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Sample records for evoked glutamate transporter

  1. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  2. Activation of glutamate transport evokes rapid glutamine release from perisynaptic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uwechue, Nneka M; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Chevy, Quentin; Billups, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of astrocytes by neuronal activity and the subsequent release of neuromodulators is thought to be an important regulator of synaptic communication. In this study we show that astrocytes juxtaposed to the glutamatergic calyx of Held synapse in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are stimulated by the activation of glutamate transporters and consequently release glutamine on a very rapid timescale. MNTB principal neurones express electrogenic system A glutamine transporters, and were exploited as glutamine sensors in this study. By simultaneous whole-cell voltage clamping astrocytes and neighbouring MNTB neurones in brainstem slices, we show that application of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) substrate d-aspartate stimulates astrocytes to rapidly release glutamine, which is detected by nearby MNTB neurones. This release is significantly reduced by the toxins l-methionine sulfoximine and fluoroacetate, which reduce glutamine concentrations specifically in glial cells. Similarly, glutamine release was also inhibited by localised inactivation of EAATs in individual astrocytes, using internal dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or dissipating the driving force by modifying the patch-pipette solution. These results demonstrate that astrocytes adjacent to glutamatergic synapses can release glutamine in a temporally precise, controlled manner in response to glial glutamate transporter activation. Since glutamine can be used by neurones as a precursor for glutamate and GABA synthesis, this represents a potential feedback mechanism by which astrocytes can respond to synaptic activation and react in a way that sustains or enhances further communication. This would therefore represent an additional manifestation of the tripartite relationship between synapses and astrocytes. PMID:22411007

  3. Mechanisms of glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Robert J; Ryan, Renae M

    2013-10-01

    L-Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system and plays important roles in a wide variety of brain functions, but it is also a key player in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. The control of glutamate concentrations is critical to the normal functioning of the central nervous system, and in this review we discuss how glutamate transporters regulate glutamate concentrations to maintain dynamic signaling mechanisms between neurons. In 2004, the crystal structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian glutamate transporter family of proteins was crystallized and its structure determined. This has paved the way for a better understanding of the structural basis for glutamate transporter function. In this review we provide a broad perspective of this field of research, but focus primarily on the more recent studies with a particular emphasis on how our understanding of the structure of glutamate transporters has generated new insights.

  4. SLC1 Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Grewer, Christof; Gameiro, Armanda; Rauen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the neurotransmitter glutamate belong to the solute carrier 1 (SLC1) family. They are secondary active transporters, taking up glutamate into the cell against a substantial concentration gradient. The driving force for concentrative uptake is provided by the cotransport of Na+ ions and the countertransport of one K+ in a step independent of the glutamate translocation step. Due to eletrogenicity of transport, the transmembrane potential can also act as a driving force. Glutamate transporters are expressed in many tissues, but are of particular importance in the brain, where they contribute to the termination of excitatory neurotransmission. Glutamate transporters can also run in reverse, resulting in glutamate release from cells. Due to these important physiological functions, glutamate transporter expression and, therefore, the transport rate, are tightly regulated. This review summarizes recent literature on the functional and biophysical properties, structure-function relationships, regulation, physiological significance, and pharmacology of glutamate transporters. Particular emphasis is on the insight from rapid kinetic and electrophysiological studies, transcriptional regulation of transporter expression, and reverse transport and its importance for pathophysiological glutamate release under ischemic conditions. PMID:24240778

  5. Glutamate Transporter-Mediated Glutamate Secretion in the Mammalian Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Uehara, Shunsuke; Muroyama, Akiko; Hille, Bertil; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Koh, Duk-Su

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are expressed throughout the central nervous system where their major role is to clear released glutamate from presynaptic terminals. Here we report a novel function of the transporter in rat pinealocytes. This electrogenic transporter conducted inward current in response to L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate and depolarized the membrane in patch clamp experiments. Ca2+ imaging demonstrated that the transporter-mediated depolarization induced a significant Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ rise finally evoked glutamate exocytosis as detected by carbon-fiber amperometry and by high-performance liquid chromatography. In pineal slices with densely packed pinealocytes, glutamate released from the cells effectively activated glutamate transporters in neighboring cells. The Ca2+ signal generated by KCl depolarization or acetylcholine propagated through several cell layers by virtue of the regenerative ‘glutamate-induced glutamate release’. Therefore we suggest that glutamate transporters mediate synchronized elevation of L-glutamate and thereby efficiently down-regulate melatonin secretion via previously identified inhibitory metabotropic glutamate receptors in the pineal gland. PMID:18945893

  6. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Setiadi, Jeffry; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review. PMID:26569328

  7. Pyridoxine inhibits depolarization-evoked glutamate release in nerve terminals from rat cerebral cortex: a possible neuroprotective mechanism?

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Tair; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-10-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)) protects neurons against neurotoxicity. An excessive release of glutamate is widely considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. We investigated whether pyridoxine affected glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Pyridoxine inhibited the release of glutamate that was evoked by exposing synaptosomes to the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was concentration-dependent. Inhibition of glutamate release by pyridoxine was prevented by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, or by chelating intraterminal Ca(2+), but was insensitive to DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate, a glutamate transporter inhibitor. Pyridoxine did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Examination of the effect of pyridoxine on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] revealed that diminution of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the pyridoxine-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was completely prevented by blocking the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, but not by blocking intracellular Ca(2+) release or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. Furthermore, the pyridoxine effect on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was abolished by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (GF109203X) or bisindolylmaleimide IX (Ro318220), and pyridoxine significantly decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of PKC, PKCalpha, and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate. Together, these results suggest that pyridoxine inhibits glutamate release from rat cortical synaptosomes, through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry and PKC activity.

  8. Differential effects of glutamate transporter inhibitors on the global electrophysiological response of astrocytes to neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bernardinelli, Yann; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2008-11-13

    Astrocytes are responsible for regulating extracellular levels of glutamate and potassium during neuronal activity. Glutamate clearance is handled by glutamate transporter subtypes glutamate transporter 1 and glutamate-aspartate transporter in astrocytes. DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) and dihydrokainate (DHK) are extensively used as inhibitors of glial glutamate transport activity. Using whole-cell recordings, we characterized the effects of both transporter inhibitors on afferent-evoked astrocyte currents in acute cortical slices of 3-week-old rats. When neuronal afferents were stimulated, passive astrocytes responded by a rapid inward current followed by a persistent tail current. The first current corresponded to a glutamate transporter current. This current was inhibited by both inhibitors and by tetrodotoxin. The tail current is an inward potassium current as it was blocked by barium. Besides inhibiting transporter currents, TBOA strongly enhanced the tail current. This effect was barium-sensitive and might be due to a rise in extracellular potassium level and increased glial potassium uptake. Unlike TBOA, DHK did not enhance the tail current but rather inhibited it. This result suggests that, in addition to inhibiting glutamate transport, DHK prevents astrocyte potassium uptake, possibly by blockade of inward-rectifier channels. This study revealed that, in brain slices, glutamate transporter inhibitors exert complex effects that cannot be attributed solely to glutamate transport inhibition.

  9. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  10. Kanamycin ototoxicity in glutamate transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Hyodo, Jun; Taniguchi, Masafumi; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2005-06-03

    Glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST), a powerful glutamate uptake system, removes released glutamate from the synaptic cleft and facilitates the re-use of glutamate as a neurotransmitter recycling system. Aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss is mediated via a glutamate excitotoxic process. We investigated the effect of aminoglycoside ototoxicity in GLAST knockout mice using the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR) and number of hair cells in the cochlea. Kanamycin (100 mg/mL) was injected directly into the posterior semicircular canal of mice. Before the kanamycin treatment, there was no difference in the ABR threshold average between the wild-type and knockout mice. Kanamycin injection aggravated the ABR threshold in the GLAST knockout mice compared with the wild-type mice, and the IHC degeneration was more severe in the GLAST knockout mice. These findings suggest that GLAST plays an important role in preventing the degeneration of inner hair cells in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

  11. In situ fluorescence imaging of glutamate-evoked mitochondrial Na+ responses in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bernardinelli, Yann; Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Astrocytes can experience large intracellular Na+ changes following the activation of the Na+-coupled glutamate transport. The present study investigated whether cytosolic Na+ changes are transmitted to mitochondria, which could therefore influence their function and contribute to the overall intracellular Na+ regulation. Mitochondrial Na+ (Na+(mit)) changes were monitored using the Na+-sensitive fluorescent probe CoroNa Red (CR) in intact primary cortical astrocytes, as opposed to the classical isolated mitochondria preparation. The mitochondrial localization and Na+ sensitivity of the dye were first verified and indicated that it can be safely used as a selective Na+(mit) indicator. We found by simultaneously monitoring cytosolic and mitochondrial Na+ using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate and CR, respectively, that glutamate-evoked cytosolic Na+ elevations are transmitted to mitochondria. The resting Na+(mit) concentration was estimated at 19.0 +/- 0.8 mM, reaching 30.1 +/- 1.2 mM during 200 microM glutamate application. Blockers of conductances potentially mediating Na+ entry (calcium uniporter, monovalent cation conductances, K+(ATP) channels) were not able to prevent the Na+(mit) response to glutamate. However, Ca2+ and its exchange with Na+ appear to play an important role in mediating mitochondrial Na+ entry as chelating intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA or inhibiting Na+/Ca2+ exchanger with CGP-37157 diminished the Na+(mit) response. Moreover, intracellular Ca2+ increase achieved by photoactivation of caged Ca2+ also induced a Na+(mit) elevation. Inhibition of mitochondrial Na/H antiporter using ethylisopropyl-amiloride caused a steady increase in Na+(mit) without increasing cytosolic Na+, indicating that Na+ extrusion from mitochondria is mediated by these exchangers. Thus, mitochondria in intact astrocytes are equipped to efficiently sense cellular Na+ signals and to dynamically regulate their Na+ content.

  12. Hetero-oligomerization of neuronal glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Nothmann, Doreen; Leinenweber, Ariane; Torres-Salazar, Delany; Kovermann, Peter; Hotzy, Jasmin; Gameiro, Armanda; Grewer, Christof; Fahlke, Christoph

    2011-02-04

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) mediate the uptake of glutamate into neuronal and glial cells of the mammalian central nervous system. Two transporters expressed primarily in glia, EAAT1 and EAAT2, are crucial for glutamate homeostasis in the adult mammalian brain. Three neuronal transporters (EAAT3, EAAT4, and EAAT5) appear to have additional functions in regulating and processing cellular excitability. EAATs are assembled as trimers, and the existence of multiple isoforms raises the question of whether certain isoforms can form hetero-oligomers. Co-expression and pulldown experiments of various glutamate transporters showed that EAAT3 and EAAT4, but neither EAAT1 and EAAT2, nor EAAT2 and EAAT3 are capable of co-assembling into heterotrimers. To study the functional consequences of hetero-oligomerization, we co-expressed EAAT3 and the serine-dependent mutant R501C EAAT4 in HEK293 cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied glutamate/serine transport and anion conduction using electrophysiological methods. Individual subunits transport glutamate independently of each other. Apparent substrate affinities are not affected by hetero-oligomerization. However, polarized localization in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was different for homo- and hetero-oligomers. EAAT3 inserts exclusively into apical membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells when expressed alone. Co-expression with EAAT4 results in additional appearance of basolateral EAAT3. Our results demonstrate the existence of heterotrimeric glutamate transporters and provide novel information about the physiological impact of EAAT oligomerization.

  13. G-protein coupled receptor-evoked glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes: role of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Cali, Corrado; Lopatar, Jan; Petrelli, Francesco; Pucci, Luca; Bezzi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are highly secretory cells, participating in rapid brain communication by releasing glutamate. Recent evidences have suggested that this process is largely mediated by Ca(2+)-dependent regulated exocytosis of VGLUT-positive vesicles. Here by taking advantage of VGLUT1-pHluorin and TIRF illumination, we characterized mechanisms of glutamate exocytosis evoked by endogenous transmitters (glutamate and ATP), which are known to stimulate Ca(2+) elevations in astrocytes. At first we characterized the VGLUT1-pHluorin expressing vesicles and found that VGLUT1-positive vesicles were a specific population of small synaptic-like microvesicles containing glutamate but which do not express VGLUT2. Endogenous mediators evoked a burst of exocytosis through activation of G-protein coupled receptors. Subsequent glutamate exocytosis was reduced by about 80% upon pharmacological blockade of the prostaglandin-forming enzyme, cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, receptor stimulation was accompanied by extracellular release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Interestingly, administration of exogenous PGE2 produced per se rapid, store-dependent burst exocytosis of glutamatergic vesicles in astrocytes. Finally, when PGE2-neutralizing antibody was added to cell medium, transmitter-evoked exocytosis was again significantly reduced (by about 50%). Overall these data indicate that cyclooxygenase products are responsible for a major component of glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes and that large part of such component is sustained by autocrine/paracrine action of PGE2.

  14. Spike-independent release of ATP from Xenopus spinal neurons evoked by activation of glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul; Dale, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    As the release of ATP from neurons has only been directly studied in a few cases, we have used patch sniffing to examine ATP release from Xenopus spinal neurons. ATP release was detected following intracellular current injection to evoke spikes. However, spiking was not essential as both glutamate and NMDA could evoke release of ATP in the presence of TTX. Neither acetylcholine nor high K+ was effective at inducing ATP release in the presence of TTX. Although Cd2+ blocked glutamate-evoked release of ATP suggesting a dependence on Ca2+ entry, neither ω-conotoxin-GVIA nor nifedipine prevented ATP release. N-type and L-type channels are thus not essential for glutamate-evoked ATP release. That glutamate receptors can elicit release in the absence of spiking suggests a close physical relationship between these receptors, the Ca2+ channels and release sites. As the dependence of ATP release on the influx of Ca2+ through Ca2+ channel subtypes differs from that of synaptic transmitter release, ATP may be released from sites that are distinct from those of the principal transmitter. In addition to its role as a fast transmitter, ATP may thus be released as a consequence of the activation of excitatory glutamatergic synapses and act to signal information about activity patterns in the nervous system. PMID:11986374

  15. Pentameric assembly of a neuronal glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, S; Kreman, M; Kavanaugh, M P; Wright, E M; Zampighi, G A

    2000-07-18

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy was used to study the structure of a human neuronal glutamate transporter (EAAT3). EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and its function was correlated with the total number of transporters in the plasma membrane of the same cells. Function was assayed as the maximum charge moved in response to a series of transmembrane voltage pulses. The number of transporters in the plasma membrane was determined from the density of a distinct 10-nm freeze-fracture particle, which appeared in the protoplasmic face only after EAAT3 expression. The linear correlation between EAAT3 maximum carrier-mediated charge and the total number of the 10-nm particles suggested that this particle represented functional EAAT3 in the plasma membrane. The cross-sectional area of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane (48 +/- 5 nm(2)) predicted 35 +/- 3 transmembrane alpha-helices in the transporter complex. This information along with secondary structure models (6-10 transmembrane alpha-helices) suggested an oligomeric state for EAAT3. EAAT3 particles were pentagonal in shape in which five domains could be identified. They exhibited fivefold symmetry because they appeared as equilateral pentagons and the angle at the vertices was 110 degrees. Each domain appeared to contribute to an extracellular mass that projects approximately 3 nm into the extracellular space. Projections from all five domains taper toward an axis passing through the center of the pentagon, giving the transporter complex the appearance of a penton-based pyramid. The pentameric structure of EAAT3 offers new insights into its function as both a glutamate transporter and a glutamate-gated chloride channel.

  16. Localization of neuronal and glial glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, J D; Martin, L; Levey, A I; Dykes-Hoberg, M; Jin, L; Wu, D; Nash, N; Kuncl, R W

    1994-09-01

    The cellular and subcellular distributions of the glutamate transporter subtypes EAAC1, GLT-1, and GLAST in the rat CNS were demonstrated using anti-peptide antibodies that recognize the C-terminal domains of each transporter. On immunoblots, the antibodies specifically recognize proteins of 65-73 kDa in total brain homogenates. Immunocytochemistry shows that glutamate transporter subtypes are distributed differentially within neurons and astroglia. EAAC1 is specific for certain neurons, such as large pyramidal cortical neurons and Purkinje cells, but does not appear to be selective for glutamatergic neurons. GLT-1 is localized only to astroglia. GLAST is found in both neurons and astroglia. The regional localizations are unique to each transporter subtype. EAAC1 is highly enriched in the cortex, hippocampus, and caudate-putamen and is confined to pre- and postsynaptic elements. GLT-1 is distributed in astrocytes throughout the brain and spinal cord. GLAST is most abundant in Bergmann glia in the cerebellar molecular layer brain, but is also present in the cortex, hippocampus, and deep cerebellar nuclei.

  17. Effects of glial glutamate transporter inhibitors on intracellular Na+ in mouse astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chatton, J Y; Shimamoto, K; Magistretti, P J

    2001-03-02

    The effects of inhibitors of the glial Na+/glutamate co-transporter on the intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+](i)) were investigated in mouse cortical astrocytes. [Na+](i) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy on single astrocytes using the Na+-sensitive probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophtalate. Application of the competitive inhibitors threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (THA) and trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (t-PDC) resulted in robust and reversible increases in [Na+](i) that were comparable in shape to the response to glutamate but about twice lower in amplitude. As previously observed with glutamate, the amplitude of the [Na+](i) response to these compounds was concentration-dependent with EC(50) values of 11.1 microM (THA) and 7.6 microM (t-PDC), as was the initial rate of [Na+](i) rise (EC(50) values of 14.8 microM for THA and 11.5 microM for t-PDC). Both compounds diminished the response to subsequent glutamate applications, possibly because of an inhibitory effect of the intracellularly-accumulated compounds. In comparison, the newly-developed compound threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) alone did not cause any significant alteration of [Na+](i) up to a concentration of 500 microM . TBOA inhibited the [Na+](i) response evoked by 200 microM glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 114 and 63 microM, as measured on the amplitude and the initial rate, respectively. The maximum inhibition of glutamate-evoked [Na+](i) increase by TBOA was approximately 70%. The residual response persisted in the presence of a non-NMDA receptor antagonist or the inhibitor of the GLT-1 glutamate transporters, dihydrokainate (DHK). In view of the complete reversibility of its effects, TBOA represents a very useful pharmacological tool for studies of glutamate transporters.

  18. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transport direction determines the kinetics of substrate transport by the glutamate transporter EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhou; Tao, Zhen; Gameiro, Armanda; Barcelona, Stephanie; Braams, Simona; Rauen, Thomas; Grewer, Christof

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate transport by the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 is known to be reversible. Thus, glutamate can either be taken up into cells, or it can be released from cells through reverse transport, depending on the electrochemical gradient of the co- and countertransported ions. However, it is unknown how fast and by which reverse transport mechanism glutamate can be released from cells. Here, we determined the steady- and pre-steady-state kinetics of reverse glutamate transport with submillisecond time resolution. First, our results suggest that glutamate and Na+ dissociate from their cytoplasmic binding sites sequentially, with glutamate dissociating first, followed by the three cotransported Na+ ions. Second, the kinetics of glutamate transport depend strongly on transport direction, with reverse transport being faster but less voltage-dependent than forward transport. Third, electrogenicity is distributed over several reverse transport steps, including intracellular Na+ binding, reverse translocation, and reverse relocation of the K+-bound EAAC1. We propose a kinetic model, which is based on a “first-in-first-out” mechanism, suggesting that glutamate association, with its extracellular binding site as well as dissociation from its intracellular binding site, precedes association and dissociation of at least one Na+ ion. Our model can be used to predict rates of glutamate release from neurons under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:17991780

  20. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Ghishan, Fayez-K; Bai, Liqun

    2005-03-28

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas, skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestive system have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  1. Cannabinoid 1 and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptors Discretely Modulate Evoked Glutamate Separately from Spontaneous Glutamate Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Action potentials trigger synaptic terminals to synchronously release vesicles, but some vesicles release spontaneously. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can modulate both of these processes. At cranial primary afferent terminals, the GPCR cannabinoid 1 (CB1) is often coexpressed with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a nonselective cation channel present on most afferents. Here we tested whether CB1 activation modulates synchronous, action potential-evoked (eEPSCs) and/or spontaneous (sEPSCs) EPSCs at solitary tract nucleus neurons. In rat horizontal brainstem slices, activation of solitary tract (ST) primary afferents generated ST-eEPSCs that were rapidly and reversibly inhibited from most afferents by activation of CB1 with arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or WIN 55,212-2 [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate]. The CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] blocked these responses. Despite profound depression of ST-eEPSCs during CB1 activation, sEPSCs in these same neurons were unaltered. Changes in temperature changed sEPSC frequency only from TRPV1+ afferents (i.e., thermal sEPSC responses only occurred in TRPV1+ afferents). CB1 activation failed to alter these thermal sEPSC responses. However, the endogenous arachidonate metabolite N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA) promiscuously activated both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. NADA inhibited ST-eEPSCs while simultaneously increasing sEPSC frequency, and thermally triggered sEPSC increases in neurons with TRPV1+ afferents. We found no evidence for CB1/TRPV1 interactions suggesting independent regulation of two separate vesicle pools. Together, these data demonstrate that action potential-evoked synchronous glutamate release is modulated separately from TRPV1-mediated glutamate release despite coexistence in

  2. Regulation of Glutamate Transport in Developing Rat Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Tara M.; Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Goldhoff, Patricia E.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate released from synaptic vesicles mediates excitatory neurotransmission by stimulating glutamate receptors. Glutamate transporters maintain low synaptic glutamate levels critical for this process, a role primarily attributed to astrocytes. Recently, vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in the rat corpus callosum has been shown to elicit AMPA receptor-mediated currents in glial progenitor cells. Glutamate transporters are the only mechanism of glutamate clearance, yet very little is known about the role of glutamate transporters in normal development of oligodendrocytes (OLs) or in excitotoxic injury to OLs. We found that OLs in culture are capable of sodium-dependent glutamate uptake with a Km of 10 ± 2 μm and a Vmax of 2.6, 5.0, and 3.8 nmol · min−1 · mg−1 for preoligodendrocytes, immature, and mature OLs, respectively. Surprisingly, EAAC1, thought to be exclusively a neuronal transporter, contributes more to [3H]l-glutamate uptake in OLs than GLT1 or GLAST. These data suggest that glutamate transporters on oligodendrocytes may serve a critical role in maintaining glutamate homeostasis at a time when unmyelinated callosal axons are engaging in glutamatergic signaling with glial progenitors. Furthermore, GLT1 was significantly increased in cultured mature OLs contrary to in vivo data in which we have shown that, although GLT1 is present on developing OLs when unmyelinated axons are prevalent in the developing rat corpus callosum, after myelination, GLT1 is not expressed on mature OLs. The absence of GLT1 in mature OLs in the rat corpus callosum and its presence in mature rat cultured OLs may indicate that a signaling process in vivo is not activated in vitro. PMID:19535601

  3. Chronic treatment with agomelatine or venlafaxine reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing compelling evidence from clinical and preclinical studies has demonstrated the primary role of alterations of glutamatergic transmission in cortical and limbic areas in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Chronic antidepressants have been shown to dampen endogenous glutamate release from rat hippocampal synaptic terminals and to prevent the marked increase of glutamate overflow induced by acute behavioral stress in frontal/prefrontal cortex. Agomelatine, a new antidepressant endowed with MT1/MT2 agonist and 5-HT2C serotonergic antagonist properties, has shown efficacy at both preclinical and clinical levels. Results Chronic treatment with agomelatine, or with the reference drug venlafaxine, induced a marked decrease of depolarization-evoked endogenous glutamate release from purified hippocampal synaptic terminals in superfusion. No changes were observed in GABA release. This effect was accompanied by reduced accumulation of SNARE protein complexes, the key molecular effector of vesicle docking, priming and fusion at presynaptic membranes. Conclusions Our data suggest that the novel antidepressant agomelatine share with other classes of antidepressants the ability to modulate glutamatergic transmission in hippocampus. Its action seems to be mediated by molecular mechanisms located on the presynaptic membrane and related with the size of the vesicle pool ready for release. PMID:23895555

  4. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  5. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ≤ 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ≤ 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11,74 ±1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P≤0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release

  6. Comparison of anaesthetic and non-anaesthetic effects on depolarization-evoked glutamate and GABA release from mouse cerebrocortical slices

    PubMed Central

    Liachenko, Serguei; Tang, Pei; Somogyi, George T; Xu, Yan

    1998-01-01

    Investigation with substances that are similar in structure, but different in anaesthetic properties, may lead to further understanding of the mechanisms of general anaesthesia.We have studied the effects of two cyclobutane derivatives, the anaesthetic, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluorocyclobutane (F3), and the non-anaesthetic, 1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6), on K+-evoked glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from isolated, superfused, cerebrocortical slices from mice, by use of h.p.l.c. with fluorescence detection for quantitative analysis.At clinically relevant concentrations, the anaesthetic, F3, inhibited 40 mM K+-evoked glutamate and GABA release by 72% and 47%, respectively, whereas the structurally similar non-anaesthetic, F6, suppressed evoked glutamate release by 70% but had no significant effects on evoked GABA release. A second exposure to 40 mM KCl after a ∼30 min washout of F3 or F6 showed recovery of K+-evoked release, suggesting that F3 and F6 did not cause any non-specific or irreversible changes in the brain slices.Our findings suggest that suppression of excitatory neurotransmitter release may not be directly relevant to the primary action of general anaesthetics. A mechanism involving inhibitory postsynaptic action is implicated, in which a moderate suppression of depolarization-evoked GABA release by the anaesthetic may be consistent with the enhancement of postsynaptic GABAergic activities. PMID:9559915

  7. Functional changes in glutamate transporters and astrocyte biophysical properties in a rodent model of focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Susan L.; Hablitz, John J.; Olsen, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical dysplasia is associated with intractable epilepsy and developmental delay in young children. Recent work with the rat freeze-induced focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) model has demonstrated that hyperexcitability in the dysplastic cortex is due in part to higher levels of extracellular glutamate. Astrocyte glutamate transporters play a pivotal role in cortical maintaining extracellular glutamate concentrations. Here we examined the function of astrocytic glutamate transporters in a FCD model in rats. Neocortical freeze lesions were made in postnatal day (PN) 1 rat pups and whole cell electrophysiological recordings and biochemical studies were performed at PN 21–28. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in astrocytes showed a near 10-fold reduction in amplitude compared to sham operated controls. Astrocyte glutamate transporter currents from lesioned animals were also significantly reduced when challenged exogenously applied glutamate. Reduced astrocytic glutamate transport clearance contributed to increased NMDA receptor-mediated current decay kinetics in lesioned animals. The electrophysiological profile of astrocytes in the lesion group was also markedly changed compared to sham operated animals. Control astrocytes demonstrate large-amplitude linear leak currents in response to voltage-steps whereas astrocytes in lesioned animals demonstrated significantly smaller voltage-activated inward and outward currents. Significant decreases in astrocyte resting membrane potential and increases in input resistance were observed in lesioned animals. However, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated no differences in the expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 in lesioned animals relative to controls. These data suggest that, in the absence of changes in protein or mRNA expression levels, functional changes in astrocytic glutamate transporters contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability in the FCD model

  8. Glutamate transporters in brain ischemia: to modulate or not?

    PubMed Central

    Krzyżanowska, Weronika; Pomierny, Bartosz; Filip, Małgorzata; Pera, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we briefly describe glutamate (Glu) metabolism and its specific transports and receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Thereafter, we focus on excitatory amino acid transporters, cystine/glutamate antiporters (system xc-) and vesicular glutamate transporters, specifically addressing their location and roles in CNS and the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Glu transporters. We provide evidence from in vitro or in vivo studies concerning alterations in Glu transporter expression in response to hypoxia or ischemia, including limited human data that supports the role of Glu transporters in stroke patients. Moreover, the potential to induce brain tolerance to ischemia through modulation of the expression and/or activities of Glu transporters is also discussed. Finally we present strategies involving the application of ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological agents, eg β-lactam antibiotics, amitriptyline, riluzole and N-acetylcysteine, which result in the significant protection of nervous tissues against ischemia. PMID:24681894

  9. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  10. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  11. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  12. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE USING PATTERN ELICITED VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, as well as other channels. This has led to the hypothesis that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity, CNS depression, and altered visual evoked ...

  13. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. METHODS: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. RESULTS: Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:27994505

  14. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain.

  15. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain.

  16. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  17. The role of different glutamate receptors in the mediation of glutamate-evoked excitation of red nucleus neurons after simulated microgravity in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Chang; Fan, Xiao-Li; Song, Xin-Ai; Li, Qiang

    2008-12-31

    The present study investigates changes in red nucleus (RN) neuronal activity and the role of glutamate receptors (GluRs) after simulated microgravity (tail-suspension) in the rat using single-unit recording and microinjection. The results showed that tail-suspension for 3, 7, and 14 days could induce a significant decrease in spontaneous firing rate of RN neurons in a time-dependent manner. Unilateral microinjection of glutamate into the RN significantly increased the firing rate of RN neurons, but the increased firing rate was significantly reduced following tail-suspension time. Microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 or the non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX into the RN blocked this excitatory effect induced by glutamate. However, microinjection of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (+/-)-MCPG into the RN had no effect. These results suggest that simulated microgravity can reduce excitability of RN neurons following a functional impairment of glutamate receptors. NMDA and non-NMDA receptors, but not mGluRs, are involved in the mediation of glutamate-evoked excitation of RN neurons. The decrease in excitability of RN neurons may be involved in simulated microgravity-induced muscle atrophy.

  18. Acute Stress Increases Depolarization-Evoked Glutamate Release in the Rat Prefrontal/Frontal Cortex: The Dampening Action of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Farisello, Pasqualina; Zappettini, Simona; Tardito, Daniela; Barbiero, Valentina S.; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Mallei, Alessandra; Baldelli, Pietro; Racagni, Giorgio; Raiteri, Maurizio; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Background Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. Methodology/Findings Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine) and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated), and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486). On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats). Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. Conclusions/Significance Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of

  19. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Milanese, Marco; Farisello, Pasqualina; Zappettini, Simona; Tardito, Daniela; Barbiero, Valentina S; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Mallei, Alessandra; Baldelli, Pietro; Racagni, Giorgio; Raiteri, Maurizio; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-01-05

    Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine) and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated), and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486). On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats). Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress, shown here for

  20. Regulatory Aspects of l-Glutamate Transport in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Pateman, J. A.; Kinghorn, J. R.; Dunn, Etta

    1974-01-01

    Wild-type cells of Aspergillus nidulans synthesize a transport system which appears to be specific for l-glutamate and l-aspartate. The system is energy dependent and concentrates l-glutamate at least 60-fold. In cells grown in the presence of 1% sucrose, l-glutamate uptake activity is regulated by ammonium control, although it is not certain whether this is at the level of transcription or translation. Mutants that are insensitive to ammonium control of certain other unrelated systems, e.g., nitrate reductase, are also insensitive, except in the case of one class of ammonium-insensitive mutants, to ammonium control of l-glutamate transport. The activity of this transport system is specifically impaired in a mutant at the aauA locus. This mutation results in poor growth with l-glutamate or l-aspartate as the sole carbon or nitrogen source and is recessive in the heterozygous diploid aauA1/+ for transport and growth characteristics. The likelihood that the mutation results in a defect of the transport mechanism rather than abnormal ammonium control is discussed. PMID:4605030

  1. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  2. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  3. Diffuse Brain Injury Elevates Tonic Glutamate Levels and Potassium-Evoked Glutamate Release in Discrete Brain Regions at Two Days Post-Injury: An Enzyme-Based Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Hinzman, Jason M.; Currier Thomas, Theresa; Burmeister, Jason J.; Quintero, Jorge E.; Huettl, Peter; Pomerleau, Francois; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors often suffer from a wide range of post-traumatic deficits, including impairments in behavioral, cognitive, and motor function. Regulation of glutamate signaling is vital for proper neuronal excitation in the central nervous system. Without proper regulation, increases in extracellular glutamate can contribute to the pathophysiology and neurological dysfunction seen in TBI. In the present studies, enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) that selectively measure extracellular glutamate at 2 Hz enabled the examination of tonic glutamate levels and potassium chloride (KCl)-evoked glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and striatum of adult male rats 2 days after mild or moderate midline fluid percussion brain injury. Moderate brain injury significantly increased tonic extracellular glutamate levels by 256% in the dentate gyrus and 178% in the dorsal striatum. In the dorsal striatum, mild brain injury significantly increased tonic glutamate levels by 200%. Tonic glutamate levels were significantly correlated with injury severity in the dentate gyrus and striatum. The amplitudes of KCl-evoked glutamate release were increased significantly only in the striatum after moderate injury, with a 249% increase seen in the dorsal striatum. Thus, with the MEAs, we measured discrete regional changes in both tonic and KCl-evoked glutamate signaling, which were dependent on injury severity. Future studies may reveal the specific mechanisms responsible for glutamate dysregulation in the post-traumatic period, and may provide novel therapeutic means to improve outcomes after TBI. PMID:20233041

  4. Release of [3H]GABA evoked by glutamate receptor agonists in cultured chick retina cells: effect of Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, I L; Duarte, C B; Santos, P F; Carvalho, C M; Carvalho, A P

    1994-11-21

    The effect of glutamate receptor agonists (NMDA, kainate, quisqualate and AMPA) on the [Ca2+]i and on [3H]GABA release was studied in cultured chick embryonic retinal cells. The release of [3H]GABA evoked by NMDA, in the absence of Ca2+, was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), and that produced by kainate and quisqualate was prevented by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine (CNQX). All the agonists tested increased the [Ca2+]i, and when the GABA transporter was blocked by 1-(2-(((diphenyl-methylene)amino)oxy)ethyl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3- pyridine-carboxylic acid (NNC-711), NMDA, AMPA or quisqualate, but not kainate, did not induce [3H]GABA release unless Ca2+ (1 mM) was present, showing that exocytotic release of [3H]GABA occurs in retinal cells under these conditions.

  5. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Vigneault, Érika; Poirel, Odile; Riad, Mustapha; Prud'homme, Josée; Dumas, Sylvie; Turecki, Gustavo; Fasano, Caroline; Mechawar, Naguib; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe) while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains. PMID:25798091

  6. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Vigneault, Érika; Poirel, Odile; Riad, Mustapha; Prud'homme, Josée; Dumas, Sylvie; Turecki, Gustavo; Fasano, Caroline; Mechawar, Naguib; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe) while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  7. The transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters is a process tip localizer

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mariko Kato; Yasui, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate transporters in the central nervous system remove glutamate released from neurons to terminate the signal. These transporters localize to astrocyte process tips approaching neuronal synapses. The mechanisms underlying the localization of glutamate transporters to these processes, however, are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the trimeric transmembrane transporter domain fragment of glutamate transporters, lacking both N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions, localized to filopodia tips. This is a common property of trimeric transporters including a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. Astrocyte specific proteins are not required for the filopodia tip localization. An extracellular loop at the centre of the 4th transmembrane helices, unique for metazoans, is required for the localization. Moreover, a C186S mutation at the 4th transmembrane region of EAAT1, found in episodic ataxia patients, significantly decreased its process tip localization. The transmembrane transporter domain fragments of glutamate transporters also localized to astrocyte process tips in cultured hippocampal slice. These results indicate that the transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters have an additional function as a sorting signal to process tips. PMID:25761899

  8. Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure increases basal glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of mice without affecting glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Ramachandra, Vorani S; Knackstedt, Lori A; Becker, Howard C

    2015-01-01

    Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is significantly elevated in ethanol-dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (also known as system XAG) or of system Xc (-) (glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger) was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (approximately twofold) in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e., ethanol-dependent) compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na(+)-dependent nor Na(+)-independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the ethanol-dependent mice.

  9. Chronic antidepressants reduce depolarization-evoked glutamate release and protein interactions favoring formation of SNARE complex in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giambattista; Giambelli, Roberto; Raiteri, Luca; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Zappettini, Simona; Musazzi, Laura; Raiteri, Maurizio; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2005-03-30

    Glutamate neurotransmission was recently implicated in the action of stress and in antidepressant mechanisms. We report that chronic (not acute) treatment with three antidepressants with different primary mechanisms (fluoxetine, reboxetine, and desipramine) markedly reduced depolarization-evoked release of glutamate, stimulated by 15 or 25 mm KCl, but not release of GABA. Endogenous glutamate and GABA release was measured in superfused synaptosomes, freshly prepared from hippocampus of drug-treated rats. Interestingly, treatment with the three drugs only barely changed the release of glutamate (and of GABA) induced by ionomycin. In synaptic membranes of chronically treated rats we found a marked reduction in the protein-protein interaction between syntaxin 1 and Thr286-phosphorylated alphaCaM kinase II (alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) (an interaction previously proposed to promote neurotransmitter release) and a marked increase in the interaction between syntaxin 1 and Munc-18 (an interaction proposed to reduce neurotransmitter release). Furthermore, we found a selective reduction in the expression level of the three proteins forming the core SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complex. These findings suggest that antidepressants work by stabilizing glutamate neurotransmission in the hippocampus and that they may represent a useful tool for the study of relationship between functional and molecular processes in nerve terminals.

  10. Activation of spinal group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in rats evokes local glutamate release and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors: effects of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Lorrain, Daniel S; Correa, Lucia; Anderson, Jeffery; Varney, Mark

    2002-07-26

    Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((RS)-3,5-DHPG) to rats produces an immediate display of spontaneous nociceptive behaviors (SNBs) persisting for up to 10 h after injection (NeuroReport 7 (1996) 2743). The mechanisms underlying these behavioral effects are not entirely understood but may include enhanced release of glutamate within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The current experiments used microdialysis in awake moving animals to test: (1), whether i.t. (S)-3,5-DHPG increases the local release of glutamate at doses that also induce SNBs; and (2), whether the effects on glutamate release (as well as SNBs) can be blocked by pretreatment with the mGluR5 selective antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a microdialysis probe inserted into the i.t. space of the spinal cord (J. Neurosci. Methods 62 (1995) 43) and then tested under i.t. drug conditions (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mM (S)-3,5-DHPG) following a 2-3 day recovery period. As predicted, local application of (S)-3,5-DHPG via the microdialysis probe increased the release of glutamate in a dose-dependent manner. Significant SNBs were also noted in the 0.1 and 1 mM groups in a manner paralleling the onset and duration of the glutamate response. Pretreatment with MPEP (55 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) blocked glutamate release to the 0.1 mM dose of (S)-3,5-DHPG, and also decreased the proportion of animals displaying SNBs in this dose group. No effects of MPEP were seen against the higher dose of (S)-3,5-DHPG (1 mM). These results suggest that stimulation of spinal mGluR5 leads to glutamate release within the spinal cord, a response that may in part account for the nociceptive behaviors evoked by i.t. (S)-3,5-DHPG.

  11. Ceftriaxone normalizes nucleus accumbens synaptic transmission, glutamate transport and export following cocaine self-administration and extinction training

    PubMed Central

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Reissner, Kathryn J.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Knackstedt, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Decreased basal glutamate levels are observed in the rat nucleus accumbens (NA) core following cocaine self-administration. This disruption of glutamate homeostasis arises from a reduction in the export of glutamate via system xC- and is accompanied by a decrease in expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system xC-. A second hallmark of disrupted homeostasis is a decrease in expression and function of the major glutamate transporter, GLT-1. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone restores xCT and GLT-1 expression following cocaine self-administration and attenuates both cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement. Here we used a 3H-glutamate uptake assay and microdialysis to test the hypothesis that ceftriaxone restores the function of both GLT-1 and xCT (glutamate reuptake and export, respectively) in the NA core following cocaine self-administration. We also used electrophysiology to investigate the ability of ceftriaxone to normalize measures of synaptic plasticity following cocaine. We found that 5 days of ceftriaxone treatment following cocaine self-administration restores basal glutamate levels in the accumbens core, likely through an upregulation of system xC- function. We also found that ceftriaxone restores glutamate re-uptake and attenuates the increase in synaptically-released glutamate that accompanies cocaine-primed reinstatement. Ceftriaxone also reversed the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core, evidenced by normalized spontaneous EPSC amplitude and frequency and evoked EPSC amplitude. These data indicate that ceftriaxone normalizes multiple aspects of glutamate homeostasis following cocaine self-administration and thus holds the potential to reduce relapse in human cocaine addicts. PMID:22956831

  12. Ceftriaxone normalizes nucleus accumbens synaptic transmission, glutamate transport, and export following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Reissner, Kathryn J; Kalivas, Peter W; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2012-09-05

    Decreased basal glutamate levels are observed in the rat nucleus accumbens (NA) core following cocaine self-administration. This disruption of glutamate homeostasis arises from a reduction in the export of glutamate via system x(C)(-) and is accompanied by a decrease in expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system x(C)(-). A second hallmark of disrupted homeostasis is a decrease in expression and function of the major glutamate transporter, GLT-1. We have previously shown that chronic treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone restores xCT and GLT-1 expression following cocaine self-administration and attenuates both cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement. Here we used a (3)H-glutamate uptake assay and microdialysis to test the hypothesis that ceftriaxone restores the function of both GLT-1 and xCT (glutamate reuptake and export, respectively) in the NA core following cocaine self-administration. We also used electrophysiology to investigate the ability of ceftriaxone to normalize measures of synaptic plasticity following cocaine. We found that 5 d of ceftriaxone treatment following cocaine self-administration restores basal glutamate levels in the accumbens core, likely through an upregulation of system x(C)(-) function. We also found that ceftriaxone restores glutamate reuptake and attenuates the increase in synaptically released glutamate that accompanies cocaine-primed reinstatement. Ceftriaxone also reversed the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core, evidenced by normalized spontaneous EPSC amplitude and frequency and evoked EPSC amplitude. These data indicate that ceftriaxone normalizes multiple aspects of glutamate homeostasis following cocaine self-administration and thus holds the potential to reduce relapse in human cocaine addicts.

  13. Role of Glutamate Transporters in Redox Homeostasis of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stephanie M.; Ogunrinu-Babarinde, Toyin; Holt, Kenneth T.; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is especially important in the brain where high oxygen consumption produces an abundance of harmful oxidative by-products. Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide non-protein thiol. It is the central nervous system’s most abundant antioxidant, and the master controller of brain redox homeostasis. The glutamate transporters, System xc− (SXC) and the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAAT), play important, synergistic roles in the synthesis of GSH. In glial cells, SXC mediates the uptake of cystine, which after intracellular reduction to cysteine, reacts with glutamate during the rate-limiting step of GSH synthesis. EAAT3 mediates direct cysteine uptake for neuronal GSH synthesis. SXC and EAAT work in concert in glial cells to provide two intracellular substrates for GSH synthesis, cystine and glutamate. Their cyclical basal function also prevents a buildup of extracellular glutamate, which SXC releases extracellularly in exchange for cystine uptake. Maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis is critical to prevent neuronal toxicity, as well as glutamate-mediated SXC inhibition, of which each could lead to a depletion of intracellular GSH and loss of cellular redox control. Many neurological diseases show evidence of GSH dysfunction, and increased GSH has been widely associated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance of gliomas. We present evidence suggesting that gliomas expressing elevated levels of SXC are more reliant on GSH for growth and survival. They have an increased inherent radiation resistance, yet inhibition of SXC can increase tumor sensitivity at low radiation doses. GSH depletion through SXC inhibition may be a viable mechanism to enhance current glioma treatment strategies and make tumors more sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy protocols. PMID:24418113

  14. Relationship between increase in astrocytic GLT-1 glutamate transport and late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na+-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and late long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Four issues were addressed in this research: Which glutamate transporter is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP? In what cell type in the hippocampus does the increase in glutamate uptake occur? Does a single type of cell contain all the mechanisms to respond to an induction stimulus with a change in glutamate uptake? What role does the increase in glutamate uptake play during L-LTP? We have confirmed that GLT-1 is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP. Also, we found that astrocytes were responsible for much, if not all, of the increase in glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices during L-LTP. Additionally, we found that cultured astrocytes alone were able to respond to an induction stimulus with an increase in glutamate uptake. Inhibition of basal glutamate uptake did not affect the induction of L-LTP, but inhibition of the increase in glutamate uptake did inhibit both the expression of L-LTP and induction of additional LTP. It seems likely that heightened glutamate transport plays an ongoing role in the ability of hippocampal circuitry to code and store information. PMID:23166293

  15. The Split Personality of Glutamate Transporters: A Chloride Channel and a Transporter.

    PubMed

    Cater, Rosemary J; Ryan, Renae M; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Transporters and ion channels are conventionally categorised into distinct classes of membrane proteins. However, some membrane proteins have a split personality and can function as both transporters and ion channels. The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in particular, function as both glutamate transporters and chloride (Cl(-)) channels. The EAATs couple the transport of glutamate to the co-transport of three Na(+) ions and one H(+) ion into the cell, and the counter-transport of one K(+) ion out of the cell. The EAAT Cl(-) channel is activated by the binding of glutamate and Na(+), but is thermodynamically uncoupled from glutamate transport and involves molecular determinants distinct from those responsible for glutamate transport. Several crystal structures of an EAAT archaeal homologue, GltPh, at different stages of the transport cycle, alongside numerous functional studies and molecular dynamics simulations, have provided extensive insights into the mechanism of substrate transport via these transporters. However, the molecular determinants involved in Cl(-) permeation, and the mechanism by which this channel is activated are not entirely understood. Here we will discuss what is currently known about the molecular determinants involved in EAAT-mediated Cl(-) permeation and the mechanisms that underlie their split personality.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are membrane proteins that enable sodium-coupled uptake of glutamate and other amino acids into neurons. Crystal structures of the archaeal homolog GltPh have been recently determined both in the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here we construct homology models for the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3 in both conformations and perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate its similarities and differences from GltPh. In particular, we study the coordination of the different ligands, the gating mechanism and the location of the proton and potassium binding sites in EAAT3. We show that the protonation of the E374 residue is essential for binding of glutamate to EAAT3, otherwise glutamate becomes unstable in the binding site. The gating mechanism in the inward-facing state of EAAT3 is found to be different from that of GltPh, which is traced to the relocation of an arginine residue from the HP1 segment in GltPh to the TM8 segment in EAAT3. Finally, we perform free energy calculations to locate the potassium binding site in EAAT3, and find a high-affinity site that overlaps with the Na1 and Na3 sites in GltPh.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Mammalian Glutamate Transporter EAAT3

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are membrane proteins that enable sodium-coupled uptake of glutamate and other amino acids into neurons. Crystal structures of the archaeal homolog GltPh have been recently determined both in the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here we construct homology models for the mammalian glutamate transporter EAAT3 in both conformations and perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate its similarities and differences from GltPh. In particular, we study the coordination of the different ligands, the gating mechanism and the location of the proton and potassium binding sites in EAAT3. We show that the protonation of the E374 residue is essential for binding of glutamate to EAAT3, otherwise glutamate becomes unstable in the binding site. The gating mechanism in the inward-facing state of EAAT3 is found to be different from that of GltPh, which is traced to the relocation of an arginine residue from the HP1 segment in GltPh to the TM8 segment in EAAT3. Finally, we perform free energy calculations to locate the potassium binding site in EAAT3, and find a high-affinity site that overlaps with the Na1 and Na3 sites in GltPh. PMID:24643009

  18. The Discovery of Slowness: Low-Capacity Transport and Slow Anion Channel Gating by the Glutamate Transporter EAAT5

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Armanda; Braams, Simona; Rauen, Thomas; Grewer, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) control the glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft by glial and neuronal glutamate uptake. Uphill glutamate transport is achieved by the co-/countertransport of Na+ and other ions down their concentration gradients. Glutamate transporters also display an anion conductance that is activated by the binding of Na+ and glutamate but is not thermodynamically coupled to the transport process. Of the five known glutamate transporter subtypes, the retina-specific subtype EAAT5 has the largest conductance relative to glutamate uptake activity. Our results suggest that EAAT5 behaves as a slow-gated anion channel with little glutamate transport activity. At steady state, EAAT5 was activated by glutamate, with a Km= 61 ± 11 μM. Binding of Na+ to the empty transporter is associated with a Km = 229 ± 37 mM, and binding to the glutamate-bound form is associated with a Km = 76 ± 40 mM. Using laser-pulse photolysis of caged glutamate, we determined the pre-steady-state kinetics of the glutamate-induced anion current of EAAT5. This was characterized by two exponential components with time constants of 30 ± 1 ms and 200 ± 15 ms, which is an order of magnitude slower than those observed in other glutamate transporters. A voltage-jump analysis of the anion currents indicates that the slow activation behavior is caused by two slow, rate-limiting steps in the transport cycle, Na+ binding to the empty transporter, and translocation of the fully loaded transporter. We propose a kinetic transport scheme that includes these two slow steps and can account for the experimentally observed data. Overall, our results suggest that EAAT5 may not act as a classical high-capacity glutamate transporter in the retina; rather, it may function as a slow-gated glutamate receptor and/or glutamate buffering system. PMID:21641307

  19. Fingolimod effects in neuroinflammation: Regulation of astroglial glutamate transporters?

    PubMed

    Lee, De-Hyung; Seubert, Silvia; Huhn, Konstantin; Brecht, Lukas; Rötger, Caroline; Waschbisch, Anne; Schlachetzki, Johannes; Klausmeyer, Alice; Melms, Arthur; Wiese, Stefan; Winkler, Jürgen; Linker, Ralf A

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod is an oral sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor modulator which reduces the recirculation of immune cells and may also directly target glial cells. Here we investigate effects of fingolimod on expression of astroglial glutamate transporters under pro-inflammatory conditions. In astrocyte cell culture, the addition of pro-inflammatory cytokines led to a significant downregulation of glutamate transporters glutamate transporter-1 (slc1a2/SLC1A2) and glutamate aspartate transporter (slc1a3/SLC1A3) expression on the mRNA or protein level. In this setting, the direct application of fingolimod-1 phosphate (F1P) on astrocytes did not change expression levels of slc1a2 and slc1a3 mRNA. The analysis of both transporters on the protein level by Western Blot and immunocytochemistry did also not reveal any effect of F1P. On a functional level, the addition of conditioned supernatants from F1P treated astrocytes to neuronal cell culture did not result in increased neurite growth. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis as a model of multiple sclerosis, fingolimod treatment reduced T cell and macrophages/microglia mediated inflammation and also diminished astrocyte activation. At the same time, fingolimod restored the reduced expression of slc1a2 and slc1a3 in the inflamed spinal cord on the mRNA level and of SLC1A2 and SLC1A3 on the protein level, presumably via indirect, anti-inflammatory mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for a predominantly peripheral effect of the compound in neuroinflammation.

  20. Fingolimod effects in neuroinflammation: Regulation of astroglial glutamate transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, De-Hyung; Seubert, Silvia; Huhn, Konstantin; Brecht, Lukas; Rötger, Caroline; Waschbisch, Anne; Schlachetzki, Johannes; Klausmeyer, Alice; Melms, Arthur; Wiese, Stefan; Winkler, Jürgen; Linker, Ralf A.

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod is an oral sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor modulator which reduces the recirculation of immune cells and may also directly target glial cells. Here we investigate effects of fingolimod on expression of astroglial glutamate transporters under pro-inflammatory conditions. In astrocyte cell culture, the addition of pro-inflammatory cytokines led to a significant downregulation of glutamate transporters glutamate transporter-1 (slc1a2/SLC1A2) and glutamate aspartate transporter (slc1a3/SLC1A3) expression on the mRNA or protein level. In this setting, the direct application of fingolimod-1 phosphate (F1P) on astrocytes did not change expression levels of slc1a2 and slc1a3 mRNA. The analysis of both transporters on the protein level by Western Blot and immunocytochemistry did also not reveal any effect of F1P. On a functional level, the addition of conditioned supernatants from F1P treated astrocytes to neuronal cell culture did not result in increased neurite growth. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis as a model of multiple sclerosis, fingolimod treatment reduced T cell and macrophages/microglia mediated inflammation and also diminished astrocyte activation. At the same time, fingolimod restored the reduced expression of slc1a2 and slc1a3 in the inflamed spinal cord on the mRNA level and of SLC1A2 and SLC1A3 on the protein level, presumably via indirect, anti-inflammatory mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for a predominantly peripheral effect of the compound in neuroinflammation. PMID:28273090

  1. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Simmler, Linda D.; Blakely, Randy D.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for >90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggests that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. PMID:24611756

  2. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  3. The role of dorsomedial hypotalamus ionotropic glutamate receptors in the hypertensive and tachycardic responses evoked by Tityustoxin intracerebroventricular injection.

