing sustainability issues 'closer to home' and making them more relevant for clinical practice. The study was designed to measure the impact of a sustainability-focussed, scenario-based learning educational intervention on the attitudes and knowledge of student nurses and midwives. Pre test/Post test intervention study using scenario-based learning as the educational intervention. The Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) was used as the outcome measure. Clinical skills session in a UK University School of Nursing and Midwifery. 676 second year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. The 7-point scale SANS survey was completed before and after the teaching session; standard non-parametric analysis compared pre and post intervention scores. Changes were observed in attitude towards climate change and sustainability and to the inclusion of these topics within the nursing curricula (p=0.000). Participants demonstrated greater knowledge of natural resource use and the cost of waste disposal following the session (p=0.000). Participants also reported that sessions were realistic, and levels of agreement with statements supporting the value of the session and the interactive nature of delivery were higher following the session. Using a scenario-based learning approach with nursing and midwifery students can change attitudes and knowledge towards sustainability and climate change. Embedding this approach in the context of clinical skills provides a novel and engaging approach that is both educationally sound and clinically relevant. Copyright © 2017

  6. An investigation into the description of patients' problems by nurses using two different needs-based nursing models.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an investigation into how nurses describe patients' problems and the possible effects of an espoused nursing model on these descriptions. A descriptive study was conducted on two medical wards in a Welsh District General Hospital. Data collected were subjected to content analysis using Gordon's Functional Health Patterns to order the data. The two wards investigated, whilst being very similar in many ways, utilized different nursing models. Findings showed that the nurses studied, when describing patients' problems, most commonly used medical diagnoses or the medical reasons for admission. Patients' problems identified predominately addressed bio-physical needs with scant attention given to psycho-social needs. Despite the use of two different nursing models the language and emphasis of problem description were very similar and there was no evidence of the application of the conceptual underpinnings of the two models. It is suggested that although the use of a ready-made nursing language may have drawbacks, the British nurse should understand and assess the value of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA) nursing diagnoses. Without such involvement this system may be implemented in the United Kingdom (UK) without the input and influence of practising nurses.

  7. What is the value of Values Based Recruitment for nurse education programmes?

    PubMed

    Groothuizen, Johanna E; Callwood, Alison; Gallagher, Ann

    2018-05-01

    A discussion of issues associated with Values Based Recruitment (VBR) for nurse education programmes. Values Based Recruitment is a mandatory element in selection processes of students for Higher Education healthcare courses in England, including all programmes across nursing. Students are selected on the basis that their individual values align with those presented in the Constitution of the National Health Service. However, there are issues associated with the use of values as selection criteria that have been insufficiently addressed. These are discussed. Discussion paper. This article is based on documents published on the website of the executive body responsible for the implementation of a policy regarding VBR in Higher Education Institutions up until June 2017 and our evaluation of the conceptualisation of VBR, underpinned by contemporary theory and literature. Values Based Recruitment influences who is accepted onto a nurse education programme, but there has been limited critical evaluation regarding the effectiveness of employing values as selection criteria. Values are subject to interpretation and evidence regarding whether or how VBR will improve practice and care is lacking. The issues discussed in this article show that Higher Education Institutions offering nursing courses, whether in England or in other countries, should be critical and reflective regarding the implementation of VBR methods. We call for a debate regarding the meaning and implications of VBR and further research regarding its validity and effectiveness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Using a handbook to improve nurses' continence care.

    PubMed

    Williams, K; Roe, B; Sindhu, F

    Nursing care should be based on sound research evidence with demonstrated clinical effectiveness. Dissemination of this research evidence is, therefore, of paramount importance. A study using focus groups was undertaken during 1993-1994 to evaluate the dissemination of a clinical handbook for continence care to qualified nurses, in relation to reported nursing practice in care of the elderly wards/units in one health authority. A total of 124 nurses participated in the study and 98 variables were included. Improvements were recorded in nurses' responses between the pre-test and post-test for 84 (86 per cent) variables in the experimental group and 58 (59 per cent) in the control group. This demonstrates the positive value of the clinical handbook as a method of disseminating research evidence.

  9. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara T; Throop, Meryia D; Raju, Dheeraj; Murphy, Deborah A; Loan, Lori A; Patrician, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of a dynamic educational and mentoring program, facilitated by unit-level mentors, to introduce, promote, and sustain an evidence-based practice (EBP) culture among nurses in a military healthcare setting. The need to identify gaps in practice, apply principles of EBP, and advance scientific applications in the pursuit of quality nursing care is as important to military healthcare as it is in the civilian sector. The Advancing Research through Close Collaboration Model guided the intervention and study. Three instruments were used: the Organizational Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-Based Practice, EBP Beliefs, and EBP Implementation scales. The study took place in 3 military hospitals simultaneously undergoing facility and staff integration. Data were collected from staff nurses in the inpatient nursing units before and after a facilitated education and mentoring intervention. Three hundred sixty nurses (38%) completed baseline, and 325 (31%) completed follow-up surveys. Scores improved on all 3 measures following implementation of the program; however, the differences were statistically significant only for the Organizational Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-Based Practice scale (70.96 vs 77.63, t = -3.95, P < .01). In the paired individual pretest/posttest subsample (n = 56), scores improved significantly on all 3 instruments. Despite typically high turnover rates of military personnel and restructuring of 3 facilities during the study period, the readiness for, beliefs about, and implementation of EBP improved. This study suggests that a commitment to an EBP culture may diffuse among individuals in an organization, even while experiencing significant change. It also demonstrates that a unit-level mentored EBP program is sustainable despite changes in organizational structure and workforce composition.