    PubMed

    Silva, F C; Guidine, Patrícia Alves Maia; Machado, Natalia Lima; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; de Menezes, R C; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Moraes, Márcio Flávio; Chianca, Deoclécio Alves

    2015-03-01

    The scorpion envenoming syndrome is an important worldwide public health problem due to its high incidence and potential severity of symptoms. Some studies address the high sensitivity of the central nervous system to this toxin action. It is known that cardiorespiratory manifestations involve the activation of the autonomic nervous system. However, the origin of this modulation remains unclear. Considering the important participation of the dorsomedial hypotalamus (DMH) in the cardiovascular responses during emergencial situations, the aim of this work is to investigate the involvement of the DMH on cardiovascular responses induced by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of Tityustoxin (TsTX, a α-type toxin extracted from the Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom). Urethane-anaesthetized male Wistar rats (n=30) were treated with PBS, muscimol or ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, bilaterally in DMH and later, with an icv injection of TsTX, or treated only with PBS in both regions. TsTX evoked a marked increase in mean arterial pressure and heart rate in all control rats. Interestingly, injection of muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, did not change the pressor and tachycardic responses evoked by TsTX. Remarkably, the injection ionotropic glutamate receptors antagonists in DMH abolished the pressor and the tachycardic response evoked by TsTX. Our data suggest that the central circuit recruited by TsTX, whose activation results in an array of physiological and behavioral alterations, depend on the activation of DMH ionotropic glutamate receptors. Moreover, our data provide new insights on the central mechanisms involved in the development of symptoms in the severe scorpion envenomation syndrome.

  4. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Sessle, Barry J; Coderre, Terence J

    2013-05-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analyzed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH of IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.

  5. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, C.Y.; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Sessle, Barry J.; Coderre, Terence J.

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1 h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analysed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH in IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.1 PMID:23454190

  6. Glutamate transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mediated by a novel binding protein-dependent secondary transport system.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M H; van der Heide, T; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1996-11-12

    Growth of a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on glutamate as sole carbon and nitrogen source can be restored by the addition of millimolar amounts of Na+. Uptake of glutamate (Kt of 0.2 microM) by the mutant strictly requires Na+ (K(m) of 25 mM) and is inhibited by ionophores that collapse the proton motive force (pmf). The activity is osmotic-shock-sensitive and can be restored in spheroplasts by the addition of osmotic shock fluid. Transport of glutamate is also observed in membrane vesicles when Na+, a proton motive force, and purified glutamate binding protein are present. Both transport and binding is highly specific for glutamate. The Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporter of Rb. sphaeroides is an example of a secondary transport system that requires a periplasmic binding protein and may define a new family of bacterial transport proteins.

  7. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of Astrocyte Glutamate Transporters Decreases Seizures in a Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling-Hui; Bero, Adam W.; Zhang, Bo; Holtzman, David M.; Wong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to epileptogenesis and other neurological deficits in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). In particular, decreased expression and function of astrocyte glutamate transporters have been implicated in causing elevated extracellular glutamate levels, neuronal death, and epilepsy in a mouse model of TSC (Tsc1GFAPCKO mice), involving inactivation of the Tsc1 gene primarily in astrocytes. Here, we tested whether pharmacological induction of astrocyte glutamate transporter expression can prevent the neurological phenotype of Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. Early treatment with ceftriaxone prior to the onset of epilepsy increased expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters, decreased extracellular glutamate levels, neuronal death, and seizure frequency, and improved survival in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. In contrast, late treatment with ceftriaxone after onset of epilepsy increased glutamate transporter expression, but had no effect on seizures. These results indicate that astrocyte glutamate transporters contribute to epileptogenesis in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for epilepsy in TSC directed at astrocytes. PMID:20045054

  9. Role of astrocytic glutamate transporter in alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer R; Jia, Yun-Fang; Qiu, Yan-Yan; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is one of the most widespread neuropsychiatric conditions, having a significant health and socioeconomic impact. According to the 2014 World Health Organization global status report on alcohol and health, the harmful use of alcohol is responsible for 5.9% of all deaths worldwide. Additionally, 5.1% of the global burden of disease and injury is ascribed to alcohol (measured in disability adjusted life years, or disability adjusted life years). Although the neurobiological basis of AUD is highly complex, the corticostriatal circuit contributes significantly to the development of addictive behaviors. In-depth investigation into the changes of the neurotransmitters in this circuit, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyricacid, and glutamate, and their corresponding neuronal receptors in AUD and other addictions enable us to understand the molecular basis of AUD. However, these discoveries have also revealed a dearth of knowledge regarding contributions from non-neuronal sources. Astrocytes, though intimately involved in synaptic function, had until recently been noticeably overlooked in their potential role in AUD. One major function of the astrocyte is protecting neurons from excitotoxicity by removing glutamate from the synapse via excitatory amino acid transporter type 2. The importance of this key transporter in addiction, as well as ethanol withdrawal, has recently become evident, though its regulation is still under investigation. Historically, pharmacotherapy for AUD has been focused on altering the activity of neuronal glutamate receptors. However, recent clinical evidence has supported the animal-based findings, showing that regulating glutamate homeostasis contributes to successful management of recovery from AUD. PMID:27014596

  10. Interactions of MK-801 with glutamate-, glutamine- and methamphetamine-evoked release of ( sup 3 H)dopamine from striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Scallet, A.C.; Holson, R.R.; Lipe, G.W.; Slikker, W. Jr.; Ali, S.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The interactions of MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d) cyclohepten-5,10-imine), glutamate and glutamine with methamphetamine (METH)-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were assessed in vitro to determine whether MK-801 inhibition of METH neurotoxicity might be mediated presynaptically, and to evaluate the effects of glutamatergic stimulation on METH-evoked dopamine release. MK-801 inhibition of glutamate- or METH-evoked dopamine release might reduce synaptic dopamine levels during METH exposure and decrease the formation of 6-hydroxydopamine or other related neurotoxins. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 40 microM and 1 mM glutamate evoked a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated ({sup 3}H)dopamine and ({sup 3}H)metabolite (tritium) release of 3 to 6 and 12 to 16% of total tritium stores, respectively, from striatal slices. With 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 10 mM glutamate alone or in combination with the dopamine uptake blocker nomifensine released only 2.1 or 4.2%, respectively, of total tritium stores, and release was only partially dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors. With or without 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 0.5 or 5 microM METH evoked a substantial release of tritium (5-8 or 12-21% of total stores, respectively). METH-evoked dopamine release was not affected by 5 microM MK-801 but METH-evoked release was additive with glutamate-evoked release. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 1 mM glutamine increased glutamate release and induced the release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine and metabolites. Both 0.5 and 5 microM METH also increased tritium release with 1 mM glutamine present. When striatal slices were exposed to 5 microM METH this glutamine-evoked release of glutamate was increased more than 50%.

  11. HIV protease inhibitors disrupt astrocytic glutamate transporter function and neurobehavioral performance.

    PubMed

    Vivithanaporn, Pornpun; Asahchop, Eugene L; Acharjee, Shaona; Baker, Glen B; Power, Christopher

    2016-02-20

    The neurotoxic actions of the HIV protease inhibitors, amprenavir (APV) and lopinavir (LPV) were investigated. With combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected persons exhibit neurocognitive impairments, raising the possibility that cART might exert adverse central nervous system (CNS) effects. We examined the effects of LPV and APV using in-vitro and in-vivo assays of CNS function. Gene expression, cell viability and amino-acid levels were measured in human astrocytes, following exposure to APV or LPV. Neurobehavioral performance, amino-acid levels and neuropathology were examined in HIV-1 Vpr transgenic mice after treatment with APV or LPV. Excitatory amino-acid transporter-2 (EAAT2) expression was reduced in astrocytes treated with LPV or APV, especially LPV (P < 0.05), which was accompanied by reduced intracellular L-glutamate levels in LPV-treated cells (P < 0.05). Treatment of astrocytes with APV or LPV reduced the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67 (P < 0.05) although cell survival was unaffected. Exposure of LPV to astrocytes augmented glutamate-evoked transient rises in [Cai] (P < 0.05). Vpr mice treated with LPV showed lower concentrations of L-glutamate, L-aspartate and L-serine in cortex compared with vehicle-treated mice (P < 0.05). Total errors in T-maze assessment were increased in LPV and APV-treated animals (P < 0.05). EAAT2 expression was reduced in the brains of protease inhibitor-treated animals, which was associated with gliosis (P < 0.05). These results indicated that contemporary protease inhibitors disrupt astrocyte functions at therapeutic concentrations with enhanced sensitivity to glutamate, which can lead to neurobehavioral impairments. ART neurotoxicity should be considered in future therapeutic regimens for HIV/AIDS.

  12. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Simmler, Linda D; Blakely, Randy D; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-07-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for > 90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) remains unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high-affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggest that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is expressed by astrocytes, which also express dopamine receptors. Regulation of prefrontal cortical (PFC) GLT-1 potentially offers a novel treatment approach to the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Partial PFC dopamine deafferentation increased membrane expression of GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake, but did not alter levels of the other two neocortical glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1.

  13. Excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and axonal damage induced by glutamate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Domercq, María; Etxebarria, Estibaliz; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    Glutamate uptake is crucial to terminate glutamate signaling and to prevent excitotoxicity. The present study describes the expression of functional glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 in oligodendrocytes by means of electrophysiology, uptake assays, and immunocytochemistry. Inhibition of glutamate uptake, both in oligodendrocyte cultures and in isolated optic nerves, increases glutamate levels and causes oligodendrocyte excitotoxicity, which is prevented by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptor antagonists. Furthermore, glutamate transporter inhibitors or antisense oligonucleotides applied onto the optic nerve in vivo lead to oligodendroglial loss, massive demyelination, and severe axonal damage. Overall, these results demonstrate that the integrity of oligodendrocytes and white matter depends on proper glutamate transporter function. Deregulated transporter activity may contribute to acute and chronic white matter damage.

  14. Neutralizing aspartate 83 modifies substrate translocation of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Hotzy, Jasmin; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-06-08

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into neuronal and glial cells. EAATs are not only secondary active glutamate transporters but also function as anion channels. Gating of EAAT anion channels is tightly coupled to transitions within the glutamate uptake cycle, resulting in Na(+)- and glutamate-dependent anion currents. A point mutation neutralizing a conserved aspartic acid within the intracellular loop close to the end of transmembrane domain 2 was recently shown to modify the substrate dependence of EAAT anion currents. To distinguish whether this mutation affects transitions within the uptake cycle or directly modifies the opening/closing of the anion channel, we used voltage clamp fluorometry. Using three different sites for fluorophore attachment, V120C, M205C, and A430C, we observed time-, voltage-, and substrate-dependent alterations of EAAT3 fluorescence intensities. The voltage and substrate dependence of fluorescence intensities can be described by a 15-state model of the transport cycle in which several states are connected to branching anion channel states. D83A-mediated changes of fluorescence intensities, anion currents, and secondary active transport can be explained by exclusive modifications of substrate translocation rates. In contrast, sole modification of anion channel opening and closing is insufficient to account for all experimental data. We conclude that D83A has direct effects on the glutamate transport cycle and that these effects result in changed anion channel function.

  15. Somatostatin inhibits potassium-evoked glutamate release by activation of the sst(2) somatostatin receptor in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Dal Monte, Massimo; Petrucci, Cristina; Cozzi, Andrea; Allen, Jeremy P; Bagnoli, Paola

    2003-02-01

    In the mammalian retina, somatostatin (SRIF-14) acts through distinct receptor subtypes (sst(1-5)). Among them, sst(2) has been localized to numerous retinal cells, including photoreceptors and rod bipolar cells (RBCs). The specific role of sst(2) in the retina is largely undetermined. In this study, we characterized retinas of mice with targeted deletion of sst(2) (sst(2) KO) and we investigated functions of sst(2) in respect to its possible modulation of glutamate (GLU) release, as measured by HPLC. In contrast with wild-type (WT) mice, sst(2) mRNA and sst(2A) immunoreactivity were no longer detectable in the retina of sst(2) KO mice. In retinal explants of WT mice, SRIF and its analogue octreotide that displays high selectivity for sst(2), similarly reduced the evoked release of GLU without affecting its basal level. In sst(2) KO retinas, SRIF or octreotide did not affect GLU release indicating that they act at sst(2). Unexpectedly, the compound CYN-154806, although introduced as the first potent sst(2) antagonist, reduced the evoked release of GLU with equipotency to SRIF and octreotide. Its inhibitory effect was no longer observed in sst(2) KO retinas, indicating that this substance acts at sst(2) receptors as an agonist. In conclusion, SRIF controls evoked release of GLU through sst(2) receptors and this control may represent part of a mechanism by which SRIF regulates GLU concentration in the retina.

  16. Protein Interactions of the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter VGLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Magda S.; Foss, Sarah M.; Park, C. Kevin; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Exocytotic release of glutamate depends upon loading of the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs. The major isoforms, VGLUT1 and 2, exhibit a complementary pattern of expression in synapses of the adult rodent brain that correlates with the probability of release and potential for plasticity. Indeed, expression of different VGLUT protein isoforms confers different properties of release probability. Expression of VGLUT1 or 2 protein also determines the kinetics of synaptic vesicle recycling. To identify molecular determinants that may be related to reported differences in VGLUT trafficking and glutamate release properties, we investigated some of the intrinsic differences between the two isoforms. VGLUT1 and 2 exhibit a high degree of sequence homology, but differ in their N- and C-termini. While the C-termini of VGLUT1 and 2 share a dileucine-like trafficking motif and a proline-, glutamate-, serine-, and threonine-rich PEST domain, only VGLUT1 contains two polyproline domains and a phosphorylation consensus sequence in a region of acidic amino acids. The interaction of a VGLUT1 polyproline domain with the endocytic protein endophilin recruits VGLUT1 to a fast recycling pathway. To identify trans-acting cellular proteins that interact with the distinct motifs found in the C-terminus of VGLUT1, we performed a series of in vitro biochemical screening assays using the region encompassing the polyproline motifs, phosphorylation consensus sites, and PEST domain. We identify interactors that belong to several classes of proteins that modulate cellular function, including actin cytoskeletal adaptors, ubiquitin ligases, and tyrosine kinases. The nature of these interactions suggests novel avenues to investigate the modulation of synaptic vesicle protein recycling. PMID:25334008

  17. Atorvastatin and Fluoxetine Prevent Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Evoked by Glutamate Toxicity in Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Ludka, Fabiana K; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Constantino, Leandra Celso; Massari, Caio; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-07-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to exert a neuroprotective action by counteracting glutamatergic toxicity. Recently, we have shown atorvastatin also exerts an antidepressant-like effect that depends on both glutamatergic and serotonergic systems modulation. Excitotoxicity is involved in several brain disorders including depression; thus, it is suggested that antidepressants may target glutamatergic system as a final common pathway. In this study, a comparison of the mechanisms involved in the putative neuroprotective effect of a repetitive atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal slices was performed. Adult Swiss mice were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.), once a day during seven consecutive days. On the eighth day, animals were killed and hippocampal slices were obtained and subjected to an in vitro protocol of glutamate toxicity. An acute treatment of atorvastatin or fluoxetine was not neuroprotective; however, the repeated atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment prevented the decrease in cellular viability induced by glutamate in hippocampal slices. The loss of cellular viability induced by glutamate was accompanied by increased D-aspartate release, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine repeated treatment also presented an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment was effective in protecting mice hippocampal slices from glutamate toxicity by preventing the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    PubMed Central

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  19. Stimulus-evoked increase of glutamate in the mediorostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale of domestic chick after auditory filial imprinting: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Gruss, M; Braun, K

    1996-03-01

    Imprinting in chicks is a form of juvenile learning that has been used to study the basic cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. The forebrain area mediorostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale (MNH) is a center for acoustic imprinting. Electrophysiological and pharmacological behavioral studies in the MNH have demonstrated that the glutamatergic system and the associated receptors are critically involved in auditory filial imprinting. Accordingly, we investigated the hypothesis that stimulus-evoked glutamate release may be altered after this learning process. Using an in vivo microdialysis technique, we observed a significantly higher increase of extracellular glutamate level in tone-imprinted chicks during exposure to the previously imprinted tone than in socially imprinted control chicks. In a further series of experiments, where we exposed animals from both experimental groups to handling distress, glutamate levels in MNH showed only a slight increase, whereas we observed a pronounced increase of extracellular glutamate in the lobus parolfactorius (LPO), the avian analogue of the basal ganglia. No difference of distress-evoked glutamate release was found in MNH and LPO between tone-imprinted and socially imprinted chicks. The tone-evoked enhanced glutamate response in tone-imprinted chicks suggests that during auditory imprinting glutamatergic synapses develop the potential to increase transmitter release in response to the imprinting stimulus.

  20. Abolition of substrate-dependent currents by tyrosine mutation in the transmembrane domain of glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Choi, I; Chiu, S Y

    1997-03-24

    By site-directed mutagenesis we examined the roles of tyrosine residues (Tyr127) in the putative transmembrane domain of rat glutamate transporter (GLAST). When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, Y127F mutant protein, which was localized in plasma membranes of oocytes, completely abolished glutamate uptake currents but did not affect the intrinsic substrate-independent currents. Coexpression of wild type and mutant transporters supports that the Y127F mutation did not elicit glutamate efflux. The efflux of glutamate by wild type or Y127F mutant transporters was measured under the condition of ion perturbation where transporters run in the reverse direction.

  1. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  2. Intracellular Na+ concentration influences short-term plasticity of glutamate transporter-mediated currents in neocortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Myakhar, Olga; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-04-01

    Fast synaptic transmission requires a rapid clearance of the released neurotransmitter from the extracellular space. Glial glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) strongly contribute to glutamate removal. In this work, we investigated the paired-pulse plasticity of synaptically activated, glutamate transporter-mediated currents (STCs) in cortical layer 2/3 astrocytes. STCs were elicited by local electrical stimulation in layer 4 in the presence of ionotropic glutamate (AMPA and NMDA), GABAA, and GABAB receptor antagonists. In experiments with low [Na(+)]i (5 mM) intrapipette solution, STCs elicited by paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at short (<250 ms) interstimulus intervals (ISIs) and paired-pulse depression at longer ISIs. In experiments with close to physiological, high [Na(+)]i (20 mM) intrapipette solution, PPF of STCs at short ISIs was significantly reduced. In addition, the STC kinetics was slowed in the presence of high [Na(+)]i. Exogenous GABA increased astrocytic [Na(+)]i, reduced the mean STC amplitude, decreased PPF at short ISIs, and slowed STC kinetics. All GABA-induced changes were blocked by NO-711 and SNAP-5114, GABA transporter (GATs) antagonists. In experiments with the low intrapipette solution, GAT blockade under control conditions decreased PPF at short ISIs both at room and at near physiological temperatures. Dialysis of single astrocyte with low [Na(+)]i solution increased the amplitude and reduced PPR of evoked field potentials recorded in the vicinity of the astrocyte. We conclude that (1) endogenous GABA via GATs may influence EAAT functioning and (2) astrocytic [Na(+)]i modulates the short-term plasticity of STCs and in turn the efficacy of glutamate removal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of ampicillin on cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter and glutamate transporter 1 isoforms as well as ethanol drinking in male P rats

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Evidence demonstrated that glial cells, mainly astrocytes, regulate glutamate uptake, which is regulated by several glutamate transporters. Among these glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1; its human homolog is excitatory amino acid transporter-2) is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake by glial cells. Cystine-glutamate antiporter (xCT) is another glial protein critical in regulating glutamate transmission. Several studies from our laboratory demonstrated that attenuation of ethanol intkae was associated in part with upregulation of xCT and GLT suggesting the important role of these transporters in the treatment of ethanol dependence. We found recently that β-lactam antibiotic, ampicillin, upregulated GLT-1 expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and consequently reduced ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of ampicillin on the expressions of xCT and GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b) as well as on GLAST expression. We found that ampicillin reduced ethanol intake as compared to the saline (control)-treated group. In addition, we found that ampicillin induced upregulation of xCT, GLT-1a, and GLT-1b expressions in both the PFC and NAc, but had no effect on GLAST expression. Our findings provide significant role of ampicillin on upregulating xCT and GLT-1 isoforms expressions, might be suggested as possible tragets for the attenuation of ethanol consumption. PMID:26071905

  4. Effects of ammonia on high affinity glutamate uptake and glutamate transporter EAAT3 expression in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Helen; Zwingmann, Claudia; Pannunzio, Marc; Butterworth, Roger F

    2003-07-01

    Increased levels of extracellular glutamate are a consistent feature of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with liver failure and other hyperammonemic pathologies. Reduction of glutamate uptake has been described in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes, synaptosomes, and in animal models of hyperammonemia. In the present study, we examine the effects of pathophysiological concentrations of ammonia on D-aspartate (a non-metabolizable analog of glutamate) uptake by cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Exposure of these cells to ammonia resulted in time-dependent (24% reduction at 24h and 60% reduction at 5 days, P<0.001) and dose-dependent (21, 37, and 57% reduction at 1, 2.5, and 5mM for 5 days, P<0.01) suppression of D-aspartate uptake. Kinetic analyses revealed significant decreases in the velocity of uptake (V(max)) (37% decrease at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 52% decrease at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001) as well as significant reductions in K(m) values (25% reduction at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 45% reduction at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001). Western blotting, on the other hand, showed no significant changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/EAAT3 protein, the only glutamate transporter currently known to be expressed by these cells. In addition, 1H combined with 13C-NMR spectroscopy studies using the stable isotope [1-13C]-glucose demonstrated a significant increase in intracellular glutamate levels derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose, rather than from the deamidation of exogenous glutamine in cultured granule neurons exposed to ammonia. The present study provides evidence that the effects of ammonia on glutamate uptake are not solely an astrocytic phenomenon and that unlike the astrocytic glutamate transporter counterpart, EAAT3 protein expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells is not down-regulated when exposed to ammonia. Decrease of glutamate uptake in these cellular preparations may afford an additional regulatory mechanism aimed at

  5. Nicotine decreases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hea-Jo; Lim, Young-Jin; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hur, Wonseok; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-02-10

    Nicotine, the main ingredient of tobacco, elicits seizures in animal models and cigarette smoking is regarded as a behavioral risk factor associated with epilepsy or seizures. In the hippocampus, the origin of nicotine-induced seizures, most glutamate uptake could be performed primarily by excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3). An association between temporal lobe epilepsy and EAAT3 downregulation has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine may elicit seizures through the attenuation of EAAT3 activity. We investigated chronic nicotine exposure (72 h) cause reduction of the activity of EAAT3 in a Xenopus oocyte expression system using a two-electrode voltage clamp. The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) were also determined. Nicotine (0.001-1 μM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in EAAT3 activity with maximal inhibition at nicotine concentrations of 0.03 μM or higher and at an exposure time of 72 h. Vmax on the glutamate response was significantly reduced in the nicotine group (0.03 μM for 72 h), but the Km value of EAAT3 for glutamate was not altered. When nicotine-exposed oocytes (0.03 μM for 72 h) were pretreated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator), the nicotine-induced reduction in EAAT3 activity was abolished. PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, chelerythrine, and calphostin C) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, nicotine, and PKC inhibitors+nicotine groups. Similar response patterns were observed among PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), nicotine, and PI3K inhibitors+nicotine. In conclusion, this study suggests that nicotine decreases EAAT3 activity, and that this inhibition seems to be dependent on PKC and PI3K. Our results may provide an additional mechanism for nicotine-induced seizure.

  6. Loss of Astrocytic Glutamate Transporters in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, Alan S.; Sheedy, Donna; Oanea, Raluca; Aghourian, Meghmik; Sun, Simon; Jung, Jee Yong; Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE), a neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency (TD), is characterized by structural damage in brain regions that include the thalamus and cerebral cortex. The basis for these lesions is unclear, but may involve a disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission. We have therefore investigated levels of the astrocytic glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in order to evaluate their role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Histological assessment of the frontal cortex revealed a significant loss of neurons in neuropathologically confirmed cases of WE compared with age-matched controls, concomitant with decreases in α-internexin and synaptophysin protein content of 67 and 52% by immunoblotting. EAAT2 levels were diminished by 71% in WE, with levels of EAAT1 also reduced by 62%. Loss of both transporter sites was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. Development of TD in rats caused a profound loss of EAAT1 and EAAT2 in the thalamus accompanied by decreases in other astrocyte-specific proteins. Treatment of TD rats with N-acetylcysteine prevented the downregulation of EAAT2 in the medial thalamus, and ameliorated the loss of several other astrocyte proteins, concomitant with increased neuronal survival. Our results suggest that (1) loss of EAAT1 and EAAT2 glutamate transporters is associated with structural damage to the frontal cortex in patients with WE, (2) oxidative stress plays an important role in this process, and (3) TD has a profound effect on the functional integrity of astrocytes. Based on these findings, we recommend that early treatment using a combination of thiamine AND antioxidant approaches should be an important consideration in cases of WE. PMID:19565658

  7. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  8. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  9. Time Course Analysis of the Effects of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Pain and Vasomotor Responses Evoked by Glutamate Injection into Human Temporalis Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt da Silva, Larissa; Kulas, Dolarose; Karshenas, Ali; Cairns, Brian E.; Bach, Flemming W.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    The effect of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) on glutamate-evoked temporalis muscle pain and vasomotor responses was investigated in healthy men and women over a 60 day time course. Subjects participated in a pre-BoNTA session where their responses to injection of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) and saline (0.2 mL) into the temporalis muscles were assessed. On Day 1, BoNTA (5 U) was injected into one temporalis muscle and saline into the contralateral temporalis muscle, in a randomized order. Subjects then received intramuscular injections of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) into the left and right temporalis muscles at 3 h and subsequently 7, 30 and 60 days post-injection of BoNTA. Pain intensity, pain area, and neurogenic inflammation (skin temperature and skin blood perfusion) were recorded. Prior to BoNTA treatment, glutamate evoked significantly greater pain and vasomotor reactions (P < 0.001) than saline. BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate-evoked pain intensity (P < 0.05), pain area (P < 0.01), skin blood perfusion (P < 0.05), and skin temperature (P < 0.001). The inhibitory effect of BoNTA was present at 3 h after injection, peaked after 7 days and returned to baseline by 60 days. Findings from the present study demonstrated a rapid action of BoNTA on glutamate-evoked pain and neurogenic inflammation, which is in line with animal studies. PMID:24517906

  10. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S S; Wainer, Irving W; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O; Huang, Xi-Ping; Gould, Todd D

    2016-10-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine's antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine's side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1-D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine's enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. U.S. Government

  11. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  12. Reduction by gabapentin of K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate from the caudal trigeminal nucleus of the streptozotocin-treated rat

    PubMed Central

    Maneuf, Y P; Blake, R; Andrews, N A; McKnight, A T

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we showed that gabapentin can inhibit a facilitatory effect of substance P (SP) on K+-evoked glutamate release in rat trigeminal slices (Maneuf et al., 2001), and we have now examined the effect of gabapentin on glutamate release in the trigeminal slice from the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat. At 4 weeks following STZ treatment (50 mg kg−1 i.p.), blood glucose was increased in the majority of cases, compared to the control level. All the treated animals showed a significant degree (P<0.001) of tactile allodynia (assessed using von Frey filaments) that did not appear to correlate with blood glucose levels.In this study, we demonstrated that, after STZ treatment, 30 μM gabapentin reduced K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate in either normal (11 mM) or high (30 mM) glucose conditions by 24 and 22%, respectively. In the normal rat, gabapentin (up to 100 μM) is ordinarily unable to affect release of glutamate from the trigeminal slice.The uptake of glutamate in Sp5C punches from streptozotocin-treated rats was reduced under normal glucose conditions (41.7% of control), whereas high glucose restored uptake to normal (84.7% of control).The addition of 1 μM substance P potentiated the evoked release of glutamate in both normal (40% increase) and high glucose (28%), and this was blocked by gabapentin (30 μM) in both conditions. It is interesting to speculate that this ability of gabapentin to reduce the release of glutamate in the trigeminal nucleus after streptozotocin treatment may be of relevance to the antihyperalgesic-allodynic actions of the drug. PMID:14744819

  13. Pharmacological inhibitions of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 compromise glutamate transport in photoreceptor to ON- bipolar cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Chung, Inyoung; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    To maintain reliable signal transmission across a synapse, free synaptic neurotransmitters must be removed from the cleft in a timely manner. In the first visual synapse, this critical task is mainly undertaken by glutamate transporters (EAATs). Here we study the differential roles of the EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT5 subtypes in glutamate (GLU) uptake at the photoreceptor-to-depolarizing bipolar cell synapse in intact dark-adapted retina. Various doses of EAAT blockers and/or GLU were injected into the eye before the electroretinogram (ERG) was measured. Their effectiveness and potency in inhibiting the ERG b-wave were studied to determine their relative contributions to the GLU clearing activity at the synapse. The results showed that EAAT1 and EAAT2 plays different roles. Selectively blocking glial EAAT1 alone using UCPH101 inhibited the b-wave 2–24 hours following injection, suggesting a dominating role of EAAT1 in the overall GLU clearing capacity in the synaptic cleft. Selectively blocking EAAT2 on photoreceptor terminals had no significant effect on the b-wave, but increased the potency of exogenous GLU in inhibiting the b-wave. These suggest that EAAT2 play a secondary yet significant role in the GLU reuptake activity at the rod and the cone output synapses. Additionally, we have verified our electrophysiological findings with double-label immunohistochemistry, and extend the literature on the spatial distribution of EAAT2 splice variants in the mouse retina. PMID:25152321

  14. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport Cycle of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Verdon, Gregory; Oh, SeCheol; Serio, Ryan N.; Boudker, Olga

    2014-05-19

    Membrane transporters that clear the neurotransmitter glutamate from synapses are driven by symport of sodium ions and counter-transport of a potassium ion. Previous crystal structures of a homologous archaeal sodium and aspartate symporter showed that a dedicated transport domain carries the substrate and ions across the membrane. We report new crystal structures of this homologue in ligand-free and ions-only bound outward- and inward-facing conformations. We then show that after ligand release, the apo transport domain adopts a compact and occluded conformation that can traverse the membrane, completing the transport cycle. Sodium binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. Moreover, we describe a new cation-binding site ideally suited to bind a counter-transported ion. We suggest that potassium binding at this site stabilizes the translocation-competent conformation of the unloaded transport domain in mammalian homologues.

  15. Chemical activation of a high-affinity glutamate transporter in human erythrocytes and its implications for malaria-parasite-induced glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Markus; Rajendran, Esther; Baumeister, Stefan; Bietz, Sven; Kirk, Kiaran; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2012-04-12

    Human erythrocytes have a low basal permeability to L-glutamate and are not known to have a functional glutamate transporter. Here, treatment of human erythrocytes with arsenite was shown to induce the uptake of L-glutamate and D-aspartate, but not that of D-glutamate or L-alanine. The majority of the arsenite-induced L-glutamate influx was via a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent system showing characteristics of members of the "excitatory amino acid transporter" (EAAT) family. Western blots and immunofluorescence assays revealed the presence of a member of this family, EAAT3, on the erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum take up glutamate from the extracellular environment. Although the majority of uptake is via a low-affinity Na(+)-independent pathway there is, in addition, a high-affinity uptake component, raising the possibility that the parasite activates the host cell glutamate transporter.

  16. Rat meningeal and brain microvasculature pericytes co-express the vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Brian N; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2008-04-18

    Pericytes are small cells that are apposed to brain and meningeal microvasculature and control capillary contraction, thereby regulating local cerebral perfusion. Pericytes respond to exogenously applied glutamate in vitro and express metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, it is unclear if pericytes have the capacity to release glutamate. We therefore determined whether pericytes express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), which are considered to be unambiguous markers of cells that use glutamate as an intercellular signaling molecule. Leptomeningeal and brain microvasculature-associated pericytes of the adult rat, as defined by the presence of NG2 proteoglycan, expressed both VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivity, but did not express VGLUT1. Consistent with the hypothesis that pericytes release glutamate, VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivities appeared to be localized to secretory vesicles. These results suggest that glutamate is released from pericytes of the leptomeninges and brain microvasculature, and demonstrate for the first time the co-localization of VGLUT2 and VGLUT3.

  17. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on forgetting.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation; forgetting process and neurotransmission systems or their transporters; the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GAT1), glutamate (EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression of GAT1, EAAC1, DAT and SERT during forgetting in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was determined in the hippocampus (HIP), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum (STR). Results indicated that forgetting of Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of GAT1 (PFC and HIP) and DAT (PFC) while SERT (HIP) was down-regulated; no-changes were observed in striatum. Methamphetamine administration did not affect forgetting at 216 h post-training but up-regulated hippocampal DAT and EACC, prefrontal cortex DAT and striatal GAT1 or EACC1. Fluoxetine alone prevented forgetting, which was associated to striatal GAT1 and hippocampal DAT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was also able to prevent forgetting, which was associated to hippocampal DAT, prefrontal cortex SERT and striatal GAT1, DAT or SERT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Together these data show that forgetting provokes primarily hippocampal and prefrontal cortex transporters changes; forgetting represent a behavioral process hardly modifiable and its prevention could causes different transporters expression patterns.

  18. Neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT4 is expressed in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Hui; Walters, Winston M; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Karmally, Shaffiat A; Bethea, John R

    2003-10-01

    High-affinity excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are essential to terminate glutamatergic neurotransmission and to prevent excitotoxicity. To date, five distinct EAATs have been cloned from animal and human tissues: GLAST (EAAT1), GLT-1 (EAAT2), EAAC1 (EAAT3), EAAT4, and EAAT5. EAAT1 and EAAT2 are commonly known as glial glutamate transporters, whereas EAAT3, EAAT4, and EAAT5 are neuronal. EAAT4 is largely expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. In this study, using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we found that EAAT4-like immunoreactivity (ir) is enriched in the spinal cord and forebrain. Double-labeled fluorescent immunostaining and confocal image analysis indicated that EAAT4-like ir colocalizes with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The astrocytic localization of EAAT4 was further confirmed in astrocyte cultures by double-labeled fluorescent immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated mRNA expression of EAAT4 in astrocyte cultures. Sequencing confirmed the specificity of the amplified fragment. These results demonstrate that EAAT4 is expressed in astrocytes. This astrocytic localization of neuronal EAAT4 may reveal a new function of EAAT4 in the central nervous system.

  19. Increasing influence of the glutamate transporter inhibitor on glutamate release in low [Na +] media under extremal conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    The effect of the competitive nontransportable inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate DL-TBOA on the release of glutamate in Ca 2 -free Na - and NMDG-supplemented media was evaluated after exposure of rats to extremal conditions 6 min incubation of synaptosomes with 10 mu M DL-TBOA in low Na media resulted in the increase in extracellular L- 14 C glutamate level for control animals by 2 0 pm 0 5 of total accumulated label and 100 mu M DL-TBOA - 3 5 pm 0 5 respectively The experimental data for animals subjected to centrifuge-induced hypergravity showed 4 0 pm 1 0 and 9 0 pm 2 0 increase in L- 14 C glutamate level for 10 mu M and 100 mu M DL-TBOA respectively D le 0 05 The enhancement of the extracellular level of L- 14 C glutamate after application of DL-TBOA would be expected to connect with the inhibition of L- 14 C glutamate uptake process It appears that DL-TBOA inhibited uptake more potently after hypergravity The effect of DL-TBOA on depolarization-induced carrier-mediated L- 14 C glutamate release increased after hypergravity loading in Na - and low Na NMDG- supplemented media 10 mu M DL-TBOA-induced decrease in L- 14 C glutamate release in Na - supplemented medium was 15 2 pm 2 2 in the control experiments and 26 2 pm 3 9 after loading D le 0 05 and in low Na medium was 37 0 pm 2 5 and 45 0 pm 3 4 respectively DL-TBOA was demonstrated to better inhibit the transporter-mediated

  20. Glutamate-evoked release of endogenous brain dopamine: inhibition by an excitatory amino acid antagonist and an enkephalin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Marien, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADL) on the spontaneous and the L-glutamic acid (L-Glu)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from superfused slices of rat caudate-putamen. The amount of dopamine in slice superfusates was measured by a sensitive method employing high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (h.p.l.c.-e.d.) after a two-step separation procedure. The spontaneous release of endogenous dopamine was partially dependent on Ca2+, enhanced in Mg2+-free superfusion medium, partially reduced by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), partially reduced by the putative excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (DL-APH, 1 mM), and increased 10 fold by the dopamine uptake blocker, nomifensine (10 microM). DADL (5 and 50 nM) did not significantly affect spontaneous dopamine release. L-Glu (0.1-10 mM) produced a concentration-dependent release of endogenous dopamine from slices of caudate-putamen. This effect was Ca2+-dependent, strongly inhibited by 1.2 mM Mg2+, attenuated by DL-APH (1 mM), attenuated by TTX (0.3 microM), and enhanced by nomifensine (10 microM). In the presence of nomifensine DADL (50 nM) reduced significantly the L-Glu-evoked release of endogenous dopamine by 20%. The inhibitory effect of DADL was blocked by 10 microM naloxone. These results indicate that L-Glu stimulates the Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous dopamine in the caudate-putamen by activation of N-methy-D-aspartate-type of excitatory amino acid receptors. This release can be selectively modified by the delta-opioid agonist DADL in a naloxone-sensitive manner. PMID:2884003

  1. Nerve injury enhances rat neuronal glutamate transporter expression: identification by differential display PCR.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, S; Yao, G L; Morita, N; Kato, H; Kiyama, H

    1995-12-01

    An increase in neuronal glutamate transporter expression after nerve injury was demonstrated by means of differential display PCR (DD-PCR) coupled with in situ hybridization. DD-PCR was carried out to compare differences in expression of mRNAs between axotomized and normal hypoglossal motoneurons in the rat. The expression of several gene fragments were found to be increased following nerve injury; the full length cDNA corresponding to one fragment was cloned by subsequent rat cDNA library screening. The close homology of glutamate transporters with our rat cDNA led us to conclude that this clone corresponds to the rat neuronal glutamate transporter (rat EAAC1). We speculate that the upregulation of this glutamate uptake system may increase the resistance of these cells against neurotoxic glutamate accumulation during the process of nerve regeneration.

  2. Effect of levetiracetam on molecular regulation of hippocampal glutamate and GABA transporters in rats with chronic seizures induced by amygdalar FeCl3 injection.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yuto; Doi, Taku; Nagatomo, Keiko; Tokumaru, Jun; Takaki, Mayuko; Willmore, L James

    2007-06-02

    Enhancement of the glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission efficacy in the FeCl3 induced epilepsy model is associated with changes in the levels of glutamate and GABA transporter proteins. This study examined the effect of levetiracetam (LEV) on glutamate overflow and glutamate/GABA transporters expression in rats with epileptogenesis induced by the amygdalar injection of 1.0 microl of 100 mM FeCl3 (epileptic rat) and in control rats receiving amygdalar acidic saline injection (non-epileptic rat). In amygdalar acidic saline injected rats, 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow was significantly suppressed by both 32 and 100 microM LEV co-perfusion. In unilateral amygdalar FeCl3 injected rats, 32 microM LEV was ineffective, but the 100 microM LEV statistically suppressed glutamate overflow. Western blotting was employed to determine the hippocampal expression of glutamate/GABA transporters in epileptic or non-epileptic rats. The rats were treated for 14 days with 54 mg/kg LEV or vehicle intraperitoneally injection. Following 14 days of treatment, the ipsilateral hippocampus was removed for a Western blot analysis. In non-epileptic rats, the expression increased for all of the glutamate and GABA transporters (GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC-1, GAT-1 and GAT-3) while the glutamate transporter regulating protein (GTRAP3-18) decreased in comparison to those of normal rats that were treated with the vehicle. In epileptic rats receiving LEV, the EAAC-1 and GAT-3 levels increased while GTRAP3-18 (89%) decreased in comparison to those of the epileptic rats treated with the vehicle. GTRAP3-18 inhibitor regulates glutamate-binding affinity to EAAC-1. The anti-epileptic action of LEV may be partially due to a reduction of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and an enhancement of the GABAergic inhibition as observed with the inhibitory effect on the 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow. These conclusions are supported by the increase in the expression of glial glutamate transporters (GLAST

  3. Glutamine synthetase gene expression and glutamate transporters in C6-glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baber, Zafeer; Haghighat, Nasrin

    2010-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the major glutamate-forming enzyme of vertebrae and is accepted to be a marker of astroglial cells. Maturation of astroglial cells is characterized by an increase in GS activity, and the regulation of this enzyme is the topic of many publications. The amino acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and mediates normal excitatory synaptic transmission by interaction with postsynaptic receptors. Glutamate also acts as a potent neurotoxin when present at high concentration. Glutamate neurotoxicity plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the normal condition, L-glutamate is predominantly taken up, metabolized and recycled by astrocytes through the glutamate transporters (GLAST/GLT1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) catalytic activity. Because of the fundamental role of these glutamate transporters and the glutamine synthetase enzyme in controlling cerebral glutamate level, regulation of GS and studying of the glutamate transporters in glial cells is important. Astrocytes are supportive cells and act as the site of detoxification of glutamate in the brain. However, their isolation from the brain is a tedious, costly and time consuming procedure. On the other hand, the C6-glioma cells are readily available on the market. They are well characterized and have been a useful model for CNS glia in many laboratories. For this study, we used the C6-glioma cell line as a model system. We examined the presence or absence of glial specific glutamate transporters (GLTI and GLAST) in C6-glioma cells, which was done by immunocytochemistry. We also examined glutamine synthetase gene expression in these cells by treatment of the C6-glioma cells with estrogen (17ß estradiol). The findings from this study provide useful information about C6-glioma cells which makes the study of the CNS tremendously inexpensive.

  4. Sensorineural deafness and seizures in mice lacking vesicular glutamate transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Seal, Rebecca P; Akil, Omar; Yi, Eunyoung; Weber, Christopher M; Grant, Lisa; Yoo, Jong; Clause, Amanda; Kandler, Karl; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Lustig, Lawrence R; Edwards, Robert H

    2008-01-24

    The expression of unconventional vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3 by neurons known to release a different classical transmitter has suggested novel roles for signaling by glutamate, but this distribution has raised questions about whether the protein actually contributes to glutamate release. We now report that mice lacking VGLUT3 are profoundly deaf due to the absence of glutamate release from hair cells at the first synapse in the auditory pathway. The early degeneration of some cochlear ganglion neurons in knockout mice also indicates an important developmental role for the glutamate released by hair cells before the onset of hearing. In addition, the mice exhibit primary, generalized epilepsy that is accompanied by remarkably little change in ongoing motor behavior. The glutamate release conferred by expression of VGLUT3 thus has an essential role in both function and development of the auditory pathway, as well as in the control of cortical excitability.

  5. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  6. Estrogen and tamoxifen reverse manganese–induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Sook Y.; Sidoryk, Marta; Jiang, Haiyan; Yin, Zhaobao; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) can cause manganism, a neurodegenerative disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. The toxicity of Mn includes impairment of astrocytic glutamate transporters. 17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to be neuroprotective in various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and some selective estrogen receptor modulators, including tamoxifen (TX), also possess neuroprotective properties. We have tested our hypothesis that E2 and TX reverse Mn-induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes. The results established that E2 and TX increased glutamate transporter function and reversed Mn-induced glutamate uptake inhibition, primarily via the up-regulation of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). E2 and TX also increased astrocytic GLAST mRNA levels and attenuated the Mn-induced inhibition of GLAST mRNA expression. In addition, E2 and TX effectively increased the expression of transforming growth factor β1, a potential modulator of the stimulatory effects of E2/TX on glutamate transporter function. This effect was mediated by the activation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways. These novel findings suggest, for the first time, that E2 and TX enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter expression via increased transforming growth factor β1 expression. Furthermore, the present study is the first to show that both E2 and TX effectively reverse Mn-induced glutamate transport inhibition by restoring its expression and activity, thus offering a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis. PMID:19453300

  7. Estrogen and tamoxifen reverse manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Sook Y; Sidoryk, Marta; Jiang, Haiyan; Yin, Zhaobao; Aschner, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) can cause manganism, a neurodegenerative disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. The toxicity of Mn includes impairment of astrocytic glutamate transporters. 17beta-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to be neuroprotective in various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and some selective estrogen receptor modulators, including tamoxifen (TX), also possess neuroprotective properties. We have tested our hypothesis that E2 and TX reverse Mn-induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes. The results established that E2 and TX increased glutamate transporter function and reversed Mn-induced glutamate uptake inhibition, primarily via the up-regulation of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). E2 and TX also increased astrocytic GLAST mRNA levels and attenuated the Mn-induced inhibition of GLAST mRNA expression. In addition, E2 and TX effectively increased the expression of transforming growth factor beta1, a potential modulator of the stimulatory effects of E2/TX on glutamate transporter function. This effect was mediated by the activation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways. These novel findings suggest, for the first time, that E2 and TX enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter expression via increased transforming growth factor beta1 expression. Furthermore, the present study is the first to show that both E2 and TX effectively reverse Mn-induced glutamate transport inhibition by restoring its expression and activity, thus offering a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  8. Rapid changes in expression of glutamate transporters after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Mills, Charles D; Ye, Zaiming; Fullwood, Steven D; McAdoo, David J; Hulsebosch, Claire E; Westlund, Karin N

    2002-02-08

    Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. After its release, specific transporter proteins rapidly remove extracellular glutamate from the synaptic cleft. The clearance of excess extracellular glutamate prevents accumulation under normal conditions; however, CNS injury elevates extracellular glutamate concentrations to neurotoxic levels. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in expression and in spatial localization of glial glutamate transporters GLAST (EAAT1) and GLT-1 (EAAT2) and the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) after spinal cord contusion injury (SCI). The levels of all three transporters significantly increased at the epicenter of injury (T10) and in segments rostral and caudal to the epicenter as determined by Western blot analysis. Quantitative immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increase in GLAST staining in laminae I-V and lamina X both rostral and caudal to the epicenter of injury. Staining for GLT-1 increased significantly in lamina I rostral to the injury site and in the entire gray matter caudal to the injury site. A significant increase in EAAC1 staining was observed in laminae I-IV rostral to the epicenter of injury and throughout the gray matter caudal to the injury site. The results suggest that upregulation of these high affinity transporters occurs rapidly and is important in regulating glutamate homeostasis after SCI.

  9. Ceftriaxone modulates uptake activity of glial glutamate transporter-1 against global brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Yan; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Dan; Li, Li; Li, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone(Cef) selectively increases the expression of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which was thought to be neuroprotective in some circumstances. However, the effect of Cef on glutamate uptake of GLT-1 was mostly assayed using in vitro studies such as primary neuron/astrocyte cultures or brain slices. In addition, the effect of Cef on neurons in different ischemic models was still discrepant. Therefore, this study was undertaken to observe the effect of Cef on neurons in global brain ischemia in rats, and especially to provide direct evidence of the up-regulation of GLT-1 uptake for glutamate contributing to the neuronal protection of Cef against brain ischemia. Neuropathological evaluation indicated that administration of Cef, especially pre-treatment protocols, significantly prevented delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 subregion normally induced by global brain ischemia. Simultaneously, pre-administration of Cef significantly up-regulated the expression of GLT-1. Particularly, GLT-1 uptake assay with (3) H-glutamate in living cells from adult rats showed that up-regulation in glutamate uptake accompanied up-regulated GLT-1 expression. Inhibition of GLT-1 by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides or dihydrokainate significantly inhibited the Cef-induced up-regulation in GLT-1 uptake and the neuroprotective effect against global ischemia. Thus, we may conclude that Cef protects neurons against global brain ischemia via up-regulation of the expression and glutamate uptake of GLT-1. Glutamate uptake by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is the principal way to regulate extracellular glutamate homeostasis in central nervous system. Over-accumulation of glutamate results in excitotoxicity and injures neurons after cerebral ischemia. Ceftriaxone up-regulates GLT-1 expression and uptake of glutamate, diminishes the excitotoxicity of glutamate and then protects neurons against global brain ischemia. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Estrogen attenuates manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. in J Neurochem 80:807-814, 2002; Pawlak et al. in Brain Res Mol Brain Res 138:1-7, 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuro SERMs) (Zhao et al. in Neuroscience 132:299-311, 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamate uptake. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  11. Harmine, A Natural Beta-Carboline Alkaloid, Upregulates Astroglial Glutamate Transporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Sattler, Rita; Yang, Eun Ju; Nunes, Alice; Ayukawa, Yoko; Akhtar, Sadia; Ji, Grace; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate is the predominant excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate transporter EAAT2 /GLT-1 is the physiologically dominant astroglial protein that inactivates synaptic glutamate. Previous studies have shown that EAAT2 dysfunction leads to excessive extracellular glutamate and may contribute to various neurological disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The recent discovery of the neuroprotective properties of ceftriaxone, a beta lactam antibiotic, suggested that increasing EAAT2 /GLT-1 gene expression might be beneficial in ALS and other neurological/psychiatric disorders by augmenting astrocytic glutamate uptake. Here we report our efforts to develop a new screening assay for identifying compounds that activate EAAT2 gene expression. We generated fetal derived-human immortalized astroglial cells that are stably expressing a firefly luciferase reporter under the control of the human EAAT2 promoter. When screening a library of 1040 FDA approved compounds and natural products, we identified harmine, a naturally occurring beta-carboline alkaloid, as one of the top hits for activating the EAAT2 promoter. We further tested harmine in our in vitro cell culture systems and confirmed its ability to increase EAAT2/GLT1 gene expression and functional glutamate uptake activity. We next tested its efficacy in both wild type animals and in an ALS animal model of disease and demonstrated that harmine effectively increased GLT-1 protein and glutamate transporter activity in vivo. Our studies provide potential novel neurotherapeutics by modulating the activity of glutamate transporters via gene activation. PMID:21034752

  12. Ceftriaxone Preserves Glutamate Transporters and Prevents Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Vulnerability to Brain Excitotoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jagadapillai, Rekha; Mellen, Nicholas M.; Sachleben, Leroy R.; Gozal, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia alters cellular metabolism and although the effects of sustained hypoxia (SH) have been extensively studied, less is known about chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH), commonly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and stroke. We hypothesize that impaired glutamate homeostasis after chronic IH may underlie vulnerability to stroke-induced excitotoxicity. P16 organotypic hippocampal slices, cultured for 7 days were exposed for 7 days to IH (alternating 2 min 5% O2 - 15 min 21% O2), SH (5% O2) or RA (21% O2), then 3 glutamate challenges. The first and last exposures were intended as a metabolic stimulus (200 µM glutamate, 15 min); the second emulated excitotoxicity (10 mM glutamate, 10 min). GFAP, MAP2, and EAAT1, EAAT2 glutamate transporters expression were assessed after exposure to each hypoxic protocol. Additionally, cell viability was determined at baseline and after each glutamate challenge, in presence or absence of ceftriaxone that increases glutamate transporter expression. GFAP and MAP2 decreased after 7 days IH and SH. Long-term IH but not SH decreased EAAT1 and EAAT2. Excitotoxic glutamate challenge decreased cell viability and the following 200 µM exposure further increased cell death, particularly in IH-exposed slices. Ceftriaxone prevented glutamate transporter decrease and improved cell viability after IH and excitotoxicity. We conclude that IH is more detrimental to cell survival and glutamate homeostasis than SH. These findings suggest that impaired regulation of extracellular glutamate levels is implicated in the increased brain susceptibility to excitotoxic insult after long-term IH. PMID:25014412

  13. Glutamate transport and xanthan gum production in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Robert; Nishidomi, Sabrina; Nepomuceno, Roberto; Oshiro, Elisa; de Cassia Café Ferreira, Rita

    2013-11-01

    L-glutamate plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism in all living organisms. In the genus Xanthomonas, the nitrogen nutrition is an important factor involved in the xanthan gum production, an important exopolysaccharide with various industrial and biotechnological applications. In this report, we demonstrate that the use of L-glutamate by the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri as a nitrogen source in defined medium significantly increases the production of xanthan gum. This increase is dependent on the L-glutamate concentration. In addition, we have also characterized a glutamate transport system that is dependent on a proton gradient and on ATP and is modulated by amino acids that are structurally related to glutamate. This is the first biochemical characterization of an energy substrate transport system observed in a bacterial phytopathogen with a broad economic and industrial impact due to xanthan gum production.

  14. The GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) glutamate transporter is essential for glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bjørnsen, Lars Petter; Hadera, Mussie G; Zhou, Yun; Danbolt, Niels C; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by cellular uptake catalyzed mostly by the glutamate transporter subtypes GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1). Astrocytes express both GLT-1 and GLAST, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we injected GLT-1 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate 15 min before euthanization. Metabolite levels were analyzed in extracts from neocortex and cerebellum and (13)C labeling in neocortex. Whereas the cerebellum in GLT-1-deficient mice had normal levels of glutamate, glutamine, and (13)C labeling of metabolites, glutamate level was decreased but labeling from [1-(13)C] glucose was unchanged in the neocortex. The contribution from pyruvate carboxylation toward labeling of these metabolites was unchanged. Labeling from [1,2-(13)C] acetate, originating in astrocytes, was decreased in glutamate and glutamine in the neocortex indicating reduced mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes. The decreased amount of glutamate in the cortex indicates that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the cortex. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by uptake via GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1) transporters, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we used [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate injection and NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex.

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone's antiepileptic action in FeCl3-induced epileptogenesis involves upregulation of glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Monika; Singh, Rameshwar; Mukherjee, Somnath; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a neuroactive androgen steroid, has antiepileptic action in iron-induced experimental epilepsy (which models post-traumatic clinical epilepsy). In iron-induced epilepsy increased extracellular glutamate resulting from its reduced glial uptake due to the down-regulation (decreased expression) of transporters (glial and or neuronal) is active during epileptogenesis. The present study was aimed at determining whether the mechanism of antiepileptic action of DHEA involved upregulation (increased expression) of glutamate transporters. Iron-induced epileptogenesis was performed in rats by FeCl3 injection into the cerebral cortex. DHEA was administered intraperitoneally to the iron-induced epileptic rats for 7, 14 and 21 days. Levels of glutamate transporters mRNAs expression were measured using quantitative PCR in the hippocampus during the chronic phase of iron-induced epileptogenesis. There were significant reductions in the glutamate transporter mRNAs in epileptogenesis. DHEA treatment resulted in a significant elevation of glutamate transporters: GLT-1, GLAST and EACC-1 mRNA indicating that the DHEA treatment induced upregulation of these transporters. The results are of significance in respect of the mechanism of the antiepileptic action of neurosteroids and the glutamate transporters as therapeutic targets in glutamatergic epileptogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Glutamate transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mediated by a novel binding protein-dependent secondary transport system

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Mariken H. J.; van der Heide, Tiemen; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on glutamate as sole carbon and nitrogen source can be restored by the addition of millimolar amounts of Na+. Uptake of glutamate (Kt of 0.2 μM) by the mutant strictly requires Na+ (Km of 25 mM) and is inhibited by ionophores that collapse the proton motive force (pmf). The activity is osmotic-shock-sensitive and can be restored in spheroplasts by the addition of osmotic shock fluid. Transport of glutamate is also observed in membrane vesicles when Na+, a proton motive force, and purified glutamate binding protein are present. Both transport and binding is highly specific for glutamate. The Na+-dependent glutamate transporter of Rb. sphaeroides is an example of a secondary transport system that requires a periplasmic binding protein and may define a new family of bacterial transport proteins. PMID:8917497

  17. Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3) of the blood-brain barrier. A mechanism for glutamate removal.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, R L; Martínez-López, I; DeJoseph, M R; Viña, J R; Hawkins, R A

    1999-11-05

    Na(+)-dependent transporters for glutamate exist on astrocytes (EAAT1 and EAAT2) and neurons (EAAT3). These transporters presumably assist in keeping the glutamate concentration low in the extracellular fluid of brain. Recently, Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport was described on the abluminal membrane of the blood-brain barrier. To determine whether the above-mentioned transporters participate in glutamate transport of the blood-brain barrier, total RNA was extracted from bovine cerebral capillaries. cDNA for EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 was observed, indicating that mRNA was present. Western blot analysis demonstrated all three transporters were expressed on abluminal membranes, but none was detectable on luminal membranes of the blood-brain barrier. Measurement of transport kinetics demonstrated voltage dependence, K(+)-dependence, and an apparent K(m) of 14 microM (aggregate of the three transporters) at a transmembrane potential of -61 mV. Inhibition of glutamate transport was observed using inhibitors specific for EAAT2 (kainic acid and dihydrokainic acid) and EAAT3 (cysteine). The relative activity of the three transporters was found to be approximately 1:3:6 for EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3, respectively. These transporters may assist in maintaining low glutamate concentrations in the extracellular fluid.

  18. Subcellular fractionation on Percoll gradient of mossy fiber synaptosomes: evoked release of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamate decarboxylase activity in control and degranulated rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Taupin, P; Ben-Ari, Y; Roisin, M P

    1994-05-02

    Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation in isotonic Percoll sucrose, we have characterized two subcellular fractions (PII and PIII) enriched in mossy fiber synaptosomes and two others (SII and SIII) enriched in small synaptosomes. These synaptosomal fractions were compared with those obtained from adult hippocampus irradiated at neonatal stage to destroy granule cells and their mossy fibers. Synaptosomes were viable as judged by their ability to release aspartate, glutamate and GABA upon K+ depolarization. After irradiation, compared to the control values, the release of glutamate and GABA was decreased by 57 and 74% in the PIII fraction, but not in the other fractions and the content of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was also decreased in PIII fraction by 62, 44 and 52% respectively. These results suggest that mossy fiber (MF) synaptosomes contain and release glutamate and GABA. Measurement of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, exhibited no significant difference after irradiation, suggesting that GABA is not synthesized by this enzyme in mossy fibers.

  19. Energy coupling of L-glutamate transport and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in brain synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Y; Maeda, M; Futai, M

    1990-10-01

    Energy coupling of L-glutamate transport in brain synaptic vesicles has been studied. ATP-dependent acidification of the bovine brain synaptic vesicles was shown to require CI-, to be accelerated by valinomycin and to be abolished by ammonium sulfate, nigericin or CCCP plus valinomycin, and K+. On the other hand, ATP-driven formation of a membrane potential (positive inside) was found to be stimulated by ammonium sulfate, not to be affected by nigericin and to be abolished by CCCP plus valinomycin and K+. Like formation of a membrane potential, ATP-dependent L-[3H]glutamate uptake into vesicles was stimulated by ammonium sulfate, not affected by nigericin and abolished by CCCP plus valinomycin and K+. The L-[3H]glutamate uptake differed in specificity from the transport system in synaptic plasma membranes. Both ATP-dependent H+ pump activity and L-glutamate uptake were inhibited by bafilomycin and cold treatment (common properties of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase). ATP-dependent acidification in the presence of L-glutamate was also observed, suggesting that L-glutamate uptake lowered the membrane potential to drive further entry of H+. These results were consistent with the notion that the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase of synpatic vesicles formed a membrane potential to drive L-glutamate uptake. ATPase activity of the vesicles was not affected by the addition of Cl-, glutamate or nigericin, indicating that an electrochemical H+ gradient had no effect on the ATPase activity.

  20. Valproic acid induces the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter-3 in human oligodendroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M G; Franchi-Gazzola, R; Reia, L; Allegri, M; Uggeri, J; Chiu, M; Sala, R; Bussolati, O

    2012-12-27

    Glutamate transport in early, undifferentiated oligodendrocytic precursors has not been characterized thus far. Here we show that human oligodendroglioma Hs683 cells are not endowed with EAAT-dependent anionic amino acid transport. However, in these cells, but not in U373 human glioblastoma cells, valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, markedly induces SLC1A1 mRNA, which encodes for the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The effect is detectable after 8h and persists up to 120h of treatment. EAAT3 protein increase becomes detectable after 24h of treatment and reaches its maximum after 72-96h, when it is eightfold more abundant than control. The initial influx of d-aspartate increases in parallel, exhibiting the typical features of an EAAT3-mediated process. SLC1A1 mRNA induction is associated with the increased expression of PDGFRA mRNA (+150%), a marker of early oligodendrocyte precursor cells, while the expression of GFAP, CNP and TUBB3 remains unchanged. Short term experiments have indicated that the VPA effect is shared by trichostatin A, another inhibitor of histone deacetylases. On the contrary, EAAT3 induction is neither prevented by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases nor triggered by a prolonged incubation with lithium, thus excluding a role for the GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Thus, the VPA-dependent induction of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in human oligodendroglioma cells likely occurs through an epigenetic mechanism and may represent an early indicator of commitment to oligodendrocytic differentiation.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of proton transport in the glutamate transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-06-17

    The uptake of glutamate in nerve synapses is carried out by the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), involving the cotransport of a proton and three Na(+) ions and the countertransport of a K(+) ion. In this study, we use an EAAT3 homology model to calculate the pKa of several titratable residues around the glutamate binding site to locate the proton carrier site involved in the translocation of the substrate. After identifying E374 as the main candidate for carrying the proton, we calculate the protonation state of this residue in different conformations of EAAT3 and with different ligands bound. We find that E374 is protonated in the fully bound state, but removing the Na2 ion and the substrate reduces the pKa of this residue and favors the release of the proton to solution. Removing the remaining Na(+) ions again favors the protonation of E374 in both the outward- and inward-facing states, hence the proton is not released in the empty transporter. By calculating the pKa of E374 with a K(+) ion bound in three possible sites, we show that binding of the K(+) ion is necessary for the release of the proton in the inward-facing state. This suggests a mechanism in which a K(+) ion replaces one of the ligands bound to the transporter, which may explain the faster transport rates of the EAATs compared to its archaeal homologs.

  2. Exposure to altered gravity conditions results in hypoxia-related enhancement of the presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana

    High-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters locate in the plasma membrane and maintain the low concentration of glutamate in synaptic cleft by the uptake of glutamate into neurons. Under hypoxic conditions glutamate transporters contribute to the glutamate release due to functioning in reverse mode. The release of glutamate via reverse-operated Na+-dependent glutamate transporters was investigated in brain synaptosomes under conditions of centrifugeinduced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analisis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity of control and hypergravity synaptosomes. Protonophore FCCP dissipates the proton gradient across synaptic vesicle thus synaptic vesicles are not able to keep glutamate inside. 1 microM FCCP induced the release of 4. 8 ±1. 0 % and 8. 0 ±1. 0 % of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control and G-loaded animals, respectively. Ca 2+-independent high- KCl stimulated L-[14C]glutamate release from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP increased considerably from 27. 0 ± 2. 2 % to 35. 0 ± 2. 3 % after centrifuge-induced hypergravity. No-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate was found to inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[14C]glutamate, thus the release was concluded to occur due to reversal of glutamate transporters. We have also found the inhibition of the activity of Na \\ K ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes after hypergravity that might also contribute to the enhancement of the transporter-mediated release of glutamate. These hypergravity-induced alterations in the transporter-mediated release of glutamate were suggested to correlate with the hypoxic injury of neurons. The changes we have revealed for the transporter-mediated release of glutamate may lead to mental disorders, upcoming seizures and neurotoxicity under hypergravity conditions.

  3. Estrogen attenuates Manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao BT; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17 -Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. 2002; Pawlak et al. 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuroSERMs) (Zhao et al. 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen (TX) may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis. PMID:22878846

  4. Chronic postnatal stress induces voluntary alcohol intake and modifies glutamate transporters in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Andreu, Marcela; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal stress alters stress responses for life, with serious consequences on the central nervous system (CNS), involving glutamatergic neurotransmission and development of voluntary alcohol intake. Several drugs of abuse, including alcohol and cocaine, alter glutamate transport (GluT). Here, we evaluated effects of chronic postnatal stress (CPS) on alcohol intake and brain glutamate uptake and transporters in male adolescent Wistar rats. For CPS from postnatal day (PD) 7, pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4 °C) for 1 h daily for 20 days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7 days (5-7 rats per group), then killed. CPS: (1) increased voluntary ethanol intake, (2) did not affect body weight gain or produce signs of toxicity with alcohol exposure, (3) increased glutamate uptake by hippocampal synaptosomes in vitro and (4) reduced protein levels (Western measurements) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and excitatory amino-acid transporter-3 (EAAT-3) but increased glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) levels. We propose that CPS-induced decrements in GLT-1 and EAAT-3 expression levels are opposed by activation of a compensatory mechanism to prevent excitotoxicity. A greater role for GLAST in total glutamate uptake to prevent enlarged extracellular glutamate levels is inferred. Although CPS strongly increased intake of ethanol, this had little impact on effects of CPS on brain glutamate uptake or transporters. However, the impact of early life adverse events on glutamatergic neurotransmission may underlie increased alcohol consumption in adulthood.

  5. Neuroprotection Promoted by Guanosine Depends on Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Transporters Activity in Hippocampal Slices Subjected to Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martins, Wagner C; Thomaz, Daniel T; Coelho, Victor; Poluceno, Gabriela Godoy; Lanznaster, Débora; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-05-01

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent against glutamatergic excitotoxicity by increasing glutamate uptake and decreasing its release. In this study, a putative effect of GUO action on glutamate transporters activity modulation was assessed in hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of brain ischemia. Slices subjected to OGD showed increased excitatory amino acids release (measured by D-[(3)H]aspartate release) that was prevented in the presence of GUO (100 µM). The glutamate transporter blockers, DL-TBOA (10 µM), DHK (100 µM, selective inhibitor of GLT-1), and sulfasalazine (SAS, 250 µM, Xc(-) system inhibitor) decreased OGD-induced D-aspartate release. Interestingly, DHK or DL-TBOA blocked the decrease in glutamate release induced by GUO, whereas SAS did not modify the GUO effect. GUO protected hippocampal slices from cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters, however selective blockade of GLT-1 or Xc- system only did not affect this protective action of GUO. OGD decreased hippocampal glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and GUO recovered GS activity to control levels without altering the kinetic parameters of GS activity, thus suggesting GUO does not directly interact with GS. Additionally, the pharmacological inhibition of GS activity with methionine sulfoximine abolished the effect of GUO in reducing D-aspartate release and cellular damage evoked by OGD. Altogether, results in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD show that GUO counteracts the release of excitatory amino acids, stimulates the activity of GS, and decreases the cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters activity.

  6. Colocalization of serotonin and vesicular glutamate transporter 3-like immunoreactivity in the midbrain raphe of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Mintz, Eric M; Scott, Tamara J

    2006-02-13

    Vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) expression has been specifically localized to brain regions rich in serotonergic cells. It has been suggested that this transporter may contribute to the regulation of extracellular glutamate concentrations via a nonsynaptic mechanism. In this study, we examine the colocalization of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 immunoreactivity with serotonin immunoreactivity in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei of Syrian hamsters. Brain sections from adult hamsters were fluorescently labeled for serotonin-ir and VGLUT3-ir and examined using confocal microscopy. The results indicate that most serotonergic cells of the midbrain raphe also expressed vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In addition, nonserotonergic cells in these brain regions also show immunoreactivity for the transporter. These data confirm previous findings of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 expression in serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons in rats. These findings suggest that the location of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 may be as much a function of neuroanatomical location as of the neurochemical identity of the expressing neurons.

  7. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D induces the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 and alters glutamate handling in non-transformed mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Genomic profiling of immortalized human mammary epithelial (hTERT-HME1) cells identified several metabolic genes, including the membrane glutamate transporter, SLC1A1, as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated. In these studies we have surveyed the effects of 1,25D on known glutamate transporters and evaluated its impact on cellular glutamate handling. We confirm that expression of SLC1A1 and all of its known transcript variants are significantly upregulated in hTERT-HME1 cells following 1,25D treatment. Expression of the full-length cognate protein, EAAT3 is correspondingly increased in 1,25D treated hTERT-HME1 cells. Under the same conditions, the expression of two other glutamate transporters - SLC1A6 (EAAT4) and SLC1A2 (EAAT2 or GLT-1) - is enhanced by 1,25D while that of SLC1A3 (EAAT1 or GLAST) and SLC7A11 (xCT) is decreased. Glutamate is not essential for growth of hTERT-HME1 cells, and supplemental glutamate (up to 0.5 mM) does not abrogate the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D. These data suggest that extracellular glutamate is not a major contributor to cellular energy metabolism in hTERT-HME1 cells under basal conditions and that the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D are not secondary to its effects on glutamate handling. Instead, the effects of 1,25D on glutamate transporters translated to a decrease in cellular glutamate concentration and an increase in media glutamate concentration, suggesting that one or more of these transporters functions to export glutamate in response to 1,25D exposure. The reduced cellular glutamate concentration may also reflect its incorporation into the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool, which is increased upon 1,25D treatment. In support of this concept, the expression of GCLC (which codes for the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) and genes which generate reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH (ie, G6PD, PGD, IDH2) are elevated in 1,25D treated cells. Taken together, these data identify 1,25D as a physiological

  8. Stimulation-Evoked Ca2+ Signals in Astrocytic Processes at Hippocampal CA3–CA1 Synapses of Adult Mice Are Modulated by Glutamate and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Szokol, Karolina; Jensen, Vidar; Enger, Rune; Trivedi, Chintan A.; Hvalby, Øivind; Helm, P. Johannes; Looger, Loren L.; Sprengel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To date, it has been difficult to reveal physiological Ca2+ events occurring within the fine astrocytic processes of mature animals. The objective of the study was to explore whether neuronal activity evokes astrocytic Ca2+ signals at glutamatergic synapses of adult mice. We stimulated the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibers in acute hippocampal slices from adult mice transduced with the genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator GCaMP5E driven by the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Two-photon imaging revealed global stimulation-evoked astrocytic Ca2+ signals with distinct latencies, rise rates, and amplitudes in fine processes and somata. Specifically, the Ca2+ signals in the processes were faster and of higher amplitude than those in the somata. A combination of P2 purinergic and group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists reduced the amplitude of the Ca2+ transients by 30–40% in both astrocytic compartments. Blockage of the mGluRs alone only modestly reduced the magnitude of the stimulation-evoked Ca2+ signals in processes and failed to affect the somatic Ca2+ response. Local application of group I or I/II mGluR agonists or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) elicited global astrocytic Ca2+ signals that mimicked the stimulation-evoked astrocytic Ca2+ responses. We conclude that stimulation-evoked Ca2+ signals in astrocytic processes at CA3–CA1 synapses of adult mice (1) differ from those in astrocytic somata and (2) are modulated by glutamate and ATP. PMID:25698739

  9. Stimulation-evoked Ca2+ signals in astrocytic processes at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses of adult mice are modulated by glutamate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wannan; Szokol, Karolina; Jensen, Vidar; Enger, Rune; Trivedi, Chintan A; Hvalby, Øivind; Helm, P Johannes; Looger, Loren L; Sprengel, Rolf; Nagelhus, Erlend A

    2015-02-18

    To date, it has been difficult to reveal physiological Ca(2+) events occurring within the fine astrocytic processes of mature animals. The objective of the study was to explore whether neuronal activity evokes astrocytic Ca(2+) signals at glutamatergic synapses of adult mice. We stimulated the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibers in acute hippocampal slices from adult mice transduced with the genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator GCaMP5E driven by the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Two-photon imaging revealed global stimulation-evoked astrocytic Ca(2+) signals with distinct latencies, rise rates, and amplitudes in fine processes and somata. Specifically, the Ca(2+) signals in the processes were faster and of higher amplitude than those in the somata. A combination of P2 purinergic and group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists reduced the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transients by 30-40% in both astrocytic compartments. Blockage of the mGluRs alone only modestly reduced the magnitude of the stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals in processes and failed to affect the somatic Ca(2+) response. Local application of group I or I/II mGluR agonists or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) elicited global astrocytic Ca(2+) signals that mimicked the stimulation-evoked astrocytic Ca(2+) responses. We conclude that stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals in astrocytic processes at CA3-CA1 synapses of adult mice (1) differ from those in astrocytic somata and (2) are modulated by glutamate and ATP.

  10. HCMV induces dysregulation of glutamate uptake and transporter expression in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ling; Wang, Bin; Qian, Dong-Meng; Song, Xu-Xia; Hu, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections are the leading cause of viral induced birth defects, affecting the central nervous system (CNS) primarily. Fetal CNS is especially vulnerable to CMV induced injury. As HCMV permissive cells, astrocytes are responsible for major glutamate transport and regulate extracellular levels of glutamate avoiding its accumulation which is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, highly purified astrocytes isolated from human first trimester aborted fetal brain were infected with HCMV AD169, glutamate uptake function was detected by (3)H labeling technic, and the expression level alterations of glutamate transporters (GLAST, GLT-1), glutamine synthetase (GS) and its activity were also investigated. Protein kinases C (PKC) inhibitor treatment was to identify whether PKC signalling involved in regulating glutamate uptake, protein expression of GLAST, GLT-1, GS and GS activity. Results indicated HCMV AD169 infection could modulate glutamate uptake, expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, GS and it activity through PKC signalling, suggesting a great susceptibility of human fetal astrocytes to HCMV infection, which significantly alters the uptake and metabolism of an important excitatory amino acid, glutamate, may be a potential mechanism for HCMV associated neurological disease, and an effective therapeutic target in neural diseases.

  11. Effects of ampicillin on cystine/glutamate antiporter and glutamate transporter 1 isoforms as well as ethanol drinking in male P rats.

    PubMed

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Sari, Youssef

    2015-07-23

    Evidence demonstrated that glial cells, mainly astrocytes, regulate glutamate uptake through several glutamate transporters. Among these glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1; its human homolog is excitatory amino acid transporter-2) is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake. Cystine-glutamate antiporter (xCT) is another glial protein critical in regulating glutamate transmission. Several studies from our laboratory demonstrated that attenuation of ethanol intkae was associated in part with upregulation of xCT and GLT-1 expression suggesting the important role of these transporters in the treatment of ethanol dependence. We found recently that β-lactam antibiotic, ampicillin, upregulated GLT-1 expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and consequently reduced ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of ampicillin on the expression of xCT and GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b) as well as on GLAST expression. We found that ampicillin reduced ethanol intake as compared to the saline (control)-treated group. In addition, we found that ampicillin induced upregulation of xCT, GLT-1a, and GLT-1b expression in both the PFC and NAc, but had no effect on GLAST expression. Our findings provide significant role of ampicillin on upregulating xCT and GLT-1 isoforms expression, might be suggested as possible targets for the attenuation of ethanol consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal partitioning of hexokinase 1 suggests disruption of a glutamate transport protein complex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shan, Dan; Mount, Daniel; Moore, Stephen; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2014-04-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) belongs to a family of Na(+) dependent glutamate transporters that maintain a low synaptic concentration of glutamate by removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft into astroglia and neurons. EAAT2 activity depends on Na(+) and K(+) gradients generated by Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and ATP. Hexokinase 1 (HK1), an initial enzyme of glycolysis, binds to mitochondrial outer membrane where it couples cytosolic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, producing ATP utilized by the EAAT2/Na(+)/K(+) ATPase protein complex to facilitate glutamate reuptake. In this study, we hypothesized that the protein complex formed by EAAT2, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and mitochondrial proteins in human postmortem prefrontal cortex may be disrupted, leading to abnormal glutamate transmission in schizophrenia. We first determined that EAAT2, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, HK1 and aconitase were found in both EAAT2 and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase interactomes by immunoisolation and mass spectrometry in human postmortem prefrontal cortex. Next, we measured levels of glutamate transport complex proteins in subcellular fractions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and found increases in the EAAT2B isoform of EAAT2 in a fraction containing extrasynaptic membranes and increased aconitase 1 in a mitochondrial fraction. Finally, an increased ratio of HK1 protein in the extrasynaptic membrane/mitochondrial fraction was found in subjects with schizophrenia, suggesting that HK1 protein is abnormally partitioned in this illness. Our findings indicate that the integrity of the glutamate transport protein complex may be disrupted, leading to decreased perisynaptic buffering and reuptake of glutamate, as well as impaired energy metabolism in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Glutamate Transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 Are Expressed in Vestibular Hair Cells and Calyx Endings

    PubMed Central

    Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chidavaenzi, Robstein L.; Venteo, Stephanie; Desmadryl, Gilles; Goldberg, Jay M.; Lysakowski, Anna; Chabbert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST), a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements. PMID:23049999

  14. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes during normal human corticogenesis and type II lissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akiko; Takashima, Sachio; Yokoo, Hideaki; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wada, Keiji; Iwaki, Toru

    2005-03-31

    Glutamate transporters are thought to have an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development. We investigated the expression of the sodium-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 in 11 human autopsied cases without neurological disorders and in four cases with type II lissencephaly including Walker Warburg's syndrome (WWS) and Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), both of which are classified as migration disorders of the human brain. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes was differentially regulated during normal human corticogenesis. Although EAAT1 and EAAT2 were mainly localized to the cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain, EAAT1 was enriched in the proliferative zones and radial glia from 13 gestational weeks (GW) to 20 GW. EAAT2 was abundant in the intermediate zone until 23 GW, and transiently expressed in the radial fibers of the transitional form of radial glia into mature astrocytes as well as partly in the corticofugal axonal bundles. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was robust in the apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons in the marginal zone and cortical plate during corticogenesis, and decreased postnatally. In the individuals with type II lissencephaly, glutamate transporters were expressed in the extrusion of neuroglial tissue. Bundles of EAAT2-immunoreactive radial fibers were prominent in the specimens at 20 GW. Thus, glutamate transporters are differentially regulated during normal and impaired corticogenesis. Altered glutamate transporter expression in type II lissencephaly suggests that glutamate metabolism is involved in the formation of the normal cortex and contributes to the disorganized cortex seen in migration disorders.

  15. Lesion-Induced Alterations in Astrocyte Glutamate Transporter Expression and Function in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Alexandra E.; Langer, Julia; Kafitz, Karl W.; Rose, Christine R.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes express the sodium-dependent glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1, which are critical to maintain low extracellular glutamate concentrations. Here, we analyzed changes in their expression and function following a mechanical lesion in the CA1 area of organotypic hippocampal slices. 6-7 days after lesion, a glial scar had formed along the injury site, containing strongly activated astrocytes with increased GFAP and S100β immunoreactivity, enlarged somata, and reduced capability for uptake of SR101. Astrocytes in the scar's periphery were swollen as well, but showed only moderate upregulation of GFAP and S100β and efficiently took up SR101. In the scar, clusters of GLT-1 and GLAST immunoreactivity colocalized with GFAP-positive fibers. Apart from these, GLT-1 immunoreactivity declined with increasing distance from the scar, whereas GLAST expression appeared largely uniform. Sodium imaging in reactive astrocytes indicated that glutamate uptake was strongly reduced in the scar but maintained in the periphery. Our results thus show that moderately reactive astrocytes in the lesion periphery maintain overall glutamate transporter expression and function. Strongly reactive astrocytes in the scar, however, display clusters of GLAST and GLT-1 immunoreactivity together with reduced glutamate transport activity. This reduction might contribute to increased extracellular glutamate concentrations and promote excitotoxic cell damage at the lesion site. PMID:24078881

  16. Plasticity of Astrocytic Coverage and Glutamate Transporter Expression in Adult Mouse Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pascal; Hirling, Harald; Welker, Egbert; Knott, Graham W

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytes play a major role in the removal of glutamate from the extracellular compartment. This clearance limits the glutamate receptor activation and affects the synaptic response. This function of the astrocyte is dependent on its positioning around the synapse, as well as on the level of expression of its high-affinity glutamate transporters, GLT1 and GLAST. Using Western blot analysis and serial section electron microscopy, we studied how a change in sensory activity affected these parameters in the adult cortex. Using mice, we found that 24 h of whisker stimulation elicited a 2-fold increase in the expression of GLT1 and GLAST in the corresponding cortical column of the barrel cortex. This returns to basal levels 4 d after the stimulation was stopped, whereas the expression of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 remained unaltered throughout. Ultrastructural analysis from the same region showed that sensory stimulation also causes a significant increase in the astrocytic envelopment of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We conclude that a period of modified neuronal activity and synaptic release of glutamate leads to an increased astrocytic coverage of the bouton–spine interface and an increase in glutamate transporter expression in astrocytic processes. PMID:17048987

  17. Effects of Administered Ethanol and Methamphetamine on Glial Glutamate Transporters in Rat Striatum and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Fahad S; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Sari, Youssef

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) or methamphetamine (MA) can lead to increase in extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain. Although studies from ours showed the effects of EtOH exposure on key glial glutamate transporters, little is known about the effects of sequential exposure to EtOH and MA or MA alone on certain glial glutamate transporters. In this study, we investigated the effects of sequential exposure to EtOH and MA on the expression of the major glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), as well as cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in striatum and hippocampus. We also tested the effects of ceftriaxone (CEF), known to upregulate GLT-1, in animals administered EtOH and MA. Wistar rats were orally gavaged with EtOH (6 g/kg) or water for 7 days. On the following day (day 8), the rats received four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of MA (10 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) occurring every 2 h. The rats were then treated with CEF (200 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or saline on days 8, 9, and 10. EtOH or MA exposure caused a significant downregulation of GLT-1 expression as compared to control groups in striatum and hippocampus. Furthermore, sequential exposure of EtOH and MA caused a significant downregulation of GLT-1 expression as compared to either drug administered alone in both brain regions. Importantly, GLT-1 expression was restored following CEF treatment. There were no significant differences on xCT and GLAST expression in striatum and hippocampus between all groups. These findings demonstrated that sequential exposure to EtOH and MA has additive effect in downregulation of GLT-1 and this effect can be attenuated by CEF treatment.

  18. TM4 of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 experiences substrate-induced motion during the transport cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xiuliang; Tan, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xiuping; Lu, Lingli; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), also known as glial glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1), plays an important role in maintaining the extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. The highly conserved TM2 transmembrane domain of GLT-1 maintains a stable position during the transport cycle; however, the effect of the transport cycle on the topology of TM4 in not well established. To further reveal the function of TM4, two cysteine pairs between TM2 and TM4 were introduced using site-directed mutagenesis. A significant decrease of transport activity was observed in the I93C/V241C and I97C/V241C mutants upon application of the oxidative cross-linking reagent, copper (II) (1,10-phenanthroline)3 (CuPh), which suggests that a conformational shift is essential for transporter activity. Furthermore, the decrease in activity by CuPh crosslinking was enhanced in external media with glutamate or potassium, which suggests that TM2 and TM4 assume closer proximity in the inward-facing conformation of the transporter. Our results suggest that the TM4 domain of GLT-1, and potentially other glutamate transporters, undergoes a complex conformational shift during substrate translocation, which involves an increase in the proximity of the TM2 and TM4 domains in the inward-facing conformation. PMID:27698371

  19. Substituted quinolines as inhibitors of L-glutamate transport into synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, R D; Esslinger, C S; Thompson, C M; Bridges, R J

    1998-07-01

    This study investigated the structure-activity relationships and kinetic properties of a library of kynurenate analogues as inhibitors of 3H-L-glutamate transport into rat forebrain synaptic vesicles. The lack of inhibitory activity observed with the majority of the monocyclic pyridine derivatives suggested that the second aromatic ring of the quinoline-based compounds played a significant role in binding to the transporter. A total of two kynurenate derivatives, xanthurenate and 7-chloro-kynurenate, differing only in the carbocyclic ring substituents, were identified as potent competitive inhibitors, exhibiting Ki values of 0.19 and 0.59 mM, respectively. The Km value for L-glutamate was found to be 2.46 mM. Parallel experiments demonstrated that while none of the kynurenate analogues tested effectively inhibited the synaptosomal transport of 3H-D-aspartate, some cross-reactivity was observed with the EAA ionotropic receptors. Molecular modeling studies were carried out with the identified inhibitors and glutamate in an attempt to preliminarily define the pharmacophore of the vesicular transporter. It is hypothesized that the ability of the kynurenate analogues to bind to the transporter may be tied to the capacity of the quinoline carbocyclic ring to mimic the negative charge of the gamma-carboxylate of glutamate. A total of two low energy solution conformers of glutamate were identified that exhibited marked functional group overlap with the most potent inhibitor, xanthurenate. These results help to further refine the pharmacological specificity of the glutamate binding site on the vesicular transporter and identify a series of inhibitors with which to investigate transporter function.

  20. Glutamate transport decreases mitochondrial pH and modulates oxidative metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Guillaume; Perreten, Hélène; Lengacher, Sylvain; Poburko, Damon; Demaurex, Nicolas; Magistretti, Pierre J; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-03-09

    During synaptic activity, the clearance of neuronally released glutamate leads to an intracellular sodium concentration increase in astrocytes that is associated with significant metabolic cost. The proximity of mitochondria at glutamate uptake sites in astrocytes raises the question of the ability of mitochondria to respond to these energy demands. We used dynamic fluorescence imaging to investigate the impact of glutamatergic transmission on mitochondria in intact astrocytes. Neuronal release of glutamate induced an intracellular acidification in astrocytes, via glutamate transporters, that spread over the mitochondrial matrix. The glutamate-induced mitochondrial matrix acidification exceeded cytosolic acidification and abrogated cytosol-to-mitochondrial matrix pH gradient. By decoupling glutamate uptake from cellular acidification, we found that glutamate induced a pH-mediated decrease in mitochondrial metabolism that surpasses the Ca(2+)-mediated stimulatory effects. These findings suggest a model in which excitatory neurotransmission dynamically regulates astrocyte energy metabolism by limiting the contribution of mitochondria to the metabolic response, thereby increasing the local oxygen availability and preventing excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  1. Effects of experimental traumatic brain injury and impaired glutamate transport on cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Zare, Mahshid Sadat; Gu, Feng; Abdulla, Ahmad; Powell, Simon; Žiburkus, Jokūbas

    2017-09-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, migraines, and seizures. Typically, following TBIs and other insults, neuronal excitability in and around the area of the injury is affected, with reported increases in local glutamate signaling. Astrocytic glutamate transporters are critical for precise regulation of the extracellular glutamate availability. However, it remains unclear how impaired astrocytic glutamate transport or an acute TBI affect characteristics of the CSD. We quantified the properties of CSD using whole-cell and extracellular electrophysiological recordings, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) in rat visual cortex in vitro. To model impaired astrocytic glutamate transport, we used astrocytic glutamate transporter blocker (2S, 3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoylamino] benzyloxy] aspartate (TFB-TBOA). In addition, an acute incision through the superficial cortical layers was used to model the effects of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) on CSD characteristics. Both manipulations; impaired glutamate cycling and acute cut profoundly affected the physiological properties of cell firing, latency to CSD formation, and its frequency of occurrence. VSD imaging analysis revealed significant changes in spatiotemporal dynamics and propagation of the CSD, suggesting that the cut itself may not initiate CSD depolarizing waves, but rather attract them. Blockade of GLT-1 caused significant reduction in whole-cell sodium currents and changes in CSD wave spatiotemporal characteristics as well, slowing it or even 'trapping' its propagation. Our results reveal new information about CSD properties in these pathological conditions and demonstrate an important role of GLT-1 in regulation of CSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Ceftriaxone on Glial Glutamate Transporters in Wistar Rats Administered Sequential Ethanol and Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the psychostimulants that is co-abused with ethanol. Repeated exposure to high dose of METH has been shown to cause increases in extracellular glutamate concentration. We have recently reported that ethanol exposure can also increase the extracellular glutamate concentration and downregulate the expression of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). GLT-1 is a glial transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate. A Wistar rat model of METH and ethanol co-abuse was used to examine the expression of GLT-1 as well as other glutamate transporters such as cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). We also examined the body temperature in rats administered METH, ethanol or both drugs. We further investigated the effects of ceftriaxone (CEF), a β-lactam antibiotic known to upregulate GLT-1, in this METH/ethanol co-abuse rat model. After 7 days of either ethanol (6 g/kg) or water oral gavage, Wistar rats received either saline or METH (10 mg/kg i.p. every 2 h × 4), followed by either saline or CEF (200 mg/kg) posttreatment. METH administered alone decreased GLT-1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and increased body temperature, but did not reduce either xCT or GLAST expression in ethanol and water-pretreated rats. Interestingly, ethanol and METH were found to have an additive effect on the downregulation of GLT-1 expression in the NAc but not in the PFC. Moreover, ethanol alone caused GLT-1 downregulation in the NAc and elevated body temperature compared to control. Finally, CEF posttreatment significantly reversed METH-induced hyperthermia, restored GLT-1 expression, and increased xCT expression. These findings suggest the potential therapeutic role of CEF against METH- or ethanol/METH-induced hyperglutamatergic state and hyperthermia. PMID:27713684

  3. Glutamate transporter GLT-1 as a therapeutic target for substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas J.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new treatments for substance use disorders requires identification of targetable molecular mechanisms. Pathology in glutamatergic neurotransmission system in brain reward circuitry has been implicated in relapse to multiple classes of drugs. Glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) crucially regulates glutamatergic signaling by removing excess glutamate from the extrasynaptic space. The purpose of this review is to highlight the effects of addictive drug use on GLT-1 and glutamate uptake, and using GLT-1 as a target in addiction pharmacotherapy. Cocaine, opioids, ethanol, nicotine, amphetamines, and cannabinoids each affect GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake, and restoring GLT-1 expression with N-acetylcysteine or ceftriaxone shows promise in correcting pre-clinical and clinical manifestations of drug addiction. PMID:26022265

  4. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  5. Altered postnatal development of cortico-hippocampal neuronal electric activity in mice deficient for the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Galán, Marta; Makarova, Julia; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Herreras, Oscar

    2012-02-01

    The deficiency in the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1 results in a loss of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle in the brain neurons, hypomyelination, and additional defects in the brain metabolism. We studied the development of cortico/hippocampal local field potential (LFP) in Aralar/AGC1 knockout (KO) mice. Laminar profiles of LFP, evoked potentials, and unit activity were recorded under anesthesia in young (P15 to P22) Aralar-KO and control mice as well as control adults. While LFP power increased 3 to 7 times in both cortex and hippocampus of control animals during P15 to P22, the Aralar-KO specimens hardly progressed. The divergence was more pronounced in the CA3/hilus region. In parallel, spontaneous multiunit activity declined severely in KO mice. Postnatal growth of hippocampal-evoked potentials was delayed in KO mice, and indicated abnormal synaptic and spike electrogenesis and reduced output at P20 to P22. The lack of LFP development in KO mice was accompanied by the gradual appearance of epileptic activity in the CA3/hilus region that evolved to status epilepticus. Strikingly, CA3 bursts were poorly conducted to the CA1 field. We conclude that disturbed substrate supply to neuronal mitochondria impairs development of cortico-hippocampal LFPs. Aberrant neuronal electrogenesis and reduced neuron output may explain circuit dysfunction and phenotype deficiencies.

  6. Functional and morphological characterization of glutamate transporters in the rat locus coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, M C; Gerrikagoitia, I; Martínez-Millán, L; Mendiguren, A; Pineda, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in the CNS contribute to the clearance of glutamate released during neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to explore the role of EAATs in the regulation of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons by glutamate. Experimental Approach We measured the effect of different EAAT subtype inhibitors/enhancers on glutamate- and KCl-induced activation of LC neurons in rat slices. EAAT2–3 expression in the LC was also characterized by immunohistochemistry. Key Results The EAAT2–5 inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyloxaspartic acid (100 μM), but not the EAAT2, 4, 5 inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (100 μM) or the EAAT2 inhibitor dihydrokainic acid (DHK; 100 μM), enhanced the glutamate- and KCl-induced activation of the firing rate of LC neurons. These effects were blocked by ionotropic, but not metabotrobic, glutamate receptor antagonists. DHK (100 μM) was the only EAAT inhibitor that increased the spontaneous firing rate of LC cells, an effect that was due to inhibition of EAAT2 and subsequent AMPA receptor activation. Chronic treatment with ceftriaxone (200 mg·kg−1 i.p., once daily, 7 days), an EAAT2 expression enhancer, increased the actions of glutamate and DHK, suggesting a functional impact of EAAT2 up-regulation on the glutamatergic system. Immuhistochemical data revealed the presence of EAAT2 and EAAT3 surrounding noradrenergic neurons and EAAT2 on glial cells in the LC. Conclusions and Implications These results remark the importance of EAAT2 and EAAT3 in the regulation of rat LC by glutamate. Neuronal EAAT3 would be responsible for terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate, whereas glial EAAT2 would regulate tonic glutamate concentrations in this nucleus. PMID:23638698

  7. Astrocyte VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent cycling and modulate glutamate transporter trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Guillon, Marc; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Key points Mouse cortical astrocytes express VAMP3 but not VAMP2. VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo- and endocytotic cycling at the plasma membrane. VAMP3 vesicle traffic regulates the recycling of plasma membrane glutamate transporters. cAMP modulates VAMP3 vesicle cycling and glutamate uptake. Abstract Previous studies suggest that small synaptic-like vesicles in astrocytes carry vesicle-associated vSNARE proteins, VAMP3 (cellubrevin) and VAMP2 (synaptobrevin 2), both contributing to the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis of gliotransmitters, thereby modulating brain information processing. Here, using cortical astrocytes taken from VAMP2 and VAMP3 knock-out mice, we find that astrocytes express only VAMP3. The morphology and function of VAMP3 vesicles were studied in cultured astrocytes at single vesicle level with stimulated emission depletion (STED) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopies. We show that VAMP3 antibodies label small diameter (∼80 nm) vesicles and that VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo-endocytosis. We also show that this pathway modulates the surface expression of plasma membrane glutamate transporters and the glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Finally, using pharmacological and optogenetic tools, we provide evidence suggesting that the cytosolic cAMP level influences astrocytic VAMP3 vesicle trafficking and glutamate transport. Our results suggest a new role for VAMP3 vesicles in astrocytes. PMID:25864578

  8. The Domain Interface of the Human Glutamate Transporter EAAT1 Mediates Chloride Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Cater, Rosemary J.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Ryan, Renae M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of glutamate within the glutamatergic synapse is tightly regulated by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs). In addition to their primary role of clearing extracellular glutamate, the EAATs also possess a thermodynamically uncoupled Cl− conductance. Several crystal structures of an archaeal EAAT homolog, GltPh, at different stages of the transport cycle have been solved. In a recent structure, an aqueous cavity located at the interface of the transport and trimerization domains has been identified. This cavity is lined by polar residues, several of which have been implicated in Cl− permeation. We hypothesize that this cavity opens during the transport cycle to form the Cl− channel. Residues lining this cavity in EAAT1, including Ser-366, Leu-369, Phe-373, Arg-388, Pro-392, and Thr-396, were mutated to small hydrophobic residues. Wild-type and mutant transporters were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology, and radiolabeled substrate uptake was used to investigate function. Significant alterations in substrate-activated Cl− conductance were observed for several mutant transporters. These alterations support the hypothesis that this aqueous cavity at the interface of the transport and trimerization domains is a partially formed Cl− channel, which opens to form a pore through which Cl− ions pass. This study enhances our understanding as to how glutamate transporters function as both amino-acid transporters and Cl− channels. PMID:25099801

  9. Effects of Amoxicillin and Augmentin on Cystine-Glutamate Exchanger and Glutamate Transporter 1 Isoforms as well as Ethanol Intake in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hakami, Alqassem Y.; Hammad, Alaa M.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is associated with alteration of glutamate transport and glutamate neurotransmission. Glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is a major transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate concentration, which is also regulated by cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT). Importantly, we recently reported that amoxicillin and Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate) upreglulated GLT-1 expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) as well as reduced ethanol consumption in male P rats. In this study, we examined the effects of amoxicillin and Augmentin on GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), xCT, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) expression in NAc and PFC as well as ethanol intake in male P rats. We found that both compounds significantly reduced ethanol intake, and increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in NAc. However, only Augmentin increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in PFC. There were no effects of these compounds on GLAST expression in NAc and PFC. These findings demonstrated that Augmentin and amoxicillin have the potential to upregulate GLT-1 isoforms and xCT expression, and consequently attenuate ethanol dependence. PMID:27199635

  10. Large collective motions regulate the functional properties of glutamate transporter trimers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jie; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Watts, Spencer D.; Bahar, Ivet; Amara, Susan G.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters clear synaptically released glutamate to maintain precise communication between neurons and limit glutamate neurotoxicity. Although much progress has been made on the topology, structure, and function of these carriers, few studies have addressed large-scale structural motions collectively associated with substrate transport. Here we show that a series of single cysteine substitutions in the helical hairpin HP2 of excitatory amino acid transporter 1 form intersubunit disulfide cross-links within the trimer. After cross-linking, substrate uptake, but not substrate-activated anion conductance, is completely inhibited in these mutants. These disulfide bridges link residue pairs > 40 Å apart in the outward-facing crystal structure, and can be explained by concerted subunit movements predicted by the anisotropic network model (ANM). The existence of these global motions is further supported by the observation that single cysteine substitutions at the extracellular part of the transmembrane domain 8 can also be cross-linked by copper phenanthroline as predicted by the ANM. Interestingly, the transport domain in the un-cross-linked subunit of the trimer assumes an inward-facing orientation, suggesting that individual subunits potentially undergo separate transitions between outward- and inward-facing forms, rather than an all-or-none transition of the three subunits, a mechanism also supported by ANM-predicted intrinsic dynamics. These results shed light on how large collective motions contribute to the functional dynamics of glutamate transporters. PMID:21876140

  11. Effect of berberine and Berberis aetnensis C. Presl. alkaloid extract on glutamate-evoked tissue transglutaminase up-regulation in astroglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Agata; Acquaviva, Rosaria; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Raciti, Giuseppina; Vanella, Angelo; De Pasquale, Rita; Puglisi, Salvatore; Iauk, Liliana

    2011-06-01

    Berberis aetnensis C. Presl. is a bushy-spiny shrub common on Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy), containing various alkaloids with several pharmacological properties. This study assessed the effect of berberine and of the alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis roots on the glutamate-evoked tissue transglutaminase (TG2) up-regulation in rat astrocyte primary cultures, used as an in vitro model of excitotoxicity. The findings show that the alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis roots consists mainly of berberine. Furthermore, berberine and the alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis roots were able to restore the oxidative status modified by glutamate and the levels of TG2 to control values. It was found that berberine or the alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis roots are able to ameliorate the excessive production of glutamate, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. Thus, it is suggested that berberine and the alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis roots, may represent a natural therapeutic strategy in the neuropathological conditions associated with excitotoxicity.

  12. Changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 in rat brain after exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kerdsan, Walailuk; Thanoi, Samur; Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa

    2012-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psychostimulant, can induce glutamate release in several brain areas such as cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Excess glutamate is ordinarily removed from the synaptic cleft by glutamate transporters for maintaining homoeostasis. EAAT3, a subtype of glutamate transporter expressed mainly by neurons, is a major glutamate transporter in the hippocampus and cortex. Therefore, this study examined the effects of acute and sub-acute METH administration on the expression of the EAAT3 in the hippocampal formation, striatum and frontal cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received vehicle injections (i.p.) for 13 days followed by one injection of METH (8 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 14 in acute group. Animals received METH (4 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 14 days in sub-acute and control groups, respectively. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was determined by western blotting followed by measurement of the integrated optical density. A significant increase in EAAT3 was found in the hippocampal formation after sub-acute, but not acute, METH administration. Conversely, a significant decrease in EAAT3 in striatum was observed in both acute and sub-acute groups. A trend towards a decrease in EAAT3 was also found in frontal cortex in the sub-acute group. Our results of decreased EAAT3 in striatum and frontal cortex suggest deficits of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses after METH exposure. Increased EAAT3 expression in the hippocampus may be a compensatory response to possible deficits of glutamatergic neurotransmission induced by METH. Moreover, our findings provide further support for glutamatergic dysfunction with abnormalities involving a transporter important in the regulation of neuronal glutamate.

  13. Elevated ammonium levels: differential acute effects on three glutamate transporter isoforms.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Rikke; Novak, Ivana; MacAulay, Nanna

    2012-03-15

    Increased ammonium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3)) in the brain is a significant factor in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy, which involves altered glutamatergic neurotransmission. In glial cell cultures and brain slices, glutamate uptake either decreases or increases following acute ammonium exposure but the factors responsible for the opposing effects are unknown. Excitatory amino acid transporter isoforms EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 were expressed in Xenopus oocytes to study effects of ammonium exposure on their individual function. Ammonium increased EAAT1- and EAAT3-mediated [(3)H]glutamate uptake and glutamate transport currents but had no effect on EAAT2. The maximal EAAT3-mediated glutamate transport current was increased but the apparent affinities for glutamate and Na(+) were unaltered. Ammonium did not affect EAAT3-mediated transient currents, indicating that EAAT3 surface expression was not enhanced. The ammonium-induced stimulation of EAAT3 increased with increasing extracellular pH, suggesting that the gaseous form NH(3) mediates the effect. An ammonium-induced intracellular alkalinization was excluded as the cause of the enhanced EAAT3 activity because 1) ammonium acidified the oocyte cytoplasm, 2) intracellular pH buffering with MOPS did not reduce the stimulation, and 3) ammonium enhanced pH-independent cysteine transport. Our data suggest that the ammonium-elicited uptake stimulation is not caused by intracellular alkalinization or changes in the concentrations of cotransported ions but may be due to a direct effect on EAAT1/EAAT3. We predict that EAAT isoform-specific effects of ammonium combined with cell-specific differences in EAAT isoform expression may explain the conflicting reports on ammonium-induced changes in glial glutamate uptake.

  14. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Miguel V; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 μm, niflumic acid caused a 19 ± 5 % reduction in l-[3H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of dl-[3H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the l-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, l-glutamate and l-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the l-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the l-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters. PMID:11432999

  15. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, M V; Vandenberg, R J

    2001-07-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. 2. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 microM, niflumic acid caused a 19 +/- 5 % reduction in L-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of DL-[(3)H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. 3. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the L-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. 4. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, L-glutamate and L-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the L-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the L-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. 5. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters.

  16. Glutamate transporter GLT-1 mediates N-acetylcysteine inhibition of cocaine reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Gipson, Cassandra D; Tran, Phuong K; Knackstedt, Lori A; Scofield, Michael D; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-03-01

    Both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may be useful in treating relapse to addictive drug use. Cocaine self-administration in rats reduces both cystine-glutamate exchange and glutamate transport via GLT-1 in the nucleus accumbens, and NAC treatment normalizes these two glial processes critical for maintaining glutamate homeostasis. However, it is not known if one or both of these actions by NAC is needed to inhibit relapse to cocaine seeking. To determine whether the restoration of GLT-1 and/or cystine-glutamate exchange is required for NAC to inhibit cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, we utilized the rat self-administration/extinction/reinstatement model of cocaine relapse. Rats were pre-treated in the nucleus accumbens with vivo-morpholino antisense oligomers targeting either GLT-1 or xCT (catalytic subunit of the cystine-glutamate exchanger) overlapping with daily NAC administration during extinction (100 mg/kg, i.p. for the last 5 days). Rats then underwent cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the absence of NAC, to determine if preventing NAC-induced restoration of one or the other protein was sufficient to block the capacity of chronic NAC to inhibit reinstatement. The vivo-morpholino suppression of xCT reduced cystine-glutamate exchange but did not affect NAC-induced reduction of reinstated cocaine seeking. In contrast, suppressing NAC-induced restoration of GLT-1 not only prevented NAC from inhibiting reinstatement, but augmented the capacity of cues to reinstate cocaine seeking. We hypothesized that the increased reinstatement after inhibiting NAC induction of GLT-1 resulted from increased extracellular glutamate, and show that augmented reinstatement is prevented by blocking mGluR5. Restoring GLT-1, not cystine-glutamate exchange, is a key mechanism whereby daily NAC reduces cue-induced cocaine reinstatement. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Decreased expression of glutamate transporters in astrocytes after human traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    van Landeghem, Frank K H; Weiss, Thorsten; Oehmichen, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    The primary mechanism for eliminating synaptically released glutamate is uptake by astrocytes. In the present study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the cellular expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2. Morphometrical immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a predominant expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2 in astrocytes of normal human neocortex (n = 10). Following traumatic injury of human brain (n = 55), the number of EAAT2-positive cells was decreased for a prolonged survival period within the traumatized neocortex and the pericontusional region. GFAP-positive astrocytes decreased in number within the first 24 h. Thereafter, the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes increased again, indicating formation of reactive gliosis. Double immunofluorescence examinations revealed a reduction in absolute numbers of GFAP-positive astrocytes coexpressing EAAT1 or EAAT2 at survival times up to 7 days. In addition, the relative fractions of astrocytes coexpressing glutamate transporters decreased following TBI. We conclude that the posttraumatic reduction in cellular EAAT 1 and EAAT2 expression is predominantly due to degeneration of astrocytes and to downregulation in surviving astrocytes. Our results support the view that reduced glutamate uptake by astrocytes contributes to posttraumatic elevation of extracellular glutamate in humans.

  18. Embryonic alcohol exposure promotes long-term effects on cerebral glutamate transport of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Suelen; Mussulini, Ben Hur; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Zenki, Kamila Cagliari; Santos da Silva, Emerson; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed substance throughout the world. During development it can substantially damage the human fetus, whereas the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. The brain damage induced by prenatal alcohol exposure may lead to a variety of long-lasting behavioral and neurochemical problems. However, there are no data concerning the effects of developmental ethanol exposure on the glutamatergic system, where extracellular glutamate acts as signaling molecule. Here we investigated the effect of ethanol exposure for 2h (concentrations of 0.0%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.50%, and 1.00%) in embryos at 24h post-fertilization (hpf) by measuring the functionality of glutamate transporters in the brain of adult (4 months) zebrafish. However, ethanol 0.1%, 0.25% and 0.50% decreased transport of glutamate to 81.96%, 60.65% and 45.91% respectively, when compared with the control group. Interestingly, 1.00% was able to inhibit the transport activity to 68.85%. In response to the embryonic alcohol exposure, we found impairment in the function of cerebral glutamate transport in adult fish, contributing to long-term alteration in the homeostasis glutamatergic signaling.

  19. Bovine neuronal vesicular glutamate transporter activity is inhibited by ergovaline and other ergopeptines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    L-Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter responsible for neurotransmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. Vesicular Glu transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 concentrate (50 mM) Glu (Km = 1 to 4 mM) into synaptic vesicles (S...

  20. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death.