  11. Visualization studies on evidence-based medicine domain knowledge (series 3): visualization for dissemination of evidence based medicine information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiantong; Yao, Leye; Li, Youping; Clarke, Mike; Gan, Qi; Li, Yifei; Fan, Yi; Gou, Yongchao; Wang, Li

    2011-05-01

    treatment, nursing, health economic and management, and medical education. Internationally, EBM research topics have begun to shift, from drug treatment to surgery or other non-pharmacological treatments; from therapy to diagnosis, rehabilitation, and prevention; from evidence based clinical practice to evidence based management and policymaking. The philosophy and method of EBM, evidence production and translation are also shifting from well resourced settings to low- and middle-income countries, especially those in which English is not a major language. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  12. Nursing work directions in Australia: does evidence drive the policy?

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Duffield, Christine; Aisbett, Chris; Diers, Donna; Stasa, Helen

    2012-01-01

    A significant body of research has shown a relationship between nurse staffing (in particular, skill-mix: the proportion of Registered Nurses [RNs]) and both morbidity and mortality. This relationship is typically investigated by measuring the incidence of Nursing Sensitive Outcomes (NSOs) under different skill-mix levels. Yet whilst the evidence suggests that richer skill-mix is associated with a lower incidence of NSOs, recent Australian policy reforms have proposed the replacement of Registered Nurses with less qualified staff. The present study sought to examine the relationship between staffing, skill-mix, and incidence of NSOs at two hospitals in one Australian state. The study sought to determine the rate of occurrence of several NSOs, the relationship of skill-mix to that rate, and the number of patients affected per annum. It was found that the current rate of NSOs across wards ranged from 0.17% to 1.05%, and that there was an inverse relationship between the proportion of hours worked by RNs and NSO rates: an increase of 10% in the proportion of hours worked by RNs was linked to a decrease in NSO rates by between 11% and 45%. It was estimated that increasing the RN staffing percentage by 10% would mean 160 fewer adverse outcomes for patients per year across these two hospitals. Importantly, increases in nursing hours overall (without increases in skill-mix) had no significant effect on patient outcomes. These findings challenge current policy recommendations, which propose increasing the number of unregistered staff without increasing skill-mix.

  13. The effectiveness of mindfulness based programs in reducing stress experienced by nurses in adult hospital settings: a systematic review of quantitative evidence protocol.

    PubMed

    Botha, Elmarie; Gwin, Teri; Purpora, Christina

    2015-10-01

    -related stress influences people differently based on their viewpoint and their interpretation of the situation. He states that individuals need to be able to see the whole picture, have perspective on the connectivity of all things and not operate on automatic pilot to effectively cope with stress. The goal of mindfulness meditation is to empower individuals to respond to situations consciously rather than automatically.Prior to the commencement of this systematic review, the Cochrane Library and JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports were searched. No previous systematic reviews on the topic of reducing stress experienced by nurses through mindfulness programs were identified. Hence, the objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the best research evidence available pertaining to mindfulness-based programs and their effectiveness in reducing perceived stress among nurses.

  14. Team-Based Models for End-of-Life Care: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background End of life refers to the period when people are living with advanced illness that will not stabilize and from which they will not recover and will eventually die. It is not limited to the period immediately before death. Multiple services are required to support people and their families during this time period. The model of care used to deliver these services can affect the quality of the care they receive. Objectives Our objective was to determine whether an optimal team-based model of care exists for service delivery at end of life. In systematically reviewing such models, we considered their core components: team membership, services offered, modes of patient contact, and setting. Data Sources A literature search was performed on October 14, 2013, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to October 14, 2013. Review Methods Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and full-text articles were obtained that met the inclusion criteria. Studies were included if they evaluated a team model of care compared with usual care in an end-of-life adult population. A team was defined as having at least 2 health care disciplines represented. Studies were limited to English publications. A meta-analysis was completed to obtain pooled effect estimates where data permitted. The GRADE quality of the evidence was evaluated. Results Our literature search located 10 randomized controlled trials which, among them, evaluated the following 6 team-based models of care: hospital, direct contact home, direct contact home, indirect contact comprehensive, indirect contact comprehensive, direct contact comprehensive, direct, and early contact Direct contact is when team members see the patient; indirect contact is when they advise another health care practitioner (e.g., a family doctor) who sees

  15. Improvement in critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students through problem-based learning: a crossover-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dehong; Zhang, Yaqing; Xu, Yun; Wu, Juemin; Wang, Caifeng

    2013-10-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is important to nursing education and practice. Although there is evidence that active learning approaches, such as problem-based learning (PBL), are effective in developing CT dispositions, the findings are inconclusive. This study examines the effect of PBL on the development of CT dispositions in nursing students using a crossover-experimental study in a course offered to nursing students in China. All students were randomly assigned to two parallel groups, with one group receiving PBL and the other receiving lecture-based learning (LBL) as a control. The CT Dispositions Inventory-Chinese Version was administered before and after the semester-long course. Data were collected at three time points. No significant differences between groups were noted in overall and sub-scale scores at baseline; however, pronounced differences in overall posttest scores existed between the PBL and LBL groups. Thus, PBL learning significantly enhanced the CT dispositions of nursing students enrolled in Medical-Surgical Nursing II. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Striving for best practice: standardising New Zealand nursing procedures, 1930-1960.