  1. [(18)F]FDG PET signal is driven by astroglial glutamate transport.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Eduardo R; Parent, Maxime J; Souza, Débora G; Leuzy, Antoine; Lecrux, Clotilde; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Gauthier, Serge; Pellerin, Luc; Hamel, Edith; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Contributions of glial cells to neuroenergetics have been the focus of extensive debate. Here we provide positron emission tomography evidence that activation of astrocytic glutamate transport via the excitatory amino acid transporter GLT-1 triggers widespread but graded glucose uptake in the rodent brain. Our results highlight the need for a reevaluation of the interpretation of [(18)F]FDG positron emission tomography data, whereby astrocytes would be recognized as contributing to the [(18)F]FDG signal.

  2. Distribution of glutamate transporters in the hippocampus of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Proper, E A; Hoogland, G; Kappen, S M; Jansen, G H; Rensen, M G A; Schrama, L H; van Veelen, C W M; van Rijen, P C; van Nieuwenhuizen, O; Gispen, W H; de Graan, P N E

    2002-01-01

    In patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased extracellular glutamate levels in the epileptogenic hippocampus both during and after clinical seizures have been reported. These increased glutamate levels could be the result of malfunctioning and/or downregulation of glutamate transporters (also known as EAATs; excitatory amino acid transporters). In this study, the distribution of protein and mRNA of EAAT subtypes was examined in the hippocampus of TLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS group) and without hippocampal sclerosis (non-HS group), and in autopsy controls without neurological disorders. EAAT protein localization was studied by immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections using specific poly- and monoclonal antibodies against the glial glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 and the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3. Antibody specificity was shown by immunoblotting. In the HS group, a small decrease in EAAT1-immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in CA4 and in the polymorphic and supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus, compared with the control group. The strongest changes were found for EAAT2 levels. In the non-HS group, increased EAAT2-IR was detected in the CA1 and CA2 field, compared with non-epileptic controls. EAAT2-IR was decreased in the HS compared with the non-HS group. Fewer EAAT3-positive cells were found in the HS group than in the non-HS and control group. In both TLE groups, increased EAAT3 levels were observed in individual neurones. In the HS group, the percentage of EAAT3-IR neurones was increased in CA2 and in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Radioactive in situ hybridization for EAAT1-3 confirmed our immunohistochemical results. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization showed that not only astrocytes, but also neurones express EAAT2 mRNA. Taken together, differences in both mRNA and protein levels of glutamate transporter subtypes were found in specific regions in the TLE hippocampus, with most severe

  3. Regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 by mammalian target of rapamycin mTOR.

    PubMed

    Almilaji, Ahmad; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Guo, Anne; Munoz, Carlos; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-05-04

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is stimulated by insulin, growth factors and nutrients and confers survival of several cell types. The kinase has previously been shown to stimulate amino acid uptake. In neurons, the cellular uptake of glutamate by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) decreases excitation and thus confers protection against excitotoxicity. In epithelia, EAAT3 accomplishes transepithelial glutamate and aspartate transport. The present study explored, whether mTOR regulates EAAT3 (SLC1A1). To this end, cRNA encoding EAAT3 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without cRNA encoding mTOR and the glutamate induced current (I(glu)), a measure of glutamate transport, determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. Moreover, EAAT3 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. As a result, I(glu) was observed in Xenopus oocytes expressing EAAT3 but not in water injected oocytes. Coexpression of mTOR significantly increased I(glu), an effect reversed by rapamycin (100 nM). mTOR coexpression increased EAAT3 protein abundance in the cell membrane. The decay of I(glu) following inhibition of carrier insertion with brefeldin A in oocytes coexpressing EAAT3 with mTOR was similar in the presence and absence of rapamycin (100 nM). In conclusion, mTOR is a novel powerful regulator of EAAT3 and may thus contribute to protection against neuroexcitotoxicity.

  4. Engineering the glutamate transporter homologue GltPh using protein semisynthesis.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Annen, Alvin W; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2015-03-03

    Glutamate transporters catalyze the concentrative uptake of glutamate from synapses and are essential for normal synaptic function. Despite extensive investigations of glutamate transporters, the mechanisms underlying substrate recognition, ion selectivity, and the coupling of substrate and ion transport are not well-understood. Deciphering these mechanisms requires the ability to precisely engineer the transporter. In this study, we describe the semisynthesis of GltPh, an archaeal homologue of glutamate transporters. Semisynthesis allows the precise engineering of GltPh through the incorporation of unnatural amino acids and peptide backbone modifications. In the semisynthesis, the GltPh polypeptide is initially assembled from a recombinantly expressed thioester peptide and a chemically synthesized peptide using the native chemical ligation reaction followed by in vitro folding to the native state. We have developed a robust procedure for the in vitro folding of GltPh. Biochemical characterization of the semisynthetic GltPh indicates that it is similar to the native transporter. We used semisynthesis to substitute Arg397, a highly conserved residue in the substrate binding site, with the unnatural analogue, citrulline. Our studies demonstrate that Arg397 is required for high-affinity substrate binding, and on the basis of our results, we propose that Arg397 is involved in a Na+-dependent remodeling of the substrate binding site required for high-affinity Asp binding. We anticipate that the semisynthetic approach developed in this study will be extremely useful in investigating functional mechanisms in GltPh. Further, the approach developed in this study should also be applicable to other membrane transport proteins.

  5. Quantitative analysis of immunolabeling for serotonin and for glutamate transporters after administration of imipramine and citalopram.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan M; Bryan-Lluka, Lesley J; Pow, David V

    2005-05-03

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an amine neurotransmitter derived from tryptophan and is important in brain systems regulating mood, emotional behavior, and sleep. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs are used to treat disorders such as depression, stress, eating disorders, autism, and schizophrenia. It is thought that these drugs act to prolong the action of 5-HT by blocking reuptake. This may lead to decreased 5-HT content in the nerve fibers themselves; however, this has not previously been directly demonstrated. We have studied the effects of administration of two drugs, imipramine and citalopram, on levels of 5-HT in nerve fibers in the murine brain. Quantitative analysis of the areal density of 5-HT fibers throughout the brain was performed using ImageJ software. While a high density of fibers was observed in mid- and hind-brain regions and areas such as thalamus and hypothalamus, densities were far lower in areas such as cortex, where SSRIs might be thought to exert their actions. As anticipated, imipramine and citalopram produced a decline in 5-HT levels in nerve fibers, but the result was not uniform. Areas such as inferior colliculus showed significant reduction whereas little, if any, change was observed in the adjacent superior colliculus. The reason for, and significance of, this regionality is unclear. It has been proposed that serotonin effects in the brain might be linked to changes in glutamatergic transmission. Extracellular glutamate levels are regulated primarily by glial glutamate transporters. Qualitative evaluation of glutamate transporter immunolabeling in cortex of control and drug-treated mice revealed no discernable difference in intensity of glutamate transporter immunoreactivity. These data suggest that changes in intracellular and extracellular levels of serotonin do not cause concomitant changes in astroglial glutamate transporter expression, and thus cannot represent a mechanism for the delayed efficacy of

  6. Axonal Segregation and Role of the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter VGLUT3 in Serotonin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Aurore N.; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Giguère, Nicolas; Fortin, Guillaume M.; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Descarries, Laurent; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2016-01-01

    A subset of monoamine neurons releases glutamate as a cotransmitter due to presence of the vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT2 or VGLUT3. In addition to mediating vesicular loading of glutamate, it has been proposed that VGLUT3 enhances serotonin (5-HT) vesicular loading by the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in 5-HT neurons. In dopamine (DA) neurons, glutamate appears to be released from specialized subsets of terminals and it may play a developmental role, promoting neuronal growth and survival. The hypothesis of a similar developmental role and axonal localization of glutamate co-release in 5-HT neurons has not been directly examined. Using postnatal mouse raphe neurons in culture, we first observed that in contrast to 5-HT itself, other phenotypic markers of 5-HT axon terminals such as the 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT) show a more restricted localization in the axonal arborization. Interestingly, only a subset of SERT- and 5-HT-positive axonal varicosities expressed VGLUT3, with SERT and VGLUT3 being mostly segregated. Using VGLUT3 knockout mice, we found that deletion of this transporter leads to reduced survival of 5-HT neurons in vitro and also decreased the density of 5-HT-immunoreactivity in terminals in the dorsal striatum and dorsal part of the hippocampus in the intact brain. Our results demonstrate that raphe 5-HT neurons express SERT and VGLUT3 mainly in segregated axon terminals and that VGLUT3 regulates the vulnerability of these neurons and the neurochemical identity of their axonal domain, offering new perspectives on the functional connectivity of a cell population involved in anxiety disorders and depression. PMID:27147980

  7. 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated neurotransmission modulates spontaneous and vagal-evoked glutamate release in the nucleus of the solitary tract effect of uptake blockade.

    PubMed

    Hosford, Patrick S; Mifflin, Steve W; Ramage, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    The effect of blockade of either 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)/serotonin transporter (SERT) with citalopram or the organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3)/plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) with decynium-22 (D-22) on spontaneous and evoked release of 5-HT in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) was investigated in rat brainstem slices treated with gabazine. 5-HT release was measured indirectly by changes in the frequency and amplitude of glutamatergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) [in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX)] and evoked EPSCs. Blockade of 5-HT3 receptors with granisetron reduced, whereas the 5-HT3 agonist phenylbiguanide increased, the frequency of mEPSCs. 5-HT decreased mEPSC frequency at low concentrations and increased frequency at high concentrations. This inhibition was blocked by the 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), which was ineffective on its own, whereas the excitation was reversed by granisetron. The addition of citalopram or D-22 caused inhibition, which was prevented by 5-HT1A blockade. Thus, in the NTS, the spontaneous release of 5-HT is able to activate 5-HT3 receptors, but not 5-HT1A receptors, as the release in their vicinity is removed by uptake. The ineffectiveness of corticosterone suggests that the low-affinity, high-capacity transporter is PMAT, not OCT3. For evoked 5-HT release, only D-22 caused an increase in the amplitude of EPSCs, with a decrease in the paired pulse ratio, and increased the number of spontaneous EPSCs after 20-Hz stimulation. Thus, for the evoked release of 5-HT, the low-affinity, high-capacity transporter PMAT, but not 5-HT transporter (5-HTT)/SERT, is important in the regulation of changes in 5-HT extracellular concentration.

  8. Regulation of hepatic EAAT-2 glutamate transporter expression in human liver cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Najimi, Mustapha; Stéphenne, Xavier; Sempoux, Christine; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity and expression of EAAT2 glutamate transporter in both in vitro and in vivo models of cholestasis. METHODS: This study was conducted on human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cell cultures, the liver of bile duct ligated rats and human specimens from cholestatic patients. EAAT2 glutamate transporter activity and expression were analyzed using a substrate uptake assay, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. RESULTS: In HepG2 cells, cholestasis was mimicked by treating cells with the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Under such conditions, EAAT2 transporter activity was decreased both at the level of substrate affinity and maximal transport velocity. The decreased uptake was correlated with intracellular translocation of EAAT2 molecules as demonstrated using immunofluorescence. In the liver of bile duct ligated rats, an increase in EAAT2 transporter protein expression in hepatocytes was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. The same findings were observed in human liver specimens of cholestasis in which high levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were documented in patients with biliary atresia and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the alteration in glutamate handling by hepatocytes in liver cholestasis and suggests a potential cross-talk between glutamatergic and bile systems. PMID:24587631

  9. Involvement of the glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporter GLT-1 in antidepressant-like effects of Xiao Yao san on chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiu-Fang; Li, Yue-Hua; Chen, Jia-Xu; Sun, Long-Ji; Jiao, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xin-Xin; Zhou, Yan

    2017-06-19

    Xiao Yao San (XYS) is an herbal prescription which is used in the treatment of depression for thousands of years from Song dynasty in China (960-1127 A.D.), and is the bestselling and most popular herb formula for treating major depression. This study aimed to assess the chronic antidepressant effects of XYS and fluoxetine in depressed mice induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and its association with  alterations in glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporters. Mice in the control and model group were given 0.5 ml physiological saline by intragastric administration. Mice in two treatment groups were given XYS (0.25 g/kg/d) and fluoxetine (2.6 mg/kg/d), respectively. The depressive-like behaviors such as forced swim test (FST), sucrose preference test (SPT) and novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) test were measured after mice exposed to CUMS for 21 days. Body weight, contents of glutamate and glutamine, glutamine/glutamate ratio that is usually thought to reflect glutamate/glutamine cycle, and the protein and mRNA expressions of glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporter 1-2,GLAST/EAAT1 and GLT-1/EAAT2) were measured. The immunoreactivities of GLAST and GLT-1 in the hippocampus were also investigated. After CUMS exposure, mice exhibited depressive-like behaviors, body weight loss, increased glutamate level, decreased glutamine level, elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio, decreased GLT-1 protein expression and mRNA level, and decreased average optical density (AOD) of GLT-1 in the CA1, CA3 and DG in the hippocampus. These abnormalities could be effectively reversed by XYS or fluoxetine treatment. In addition, the study also found that GLAST expression in the hippocampus could not be altered by 21-d CUMS. The studies indicated that XYS may have therapeutic actions on depression -like behavior s induced by CUMS in mice possibly mediated by modulation of glutamate/glutamine cycle and glutamate transporter GLT-1 in the hippocampus.

  10. The density of EAAC1 (EAAT3) glutamate transporters expressed by neurons in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Holmseth, Silvia; Dehnes, Yvette; Huang, Yanhua H; Follin-Arbelet, Virginie V; Grutle, Nina J; Mylonakou, Maria N; Plachez, Celine; Zhou, Yun; Furness, David N; Bergles, Dwight E; Lehre, Knut P; Danbolt, Niels C

    2012-04-25

    The extracellular levels of excitatory amino acids are kept low by the action of the glutamate transporters. Glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) are the most abundant subtypes and are essential for the functioning of the mammalian CNS, but the contribution of the EAAC1 subtype in the clearance of synaptic glutamate has remained controversial, because the density of this transporter in different tissues has not been determined. We used purified EAAC1 protein as a standard during immunoblotting to measure the concentration of EAAC1 in different CNS regions. The highest EAAC1 levels were found in the young adult rat hippocampus. Here, the concentration of EAAC1 was ∼0.013 mg/g tissue (∼130 molecules μm⁻³), 100 times lower than that of GLT-1. Unlike GLT-1 expression, which increases in parallel with circuit formation, only minor changes in the concentration of EAAC1 were observed from E18 to adulthood. In hippocampal slices, photolysis of MNI-D-aspartate (4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl-D-aspartate) failed to elicit EAAC1-mediated transporter currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and D-aspartate uptake was not detected electron microscopically in spines. Using EAAC1 knock-out mice as negative controls to establish antibody specificity, we show that these relatively small amounts of EAAC1 protein are widely distributed in somata and dendrites of all hippocampal neurons. These findings raise new questions about how so few transporters can influence the activation of NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses.

  11. Retinal glutamate transporter changes in experimental glaucoma and after optic nerve transection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R G; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Quigley, Harry A

    2002-07-01

    High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal ganglion cells. Effective buffering of extracellular glutamate by retinal glutamate transporters is therefore important. This study was conducted to investigate whether glutamate transporter changes occur with two models of optic nerve injury in the rat. Glaucoma was induced in one eye of 35 adult Wistar rats by translimbal diode laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Twenty-five more rats underwent unilateral optic nerve transection. Two glutamate transporters, GLAST (EAAT-1) and GLT-1 (EAAT-2), were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Western blot analysis. Treated and control eyes were compared 3 days and 1, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Optic nerve damage was assessed semiquantitatively in epoxy-embedded optic nerve cross sections. Trabecular laser treatment resulted in moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in all animals. After 1 to 6 weeks of experimental glaucoma, all treated eyes had significant optic nerve damage. Glutamate transporter changes were not detected by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly reduced GLT-1 in glaucomatous eyes compared with control eyes at 3 days (29.3% +/- 6.7%, P = 0.01), 1 week (55.5% +/- 13.6%, P = 0.02), 4 weeks (27.2% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.05), and 6 weeks (38.1% +/- 7.9%, P = 0.01; mean reduction +/- SEM, paired t-tests, n = 5 animals per group, four duplicate Western blot analyses per eye). The magnitude of the reduction in GLT-1 correlated significantly with mean IOP in the glaucomatous eye (r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.01, linear regression). GLAST was significantly reduced (33.8% +/- 8.1%, mean +/- SEM) after 4 weeks of elevated IOP (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 5 animals per group). In contrast to glaucoma, optic nerve transection resulted in an increase in GLT-1 compared with the control eye (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 15 animals). There was no significant change in GLAST after transection. GLT-1 and GLAST were significantly

  12. Lobelane Inhibits Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release via Inhibition of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Justin R.; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (Ki = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [3H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC50 = 0.65 μM; Imax = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC50 = 0.42 μM, Imax = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for the development of a

  13. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  14. Amyloid-beta peptide decreases expression and function of glutamate transporters in nervous system cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Zhang, Xiuping; Meng, Xingjun; Xu, Pingyi; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2017-02-08

    Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter that regulates brain functions, and its activity is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters. Excess glutamate in the synaptic cleft and dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporters have been shown to be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease, but the precise regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. Using a D-[(3)H]-aspartic acid uptake assay, we found that Aβ1-42 oligomers impaired glutamate uptake in astrocytes and neurons. In astrocytes, this process was accompanied by reduced expression of GLT-1 and GLAST as detected by Western blot and immunocytofluorescence. However, mRNA levels of EAATs detected by qPCR in astrocytes and neurons were not altered, which suggests that this process is post-translational. Co-localization analysis using immunocytofluorescence showed that ubiquitylation of GLT-1 significantly increased. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced endocytosis of astrocytic GLT-1 may be involved in ubiquitylation. In addition, Aβ1-42 oligomers enhanced secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 into culture supernatant, which may be correlated with an inflammatory response and altered EAATs expression or function in Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the idea that dysregulation of the glutamatergic system may play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, enhancing expression or function of EAATs in astrocytes and neurons might be a new therapeutic approach in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. [Induction of amnesia evoked by memory reconsolidation disruption with glutamate or serotonin receptor antagonists depends on protein synthesis activation].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V

    2010-12-01

    Effects of DNQX (ionotropic AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonist) and metiotepin (serotonin receptor antagonist) and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor) on long-term memory reconsolidation processes were studied in snail Helix lucorum with definite type of food aversion conditioned reflex. DNQX or cycloheximide injected immediately before reminding disrupt retrieval of the food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, and repeated trials of learning with the same food as at initial trials did not form the food aversion 2 weeks later. Metiotepin + reminding also discrupt recalling of food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, while food aversion was repaired after repeated trials 2 weeks later. Simultaneous injections of DNQX + cycloheximide or metiotepin + cycloheximide immediately before reminding do not discrupt the food aversion. We suggest that unrecovered and recovered forms of amnesia induced by AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonists or serotonin receptor antagonist, respectively, need specific protein molecules de novo.

  16. Effects of Protons and HZE Particles on Glutamate Transport in Astrocytes, Neurons and Mixed Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Martha C.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Green, Lora M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation-induced neurotoxicity is a well-characterized phenomenon. However, the underlying mechanism of this toxicity is poorly understood. In the central nervous system (CNS), excitotoxic mechanisms are implicated in many neurodegenerative disease processes. Pivotal to the excitotoxic pathway is dysfunction of glutamate signaling. We reported previously that exposure to low-LET γ radiation results in altered glutamate transport in neurons and astrocytes. In the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of various particle radiations of differing LET on glutamate transport as a measure of the neurochemical vulnerability of the CNS. NTera2-derived neurons and astrocytes isolated as pure and mixed cultures were exposed to doses of 10 cGy, 50 cGy or 2 Gy of 250 MeV protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, or 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions. Transporter function was assessed at 3 h, 2 days and 7days after exposure. Functional assessment of glutamate transport revealed that neurons and astrocytes respond in a reciprocal manner after exposure to particle radiation. Uptake activity in neurons increased after particle irradiation. This effect was evident as late as our last time (7 days) after exposure (P < 0.05). In astrocytes, transporter activity decreased after exposure. The decrease in uptake observed in astrocytes was evident 7 days after exposure to carbon and iron ions. Uptake in mixed cultures after exposure to all three forms of radiation revealed a muted interactive response suggestive of the individual responses of each cellular phenotype acting in opposition. PMID:21128790

  17. GLT-1 Transport Stoichiometry Is Constant at Low and High Glutamate Concentrations when Chloride Is Substituted by Gluconate

    PubMed Central

    Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, but prolonged exposure even at micromolar concentrations causes neuronal death. Extracellular glutamate is maintained at nanomolar level by glutamate transporters, which, however, may reverse transport and release glutamate. If and when the reverse occurs depends on glutamate transport stoichiometry (GTS). Previously we found that in the presence of chloride, the coupled GLT-1 glutamate transporter current and its relationship to radiolabeled glutamate flux significantly decreased when extracellular glutamate concentration increased above 0.2 mM, which implies a change in GTS. Such high concentrations are feasible near GLT-1 expressed close to synaptic release site during excitatory neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to determine GLT-1 GTS at both low (19–75 μM) and high (300–1200 μM) glutamate concentration ranges. GTS experiments were conducted in the absence of chloride to avoid contributions by the GLT-1 uncoupled chloride conductance. Mathematical analysis of the transporter thermodynamic equilibrium allowed us to derive equations revealing the number of a particular type of ion transported per elementary charge based on the measurements of the transporter reversal potential. We found that GLT-1a expressed in COS-7 cells co-transports 1.5 Na+, 0.5 Glu-, 0.5 H+ and counter-transports 0.6 K+ per elementary charge in both glutamate concentration ranges, and at both 37°C and 26°C temperatures. The thermodynamic parameter Q10 = 2.4 for GLT-1 turnover rate of 19 s-1 (37°C, -50 mV) remained constant in the 10 μM–10 mM glutamate concentration range. Importantly, the previously reported decrease in the current/flux ratio at high glutamate concentration was not seen in the absence of chloride in both COS-7 cells and cultured rat neurons. Therefore, only in the absence of chloride, GLT-1 GTS remains constant at all glutamate concentrations. Possible explanations for why apparent GTS might vary in

  18. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Multiple Functions of Glutamate Uptake via Meningococcal GltT-GltM l-Glutamate ABC Transporter in Neisseria meningitidis Internalization into Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Kim, Kwang Sik; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Neisseria meningitidis internalization into human brain microvasocular endothelial cells (HBMEC) was triggered by the influx of extracellular l-glutamate via the GltT-GltM l-glutamate ABC transporter, but the underlying mechanism remained unclear. We found that the ΔgltT ΔgltM invasion defect in assay medium (AM) was alleviated in AM without 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) [AM(−S)]. The alleviation disappeared again in AM(−S) supplemented with 500 μM glutamate. Glutamate uptake by the ΔgltT ΔgltM mutant was less efficient than that by the wild-type strain, but only upon HBMEC infection. We also observed that both GltT-GltM-dependent invasion and accumulation of ezrin, a key membrane-cytoskeleton linker, were more pronounced when N. meningitidis formed larger colonies on HBMEC under physiological glutamate conditions. These results suggested that GltT-GltM-dependent meningococcal internalization into HBMEC might be induced by the reduced environmental glutamate concentration upon infection. Furthermore, we found that the amount of glutathione within the ΔgltT ΔgltM mutant was much lower than that within the wild-type N. meningitidis strain only upon HBMEC infection and was correlated with intracellular survival. Considering that the l-glutamate obtained via GltT-GltM is utilized as a nutrient in host cells, l-glutamate uptake via GltT-GltM plays multiple roles in N. meningitidis internalization into HBMEC. PMID:26099588

  20. Conditional Deletion of the Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Reveals That Astrocytic GLT-1 Protects against Fatal Epilepsy While Neuronal GLT-1 Contributes Significantly to Glutamate Uptake into Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Geraldine T.; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M.; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Hameed, Mustafa Q.; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A.; Fischer, Kathryn D.; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J.

    2015-01-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake. PMID:25834045

  1. Conditional deletion of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 reveals that astrocytic GLT-1 protects against fatal epilepsy while neuronal GLT-1 contributes significantly to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Petr, Geraldine T; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A; Fischer, Kathryn D; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake.

  2. Cellular resistance to Evans blue toxicity involves an up-regulation of a phosphate transporter implicated in vesicular glutamate storage.

    PubMed

    Israël, M; Tomasi, M; Bostel, S; Meunier, F M

    2001-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that the brain-specific Na+-dependent phosphate inorganic co-transporter (BNPI) is able to support glutamate transport and storage in synaptic vesicles. A procedure for measuring the vesicular pool of glutamate is described and was used to select cell lines according to their glutamate storage capacity. Two cell lines were selected: C6BU-1, with a large intracellular glutamate storage capacity, and NG108-15, devoid of it. Their contents in BNPI mRNA were compared by RT-PCR. We found that both cell lines had BNPI, but in addition C6BU-1 alone expresses the other isoform, DNPI. We also carried out a clonal selection of NG108-15 cells in the presence of the dye Evans blue, a competitive inhibitor of vesicular glutamate transport, very toxic for cells in culture. It was assumed that only those that sequester and eliminate the drug by overexpressing a vesicular glutamate transporter would survive. We found that the NG108-15 clones resistant to Evans blue had an increased storage capacity for glutamate. These cells also up-regulated the BNPI isoform of the phosphate transporter as shown by RT-PCR and northern blot.

  3. Carbamazepine enhances the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwanwoo; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Briggs, Nicole W; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) participate in maintaining extracellular homeostasis of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter, and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT, may also regulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. Dysfunction of EAAT3 has been shown to induce seizure in rats. We hypothesize that carbamazepine, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, enhances EAAT3 activity. We tested this hypothesis using oocytes artificially expressing EAAT3 and C6 rat glioma cells expressing endogenous EAAT3. In oocytes, carbamazepine dose-dependently enhanced EAAT3 activity. The EC50 of this carbamazepine effect was 12.2muM. The concentrations of carbamazepine to significantly enhance EAAT3 activity were within the therapeutic serum levels (17-51muM) of carbamazepine for the antiepileptic effect. Carbamazepine decreased the Km but did not change the maximal response of EAAT3 to glutamate. Carbamazepine-increased EAAT3 activity was inhibited by wortmannin or LY-294002, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, but was not affected by staurosporine, chelerythrine or calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In C6 cells, carbamazepine also enhanced the endogenous EAAT3 activity. However, carbamazepine did not affect the activity of EAAT4 expressed in Cos7 cells. These results suggest that carbamazepine at clinically relevant concentrations specifically enhances the affinity of EAAT3 for glutamate to increase EAAT3 activity via a PI3K-dependent pathway. EAAT3 may be a therapeutic target for carbamazepine in the central nervous system.

  4. Caffeine alters glutamate-aspartate transporter function and expression in rat retina.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Adriana Pinto; Ferreira, Danielle Dias Pinto; Fernandes, Arlete; Martins, Robertta Silva; Borges-Martins, Vladimir Pedro Peralva; Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Dos-Santos-Pereira, Maurício; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Kubrusly, Regina Celia Cussa

    2016-11-19

    l-Glutamate and l-aspartate are the main excitatory amino acids (EAAs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and their uptake regulation is critical for the maintenance of the excitatory balance. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are widely distributed among central neurons and glial cells. GLAST and GLT1 are expressed in glial cells, whereas excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1) is neuronal. Different signaling pathways regulate glutamate uptake by modifying the activity and expression of EAATs. In the present work we show that immature postnatal day 3 (PN3) rat retinas challenged by l-glutamate release [(3)H]-d-Aspartate linked to the reverse transport, with participation of NMDA, but not of non-NMDA receptors. The amount of [(3)H]-d-Aspartate released by l-glutamate is reduced during retinal development. Moreover, immature retinae at PN3 and PN7, but not PN14, exposed to a single dose of 200 or 500μM caffeine or the selective A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist 100nM ZM241385 decreased [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. Caffeine also selectively increased total expression of EAAT3 at PN7 and its expression in membrane fractions. However, both EAAT1 and EAAT2 were reduced after caffeine treatment in P2 fraction. Addition of 100nM DPCPX, an A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist, had no effect on the [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. [(3)H]-d-Aspartate release was dependent on both extracellular sodium and Dl-TBOA, but not calcium, implying a transporter-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that in the developing rat retina caffeine modulates [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake by blocking adenosine A2AR.

  5. Functional characterization of a glutamate/aspartate transporter from the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Anita; Cohen, Bruce N; Ross, Linda S; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2003-07-01

    Glutamate elicits a variety of effects in insects, including inhibitory and excitatory signals at both neuromuscular junctions and brain. Insect glutamatergic neurotransmission has been studied in great depth especially from the standpoint of the receptor-mediated effects, but the molecular mechanisms involved in the termination of the numerous glutamatergic signals have only recently begun to receive attention. In vertebrates, glutamatergic signals are terminated by Na(+)/K(+)-dependent high-affinity excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT), which have been cloned and characterized extensively. Cloning and characterization of a few insect homologues have followed, but functional information for these homologues is still limited. Here we report a study conducted on a cloned mosquito EAAT homologue isolated from the vector of the dengue virus, Aedes aegypti. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein, AeaEAAT, exhibits 40-50% identity with mammalian EAATs, and 45-50% identity to other insect EAATs characterized thus far. It transports L-glutamate as well as L- and D-aspartate with high affinity in the micromolar range, and demonstrates a substrate-elicited anion conductance when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, as found with mammalian homologues. Analysis of the spatial distribution of the protein demonstrates high expression levels in the adult thorax, which is mostly observed in the thoracic ganglia. Together, the work presented here provides a thorough examination of the role played by glutamate transport in Ae. aegypti.

  6. Alternate splicing and expression of the glutamate transporter EAAT5 in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aven; Anderson, Ashley R; Barnett, Nigel L; Stevens, Melissa G; Pow, David V

    2012-09-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 5 (EAAT5) is an unusual glutamate transporter that is expressed in the retina, where it is localised to two populations of glutamatergic neurons, namely the bipolar neurons and photoreceptors. EAAT5 exhibits two distinct properties, acting both as a slow glutamate transporter and as a glutamate-gated inhibitory receptor. The latter property is attributable to a co-associated chloride conductance. EAAT5 has previously been thought to exist only as a full-length form. We now demonstrate by PCR cloning and sequencing, the presence of five novel splice variant forms of EAAT5 which skip either partial or complete exons in the rat retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that each of these variants is expressed at the protein level as assessed by Western blotting using splice-specific antibodies that we have generated. We conclude that EAAT5 exists in multiple spliced forms, and propose, based upon retention or absence of key structural features, that these variant forms may potentially exhibit distinct properties relative to the originally described form of EAAT5. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotinic receptor activation contrasts pathophysiological bursting and neurodegeneration evoked by glutamate uptake block on rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Impaired uptake of glutamate builds up the extracellular level of this excitatory transmitter to trigger rhythmic neuronal bursting and delayed cell death in the brainstem motor nucleus hypoglossus. This process is the expression of the excitotoxicity that underlies motoneuron degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affecting bulbar motoneurons. In a model of motoneuron excitotoxicity produced by pharmacological block of glutamate uptake in vitro, rhythmic bursting is suppressed by activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors with their conventional agonist nicotine. Emergence of bursting is facilitated by nicotinic receptor antagonists. Following excitotoxicity, nicotinic receptor activity decreases mitochondrial energy dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and production of toxic radicals. Globally, these phenomena synergize to provide motoneuron protection. Nicotinic receptors may represent a novel target to contrast pathological overactivity of brainstem motoneurons and therefore to prevent their metabolic distress and death. Excitotoxicity is thought to be one of the early processes in the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because high levels of glutamate have been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of such patients due to dysfunctional uptake of this transmitter that gradually damages brainstem and spinal motoneurons. To explore potential mechanisms to arrest ALS onset, we used an established in vitro model of rat brainstem slice preparation in which excitotoxicity is induced by the glutamate uptake blocker dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). Because certain brain neurons may be neuroprotected via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine, we investigated if nicotine could arrest excitotoxic damage to highly ALS-vulnerable hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs). On 50% of patch-clamped HMs, TBOA induced intense network bursts that were inhibited by 1-10 μm nicotine, whereas nAChR antagonists

  8. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout leads to decreased heart rate possibly via parasympathetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Jiejie; Li, Liaoliao; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-08-01

    Parasympathetic tone is a dominant neural regulator for basal heart rate. Glutamate transporters (EAAT) via their glutamate uptake functions regulate glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We showed that EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice had a slower heart rate than wild-type mice when they were anesthetized. We design this study to determine whether non-anesthetized EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate and, if so, what may be the mechanism for this effect. Young adult EAAT3 knockout mice had slower heart rates than those of their littermate wild-type mice no matter whether they were awake or anesthetized. This difference was abolished by atropine, a parasympatholytic drug. Carbamylcholine chloride, a parasympathomimetic drug, equally effectively reduced the heart rates of wild-type and EAAT3 knockout mice. Positive immunostaining for EAAT3 was found in the area of nuclei deriving fibers for vagus nerve. There was no positive staining for the EAATs in the sinoatrial node. These results suggest that EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate at rest. This effect may be caused by an increased parasympathetic tone possibly due to increased glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These findings indicate that regulation of heart rate, a vital sign, is one of the EAAT biological functions.

  9. Platelets as potential peripheral markers to study functioning of the high-affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters in the nerve terminals of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Kasatkina, L. A.

    Activity of the high-affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters in the brain nerve terminals is demonstrated to alter under artificial gravity conditions. A comparison analysis is made for L-[14C] glutamate transport in platelets and isolated nerve terminals. The kinetic characteristics of the transporters, [Na+]-dependence and influence of the transpoter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate on the L-[14C] glutamate uptake process are determined. It is shown that glutamate uptake process is very similar for platelets and nerve terminals. Thus it is reasonable to use platelets as a potential peripheral model for glutamate transport.

  10. Motor neuron impairment mediated by a sumoylated fragment of the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Emily; Bogush, Alex; Goffredo, Michael; Roncaglia, Paola; Gustincich, Stefano; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutamate handling ensuing downregulation of expression and activity levels of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 is implicated in excitotoxic degeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We previously reported that EAAT2 (a.k.a. GLT-1) is cleaved by caspase-3 at its cytosolic carboxy-terminus domain. This cleavage results in impaired glutamate transport activity and generates a proteolytic fragment (CTE) that we found to be post-translationally conjugated by SUMO1. We show here that this sumoylated CTE fragment accumulates in the nucleus of spinal cord astrocytes of the SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS at symptomatic stages of disease. Astrocytic expression of CTE, artificially tagged with SUMO1 (CTE-SUMO1) to mimic the native sumoylated fragment, recapitulates the nuclear accumulation pattern of the endogenous EAAT2-derived proteolytic fragment. Moreover, in a co-culture binary system, expression of CTE-SUMO1 in spinal cord astrocytes initiates extrinsic toxicity by inducing caspase-3 activation in motor neuron-derived NSC-34 cells or axonal growth impairment in primary motor neurons. Interestingly, prolonged nuclear accumulation of CTE-SUMO1 is intrinsically toxic to spinal cord astrocytes, although this gliotoxic effect of CTE-SUMO1 occurs later than the indirect, non-cell autonomous toxic effect on motor neurons. As more evidence on the implication of SUMO substrates in neurodegenerative diseases emerges, our observations strongly suggest that the nuclear accumulation in spinal cord astrocytes of a sumoylated proteolytic fragment of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 could participate to the pathogenesis of ALS and suggest a novel, unconventional role for EAAT2 in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:21769946

  11. Abnormal Expression of Glutamate Transporter and Transporter Interacting Molecules in Prefrontal Cortex in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Deborah; Gupta, Daya; Harotunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate cycling is critically important for neurotransmission, and may be altered in schizophrenia. The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) facilitate the reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft and have a key role in glutamate cycling. We hypothesized that expression of the EAATs and the EAAT regulating proteins ARHGEF11, JWA, G protein suppressor pathway 1 (GPS1), and KIAA0302 are altered in the brain in schizophrenia. To test this, we measured expression of EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT interacting proteins in postmortem tissue from the dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia and a comparison group using in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. We found increased EAAT1 transcripts and decreased protein expression, increased EAAT3 transcripts and protein, and elevated protein expression of both GPS1 and KIAA0302 protein. We did not find any changes in expression of EAAT2. These data indicate that proteins involved in glutamate reuptake and cycling are altered in the cortex in schizophrenia, and may provide potential targets for future treatment strategies. PMID:18678470

  12. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  13. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  14. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES FOR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS REVEAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ORGANOPHOSPHATES BUT SIMILARITIES WITH UNRELATED NEUROTOXICANTS

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Lobner, Doug; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2010-01-01

    The developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphates involves mechanisms other than their shared property as cholinesterase inhibitors, among which are excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. We used PC12 cells as a neurodevelopmental model to compare the effects of chlorpyrifos and diazinon on the expression of genes encoding glutamate transporters. Chlorpyrifos had a greater effect in cells undergoing nerve growth factor-induced neurodifferentiation as compared to undifferentiated PC12 cells, with peak sensitivity at the initiation of differentiation, reflecting a global upregulation of all the glutamate transporter genes expressed in this cell line. In differentiating cells, chlorpyrifos had a significantly greater effect than did diazinon and concordance analysis indicated no resemblance in their expression patterns. At the same time, the smaller effects of diazinon were highly concordant with those of an organochlorine pesticide (dieldrin) and a metal (divalent nickel). We also performed similar evaluations for the cystine/glutamate exchanger, which provides protection against oxidative stress by moving cystine into the cell; again, chlorpyrifos had the greatest effect, in this case reducing expression in undifferentiated and differentiating cells. Our results point to excitotoxicity and oxidative stress as major contributors to the noncholinesterase mechanisms that distinguish the neurodevelopmental outcomes betweem different organophosphates while providing a means whereby apparently unrelated neurotoxicants may produce similar outcomes. PMID:20600679

  15. Role of neuronal glutamate transporter in the cysteine uptake and intracellular glutathione levels in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Himi, T; Ikeda, M; Yasuhara, T; Nishida, M; Morita, I

    2003-12-01

    Cysteine uptake is the rate-limiting process in glutathione synthesis. Previously we have shown that the inhibitors of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) significantly enhance glutamate toxicity via depletion of intracellular glutathione. In this study we show evidence that the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 is directly enrolled in cysteine uptake in cultured neurons. Neuronal cysteine uptake was dependent on the extracellular sodium, and was suppressed by EAAT inhibitors. Cysteine uptake was suppressed by extracellular glutamate and aspartate, substrates of EAATs, and not by substrates of cysteine transporters. Intracellular glutathione levels were reduced by EAAT inhibitors, and not by inhibitors of cysteine transporters. Knock down of EAAT3 expression using antisense oligonucleotide significantly reduced cysteine uptake, intracellular glutathione level, and neuronal viability against oxidative stress. These facts indicate that EAAT3 functions as a cysteine transporter, and this function seems to be unique and distinct from cysteine transporters that have been reported.

  16. Distribution of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Auditory Ganglion and Cochlear Nuclei of Pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Karim, M R; Atoji, Y

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate is a principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the auditory system. Our previous studies revealed localization of glutamate receptor mRNAs in the pigeon cochlear nuclei, suggesting the existence of glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. This study demonstrated localization of mRNAs for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate and NMDA) in the auditory ganglion (AG) and cochlear nuclei (magnocellular, angular and laminar nuclei). VGluT2 mRNA was intensely expressed in AG and intensely or moderately in the cochlear nuclei. The AG and cochlear nuclei showed intense-to-moderate mRNA signals for GluA2, GluA3, GluA4, GluK4 and GluN1. These results suggest that the pigeon AG neurons receives glutamatergic input from hair cells and in turn projects to the magnocellular and angular nuclei. Glutamate may play a pivotal role in the excitatory synapse transmission in the peripheral auditory pathway of birds.

  17. Glial glutamate transporters mediate a functional metabolic crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes in the mouse developing cortex.

    PubMed

    Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Bonvento, Gilles; Tanaka, Kohichi; Steiner, Pascal; Welker, Egbert; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2003-01-23

    Neuron-glia interactions are essential for synaptic function, and glial glutamate (re)uptake plays a key role at glutamatergic synapses. In knockout mice, for either glial glutamate transporters, GLAST or GLT-1, a classical metabolic response to synaptic activation (i.e., enhancement of glucose utilization) is decreased at an early functional stage in the somatosensory barrel cortex following activation of whiskers. Investigation in vitro demonstrates that glial glutamate transport represents a critical step for triggering enhanced glucose utilization, but also lactate release from astrocytes through a mechanism involving changes in intracellular Na(+) concentration. These data suggest that a metabolic crosstalk takes place between neurons and astrocytes in the developing cortex, which would be regulated by synaptic activity and mediated by glial glutamate transporters.

  18. Loss-of-function mutations in the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 cause human dicarboxylic aminoaciduria

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles G.; Ryan, Renae M.; Thoeng, Annora D.; Ng, Cynthia; King, Kara; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M.; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Bröer, Stefan; Rasko, John E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Solute carrier family 1, member 1 (SLC1A1; also known as EAAT3 and EAAC1) is the major epithelial transporter of glutamate and aspartate in the kidneys and intestines of rodents. Within the brain, SLC1A1 serves as the predominant neuronal glutamate transporter and buffers the synaptic release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate within the interneuronal synaptic cleft. Recent studies have also revealed that polymorphisms in SLC1A1 are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in early-onset patient cohorts. Here we report that SLC1A1 mutations leading to substitution of arginine to tryptophan at position 445 (R445W) and deletion of isoleucine at position 395 (I395del) cause human dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, an autosomal recessive disorder of urinary glutamate and aspartate transport that can be associated with mental retardation. These mutations of conserved residues impeded or abrogated glutamate and cysteine transport by SLC1A1 and led to near-absent surface expression in a canine kidney cell line. These findings provide evidence that SLC1A1 is the major renal transporter of glutamate and aspartate in humans and implicate SLC1A1 in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. PMID:21123949

  19. GPR30 regulates glutamate transporter GLT-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-08-03

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury.

  20. GPR30 Regulates Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury. PMID:22645130

  1. Caffeine-induced inhibition of the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sang-Tae; Zuo, Zhiyi; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-02-27

    Caffeine has been known to trigger seizures, however, the precise mechanism about the proconvulsive effect of caffeine remains unclear. Glutamate transporters play an important role to maintain the homeostasis of glutamate concentration in the brain tissue. Especially, dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) can lead to seizures. We investigated the effects of caffeine on the activity of EAAT3 and the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30μM)-induced inward currents were recorded via the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Caffeine decreased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine (30μM for 3min) significantly reduced V(max), but did not alter K(m) value of EAAT3 for glutamate. When preincubated oocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) were exposed to caffeine, PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Two PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine and staurosporine) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity. Whereas, there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, caffeine, and PKC inhibitors+caffeine groups. In similarly fashion, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) significantly decreased EAAT3 activity, however no statistical differences were observed among the wortmannin, caffeine, and wortmannin+caffeine groups. Our results demonstrate that caffeine attenuates EAAT3 activity and this reducing effect of caffeine seems to be mediated by PKC and PI3K.

  2. The glutamate transporter EAAT4 in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells: a glutamate-gated chloride channel concentrated near the synapse in parts of the dendritic membrane facing astroglia.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Y; Chaudhry, F A; Ullensvang, K; Lehre, K P; Storm-Mathisen, J; Danbolt, N C

    1998-05-15

    Antibodies to an excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT4) label a glycoprotein of approximately 65 kDa strongly in the cerebellum and weakly in the forebrain. Cross-linking of cerebellar proteins with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate before solubilization causes dimer bands of EAAT4 and both dimer and trimer bands of the other glutamate transporters GLAST (EAAT1) and GLT (EAAT2) to appear on immunoblots. In contrast to GLAST, GLT, and EAAC (EAAT3), EAAT4 is unevenly distributed in the cerebellar molecular layer, being strongly expressed in parasagittal zones. It is located in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and the highest concentrations are seen in ones expressing high levels of zebrin II (aldolase C). The labeling of Purkinje cell spines and thin dendrites is stronger than that of large diameter dendrites and cell bodies. EAAT4 is present at low concentrations in the synaptic membrane, but is highly enriched in the parts of the dendritic and spine membranes facing astrocytes (which express GLAST and GLT) compared with parts facing neuronal membranes, suggesting a functional relationship with glial glutamate transporters. The presence of EAAT4 in intracellular cisterns and multivesicular organelles may reflect turnover of transporter in the plasma membrane. The total Purkinje cell spine surface and the EAAT4 concentration were found to be 1.1 m2/cm3 and 0.2 mg/cm3, respectively, in the molecular layer, corresponding to 1800 molecules/microm2. The juxtasynaptic location of EAAT4 may explain electrophysiological observations predicting the presence of a neuronal glutamate transporter near the release site at a Purkinje cell spine synapse. EAAT4 may function as a combined transporter and inhibitory glutamate receptor.

  3. Protonation of a glutamate residue modulates the dynamics of the drug transporter EmrE.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using NMR spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for wild-type EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding.

  4. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding. PMID:26751516

  5. Ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters are involved in necrotic neuronal cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation of hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Noraberg, J; Noer, H; Zimmer, J

    2005-01-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures represent a feasible model for studies of cerebral ischemia and the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration. New results and a review of existing data are presented in the first part of this paper. The role of glutamate transporters, with special reference to recent results on inhibition of glutamate transporters under normal and energy-failure (ischemia-like) conditions is reviewed in the last part of the paper. The experimental work is based on hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7 day old rats and grown for about 3 weeks. In such cultures we investigated the subfield neuronal susceptibility to oxygen-glucose deprivation, the type of induced cell death and the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Hippocampal slice cultures were also used in our studies on glutamate transporters reviewed in the last part of this paper. Neurodegeneration was monitored and/or shown by cellular uptake of propidium iodide, loss of immunocytochemical staining for microtubule-associated protein 2 and staining with Fluoro-Jade B. To distinguish between necrotic vs. apoptotic neuronal cell death we used immunocytochemical staining for active caspase-3 (apoptosis indicator) and Hoechst 33342 staining of nuclear chromatin. Our experimental studies on oxygen-glucose deprivation confirmed that CA1 pyramidal cells were the most susceptible to this ischemia-like condition. Judged by propidium iodide uptake, a selective CA1 lesion, with only minor affection on CA3, occurred in cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 30 min. Nuclear chromatin staining by Hoechst 33342 and staining for active caspase-3 showed that oxygen-glucose deprivation induced necrotic cell death only. Addition of 10 microM of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, and 20 microM of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihyroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl

  6. Effects of MS-153 on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male P rats

    PubMed Central

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M.; Sari, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We have recently found that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for five weeks in alcohol-preferring rats, and upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex resulted, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cysteine glutamate antiporter (xCT) was also found to be downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. In this study, we examined the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(−)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expression of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for five weeks, and then after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for five days. The results showed that MS-153 treatment significantly reduced ethanol consumption in P rats. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle treated rats (ethanol vehicle group) as compared to water control animals. Importantly, MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expression in these brain regions. These findings provide important role of MS-153 on these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol drinking behavior. PMID:25601490

  7. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via NF-κB and CREB at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics, and translational regulation of EAAT2. PMID:25064045

  8. Glutamate receptors modulate sodium-dependent and calcium-independent vitamin C bidirectional transport in cultured avian retinal cells.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Camila Cabral; Miya, Vivian Sayuri; Calaza, Karin da Costa; Santos, Rochelle Alberto Martins; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin C is transported in the brain by sodium vitamin C co-transporter 2 (SVCT-2) for ascorbate and glucose transporters for dehydroascorbate. Here we have studied the expression of SVCT-2 and the uptake and release of [(14)C] ascorbate in chick retinal cells. SVCT-2 immunoreactivity was detected in rat and chick retina, specially in amacrine cells and in cells in the ganglion cell layer. Accordingly, SVCT-2 was expressed in cultured retinal neurons, but not in glial cells. [(14)C] ascorbate uptake was saturable and inhibited by sulfinpyrazone or sodium-free medium, but not by treatments that inhibit dehydroascorbate transport. Glutamate-stimulated vitamin C release was not inhibited by the glutamate transport inhibitor l-beta-threo-benzylaspartate, indicating that vitamin C release was not mediated by glutamate uptake. Also, ascorbate had no effect on [(3)H] D-aspartate release, ruling out a glutamate/ascorbate exchange mechanism. 2-Carboxy-3-carboxymethyl-4-isopropenylpyrrolidine (Kainate) or NMDA stimulated the release, effects blocked by their respective antagonists 6,7-initroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) or (5R,2S)-(1)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801). However, DNQX, but not MK-801 or 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), blocked the stimulation by glutamate. Interestingly, DNQX prevented the stimulation by NMDA, suggesting that the effect of NMDA was mediated by glutamate release and stimulation of non-NMDA receptors. The effect of glutamate was neither dependent on external calcium nor inhibited by 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N',N',N',N',-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxy-methyl ester) (BAPTA-AM), an internal calcium chelator, but was inhibited by sulfinpyrazone or by the absence of sodium. In conclusion, retinal cells take up and release vitamin C, probably through SVCT-2, and the release can be stimulated by NMDA or non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

  9. Astrocytes and glutamate homoeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: a decrease in glutamine synthetase, but not in glutamate transporter-1, in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Syková, Eva; Chvátal, Alexander; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J

    2013-10-07

    Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system). Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease). AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex). Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase) and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1) in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD). GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3) of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1-9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals) in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots), which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate-glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory.

  10. Unaltered Glutamate Transporter-1 Protein Levels in Aquaporin-4 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of glutamate and water homeostasis in the brain is crucial to healthy brain activity. Astrocytic glutamate transporter-1 (GLT1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are the main regulators of extracellular glutamate and osmolarity, respectively. Several studies have reported colocalization of GLT1 and AQP4, but the existence of a physical interaction between the two has not been well studied. Therefore, we used coimmunoprecipitation to determine whether a strong interaction exists between these two important molecules in mice on both a CD1 and C57BL/6 background. Furthermore, we used Western blot and immunohistochemistry to examine GLT1 levels in AQP4 knockout (AQP4−/−) mice. An AQP4-GLT1 precipitate was not detected, suggesting the lack of a strong physical interaction between AQP4 and GLT1. In addition, GLT1 protein levels remained unaltered in tissue from CD1 and C57BL/6 AQP4−/− mice. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that AQP4 and GLT1 do colocalize, but only in a region-specific manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that AQP4 and GLT1 do not have a strong physical interaction between them and are, instead, differentially regulated. PMID:28078912

  11. Small-molecule activator of glutamate transporter EAAT2 translation provides neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qiongman; Chang, Ling-Chu; Takahashi, Kou; Liu, Qibing; Schulte, Delanie A; Lai, Liching; Ibabao, Brian; Lin, Yuchen; Stouffer, Nathan; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitra; Xing, Xuechao; Seyb, Kathleen I; Cuny, Gregory D; Glicksman, Marcie A; Lin, Chien-Liang Glenn

    2014-03-01

    Glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays a major role in glutamate clearance in synaptic clefts. Several lines of evidence indicate that strategies designed to increase EAAT2 expression have potential for preventing excitotoxicity, which contributes to neuronal injury and death in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously discovered several classes of compounds that can increase EAAT2 expression through translational activation. Here, we present efficacy studies of the compound LDN/OSU-0212320, which is a pyridazine derivative from one of our lead series. In a murine model, LDN/OSU-0212320 had good potency, adequate pharmacokinetic properties, no observed toxicity at the doses examined, and low side effect/toxicity potential. Additionally, LDN/OSU-0212320 protected cultured neurons from glutamate-mediated excitotoxic injury and death via EAAT2 activation. Importantly, LDN/OSU-0212320 markedly delayed motor function decline and extended lifespan in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We also found that LDN/OSU-0212320 substantially reduced mortality, neuronal death, and spontaneous recurrent seizures in a pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model. Moreover, our study demonstrated that LDN/OSU-0212320 treatment results in activation of PKC and subsequent Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation, which regulates activation of EAAT2 translation. Our data indicate that the use of small molecules to enhance EAAT2 translation may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. The Glutamate Transporter GLT1a Is Expressed in Excitatory Axon Terminals of Mature Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizhi; Mahadomrongkul, Veeravan; Berger, Urs V.; Bassan, Merav; DeSilva, Tara; Tanaka, Kohichi; Irwin, Nina; Aoki, Chiye; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    GLT1 is the major glutamate transporter of the brain and has been thought to be expressed exclusively in astrocytes. Although excitatory axon terminals take up glutamate, the transporter responsible has not been identified. GLT1 is expressed in at least two forms varying in the C termini, GLT1a and GLT1b. GLT1 mRNA has been demonstrated in neurons, without associated protein. Recently, evidence has been presented, using specific C terminus-directed antibodies, that GLT1b protein is expressed in neurons in vivo. These data suggested that the GLT1 mRNA detected in neurons encodes GLT1b and also that GLT1b might be the elusive presynaptic transporter. To test these hypotheses, we used variant-specific probes directed to the 3′-untranslated regions for GLT1a and GLT1b to perform in situ hybridization in the hippocampus. Contrary to expectation, GLT1a mRNA was the more abundant form. To investigate further the expression of GLT1 in neurons in the hippocampus, antibodies raised against the C terminus of GLT1a and against the N terminus of GLT1, found to be specific by testing in GLT1 knock-out mice, were used for light microscopic and EM-ICC. GLT1a protein was detected in neurons, in 14–29% of axons in the hippocampus, depending on the region. Many of the labeled axons formed axo-spinous, asymmetric, and, thus, excitatory synapses. Labeling also occurred in some spines and dendrites. The antibody against the N terminus of GLT1 also produced labeling of neuronal processes. Thus, the originally cloned form of GLT1, GLT1a, is expressed as protein in neurons in the mature hippocampus and may contribute significantly to glutamate uptake into excitatory terminals. PMID:14762132

  13. Gabapentin inhibits the activity of the rat excitatory glutamate transporter 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yang Sook; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Chi Hyo; Han, Jong In; Zuo, Zhiyi; Baik, Hee Jung

    2015-09-05

    Gabapentin, a derivative of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The pharmacological mechanisms for gabapentin effects are not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of gabapentin on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) that can regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Membrane currents were recorded after application of l-glutamate in the presence or absence of different concentrations of gabapentin (1-300μM) by using a two-electrode voltage clamp. To determine the effect of gabapentin on Vmax and Km of EAAT3 for l-glutamate, l-glutamate at 3-300μM was used. To study the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on gabapentin-induced changes in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were incubated with the PKC activator (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA), the PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine or staurosporine), and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Gabapentin decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner and EAAT3 activity was significantly inhibited by 10-300μM gabapentin. Gabapentin significantly decreased Vmax without affecting Km. PMA increased EAAT3 activity; however, gabapentin attenuated the PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity. Pre-incubation of oocytes with chelerythrine, staurosporine, or wortmannin decreased basal EAAT3 activity, which was further reduced by gabapentin. We conclude that gabapentin decreases EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant and higher concentrations, in which PKC and PI3K may not be involved. The results suggest that EAAT3 might not be a target for the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin.