    PubMed

    Wood, Pamela J; Nelson, Katherine

    2013-11-01

    To identify how nurses in the past determined best practice, using the context of New Zealand, 1930-1960. In the current context of evidence-based practice, nurses strive to provide the best care, based on clinical research. We cannot assume that nurses in the past, prior to the evidence-based practice movement, did not also have a deliberate process for pursuing best practice. Discovering historical approaches to determining best practice will enrich our understanding of how nurses' current efforts are part of a continuing commitment to ensuring quality care. Historical research. The records of the Nursing Education Committee of the New Zealand Registered Nurses' Association, 1940-1959, and the 309 issues of New Zealand's nursing journal, Kai Tiaki, 1930-1960, were analysed to identify the profession's approach to ensuring best practice. This approach was then interpreted within the international context, particularly Canada and the USA. For nearly 30 years, nurse leaders collaborated in undertaking national surveys of training hospitals requesting information on different nursing practices. They subsequently distributed instructions for a range of procedures and other aspects of nursing care to standardise practice. Standardising nursing care was an effective way to ensure quality nursing at a time when hospital care was delivered mostly by nurses in training. The reasons for and timing of standardisation of nursing care in New Zealand differed from the international move towards standardisation, particularly in the USA. Historically, nurses also pursued best practice, based on standardising nursing procedures. Examining the antecedents of the present evidence-based approach to care reminds us that the process and reasons for determining best practice change through time. As knowledge and practice continually change, current confident assertions of best practice should and will continue to be challenged in future. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Higher prices, higher quality? Evidence from German nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Herr, Annika; Hottenrott, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the relationship between prices and quality of 7400 German nursing homes. We use a cross section of public quality reports for all German nursing homes, which had been evaluated between 2010 and 2013 by external institutions. Our analysis is based on multivariate regressions in a two stage least squares framework, where we instrument prices to explain their effect on quality controlling for income, nursing home density, demographics, labour market characteristics, and infrastructure at the regional level. Descriptive analysis shows that prices and quality do not only vary across nursing homes, but also across counties and federal states and that quality and prices correlate positively. Second, the econometric analysis, which accounts for the endogenous relation between negotiated price and reported quality, shows that quality indeed positively depends on prices. In addition, more places in nursing homes per people in need are correlated with both lower prices and higher quality. Finally, unobserved factors at the federal state level capture some of the variation of reported quality across nursing homes. Our results suggest that higher prices increase quality. Furthermore, since reported quality and prices vary substantially across federal states, we conclude that the quality and prices of long-term care facilities may well be compared within federal states but not across. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion of Evidence-based Intensive Care Unit Organizational Practices. A State-Wide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Rachel; Madden, Vanessa; Kahn, Jeremy M; Asch, David A; Barnato, Amber E; Halpern, Scott D; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad

    2017-02-01

    Several intensive care unit (ICU) organizational practices have been associated with improved patient outcomes. However, the uptake of these evidence-based practices is unknown. To assess diffusion of ICU organizational practices across the state of Pennsylvania. We conducted two web-based, cross-sectional surveys of ICU organizational practices in Pennsylvania acute care hospitals, in 2005 (chief nursing officer respondents) and 2014 (ICU nurse manager respondents). Of 223 eligible respondents, nurse managers from 136 (61%) medical, surgical, mixed medical-surgical, cardiac, and specialty ICUs in 98 hospitals completed the 2014 survey, compared with 124 of 164 (76%) chief nursing officers in the 2005 survey. In 2014, daytime physician staffing models varied widely, with 23 of 136 (17%) using closed models and 33 (24%) offering no intensivist staffing. Nighttime intensivist staffing was used in 37 (27%) ICUs, 38 (28%) used nonintensivist attending staffing, and 24 (18%) had no nighttime attending physicians. Daily multidisciplinary rounds occurred in 93 (68%) ICUs. Regular participants included clinical pharmacists in 68 of 93 (73%) ICUs, respiratory therapists in 62 (67%), and advanced practitioners in 37 (39%). Patients and family members participated in rounds in 36 (39%) ICUs. Clinical protocols or checklists for mechanically ventilated patients were available in 128 of 133 (96%) ICUs, low tidal volume ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome in 54 of 132 (41%) ICUs, prone positioning for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in 37 of 134 (28%) ICUs, and family meetings in 19 of 134 (14%) ICUs. Among 61 ICUs that responded to both surveys, there was a significant increase in the proportion of ICUs using nighttime in-ICU attending physicians (23 [38%] in 2005 vs. 30 [49%] in 2014; P = 0.006). The diffusion of evidence-based ICU organizational practices has been variable across the state of Pennsylvania. Only half of Pennsylvania ICUs have

  19. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    in the pursuit of quality nursing care is as important to military healthcare as it is in the civilian sector. Description: The Advancing...information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information...identify gaps in practice, apply principles of evidence-based practice (EBP), and advance scientific applications in the pursuit of quality nursing

  20. Internet-based learning programme to increase nurses' knowledge level about venous leg ulcer care in home health care.

    PubMed

    Ylönen, Minna; Viljamaa, Jaakko; Isoaho, Hannu; Junttila, Kristiina; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2017-11-01

    and cost-effective access to evidence-based education. Education programme about venous leg ulcer nursing care material can be used in all nursing environments where Internet is available. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nurses experience of using scientific knowledge in clinical practice: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Renolen, Åste; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Guidelines recommend the use of evidence-based practice in nursing. Nurses are expected to give patients care and treatment based on the best knowledge available. They may have knowledge and positive attitudes, but this does not mean that they are basing their work on evidence-based practice. Knowledge is still lacking about what is needed to successfully implement evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to gain more knowledge about what nurses perceive as the most important challenge in implementing evidence-based practice and to explain how they act to face and overcome this challenge. We used classical grounded theory methodology and collected data through four focus groups and one individual interview in different geographical locations in one large hospital trust in Norway. Fourteen registered clinical practice nurses participated. We analysed the data in accordance with grounded theory, using the constant comparative method. Contextual balancing of knowledge emerged as the core category and explains how the nurses dealt with their main concern, how to determine what types of knowledge they could trust. The nurses' main strategies were an inquiring approach, examining knowledge and maintaining control while taking care of patients. They combined their own experienced-based knowledge and the guidelines of evidence-based practice with a sense of control in the actual situation. The grounded theory contextual balancing of knowledge may help us to understand how nurses detect what types of knowledge they can trust in clinical practice. The nurses needed to rely on what they did, and they seemed to rely on their own experience rather than on research. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Developing leadership in nurse managers: the British Columbia Nursing Leadership Institute.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, Maura; Bouthillette, France

    2008-01-01

    The British Columbia Nursing Administrative Leadership Institute for First Line Nurse Leaders (BC NLI) is a collaborative partnership among British Columbia's Chief Nursing Officers, the Ministry of Health Nursing Directorate and the University of British Columbia School of Nursing. This initiative consists of a four-day residential program and a year-long leadership project between BC NLI participants and their organizational mentors. The evidence-based curriculum covers universal leadership and management concepts, but it also addresses leadership issues of relevance to nurse leaders in today's complex healthcare environments. The BC NLI is part of a provincial health human resources endeavour to ensure sufficient nursing leaders - for now and in the future. This paper will discuss the development, implementation and evaluation of the BC NLI. Unique aspects of the program, such as its online networking component, will be described, and its role in nursing leadership research will be briefly examined.

  3. Nursing home cost and ownership type: evidence of interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Arling, G; Nordquist, R H; Capitman, J A

    1987-06-01

    Due to steadily increasing public expenditures for nursing home care, much research has focused on factors that influence nursing home costs, especially for Medicaid patients. Nursing home cost function studies have typically used a number of predictor variables in a multiple regression analysis to determine the effect of these variables on operating cost. Although several authors have suggested that nursing home ownership types have different goal orientations, not necessarily based on economic factors, little attention has been paid to this issue in empirical research. In this study, data from 150 Virginia nursing homes were used in multiple regression analysis to examine factors accounting for nursing home operating costs. The context of the study was the Virginia Medicaid reimbursement system, which has intermediate care and skilled nursing facility (ICF and SNF) facility-specific per diem rates, set according to facility cost histories. The analysis revealed interaction effects between ownership and other predictor variables (e.g., percentage Medicaid residents, case mix, and region), with predictor variables having different effects on cost depending on ownership type. Conclusions are drawn about the goal orientations and behavior of chain-operated, individual for-profit, and public and nonprofit facilities. The implications of these findings for long-term care reimbursement policies are discussed.

  4. Nursing home cost and ownership type: evidence of interaction effects.

    PubMed Central

    Arling, G; Nordquist, R H; Capitman, J A

    1987-01-01

    Due to steadily increasing public expenditures for nursing home care, much research has focused on factors that influence nursing home costs, especially for Medicaid patients. Nursing home cost function studies have typically used a number of predictor variables in a multiple regression analysis to determine the effect of these variables on operating cost. Although several authors have suggested that nursing home ownership types have different goal orientations, not necessarily based on economic factors, little attention has been paid to this issue in empirical research. In this study, data from 150 Virginia nursing homes were used in multiple regression analysis to examine factors accounting for nursing home operating costs. The context of the study was the Virginia Medicaid reimbursement system, which has intermediate care and skilled nursing facility (ICF and SNF) facility-specific per diem rates, set according to facility cost histories. The analysis revealed interaction effects between ownership and other predictor variables (e.g., percentage Medicaid residents, case mix, and region), with predictor variables having different effects on cost depending on ownership type. Conclusions are drawn about the goal orientations and behavior of chain-operated, individual for-profit, and public and nonprofit facilities. The implications of these findings for long-term care reimbursement policies are discussed. PMID:3301746

  5. Nurse Managers' prerequisite for nursing development: a survey on pressure ulcers and contextual factors in hospital organizations.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Brudin, Lars; Idvall, Ewa

    2010-09-01

    To describe and compare pressure ulcer prevalence in two county councils and concurrently explore Nurse Managers' perspective of contextual factors in a hospital organization. Despite good knowledge about risk factors and prevention of pressure ulcers, the prevalence of pressure ulcers remains high. Nurse Managers' have a key role in implementing evidence-based practice. The present study included five hospitals in two Swedish county councils: county council A (non-university setting) and county council B (university setting). A pressure ulcer prevalence study was conducted according to the methodology developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The Nurse Managers' answered a (27-item) questionnaire on contextual factors. County council B had significantly less pressure ulcers grade (2-4) (7.7%) than county council A (11.3%). The Nurse Managers' assessed only two out of the 27 general contextual items significantly differently. Some significant differences were observed in ward organization. In county council B, the Nurse Managers' seemed more aware of prevention strategies compared with Nurse Managers' in county council A. The Nurse Managers' should take more responsibility to develop the prerequisite for quality improvement in nursing. Nursing outcomes (e.g. pressure ulcers) should be incorporated into national quality registries for benchmarking and Nurse Managers' competence in evidence-based practice and research methodology increased. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Caring Relationships in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person’s genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses’ experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person’s position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology. PMID:23894261

  7. Lecture-based versus problem-based learning in ethics education among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Khatiban, Mahnaz; Falahan, Seyede Nayereh; Amini, Roya; Farahanchi, Afshin; Soltanian, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Moral reasoning is a vital skill in the nursing profession. Teaching moral reasoning to students is necessary toward promoting nursing ethics. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of problem-based learning and lecture-based methods in ethics education in improving (1) moral decision-making, (2) moral reasoning, (3) moral development, and (4) practical reasoning among nursing students. This is a repeated measurement quasi-experimental study. Participants and research context: The participants were nursing students in a University of Medical Sciences in west of Iran who were randomly assigned to the lecture-based (n = 33) or the problem-based learning (n = 33) groups. The subjects were provided nursing ethics education in four 2-h sessions. The educational content was similar, but the training methods were different. The subjects completed the Nursing Dilemma Test before, immediately after, and 1 month after the training. The data were analyzed and compared using the SPSS-16 software. Ethical considerations: The program was explained to the students, all of whom signed an informed consent form at the baseline. The two groups were similar in personal characteristics (p > 0.05). A significant improvement was observed in the mean scores on moral development in the problem-based learning compared with the lecture-based group (p < 0.05). Although the mean scores on moral reasoning improved in both the problem-based learning and the lecture-based groups immediately after the training and 1 month later, the change was significant only in the problem-based learning group (p < 0.05). The mean scores on moral decision-making, practical considerations, and familiarity with dilemmas were relatively similar for the two groups. The use of the problem-based learning method in ethics education enhances moral development among nursing students. However, further studies are needed to determine whether such method improves moral decision-making, moral reasoning