  14. Possible Roles of Glutamate Transporter EAAT5 in Mouse Cone Depolarizing Bipolar Cell Light Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Chung, Inyoung; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable feature of neuronal glutamate transporters (EAATs) is their dual functions of classical carriers and ligand-gated chloride (CI−) channels. CI− conductance is rapidly activated by glutamate in subtype EAAT5, which mediates light responses in depolarizing bipolar cells (DBC) in retinae of lower vertebrates. In this study, we examine whether EAAT5 also mediates the DBC light response in mouse. We took advantage of an infrared illuminated micro-injection system, and studied the effects of the EAAT blocker (TBOA) and a glutamate receptor agonist (LAP4) on the mouse electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses. Our results showed that TBOA and LAP4 shared similar temporal patterns of inhibition: both inhibited the ERG b-wave shortly after injection and recovered with similar time courses. TBOA inhibited the b-wave completely at mesopic light intensity with an IC50 value about 1 log unit higher than that of LAP4. The inhibitory effects of TBOA and LAP4 were found to be additive in the photopic range. Furthermore, TBOA alone inhibited the b-wave in the cone operative range in knockout mice lacking DBCRs at a low concentration that did not alter synaptic glutamate clearance activity. It also produced a stronger inhibition than that of LAP4 on the cone-driven b-wave measured with a double flash method in wildtype mice. These electrophysiological data suggest a significant role for EAAT5 in mediating cone-driven DBC light responses. Our immunohistochemistry data indicated the presence of postsynaptic EAAT5 on some DBCCs and some DBCRs, providing an anatomical basis for EAAT5’s role in DBC light responses. PMID:24972005

  15. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats.

  16. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats. PMID:28280461

  17. [Glutamate and malignant gliomas, from epilepsia to biological aggressiveness: therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Blecic, Serge; Rynkowski, Michal; De Witte, Olivier; Lefranc, Florence

    2013-09-01

    In this review article, we describe the unrecognized roles of glutamate and glutamate receptors in malignant glioma biology. The neurotransmitter glutamate released from malignant glioma cells in the extracellular matrix is responsible for seizure induction and at higher concentration neuronal cell death. This neuronal cell death will create vacated place for tumor growth. Glutamate also stimulates the growth and the migration of glial tumor cells by means of the activation of glutamate receptors on glioma cells in a paracrine and autocrine manner. The multitude of effects of glutamate in glioma biology supports the rationale for pharmacological targeting of glutamate receptors and transporters in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gliomas in neurology and neuro-oncology. Using the website www.clinicaltrials.gov/ as a reference - a service developed by the National Library of Medicine for the National Health Institute in USA - we have evoked the few clinical trials completed and currently ongoing with therapies targeting the glutamate receptors.

  18. Na+ dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3) in primary astrocyte cultures: effect of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Miralles, V J; Martínez-López, I; Zaragozá, R; Borrás, E; García, C; Pallardó, F V; Viña, J R

    2001-12-13

    The Na+ -dependent L-glutamate transporters EAAT1(GLAST), EAAT2 (GLT-1) and EAAT3 (EAAC1) are expressed in primary astrocyte cultures, showing that the EAAT3 transporter is not neuron-specific. The presence of these three transporters was evaluated by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunocytochemical techniques, and transport activity. When primary astrocyte cultures were incubated with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the GSH concentration was significantly lower than in control cultures, but the expression and amount of protein of EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 and transport of L-glutamate was unchanged. Oxidative stress was created by adding H(2)O(2) or tert.-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bOOH) to the primary astrocyte cultures and cell damage was evaluated by measuring activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Under oxidative stress, GSH levels were significantly lower than in control astrocytes; but the expression and the amount of protein of the three transporters remained unchanged. However, L-glutamate uptake was significantly lower in astrocytes under oxidative conditions when compared to controls. L-Glutamate uptake was not changed in the presence of ascorbate, but was partially recovered in the presence of DTT and GSH ethyl ester. This report emphasizes that oxidative stress and not GSH depletion alters transporter activity without changing transporter expression.

  19. Electrophysiology of glutamate and sodium co-transport in a glial cell of the salamander retina.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E A; Tachibana, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Müller cells were isolated from salamander retinas and their membrane voltage was controlled with a whole-cell voltage clamp. External D-aspartate, L-aspartate and L-glutamate each induced a membrane current. D-Glutamate, kainate, quisqualate and N-methyl-D-aspartate were more than 100x less effective than L-aspartate. Kynurenic acid had no effect on the current produced by L-glutamate, L-aspartate or D-aspartate. 2. The current induced by an acidic amino acid (AAA) was completely dependent on the presence of external Na+. Neither Li+, Cs+, choline nor TEA+ were able to substitute for Na+. The relationship between external Na+ concentration and current amplitude can be explained if the binding of three Na+ ions enabled transport. The apparent affinity constant for Na+ binding was 41 mM. Altering K+, H+ and Cl- concentrations demonstrated that these ions are not required for transport. 3. The shape of the current-voltage relation did not depend on the external amino acid concentration. The relationship between D-aspartate concentration and current amplitude can be described by the binding of D-aspartate to a single site with an apparent affinity constant of 20 microM. 4. Influx and efflux of AAA were not symmetric. Although influx was electrogenic, efflux did not produce a current. Moreover, influx stimulated efflux; but efflux inhibited influx. 5. Removing external Na+ demonstrated that Na+ carried a current in the absence of an AAA. Li+ was a very poor substitute for Na+. This current may be due to the uncoupled movement of Na+ through the transporter. The relationship between the external Na+ concentration and the amplitude of the uncoupled current can be explained if the binding of two or three Na+ ions enabled the translocation of Na+ in the absence of an AAA. The apparent affinity constant for Na+ binding was approximately 90 mM. 6. The temperature dependence of the AAA-induced current had a Q10 between 8 and 18 degrees C of 1.95. The Q10 is consistent

  20. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on memory formation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Víquez, Leticia; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation, amnesia and/or therapeutic targets for memory alterations, the role of transporters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GAT1), glutamate (neuronal glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier; EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper Western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression changes on them during memory formation in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was evaluated in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and striatum. Data indicated that in addition of memory performance other behavioral parameters (e.g., explorative behavior, food-intake, etc.) that memory formation was recorded. Thus, memory formation in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of prefrontal cortex GAT1 and EAAC1, striatal SERT, DAT and EACC1; while, hippocampal EACC1, GAT1 and SERT were down-regulated. METH impaired short (STM) and long-term memory (LTM), at 24 or 48h. The METH-induced amnesia down-regulated SERT, DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 in hippocampus and the GAT1 in striatum; no-changes were observed in prefrontal cortex. Post-training administration of fluoxetine improved LTM (48h), which was associated to DAT, GAT1 (prefrontal cortex) up-regulation, but GAT1 (striatum) and SERT (hippocampus) down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was able to prevent amnesia, which was associated to DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 (prefrontal cortex), SERT and DAT (hippocampus) and EACC1 or DAT (striatal) up-regulation. Together these data show that memory formation, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects are associated to specific patters of transporters expression.

  1. Changes in the expression of the glutamate transporter EAAT3/EAAC1 in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Bardelli, Donatella; Chiu, Martina; Bussolati, Ovidio

    2014-06-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are high-affinity Na(+)-dependent carriers of major importance in maintaining glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system. EAAT3, the human counterpart of the rodent excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1), is encoded by the SLC1A1 gene. EAAT3/EAAC1 is ubiquitously expressed in the brain, mostly in neurons but also in other cell types, such as oligodendrocyte precursors. While most of the glutamate released in the synapses is taken up by the "glial-type" EAATs, EAAT2 (GLT-1 in rodents) and EAAT1 (GLAST), the functional role of EAAT3/EAAC1 is related to the subtle regulation of glutamatergic transmission. Moreover, because it can also transport cysteine, EAAT3/EAAC1 is believed to be important for the synthesis of intracellular glutathione and subsequent protection from oxidative stress. In contrast to other EAATs, EAAT3/EAAC1 is mostly intracellular, and several mechanisms have been described for the rapid regulation of the membrane trafficking of the transporter. Moreover, the carrier interacts with several proteins, and this interaction modulates transport activity. Much less is known about the slow regulatory mechanisms acting on the expression of the transporter, although several recent reports have identified changes in EAAT3/EAAC1 protein level and activity related to modulation of its expression at the gene level. Moreover, EAAT3/EAAC1 expression is altered in pathological conditions, such as hypoxia/ischemia, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. This review summarizes these results and provides an overall picture of changes in EAAT3/EAAC1 expression in health and disease.

  2. Differential localization of vesicular glutamate transporters and peptides in corneal afferents to trigeminal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Deborah M; Tonsfeldt, Karen; Hermes, Sam M; Helfand, Helen; Aicher, Sue A

    2010-09-01

    Trigeminal afferents convey nociceptive information from the corneal surface of the eye to the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Trigeminal afferents, like other nociceptors, are thought to use glutamate and neuropeptides as neurotransmitters. The current studies examined whether corneal afferents contain both neuropeptides and vesicular glutamate transporters. Corneal afferents to the Vc were identified by using cholera toxin B (CTb). Corneal afferents project in two clusters to the rostral and caudal borders of the Vc, regions that contain functionally distinct nociceptive neurons. Thus, corneal afferents projecting to these two regions were examined separately. Dual immunocytochemical studies combined CTb with either calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1), or VGluT2. Corneal afferents were more likely to contain CGRP than SP, and corneal afferents projecting to the rostral region were more likely to contain CGRP than afferents projecting caudally. Overall, corneal afferents were equally likely to contain VGluT1 or VGluT2. Together, 61% of corneal afferents contained either VGluT1 or VGluT2, suggesting that some afferents lack a VGluT. Caudal corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT2 than VGluT1, whereas rostral corneal afferents were more likely to contain VGluT1 than VGluT2. Triple-labeling studies combining CTb, CGRP, and VGluT2 showed that very few corneal afferents contain both CGRP and VGluT2, caudally (1%) and rostrally (2%). These results suggest that most corneal afferents contain a peptide or a VGluT, but rarely both. Our results are consistent with a growing literature suggesting that glutamatergic and peptidergic sensory afferents may be distinct populations.

  3. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Neuronal Exosomal miRNA-dependent Translational Regulation of Astroglial Glutamate Transporter GLT1*

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23364798

  5. Progesterone increases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Son, Ilsoon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-05

    Progesterone is an important sex hormone for pregnancy and also has neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects. It is well-known that full-term parturients become more susceptible to volatile anesthetics. Glutamate transporters are important for preventing neurotoxicity and anesthetic action in the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of progesterone on the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), the major neuronal EAAT. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by injecting its mRNA. Oocytes were incubated with diluted progesterone for 72 h. Two-electrode voltage clamping was used to measure membrane currents before, during, and after applying 30 μML-glutamate. Progesterone (1-100 nM) significantly increased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Our kinetic study showed that the Vmax was increased in the progesterone group compared with that in the control group (2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.2μC for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P<0.05), however, Km was unaltered (46.7 ± 10.2μM vs. 55.9 ± 10.5μM for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P>0.05). Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, did not change progesterone-enhanced EAAT3 activity. Inhibitors of PKC or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) abolished the progesterone-induced increases in EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that progesterone enhances EAAT3 activity and that PKC and PI3K are involved in mediating these effects. These effects of progesterone may contribute to its anticonvulsant and anesthesia-related properties.

  6. The transcription factor regulatory factor X1 increases the expression of neuronal glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-07-28

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) play an important role in maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. However, very few studies have investigated the regulation of EAAT expression. A binding sequence for the regulatory factor X1 (RFX1) exists in the promoter region of the gene encoding for EAAT3, a neuronal EAAT, but not in the promoter regions of the genes encoding for EAAT1 and EAAT2, two glial EAATs. RFX proteins are transcription factors binding to X-boxes of DNA sequences. Although RFX proteins are necessary for the normal function of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, their roles in the mammalian brain are not known. We showed that RFX1 increased EAAT3 expression and activity in C6 glioma cells. RFX1 binding complexes were found in the nuclear extracts of C6 cells. The activity of EAAT3 promoter as measured by luciferase reporter activity was increased by RFX1 in C6 cells and the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. However, RFX1 did not change the expression of EAAT2 proteins in the NRK52E cells. RFX1 proteins were expressed in the neurons of rat brain. A high expression level of RFX1 proteins was found in the neurons of cerebral cortex and Purkinje cells. Knockdown of the RFX1 expression by RFX1 antisense oligonucleotides decreased EAAT3 expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. These results suggest that RFX1 enhances the activity of EAAT3 promoter to increase the expression of EAAT3 proteins. This study provides initial evidence for the regulation of gene expression in the nervous cells by RFX1.

  7. VGLUT3 (vesicular glutamate transporter type 3) contribution to the regulation of serotonergic transmission and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Amilhon, Bénédicte; Lepicard, Eve; Renoir, Thibault; Mongeau, Raymond; Popa, Daniela; Poirel, Odile; Miot, Stéphanie; Gras, Christelle; Gardier, Alain M; Gallego, Jorge; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence; Gasnier, Bruno; Giros, Bruno; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2010-02-10

    Three different subtypes of H(+)-dependent carriers (named VGLUT1-3) concentrate glutamate into synaptic vesicles before its exocytotic release. Neurons using other neurotransmitter than glutamate (such as cholinergic striatal interneurons and 5-HT neurons) express VGLUT3. It was recently reported that VGLUT3 increases acetylcholine vesicular filling, thereby, stimulating cholinergic transmission. This new regulatory mechanism is herein designated as vesicular-filling synergy (or vesicular synergy). In the present report, we found that deletion of VGLUT3 increased several anxiety-related behaviors in adult and in newborn mice as early as 8 d after birth. This precocious involvement of a vesicular glutamate transporter in anxiety led us to examine the underlying functional implications of VGLUT3 in 5-HT neurons. On one hand, VGLUT3 deletion caused a significant decrease of 5-HT(1A)-mediated neurotransmission in raphe nuclei. On the other hand, VGLUT3 positively modulated 5-HT transmission of a specific subset of 5-HT terminals from the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. VGLUT3- and VMAT2-positive serotonergic fibers show little or no 5-HT reuptake transporter. These results unravel the existence of a novel subset of 5-HT terminals in limbic areas that might play a crucial role in anxiety-like behaviors. In summary, VGLUT3 accelerates 5-HT transmission at the level of specific 5-HT terminals and can exert an inhibitory control at the raphe level. Furthermore, our results suggest that the loss of VGLUT3 expression leads to anxiety-associated behaviors and should be considered as a potential new target for the treatment of this disorder.

  8. The conversion of glutamate by glutamine synthase in neocortical astrocytes from juvenile rat is important to limit glutamate spillover and peri/extrasynaptic activation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Yosra; Amri, Mohamed; Becq, Hélène; Molinari, Florence; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Glutamate transporters (EAATs) are important to maintain spatial and temporal specificity of synaptic transmission. Their efficiency to uptake and transport glutamate into the intracellular space depends on several parameters including the intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and glutamate, the elevations of which may slow down the cycling rate of EAATs. In astrocytes, glutamate is maintained at low concentration due to the presence of specific enzymes such as glutamine synthase (GS). GS inhibition results in cytosolic accumulation of glutamate suggesting that the conversion of glutamate by GS is important for EAATs operation. Here we recorded astrocytes from juvenile rat neocortical slices and analyzed the consequences of elevated intracellular glutamate concentrations and of GS inhibition on the time course of synaptically evoked transporter current (STC). In slices from rats treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a GS inhibitor, STC evoked by short burst of high frequency stimulation (HFS; 100 Hz for 100 ms) but not by low frequency stimulation (LFS; 0.1 Hz) was twice slower than STC evoked from saline injected rats. Same results were obtained for astrocytes recorded with pipette containing 3-10 mM glutamate and compared with cells recorded with 0 or1 mM glutamate in the patch pipette. We also showed that HFS elicited significantly larger NMDAR-excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with a stronger peri/extrasynaptic component in pyramidal cells from MSO-treated compared with saline treated rats. Taken together our data demonstrate that the conversion of glutamate by GS is fundamental to ensure an efficient clearance of glutamate by EAATs and to prevent glutamate spillover. GLIA 2017;65:401-415.

  9. Glutamate transporter type 3 attenuates the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhiyi; Fang, Hongyu

    2005-06-01

    We studied the regulation of N-methy-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) current/activation by glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), a neuronal EAAT in vivo, in the restricted extracellular space of a biological model. This model involved co-expressing EAAT3 and NMDAR (composed of NMDAR1-1a and NMDAR2A) in Xenopus oocytes. The NMDAR current was reduced in the co-expression oocytes but not in oocytes expressing NMDAR only when the flow of glutamate-containing superfusate was stopped. The degree of this current reduction was glutamate concentration-dependent. No reduction of NMDAR current was observed in Na+-free solution or when NMDA, a non-substrate for EAATs, was used as the agonist for NMDAR. In the continuous flow experiments, the dose-response curve of glutamate-induced current was shifted to the right-hand side in co-expression oocytes compared with oocytes expressing NMDAR alone. The degree of this shift depended on the abundance of EAAT3 in the co-expression oocytes. Thus, the glutamate concentrations sensed by NMDAR locally were lower than those in the superfusates. These results suggest that EAAT3 regulates the amplitude of NMDAR currents at pre-saturated concentrations of glutamate to EAAT3. Thus, EAATs, by rapidly regulating glutamate concentrations near NMDAR, modulate NMDAR current/activation.

  10. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinshan; Jiang, Ke; Li, Zhaoduan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27932896

  11. Production of free glutamate in milk requires the leucine transporter LAT1.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Nakamura, Eiji; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Hirota, Mariko; San Gabriel, Ana; Nakamura, Ken-Ichiro; Chotechuang, Nattida; Wu, Guoyao; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Torii, Kunio

    2013-09-15

    The concentration of free glutamate (Glu) in rat's milk is ∼10 times higher than that in plasma. Previous work has shown that mammary tissue actively transports circulatory leucine (Leu), which is transaminated to synthesize other amino acids such as Glu and aspartate (Asp). To investigate the molecular basis of Leu transport and its conversion into Glu in the mammary gland, we characterized the expression of Leu transporters and [(3)H]Leu uptake in rat mammary cells. Gene expression analysis indicated that mammary cells express two Leu transporters, LAT1 and LAT2, with LAT1 being more abundant than LAT2. This transport system is sodium independent and transports large neutral amino acids. The Leu transport system in isolated rat mammary cells could be specifically blocked by the LAT1 inhibitors 2-aminobicyclo-[2.2.1]-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and triiodothyronine (T3). In organ cultures, Glu secretion was markedly inhibited by these LAT1 inhibitors. Furthermore, the profiles of Leu uptake inhibition by amino acids in mammary cells were similar to those reported for LAT1. In vivo, concentrations of free Glu and Asp increased in milk by oral gavage with Leu at 6, 12, and 18 days of lactation. These results indicate that the main Leu transporter in mammary tissue is LAT1 and the transport of Leu is a limiting factor for the synthesis and release of Glu and Asp into milk. Our studies provide the bases for the molecular mechanism of Leu transport in mammary tissue by LAT1 and its active role on free Glu secretion in milk, which confer umami taste in suckling pups.

  12. Astrocytes and glutamate homoeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: a decrease in glutamine synthetase, but not in glutamate transporter-1, in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Syková, Eva; Chvátal, Alexander; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system). Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease). AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex). Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase) and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1) in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD). GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3) of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1–9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals) in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots), which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate–glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory. PMID:24059854

  13. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  14. Effects of cefazolin and cefoperazone on glutamate transporter 1 isoforms and cystine/glutamate exchanger as well as alcohol drinking behavior in male alcohol-preferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Rao, P.S.S.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments attenuated ethanol consumption, at least in part, through upregulation of GLT-1 expression in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we determined the effects of these compounds on the expression of GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT), which is another glial glutamate transporter co-localized with GLT-1, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). We found that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments decreased ethanol intake and upregulated both GLT-1 isoforms, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) compared to saline treated group. In addition, cefazolin increased the expression of xCT in NAc and PFC, while cefoperazone upregulated xCT expression only in NAc. However, we did not find any significant differences in GLAST expression between the treated and control groups. Overall, our findings suggest that cefazolin and cefoperazone may be considered as potential compounds for the treatment of ethanol dependence. PMID:26790351

  15. Effects of cefazolin and cefoperazone on glutamate transporter 1 isoforms and cystine/glutamate exchanger as well as alcohol drinking behavior in male alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Rao, P S S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we have reported that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments attenuated ethanol consumption, at least in part, through upregulation of GLT-1 expression in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we determined the effects of these compounds on the expression of GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT), which is another glial glutamate transporter co-localized with GLT-1, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). We found that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments decreased ethanol intake and upregulated both GLT-1 isoforms, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) compared to saline treated group. In addition, cefazolin increased the expression of xCT in NAc and PFC, while cefoperazone upregulated xCT expression only in NAc. However, we did not find any significant differences in GLAST expression between the treated and control groups. Overall, our findings suggest that cefazolin and cefoperazone may be considered as potential compounds for the treatment of ethanol dependence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  17. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bacigaluppi, Marco; Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego; Martino, Gianvito

    2016-10-12

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory-inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster axonal rewiring and dendritic

  18. A quantitative analysis of L-glutamate-regulated Na+ dynamics in mouse cortical astrocytes: implications for cellular bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Chatton, J Y; Marquet, P; Magistretti, P J

    2000-11-01

    The mode of Na+ entry and the dynamics of intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) changes consecutive to the application of the neurotransmitter glutamate were investigated in mouse cortical astrocytes in primary culture by video fluorescence microscopy. An elevation of [Na+]i was evoked by glutamate, whose amplitude and initial rate were concentration dependent. The glutamate-evoked Na+ increase was primarily due to Na+-glutamate cotransport, as inhibition of non-NMDA ionotropic receptors by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxiline-2,3-dione (CNQX) only weakly diminished the response and D-aspartate, a substrate of the glutamate transporter, produced [Na+]i elevations similar to those evoked by glutamate. Non-NMDA receptor activation could nevertheless be demonstrated by preventing receptor desensitization using cyclothiazide. Thus, in normal conditions non-NMDA receptors do not contribute significantly to the glutamate-evoked Na+ response. The rate of Na+ influx decreased during glutamate application, with kinetics that correlate well with the increase in [Na+]i and which depend on the extracellular concentration of glutamate. A tight coupling between Na+ entry and Na+/K+ ATPase activity was revealed by the massive [Na+]i increase evoked by glutamate when pump activity was inhibited by ouabain. During prolonged glutamate application, [Na+]i remains elevated at a new steady-state where Na+ influx through the transporter matches Na+ extrusion through the Na+/K+ ATPase. A mathematical model of the dynamics of [Na+]i homeostasis is presented which precisely defines the critical role of Na+ influx kinetics in the establishment of the elevated steady state and its consequences on the cellular bioenergetics. Indeed, extracellular glutamate concentrations of 10 microM already markedly increase the energetic demands of the astrocytes.

  19. Charge Compensation Mechanism of a Na+-coupled, Secondary Active Glutamate Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Grewer, Christof; Zhang, Zhou; Mwaura, Juddy; Albers, Thomas; Schwartz, Alexander; Gameiro, Armanda

    2012-01-01

    Forward glutamate transport by the excitatory amino acid carrier EAAC1 is coupled to the inward movement of three Na+ and one proton and the subsequent outward movement of one K+ in a separate step. Based on indirect evidence, it was speculated that the cation binding sites bear a negative charge. However, little is known about the electrostatics of the transport process. Valences calculated using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation indicate that negative charge is transferred across the membrane when only one cation is bound. Consistently, transient currents were observed in response to voltage jumps when K+ was the only cation on both sides of the membrane. Furthermore, rapid extracellular K+ application to EAAC1 under single turnover conditions (K+ inside) resulted in outward transient current. We propose a charge compensation mechanism, in which the C-terminal transport domain bears an overall negative charge of −1.23. Charge compensation, together with distribution of charge movement over many steps in the transport cycle, as well as defocusing of the membrane electric field, may be combined strategies used by Na+-coupled transporters to avoid prohibitive activation barriers for charge translocation. PMID:22707712

  20. Regulation of the Na(+)-coupled glutamate transporter EAAT3 by PIKfyve.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Fabian; Gehring, Eva-Maria; Zürn, Agathe; Laufer, Joerg; Lindner, Ricco; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Tavaré, Jeremy M; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Boehmer, Christoph; Palmada, Monica; Gruner, Ivonne; Lang, Undine E; Seebohm, Guiscard; Lang, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The Na(+), glutamate cotransporter EAAT3 is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. It accomplishes transepithelial transport and the cellular uptake of acidic amino acids. Regulation of EAAT3 activity involves a signaling cascade including the phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3)-kinase, the phosphoinositide dependent kinase PDK1, and the serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1. Targets of SGK1include the mammalian phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-5-kinase PIKfyve (PIP5K3). The present experiments explored whether PIKfyve participates in the regulation of EAAT3 activity. To this end,EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGK1 and/or PIKfyve and glutamate-induced current (I(glu)) determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. In Xenopus oocytes expressing EAAT3 but not in water injected oocytes glutamate induced an inwardly directed I(glu). Coexpression of either, SGK1 orPIKfyve, significantly enhanced I(glu) in EAAT3 expressing oocytes. The increased I(glu) was paralleled by increased EAAT3 protein abundance in the oocyte cell membrane. I(glu) and EAAT3 protein abundance were significantly larger in oocytes coexpressing EAAT3, SGK1 and PIKfyve than in oocytes expressingEAAT3 and either, SGK1 or PIKfyve, alone. Coexpression of the inactive SGK1 mutant (K127N)SGK1 did not significantly alter I(glu) in EAAT3 expressing oocytes and completely reversed the stimulating effect ofPIKfyve coexpression on I(glu). The stimulating effect of PIKfyve on I(glu) was abolished by replacement of the serine by alanine in the SGK consensus sequence ((S318A)PIKfyve). Moreover, additional coexpression of(S318A)PIKfyve significantly blunted I(glu) in Xenopus oocytes coexpressing SGK1 and EAAT3. The observations demonstrate that PIKfyve participates in EAAT3 regulation likely downstream of SGK1.

  1. Analogies between respiration and a light-driven proton pump as sources of energy for active glutamate transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belliveau, J. W.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is known to contain sheets of bacteriorhodopsin, a pigment which upon exposure to light undergoes cyclic protonation and deprotonation, resulting in net H(+) translocation. In this paper, experiments were conducted to test H. halobium cell envelope vesicles for respiration-induced glutamate uptake. It is shown that glutamate transport in H. halobium cell envelope vesicles can occur as a result of respiration, as well as light acting on bacteriorhodopsin. Glutamate transport can be energized by the oxidation of dimethyl phenylenediamine, and the properties of the transport system are entirely analogous to those observed with illumination as the source of energy. In the case of respiration-dependent glutamate transport, the transportation is also driven by a Na(+) gradient, thereby confirming the existence of a single glutamate transport system independent of the source of energy. The analogy observed is indirect evidence that the cytochrome oxidase of H. halobium functions as a H(+) pump.

  2. Down-regulation of Na+-coupled glutamate transporter EAAT3 and EAAT4 by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Dërmaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Fraser, Scott; Kemp, Bruce E; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    The glutamate transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4 are expressed in neurons. They contribute to the cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate and thus to the clearance of the excitatory transmitters from the extracellular space. During ischemia, extracellular accumulation of glutamate may trigger excitotoxicity. Energy depletion leads to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a kinase enhancing energy production and limiting energy expenditure. The present study thus explored the possibility that AMPK regulates EAAT3 and/or EAAT4. To this end, EAAT3 or EAAT4 were expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without AMPK and electrogenic glutamate transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. In EAAT3- and in EAAT4-expressing oocytes glutamate generated a current (I(g)), which was half maximal (K(M)) at 74 microM (EAAT3) or at 4 microM (EAAT4) glutamate. Co-expression of constitutively active (gammaR70Q)AMPK or of wild type AMPK did not affect K(M) but significantly decreased the maximal I(g) in both EAAT3- (by 34%) and EAAT4- (by 49%) expressing oocytes. Co-expression of the inactive mutant (alphaK45R)AMPK [alpha1(K45R)beta1gamma1] did not appreciably affect I(g). According to confocal microscopy and chemiluminescence co-expression of (gammaR70Q)AMPK or of wild type AMPK reduced the membrane abundance of EAAT3 and EAAT4. The observations show that AMPK down-regulates Na(+)-coupled glutamate transport.

  3. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity and glutamate efflux by reversal of high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters from rat brain synaptosomes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate uptake by high affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters is essential for termination of the synaptic transmission. Glutamate transporters may also contribute to an increase in extracellular glutamate. Glutamate efflux can occur by reversal of the sodium-dependent glutamate transporters during ATP depletion and dissipation of the sodium gradient across the cell membrane. Depolarization-induced calcium independent release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomal cytosolic pool is Na+-dependent and due to reverse of the neurotransmitter transporters also. We used monovalent organic cations N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) to replace extracellular sodium, suggesting that the reducing of Na+ elucidate further the mechanism underlying Ca2+-independent glutamate release. A reduction in extracellular sodium would facilitate reversal of sodium-dependent transporters with extrusion of glutamate. We have compared the basal release of glutamate in Ca2+-free Na+-supplemented and NMDG-supplemented medium in control and after exposure of animals to long-arm centrifuge-induced hypergravity (ten G, during one hour). Replacement of sodium by NMDG enhanced basal level of neurotransmitter. The value of basal level increased to 110± 4% and 140± 2% in the medium with NMDG in comparison with Na+ under the control and hypergravity conditions, respectively. It is likely to reflect the enhancement of the neurotransmitter level in cytosolic pool. Thermodynamic considerations show that the extracellular level of a amino acid neurotransmitter, such as glutamate, that can be generated by transporter reversal are directly proportional to the intracellular concentration of the intracellular concentration of amino acid. KCl-stimulated glutamate release from cytosolic pool increased not statistically after hypergravity loading. We examined the effects of transporter inhibitors DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate ( DL-TBOA) on the release to elucidate whether reverse transport via the

  4. Neurochemical and behavioral characterization of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    González, Luis F; Henríquez-Belmar, Francisca; Delgado-Acevedo, Claudia; Cisternas-Olmedo, Marisol; Arriagada, Gloria; Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Murphy, Dennis L; Moya, Pablo R

    2017-09-19

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe neuropsychiatric condition affecting 1-3% of the worldwide population. OCD has a strong genetic component, and the SLC1A1 gene that encodes neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 is a strong candidate for this disorder. To evaluate the impact of reduced EAAT3 expression in vivo, we studied male EAAT3 heterozygous and wild-type littermate mice using a battery of behavioral paradigms relevant to anxiety (open field test, elevated plus maze) and compulsivity (marble burying), as well as locomotor activity induced by amphetamine. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we also determined tissue neurotransmitter levels in cortex, striatum and thalamus-brain areas that are relevant to OCD. Compared to wild-type littermates, EAAT3 heterozygous male mice have unaltered baseline anxiety-like, compulsive-like behavior and locomotor activity. Administration of acute amphetamine (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) increased locomotion with no differences across genotypes. Tissue levels of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and serotonin did not vary between EAAT3 heterozygous and wild-type mice. Our results indicate that reduced EAAT3 expression does not impact neurotransmitter content in the corticostriatal circuit nor alter anxiety or compulsive-like behaviors.

  5. Glutamate Transporter EAAT2 Expression is Up-Regulated in Reactive Astrocytes in Human Periventricular Leukomalacia

    PubMed Central

    DESILVA, TARA M.; BILLIARDS, SARAID S.; BORENSTEIN, NATALIA S.; TRACHTENBERG, FELICIA L.; VOLPE, JOSEPH J.; KINNEY, HANNAH C.; ROSENBERG, PAUL A.

    2010-01-01

    The major neuropathological correlate of cerebral palsy in premature infants is periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), a disorder of the immature cerebral white matter. Cerebral ischemia leading to excitotoxicity is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of this disorder, implying a critical role for glutamate transporters, the major determinants of extracellular glutamate concentration. Previously, we found that EAAT2 expression is limited primarily to premyelinating oligodendrocytes early in development and is rarely observed in astrocytes until >40 weeks. In this study, we analyzed the expression of EAAT2 in cerebral white matter from PVL and control cases. Western blot analysis suggested an up-regulation of EAAT2 in PVL compared with control cases. Single- and double-label immunocytochemistry showed a significantly higher percentage of EAAT2-immunopositive astrocytes in PVL (51.8% ± 5.6%) compared with control white matter (21.4% ± 5.6%; P = 0.004). Macrophages in the necrotic foci in PVL also expressed EAAT2. Premyelinating oligodendrocytes in both PVL and control cases expressed EAAT2, without qualitative difference in expression. The previously unrecognized up-regulation of EAAT2 in reactive astrocytes and its presence in macrophages in PVL reported here may reflect a response to either hypoxic-ischemic injury or inflammation. PMID:18314905

  6. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 1 Is Required for Photoreceptor Synaptic Signaling But Not For Intrinsic Visual Functions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Juliette; Fremeau, Robert T.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Rentería, René C.; Yang, Haidong; Hua, Zhaolin; Liu, Xiaorong; LaVail, Matthew M.; Edwards, Robert H.; Copenhagen, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission requires vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) to sequester glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Generally, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 isoforms show complementary expression in the CNS and retina. However, little is known about whether isoform-specific expression serves distinct pathways and physiological functions. Here, by examining visual functions in VGLUT1-null mice, we demonstrate that visual signaling from photoreceptors to retinal output neurons requires VGLUT1. However, photoentrainment and pupillary light responses are preserved. We provide evidence that melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), signaling via VGLUT2 pathways, support these non-image-forming functions. We conclude that VGLUT1 is essential for transmitting visual signals from photoreceptors to second- and third-order neurons, but VGLUT1 is not necessary for intrinsic visual functions. Furthermore, melanopsin and VGLUT2 expression in a subset of RGCs immediately after birth strongly supports the idea that intrinsic vision can function well before rod- and cone-mediated signaling has matured. PMID:17611277

  7. P301L Tau Expression Affects Glutamate Release and Clearance in the Hippocampal Trisynaptic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Holly C.; Rudy, Carolyn C.; Batten, Seth R.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Reed, Miranda N.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often exhibit hippocampal hyperexcitability. A growing body of evidence suggests perturbations in the glutamatergic tripartite synapse may underlie this hyperexcitability. Here, we used a tau mouse model of AD (rTg(TauP301L)4510) to examine the effects of tau pathology on hippocampal glutamate regulation. We found a 40% increase in hippocampal vGLUT, which packages glutamate into vesicles, and has previously been shown to influence glutamate release, and a 40% decrease in hippocampal GLT-1, the major glutamate transporter responsible for removing glutamate from the extracellular space. To determine whether these alterations affected glutamate regulation in vivo, we measured tonic glutamate levels, potassium-evoked glutamate release, and glutamate uptake/clearance in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions of the hippocampus. P301L tau expression resulted in a 4- and 7-fold increase in potassium-evoked glutamate release in the DG and CA3, respectively, and significantly decreased glutamate clearance in all 3 regions. Both release and clearance correlated with memory performance in the hippocampal-dependent Barnes maze task. Alterations in mice expressing P301L were observed at a time when tau pathology was subtle and before readily detectable neuron loss. These data suggest novel mechanisms by which tau may mediate hyperexcitability. PMID:25319522

  8. Anisotonic media and glutamate-induced ion transport and volume responses in primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Kimelberg, H K

    1987-01-01

    1. The responses of primary monolayer astrocyte cultures prepared from neonatal rat brains to hyper- and hypotonic media and to the addition of L-glutamic acid were examined as part of a systematic approach to use these cultures to obtain information on the mechanisms of the volume changes seen in astroglial cells in situ. 2. Addition of 200 mM mannitol to the medium to make it hypertonic caused cell shrinkage as measured with [14C]3-O-methyl-D-glucose, and also activated K+ and Cl- uptake measured with 86Rb+ and 36Cl- respectively. The increased ion uptake was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM bumetanide, showing that the Na+ + K+ + 2 Cl- co-transport system was being activated by cell shrinkage. 3. Studies of 86Rb+ uptake as a function of external K+ and hypertonic media showed a complex pattern. Increased bumetanide-sensitive, hypertonic-stimulated uptake of 86Rb+ was seen up to 20 mM K+0, with maximum stimulation being first reached at around 2 to 5 mM K+. At concentrations greater than 20 mM K+0 there was a further increase in bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, but there was no stimulation of this uptake by hypertonicity. There were also increases in bumetanide-insensitive 86Rb+ fluxes at [K+]0 higher than 20 mM that may have been due to opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels; this increased 86Rb+ flux was decreased in hypertonic medium. 4. When primary astrocyte cultures were swollen in hypotonic medium there was a rapid increase in volume as measured with [14C] 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, which then decreased in the continued presence of hypotonic medium. Thus, these cells exhibit volume regulatory decrease or RVD, as described for other cells. The possible ionic bases of this phenomenon have not yet been fully examined but the initial RVD did not appear to stimulate a furosemide-sensitive cotransport system. 5. Glutamate has been implicated as a possible endogenous effector of volume change in astrocytes. In the presence of ouabain, L-glutamate led to swelling of

  9. Transport rates of a glutamate transporter homologue are influenced by the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Benjamin C; Vandenberg, Robert J; Ryan, Renae M

    2015-04-10

    The aspartate transporter from Pyrococcus horikoshii (GltPh) is a model for the structure of the SLC1 family of amino acid transporters. Crystal structures of GltPh provide insight into mechanisms of ion coupling and substrate transport; however, structures have been solved in the absence of a lipid bilayer so they provide limited information regarding interactions that occur between the protein and lipids of the membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of the lipid environment on aspartate transport by reconstituting GltPh into liposomes of defined lipid composition where the primary lipid is phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or its methyl derivatives. We showed that the rate of aspartate transport and the transmembrane orientation of GltPh were influenced by the primary lipid in the liposomes. In PE liposomes, we observed the highest transport rate and showed that 85% of the transporters were orientated right-side out, whereas in trimethyl PE liposomes, 50% of transporters were right-side out, and we observed a 4-fold reduction in transport rate. Differences in orientation can only partially explain the lipid composition effect on transport rate. Crystal structures of GltPh revealed a tyrosine residue (Tyr-33) that we propose interacts with lipid headgroups during the transport cycle. Based on site-directed mutagenesis, we propose that a cation-π interaction between Tyr-33 and the lipid headgroups can influence conformational flexibility of the trimerization domain and thus the rate of transport. These results provide a specific example of how interactions between membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins can influence function and highlight the importance of the role of the membrane in transporter function.

  10. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle.

    PubMed

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate in this neural communication, i.e., the transporters responsible for glutamine efflux from astrocytes and influx into the neurons, such as the members of the SNAT, LAT, y(+)LAT, and ASC families of transporters. The SNAT family consists of the transporter isoforms SNAT3 and SNAT5 that are related to efflux from the astrocytic compartment, and SNAT1 and SNAT2 that are associated with glutamine uptake into the neuronal compartment. The isoforms SNAT7 and SNAT8 do not have their role completely understood, but they likely also participate in the GGC. The isoforms LAT2 and y(+)LAT2 facilitate the exchange of neutral amino acids and cationic amino acids (y(+)LAT2 isoform) and have been associated with glutamine efflux from astrocytes. ASCT2 is a Na(+)-dependent antiporter, the participation of which in the GGC also remains to be better characterized. All these isoforms are tightly regulated by transcriptional and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases, such as Hepatic Encephalopathy and Manganism. However, there might also be other neuropathological conditions associated with an altered GGC, in which glutamine transporters are dysfunctional. Hence, it appears to be of critical importance that the physiological and pathological aspects of glutamine transporters are thoroughly investigated.

  11. Rapid chemoenzymatic route to glutamate transporter inhibitor l-TFB-TBOA and related amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haigen; Younes, Sabry H H; Saifuddin, Mohammad; Tepper, Pieter G; Zhang, Jielin; Keller, Erik; Heeres, André; Szymanski, Wiktor; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2017-03-21

    The complex amino acid (l-threo)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (l-TFB-TBOA) and its derivatives are privileged compounds for studying the roles of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission, animal behavior, and in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. The wide-spread use of l-TFB-TBOA stems from its high potency of EAAT inhibition and the lack of off-target binding to glutamate receptors. However, one of the main challenges in the evaluation of l-TFB-TBOA and its derivatives is the laborious synthesis of these compounds in stereoisomerically pure form. Here, we report an efficient and step-economic chemoenzymatic route that gives access to enantio- and diastereopure l-TFB-TBOA and its derivatives at multigram scale.

  12. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 1 Orchestrates Recruitment of Other Synaptic Vesicle Cargo Proteins during Synaptic Vesicle Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Marrs, Julia; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    A long standing question in synaptic physiology is how neurotransmitter-filled vesicles are rebuilt after exocytosis. Among the first steps in this process is the endocytic retrieval of the transmembrane proteins that are enriched in synaptic vesicles (SVs). At least six types of transmembrane proteins must be recovered, but the rules for how this multiple cargo selection is accomplished are poorly understood. Among these SV cargos is the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGlut). We show here that vGlut1 has a strong influence on the kinetics of retrieval of half of the known SV cargos and that specifically impairing the endocytosis of vGlut1 in turn slows down other SV cargos, demonstrating that cargo retrieval is a collective cargo-driven process. Finally, we demonstrate that different cargos can be retrieved in the same synapse with different kinetics, suggesting that additional post-endocytic sorting steps likely occur in the nerve terminal. PMID:26224632

  13. Coupled binding mechanism of three sodium ions and aspartate in the glutamate transporter homologue GltTk

    PubMed Central

    Guskov, Albert; Jensen, Sonja; Faustino, Ignacio; Marrink, Siewert J.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable transport of anionic amino acids across the cell membrane by coupling it to the downhill transport of cations. This coupling mechanism is still poorly understood, in part because the available crystal structures of these transporters are of relatively low resolution. Here we solve crystal structures of the archaeal transporter GltTk in the presence and absence of aspartate and use molecular dynamics simulations and binding assays to show how strict coupling between the binding of three sodium ions and aspartate takes place. PMID:27830699

  14. The ontogenic expressions of multiple vesicular glutamate transporters during postnatal development of rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Ina, A; Konno, J; Wu, T; Shutoh, F; Nogami, H; Hisano, S

    2008-03-18

    The pineal gland expresses vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), which are thought to transport glutamate into synaptic-like microvesicles in the pinealocytes. Recently, we reported that the rat pineal gland also expresses VGLUT1v which is a novel variant of VGLUT1 during the perinatal period. To explore the biological significance of these VGLUT expressions in pineal development, we studied the ontogeny of VGLUT in this gland by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using rats. Histological analysis revealed that intensities of VGLUT1 hybridization signal and immunostaining drastically increase by postnatal day (P) 7, whereas VGLUT2 expression exhibits high levels of mRNA and protein at birth and decreases gradually from P7 onward. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis supported these histological observations, showing that expressions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 exhibit opposite patterns to each other. Coinciding with VGLUT1-upregulation, RT-PCR data showed that expressions of dynamin 1 and endophilin 1, which are factors predictably involved in the endocytotic recovery of VGLUT1-associated vesicle, are also increased by P7. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of VGLUT1v demonstrated that its mRNA expression is upregulated by P7, kept at the same level until P14, and apparently decreased at P21, suggesting its functional property required for a certain developmental event. Moreover, a comparison of mRNA expressions at daytime and nighttime revealed that neither VGLUT1 nor VGLUT1v shows any difference in both P7 and P21 glands, whereas VGLUT2 is significantly lower at daytime than at nighttime at P21 but not P7, the time point at which the melatonin rhythm is not yet generated. The present study shows that expressions of these VGLUT types are differentially regulated during postnatal pineal development, each presumably participating in physiologically distinct glutamatergic functions.

  15. Vesicular glutamate transporter 3 is required for synaptic transmission in zebrafish hair cells.

    PubMed

    Obholzer, Nikolaus; Wolfson, Sean; Trapani, Josef G; Mo, Weike; Nechiporuk, Alex; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth; Seiler, Christoph; Sidi, Samuel; Söllner, Christian; Duncan, Robert N; Boehland, Andrea; Nicolson, Teresa

    2008-02-27

    Hair cells detect sound and movement and transmit this information via specialized ribbon synapses. Here we report that asteroid, a gene identified in an ethylnitrosourea mutagenesis screen of zebrafish larvae for auditory/vestibular mutants, encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (Vglut3). A splice site mutation in exon 2 of vglut3 results in a severe truncation of the predicted protein product and morpholinos directed against the vglut3 ATG start site or the affected splice junction replicate the asteroid phenotype. In situ hybridization shows that vglut3 is exclusively expressed in hair cells of the ear and lateral line organ. A second transporter gene, vglut1, is also expressed in zebrafish hair cells, but the level of vglut1 mRNA is not increased in the absence of Vglut3. Antibodies against Vglut3 label the basal end of hair cells and labeling is not present in asteroid/vglut3 mutants. Based on the localization of Vglut3 in hair cells, we suspected that the lack of vestibulo-ocular and acoustic startle reflexes in asteroid/vglut3 mutants was attributable to a defect in synaptic transmission in hair cells. In support of this notion, action currents in postsynaptic acousticolateralis neurons are absent in asteroid/vglut3 mutants. At the ultrastructural level, mutant asteroid/vglut3 hair cells show a decrease in the number of ribbon-associated synaptic vesicles, indicating a role for Vglut3 in synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or tethering to the ribbon body. Lack of postsynaptic action currents in the mutants suggests that the remaining hair-cell synaptic vesicles contain insufficient levels of glutamate for generation of action potentials in first-order neurons.

  16. L-Glutamate supplementation improves small intestinal architecture and enhances the expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng; Zhang, Bolin; Yu, Changning; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Hui; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2014-01-01

    L-Glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the small intestine. However, few studies have demonstrated the effect of L-glutamate on the intestinal architecture and signaling of amino acids in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary L-glutamate supplementation on the intestinal architecture and expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets. A total of 120 weaning piglets aged 35 ± 1 days with an average body weight at 8.91 ± 0.45 kg were randomly allocated to two treatments with six replicates of ten piglets each, fed with diets containing 1.21% alanine, or 2% L-glutamate. L-Glutamate supplementation increased the activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) in the jejunal mucosa. Also, the mRNA expression level of jejunal mucosa glutamine synthetase (GS) was increased by L-glutamate supplementation. The height of villi in duodenal and jejunal segments, and the relative mRNA expression of occludin and zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) in jejunal mucosa were increased by dietary L-glutamate supplementation. L-Glutamate supplementation increased plasma concentrations of glutamate, arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and threonine. L-Glutamate supplementation also increased the relative mRNA expression of the jejunal mucosa Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR), metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4), and neutral amino acid transporter B(0)-like (SLC1A5) in the jejunal mucosa. These findings suggest that dietary addition of 2% L-glutamate improves the intestinal integrity and influences the expression of amino acid receptors and transporters in the jejunum of weaning, which is beneficial for the improvement of jejunal nutrients for digestion and absorption.

  17. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance.

  18. The glutamate transporters EAAT2 and EAAT3 mediate cysteine uptake in cortical neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongmei; Swanson, Raymond A

    2003-03-01

    Cysteine availability is normally the rate-limiting factor in glutathione synthesis. How neurons obtain cysteine from extracellular space is not well established. Here we used mouse cortical neuron cultures to examine the role of the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in neuronal cysteine uptake. The cultured neurons expressed both EAAT2 and EAAT3. Cysteine uptake was predominantly (> 85%) Na+-dependent, with an apparent Km of 37 microm. Cysteine uptake was reduced by the EAAT substrates l-glutamate and l-aspartate and by synthetic EAAT inhibitors. The non-selective EAAT inhibitor threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate had a significantly greater maximal inhibitory effect than did the EAAT2-selective inhibitor, dihydrokainate, indicating uptake by both EAAT2 and EAAT3. Serine, a substrate of ASC uptake system, had negligible effects on cysteine uptake at 10-fold excess concentrations. To assess the functional importance of EAAT-mediated cysteine uptake in neuronal glutathione synthesis, cultures were treated with diethylmaleate to deplete glutathione, then incubated with cysteine in the presence or absence of EAAT inhibitors. Threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate and the non-transportable inhibitor threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate both inhibited the cysteine-dependent glutathione synthesis. The findings suggest that neuronal EAAT activity can be a rate-limiting step for neuronal glutathione synthesis and that the primary function of EAATs expressed by neurons in vivo may be to transport cysteine.

  19. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout reduces brain tolerance to focal brain ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-05-01

    Excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) transport glutamate into cells under physiologic conditions. Excitatory amino-acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) is the major neuronal EAAT and also uptakes cysteine, the rate-limiting substrate for synthesis of glutathione. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 contributes to providing brain ischemic tolerance. Male 8-week-old EAAT3 knockout mice on CD-1 mouse gene background and wild-type CD-1 mice were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 90 minutes. Their brain infarct volumes, neurologic functions, and brain levels of glutathione, nitrotyrosine, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) were evaluated. The EAAT3 knockout mice had bigger brain infarct volumes and worse neurologic deficit scores and motor coordination functions than did wild-type mice, no matter whether these neurologic outcome parameters were evaluated at 24 hours or at 4 weeks after brain ischemia. The EAAT3 knockout mice contained higher levels of HNE in the ischemic penumbral cortex and in the nonischemic cerebral cortex than did wild-type mice. Glutathione levels in the ischemic and nonischemic cortices of EAAT3 knockout mice tended to be lower than those of wild-type mice. Our results suggest that EAAT3 is important in limiting ischemic brain injury after focal brain ischemia. This effect may involve attenuating brain oxidative stress.