  8. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role in obesity interventions. Building on a previous study, this study examines a refined health messaging (Let's Go 5-2-1-0) program delivered to fourth and fifth graders (n = 72) by a school nurse with reinforcement on-site health coaching by senior nursing students. Two nursing schools and two elementary schools participated. Measures of PA, body mass index percentile, and self-reported health habits were collected at baseline (School A, September 2009 and School B, January 2010) and end of year (April 2010 for both schools). Findings included statistically significant increases in PA levels and improvements in child-reported health habits. School nurses can influence obesity prevention. Further research on adoption of school nurse-led obesity interventions is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Wikipedia as an evidence source for nursing and healthcare students.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Carol A

    2011-02-01

    Where students once were confined to the University library, they are now at liberty to wander through cyber-space at will. There is evidence to suggest that student have been very quick to exploit the opportunities that the Internet can offer them. Students frequently cited search engines such as Google and Web 2.0 information sharing sites such as Wikipedia as the first places they look when seeking information for an assignment. Although a number of disciplines have accepted that Wikipedia can be viewed as an accurate and legitimate evidence source nurse educators tend to view Wikipedia with a degree of suspicion. The purpose of this paper is to carry out an exploratory study of health and health related content on a sample of Wikipedia site with the overall intention of assessing the quality of their source and supporting information. A 10% sample of health related Wikipedia entries were evaluated, with a total of 2598 references assessed. In total 1473 (56%) of the references citied on the Wikipedia pages reviewed could be argued to come from clearly identifiable reputable sources. This translates to a mean number of reputable sources of M=29 per Wikipedia entry. The quality of the evidence taken obtained from the 2500 plus references from over 50 Wikipedia pages was of sufficiently sound quality to suggest that, for health related entries, Wikipedia is appropriate for use by nursing students. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. US nurse labor market dynamics are key to global nurse sufficiency.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H

    2007-06-01

    To review estimates of U.S. nurse supply and demand, document trends in nurse immigration to the United States and their impact on nursing shortage, and consider strategies for resolving the shortage of nurses in the United States without adversely affecting health care in lower-income countries. Production capacity of nursing schools is lagging current and estimated future needs, suggesting a worsening shortage and creating a demand for foreign-educated nurses. About 8 percent of U.S. registered nurses (RNs), numbering around 219,000, are estimated to be foreign educated. Eighty percent are from lower-income countries. The Philippines is the major source country, accounting for more than 30 percent of U.S. foreign-educated nurses. Nurse immigration to the United States has tripled since 1994, to close to 15,000 entrants annually. Foreign-educated nurses are located primarily in urban areas, most likely to be employed by hospitals, and somewhat more likely to have a baccalaureate degree than native-born nurses. There is little evidence that foreign-educated nurses locate in areas of medical need in any greater proportion than native-born nurses. Although foreign-educated nurses are ethnically more diverse than native-born nurses, relatively small proportions are black or Hispanic. Job growth for RNs in the United States is producing mounting pressure by commercial recruiters and employers to ease restrictions on nurse immigration at the same time that American nursing schools are turning away large numbers of native applicants because of capacity limitations. Increased reliance on immigration may adversely affect health care in lower-income countries without solving the U.S. shortage. The current focus on facilitating nurse immigration detracts from the need for the United States to move toward greater self-sufficiency in its nurse workforce. Expanding nursing school capacity to accommodate qualified native applicants and implementing evidence-based initiatives to

  11. A qualitative study of continuing education needs of rural nursing unit staff: the nurse administrator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody; Everly, Marcee; Bozarth, Lisa; Bauer, Renee; Walters, Linda; Sample, Marilyn; Anderson, Louise

    2013-04-01

    This study reports perceptions of the continuing education (CE) needs of nursing unit staff in 40 rural healthcare facilities (10 hospitals and 30 long-term care facilities) in a rural Midwestern U.S. region from the perspective of nurse administrators in an effort to promote a community-based academic-practice CE partnership. Qualitative data collection involving naturalistic inquiry methodology was based on key informant interviews with nurse administrators (n=40) working and leading in the participating health care facilities. Major themes based on nurse administrators' perceptions of CE needs of nursing unit staff were in four broad conceptual areas: "Cultural issues", "clinical nursing skills", "patient care", and "patient safety". Major sub-themes for each conceptual area are highlighted and discussed with narrative content as expressed by the participants. Related cultural sub-themes expressed by the nurse administrators included "horizontal violence" (workplace-hospital and LTC nursing unit staff) and "domestic violence" (home-LTC nursing unit staff). The uniqueness of nurses' developmental learning needs from a situational point of view can be equally as important as knowledge-based and/or skill-based learning needs. Psychological self-reflection is discussed and recommended as a guiding concept to promote the development and delivery of relevant, empowering and evidence-based CE offerings for rural nursing unit staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increasing utilization of Internet-based resources following efforts to promote evidence-based medicine: a national study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the beginning of 2007, the National Health Research Institutes has been promoting the dissemination of evidence-based medicine (EBM). The current study examined longitudinal trends of behaviors in how hospital-based physicians and nurses have searched for medical information during the spread of EBM. Methods Cross-sectional postal questionnaire surveys were conducted in nationally representative regional hospitals of Taiwan thrice in 2007, 2009, and 2011. Demographic data were gathered concerning gender, age, working experience, teaching appointment, academic degree, and administrative position. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors and changes over time. Results Data from physicians and nurses were collected in 2007 (n = 1156), 2009 (n = 2975), and 2011 (n = 3999). There were significant increases in the use of four Internet-based resources – Web portals, online databases, electronic journals, and electronic books – across the three survey years among physicians and nurses (p < 0.001). Access to textbooks and printed journals, however, did not change over the 4-year study period. In addition, there were significant relationships between the usage of Internet-based resources and users’ characteristics. Age and faculty position were important predictors in relation to the usage among physicians and nurses, while academic degree served as a critical factor among nurses only. Conclusions Physicians and nurses used a variety of sources to look for medical information. There was a steady increase in use of Internet-based resources during the diffusion period of EBM. The findings highlight the importance of the Internet as a prominent source of medical information for main healthcare professionals. PMID:23289500

  13. Correctional nursing: a study protocol to develop an educational intervention to optimize nursing practice in a unique context.