  20. Effect of environmental enrichment on dopamine and serotonin transporters and glutamate neurotransmission in medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Darna, Mahesh; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Bardo, Michael T.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) have decreased dopamine transporter (DAT) function and expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as well as increased d-amphetamine-induced glutamate release in nucleus accumbens compared to rats raised in an isolated condition (IC). In these previous studies, DAT function and expression were evaluated using mPFC pooled from four rats for each condition to obtain kinetic parameters due to sparse DAT expression in mPFC. In contrast, accumbal glutamate release was determined using individual rats. The current study extends the previous work and reports on the optimization of DAT and serotonin transporter (SERT) functional assays, as well as cell surface expression assays using both mPFC and orbital frontal cortex (OFC) from individual EC or IC rats. In addition, the effect of d-amphetamine on glutamate release in mPFC and OFC of EC and IC rats was determined using in vivo microdialysis. Results show that environmental enrichment decreased maximal transport velocity (Vmax) for [3H]dopamine uptake in mPFC, but increased Vmax for [3H]dopamine uptake in OFC. Corresponding changes in DAT cell surface expression were not found. In contrast, Vmax for [3H]serotonin uptake and cellular localization of SERT in mPFC and OFC were not different between EC and IC rats. Further, acute d-amphetamine (2 mg/kg, s.c.) increased extracellular glutamate concentrations in mPFC of EC rats only and in OFC of IC rats only. Overall, these results suggest that enrichment produces long-lasting alterations in mPFC and OFC DAT function via a trafficking-independent mechanism, as well as differential glutamate release in mPFC and OFC. Rearing-induced modulation of DAT function and glutamate release in prefrontal cortical subregions may contribute to the known protective effects of enrichment on drug abuse vulnerability. PMID:25536304

  1. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: Putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1. Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1.Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25128239

  3. Hippocampal glutamate level and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) are up-regulated in senior rat associated with isoflurane-induced spatial learning/memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiangdong; Xu, Chengshi; Wang, Hui; Xu, Jie; Liu, Weiran; Wang, Yun; Jia, Xingyuan; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline is a clinical concern especially for senior patients. It is generally recognized that glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in the physiopathologic process of neurocognitive deterioration. However, alterations of glutamatergic system in prolonged isoflurane-induced learning/memory decline are still unclear. This study investigates the question whether glutamate concentration and corresponding transporters or receptors display any alternations in aged rat suffering from isoflurane-induced learning/memory impairment. 111 male Sprague-Dawley rats (>18 months) were randomly divided into two main groups: hippocampal microdialysis group (n = 38) and western blotting group (n = 73). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups including (1) control subgroup (n = 6 and 10, receiving no behavioral trial, anesthesia or air exposure); (2) air-exposed subgroup (n = 7 and 15, receiving behavioral trial and air exposure but not anesthesia); (3) isoflurane anesthesia subgroup (n = 25 and 48, receiving both behavioral trial and anesthesia). The isoflurane-exposed rats were further divided into a learning/memory-impaired subgroup and a non-learning/memory-impaired subgroup according to their behavioral performance, which was measured using Morris water maze. Hippocampal glutamate concentrations in microdialysates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, NMDAR1, NMDAR2A/B, AMPAR and tau in hippocampus were assessed via quantitative Western blotting. The incidences of learning/memory impairment of isoflurane-exposed rats in hippocampal microdialysis group and western blotting group were 12.0 (3/25) and 10.4 % (5/48) respectively. The intra-anesthesia hippocampal glutamate levels were significantly lower than those of non-anesthesized rats. The learning/memory-impaired rats showed a long-lasting increased glutamate level from 24 h after isoflurane exposure to the end of the study, but the other

  4. NEUTRALIZATION OF THE ASPARTIC ACID RESIDUE D367, BUT NOT D454, INHIBITS BINDING OF NA+ TO THE GLUTAMATE-FREE FORM AND CYCLING OF THE GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhen; Zhang, Zhou; Grewer, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Substrate transport by the plasma membrane glutamate transporter EAAC1 is coupled to cotransport of three sodium ions. One of these Na+ ions binds to the transporter already in the absence of glutamate. Here, we have investigated the possible involvement of two conserved aspartic acid residues in transmembrane segments 7 and 8 of EAAC1, D367 and D454, in Na+ cotransport. In order to test the effect of charge neutralization mutations in these positions on Na+ binding to the glutamate-free transporter, we recorded the Na+-induced anion leak current to determine the Km of EAAC1 for Na+. For EAAC1WT, this Km was determined as 120 mM. When the negative charge of D367 was neutralized by mutagenesis to asparagine, Na+ activated the anion leak current with a Km of about 2 M, indicating dramatically impaired Na+ binding to the mutant transporter. In contrast, the Na+ affinity of EAAC1D454N was virtually unchanged compared to the wild type transporter (Km = 90 mM). The reduced occupancy of the Na+ binding site of EAAC1D367N resulted in a dramatic reduction in glutamate affinity (Km = 3.6 mM, 140 mM [Na+]), which could be partially overcome by increasing extracellular [Na+]. In addition to impairing Na+ binding, the D367N mutation slowed glutamate transport, as shown by pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of transport currents, by strongly decreasing the rate of a reaction step associated with glutamate translocation. Our data are consistent with a model in which D367, but not D454 is involved in coordinating the bound Na+ in the glutamate-free transporter form. PMID:16478724

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate transporters influence synaptic function and behavior at sites distant from the synapse.

    PubMed

    Mano, Itzhak; Straud, Sarah; Driscoll, Monica

    2007-11-23

    To ensure precise neurotransmission and prevent neurotoxic accumulation, l-glutamate (Glu), the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is cleared from the synapse by glutamate transporters (GluTs). The molecular components of Glu synapses are highly conserved between Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, yet the absence of synaptic insulation in C. elegans raises fundamental questions about Glu clearance strategies in the nematode nervous system. To gain insight into how Glu clearance is accomplished and how GluTs impact neurotransmission, we probed expression and function of all 6 GluTs found in the C. elegans genome. Disruption of each GluT impacts multiple Glu-dependent behaviors, with GluT combinations commonly increasing the severity of behavioral deficits. Interestingly, the sole GluT that we find expressed in neurons is localized predominantly in presynaptic neurons, in contrast to the postsynaptic concentration of neuronal GluTs typical in mammals. Moreover, 3 of the 6 GluT genes appear strongly expressed on the capillary excretory canal cell, where they affect Glu-dependent behaviors from positions distal to glutamatergic circuits. Indeed, our focused study of GLT-3, one of the distally expressed GluTs, shows that despite this distance, GLT-3 function can balance the activity mediated by synaptic release and synaptic receptors. The effects of distal GluTs on glutamatergic circuits support that Glu diffusion outside the vicinity of the synapse is a critical factor in C. elegans neurotransmission. Together with the presynaptic localization of neuronal GluTs, these observations suggest an unusual strategy for Glu clearance in C. elegans.

  6. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Identification of a meningococcal L-glutamate ABC transporter operon essential for growth in low-sodium environments.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Caterina; Talà, Adelfia; Spinosa, Maria Rita; Progida, Cinzia; De Nitto, Eleanna; Gaballo, Antonio; Bruni, Carmelo B; Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    GdhR is a meningococcal transcriptional regulator that was previously shown to positively control the expression of gdhA, encoding the NADP-specific L-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), in response to the growth phase and/or to the carbon source. In this study we used reverse transcriptase-PCR-differential display (to identify additional GdhR-regulated genes. The results indicated that GdhR, in addition to NADP-GDH, controls the expression of a number of genes involved in glucose catabolism by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in l-glutamate import by an unknown ABC transport system. The genes encoding the putative periplasmic substrate-binding protein (NMB1963) and the permease (NMB1965) of the ABC transporter were genetically inactivated. Uptake experiments demonstrated an impairment of L-glutamate import in the NMB1965-defective mutant in the absence or in the presence of a low sodium ion concentration. In contrast, at a sodium ion concentration above 60 mM, the uptake defect disappeared, possibly because the activity of a sodium-driven secondary transporter became predominant. Indeed, the NMB1965-defective mutant was unable to grow at a low sodium ion concentration (<20 mM) in a chemically defined medium containing L-glutamate and four other amino acids that supported meningococcal growth, but it grew when the sodium ion concentration was raised to higher values (>60 mM). The same growth phenotype was observed in the NMB1963-defective mutant. Cell invasion and intracellular persistence assays and expression data during cell invasion provided evidence that the l-glutamate ABC transporter, tentatively named GltT, was critical for meningococcal adaptation in the low-sodium intracellular environment.

  8. Glutamate transporter-associated anion channels adjust intracellular chloride concentrations during glial maturation.

    PubMed

    Untiet, Verena; Kovermann, Peter; Gerkau, Niklas J; Gensch, Thomas; Rose, Christine R; Fahlke, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytic volume regulation and neurotransmitter uptake are critically dependent on the intracellular anion concentration, but little is known about the mechanisms controlling internal anion homeostasis in these cells. Here we used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with the chloride-sensitive dye MQAE to measure intracellular chloride concentrations in murine Bergmann glial cells in acute cerebellar slices. We found Bergmann glial [Cl(-) ]int to be controlled by two opposing transport processes: chloride is actively accumulated by the Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1, and chloride efflux through anion channels associated with excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) reduces [Cl(-) ]int to values that vary upon changes in expression levels or activity of these channels. EAATs transiently form anion-selective channels during glutamate transport, and thus represent a class of ligand-gated anion channels. Age-dependent upregulation of EAATs results in a developmental chloride switch from high internal chloride concentrations (51.6 ± 2.2 mM, mean ± 95% confidence interval) during early development to adult levels (35.3 ± 0.3 mM). Simultaneous blockade of EAAT1/GLAST and EAAT2/GLT-1 increased [Cl(-) ]int in adult glia to neonatal values. Moreover, EAAT activation by synaptic stimulations rapidly decreased [Cl(-) ]int . Other tested chloride channels or chloride transporters do not contribute to [Cl(-) ]int under our experimental conditions. Neither genetic removal of ClC-2 nor pharmacological block of K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter change resting Bergmann glial [Cl(-) ]int in acute cerebellar slices. We conclude that EAAT anion channels play an important and unexpected role in adjusting glial intracellular anion concentration during maturation and in response to cerebellar activity. GLIA 2017;65:388-400.

  9. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and glutamate receptor 1 mRNA in the central nervous system of the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul; Atoji, Yasuro

    2008-12-10

    Glutamate acts as the excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is mediated largely by the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) types of glutamate receptors (GluR1-4) in mammals. In the present study, we determined the cDNA sequences of pigeon VGLUT2 and GluR1 and mapped the distribution of their mRNA in the pigeon CNS. The predicted amino acids of pigeon VGLUT2 and GluR1 showed a 93% identity to human VGLUT2 and GluR1 both. In situ hybridization autoradiograms showed VGLUT2 mRNA expression exclusively in the pallium of the telencephalon, and no expression in the subpallium. Within the diencephalon, VGLUT2 mRNA was more abundant in the thalamus than in the hypothalamus. Rich VGLUT2 mRNA expression was found in the optic tectum, nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis, nucleus isthmi, pars parvocellularis, isthmo-optic nucleus, pontine nuclei, and granular layer of the cerebellum. Moderate expression was noted in the cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei, cochlear nuclei, inferior olivary nucleus, and gray matter of the spinal cord. GluR1 mRNA was expressed abundantly in the pallium and subpallium of the telencephalon, but it was poor in the diencephalon, midbrain, medulla, cerebellar cortex, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These results suggest that the cDNA sequences of VGLUT2 and GluR1 in the pigeon are comparable to those of VGLUT2 and GluR1 in mammals, respectively. The distribution of pigeon GluR1 mRNA resembles that of mammals, but the distribution of VGLUT2 mRNA resembles that of both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in mammals.

  10. Oral administration of MSG increases expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the gastrointestinal tract of young piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Yulong; Shu, Xu Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Wu, Zhenlong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    Glutamate receptors and transporters, including T1R1 and T1R3 (taste receptor 1, subtypes 1 and 3), mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), EAAC-1 (excitatory amino acid carrier-1), GLAST-1 (glutamate-aspartate transporter-1), and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1), are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. This study determined effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate [MSG; 0, 0.06, 0.5, or 1 g/kg body weight (BW)/day] for 21 days on expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the stomach and jejunum of sow-reared piglets. Both mRNA and protein levels for gastric T1R1, T1R3, mGluR1, mGluR4, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 and mRNA levels for jejunal T1R1, T1R3, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3 and EAAT4 were increased (P < 0.05) by MSG supplementation. Among all groups, mRNA levels for gastric EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 were highest (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day. EAAT1 and EAAT2 mRNA levels in the stomach and jejunum of piglets receiving 0.5 g MSG/kg BW/day, as well as jejunal EAAT3 and EAAT4 mRNA levels in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day, were higher (P < 0.05) than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Furthermore, protein levels for jejunal T1R1 and EAAT3 were higher (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Collectively, these findings indicate that dietary MSG may beneficially stimulate glutamate signaling and sensing in the stomach and jejunum of young pigs, as well as their gastrointestinal function.

  11. Ceftriaxone ameliorates tau pathology and cognitive decline via restoration of glial glutamate transporter in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zumkehr, Joannee; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Cheng, David; Kieu, Zanett; Wai, Thin; Hawkins, Charlesice; Kilian, Jason; Lim, Siok Lam; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Kitazawa, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Glial glutamate transporter, GLT-1, is the major Na(+)-driven glutamate transporter to control glutamate levels in synapses and prevent glutamate-induced excitotoxicity implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Significant functional loss of GLT-1 has been reported to correlate well with synaptic degeneration and severity of cognitive impairment among AD patients, yet the underlying molecular mechanism and its pathological consequence in AD are not well understood. Here, we find the temporal decrease in GLT-1 levels in the hippocampus of the 3xTg-AD mouse model and that the pharmacological upregulation of GLT-1 significantly ameliorates the age-dependent pathological tau accumulation, restores synaptic proteins, and rescues cognitive decline with minimal effects on Aβ pathology. In primary neuron and astrocyte coculture, naturally secreted Aβ species significantly downregulate GLT-1 steady-state and expression levels. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that GLT-1 restoration is neuroprotective and Aβ-induced astrocyte dysfunction represented by a functional loss of GLT-1 may serve as one of the major pathological links between Aβ and tau pathology.

  12. The Expression of Glutamate Aspartate Transporter (GLAST) within the Human Cochlea and its Distribution in Various Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sameer; Vorasubin, Nopawan; Lopez, Ivan A; Hosokawa, Seiji; Ishiyama, Gail; Ishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate plays an important role in the central nervous system as an excitatory neurotransmitter. However, its abundance can lead to excitotoxicity which necessitates the proper function of active glutamate transporters. The glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) has been shown to exist and function within non-human cochlear specimens regulating the inner ear glutamate concentration. In this study, we examined micro-dissected human cochleas from formalin-fixed celloidin-embedded temporal bone specimens of three different types of patients (Meniere's disease, normal controls, and other otopathologic conditions) and examined the differential expression of GLAST in the spiral ligament of the basal, middle, and apical turns of the cochlea. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with polyclonal antibodies against GLAST and image analysis was carried out with the Image J analysis software. In contrast to other studies with non-human specimens, GLAST was expressed in the spiral ligament fibrocytes but was not detected in the satellite cells of the spiral ganglia or supporting cells of the organ of Corti in the human cochlea. Our data also showed that GLAST expression significantly differs in the basal and apical turns of the cochlea. Lastly, post-hoc analysis showed a difference in the GLAST immunoreactive area of patients with Meniere's disease when compared to that of patients with other otopathologic conditions—such as presbycusis or ototoxicity. These results may potentially lead to further understanding of different disease states that affect hearing. PMID:23850643

  13. A vesicular glutamate transporter in lampreys: cDNA cloning and early expression in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Villar-Cerviño, Verona; Rocancourt, Claire; Menuet, Arnaud; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Anadón, Ramón; Mazan, Sylvie; Rodicio, Maria Celina

    2010-09-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) accumulate glutamate into synaptic vesicles of glutamatergic neurons, and thus are considered to define the phenotype of these neurons. Glutamate also appears to play a role in the development of the nervous system of vertebrates. Here we report the characterization of a vesicular glutamate transporter of lamprey (lVGluT), a novel member of the VGluT gene family. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that lVGLUT cannot be assigned to any of the three VGLUT isoforms characterized in teleosts and mammals, suggesting that these classes may have been fixed after the splitting between cyclostomes and gnathostomes. Expression pattern analysis during lamprey embryogenesis and prolarval stages shows that lVGluT expression is restricted to the nervous system. The first structure to express lVGluT was the olfactory epithelium of late embryos. In the brain of early prolarvae, lVGluT was expressed in most of the neuronal populations that generate the early axonal scaffold. lVGluT expression was also observed in neuronal populations of the rhombencephalon and spinal cord and in ganglia of the branchiomeric, octaval and posterior lateral line nerves. In the rhombencephalon, lVGluT expression appears to be spatially restricted in dorsal and ventral longitudinal domains. Comparison of the early expression of VGluT genes between the lamprey and some anamniotan gnathostomes (frog, zebrafish) reveals a conserved expression pattern, likely to reflect ancestral vertebrate characteristics. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 17β-Estradiol attenuates the activity of the glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Park, Hee-Pyeong; Kim, Chong-Sung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi; Kim, Chong-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Estrogen, a neuroactive sex hormone in the brain, enhances neuronal excitability and increases seizures. Glutamate transporters help in limiting the excitatory neurotransmission by uptaking glutamate from the synapses. We investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol on the activity of a glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), in Xenopus oocytes. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of rat EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30 μM)-induced membrane currents mediated by EAAT3 were measured using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. 17β-Estradiol reduced EAAT3 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. 17β-Estradiol (10nM for 72h) significantly decreased V(max) but had no effect on K(m) of EAAT3 for glutamate. When 17β-estradiol treated oocytes were incubated with phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, 17β-estradiol-induced decrease in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Furthermore, in pretreatment of oocytes with chelerythrine or staurosporine, two PKC inhibitors, EAAT3 activity was significantly decreased. However, there was no statistical difference among the 17β-estradiol, PKC inhibitor, or 17β-estradiol plus PKC inhibitor groups. Likewise, wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but the activity did not differ among the 17β-estradiol, wortmannin, or 17β-estradiol plus wortmannin groups. Estradiol receptor inhibitor, fulvestrant, did not change the reduced EAAT3 activity by 17β-estradiol. Our results suggest that 17β-estradiol decreases EAAT3 activity. PKC and PI3K seem to be involved in this effect, possibly not via estradiol receptors.

  15. Rapid Microelectrode Measurements and the Origin and Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, E.R.; Hascup, K.N.; Stephens, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Huettl, P.; Gratton, A.; Gerhardt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a significant role in several mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, addiction and anxiety. Previous studies on PFC glutamate-mediated function have used techniques that raise questions on the neuronal vs. astrocytic origin of glutamate. The present studies used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to monitor second-by-second resting glutamate levels in the PFC of awake rats. Locally-applied drugs were employed in an attempt to discriminate between the neuronal or glial components of the resting glutamate signal. Local application of tetrodotoxin (TTX; sodium channel blocker), produced a significant (~40%) decline in resting glutamate levels. In addition significant reductions in extracellular glutamate were seen with locally-applied ω-conotoxin (MVIIC; ~50%; calcium channel blocker), and the mGluR⅔ agonist, LY379268 (~20%), and a significant increase with the mGluR⅔ antagonist LY341495 (~40%), effects all consistent with a large neuronal contribution to the resting glutamate levels. Local administration of D,L-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; glutamate transporter inhibitor) produced an ~120% increase in extracellular glutamate levels, supporting that excitatory amino acid transporters, which are largely located on glia, modulate clearance of extracellular glutamate. Interestingly, local application of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG; cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor), produced small, non-significant bi-phasic changes in extracellular glutamate versus vehicle control. Finally, pre-administration of TTX completely blocked the glutamate response to tail pinch stress. Taken together, these results support that PFC resting glutamate levels in rats as measured by the MEA technology are at least 40-50% derived from neurons. Furthermore, these data support that the impulse flow-dependent glutamate release from a physiologically-evoked event is entirely neuronally derived. PMID:20969570

  16. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Węgrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knock-down (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All estrogen receptors (ERs: ER-α ER-β and GPR30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increase GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. PMID:22488924

  17. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-Estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and, thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knockdown (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All ERs (ER-α, ER-β, and G protein-coupled receptor 30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increases GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders.

  18. A rhythmic change of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2 expression in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hira, Yoshiki; Ehara, Ayuka; Mimura-Yamamoto, Yuka; Kawano, Michihiro; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Nogami, Haruo; Hisano, Setsuji

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland secretes melatonin under circadian control via nocturnal noradrenergic stimulation, and expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v). Although we previously reported that VGLUT2 mRNA level of rat pineal gland at postnatal day 21 is higher in the nighttime than in daytime, questions remained as to the time of postnatal onset of this phenomenon and a 24-h change in the mRNA or protein level at postnatal days. The day-night difference in VGLUT2 mRNA level was evident 14 days after birth. In the adult, VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels increased in the dark phase, with the protein level showing a 6-h delay. The nocturnal elevation in VGLUT2 mRNA level diminished under the constant light condition but persisted under the constant dark condition. The present data suggest that VGLUT2 in the rat pineal gland is involved in some nocturnal glutamatergic function.

  19. Astroglial glutamate transporter deficiency increases synaptic excitability and leads to pathological repetitive behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Aida, Tomomi; Yoshida, Junichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanimura, Asami; Iino, Yusuke; Soma, Miho; Bai, Ning; Ito, Yukiko; Cui, Wanpeng; Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Nagai, Terumi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kano, Masanobu; Götz, Magdalena; Hirase, Hajime; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2015-06-01

    An increase in the ratio of cellular excitation to inhibition (E/I ratio) has been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). A proper E/I ratio is achieved via factors expressed in neuron and glia. In astrocytes, the glutamate transporter GLT1 is critical for regulating an E/I ratio. However, the role of GLT1 dysfunction in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains unknown because mice with a complete deficiency of GLT1 exhibited seizures and premature death. Here, we show that astrocyte-specific GLT1 inducible knockout (GLAST(CreERT2/+)/GLT1(flox/flox), iKO) mice exhibit pathological repetitive behaviors including excessive and injurious levels of self-grooming and tic-like head shakes. Electrophysiological studies reveal that excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapse is normal in a basal state but is increased after repetitive stimulation. Furthermore, treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine ameliorated the pathological repetitive behaviors in iKO mice. These results suggest that astroglial GLT1 has a critical role in controlling the synaptic efficacy at corticostriatal synapses and its dysfunction causes pathological repetitive behaviors.

  20. Astroglial Glutamate Transporter Deficiency Increases Synaptic Excitability and Leads to Pathological Repetitive Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Tomomi; Yoshida, Junichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanimura, Asami; Iino, Yusuke; Soma, Miho; Bai, Ning; Ito, Yukiko; Cui, Wanpeng; Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Nagai, Terumi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kano, Masanobu; Götz, Magdalena; Hirase, Hajime; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the ratio of cellular excitation to inhibition (E/I ratio) has been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). A proper E/I ratio is achieved via factors expressed in neuron and glia. In astrocytes, the glutamate transporter GLT1 is critical for regulating an E/I ratio. However, the role of GLT1 dysfunction in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains unknown because mice with a complete deficiency of GLT1 exhibited seizures and premature death. Here, we show that astrocyte-specific GLT1 inducible knockout (GLASTCreERT2/+/GLT1flox/flox, iKO) mice exhibit pathological repetitive behaviors including excessive and injurious levels of self-grooming and tic-like head shakes. Electrophysiological studies reveal that excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapse is normal in a basal state but is increased after repetitive stimulation. Furthermore, treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine ameliorated the pathological repetitive behaviors in iKO mice. These results suggest that astroglial GLT1 has a critical role in controlling the synaptic efficacy at corticostriatal synapses and its dysfunction causes pathological repetitive behaviors. PMID:25662838

  1. Critical role of s465 in protein kinase C-increased rat glutamate transporter type 3 activity.

    PubMed

    Baik, Hee Jung; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate transporters, also called excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), uptake extracellular glutamate and regulate neurotransmission. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) increases the activity of EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the major neuronal EAAT. We designed this study to determine which amino acid residue(s) in EAAT3 may be involved in this PKC effect. Selective potential PKC phosphorylation sites were mutated. These EAAT3 mutants were expressed in the Xenopus oocytes. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a PKC activator, significantly increased wild-type EAAT3 activity. Mutation of serine 465 to alanine or aspartic acid, but not the mutation of threonine 5 to alanine, abolished PKC-increased EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest a critical role of serine 465 in the increased EAAT3 activity by PKC activation.

  2. Spinal upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 by ceftriaxone: therapeutic efficacy in a range of experimental nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Khara M.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Morgan, Kelly N.; Crysdale, Nicole Y.; Kroll, Juliet L.; Taylor, Frederick R.; Harrison, Jacqueline A.; Sloane, Evan M.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission is highly regulated, largely by glutamate transporters. In the spinal cord, the glutamate transporter GLT-1 is primarily responsible for glutamate clearance. Downregulation of GLT-1 can occur in activated astrocytes, and is associated with increased extracellular glutamate and neuroexcitation. Among other conditions, astrocyte activation occurs following repeated opioids and in models of chronic pain. If GLT-1 downregulation occurs in these states, GLT-1 could be a pharmacological target for improving opioid efficacy and controlling chronic pain. The present studies explored whether daily intrathecal treatment of rats with ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic that upregulates GLT-1 expression, could prevent development of hyperalgesia and allodynia following repeated morphine, reverse pain arising from central or peripheral neuropathy, and reduce glial activation in these models. Ceftriaxone pre-treatment attenuated the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia in response to repeated morphine, and prevented associated astrocyte activation. In a model of multiple sclerosis (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; EAE), ceftriaxone reversed tactile allodynia and halted the progression of motor weakness and paralysis. Similarly, ceftriaxone reversed tactile allodynia induced by chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). EAE and CCI each significantly reduced the expression of membrane-bound, dimerized GLT-1 protein in lumbar spinal cord, an effect normalized by ceftriaxone. Lastly, ceftriaxone normalized CCI- and EAE-induced astrocyte activation in lumbar spinal cord. Together, these data indicate that increasing spinal GLT-1 expression attenuates opioid-induced paradoxical pain, alleviates neuropathic pain, and suppresses associated glial activation. GLT-1 therefore may be a therapeutic target that could improve available treatment options for patients with chronic pain. PMID:20547213

  3. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 immunoreactivity in extrinsic and intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ewald, P; Neuhuber, W L; Raab, M

    2006-04-01

    Encouraged by the recent finding of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) immunoreactivity (-ir) in intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) of the rat esophagus, we investigated also the distribution and co-localization patterns of VGLUT1. Confocal imaging revealed substantial co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with selective markers of IGLEs, i.e., calretinin and VGLUT2, indicating that IGLEs contain both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 within their synaptic vesicles. Besides IGLEs, we found VGLUT1-ir in both cholinergic and nitrergic myenteric neuronal cell bodies, in fibers of the muscularis mucosae, and in esophageal motor endplates. Skeletal neuromuscular junctions, in contrast, showed no VGLUT1-ir. We also tested for probable co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with markers of extrinsic and intrinsic esophageal innervation and glia. Within the myenteric neuropil we found, besides co-localization of VGLUT1 and substance P, no further co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with any of these markers. In the muscularis mucosae some VGLUT1-ir fibers were shown to contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-ir. VGLUT1-ir in esophageal motor endplates was partly co-localized with vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)/choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-ir, but VGLUT1-ir was also demonstrated in separately terminating fibers at motor endplates co-localized neither with ChAT/VAChT-ir nor with nNOS-ir, suggesting a hitherto unknown glutamatergic enteric co-innervation. Thus, VGLUT1-ir was found in extrinsic as well as intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

  4. Extracellular microvesicles from astrocytes contain functional glutamate transporters: regulation by protein kinase C and cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Meylan, Patrick; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT)-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes) and because the protein kinase C (PKC) family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI) is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release. PMID:24368897

  5. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Chávez, Lucio A.; Rendón-López, Christian R. R.; Zepeda, Angélica; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Del Razo, Luz M.; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH), which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system (CNS). In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs) 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR) subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females. PMID:25709567

  6. Alphaxalone, a neurosteroid anaesthetic, increases the activity of the glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Junghee; Cheong, Il-Young; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2009-01-05

    Glutamate transporters may be important targets for anaesthetic action in the central nervous system. The authors investigated the effects of alphaxalone, an intravenous neurosteroid anaesthetic, on the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3). EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting its mRNA. Two-electrode voltage clamping was used to record membrane currents before, during, and after applying L-glutamate (30 microM) in the presence or absence of alphaxalone. Responses were quantified by integrating current traces and are reported in microCoulombs (microC). Results are presented as means+/-S.E.M. L-Glutamate induced inward currents in EAAT3 expressing oocytes, and these currents were dose-dependently increased by alphaxalone. Alphaxalone at 0.01 to 3 microM significantly increased the inward currents. In addition, the treatment of oocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, significantly increased the transporter currents (1.0+/-0.2 to 1.4+/-0.2 microC; P<0.05). However, treatment with PMA plus alphaxalone did not increase responses further as compared with PMA or alphaxalone alone. Furthermore, pretreatment of oocytes with chelerythrine or staurosporine, two PKC inhibitors, did not affect basal transporter currents, but did significantly reduce alphaxalone-enhanced EAAT3 activity; whereas oocytes pretreated with wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, showed significant reductions in basal and alphaxalone-enhanced EAAT3 activities. The above results suggest that alphaxalone enhances EAAT3 activity and that PKC and PI3K are involved in this effect.

  7. Expression of Vesicular Glutamate Transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the Rat Dental Pulp and Trigeminal Ganglion following Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yun Sook; Choi, So Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Cho, Yi Sul; Bae, Yong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that peripheral glutamate signaling mechanism is involved in the nociceptive transmission during pathological conditions. However, little is known about the glutamate signaling mechanism and related specific type of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) in the dental pulp following inflammation. To address this issue, we investigated expression and protein levels of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and trigeminal ganglion (TG) following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) application to the rat dental pulp by light microscopic immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results The density of VGLUT2− immunopositive (+) axons in the dental pulp and the number of VGLUT2+ soma in the TG increased significantly in the CFA-treated group, compared to control group. The protein levels of VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and TG were also significantly higher in the CFA-treated group than control group by Western blot analysis. The density of VGLUT1+ axons in the dental pulp and soma in the TG remained unchanged in the CFA-treated group. Conclusions These findings suggest that glutamate signaling that is mediated by VGLUT2 in the pulpal axons may be enhanced in the inflamed dental pulp, which may contribute to pulpal axon sensitization leading to hyperalgesia following inflammation. PMID:25290694

  8. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  9. Cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Huang, Chia-Yu; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-01-14

    The effect of cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, on glutamate release in isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from rat prefrontal cortex was examined. Cyanocobalamin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of cyanocobalamin was blocked by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor L-transpyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid or the nontransportable glutamate inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, indicating that this release inhibition results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis and not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Examination of the effect of cyanocobalamin on cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration revealed that the inhibition of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, largely attenuated the inhibitory effect of cyanocobalamin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release, but the Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene had no effect. Cyanocobalamin did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization; thus, the inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release produced by cyanocobalamin was not due to its decreasing synaptosomal excitability. In addition, cyanocobalamin-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release was significantly attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Ro318220. Furthermore, 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C was significantly reduced by cyanocobalamin. These results suggest that cyanocobalamin effects a decrease in protein kinase C activation, which subsequently reduces the Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels to cause a decrease in evoked glutamate

  10. Astrocyte-derived growth factors and estrogen neuroprotection: role of transforming growth factor-α in estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporters in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-05-25

    Extensive studies from the past decade have completely revolutionized our understanding about the role of astrocytes in the brain from merely supportive cells to an active role in various physiological functions including synaptic transmission via cross-talk with neurons and neuroprotection via releasing neurotrophic factors. Particularly, numerous studies have reported that astrocytes mediate the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) in various clinical and experimental models of neuronal injury. Astrocytes contain two main glutamate transporters, glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), that play a key role in preventing excitotoxic neuronal death, a process associated with most neurodegenerative diseases. E2 has been shown to increase expression of both GLAST and GLT-1 mRNA and protein and glutamate uptake in astrocytes. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) appear to mediate E2-induced enhancement of these transporters. These findings suggest that E2 exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxic neuronal injuries, at least in part, by enhancing astrocytic glutamate transporter levels and function. Therefore, the present review will discuss proposed mechanisms involved in astrocyte-mediated E2 neuroprotection, with a focus on glutamate transporters.

  11. Glutamate transport into synaptic vesicles. Roles of membrane potential, pH gradient, and intravesicular pH.

    PubMed

    Tabb, J S; Kish, P E; Van Dyke, R; Ueda, T

    1992-08-05

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is transported into bovine synaptic vesicles in a manner that is ATP dependent and requires a vesicular electrochemical proton gradient. We studied the electrical and chemical elements of this driving force and evaluated the effects of chloride on transport. Increasing concentrations of Cl- were found to increase the steady-state ATP-dependent vesicular pH gradient (delta pH) and were found to concomitantly decrease the vesicular membrane potential (delta psi). Low millimolar chloride concentrations, which cause 3-6-fold stimulation of vesicular glutamate uptake, caused small but measurable increases in delta pH and decreases in delta psi, when compared to control vesicles in the absence of chloride. Nigericin in potassium buffers was used to alter the relative proportions of delta pH and delta psi. Compared to controls, at all chloride concentrations tested, nigericin virtually abolished delta pH and increased the vesicle interior positive delta psi. Concomitantly, nigericin increased ATP-dependent glutamate uptake in 0-1 mM chloride but decreased glutamate uptake in 4 mM (45%), 20 mM (80%), and 140 mM (75%) Cl- (where delta pH in the absence of nigericin was large). These findings suggest that either delta psi, delta pH, or a combination can drive glutamate uptake, but to different degrees. In the presence of 4 mM Cl-, where uptake is optimal, both delta psi and delta pH contribute to the driving force for uptake. When the extravesicular pH was increased from 7.4 to 8.0, more Cl- was required to stimulate vesicular glutamate uptake. In the absence of Cl-, as extravesicular pH was lowered to 6.8, uptake was over 3-fold greater than it was at pH 7.4. As extravesicular pH was reduced from 8.0 toward 6.8, less Cl- was required for maximal stimulation. Decreasing the extravesicular pH from 8.0 to 6.8 in the absence of Cl- significantly increased glutamate uptake activity, even

  12. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    PubMed

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-03

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (p<0.05). Electrophysiology experiments were conducted in anaesthetized rats to determine the effect of intraganglionic injections of glutamate on the response properties of ganglion neurons that innervated either the temporalis or masseter muscle. Intraganglionic injection of glutamate (500 mM, 3 μl) evoked afferent discharge and significantly reduced muscle afferent mechanical threshold. Glutamate-evoked discharge was attenuated bythe N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) and increased by TFB-TBOA, whereas mechanical sensitization was only sensitive to APV. Antidromic invasion of muscle afferent fibers by electrical stimulation of the caudal brainstem (10 Hz) or local anesthesia of the brainstem with lidocaine did not alter glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. These findings provide a novel mechanism whereby dysfunctional trigeminal SGCs could contribute to cranial muscle tenderness in

  13. meso-Transdiene Analogs Inhibit Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 Function and Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine ReleaseS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Horton, David B.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Norrholm, Seth D.; Culver, John P.; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Harrod, Steven B.; Deaciuc, Agripina G.; Bardo, Michael T.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [3H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  14. Electrically-evoked dopamine and acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices perfused without magnesium: regulation by glutamate acting on NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shaoyu; Fredholm, Bertil B

    1997-01-01

    Rat striatal slices, preincubated with [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-choline, were continuously superfused and electrically stimulated. Electrically evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-acetylcholine (ACh) was not significantly changed by elimination of Mg2+ from superfusion buffer, but the basal release of [3H]-dopamine was doubled. Kynurenic acid (100–800  μM) caused, in the absence but not presence of Mg2+, a concentration-dependent decrease in the evoked release of these two transmitters. The addition of glycine reversed the inhibition of the evoked release of both transmitters caused by kynurenic acid (400  μM) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, glycine increased the evoked release of [3H]-dopamine via a site inhibitable by strychnine (1  μM). Another two antagonists at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and dizocilpine, also decreased significantly the evoked release of the two transmitters in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence, but not presence of Mg2+. By contrast, an antagonist of non-NMDA receptors, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (10  μM) significantly decreased the evoked release of the two transmitters in the presence, but not in the absence of Mg2+. Electrical field stimulation evoked release of endogenous adenosine, and this release tended to be higher in the absence of Mg2+. However, the addition of a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (200 nM) did not influence the evoked release of the two transmitters, showing that the released adenosine is of little importance in controlling ACh and dopamine release from striatal slices. Non-NMDA receptors may play a similar role when Mg2+ ions are present. The results indicate that NMDA receptors activated in the absence of Mg2+ participate in the electrically-evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-ACh from the striatum. PMID:9257903

  15. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  16. A critical role of glutamate transporter type 3 in the learning and memory of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Park, Sang-Hon; Zhao, Huijuan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-10-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning and memory are associated with trafficking of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) to the plasma membrane. To assess whether this trafficking is an intrinsic component of the biochemical responses underlying learning and memory, 7- to 9-week old male EAAT3 knockout mice and CD-1 wild-type mice were subjected to fear conditioning. Their hippocampal CA1 regions, amygdalae and entorhinal cortices were harvested before, or 30 min or 3 h after the fear conditioning stimulation. We found that EAAT3 knockout mice had worse contextual and tone-related learning and memory than did the wild-type mice. The expression of EAAT3, glutamate receptor (GluR)1 and GluR2 in the plasma membrane and of phospho-GluR1 (at Ser 831) and phospho-CaMKII in the hippocampus of the wild-type mice was increased at 30 min after the fear conditioning stimulation. Similar biochemical changes occurred in the amygdala. Fear conditioning also increased the expression of c-Fos and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in the CA1 regions and of Arc in the entorhinal cortices of the wild-type mice. These biochemical responses were attenuated in the EAAT3 knockout mice. These results suggest that EAAT3 plays a critical role in learning and memory. Our results also provide initial evidence that EAAT3 may have receptor-like functions to participate in the biochemical reactions underlying learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Attenuation of Ethanol Withdrawal by Ceftriaxone-Induced Upregulation of Glutamate Transporter EAAT2

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A; Camsari, Ulas M; Ruby, Christina L; Kasasbeh, Aimen; Choi, Sun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a potentially fatal outcome of severe alcohol dependence that presents a significant challenge to treatment. Although AWS is thought to be driven by a hyperglutamatergic brain state, benzodiazepines, which target the GABAergic system, comprise the first line of treatment for AWS. Using a rat model of ethanol withdrawal, we tested whether ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to increase the expression and activity of glutamate uptake transporter EAAT2, reduces the occurrence or severity of ethanol withdrawal manifestations. After a 2-week period of habituation to ethanol in two-bottle choice, alcohol-preferring (P) and Wistar rats received ethanol (4.0 g/kg) every 6 h for 3–5 consecutive days via gavage. Rats were then deprived of ethanol for 48 h during which time they received ceftriaxone (50 or 100 mg/kg, IP) or saline twice a day starting 12 h after the last ethanol administration. Withdrawal manifestations were captured by continuous video recording and coded. The evolution of ethanol withdrawal was markedly different for P rats vs Wistar rats, with withdrawal manifestations occurring >12 h later in P rats than in Wistar rats. Ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg per injection twice per day (200 mg/kg/day) reduced or abolished all manifestations of ethanol withdrawal in both rat variants and prevented withdrawal-induced escalation of alcohol intake. Finally, ceftriaxone treatment was associated with lasting upregulation of ethanol withdrawal-induced downregulation of EAAT2 in the striatum. Our data support the role of ceftriaxone in alleviating alcohol withdrawal and open a novel pharmacologic avenue that requires clinical evaluation in patients with AWS. PMID:24452391

  18. Glutamate transporter type 3 participates in maintaining morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Wan, Li; Bi, Jiangjiang; Li, Jun; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2017-03-06

    Glutamate transporters (EAAT) have been implicated in the drug addiction behavior. We determined whether EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) played a role in morphine addiction. Six- to eight-week-old EAAT3 knockout (EAAT3(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates received 3 intraperitoneal injections of 10mg/kg morphine, each on an alternative day, to induce conditioned place preference (CPP). Two days after the place preference returned to baseline, mice received 2.5mg/kg morphine to induce reinstatement. Some mice received intraperitoneal injection of 4mg/kg riluzole, an EAAT activator, 30min before morphine or saline injection. Hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area were harvested for Western analysis 24h after the last dose of morphine was injected. Morphine induced CPP in wild-type and EAAT3(-/-) mice. Gender is not a statistically significant factor to influence this behavior. This conditioned behavior extinguished after morphine administration was stopped for 8-9days in wild-type mice, while this extinction occurred 6days after discontinuation of morphine injection in EAAT3(-/-) mice. A small dose of morphine similarly reinstated the conditioned behavior in the wild-type and EAAT3(-/-) mice. Riluzole abolished morphine-induced CPP during the initial place preference. Morphine increased EAAT3 expression in the plasma membrane of medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area but did not affect EAAT3 expression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that EAAT3 delays the extinction of morphine-induced CPP. EAAT activation may prevent the formation of morphine-induced CPP.

  19. Altered vesicular glutamate transporter distributions in the mouse cochlear nucleus following cochlear insult

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Amarins N.; Stefanescu, Roxana A.; Raphael, Yehoash; Shore, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) have distinct distributions in the cochlear nucleus that correspond to the sources of the labeled terminals. VGLUT1 is mainly associated with terminals of auditory nerve fibers, whereas VGLUT2 is mainly associated with glutamatergic terminals deriving from other sources that project to the cochlear nucleus (CN), including somatosensory and vestibular terminals. Previous studies in guinea pig have shown that cochlear damage results in a decrease of VGLUT1-labeled puncta and an increase in VGLUT2-labeled puncta. This indicates cross-modal compensation that is of potential importance in somatic tinnitus. To examine whether this effect is consistent across species and to provide a background for future studies, using transgenesis, the current study examines VGLUT expression profiles upon cochlear insult by intracochlear kanamycin injections in the mouse. Intracochlear kanamycin injections abolished ipsilateral ABR responses in all animals and reduced ipsilateral spiral ganglion neuron densities in animals that were sacrificed after four weeks, but not in animals that were sacrificed after three weeks. In all unilaterally deafened animals, VGLUT1 density was decreased in CN regions that receive auditory nerve fiber terminals, i.e. in the deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), in the interstitial region where the auditory nerve enters the CN, and in the magnocellular region of the antero- and posteroventral CN. In contrast, density of VGLUT2 expression was upregulated in the fusiform cell layer of the DCN and in the granule cell lamina, which are known to receive somatosensory and vestibular terminals. These results show that a cochlear insult induces cross-modal compensation in the cochlear nucleus of the mouse, confirming previous findings in guinea pig, and that these changes are not dependent on the occurrence of spiral ganglion neuron degeneration. PMID:26705736

  20. Glutamate, aspartate and nucleotide transporters in the SLC17 family form four main phylogenetic clusters: evolution and tissue expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The SLC17 family of transporters transports the amino acids: glutamate and aspartate, and, as shown recently, also nucleotides. Vesicular glutamate transporters are found in distinct species, such as C. elegans, but the evolutionary origin of most of the genes in this family has been obscure. Results Our phylogenetic analysis shows that the SLC17 family consists of four main phylogenetic clades which were all present before the divergence of the insect lineage. One of these clades has not been previously described and it is not found in vertebrates. The clade containing Slc17a9 had the most restricted evolutionary history with only one member in most species. We detected expression of Slc17a1-17a4 only in the peripheral tissues but not in the CNS, while Slc17a5- Slc17a9 are highly expressed in both the CNS and periphery. Conclusions The in situ hybridization studies on vesicular nucleotide transporter revealed high expression throughout the cerebral cortex, certain areas in the hippocampus and in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and thalamus. Some of the regions with high expression, such as the medial habenula and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, are important sites for purinergic neurotransmission. Noteworthy, other areas relying on purine-mediated signaling, such as the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the periaqueductal gray, lack or have a very low expression of Slc17a9, suggesting that there could be another nucleotide transporter in these regions. PMID:20059771

  1. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 Expression in the Rat Pineal Gland: Detailed Analysis of Expression Pattern and Regulatory Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hisano, Setsuji

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is closely related physiologically to circadian rhythm, sleep and reproduction, and also psychiatrically to mood disorders in humans. Under circadian control, melatonin secretion is modulated via nocturnal autonomic (adrenergic) stimulation to the gland, which expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v), glutamatergic markers. Expression of VGLUT2 gene and protein in the intact gland has been reported to exhibit a rhythmic change during a day. To study VGLUT2 expression is under adrenergic control, we here performed an in vitro experiment using dispersed pineal cells of rats. Stimulation of either β-adrenergic receptor or cAMP production to the pineal cells was shown to increase mRNA level of VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 and VGLUT1v. Because an ability of glutamate to inhibit melatonin production was previously reported in the cultured gland, it is likely that pineal VGLUT2 transports glutamate engaged in the inhibition of melatonin production.

  2. GDNF pre-treatment aggravates neuronal cell loss in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal slice cultures: a possible effect of glutamate transporter up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Sarup, A; Schousboe, A; Gegelashvili, G; Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    2003-01-01

    Besides its neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons and spinal motoneurons, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia. The protective effect has so far been related to reduced activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAr). This study tested the effects of GDNF on glutamate transporter expression, with the hypothesis that modulation of glutamate transporter activity would affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, derived from 1-week-old rats, were treated with 100 ng/ml GDNF for either 2 or 5 days, followed by Western blot analysis of NMDAr subunit 1 (NR1) and two glutamate transporter subtypes, GLAST and GLT-1. After 5-day exposure to GDNF, expression of GLAST and GLT-1 was up-regulated to 169 and 181% of control values, respectively, whereas NR1 was down-regulated to 64% of control. However, despite these changes that potentially would support neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity, the long-term treatment with GDNF was found to aggravate the neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The increased cell death, assessed by propidium iodide (PI) uptake, occurred not only among the most susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells, but also in CA3 and fascia dentata. Given that glutamate transporters are able to release glutamate by reversed action during energy failure, it is suggested that the observed increase in OGD-induced cell death in the GDNF-pretreated cultures was caused by the build-up of excitotoxic concentrations of extracellular glutamate released through the glutamate transporters, which were up-regulated by GDNF. Although the extent and consequences of glutamate release via reversal of GLAST and GLT-1 transporters seem to vary in different energy failure models, the present findings should be taken into account in clinical trials of GDNF.

  3. Regulation of astrocyte glutamate transporter-1 (GLT1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression in a model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Szu, Jenny I.; Yonan, Jennifer M.; Binder, Devin K.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes regulate extracellular glutamate and water homeostasis through the astrocyte-specific membrane proteins glutamate transporter-1 (GLT1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4), respectively. The role of astrocytes and the regulation of GLT1 and AQP4 in epilepsy are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of GLT1 and AQP4 in the intrahippocampal kainic acid (IHKA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis at 1, 4, 7, and 30 days after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE) to determine hippocampal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker for reactive astrocytes), GLT1, and AQP4 expression changes during the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis). Following IHKA, all mice had SE and progressive increases in GFAP immunoreactivity and GFAP protein expression out to 30 days post-SE. A significant initial increase in dorsal hippocampal GLT1 immunoreactivity and protein levels were observed 1 day post SE and followed by a marked downregulation at 4 and 7 days post SE with a return to near control levels by 30 days post SE. AQP4 dorsal hippocampal protein expression was significantly downregulated at 1 day post SE and was followed by a gradual return to baseline levels with a significant increase in ipsilateral protein levels by 30 days post SE. Transient increases in GFAP and AQP4 mRNA were also observed. Our findings suggest that specific molecular changes in astrocyte glutamate transporters and water channels occur during epileptogenesis in this model, and suggest the novel therapeutic strategy of restoring glutamate and water homeostasis. PMID:27155358

  4. Prion protein regulates glutathione metabolism and neural glutamate and cysteine uptake via excitatory amino acid transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Kathrin; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Prion protein (PrP) plays crucial roles in regulating antioxidant systems to improve cell defenses against cellular stress. Here, we show that the interactions of PrP with the excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) in astrocytes and the interaction between PrP and EAAT3 in neurons regulate the astroglial and neuronal metabolism of the antioxidant glutathione. Ablation of PrP in astrocytes and cerebellar neurons leads to dysregulation of EAAT3-mediated uptake of glutamate and cysteine, which are precursors for the synthesis of glutathione. In PrP-deficient astrocytes, levels of intracellular glutathione are increased, and under oxidative stress, levels of extracellular glutathione are increased, due to (i) increased glutathione release via MRP1 and (ii) reduced activity of the glutathione-degrading enzyme γ-GT. In PrP-deficient cerebellar neurons, cell death is enhanced under oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, when compared to wild-type cerebellar neurons. These results indicate a functional interplay of PrP with EAAT3, MRP1 and γ-GT in astrocytes and of PrP and EAAT3 in neurons, suggesting that these interactions play an important role in the metabolic cross-talk between astrocytes and neurons and in protection of neurons by astrocytes from oxidative and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity. Interactions of prion protein (PrP) with excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) regulate the astroglial and neuronal metabolism of glutathione (GSH) which protects cells against the cytotoxic oxidative stress. PrP controls the release of GSH from astrocytes via MRP1 and regulates the hydrolysis of extracellular GSH by GGT as well as the neuronal and astroglial glutamate and cysteine uptake via EAAT3.

  5. Citrin and aralar1 are Ca2+-stimulated aspartate/glutamate transporters in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, L.; Pardo, B.; Lasorsa, F.M.; del Arco, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Iijima, M.; Runswick, M.J.; Walker, J.E.; Saheki, T.; Satrústegui, J.; Palmieri, F.

    2001-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier catalyzes an important step in both the urea cycle and the aspartate/malate NADH shuttle. Citrin and aralar1 are homologous proteins belonging to the mitochondrial carrier family with EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs in their N-terminal domains. Both proteins and their C-terminal domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, reconstituted into liposomes and shown to catalyze the electrogenic exchange of aspartate for glutamate and a H+. Overexpression of the carriers in transfected human cells increased the activity of the malate/aspartate NADH shuttle. These results demonstrate that citrin and aralar1 are isoforms of the hitherto unidentified aspartate/glutamate carrier and explain why mutations in citrin cause type II citrullinemia in humans. The activity of citrin and aralar1 as aspartate/glutamate exchangers was stimulated by Ca2+ on the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the Ca2+-binding domains of these proteins are localized. These results show that the aspartate/glutamate carrier is regulated by Ca2+ through a mechanism independent of Ca2+ entry into mitochondria, and suggest a novel mechanism of Ca2+ regulation of the aspartate/malate shuttle. PMID:11566871

  6. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Transport by Zaprinast Causes Massive Accumulation of Aspartate at the Expense of Glutamate in the Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Cleghorn, Whitney M.; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken; Rountree, Austin M.; Chertov, Andrei O.; Turner, Sally J.; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Linton, Jonathan; Sadilek, Martin; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Sweet, Ian R.; Paquet-Durand, François; Hurley, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Transport of pyruvate into mitochondria by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier is crucial for complete oxidation of glucose and for biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids. Zaprinast is a well known phosphodiesterase inhibitor and lead compound for sildenafil. We found Zaprinast alters the metabolomic profile of mitochondrial intermediates and amino acids in retina and brain. This metabolic effect of Zaprinast does not depend on inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. By providing 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine as fuels, we found that the metabolic profile of the Zaprinast effect is nearly identical to that of inhibitors of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier. Both stimulate oxidation of glutamate and massive accumulation of aspartate. Moreover, Zaprinast inhibits pyruvate-driven O2 consumption in brain mitochondria and blocks mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in liver mitochondria. Inactivation of the aspartate glutamate carrier in retina does not attenuate the metabolic effect of Zaprinast. Our results show that Zaprinast is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier activity, and this action causes aspartate to accumulate at the expense of glutamate. Our findings show that Zaprinast is a specific mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) inhibitor and may help to elucidate the roles of MPC in amino acid metabolism and hypoglycemia. PMID:24187136

  7. Decreased expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and complexin II mRNAs in schizophrenia: further evidence for a synaptic pathology affecting glutamate neurons.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, S L; Harrison, P J

    2005-03-01

    Synaptic protein gene expression is altered in schizophrenia. In the hippocampal formation there may be particular involvement of glutamatergic neurons and their synapses, but overall the profile remains unclear. In this in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) study, we examined four informative synaptic protein transcripts: vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2, complexin I, and complexin II, in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC), superior temporal cortex (STC), and hippocampal formation, in 13 subjects with schizophrenia and 18 controls. In these areas, VGLUT1 and complexin II are expressed primarily by excitatory neurons, whereas complexin I is mainly expressed by inhibitory neurons. In schizophrenia, VGLUT1 mRNA was decreased in hippocampal formation and DPFC, complexin II mRNA was reduced in DPFC and STC, and complexin I mRNA decreased in STC. Hippocampal VGLUT1 mRNA declined with age selectively in the schizophrenia group. VGLUT2 mRNA was not quantifiable due to its low level. The data provide additional evidence for a synaptic pathology in schizophrenia, in terms of a reduced expression of three synaptic protein genes. In the hippocampus, the loss of VGLUT1 mRNA supports data indicating that glutamatergic presynaptic deficits are prominent, whereas the pattern of results in temporal and frontal cortex suggests broadly similar changes may affect inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The impairment of synaptic transmission implied by the synaptic protein reductions may contribute to the dysfunction of cortical neural circuits that characterises the disorder.

  8. Abnormalities in glutamate metabolism and excitotoxicity in the retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In the physiological condition, glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive glutamate can be toxic to retinal neurons by overstimulation of the glutamate receptors. Glutamate excess is primarily attributed to perturbation in the homeostasis of the glutamate metabolism. Major pathway of glutamate metabolism consists of glutamate uptake by glutamate transporters followed by enzymatic conversion of glutamate to nontoxic glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Glutamate metabolism requires energy supply, and the energy loss inhibits the functions of both glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase. In this review, we describe the present knowledge concerning the retinal glutamate metabolism under the physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Simultaneous determination of basal and evoked output levels of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and 4-aminobutyric acid during microdialysis and from superfused brain slices.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, L; Della Corte, L; Tipton, K F

    1999-02-19

    A HPLC method, involving pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorescence detection, is described. It allows the resolution of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and GABA, in a single run with detection limits of 3.2, 1.7, 1.4 and 2 fmol/microl of perfusate, respectively. It is sufficiently sensitive and rapid (15 min) for the determination "on line" of the four amino acids in perfusates obtained during in vivo microdialysis experiments. The procedure has been used to determine basal, K+ - or veratridine-stimulated release of these amino acids in different brain areas during microdialysis and from perfused tissue slices.

  10. β-Lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid, attenuates ethanol intake and increases glial glutamate transporters expression in alcohol preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Alqassem Y; Sari, Youssef

    2017-09-14

    Studies from our laboratory showed that upregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT) expression with ceftriaxone, β-lactam antibiotic, in the brain was associated with attenuation of ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested clavulanic acid, which is another β-lactam compound with negligible antimicrobial activity, on ethanol consumption and expression of GLT-1, xCT and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Clavulanic acid has the central β-lactam pharmacophore that is critical for the upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression. We found that clavulanic acid, at 5mg/kg (i.p.) dose, significantly attenuated ethanol consumption and ethanol preference in P rats as compared to vehicle-treated group. This effect was associated with a significant increase in water intake in clavulanic acid treated group. Importantly, we found that clavulanic acid increased the expression of GLT-1 and xCT in nucleus accumbens. However, there was no effect of clavulanic acid on GLAST expression in the nucleus accumbens. Clavulanic acid treatment did not upregulate the expression of GLT-1, xCT and GLAST in prefrontal cortex. These findings revealed that clavulanic acid at 20-40 fold lower dose than ceftriaxone can attenuate ethanol consumption, in part through upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression in the nucleus accumbens. Thus, we suggest that clavulanic acid might be used as an alternative option to ceftriaxone to attenuate ethanol drinking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of the neuron-specific glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) in rat brain and spinal cord revealed by a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Shashidharan, P; Huntley, G W; Murray, J M; Buku, A; Moran, T; Walsh, M J; Morrison, J H; Plaitakis, A

    1997-10-31

    Neuronal regulation of glutamate homeostasis is mediated by high-affinity sodium-dependent and highly hydrophobic plasma membrane glycoproteins which maintain low levels of glutamate at central synapses. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate glutamate metabolism and glutamate flux at central synapses, a monoclonal antibody was produced to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 161-177 of the deduced sequence of the human neuron-specific glutamate transporter III (EAAC1). Immunoblot analysis of human and rat brain total homogenates and isolated synaptosomes from frontal cortex revealed that the antibody immunoreacted with a protein band of apparent Mr approximately 70 kDa. Deglycosylation of immunoprecipitates obtained using the monoclonal antibody yielded a protein with a lower apparent Mr (approximately 65 kDa). These results are consistent with the molecular size of the human EAAC1 predicted from the cloned cDNA. Analysis of the transfected COS-1 cells by immunocytochemistry confirmed that the monoclonal antibody is specific for the neuron-specific glutamate transporter. Immunocytochemical studies of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, substantia nigra and spinal cord revealed intense labeling of neuronal somata, dendrites, fine-caliber fibers and puncta. Double-label immunofluorescence using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein as a marker for astrocytes demonstrated that astrocytes were not co-labeled for EAAC1. The localization of EAAC1 immunoreactivity in dendrites and particularly in cell somata suggests that this transporter may function in the regulation of other aspects of glutamate metabolism in addition to terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate at central synapses.

  12. Clavulanic acid enhances glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) expression and decreases reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae; John, Joel; Langford, Dianne; Walker, Ellen; Ward, Sara; Rawls, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CTX) reduces cocaine reinforcement and relapse in preclinical assays through a mechanism involving activation of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). However, its poor brain penetrability and intravenous administration route may limit its therapeutic utility for indications related to CNS diseases. An alternative is clavulanic acid (CA), a structural analog of CTX that retains the β-lactam core required for GLT-1 activity but displays enhanced brain penetrability and oral activity relative to CTX. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CA (1, 10 mg/kg ip) would enhance GLT-1 expression and decrease cocaine self-administration (SA) in mice, but at lower doses than CTX. Experiments revealed that GLT-1 transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens of mice treated with repeated CA (1, 10 mg/kg) was enhanced relative to saline-treated mice. Repeated CA treatment (1 mg/kg) reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine (0.56 mg/kg/inf) in mice maintained on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement but did not affect acquisition of cocaine SA under fixed-ratio responding or acquisition or retention of learning. These findings suggest that the β-lactamase inhibitor CA can activate the cellular glutamate reuptake system in the brain reward circuit and reduce cocaine’s reinforcing efficacy at 100-fold lower doses than CTX. PMID:26543027

  13. Clavulanic acid enhances glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) expression and decreases reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae; John, Joel; Langford, Dianne; Walker, Ellen; Ward, Sara; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CTX) reduces cocaine reinforcement and relapse in preclinical assays through a mechanism involving activation of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). However, its poor brain penetrability and intravenous administration route may limit its therapeutic utility for indications related to CNS diseases. An alternative is clavulanic acid (CA), a structural analog of CTX that retains the β-lactam core required for GLT-1 activity but displays enhanced brain penetrability and oral activity relative to CTX. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CA (1, 10 mg/kg ip) would enhance GLT-1 expression and decrease cocaine self-administration (SA) in mice, but at lower doses than CTX. Experiments revealed that GLT-1 transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens of mice treated with repeated CA (1, 10 mg/kg) was enhanced relative to saline-treated mice. Repeated CA treatment (1 mg/kg) reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine (0.56 mg/kg/inf) in mice maintained on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement but did not affect acquisition of cocaine SA under fixed-ratio responding or acquisition or retention of learning. These findings suggest that the β-lactamase inhibitor CA can activate the cellular glutamate reuptake system in the brain reward circuit and reduce cocaine's reinforcing efficacy at 100-fold lower doses than CTX.

  14. Selective Deletion of Astroglial FMRP Dysregulates Glutamate Transporter GLT1 and Contributes to Fragile X Syndrome Phenotypes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Higashimori, Haruki; Schin, Christina S.; Chiang, Ming Sum R.; Morel, Lydie; Shoneye, Temitope A.; Nelson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    How the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in different brain cell types, especially in non-neuron glial cells, induces fragile X syndrome (FXS) phenotypes has just begun to be understood. In the current study, we generated inducible astrocyte-specific Fmr1 conditional knock-out mice (i-astro-Fmr1-cKO) and restoration mice (i-astro-Fmr1-cON) to study the in vivo modulation of FXS synaptic phenotypes by astroglial FMRP. We found that functional expression of glutamate transporter GLT1 is 40% decreased in i-astro-Fmr1-cKO somatosensory cortical astrocytes in vivo, which can be fully rescued by the selective re-expression of FMRP in astrocytes in i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Although the selective loss of astroglial FMRP only modestly increases spine density and length in cortical pyramidal neurons, selective re-expression of FMRP in astrocytes significantly attenuates abnormal spine morphology in these neurons of i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Moreover, we found that basal protein synthesis levels and immunoreactivity of phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-s6P) is significantly increased in i-astro-Fmr1-cKO mice, while the enhanced cortical protein synthesis observed in Fmr1 KO mice is mitigated in i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Furthermore, ceftriaxone-mediated upregulation of surface GLT1 expression restores functional glutamate uptake and attenuates enhanced neuronal excitability in Fmr1 KO mice. In particular, ceftriaxone significantly decreases the growth rate of abnormally accelerated body weight and completely corrects spine abnormality in Fmr1 KO mice. Together, these results show that the selective loss of astroglial FMRP contributes to cortical synaptic deficits in FXS, presumably through dysregulated astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1 and impaired glutamate uptake. These results suggest the involvement of astrocyte-mediated mechanisms in the pathogenesis of FXS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Previous studies to understand how the loss of function of fragile X

  15. Clinical aspects of urea cycle dysfunction and altered brain energy metabolism on modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters in acute and chronic hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Vijayakumar; Mani, Renuka; Arumugam, Ramakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    In living organisms, nitrogen arise primarily as ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4(+)), which is a main component of the nucleic acid pool and proteins. Although nitrogen is essential for growth and maintenance in animals, but when the nitrogenous compounds exceeds the normal range which can quickly lead to toxicity and death. Urea cycle is the common pathway for the disposal of excess nitrogen through urea biosynthesis. Hyperammonemia is a consistent finding in many neurological disorders including congenital urea cycle disorders, reye's syndrome and acute liver failure leads to deleterious effects. Hyperammonemia and liver failure results in glutamatergic neurotransmission which contributes to the alteration in the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, modulates the important cerebral process. Even though ammonia is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), in particular high concentrations of ammonia exposure to the brain leads to the alterations of glutamate transport by the transporters. Several glutamate transporters have been recognized in the central nervous system and each has a unique physiological property and distribution. The loss of glutamate transporter activity in brain during acute liver failure and hyperammonemia is allied with increased extracellular brain glutamate concentrations which may be conscientious for the cerebral edema and ultimately cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. PKC-dependent stimulation of EAAT3 glutamate transporter does not require the integrity of actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Dall'Asta, Valeria; Gazzola, Gian C; Gatti, Rita; Bussolati, Ovidio

    2006-04-01

    The activity and the membrane expression of EAAT3 glutamate transporter are stimulated upon PKC activation by phorbol esters in C6 rat glioma cells. To investigate the role of cytoskeleton in these effects, we have employed actin-perturbing toxins and found that the perturbation of actin cytoskeleton inhibits basal but not phorbol-stimulated EAAT3 activity and membrane trafficking. In the absence of phorbols, latrunculin A, a toxin that disassembles actin cytoskeleton, produced a rapid inhibition of EAAT3 activity, due to a decrease in transport V(max). The inhibitory effect was fully reversible and was not detected for other sodium dependent transport systems for amino acids. However, latrunculin did not prevent the increase in transport caused by phorbol esters and, moreover, cells pre-treated with phorbols were resistant to the inhibitory effect of the toxin on EAAT3 activity. Biotinylation experiments indicated that the inhibitory effect of latrunculin was attributable to a decreased expression of the carrier on the membrane, while the toxin did not suppress the PKC-dependent increase in EAAT3 membrane abundance. Latrunculin A effects on EAAT3 were shared by cytochalasin D, a toxin that disorganizes actin filaments with a distinct mechanism of action. On the contrary, a small, but significant, increase of EAAT3 activity was observed upon incubation with jasplakinolide, a drug that stabilizes actin microfilaments. Also jasplakinolide, however, did not hinder phorbol-dependent stimulation of aspartate transport. Colchicine, a toxin that disrupts microtubules, also lowered EAAT3 activity without preventing transport stimulation by phorbols, while microtubule stabilization by paclitaxel led to an increase in aspartate transport. It is concluded that, in C6 cells, the PKC-mediated stimulatory effects on EAAT3 are cytoskeleton-independent, while in the absence of phorbols, the transporter is partially inhibited by the disorganization of either actin microfilaments or

  17. Effects of (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male, alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We recently showed that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for 5 weeks in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and that upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex results, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cystine glutamate antiporter (xCT) is also downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. This study examines the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expressions of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and the hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for 5 weeks, after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for 5 days. The results show that MS-153 treatment significantly reduces ethanol consumption. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and the hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle-treated rats (ethanol-vehicle group) compared with water-control animals. MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expressions in these brain regions. These findings demonstrate an important role for MS-153 in these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol-drinking behavior.

  18. Genetic deletion of the neuronal glutamate transporter, EAAC1, results in decreased neuronal death after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Lane, Meredith C; Jackson, Joshua G; Krizman, Elizabeth N; Rothstein, Jeffery D; Porter, Brenda E; Robinson, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1 also called EAAT3) is a Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporter expressed by both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. It provides precursors for the syntheses of glutathione and GABA and contributes to the clearance of synaptically released glutamate. Mice deleted of EAAC1 are more susceptible to neurodegeneration in models of ischemia, Parkinson's disease, and aging. Antisense knock-down of EAAC1 causes an absence seizure-like phenotype. Additionally, EAAC1 expression increases after chemonvulsant-induced seizures in rodent models and in tissue specimens from patients with refractory epilepsy. The goal of the present study was to determine if the absence of EAAC1 affects the sensitivity of mice to seizure-induced cell death. A chemoconvulsant dose of pilocarpine was administered to EAAC1(-/-) mice and to wild-type controls. Although EAAC1(-/-) mice experienced increased latency to seizure onset, no significant differences in behavioral seizure severity or mortality were observed. We examined EAAC1 immunofluorescence 24h after pilocarpine administration and confirmed that pilocarpine causes an increase in EAAC1 protein. Forty-eight hours after induction of seizures, cell death was measured in hippocampus and in cortex using Fluoro-Jade C. Surprisingly, there was ∼2-fold more cell death in area CA1 of wild-type mice than in the corresponding regions of the EAAC1(-/-) mice. Together, these studies indicate that absence of EAAC1 results in either a decrease in pilocarpine-induced seizures that is not detectable by behavioral criteria (surprising, since EAAC1 provides glutamate for GABA synthesis), or that the absence of EAAC1 results in less pilocarpine/seizure-induced cell death, possible explanations as discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic Deletion of the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter, EAAC1, Results in Decreased Neuronal Death after Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Meredith C.; Jackson, Joshua G.; Krizman, Elizabeth N.; Rothstein, Jeffery D.; Porter, Brenda E.; Robinson, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1, also called EAAT3) is a Na+-dependent glutamate transporter expressed by both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. It provides precursors for the syntheses of glutathione and GABA and contributes to the clearance of synaptically released glutamate. Mice deleted of EAAC1 are more susceptible to neurodegeneration in models of ischemia, Parkinson’s disease, and aging. Antisense knock-down of EAAC1 causes an absence seizure-like phenotype. Additionally, EAAC1 expression increases after chemonvulsant-induced seizures in rodent models and in tissue specimens from patients with refractory epilepsy. The goal of the present study was to determine if the absence of EAAC1 affects the sensitivity of mice to seizure-induced cell death. A chemoconvulsant dose of pilocarpine was administered to EAAC1−/− mice and to wild-type controls. Although EAAC1−/− mice experienced increased latency to seizure onset, no significant differences in behavioral seizure severity or mortality were observed. We examined EAAC1 immunofluorescence 24 hours after pilocarpine administration and confirmed that pilocarpine causes an increase in EAAC1 protein. Forty-eight hours after induction of seizures, cell death was measured in hippocampus and in cortex using Fluoro-Jade C. Surprisingly, there was ~2-fold more cell death in area CA1 of wild-type mice than in the corresponding regions of the EAAC1−/− mice. Together, these studies indicate that absence of EAAC1 results in either a decrease in pilocarpine-induced seizures that is not detectable by behavioral criteria (surprising, since EAAC1 provides glutamate for GABA synthesis), or that the absence of EAAC1 results in less pilocarpine/seizure-induced cell death, possible explanations as discussed. PMID:24334055

  20. Seladin-1/DHCR24 Is Neuroprotective by Associating EAAT2 Glutamate Transporter to Lipid Rafts in Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Martínez-López, Diego; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martín-Segura, Adrian; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ledesma, María D; Dotti, Carlos G; Moro, María A

    2016-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) or selective alzheimer disease indicator 1 (seladin-1), an enzyme of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, has been implicated in neuroprotection, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, its role in ischemic stroke remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of seladin-1/DHCR24 using an experimental stroke model in mice. Dhcr24(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. In another set of experiments, WT mice were treated intraperitoneally either with vehicle or U18666A (seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor, 10 mg/kg) 30 minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Brains were removed 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion for infarct volume determination. For protein expression determination, peri-infarct region was obtained 24 h after ischemia, and Western blot or cytometric bead array was performed. Dhcr24(+/-) mice displayed larger infarct volumes after middle cerebral artery occlusion than their WT littermates. Treatment of WT mice with the seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor U18666A also increased ischemic lesion. Inflammation-related mediators were increased after ischemia in Dhcr24(+/-) mice compared with WT counterparts. Consistent with a role of cholesterol in proper function of glutamate transporter EAAT2 in membrane lipid rafts, we found a decreased association of EAAT2 with lipid rafts after ischemia when DHCR24 is genetically deleted or pharmacologically inhibited. Accordingly, treatment with U18666A decreases [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes. These results support the idea that lipid raft integrity, ensured by seladin-1/DHCR24, plays a crucial protective role in the ischemic brain by guaranteeing EAAT2-mediated uptake of glutamate excess. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Individual synaptic vesicles from the electroplaque of Torpedo californica, a classic cholinergic synapse, also contain transporters for glutamate and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huinan; Harlow, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The type of neurotransmitter secreted by a neuron is a product of the vesicular transporters present on its synaptic vesicle membranes and the available transmitters in the local cytosolic environment where the synaptic vesicles reside. Synaptic vesicles isolated from electroplaques of the marine ray, Torpedo californica, have served as model vesicles for cholinergic neurotransmission. Many lines of evidence support the idea that in addition to acetylcholine, additional neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators are also released from cholinergic synapses. We identified the types of vesicular neurotransmitter transporters present at the electroplaque using immunoblot and immunofluoresence techniques with antibodies against the vesicle acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, and 3), and the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT). We found that VAChT, VNUT, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not 3 were present by immunoblot, and confirmed that the antibodies were specific to proteins of the axons and terminals of the electroplaque. We used a single‐vesicle imaging technique to determine whether these neurotransmitter transporters were present on the same or different populations of synaptic vesicles. We found that greater than 85% of vesicles that labeled for VAChT colabeled with VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, and approximately 70% colabeled with VNUT. Based upon confidence intervals, at least 52% of cholinergic vesicles isolated are likely to contain all four transporters. The presence of multiple types of neurotransmitter transporters – and potentially neurotransmitters – in individual synaptic vesicles raises fundamental questions about the role of cotransmitter release and neurotransmitter synergy at cholinergic synapses. PMID:24744885

  2. Assignment of the gene coding for the human high-affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1 to 9p24: Potential role in dicarboxylic aminoaciduria and neurodegenerative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.P.; Kanai, Y.; Stelzner, M.; Hediger, M.A.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-03-15

    Functional defects of high-affinity glutamate transporters have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In small intestine and kidney, in which the high-affinity glutamate transporter mediates net absorption of glutamate and aspartate across epithelial cells, an inborn error of glutamate transport is thought to cause dicarboxylic aminoaciduria. This disorder is characterized by increased urinary excretion of glutamate and aspartate and is, in general, associated with neurologic and developmental abnormalities. Recently, the authors isolated a cDNA encoding a high-affinity glutamate transporter (EAAC1) that also transports aspartate but not other amino acids. EAAC1 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, particularly in brain (neurons), intestine, and kidney. Here, the authors present mapping of the chromosome location of EAAC1 using Southern analysis of a panel of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Southern analysis of EcoRI-digested DNA gave bands at 6.5, 5.6, 5.1, and 1.2 kb for human genomic DNA; 7.5 kb for mouse genomic DNA; and 7.3, 3.2, and 1 kb for hamster genomic DNA. All four human EAAC1-specific bands were observed in the lane corresponding to the human/Chinese hamster hybrid containing chromosome 9 but not in lanes corresponding to any other hybrid. Because the human/Chinese hamster hybrid is the only one retaining chromosome 9, this result unambiguously assigns human EAAC1 to chromosome 9. For precise chromosome assignment of the human EAAC1 gene, they employed FISH. Map position of the EAAC1 probe was assigned by visual inspection of the fluorescent signal on the DAPI-stained metaphase chromosomes. The human EAAC1 gene was assigned to 9p24.

  3. Distributions of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 in the visual system of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri).

    PubMed

    Balaram, P; Isaamullah, M; Petry, H M; Bickford, M E; Kaas, J H

    2015-08-15

    Vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) proteins regulate the storage and release of glutamate from synapses of excitatory neurons. Two isoforms, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, are found in most glutamatergic projections across the mammalian visual system, and appear to differentially identify subsets of excitatory projections between visual structures. To expand current knowledge on the distribution of VGLUT isoforms in highly visual mammals, we examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and primary visual cortex (V1) in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri), which are closely related to primates but classified as a separate order (Scandentia). We found that VGLUT1 was distributed in intrinsic and corticothalamic connections, whereas VGLUT2 was predominantly distributed in subcortical and thalamocortical connections. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were coexpressed in the LGN and in the pulvinar complex, as well as in restricted layers of V1, suggesting a greater heterogeneity in the range of efferent glutamatergic projections from these structures. These findings provide further evidence that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identify distinct populations of excitatory neurons in visual brain structures across mammals. Observed variations in individual projections may highlight the evolution of these connections through the mammalian lineage.

  4. Propofol reverses oxidative stress-attenuated glutamate transporter EAAT3 activity: evidence of protein kinase C involvement.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-Yeon; Park, Kum-Suk; Kim, Jin-Hee; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2007-06-22

    The authors investigated the effects of propofol on EAAT3 (excitatory amino acid transporter 3) activity under oxidative stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and the mediation of these effects by protein kinase C (PKC). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and L-glutamate (30 microM)-induced membrane currents were measured using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Exposure of these oocytes to t-BHP (1-20 mM) for 10 min dose-dependently decreased EAAT3 activity, and t-BHP (5 mM) significantly decreased the Vmax, but not the Km of EAAT3 for glutamate, and propofol (1-100 microM) dose-dependently reversed this t-BHP-attenuated EAAT3 activity. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (a PKC activator), also abolished this t-BHP-induced reduction in EAAT3 activity, whereas staurosporine (a PKC inhibitor), significantly decreased EAAT3 activity. However, as compared with staurosporine or t-BHP alone, t-BHP and staurosporine in combination did not further reduce EAAT3 activity. A similar pattern was observed for chelerythrine (also a PKC inhibitor). In oocytes pretreated with combinations of t-BHP and PMA (or staurosporine), propofol failed to change EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that propofol restores oxidative stress-reduced EAAT3 activity and that these effects of propofol may be PKC-mediated.

  5. Distributions of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 in the visual system of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri)1

    PubMed Central

    Balaram, P; Isaamullah, M; Petry, HM; Bickford, ME; Kaas, JH

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) proteins regulate the storage and release of glutamate from synapses of excitatory neurons. Two isoforms, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, are found in most glutamatergic projections across the mammalian visual system, and appear to differentially identify subsets of excitatory projections between visual structures. To expand current knowledge on the distribution of VGLUT isoforms in highly visual mammals, we examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and primary visual cortex (V1) in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri), which are closely related to primates but classified as a separate order (Scandentia). We found that VGLUT1 was distributed in intrinsic and corticothalamic connections, whereas VGLUT2 was predominantly distributed in subcortical and thalamocortical connections. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were coexpressed in the LGN and in the pulvinar complex, as well as in restricted layers of V1, suggesting a greater heterogeneity in the range of efferent glutamatergic projections from these structures. These findings provide further evidence that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identify distinct populations of excitatory neurons in visual brain structures across mammals. Observed variations in individual projections may highlight the evolution of these connections through the mammalian lineage. PMID:25521420

  6. EXPRESSION OF VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS IN TRANSIENT RECEPTOR POTENTIAL MELASTATIN 8 (TRPM8)-POSITIVE DENTAL AFFERENTS IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, T. H.; Mckemy, D. D.; Bae, Y. C.

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is activated by innocuous cool and noxious cold and plays a crucial role in cold-induced acute pain and pain hypersensitivity. To help understand the mechanism of TRPM8-mediated cold perception under normal and pathologic conditions, we used light microscopic immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis in mice expressing a genetically encoded axonal tracer in TRPM8-positive (+) neurons. We investigated the coexpression of TRPM8 and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and VGLUT2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and the dental pulp before and after inducing pulpal inflammation. Many TRPM8+ neurons in the TG and axons in the dental pulp expressed VGLUT2, while none expressed VGLUT1. TRPM8+ axons were dense in the pulp horn and peripheral pulp and also frequently observed in the dentinal tubules. Following pulpal inflammation, the proportion of VGLUT2+ and of VGLUT2+/TRPM8+ neurons increased significantly, whereas that of TRPM8+ neurons remained unchanged. Our findings suggest the existence of VGLUT2 (but not VGLUT1)-mediated glutamate signaling in TRPM8+ neurons possibly underlying the cold-induced acute pain and hypersensitivity to cold following pulpal inflammation. PMID:26166724

  7. N-Acetylcysteine and Ceftriaxone as Preconditioning Strategies in Focal Brain Ischemia: Influence on Glutamate Transporters Expression.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Weronika; Pomierny, Bartosz; Budziszewska, Boguslawa; Filip, Malgorzata; Pera, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate (Glu) plays a key role in excitotoxicity-related injury in cerebral ischemia. In the brain, Glu homeostasis depends on Glu transporters, including the excitatory amino acid transporters and the cysteine/Glu antiporter (xc-). We hypothesized that drugs acting on Glu transporters, such as ceftriaxone (CEF, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 150 mg/kg, i.p.), administered repeatedly for 5 days before focal cerebral ischemia in rats and induced by a 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), may induce brain tolerance to ischemia. We compared the effects of these drugs on brain infarct volume, neurological deficits and the mRNA and protein expression of the Glu transporter-1 (GLT-1) and xc- with the effects of ischemic preconditioning and chemical preconditioning using 3-nitropropionic acid. Administration of CEF and NAC significantly reduced infarct size and neurological deficits caused by a 90-min MCAO. These beneficial effects were accompanied by changes in GLT-1 expression caused by a 90-min MCAO at both the mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and dorsal striatum. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the regulation of GLT-1 and xc- plays a role in the development of cerebral tolerance to ischemia and that this regulation may be a novel approach in the therapy of brain ischemia.

  8. Dietary glutamate supplementation ameliorates mycotoxin-induced abnormalities in the intestinal structure and expression of amino acid transporters in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jielin; Yin, Jie; Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins.

  9. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  10. Riluzole-Triggered GSH Synthesis via Activation of Glutamate Transporters to Antagonize Methylmercury-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yu; Xu, Zhao-Fa; Liu, Wei; Xu, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bo; Wei, Yan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study was to evaluate the effect of riluzole on methylmercury- (MeHg-) induced oxidative stress, through promotion of glutathione (GSH) synthesis by activating of glutamate transporters (GluTs) in rat cerebral cortex. Methods. Eighty rats were randomly assigned to four groups, control group, riluzole alone group, MeHg alone group, and riluzole + MeHg group. The neurotoxicity of MeHg was observed by measuring mercury (Hg) absorption, pathological changes, and cell apoptosis of cortex. Oxidative stress was evaluated via determining reactive oxygen species (ROS), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), malondialdehyde (MDAs), carbonyl, sulfydryl, and GSH in cortex. Glutamate (Glu) transport was studied by measuring Glu, glutamine (Gln), mRNA, and protein of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1). Result. (1) MeHg induced Hg accumulation, pathological injury, and apoptosis of cortex; (2) MeHg increased ROS, 8-OHdG, MDA, and carbonyl, and inhibited sulfydryl and GSH; (3) MeHg elevated Glu, decreased Gln, and downregulated GLAST and GLT-1 mRNA expression and protein levels; (4) riluzole antagonized MeHg-induced downregulation of GLAST and GLT-1 function and expression, GSH depletion, oxidative stress, pathological injury, and apoptosis obviously. Conclusion. Data indicate that MeHg administration induced oxidative stress in cortex and that riluzole could antagonize this situation through elevation of GSH synthesis by activating of GluTs. PMID:22966415

  11. Brief Report: Glutamate Transporter Gene ("SLC1A1") Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (rs301430) and Repetitive Behaviors and Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Roohi, Jasmin; DeVincent, Carla J.; Kirsch, Sarah; Hatchwell, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Investigated association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs301430 in glutamate transporter gene ("SLC1A1") with severity of repetitive behaviors (obsessive-compulsive behaviors, tics) and anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Mothers and/or teachers completed a validated DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for 67 children…

  12. Brief Report: Glutamate Transporter Gene ("SLC1A1") Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (rs301430) and Repetitive Behaviors and Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Roohi, Jasmin; DeVincent, Carla J.; Kirsch, Sarah; Hatchwell, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Investigated association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs301430 in glutamate transporter gene ("SLC1A1") with severity of repetitive behaviors (obsessive-compulsive behaviors, tics) and anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Mothers and/or teachers completed a validated DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for 67 children…

  13. Astrocyte membrane properties are altered in a rat model of developmental cortical malformation but single-cell astrocytic glutamate uptake is robust.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Danbolt, Niels Christian; Dulla, Chris G

    2016-05-01

    Developmental cortical malformations (DCMs) are linked with severe epilepsy and are caused by both genetic and environmental insults. DCMs include several neurological diseases, such as focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, and others. Human studies have implicated astrocyte reactivity and dysfunction in the pathophysiology of DCMs, but their specific role is unknown. As astrocytes powerfully regulate glutamate neurotransmission, and glutamate levels are known to be increased in human epileptic foci, understanding the role of astrocytes in the pathological sequelae of DCMs is extremely important. Additionally, recent studies examining astrocyte glutamate uptake in DCMs have reported conflicting results, adding confusion to the field. In this study we utilized the freeze lesion (FL) model of DCM, which is known to induce reactive astrocytosis and cause significant changes in astrocyte morphology, proliferation, and distribution. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording from astrocytes, we recorded both UV-uncaging and synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents (TCs), widely accepted assays of functional glutamate transport by astrocytes. With this approach, we set out to test the hypothesis that astrocyte membrane properties and glutamate transport were disrupted in this model of DCM. Though we found that the developmental maturation of astrocyte membrane resistance was disrupted by FL, glutamate uptake by individual astrocytes was robust throughout FL development. Interestingly, using an immunolabeling approach, we observed spatial and developmental differences in excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) expression in FL cortex. Spatially specific differences in EAAT2 (GLT-1) and EAAT1 (GLAST) expression suggest that the relative contribution of each EAAT to astrocytic glutamate uptake may be altered in FL cortex. Lastly, we carefully analyzed the amplitudes and onset times of both synaptically- and UV uncaging-evoked TCs. We found that in

  14. Synthetic cathinone MDPV downregulates glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) and produces rewarding and locomotor-activating effects that are reduced by a GLT-1 activator

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Ryan A.; Hicks, Callum; Nayak, Sunil U.; Tallarida, Christopher S.; Nucero, Paul; Reitz, Allen B.; Smith, Garry R.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cathinones produce dysregulation of monoamine systems, but their effects on the glutamate system and the influence of glutamate on behavioral effects related to cathinone abuse are unknown. A principal regulator of glutamate homeostasis is glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1), an astrocytic protein that clears glutamate from the extracellular space and influences behavioral effects of established psychostimulants. We hypothesized that repeated administration of the synthetic cathinone, MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), would affect GLT-1 expression in the corticolimbic circuit, and that a GLT-1 activator (ceftriaxone, CTX) would reduce rewarding and locomotor-stimulant effects of MDPV in rats. GLT-1 protein expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), but not prefrontal cortex (PFC), was decreased following withdrawal (2, 5 and 10 days) from repeated MDPV treatment, but not immediately after the last MDPV injection. CTX (200 mg/kg) pretreatment did not affect acute locomotor activation produced by MDPV (0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). However, CTX (200 mg/kg) administered during a 7-day MDPV treatment paradigm attenuated the development of MDPV-induced sensitization of repetitive movements in rats challenged with MDPV following 11 days of drug abstinence. Pretreatment with CTX (200 mg/kg) during a 4-day MDPV (2 mg/kg) conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm reduced the development of place preference produced by MDPV. The present data demonstrate dysregulation of corticolimbic glutamate transport systems during withdrawal from chronic MDPV exposure, and show that a GLT-1 transporter activator disrupts behavioral effects of MDPV that are related to synthetic cathinone abuse. PMID:27085607

  15. Synthetic cathinone MDPV downregulates glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) and produces rewarding and locomotor-activating effects that are reduced by a GLT-1 activator.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Ryan A; Hicks, Callum; Nayak, Sunil U; Tallarida, Christopher S; Nucero, Paul; Smith, Garry R; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic cathinones produce dysregulation of monoamine systems, but their effects on the glutamate system and the influence of glutamate on behavioral effects related to cathinone abuse are unknown. A principal regulator of glutamate homeostasis is glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1), an astrocytic protein that clears glutamate from the extracellular space and influences behavioral effects of established psychostimulants. We hypothesized that repeated administration of the synthetic cathinone, MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), would affect GLT-1 expression in the corticolimbic circuit, and that a GLT-1 activator (ceftriaxone, CTX) would reduce rewarding and locomotor-stimulant effects of MDPV in rats. GLT-1 protein expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), but not prefrontal cortex (PFC), was decreased following withdrawal (2, 5 and 10 days) from repeated MDPV treatment, but not immediately after the last MDPV injection. CTX (200 mg/kg) pretreatment did not affect acute locomotor activation produced by MDPV (0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). However, CTX (200 mg/kg) administered during a 7-day MDPV treatment paradigm attenuated the development of MDPV-induced sensitization of repetitive movements in rats challenged with MDPV following 11 days of drug abstinence. Pretreatment with CTX (200 mg/kg) during a 4-day MDPV (2 mg/kg) conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm reduced the development of place preference produced by MDPV. The present data demonstrate dysregulation of corticolimbic glutamate transport systems during withdrawal from chronic MDPV exposure, and show that a GLT-1 transporter activator disrupts behavioral effects of MDPV that are related to synthetic cathinone abuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  17. Constraints imposed by the membrane selectively guide the alternating access dynamics of the glutamate transporter GltPh.

    PubMed

    Lezon, Timothy R; Bahar, Ivet

    2012-03-21

    Substrate transport in sodium-coupled amino acid symporters involves a large-scale conformational change that shifts the access to the substrate-binding site from one side of the membrane to the other. The structural change is particularly substantial and entails a unique piston-like quaternary rearrangement in glutamate transporters, as evidenced by the difference between the outward-facing and inward-facing structures resolved for the archaeal aspartate transporter Glt(Ph). These structural changes occur over time and length scales that extend beyond the reach of current fully atomic models, but are regularly explored with the use of elastic network models (ENMs). Despite their success with other membrane proteins, ENM-based approaches for exploring the collective dynamics of Glt(Ph) have fallen short of providing a plausible mechanism. This deficiency is attributed here to the anisotropic constraints imposed by the membrane, which are not incorporated into conventional ENMs. Here we employ two novel (to our knowledge) ENMs to demonstrate that one can largely capture the experimentally observed structural change using only the few lowest-energy modes of motion that are intrinsically accessible to the transporter, provided that the surrounding lipid molecules are incorporated into the ENM. The presence of the membrane reduces the overall energy of the transition compared with conventional models, showing that the membrane not only guides the selected mechanism but also acts as a facilitator. Finally, we show that the dynamics of Glt(Ph) is biased toward transitions of individual subunits of the trimer rather than cooperative transitions of all three subunits simultaneously, suggesting a mechanism of transport that exploits the intrinsic dynamics of individual subunits. Our software is available online at http://www.membranm.csb.pitt.edu. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interrelation between the structural and transport properties of pervaporation membranes with diffusion layers based on poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, S. V.; Kremnev, R. V.; Baklagina, Yu. G.; Volchek, B. Z.; Vlasova, E. N.; Shabsels, B. M.; Romashkova, K. A.; Romanov, D. P.; Arkhipov, S. N.; Bogomazov, A. V.; Uchytil, P.

    2011-05-01

    The interrelation between the transport properties of pervaporation membranes (used to separate toluene-n-heptane mixtures) and the structure of poly-γ-benzyl- L-glutamate diffusion layers has been studied. The decrease in the membrane selectivity while increasing the flux at the transition from 3 to 50 wt % toluene in the mixture under separation is accompanied by a change in the ordered structure of poly-γ-benzyl- L-glutamate structure without variation in the α-helical conformation of the polypeptide chain.

  19. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  20. Molecular cloning, gene structure, expression profile and functional characterization of the mouse glutamate transporter (EAAT3) interacting protein GTRAP3-18.

    PubMed

    Butchbach, Matthew E R; Lai, Liching; Lin, Chien-liang Glenn

    2002-06-12

    Glutamate is an important amino acid implicated in energy metabolism, protein biosynthesis and neurotransmission. The Na(+)-dependent high-affinity excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3 (EAAC1) facilitates glutamate uptake into most cells. Recently, a novel rat EAAT3-interacting protein called GTRAP3-18 has been identified by a yeast two-hybrid screening. GTRAP3-18 functions as a negative modulator of EAAT3-mediated glutamate transport. In order to further understand the function and regulation of GTRAP3-18, we cloned the mouse orthologue to GTRAP3-18 and determined its gene structure and its expression pattern. GTRAP3-18 encodes a 188-residue hydrophobic protein whose sequence is highly conserved amongst vertebrates. Mouse and human GTRAP3-18 genes contain three exons separated by two introns. The GTRAP3-18 gene is found on mouse chromosome 6D3 and on human chromosome 3p14, a susceptibility locus for cancer and epilepsy. GTRAP3-18 protein and RNA were found both in neuronal rich regions of the brain and in non-neuronal tissues such as the kidney, heart and skeletal muscle. Mouse GTRAP3-18 inhibited EAAT3-mediated glutamate transport in a dose-dependent manner. These studies show that GTRAP3-18 is a ubiquitously expressed protein that functions as a negative regulator of EAAT3 function.

  1. The Amino Acid Transporter JhI-21 Coevolves with Glutamate Receptors, Impacts NMJ Physiology, and Influences Locomotor Activity in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anna B; Augustin, Hrvoje; Clark, Nathan L; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Simonnet, Mégane M; Steinert, Joern R; Geillon, Flore; Manière, Gérard; Featherstone, David E; Grosjean, Yael

    2016-01-25

    Changes in synaptic physiology underlie neuronal network plasticity and behavioral phenomena, which are adjusted during development. The Drosophila larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) represents a powerful synaptic model to investigate factors impacting these processes. Amino acids such as glutamate have been shown to regulate Drosophila NMJ physiology by modulating the clustering of postsynaptic glutamate receptors and thereby regulating the strength of signal transmission from the motor neuron to the muscle cell. To identify amino acid transporters impacting glutmatergic signal transmission, we used Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), a recently developed bioinformatic tool. Our screen identified ten proteins co-evolving with NMJ glutamate receptors. We selected one candidate transporter, the SLC7 (Solute Carrier) transporter family member JhI-21 (Juvenile hormone Inducible-21), which is expressed in Drosophila larval motor neurons. We show that JhI-21 suppresses postsynaptic muscle glutamate receptor abundance, and that JhI-21 expression in motor neurons regulates larval crawling behavior in a developmental stage-specific manner.

  2. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    on AMPA receptors, showed similar results as observed for AMPA under non-desensitizing conditions. The NMDA receptor antagonist (5R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801) had only minor effects on the [(3)H]D-aspartate release induced by AMPA and kainate. Thus, the depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from cultured GABAergic neurons appears to be caused mainly by reversal of the glutamate transporters.

  3. The 3-4 loop of an archaeal glutamate transporter homolog experiences ligand-induced structural changes and is essential for transport.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Taylor, Erin M; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-07-20

    Glutamatergic synaptic transmission is terminated by members of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) family of proteins that remove glutamate from the synaptic cleft by transporting it into surrounding glial cells. Recent structures of a bacterial homolog suggest that major motions within the transmembrane domain translocate the substrate across the membrane. However, the events leading to this large structural rearrangement are much less clear. Two reentrant loops have been proposed to act as extracellular and intracellular gates, but whether other regions of these proteins play a role in the transport process is unknown. We hypothesized that transport-related conformational changes could change the solvent accessibilities of affected residues, as reflected in protease sensitivity or small-molecule reactivity. In the model system Glt(Ph), an archaeal EAAT homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii, limited trypsin proteolysis experiments initially identified a site in the long extracellular loop that stretches between helices 3 and 4 that becomes protected from proteolysis in the presence of a substrate, L-aspartate, or an inhibitor, DL-TBOA in the presence of Na(+), the cotransported ion. Using a combination of site-directed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and fluorescein-5-maleimide labeling we found that positions throughout the loop experience these ligand-induced conformational changes. By selectively cleaving the 3-4 loop (via introduced Factor Xa sites) we demonstrate that it plays a vital role in the transport process; though structurally intact, the cleaved proteins are unable to transport aspartate. These results inculcate the 3-4 loop as an important player in the transport process, a finding not predicted by any of the available crystal structures of Glt(Ph).

  4. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout mice have a decreased isoflurane requirement to induce loss of righting reflex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2010-12-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) uptake extracellular glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the main neuronal EAAT, is expressed widely in the CNS. We have shown that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity and trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 mediates isoflurane-induced anesthesia. To test this hypothesis, the potency of isoflurane to induce immobility and hypnosis, two major components of general anesthesia, was compared in the CD-1 wild-type mice and EAAT knockout mice that had a CD-1 strain gene background. Hypnosis was assessed by loss of righting reflex in this study. The expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2, two widely expressed EAATs in the CNS, in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord was not different between the EAAT3 knockout mice and wild-type mice. The concentration required for isoflurane to cause immobility to painful stimuli, a response involving primarily reflex loops in the spinal cord, was not changed by EAAT3 knockout. However, the EAAT3 knockout mice were more sensitive to isoflurane-induced hypnotic effects, which may be mediated by hypothalamic sleep neural circuits. Interestingly, the EAAT3 knockout mice did not have an altered sensitivity to the hypnotic effects caused by ketamine, an i.v. anesthetic that is a glutamate receptor antagonist and does not affect EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that EAAT3 modulates the sensitivity of neural circuits to isoflurane. These results, along with our previous findings which suggests that isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity, indicate that EAAT3 may regulate isoflurane-induced behavioral changes, including anesthesia.

  5. Isoflurane induces a protein kinase C alpha-dependent increase in cell-surface protein level and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-05-01

    Glutamate transporters regulate extracellular concentrations of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We have shown that the commonly used anesthetic isoflurane increased the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (excitatory amino acid transporter 3, EAAT3) possibly via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In this study, we showed that isoflurane induced a time- and concentration-dependent redistribution of EAAT3 to the cell membrane in C6 glioma cells. This redistribution was inhibited by staurosporine, a pan PKC inhibitor, or by 12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12,13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Go6976) at a concentration that selectively inhibits conventional PKC isozymes (PKC alpha, -beta, and -gamma). This isoflurane-induced EAAT3 redistribution was also blocked when the expression of PKC alpha but not PKC beta proteins was down-regulated by the respective antisense oligonucleotides. The isoflurane-induced increase of glutamate uptake by EAAT3 was abolished by the down-regulation of PKC alpha expression. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-EAAT3 antibody pulled down more PKC alpha in cells exposed to isoflurane than in control cells. Isoflurane also increased the phosphorylated EAAT3 and the redistribution of PKC alpha to the particulate fraction of cells. Consistent with the results in C6 cells, isoflurane also increased EAAT3 cell-surface expression and enhanced the association of PKC alpha with EAAT3 in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Our results suggest that the isoflurane-induced increase in EAAT3 activity requires an increased amount of EAAT3 protein in the plasma membrane. These effects are PKC alpha-dependent and may rely on the formation of an EAAT3-PKC alpha complex. Together, these results suggest an important mechanism for the regulation of glutamate transporter functions and expand our understanding of isoflurane pharmacology at cellular and molecular levels.

  6. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  7. Functional Characterization of a Vesicular Glutamate Transporter in an Interneuron That Makes Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Connections in a Molluscan Neural Circuit.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian; Alexeeva, Vera; Chen, Song-An; Yu, Ke; Due, Michael R; Tan, Li-Nuo; Chen, Ting-Ting; Liu, Dan-Dan; Cropper, Elizabeth C; Vilim, Ferdinand S; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2015-06-17

    Understanding circuit function requires the characterization of component neurons and their neurotransmitters. Previous work on radula protraction in the Aplysia feeding circuit demonstrated that critical neurons initiate feeding via cholinergic excitation. In contrast, it is less clear how retraction is mediated at the interneuronal level. In particular, glutamate involvement was suggested, but was not directly confirmed. Here we study a suspected glutamatergic retraction interneuron, B64. We used the representational difference analysis (RDA) method to successfully clone an Aplysia vesicular glutamate transporter (ApVGLUT) from B64 and from a glutamatergic motor neuron B38. Previously, RDA was used to characterize novel neuropeptides. Here we demonstrate its utility for characterizing other types of molecules. Bioinformatics suggests that ApVGLUT is more closely related to mammalian VGLUTs than to Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans VGLUTs. We expressed ApVGLUT in a cell line, and demonstrated that it indeed transports glutamate in an ATP and proton gradient-dependent manner. We mapped the ApVGLUT distribution in the CNS using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. Further, we demonstrated that B64 is ApVGLUT positive, supporting the idea that it is glutamatergic. Although glutamate is primarily an excitatory transmitter in the mammalian CNS, B64 elicits inhibitory PSPs in protraction neurons to terminate protraction and excitatory PSPs in retraction neurons to maintain retraction. Pharmacological data indicated that both types of PSPs are mediated by glutamate. Thus, glutamate mediates the dual function of B64 in Aplysia. More generally, our systematic approaches based on RDA may facilitate analyses of transmitter actions in small circuits with identifiable neurons.

  8. Upregulation of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and STAT3 Activation in the Spinal Cord of Mice Receiving 3,3'-Iminodipropionitrile.

    PubMed

    Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Yamasaki, Ryo; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-09-30

    Chronic administration of 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) causes axonal impairment. Although controversy still remains, it has been suggested that IDPN intoxication mimics the axonopathy of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Interestingly, recent studies including our own showed that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in spinal α-motoneurons was activated in both IDPN-treated mice and SOD1 (G93A) mice, a genetic model of familial ALS. Because activation of STAT3 occurs in response to various stimuli, such as axonal injury, ischemia, and excessive glutamate, here we focused on a potential link between phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3, an active form) and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2, a regulator of glutamate storage and release) in IDPN-treated mice and SOD1 (G93A) mice. Impairment of axonal transport was confirmed by western blot analysis: the expression levels of phosphorylated neurofilament H were elevated in both models. As shown in SOD1 (G93A) mice, the expression frequencies of VGluT2 in synaptophysin-positive (SYP)(+) presynaptic terminals around spinal α-motoneurons were significantly higher in IDPN-treated mice than in vehicle controls. The coverages of spinal α-motoneurons by VGluT2(+) presynaptic terminals were more elevated around pSTAT3(+) cells than around pSTAT3(-) cells in IDPN-treated mice and SOD1 (G93A) mice. Considering that excessive glutamate is shown to be involved in axonal impairment and STAT3 activation, the present results suggest that IDPN-induced upregulation of VGluT2 may result in an increase in glutamate, which might cause axonopathy and induction of pSTAT3. The link between upregulation of VGluT2 and activation of STAT3 via glutamate may represent a common pathological feature of IDPN-treated mice and SOD1 (G93A) mice.

  9. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Transcription Factor Nrf1 Negatively Regulates the Cystine/Glutamate Transporter and Lipid-Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Peirce, Vivian; Baird, Liam; Matsuyama, Yuka; Takaku, Misaki; Walsh, Shawn V.; Griffin, Julian L.; Uruno, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Liver-specific Nrf1 (NF-E2-p45-related factor 1) knockout mice develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify postnatal mechanisms responsible for this phenotype, we generated an inducible liver-specific Nrf1 knockout mouse line using animals harboring an Nrf1flox allele and a rat CYP1A1-Cre transgene (Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre mice). Administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) to these mice (Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice) resulted in loss of hepatic Nrf1 expression. The livers of mice lacking Nrf1 accumulated lipid, and the hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition in such animals differed significantly from that in the Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre control. This change was provoked by upregulation of several FA metabolism genes. Unexpectedly, we also found that the level of glutathione was increased dramatically in livers of Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice. While expression of glutathione biosynthetic enzymes was unchanged, xCT, a component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−, was significantly upregulated in livers of Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice, suggesting that Nrf1 normally suppresses xCT. Thus, stress-inducible expression of xCT is a two-step process: under homeostatic conditions, Nrf1 effectively suppresses nonspecific transactivation of xCT, but when cells encounter severe oxidative/electrophilic stress, Nrf1 is displaced from an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the gene promoter while Nrf2 is recruited to the ARE. Thus, Nrf1 controls both the FA and the cystine/cysteine content of hepatocytes by participating in an elaborate regulatory network. PMID:25092871

  11. Transcription factor Nrf1 negatively regulates the cystine/glutamate transporter and lipid-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Peirce, Vivian; Baird, Liam; Matsuyama, Yuka; Takaku, Misaki; Walsh, Shawn V; Griffin, Julian L; Uruno, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D

    2014-10-01

    Liver-specific Nrf1 (NF-E2-p45-related factor 1) knockout mice develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify postnatal mechanisms responsible for this phenotype, we generated an inducible liver-specific Nrf1 knockout mouse line using animals harboring an Nrf1(flox) allele and a rat CYP1A1-Cre transgene (Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre mice). Administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) to these mice (Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice) resulted in loss of hepatic Nrf1 expression. The livers of mice lacking Nrf1 accumulated lipid, and the hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition in such animals differed significantly from that in the Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre control. This change was provoked by upregulation of several FA metabolism genes. Unexpectedly, we also found that the level of glutathione was increased dramatically in livers of Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice. While expression of glutathione biosynthetic enzymes was unchanged, xCT, a component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system x(c)(-), was significantly upregulated in livers of Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice, suggesting that Nrf1 normally suppresses xCT. Thus, stress-inducible expression of xCT is a two-step process: under homeostatic conditions, Nrf1 effectively suppresses nonspecific transactivation of xCT, but when cells encounter severe oxidative/electrophilic stress, Nrf1 is displaced from an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the gene promoter while Nrf2 is recruited to the ARE. Thus, Nrf1 controls both the FA and the cystine/cysteine content of hepatocytes by participating in an elaborate regulatory network.

  12. RESTORATION OF NORMAL GLUTAMIC ACID TRANSPORT IN VITAMIN B6-DEFICIENT LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM BY ACETATE, AMMONIUM, AND VITAMIN B6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLUTAMIC ACID, * LACTOBACILLUS , VITAMIN B COMPLEX, METABOLIC DISEASES, VITAMIN B COMPLEX, ACETATES, AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS, CHLORAMPHENICOL, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, AMINO ACIDS, PENICILLINS, CELL WALL, SYNTHESIS, OSMOSIS.

  13. The Hydroxyl Side Chain of a Highly Conserved Serine Residue Is Required for Cation Selectivity and Substrate Transport in the Glial Glutamate Transporter GLT-1/SLC1A2*

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Alexandre; Montalbetti, Nicolas; Gyimesi, Gergely; Pujol-Giménez, Jonai; Hediger, Matthias A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain synaptic concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter below neurotoxic levels. Their transport cycle consists of cotransport of glutamate with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of potassium. Structural studies proposed that a highly conserved serine located in the binding pocket of the homologous GltPh coordinates l-aspartate as well as the sodium ion Na1. To experimentally validate these findings, we generated and characterized several mutants of the corresponding serine residue, Ser-364, of human glutamate transporter SLC1A2 (solute carrier family 1 member 2), also known as glutamate transporter GLT-1 and excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT2. S364T, S364A, S364C, S364N, and S364D were expressed in HEK cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes to measure radioactive substrate transport and transport currents, respectively. All mutants exhibited similar plasma membrane expression when compared with WT SLC1A2, but substitutions of serine by aspartate or asparagine completely abolished substrate transport. On the other hand, the threonine mutant, which is a more conservative mutation, exhibited similar substrate selectivity, substrate and sodium affinities as WT but a lower selectivity for Na+ over Li+. S364A and S364C exhibited drastically reduced affinities for each substrate and enhanced selectivity for l-aspartate over d-aspartate and l-glutamate, and lost their selectivity for Na+ over Li+. Furthermore, we extended the analysis of our experimental observations using molecular dynamics simulations. Altogether, our findings confirm a pivotal role of the serine 364, and more precisely its hydroxyl group, in coupling sodium and substrate fluxes. PMID:26483543

  14. Effects of propofol on the activity of rat glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes: the role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Do, Sang-Hwan; Ham, Byung-Moon; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2003-06-05

    We investigated the effects of propofol on one type of glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) and the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in mediating these effects. Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. L-glutamate (30 microM)-induced membrane currents were measured. Propofol increased glutamate-induced inward currents significantly at two tested concentrations (30 and 100 microM) but not at other concentrations. Propofol (30 microM) significantly increased V(max), but not K(m) of EAAT3 for glutamate. The combination of phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) and propofol did not increase the responses further compared with PMA or propofol alone. Three PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, calphostin C, and chelerythrine) did not affect basal EAAT3 activity but significantly inhibited the propofol-enhanced EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that propofol enhances EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant concentrations and PKC may mediate these effects.