    PubMed

    Almost, Joan; Gifford, Wendy A; Doran, Diane; Ogilvie, Linda; Miller, Crystal; Rose, Don N; Squires, Mae

    2013-06-21

    Nurses are the primary healthcare providers in correctional facilities. A solid knowledge and expertise that includes the use of research evidence in clinical decision making is needed to optimize nursing practice and promote positive health outcomes within these settings. The institutional emphasis on custodial care within a heavily secured, regulated, and punitive environment presents unique contextual challenges for nursing practice. Subsequently, correctional nurses are not always able to obtain training or ongoing education that is required for broad scopes of practice. The purpose of the proposed study is to develop an educational intervention for correctional nurses to support the provision of evidence-informed care. A two-phase mixed methods research design will be used. The setting will be three provincial correctional facilities. Phase one will focus on identifying nurses' scope of practice and practice needs, describing work environment characteristics that support evidence-informed practice and developing the intervention. Semi-structured interviews will be completed with nurses and nurse managers. To facilitate priorities for the intervention, a Delphi process will be used to rank the learning needs identified by participants. Based on findings, an online intervention will be developed. Phase two will involve evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention to inform a future experimental design. The context of provincial correctional facilities presents unique challenges for nurses' provision of care. This study will generate information to address practice and learning needs specific to correctional nurses. Interventions tailored to barriers and supports within specific contexts are important to enable nurses to provide evidence-informed care.

  14. A systematic review of evidence relating to clinical supervision for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Deery, Ruth; Fleming, Mick; Rankin, Jean; Sloan, Graham; Cheyne, Helen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review evidence relating to clinical supervision for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals. Since 1902 statutory supervision has been a requirement for UK midwives, but this is due to change. Evidence relating to clinical supervision for nurses and allied health professions could inform a new model of clinical supervision for midwives. A systematic review with a contingent design, comprising a broad map of research relating to clinical supervision and two focussed syntheses answering specific review questions. Electronic databases were searched from 2005 - September 2015, limited to English-language peer-reviewed publications. Systematic reviews evaluating the effectiveness of clinical supervision were included in Synthesis 1. Primary research studies including a description of a clinical supervision intervention were included in Synthesis 2. Quality of reviews were judged using a risk of bias tool and review results summarized in tables. Data describing the key components of clinical supervision interventions were extracted from studies included in Synthesis 2, categorized using a reporting framework and a narrative account provided. Ten reviews were included in Synthesis 1; these demonstrated an absence of convincing empirical evidence and lack of agreement over the nature of clinical supervision. Nineteen primary studies were included in Synthesis 2; these highlighted a lack of consistency and large variations between delivered interventions. Despite insufficient evidence to directly inform the selection and implementation of a framework, the limited available evidence can inform the design of a new model of clinical supervision for UK-based midwives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Nursing home nurses' and community-dwelling older adults' reported knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Christine E; Beeber, Anna; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Ward, Kimberly; Meade, Megan; Ross, Brittany; Sloane, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic overuse causes antibiotic resistance, one of the most important threats to human health. Older adults, particularly those in nursing homes, often receive antibiotics when they are not indicated. To understand knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of nursing home (NH) nurses and community-dwelling older adults towards antibiotic use, especially in clinical situations consistent with antibiotic overuse, we conducted a mixed-method survey in two NHs and one Family Medicine clinic in North Carolina, among English-speaking nurses and community-dwelling, cognitively intact adults aged 65 years or older. Based on the Knowledge-Attitude-Practice model, the survey assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behavior towards antibiotic use, including three vignettes designed to elicit possible antibiotic overuse: asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a viral upper respiratory illness (URI), and a wound from a fall. Of 31 NH nurses and 66 community-dwelling older adults, 70% reported knowledge of the dangers of taking antibiotics. Nurses more often reported evidence-based attitudes towards antibiotics than older adults, except 39% agreed with the statement "by the time I am sick enough to go to the doctor with a cold, I expect an antibiotic", while only 28% of older adults agreed with it. A majority of nurses did not see the need for antibiotics in any of the three vignettes: 77% for the ASB vignette, 87% for the URI vignette, and 97% for the wound vignette. Among older adults, 50% did not perceive a need for antibiotics in the ASB vignette, 58% in the URI vignette, and 74% in the wound vignette. While a substantial minority had no knowledge of the dangers of antibiotic use, non-evidence-based attitudes towards antibiotics, and behaviors indicating inappropriate management of suspected infections, most NH nurses and community-dwelling older adults know the harms of antibiotic use and demonstrate evidence-based attitudes and behaviors. However, more work is needed to improve the

  16. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  17. Competence for older people nursing in care and nursing homes: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Kiljunen, Outi; Välimäki, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi; Partanen, Pirjo

    2017-09-01

    People living in care and nursing homes are vulnerable individuals with complex needs; therefore, a wide array of nursing competence is needed to ensure their well-being. When developing the quality of care in these units, it is essential to know what type of competence is required for older people nursing. The aim of this integrative review was to identify the competence needed for older people nursing in licensed practical nurses' and registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes. Integrative literature review. We performed an integrative review using Whittemore and Knafl's method. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Scopus databases were searched for studies published from 2006 to April 2016. We assessed the quality of the studies using Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools and analysed the data by applying qualitative content analysis. Ten articles were included in the review. Most of the studies focused on registered nurses' work. We identified five competence areas that are needed for older people nursing in registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes: attitudinal and ethical, interactional, evidence-based care, pedagogical, and leadership and development competence. Empirical evidence of competence requirements related to licensed practical nurses' work in these facilities was scarce. The competence required for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses should be clearly identified to support competence management in the care and nursing home context. Well-educated nursing staff are needed in care and nursing homes to provide high-quality care because comprehensive and advanced nurse competence is required to meet the needs of older people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Vocation in theology-based nursing theories.

    PubMed

    Lundmark, Mikael

    2007-11-01

    By using the concepts of intrinsicality/extrinsicality as analytic tools, the theology-based nursing theories of Ann Bradshaw and Katie Eriksson are analyzed regarding their explicit and/or implicit understanding of vocation as a motivational factor for nursing. The results show that both theories view intrinsic values as guarantees against reducing nursing practice to mechanistic applications of techniques and as being a way of reinforcing a high ethical standard. The theories explicitly (Bradshaw) or implicitly (Eriksson) advocate a vocational understanding of nursing as being essential for nursing theories. Eriksson's theory has a potential for conceptualizing an understanding of extrinsic and intrinsic motivational factors for nursing but one weakness in the theory could be the risk of slipping over to moral judgments where intrinsic factors are valued as being superior to extrinsic. Bradshaw's theory is more complex and explicit in understanding the concept of vocation and is theologically more plausible, although also more confessional.

  19. Scientific evidence of dockworker illness to nursing clinical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde de; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina

    2016-04-01

    To identify scientific evidence of occupational illness of dockworkers published in the literature. systematic review of the literature, developed according to the Cochrane method. The databases searched were: Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL and SciELO. Studies from 1988 to 2014 were selected. The data were analyzed according to the level of evidence and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. We included 14 studies, in which 11 (78.6%) were from international journals. The year of 2012 showed greater number of studies. All studies were classified as: Level of Evidence 4, highlighting lung cancer, musculoskeletal and ischemic diseases, causal link in chemical risks. The development of preventive measures should especially include chemical exposure of workers applying the clinical reasoning of nurses' environmental knowledge to care for illnesses. Identificar evidências científicas de adoecimento ocupacional do trabalhador portuário publicadas na literatura. Revisão sistemática da literatura, construída conforme o método Cochrane. As bases de dados pesquisadas foram Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL e SciELO. Foram selecionados artigos publicados de 1988 a 2014. Os dados foram analisados conforme o Nível de Evidência e Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. Foram selecionadas 14 publicações, das quais 11 (78,6%) de revistas internacionais. O ano de 2012 reuniu maior número de publicações no período de estudo. Todas as publicações pertenciam ao Nível de Evidência 4, destacando o câncer pulmonar, doenças osteomusculares e isquêmicas, com nexo causal nos riscos químicos. A elaboração de medidas preventivas deve prever especialmente a exposição química do trabalhador, aplicando ao raciocínio clínico do enfermeiro um conhecimento ambiental para a assistência aos adoecimentos.

  20. Community-Based Nursing versus Community Health Nursing: What Does It All Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zotti, Marianne E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Offers practice models for community-based nursing and community health nursing that demonstrate the different roles, philosophies, and activities of the two approaches. Points to curriculum changes that are needed to prepare students to practice in an increasingly community-oriented health care industry. (Author)

  1. Building a values-based culture in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Tetley, Josie; Dobson, Fiona; Jack, Kirsten; Pearson, Beryl; Walker, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Nurse education has found itself challenged to select and educate nurses who on completion of? of their programme? have: excellent technical skills, an ability to critically analyse care and work compassionately in ways that support the values of care that are important to service users. Recent reports of care suggest that nursing still needs to develop the values base of its student selection and education processes. Against this backdrop, this paper presents two examples from pre registration nurse education that illustrate how a values based approach is used as part of the selection process in one university and used to inform the development of a reflective poetry initiative in another university. Having presented the two examples the authors debate some of the wider benefits and challenges linked to these ways of working. For example, the importance of connecting nurses' personal beliefs, attitudes and assumptions to service user values in recruitment are discussed. The use of poetry as a way of thinking about practice that moves beyond traditional models of reflection in nursing are also considered. However, the authors recognise that if developments in nurse education are to have a real impact on nursing practice and patient care, there is the need for values based initiatives to be more directly connected to the delivery of healthcare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing students' perceptions of effective problem-based learning tutors.

    PubMed

    Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Martin, Lynn; Hammond, Cynthia; Palma, Amy; Pavkovic, Maria; Sheremet, Darlene; Roche, Carmen

    2016-11-16

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of what makes an effective tutor in problem-based learning courses, and the influence of effective teaching on students' learning and experience. Method Students enrolled in all four years of a baccalaureate nursing programme completed online surveys (n=511) and participated in focus groups (n=19). Data were analysed and combined using content analysis. Findings The data were summarised using five themes, the '5 Ps' of effective teaching in problem-based learning. Nursing students perceived effective problem-based learning tutors to be prepared with knowledge and facilitation skills, person-centred, passionate, professional and able to prepare students for success in the nursing programme. Effective tutors adjusted their approaches to students throughout the four years of the nursing programme. Conclusion Effective teaching in problem-based learning is essential and has significant effects on nursing students' learning, motivation and experience. Important attributes, skills and strategies of effective problem-based learning tutors were identified and may be used to enhance teaching and plan professional development initiatives.