  15. Brain endothelial cells induce astrocytic expression of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 by a Notch-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meredith L; Martinez-Lozada, Zila; Krizman, Elizabeth N; Robinson, Michael B

    2017-08-03

    Neuron-secreted factors induce astrocytic expression of the glutamate transporter, GLT-1 (excitatory amino acid transporter 2). In addition to their elaborate anatomic relationships with neurons, astrocytes also have processes that extend to and envelop the vasculature. Although previous studies have demonstrated that brain endothelia contribute to astrocyte differentiation and maturation, the effects of brain endothelia on astrocytic expression of GLT-1 have not been examined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that endothelia induce expression of GLT-1 by co-culturing astrocytes from mice that utilize non-coding elements of the GLT-1 gene to control expression of reporter proteins with the mouse endothelial cell line, bEND.3. We found that endothelia increased steady state levels of reporter and GLT-1 mRNA/protein. Co-culturing with primary rat brain endothelia also increases reporter protein, GLT-1 protein, and GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake. The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, bone morphogenic protein/transforming growth factor β, and nitric oxide pathways have been implicated in endothelia-to-astrocyte signaling; we provide multiple lines of evidence that none of these pathways mediate the effects of endothelia on astrocytic GLT-1 expression. Using transwells with a semi-permeable membrane, we demonstrate that the effects of the bEND.3 cell line are dependent upon contact. Notch has also been implicated in endothelia-astrocyte signaling in vitro and in vivo. The first step of Notch signaling requires cleavage of Notch intracellular domain by γ-secretase. We demonstrate that the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester blocks endothelia-induced increases in GLT-1. We show that the levels of Notch intracellular domain are higher in nuclei of astrocytes co-cultured with endothelia, an effect also blocked by N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t

  16. Ceftriaxone Treatment after Traumatic Brain Injury Restores Expression of the Glutamate Transporter, GLT-1, Reduces Regional Gliosis, and Reduces Post-Traumatic Seizures in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Grant S.; Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Hameed, Mustafa Q.; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Excessive extracellular glutamate after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to excitotoxic cell death and likely to post-traumatic epilepsy. Glutamate transport is the only known mechanism of extracellular glutamate clearance, and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is the major glutamate transporter of the mammalian brain. We tested, by immunoblot, in the rat lateral fluid percussion injury TBI model whether GLT-1 expression is depressed in the cortex after TBI, and whether GLT-1 expression after TBI is restored after treatment with ceftriaxone, a well-tolerated β-lactam antibiotic previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression in noninjured animals. We then tested whether treatment with ceftriaxone mitigates the associated regional astrogliosis, as reflected by glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression, and also whether ceftriaxone treatment mitigates the severity of post-traumatic epilepsy. We found that 7 days after TBI, GLT-1 expression in the ipsilesional cortex was reduced by 29% (n=7/group; p<0.01), relative to the contralesional cortex. However, the loss of GLT-1 expression was reversed by treatment with ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, daily, intraperitoneally). We found that ceftriaxone treatment also decreased the level of regional GFAP expression by 43% in the lesioned cortex, relative to control treatment with saline (n=7 per group; p<0.05), and, 12 weeks after injury, reduced cumulative post-traumatic seizure duration (n=6 rats in the ceftriaxone treatment group and n=5 rats in the saline control group; p<0.001). We cautiously conclude that our data suggest a potential role for ceftriaxone in treatment of epileptogenic TBI. PMID:23510201

  17. COMPARISON OF THE ONTOGENY OF THE VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER 3 (VGLUT3) WITH VGLUT1 AND VGLUT2 IN THE RAT RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Salvatore L.; Li, Stefanie; Sabatini, Andrea; Vila, Alejandro; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina, and most glutamatergic neurons express one of the three known vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, or 3). However, the expression profiles of these transporters vary greatly in the retina. VGLUT1 is expressed by photoreceptor and bipolar cell terminals, and VGLUT2 appears to be predominately expressed by ganglion cells, and perhaps Müller cells, cone photoreceptor terminals, and horizontal cells in some species. The discovery of a third vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT3, has brought about speculation concerning its role and function based on its expression in amacrine cells. To address this we studied the postnatal development of VGLUT3 from day 0 through adult in the rat retina, and compared this with the expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2. VGLUT3 expression was restricted to a population of amacrine cells. Expression of VGLUT3 was first observed at postnatal day 10 (P10) in the soma and some processes, which extensively arborized in both the ON and OFF sublamina of the IPL by P15. In contrast, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 expression appeared earlier than VGLUT3; with VGLUT1 initially detected at P5 in photoreceptor terminals and P6 in bipolar terminals, and VGLUT2 immunoreactivity initially detected at P0 in ganglion cell bodies, and remained prominent throughout all stages of development. Interestingly, VGLUT3 has extensive somatic expression throughout development, which could be involved in non-synaptic modulation by glutamate in developing retina, and could influence trophic and extra-synaptic neuronal signaling by glutamate in the inner retina. PMID:18482716

  18. Amphetamine modulates excitatory neurotransmission through endocytosis of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Suzanne M; Wheeler, David S; Li, Minghua; Watts, Spencer D; Ingram, Susan L; Amara, Susan G

    2014-07-16

    Amphetamines modify the brain and alter behavior through mechanisms generally attributed to their ability to regulate extracellular dopamine concentrations. However, the actions of amphetamine are also linked to adaptations in glutamatergic signaling. We report here that when amphetamine enters dopamine neurons through the dopamine transporter, it stimulates endocytosis of an excitatory amino acid transporter, EAAT3, in dopamine neurons. Consistent with this decrease in surface EAAT3, amphetamine potentiates excitatory synaptic responses in dopamine neurons. We also show that the process of internalization is dynamin- and Rho-mediated and requires a unique sequence in the cytosolic C terminus of EAAT3. Introduction of a peptide based on this motif into dopamine neurons blocks the effects of amphetamine on EAAT3 internalization and its action on excitatory responses. These data indicate that the internalization of EAAT3 triggered by amphetamine increases glutamatergic signaling and thus contributes to the effects of amphetamine on neurotransmission.

  19. Inhibitory effects of (2S, 3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (TFB-TBOA) on the astrocytic sodium responses to glutamate.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Luigi; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2010-02-26

    Astrocytes are responsible for the majority of the clearance of extracellular glutamate released during neuronal activity. dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) is extensively used as inhibitor of glutamate transport activity, but suffers from relatively low affinity for the transporter. Here, we characterized the effects of (2S, 3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (TFB-TBOA), a recently developed inhibitor of the glutamate transporter on mouse cortical astrocytes in primary culture. The glial Na(+)-glutamate transport system is very efficient and its activation by glutamate causes rapid intracellular Na(+) concentration (Na(+)(i)) changes that enable real time monitoring of transporter activity. Na(+)(i) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in single astrocytes using the fluorescent Na(+)-sensitive probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophtalate. When applied alone, TFB-TBOA, at a concentration of 1 microM, caused small alterations of Na(+)(i). TFB-TBOA inhibited the Na(+)(i) response evoked by 200 microM glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) value of 43+/-9 nM, as measured on the amplitude of the Na(+)(i) response. The maximum inhibition of glutamate-evoked Na(+)(i) increase by TFB-TBOA was >80%, but was only partly reversible. The residual response persisted in the presence of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX. TFB-TBOA also efficiently inhibited Na(+)(i) elevations caused by the application of d-aspartate, a transporter substrate that does not activate non-NMDA ionotropic receptors. TFB-TBOA was found not to influence the membrane properties of cultured cortical neurons recorded in whole-cell patch clamp. Thus, TFB-TBOA, with its high potency and its apparent lack of neuronal effects, appears to be one of the most useful pharmacological tools available so far for studying glial glutamate transporters.

  20. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  1. Glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1) activator ceftriaxone attenuates amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Bruce; Unterwald, Ellen M.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The β-lactam antibiotic and glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1) activator ceftriaxone prevents relapse to cocaine-seeking and inhibits morphine-induced physical dependence and tolerance in rats, but its efficacy against amphetamine-induced behaviors is unknown. METHODS Here, we tested the hypothesis that ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibits hyperactivity produced by acute amphetamine administration (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and sensitization of hyperactivity induced by repeated amphetamine exposure (2 mg/kg, i.p.). For acute experiments, rats treated with ceftriaxone for 5 days were injected with amphetamine or saline on day 6. RESULTS Amphetamine elicited less ambulatory and stereotypical activity in ceftriaxone-treated rats than in ceftriaxone-naïve rats. For chronic experiments, rats injected with ceftriaxone or saline for 8 days were also injected with amphetamine or saline on days 6–8 and then challenged with amphetamine 5 days later. Amphetamine produced greater ambulatory and stereotypical activity in amphetamine-pretreated rats than in rats previously naïve to amphetamine. Amphetamine challenge produced less ambulatory and stereotypical activity in rats pretreated with a combination of ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg) and amphetamine than in rats pretreated with only amphetamine. CONCLUSION The present demonstration that ceftriaxone attenuates amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization suggests its documented efficacy against adverse cocaine and morphine effects extends to amphetamine. PMID:21524862

  2. Chicago sky blue 6B, a vesicular glutamate transporters inhibitor, attenuates methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Zongsheng; Yan, Lingdi; Yong, Zheng; Dong, Zhaoqi; Dong, Huajin; Gong, Zehui

    2013-02-15

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that glutamatergic system plays an important role in drug addiction. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Chicago sky blue 6B (CSB6B), a vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) inhibitor, on methamphetamine (METH)-induced behaviors in mice. Mice were induced behavioral sensitization to METH by subcutaneous injection of 1mg/kg METH once daily for 7 days and then challenged with 1mg/kg METH in 14th day. Intracerebroventricular administration of CSB6B (7.5μg) 2.5h prior to METH was to observe its effects on METH -induced behavioral sensitization. Our results showed that the expressions of behavioral sensitization were significantly attenuated by intracerebroventricular administration of CSB6B 2.5h prior to METH either during the development period or before methamphetamine challenge in mice, while CSB6B itself had no effect on locomotor activity. Meanwhile, pretreatment of CSB6B also attenuated hyperactivity caused by a single injection of METH in mice. These results demonstrated that CSB6B, a VGLUTs inhibitor, attenuated acute METH-induced hyperactivity and chronic METH-induced behavioral sensitization, which indicated that VGLUTs were involved in the effect of chronic METH-induced behavioral sensitization and may be a new target against the addiction of METH.

  3. N-acetylcysteine reverses existing cognitive impairment and increased oxidative stress in glutamate transporter type 3 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2012-09-18

    Oxidative stress contributes significantly to brain aging. Animals lacking glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3) have a decreased level of glutathione, the major intracellular anti-oxidant, in neurons, and present with early onset of brain aging including brain atrophy and cognitive impairment at 11 months of age. Here, 12-month-old male EAAT3 knockout mice received intraperitoneal injection of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 150 mg/kg once every day for 4 weeks. NAC is a membrane permeable cysteine precursor that can work as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. EAAT3 knockout mice that received saline injection or did not receive any injection were also included in the study. EAAT3 knockout mice had significantly less freezing behavior than age- and gender-matched wild-type mice in context- and tone-related fear conditioning tests. The knockout mice also had decreased levels of glutathione and increased levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and proteins containing nitrotyrosine, indicators of oxidative stress, in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. NAC but not saline injection attenuated these behavioral and biochemical changes in the EAAT3 knockout mice. These results suggest that improvement of anti-oxidative capacity in neurons reverses the existing cognitive impairment in aging brains, implying a potential role of glutathione replacement in cognitive improvement of aging population.

  4. Restored glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 function as a potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kou; Kong, Qiongman; Stouffer, Nathan; Schulte, Delanie A.; Lai, Liching; Liu, Qibing; Chang, Ling-Chu; Dominguez, Sky; Xing, Xuechao; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hodgetts, Kevin J.; Glicksman, Marcie A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems play a critical role in cognitive functions and are known to be defective in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Previous literature has indicated that glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays an essential role in cognitive functions and that loss of EAAT2 protein is a common phenomenon observed in AD patients and animal models. In the current study, we investigated whether restored EAAT2 protein and function could benefit cognitive functions and pathology in APPSw,Ind mice, an animal model of AD. A transgenic mouse approach via crossing EAAT2 transgenic mice with APPSw,Ind. mice and a pharmacological approach using a novel EAAT2 translational activator, LDN/OSU-0212320, were conducted. Findings from both approaches demonstrated that restored EAAT2 protein function significantly improved cognitive functions, restored synaptic integrity, and reduced amyloid plaques. Importantly, the observed benefits were sustained one month after compound treatment cessation, suggesting that EAAT2 is a potential disease modifier with therapeutic potential for AD. PMID:25711212

  5. Molecular and functional characterisation of glutamate transporters in rat cortical astrocytes exposed to a defined combination of growth factors during in vitro differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Céline; Najimi, Mustapha; Maloteaux, Jean-Marie; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    In vitro culture of astroglial progenitors can be obtained from early post-natal brain tissues and several methods have been reported for promoting their maturation into differentiated astrocytes. Hence, a combination of several nutriments/growth factors -- the G5 supplement (insulin, transferrin, selenite, biotin, hydrocortisone, fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor) -- is widely used as a culture additive favouring the growth, differentiation and maturation of primary cultured astrocytes. Considering the key role played by glial cells in the clearance of glutamate in the synapses, cultured astrocytes are frequently used as a model for the study of glutamate transporters. Indeed, it has been shown that when tested separately, growth factors influence the expression and activity of the GLAST and GLT-1. The present study aimed at characterising the functional expression of these transporters during the time course of differentiation of cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to the supplement G5. After a few days, the vast majority of cells exposed to this supplement adopted a typical stellate morphology (fibrous or type II astrocytes) and showed intense expression of the glial fibrillary acidic protein. Both RT-PCR and immunoblotting studies revealed that the expression of both GLAST and GLT-1 rapidly increased in these cells. While this was correlated with a significant increase in specific uptake of radiolabelled aspartate, fluorescence monitoring of the Na+ influx associated with glutamate transporters activity revealed that the exposure to the G5 supplement considerably increased the percentage of cells participating in the uptake. Biochemical and pharmacological studies revealed that this activity did not involve GLT-1 but most likely reflected an increase in GLAST-mediated uptake. Together, these data indicate that the addition of this classical combination of growth factors and nutriments drives the rapid differentiation toward a homogenous

  6. A novel sorting motif in the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter 3 directs its targeting in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chialin; Glover, Greta; Banker, Gary; Amara, Susan G

    2002-12-15

    The glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) is polarized to the apical surface in epithelial cells and localized to the dendritic compartment in hippocampal neurons, where it is clustered adjacent to postsynaptic sites. In this study, we analyzed the sequences in EAAT3 that are responsible for its polarized localization in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and neurons. Confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation assays demonstrated that deletion of the EAAT3 C terminus or replacement of the C terminus of EAAT3 with the analogous region in EAAT1 eliminated apical localization in MDCK cells. The C terminus of EAAT3 was sufficient to redirect the basolateral-preferring EAAT1 and the nonpolarized EAAT2 to the apical surface. Using alanine substitution mutants, we identified a short peptide motif in the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of EAAT3 that directs its apical localization in MDCK cells. Mutation of this sequence also impairs dendritic targeting of EAAT3 in hippocampal neurons but does not interfere with the clustering of EAAT3 on dendritic spines and filopodia. These data provide the first evidence that an identical cytoplasmic motif can direct apical targeting in epithelia and somatodendritic targeting in neurons. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the two fundamental features of the localization of EAAT3 in neurons, its restriction to the somatodendritic domain and its clustering near postsynaptic sites, are mediated by distinct molecular mechanisms.

  7. Chronic pain and impaired glial glutamate transporter function in lupus-prone mice are ameliorated by blocking macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xisheng; Maixner, Dylan W; Li, Fen; Weng, Han-Rong

    2017-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-organ disease of unknown etiology in which the normal immune responses are directed against the body's own healthy tissues. Patients with SLE often suffer from chronic pain. Currently, no animal studies have been reported about the mechanisms underlying pain in SLE. In this study, the development of chronic pain in MRL lupus-prone (MRL/lpr) mice, a well-established lupus mouse model, was characterized for the first time. We found that female MRL/lpr mice developed thermal hyperalgesia at the age of 13 weeks, and mechanical allodynia at the age of 16 weeks. MRL/lpr mice with chronic pain had activation of microglia and astrocytes, over-expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), as well as suppression of glial glutamate transport function in the spinal cord. Intrathecal injection of either the CSF-1 blocker or IL-1 inhibitor attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in MRL/lpr mice. We provide evidence that the suppressed activity of glial glutamate transporters in the spinal dorsal horn in MRL/lpr mice is caused by activation of the CSF-1 and IL-1β signaling pathways. Our findings suggest that targeting the CSF-1 and IL-1β signaling pathways or the glial glutamate transporter in the spinal cord is an effective approach for the management of chronic pain caused by SLE.

  8. Relationship between L-glutamate-regulated intracellular Na+ dynamics and ATP hydrolysis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, P J; Chatton, J-Y

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate uptake into astrocytes and the resulting increase in intracellular Na+ (Na+(i)) have been identified as a key signal coupling excitatory neuronal activity to increased glucose utilization. Arguments based mostly on mathematical modeling led to the conclusion that physiological concentrations of glutamate more than double astrocytic Na+/K+-ATPase activity, which should proportionally increase its ATP hydrolysis rate. This hypothesis was tested in the present study by fluorescence monitoring of free Mg2+ (Mg2+(i)), a parameter that inversely correlates with ATP levels. Glutamate application measurably increased Mg2+(i) (i.e. decreased ATP), which was reversible after glutamate washout. Na+(i) and ATP changes were then directly compared by simultaneous Na+(i) and Mg2+ imaging. Glutamate increased both parameters with different rates and blocking the Na+/K+-ATPase during the glutamate-evoked Na+(i) response, resulted in a drop of Mg2+(i) levels (i.e. increased ATP). Taken together, this study demonstrates the tight correlation between glutamate transport, Na+ homeostasis and ATP levels in astrocytes.

  9. Motor Neuron-Specific Overexpression of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter: Impact on Motor Endurance and Evoked Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lund, David; Ruggiero, Alicia M.; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Wright, Jane; English, Brett A.; Reisz, Peter A.; Whitaker, Sarah M.; Peltier, Amanda C.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2010-01-01

    The presynaptic, hemicholinium-3 sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) supplies choline for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. In mice, a homozygous deletion of CHT (CHT−/−) leads to premature cessation of spontaneous or evoked neuromuscular signaling and is associated with perinatal cyanosis and lethality within 1 hr. Heterozygous (CHT+/−) mice exhibit diminished brain ACh levels and demonstrate an inability to sustain vigorous motor activity. We sought to explore the contribution of CHT gene dosage to motor function in greater detail using transgenic mice where CHT is expressed under control of the motor neuron promoter Hb9 (Hb9:CHT). On a CHT−/− background, the Hb9:CHT transgene conferred mice with the ability to move and breath for a postnatal period of ~24 hrs, thus increasing survival. Conversely, Hb9:CHT expression on a wild-type background (CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT) leads to an increased capacity for treadmill running compared to wild-type littermates. Analysis of the stimulated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in these animals under basal conditions established that CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice display an unexpected, bidirectional change, producing either elevated or reduced CMAP amplitude, relative to CHT+/+ animals. To examine whether these two groups arise from underlying changes in synaptic properties, we used high-frequency stimulation of motor axons to assess CMAP recovery kinetics. Although CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice in the two groups display an equivalent, time-dependent reduction in CMAP amplitude, animals with a higher basal CMAP amplitude demonstrate a significantly enhanced rate of recovery. To explain our findings, we propose a model whereby CHT support for neuromuscular signaling involves contributions to ACh synthesis as well as cholinergic synaptic vesicle availability. PMID:20888396

  10. Motor neuron-specific overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter: impact on motor endurance and evoked muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Lund, D; Ruggiero, A M; Ferguson, S M; Wright, J; English, B A; Reisz, P A; Whitaker, S M; Peltier, A C; Blakely, R D

    2010-12-29

    The presynaptic, hemicholinium-3 sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) supplies choline for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. In mice, a homozygous deletion of CHT (CHT-/-) leads to premature cessation of spontaneous or evoked neuromuscular signaling and is associated with perinatal cyanosis and lethality within 1 h. Heterozygous (CHT+/-) mice exhibit diminished brain ACh levels and demonstrate an inability to sustain vigorous motor activity. We sought to explore the contribution of CHT gene dosage to motor function in greater detail using transgenic mice where CHT is expressed under control of the motor neuron promoter Hb9 (Hb9:CHT). On a CHT-/- background, the Hb9:CHT transgene conferred mice with the ability to move and breath for a postnatal period of ∼24 h, thus increasing survival. Conversely, Hb9:CHT expression on a wild-type background (CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT) leads to an increased capacity for treadmill running compared to wild-type littermates. Analysis of the stimulated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in these animals under basal conditions established that CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice display an unexpected, bidirectional change, producing either elevated or reduced CMAP amplitude, relative to CHT+/+ animals. To examine whether these two groups arise from underlying changes in synaptic properties, we used high-frequency stimulation of motor axons to assess CMAP recovery kinetics. Although CHT+/+; Hb9:CHT mice in the two groups display an equivalent, time-dependent reduction in CMAP amplitude, animals with a higher basal CMAP amplitude demonstrate a significantly enhanced rate of recovery. To explain our findings, we propose a model whereby CHT support for neuromuscular signaling involves contributions to ACh synthesis as well as cholinergic synaptic vesicle availability.

  11. Critical role of serine 465 in isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Feng, Xiaorong; Sando, Julianne J; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-12-15

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) bind extracellular glutamate and transport it to intracellular space to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. We previously showed that isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, enhanced the activity of EAAT3, a major neuronal EAAT. This effect required a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. In this study, we prepared COS7 cells stably expressing EAAT3 with or without mutations of potential PKC phosphorylation sites in the putative intracellular domains. Here we report that mutation of threonine 5 or threonine 498 to alanine did not affect the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. However, the mutation of serine 465 to alanine abolished isoflurane-induced increase of EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane. The mutation of serine 465 to aspartic acid increased the expression of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane and also abolished the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. These results suggest an essential role of serine 465 in the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution and a direct effect of PKC on EAAT3. Consistent with these results, isoflurane induced an increase in phosphorylation of wild type, T5A, and T498A EAAT3, and this increase was absent in S465A and S465D. Our current results, together with our previous data that showed the involvement of PKCalpha in the isoflurane effects on EAAT3, suggest that the phosphorylation of serine 465 in EAAT3 by PKCalpha mediates the increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to plasma membrane after isoflurane exposure.

  12. Glutamate transporter type 3 mediates isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-01

    A pre-exposure to isoflurane reduces ischemic brain injury in rodents (isoflurane preconditioning). This neuroprotection has acute and delayed phases. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that the acute phase may involve excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). We determine whether this protection involves EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. Adult male EAAT3 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed or were not exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Sixty minutes later, they were subjected to a 90- or 60-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO). Their neurological outcomes were evaluated 24h after the MCAO. In another experiment, cerebral cortex was harvested for Western blotting at 30 min after animals were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Here, we showed that isoflurane reduced brain infarct volumes and improved neurological functions of wild-type mice after a 90-min MCAO. However, isoflurane pre-exposure did not change the neurological outcome of EAAT3 knockout mice no matter whether the MCAO was for 90 min or 60 min. Isoflurane increased phospho-Akt, a survival-promoting protein, in the wild-type mice but not in the EAAT3 knockout mice. The isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in the wild-type mice was abolished by LY294004, an Akt activation inhibitor. LY294004 alone did not affect the neurological outcome of the wild-type or EAAT3 knockout mice after focal brain ischemia. These results suggest that the isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection involves EAAT3. The downstream event includes Akt activation.

  13. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed. PMID:24227952

  14. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  15. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Group I mGluR-Regulated Translation of the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter, Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1)

    PubMed Central

    Ross, John R.; Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Porter, Brenda E.; Robinson, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that mRNA for the neuronal glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1), is found in dendrites of hippocampal neurons in culture and in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal cells after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also showed that SE increased the levels of EAAC1 mRNA ~15-fold in synaptoneurosomes. In the present study, the effects of SE on the distribution EAAC1 protein in hippocampus were examined. In addition, the effects of Group 1 mGluR receptor activation on the levels of EAAC1 protein were examined in synaptoneurosomes prepared from sham control animals and from animals that experience pilocarpine-induced SE. We find that EAAC1 immunoreactivity increases in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus after 3 h of SE. In addition, the group I mGluR agonist, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), caused an increase in EAAC1 protein levels in hippocampal synaptoneurosomes; this effect of DHPG was much larger (~3- to 5-fold) after 3 h of SE. The DHPG-induced increases in EAAC1 protein were blocked by two different inhibitors of translation but not by inhibitors of transcription. mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists completely blocked the DHPG-induced increases in EAAC1 protein. DHPG also increased the levels of GluR2/3 protein, but this effect was not altered by SE. The DHPG-induced increase in EAAC1 protein was blocked by an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These studies provide the first evidence EAAC1 translation can be regulated, and they show that regulated translation of EAAC1 is up-regulated after SE. PMID:21371038

  17. Uncovering the role of the nucleus accumbens in schizophrenia: A postmortem analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase and vesicular glutamate transporters

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, Lesley A.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is often implicated in schizophrenia (SZ) pathology, but with little evidence to support its role. This study examined postmortem human tissue to determine if abnormalities are present in the dopaminergic or glutamatergic systems in the NAcc in SZ. We compared the protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters vGLUT1 and vGLUT2 in control (n = 7) and schizophrenia (n = 13) subjects using western blot analysis. The SZ subjects were further divided by treatment status: SZ on-drug (SZ-ON, n = 6) and SZ off-drug (SZ-OFF, n = 7), to assess the effects of antipsychotic treatment. TH protein levels were similar between control and SZ subjects, and there was no difference between SZ-ON and SZ-OFF subjects. Protein levels of vGLUT1 were similar in control and SZ subjects, and there was no difference in vGLUT1 protein levels between SZ-ON and SZ-OFF subjects. In contrast, vGLUT2 protein levels were significantly elevated in the SZ group (25% increase). Protein levels of vGLUT2 did not differ between SZ-ON and SZ-OFF subjects. Similar levels of TH suggest the presynaptic DA pathway may be normal in the NAcc in SZ. The elevated vGLUT2 protein levels, but not vGLUT1, suggest the NAcc receives increased glutamatergic input in SZ, possibly from thalamic or other subcortical origins. The similarity between SZ-ON and SZ-OFF subjects suggests that the results are not caused by APD treatment. These findings provide further insight into the role of the NAcc in SZ. PMID:26386900

  18. Protein Kinase C (PKC)-promoted Endocytosis of Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Requires Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-2-dependent Ubiquitination but Not Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    García-Tardón, Noemí; González-González, Inmaculada M.; Martínez-Villarreal, Jaime; Fernández-Sánchez, Enrique; Giménez, Cecilio; Zafra, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is the main glutamate transporter in the central nervous system, and its concentration severely decreases in neurodegenerative diseases. The number of transporters in the plasma membrane reflects the balance between their insertion and removal, and it has been reported that the regulated endocytosis of GLT-1 depends on its ubiquitination triggered by protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Here, we identified serine 520 of GLT-1 as the primary target for PKC-dependent phosphorylation, although elimination of this serine did not impair either GLT-1 ubiquitination or endocytosis in response to phorbol esters. In fact, we present evidence indicating that the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 mediates the PKC-dependent ubiquitination and down-regulation of GLT-1. Overexpression of Nedd4-2 increased the ubiquitination of the transporter and promoted its degradation. Moreover, phorbol myristate acetate enhanced Nedd4-2 phosphorylation and the formation of GLT-1·Nedd4-2 complexes, whereas siRNA knockdown of Nedd4-2 prevented ubiquitination, endocytosis, and the concomitant decrease in GLT-1 activity triggered by PKC activation. These results indicate that GLT-1 endocytosis is independent of its phosphorylation and that Nedd4-2 mediates PKC-dependent down-regulation of the transporter. PMID:22505712

  19. Ceftriaxone upregulates the glutamate transporter in medial prefrontal cortex and blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in a condition place preference paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Miller, Joseph D.; Wu, Jinhua; Choi, Doo-Sup; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate signaling plays an essential role in drug-seeking behavior. Using reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP), we determined whether ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to increase the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter (EAAT2) on glial cells, blocks methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP. Rats acquired methamphetamine CPP following 7 consecutive days of conditioning, during which each animal received pairings of alternating morning methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) and afternoon saline (IP). Animals showing CPP were successfully extinguished with repeated twice daily saline administration over a 7-day period. Ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, IP) was administered (vs. saline) once a day for 7 days during the extinction period. Upon successful extinction, animals received a single dose of methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) for reinstatement and were tested for CPP one day later. Using real time PCR, EAAT2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were quantified in response to ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone blocked methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP and significantly increased EAAT2 mRNA levels in the mPFC, with a trend towards significance in the NAc. In conclusion, Ceftriaxone modulated the expression of the glutamate transporter in a critical region of the cortico-striatal addiction circuitry and attenuated drug-seeking behavior in rats. Further research is needed to test the efficacy of compounds targeting the EAAT2 in human methamphetamine-dependent users. PMID:22521042

  20. The solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, rs3794087 variant and assessment risk for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G

    2014-02-01

    A glutamatergic dysfunction has been postulated to play a role in restless legs syndrome (RLS) pathophysiology, as glutamate concentrations have been found to increase in the thalamus of RLS patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible association between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3794087 in the solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, related with glutamate transport and the risk for RLS. We studied the allelic and genotype frequencies of the SNP rs3794087 in 205 patients with RLS and 328 healthy controls using TaqMan genotyping. The rs3794087 genotype and allelic frequencies did not significantly differ between patients with RLS and controls and were unrelated with the age at onset of RLS, gender, and family history of RLS. The results of our study suggest that the rs3794087 polymorphism is not related to the risk for RLS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of intravenous anesthetics on the activity of glutamate transporter EAAT3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes: evidence for protein kinase C involvement.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Lim, Young-Jin; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-02-15

    We investigated the effects of the intravenous anesthetics, thiopental, etomidate and ketamine, on the activity of one type of glutamate transporters, EAAT3 (excitatory amino acid transporter type 3). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of its mRNA. Using two-electrode voltage clamp, membrane currents were recorded after the application of L-glutamate (30 microM) in the presence or absence of various concentrations of the anesthetics. Thiopental (0.3-30 microM) and ketamine (3-1000 microM) did not affect EAAT3 activity. Etomidate decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner (0.10-10 microM). Etomidate at 1 microM significantly decreased the Vmax, but not the Km of EAAT3 for glutamate. Chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, significantly decreased EAAT3 activity, however, there were no statistical differences among the chelerythrine, etomidate or chelerythrine plus etomidate groups. Likewise, the combination of staurosporine, another PKC inhibitor, and etomidate did not decrease the responses further compared with staurosporine or etomidate alone. Phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate, a PKC activator, abolished etomidate-induced decrease in EAAT3 activity. Since our results showed that thiopental and ketamine did not affect EAAT3 activity significantly, EAAT3 may not be a target for their anesthetic effects. Our results also suggest that etomidate, possibly via PKC, decreased EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant concentrations.

  2. Disrupting Glutamate Co-transmission Does Not Affect Acquisition of Conditioned Behavior Reinforced by Dopamine Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong V; Viereckel, Thomas; Zell, Vivien; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Broker, Carl J; Talishinsky, Aleksandr; Yoo, Ji Hoon; Galinato, Melissa H; Arvidsson, Emma; Kesner, Andrew J; Hnasko, Thomas S; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2017-03-14

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were previously found to express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and to co-transmit glutamate in the ventral striatum (VStr). This capacity may play an important role in reinforcement learning. Although it is known that activation of the VTA-VStr dopamine system readily reinforces behavior, little is known about the role of glutamate co-transmission in such reinforcement. By combining electrode recording and optogenetics, we found that stimulation of VTA dopamine neurons in vivo evoked fast excitatory responses in many VStr neurons of adult mice. Whereas conditional knockout of the gene encoding VGLUT2 in dopamine neurons largely eliminated fast excitatory responses, it had little effect on the acquisition of conditioned responses reinforced by dopamine neuron activation. Therefore, glutamate co-transmission appears dispensable for acquisition of conditioned responding reinforced by DA neuron activation.

  3. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  4. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability.

  5. Differential Regulation of Two Isoforms of the Glial Glutamate Transporter EAAT2 by DLG1 and CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    The gene for EAAT2, the major astrocytic glutamate transporter, generates two carrier isoforms (EAAT2a and EAAT2b) that vary at their C termini as a consequence of alternative RNA splicing. The EAAT2b cytoplasmic C terminus contains a postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1 (PDZ) ligand, which is absent in EAAT2a. To understand how the distinct C termini might affect transporter trafficking and surface localization, we generated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that stably express EGFP-EAAT2a or EGFP-EAAT2b and found robust basolateral membrane expression of the EAAT2b isoform. In contrast, EAAT2a displayed a predominant distribution within intracellular vesicle compartments, constitutively cycling to and from the membrane. Addition of the PDZ ligand to EAAT2a as well as its deletion from EAAT2b confirmed the importance of the motif for cell-surface localization. Using EAAT2 constructs with an extracellular biotin acceptor tag to directly assess surface proteins, we observed significant PDZ ligand-dependent EAAT2b surface expression in cultured astrocytes, consistent with observations in cell lines. Discs large homolog 1 (DLG1; SAP97), a PDZ protein prominent in both astrocytes and MDCK cells, colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with EAAT2b. shRNA knockdown of DLG1 expression decreased surface EAAT2b in both MDCK cells and cultured astrocytes, suggesting that the DLG scaffolding protein stabilizes EAAT2b at the surface. DLG1 can be phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), resulting in disruption of its PDZ-mediated interaction. In murine astrocytes and acute brain slices, activation of CaMKII decreases EAAT2b surface expression but does not alter the distribution of EAAT2a. These data indicate that the surface expression and function of EAAT2b can be rapidly modulated through the disruption of its interaction with DLG1 by CaMKII activation. PMID:25834051

  6. Enhanced expression of cystine/glutamate transporter in the lung caused by the oxidative-stress-inducing agent paraquat.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Sho; Kuwata, Kazuho; Sugimoto, Takayuki; Igarashi, Kiharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Okada, Futoshi; Fujii, Junichi; Bannai, Shiro; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-12-15

    In mammalian cultured cells, the activity of a cystine/glutamate transporter, designated System xc(-), has been shown to be essential for maintaining intracellular glutathione levels and the extracellular cystine/cysteine redox balance. The substrate-specific subunit of this transporter, xCT, is strongly induced by various stimuli, including oxidative stress, which suggests that xCT is one of the adaptive cellular defense systems against these types of stress. Embryonic fibroblasts from xCT-deficient mice fail to survive unless a cysteine precursor, N-acetylcysteine, is present. However, it is unclear whether xCT has similar functions in vivo because xCT-deficient mice are apparently normal. In this study, we investigated the phenotype of the xCT-deficient mice under paraquat-induced oxidative stress. At a paraquat dose of 45mg/kg, the survival rate of the xCT-deficient mice was significantly lower than that of the wild-type mice. Under this condition, total glutathione (the reduced form of glutathione (GSH)+the oxidized form of GSH) levels in the lungs of the xCT-deficient mice were lower than those in the lungs of the wild-type mice. Histopathological examinations showed that paraquat administration worsened the alveolar structure of the xCT-deficient mice compared with the wild-type mice. After paraquat treatment, obvious 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal reactivity was detected in the lungs of the xCT-deficient mice. Although xCT expression was slightly detectable in the lungs of the normal wild-type mice, paraquat administration induced xCT mRNA expression in the lung. Constitutive expression of xCT mRNA was detected in alveolar macrophages isolated from the pulmonary lavage fluid of the wild-type mice, and paraquat administration strongly enhanced xCT mRNA expression in these cells. GSH levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly higher in the paraquat-treated wild-type mice than in the paraquat-treated xCT-deficient mice

  7. N-ammonia assimilation, 2-oxoglutarate transport, and glutamate export in spinach chloroplasts in the presence of dicarboxylates in the light.

    PubMed

    Woo, K C; Boyle, F A; Flugge, I U; Heldt, H W

    1987-11-01

    The direct incorporation of (15)NH(4)Cl into amino acids in illuminated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate plus malate was determined. The amido-N of glutamine was the most highly labeled N-atom during (15)NH(4) assimilation in the presence of malate. In 4 minutes the (15)N-label of the amido-N of glutamine was 37% enriched. In contrast, values obtained for both the N-atom of glutamate and the amino-N of glutamine were only about 20% while that of the N-atom of aspartate was only 3%. The addition of malate during the assimilation of (15)NH(4)Cl and Na(15)NO(2) greatly increased the (15)N-label into glutamine but did not qualitatively change the order of the incorporation of (15)N-label into all the amino acids examined. This evidence indicates the direct involvement of the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway for ammonia and nitrite assimilation in isolated chloroplasts. The addition of malate or succinate during ammonia assimilation also led to more than 3-fold increase in [(14)C]2-oxoglutarate transport into the chloroplast as well as an increase in the export of [(14)C]glutamate out of the chloroplast. Little [(14)C]glutamine was detected in the medium of the chloroplast preparations. The stimulation of (15)N-incorporation and [(14)C]glutamate export by malate could be directly attributed to the increase in 2-oxoglutarate transport activity (via the 2-oxoglutarate translocator) observed in the presence of exogenous malate.

  8. /sup 15/N-Ammonia assimilation, 2-oxoglutarate transport, and glutamate export in spinach chloroplasts in the presence of dicarboxylates in the light

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, K.C.; Boyle, F.A.; Flugge, I.U.; Heldt, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    The direct incorporation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl into amino acids in illuminated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate plus malate was determined. The amido-N of glutamine was the most highly labeled N-atom during /sup 15/NH/sub 4/ assimilation in the presence of malate. In 4 minutes the /sup 15/N-label of the amido-N of glutamine was 37% enriched. In contrast, values obtained for both the N-atom of glutamate and the amino-N of glutamine were only about 20% while that of the N-atom of aspartate was only 3%. The addition of malate during the assimilation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl and Na/sup 15/NO/sub 2/ greatly increased the /sup 15/N-label into glutamine but did not qualitatively change the order of the incorporation of /sup 15/N-label into all the amino acids examined. This evidence indicates the direct involvement of the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway for ammonia and nitrite assimilation in isolated chloroplasts. The addition of malate or succinate during ammonia assimilation also led to more than 3-fold increase in (/sup 14/C)2-oxoglutarate transport into the chloroplast as well as an increase in the export of (/sup 14/C)glutamate out of the chloroplast. Little (/sup 14/C)glutamine was detected in the medium of the chloroplast preparations. The stimulation of /sup 15/N-incorporation and (/sup 14/C)glutamate export by malate could be directly attributed to the increase in 2-oxoglutarate transport activity (via the 2-oxoglutarate translocator) observed in the presence of exogenous malate.

  9. Using glutamate homeostasis as a target for treating addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Kalivas, Peter W

    2010-09-01

    Well-developed cellular mechanisms exist to preserve glutamate homeostasis and regulate extrasynaptic glutamate levels. Accumulating evidence indicates that disruptions in glutamate homeostasis are associated with addictive disorders. The disruptions in glutamate concentrations observed after prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse are associated with changes in the function and activity of several key components within the homeostatic control mechanism, including the cystine/glutamate exchanger xc(-) and the glial glutamate transporter, EAAT2/GLT-1. Changes in the balance between synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamate levels in turn influence signaling through presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamate receptors, and thus affect synaptic plasticity and circuit-level activity. In this review, we describe the evidence for impaired glutamate homeostasis as a critical mediator of long-term drug-seeking behaviors, how chronic neuroadaptations in xc(-) and the glutamate transporter, GLT-1, mediate a disruption in glutamate homeostasis, and how targeting these components restores glutamate levels and inhibits drug-seeking behaviors.

  10. Activation of a glycine transporter on spinal cord neurons causes enhanced glutamate release in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Luca; Paolucci, Egle; Prisco, Simona; Raiteri, Maurizio; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2003-01-01

    The release of [3H]D-aspartate ([3H]D-ASP) or [3H]GABA evoked by glycine from spinal cord synaptosomes was compared in mice expressing mutant human SOD1 with a Gly93 Ala substitution ([SOD1-G93A(+)]), a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and in control mice. Mice expressing mutated SOD1 were killed at the advanced phase of the pathology, when they showed signs of ingestion disability, because of paralysis of the posterior limbs. In control mice glycine concentration-dependently evoked [3H]D-ASP and [3H]GABA release. Potentiation of the spontaneous release of both amino acids is likely to be mediated by activation of a glycine transporter, since the effects of glycine were counteracted by the glycine transporter blocker glycyldodecylamide but not by the glycine receptor antagonists strychnine and 5,7-dichlorokynurenate. The glycine-evoked release of [3H]D-ASP, but not that of [3H]GABA, was significantly more pronounced in SOD1-G93A(+) than in control animals. PMID:12684256

  11. Role of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in regulating cortical parvalbumin and GABA membrane transporter 1 expression: Implications for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Allison A.; Eggan, Stephen M.; Lazarus, Matt S.; Huang, Z. Josh; Volk, David W.; Lewis, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Markers of GABA neurotransmission are altered in multiple regions of the neocortex in individuals with schizophrenia. Lower levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA and protein, which is responsible for most cortical GABA synthesis, are accompanied by lower levels of GABA membrane transporter 1 (GAT1) mRNA. These alterations are thought to be most prominent in the parvalbumin (PV)-containing subclass of interneurons, which also contain lower levels of PV mRNA. Since GAT1 and PV each reduce the availability of GABA at postsynaptic receptors, lower levels of GAT1 and PV mRNAs have been hypothesized to represent compensatory responses to an upstream reduction in cortical GABA synthesis in schizophrenia. However, such cause-and-effect hypotheses cannot be directly tested in a human illness. Consequently, we used two mouse models with reduced GAD67 expression specifically in PV neurons (PVGAD67+/−) or in all interneurons (GABAGAD67+/−) and quantified GAD67, GAT1 and PV mRNA levels using methods identical to those employed in studies of schizophrenia. Cortical levels of PV or GAT1 mRNAs were not altered in PVGAD67+/− mice during postnatal development or in adulthood. Furthermore, cellular analyses confirmed the predicted reduction in GAD67 mRNA, but failed to show a deficit in PV mRNA in these animals. Levels of PV and GAT1 mRNAs were also unaltered in GABAGAD67+/− mice. Thus, mouse lines with cortical reductions in GAD67 mRNA that match or exceed those present in schizophrenia, and that differ in the developmental timing and cell typespecificity of the GAD67 deficit, failed to provide proof-of-concept evidence that lower PV and GAT1 expression in schizophrenia are a consequence of lower GAD67 expression. Together, these findings suggest that the correlated decrements in cortical GAD67, PV and GAT1 mRNAs in schizophrenia may be a common consequence of some other upstream factor. PMID:23103418

  12. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  13. Effects of surface functionalization of hydrophilic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ on glutamate and GABA transport in brain synaptosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kociołek, Daria; Banski, Mateusz; Borisova, Tatiana; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Borysov, Arsenii; Dudarenko, Marina; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-08-01

    Specific rare earth doped nanocrystals (NCs), a recent class of nanoparticles with fluorescent features, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport process in nerve terminals isolated from rat brain (synaptosomes). Two types of hydrophilic NCs were examined in this work: (i) coated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and (ii) with OH groups at the surface. It was found that NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH within the concentration range of 0.5-3.5 and 0.5-1.5 mg/ml, respectively, did not influence Na+-dependent transporter-dependent l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA uptake and the ambient level of the neurotransmitters in the synaptosomes. An increase in NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH concentrations up to 7.5 and 3.5 mg/ml, respectively, led to the (1) attenuation of the initial velocity of uptake of l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA and (2) elevation of ambient neurotransmitters in the suspension of nerve terminals. In the mentioned concentrations, nanocrystals did not influence acidification of synaptic vesicles that was shown with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, however, decreased the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. In comparison with other nanoparticles studied with similar methodological approach, NCs start to exhibit their effects on neurotransmitter transport at concentrations several times higher than those shown for carbon dots, detonation nanodiamonds and an iron storage protein ferritin, whose activity can be registered at 0.08, 0.5 and 0.08 mg/ml, respectively. Therefore, NCs can be considered lesser neurotoxic as compared to above nanoparticles.

  14. Induction of the high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- by hypertonic stress in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Martinez, A; Felipe, A; Nicholson, B; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M; McGivan, J

    1995-01-01

    The high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- is induced (threefold increase in Vmax. with no change in Km) by hypertonicity in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1. This effect is dependent on protein synthesis and glycosylation and is accompanied by an increase in EAAC1 mRNA levels. Other Na(+)-dependent transport systems in this cell line do not respond to hypertonic stress. In contrast to recent findings [Ruiz-Montasell, Gomez-Angelats, Casado, Felipe, McGivan and Pastor-Anglada (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 9569-9573] showing that increased system A activity after hyperosmotic shock results from induction of a regulatory protein, this is the first demonstration that hypertonicity may increase the expression of the gene for an amino acid transport protein itself. Images Figure 4 PMID:7654212

  15. Synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of novel derivatives of L-beta-threo-benzylaspartate as inhibitors of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Mavencamp, Terri L; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Bridges, Richard J; Esslinger, C Sean

    2008-08-15

    A series of beta-benzylaspartate derivatives were prepared from N-trityl-L-aspartate dimethyl ester and evaluated as inhibitors of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3. The result of the structure-activity studies suggests that the position occupied by the aromatic ring of beta-benzylaspartate within the binding site of EAAT3 may be different from that occupied by comparable groups in previously identified inhibitors, such as L-threo-benzyloxy aspartate (TBOA). Further, halogen substitutions at the 3-position of the aromatic ring of beta-benzylaspartate can increase the potency with which the analogues inhibit EAAT3.

  16. The beta-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone, attenuates morphine-evoked hyperthermia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, S M; Tallarida, R; Robinson, W; Amin, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Beta-lactam antibiotics are the first practical pharmaceuticals capable of increasing the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter, GLT-1, in the CNS. However, the functional impact of beta-lactam antibiotics on specific drugs which produce their pharmacological effects by increasing glutamatergic transmission is unknown. One such drug is morphine, which causes hyperthermia in rats, mediated by an increase in glutamatergic transmission. Since drugs (e.g. antibiotics) that enhance glutamate uptake also decrease glutamatergic transmission, we tested the hypothesis that ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, would block the glutamate-dependent portion of morphine-evoked hyperthermia. Experimental approach: A body temperature assay was used to determine if ceftriaxone decreased morphine-induced hyperthermia in rats by increasing glutamate uptake. Key results: Body temperatures of rats treated with ceftriaxone (200 mg kg−1, i.p. × 7 days) did not differ from rats receiving saline. Morphine (1, 4, 8 and 15 mg kg−1, s.c.) caused significant hyperthermia. Pre-treatment with ceftriaxone, as described above, decreased the hyperthermic response to these doses of morphine. The effects of ceftriaxone were prevented by TBOA (0.2 μmol, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of glutamate transport. Conclusions and implications: Ceftriaxone attenuated the hyperthermia caused by morphine, an effect prevented by inhibiting glutamate transport. Thus this effect of ceftriaxone was most likely mediated by increased glutamate uptake. These data revealed a functional interaction between ceftriaxone and morphine and indicated that a beta-lactam antibiotic decreased the efficacy of morphine in conscious rats. PMID:17592517

  17. Novel N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl analogs of lobelane inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-10-01

    Lobelane, a chemically defunctionalized saturated analog of lobeline, has increased selectivity for the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) compared with the parent compound. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and decreases methamphetamine self-administration. Unfortunately, tolerance develops to the ability of lobelane to decrease these behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Lobelane has low water solubility, which is problematic for drug development. The aim of the current study was to determine the pharmacological effect of replacement of the N-methyl moiety with a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl (N-1,2-diol) moiety, which enhances water solubility, altering the configuration of the N-1,2-diol moiety and incorporating phenyl ring substituents into the analogs. To determine VMAT2 selectivity, structure-activity relationships also were generated for inhibition of DA and serotonin transporters. Analogs with the highest potency for inhibiting DA uptake at VMAT2 and at least 10-fold selectivity were evaluated further for ability to inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices. (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A), the (R)-4-methoxyphenyl-N-1,2-diol analog, and (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(1-naphthylethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-794A), the (R)-1-naphthyl-N-1,2-diol analog, exhibited the highest potency (K(i) ∼30 nM) inhibiting VMAT2, and both analogs inhibited methamphetamine-evoked endogenous DA release (IC(50) = 10.6 and 0.4 μM, respectively). Thus, the pharmacophore for VMAT2 inhibition accommodates the N-1,2-diol moiety, which improves drug-likeness and enhances the potential for the development of these clinical candidates as treatments for methamphetamine abuse.

  18. Novel N-1,2-Dihydroxypropyl Analogs of Lobelane Inhibit Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 Function and Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Horton, David B.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Lobelane, a chemically defunctionalized saturated analog of lobeline, has increased selectivity for the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) compared with the parent compound. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and decreases methamphetamine self-administration. Unfortunately, tolerance develops to the ability of lobelane to decrease these behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Lobelane has low water solubility, which is problematic for drug development. The aim of the current study was to determine the pharmacological effect of replacement of the N-methyl moiety with a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl (N-1,2-diol) moiety, which enhances water solubility, altering the configuration of the N-1,2-diol moiety and incorporating phenyl ring substituents into the analogs. To determine VMAT2 selectivity, structure-activity relationships also were generated for inhibition of DA and serotonin transporters. Analogs with the highest potency for inhibiting DA uptake at VMAT2 and at least 10-fold selectivity were evaluated further for ability to inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices. (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A), the (R)-4-methoxyphenyl-N-1,2-diol analog, and (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(1-naphthylethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-794A), the (R)-1-naphthyl-N-1,2-diol analog, exhibited the highest potency (Ki ∼30 nM) inhibiting VMAT2, and both analogs inhibited methamphetamine-evoked endogenous DA release (IC50 = 10.6 and 0.4 μM, respectively). Thus, the pharmacophore for VMAT2 inhibition accommodates the N-1,2-diol moiety, which improves drug-likeness and enhances the potential for the development of these clinical candidates as treatments for methamphetamine abuse. PMID:21778282

  19. Turnover and accessibility of a reentrant loop of the Na+-glutamate transporter GltS are modulated by the central cytoplasmic loop.

    PubMed

    Krupnik, Tomas; Sobczak-Elbourne, Iwona; Lolkema, Juke S

    2011-01-01

    GltS of Escherichia coli is a secondary transporter that catalyzes Na+-glutamate symport. The structural model of GltS shows two homologous domains with inverted membrane topology that are connected by a central loop that resides in the cytoplasm. Each domain contains a reentrant loop structure. Accessibility of the Cys residues in two GltS mutants in which Pro351 and Asn356 in the reentrant loop in the C-terminal domain were replaced by Cys is demonstrated to be sensitive to the catalytic state supporting a role for the reentrant loops in catalysis. Saturating concentrations of the substrate L-glutamate protected both mutants against inactivation by thiol reagents, while the presence of the co-ion Na+ stimulated the inactivation of both mutants. Insertion of the 10 kDa biotin acceptor domain (BAD) of oxaloacetate decarboxylase of Klebsiella pneumoniae in the central cytoplasmic loop blocked the access pathway from the periplasmic side of the membrane to the cysteine residues in mutants P351C and N356C in the reentrant loop. Kinetically, insertion of BAD increased the maximal rate of uptake 2.7-fold while leaving the apparent affinity constants for L-glutamate and Na+ unaltered. The data suggests that insertion of BAD in the central loop results in conformational changes at the translocation site that lower the activation energy of the translocation step without affecting the access pathway from the periplasmic side for substrate and co-ions. It is concluded that changes in the central loop that connects the two domains may have a regulatory function on the activity of the transporter.

  20. Differential expression of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 may identify distinct modes of glutamatergic transmission in the macaque visual system.

    PubMed

    Balaram, Pooja; Hackett, Troy A; Kaas, Jon H

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary neurotransmitter utilized by the mammalian visual system for excitatory neurotransmission. The sequestration of glutamate into synaptic vesicles, and the subsequent transport of filled vesicles to the presynaptic terminal membrane, is regulated by a family of proteins known as vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). Two VGLUT proteins, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, characterize distinct sets of glutamatergic projections between visual structures in rodents and prosimian primates, yet little is known about their distributions in the visual system of anthropoid primates. We have examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the visual system of macaque monkeys, an Old World anthropoid primate, in order to determine their relative distributions in the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate nucleus, pulvinar complex, V1 and V2. Distinct expression patterns for both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identified architectonic boundaries in all structures, as well as anatomical subdivisions of the superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and V1. These results suggest that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 clearly identify regions of glutamatergic input in visual structures, and may identify common architectonic features of visual areas and nuclei across the primate radiation. Additionally, we find that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 characterize distinct subsets of glutamatergic projections in the macaque visual system; VGLUT2 predominates in driving or feedforward projections from lower order to higher order visual structures while VGLUT1 predominates in modulatory or feedback projections from higher order to lower order visual structures. The distribution of these two proteins suggests that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 may identify class 1 and class 2 type glutamatergic projections within the primate visual system (Sherman and Guillery, 2006).