  3. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives: This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checklist was designed and validated for assessing nurses’ compliance with nursing process. A total of 300 nurses from various clinical settings of Tehran university of medical sciences were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequencies, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent samples t-tests. Results: The compliance rate of nursing process indicators was 79.71 ± 0.87. Mean compliance scores did not significantly differ by education level and gender. However, overall compliance scores were correlated with nurses’ age (r = 0.26, P = 0.001) and work experience (r = 0.273, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Nursing process indicators can be used to audit nursing care. Such audits can be used as quality assurance tools. PMID:26576448

  4. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  5. Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Evidence-Based Nursing Interventions to Maintain Tissue Integrity to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Avşar, Pınar; Karadağ, Ayişe

    2018-02-01

    A reduction in tissue tolerance promotes the development of pressure ulcers (PUs) and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). To determine the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of evidence-based (EB) nursing interventions on increasing tissue tolerance by maintaining tissue integrity. The study involved 154 patients in two intensive care units (77 patients, control group; 77 patients, intervention group). Data were collected using the following: patient characteristics form, Braden PU risk assessment scale, tissue integrity monitoring form, PU identification form, IAD and severity scale, and a cost table of the interventions. Patients in the intervention group were cared for by nurses trained in the use of the data collection tools and in EB practices to improve tissue tolerance. Routine nursing care was given to the patients in the control group. The researcher observed all patients in terms of tissue integrity and recorded the care-related costs. Deterioration of tissue integrity was observed in 18.2% patients in the intervention group compared to 54.5% in the control group (p < .05). The average cost to increase tissue tolerance prevention in the intervention and control groups was X¯ = $204.34 ± 41.07 and X¯ = $138.90 ± 1.70, respectively. It is recommended that EB policies and procedures are developed to improve tissue tolerance by maintaining tissue integrity. Although the cost of EB preventive initiatives is relatively high compared to those that are not EB, the former provide a significant reduction in the prevalence of tissue integrity deterioration. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice Sandra L Dearholt and Deborah Dang Sigma Theta Tau International £24.70 256pp 9781935476764 1935476769 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2012-10-26

    EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE has become the accepted term for a systematic approach by all healthcare professionals to service provision. However, as this and other recent publications demonstrate, even though there is acceptance in theory that practice should be evidence based, making the concept a reality in clinical and educational settings still requires work.

  7. Rethinking the intensive care environment: considering nature in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Minton, Claire; Batten, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    With consideration of an environmental concept, this paper explores evidence related to the negative impacts of the intensive care unit environment on patient outcomes and explores the potential counteracting benefits of 'nature-based' nursing interventions as a way to improve care outcomes. The impact of the environment in which a patient is nursed has long been recognised as one determinant in patient outcomes. Whilst the contemporary intensive care unit environment contains many features that support the provision of the intensive therapies the patient requires, it can also be detrimental, especially for long-stay patients. This narrative review considers theoretical and evidence-based literature that supports the adoption of nature-based nursing interventions in intensive care units. Research and theoretical literature from a diverse range of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, architecture and environmental science were considered in relation to patient outcomes and intensive care nursing practice. There are many nature-based interventions that intensive care unit nurses can implement into their nursing practice to counteract environmental stressors. These interventions can also improve the environment for patients' families and nurses. Intensive care unit nurses must actively consider and manage the environment in which nursing occurs to facilitate the best patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. An Evidence-based Curriculum To Prepare Students for Global Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2001-01-01

    A curriculum to prepare nurses for global public health practice contains eight modules: global burden of disease, epidemiology in developing countries, international health organizations, comparative public health, emerging infections, maternal/child health, economic development and health, and traditional/indigenous medicine. The course makes…

  9. An organizational intervention to influence evidence-informed decision making in home health nursing.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Wendy; Lefebre, Nancy; Davies, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to field test and evaluate a series of organizational strategies to promote evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) by nurse managers and clinical leaders in home healthcare. EIDM is central to delivering high-quality and effective healthcare. Barriers exist and organizational strategies are needed to support EIDM. Management and clinical leaders from 4 units participated in a 20-week organization-focused intervention. Preintervention (n = 32) and postintervention (n = 17) surveys and semistructured interviews (n = 15) were completed. Statistically significant increases were found on 4 of 31 survey items reflecting an increased organizational capacity for participants to acquire and apply research evidence in decision making. Support from designated facilitators with advanced skills in finding, appraising, and applying research was the highest rated intervention strategy. Results are useful to inform the development of organizational infrastructures to increase EIDM capacity in community-based healthcare organizations.

  10. Core Values in Nursing Care Based on the Experiences of Nurses Engaged in Neonatal Nursing: A Text-mining Approach for Analyzing Reflection Records

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Okuda, Reiko; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Background Strong feelings about and enthusiasm for nursing care are reflected in nurses’ thoughts and behaviors in clinical practice and affect their profession. This study was conducted to identify the characteristics of core values in nursing care based on the experiences of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing through a process for recognizing the conceptualization of nursing. Methods We conceptualized nursing care in 43 nurses who were involved in neonatal nursing using a reflection sheet. We classified descriptions on a sheet based on the Three-Staged Recognition scheme and analyzed them using a text-mining approach. Results Nurses involved in neonatal nursing recognized that they must take care of the “child,” “mother,” and “family.” Important elements of nursing in nurses with less than 5 years versus 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience were classified into seven clusters, respectively. These elements were mainly related to family members in both groups. In nurses with less than 5 years of experience, four clusters of one-way communication by nurses were observed in the analysis of the key elements in nursing. On the other hand, five clusters of mutual relationships between patients, their family members, and nurses were observed in nurses with 5 or more years of experience. Conclusion In conclusion, the core value of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing is family-oriented nursing. Nurses with 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience understand patients and their family members well through establishing relationships and providing comfort and safety while taking care of them. PMID:29599621

  11. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. Methods A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. Results The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as “caring pedagogy,” “value-based education,” and “teaching excellence,” caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Conclusion Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development

  12. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as "caring pedagogy," "value-based education," and "teaching excellence," caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development.

  13. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based, nurse-led health promotion for older people: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, P; Campbell, F; Rawdin, A; Wong, R; Kalita, N

    2012-01-01

    studies with respect to the nature of the intervention, the nurses delivering the programmes and the populations in which the interventions were assessed. Overall, the quality of the included studies was good: all but one of the included studies were judged to be at medium or low risk of bias. Meta-analysis of eight studies suggested a statistically significant mortality benefit for the home-based health promotion groups, whereas a meta-analysis of four studies suggested non-significant benefits in terms of fewer falls in the intervention groups than in the control groups. Positive outcomes for home-based, nurse-led health promotion interventions were also reported within individual s