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Sample records for evolved gas analysis

  1. Evolved gas analysis of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Williams, E.L. II; Grosjean, E. ); Novakov, T. )

    1994-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosols have been characterized by evolved gas analysis (EGA). Hydrocarbons selected as aerosol precursors were representative of anthropogenic emissions (cyclohexene, cyclopentene, 1-decene and 1-dodecene, n-dodecane, o-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and of biogenic emissions (the terpenes [alpha]-pinene, [beta]-pinene and d-limonene and the sesquiterpene trans-caryophyllene). Also analyzed by EGA were samples of secondary, primary (highway tunnel), and ambient (urban) aerosols before and after exposure to ozone and other photochemical oxidants. The major features of the EGA thermograms (amount of CO[sub 2] evolved as a function of temperature) are described. The usefulness and limitations of EGA data for source apportionment of atmospheric particulate carbon are briefly discussed. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis of Hydromagnesite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Boynton, W. V.

    1999-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates and sulfates) may be important phases on the surface of Mars. In order to characterize these phases the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) flying on the Mars'98 lander will perform analyses on surface samples from Mars. Hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2.4H2O] is considered a good standard mineral to examine as a Mars soil analog component because it evolves both H2O and CO2 at temperatures between 0 and 600 C. Our aim here is to interpret the DSC signature of hydromagnesite under ambient pressure and 20 sccm N2 flow in the range 25 to 600 C. The DSC curve for hydromagnesite under the above conditions consists of three endothermic peaks at temperatures 296, 426, and 548 and one sharp exotherm at 511 C. X-ray analysis of the sample at different stop temperatures suggested that the exotherm corresponded with the formation of crystalline magnesite. The first endotherm was due to dehydration of hydromagnesite, and then the second one was due to the decomposition of carbonate, immediately followed by the formation of magnesite (exotherm) and its decomposition to periclase (last endotherm). Evolution of water and CO2 were consistent with the observed enthalpy changes. A library of such DSC-evolved gas curves for putative Martian minerals are currently being acquired in order to facilitate the interpretation of results obtained by a robotic lander.

  3. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis at Mars Ambient Conditions Using the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyser (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Bode, R. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ward, M. G.; Pathare, A. V.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) combined with evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a well developed technique for the analysis of a wide variety of sample types with broad application in material and soil sciences. However, the use of the technique for samples under conditions of pressure and temperature as found on other planets is one of current development and cutting edge research. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was designed, built and tested at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Lab (LPL), utilizes DSC/EGA. TEGA, which was sent to Mars on the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander, was to be the first application of DSC/EGA on the surface of Mars as well as the first direct measurement of the volatile-bearing mineralogy in martian soil. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  4. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis at Mars Ambient Conditions Using the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, Douglas W.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Bode, R. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ward, M. G.; Pathare, A. V.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) combined with evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a well developed technique for the analysis of a wide variety of sample types with broad application in material and soil sciences. However, the use of the technique for samples under conditions of pressure and temperature as found on other planets is one of current C development and cutting edge research. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (MGA), which was designed, built and tested at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Lab (LPL), utilizes DSC/EGA. TEGA, which was sent to Mars on the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander, was to be the first application of DSC/EGA on the surface of Mars as well as the first direct measurement of the volatile-bearing mineralogy in martian soil.

  5. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of "Nanophase" Carbonates: Implications for Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis on Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Niles, P. B.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2012-01-01

    Data collected by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) suggested the presence of calcium-rich carbonates as indicated by a high temperature CO2 release while a low temperature (approx.400-680 C) CO2 release suggested possible Mg- and/or Fe-carbonates [1,2]. Interpretations of the data collected by Mars remote instruments is done by comparing the mission data to a database on the thermal properties of well-characterized Martian analog materials collected under reduced and Earth ambient pressures [3,4]. We are proposing that "nano-phase" carbonates may also be contributing to the low temperature CO2 release. The objectives of this paper is to (1) characterize the thermal and evolved gas proper-ties of carbonates of varying particle size, (2) evaluate the CO2 releases from CO2 treated CaO samples and (3) examine the secondary CO2 release from reheated calcite of varying particle size.

  6. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  7. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Hydromagnesite and Nesquehonite: Implications for Remote Thermal Analysis on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Golden, D. C.; Lin, I.-C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) may be important phases on the surface of Mars. In order to characterize these potential phases the Thermal Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was onboard the Mars Polar Lander, was to have performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved-gas analysis of soil samples collected from the surface. The sample chamber in TEGA operates at about 100 mbar (approximately 76 torr) with a N2, carrier gas flow of 0.4 seem. Essentially, no information exists on the effects of reduced pressure on the thermal properties of volatile-bearing minerals. In support of TEGA, we have constructed a laboratory analog for TEGA from commercial instrumentation. We connected together a commercial differential scanning calorimeter, a quadruple mass spectrometer, a vacuum pump, digital pressure gauge, electronic mass flow meter, gas "K" bottles, gas dryers, and high and low pressure regulators using a collection of shut off and needle valves. Our arrangement allows us to vary and control the pressure and carrier gas flow rate inside the calorimeter oven chamber.

  8. Thermal and evolved gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Boynton, W. V.; James, R. L.; Verts, W. T.; Bailey, S. H.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument will perform calorimetry and evolved gas analysis on soil samples collected from the Martian surface. TEGA is one of three instruments, along with a robotic arm, that form the Mars Volatile and Climate Survey (MVACS) payload. The other instruments are a stereo surface imager, built by Peter Smith of the University of Arizona and a meteorological station, built by JPL. The MVACS lander will investigate a Martian landing site at approximately 70 deg south latitude. Launch will take place from Kennedy Space Center in January, 1999. The TEGA project started in February, 1996. In the intervening 24 months, a flight instrument concept has been designed, prototyped, built as an engineering model and flight model, and tested. The instrument performs laboratory-quality differential-scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range of Mars ambient to 1400K. Low-temperature volatiles (water and carbon dioxide ices) and the carbonates will be analyzed in this temperature range. Carbonates melt and evolve carbon dioxide at temperatures above 600 C. Evolved oxygen (down to a concentration of 1 ppm) is detected, and C02 and water vapor and the isotopic variations of C02 and water vapor are detected and their concentrations measured. The isotopic composition provides important tests of the theory of solar system formation.

  9. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by Evolved Gas Analysis of Rocknest Soils: Global Implication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; McKay, C. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Franz, H. B.; McAdam, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) recently ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. Rocknest was selected as the source of the first samples analyzed because it is representative of both windblown material in Gale crater as well as the globally-distributed dust. The four samples analyzed by SAM were portioned from the fifth scoop at this location. The material delivered to SAM passed through a 150 m sieve and should have been well mixed during the sample acquisition/ preparation/handoff process. Rocknest samples were heated to 835 C at a 35 C/minute ramp rate with a He carrier gas flow rate of 1.5 standard cubic centimeters per minute and at an oven pressure of 30 mbar. Evolved gases were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS).

  10. Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup on Gas-Evolving Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose

    2013-01-21

    Batches made with a variety of precursors were subjected to thermo-gravimetric analysis. The baseline modifications included all-nitrate batch with sucrose addition, all-carbonate batch, and batches with different sources of alumina. All batches were formulated for a single glass composition (a vitrified simulated high-alumina high-level waste). Batch samples were heated from the ambient temperature to 1200°C at constant heating rates ranging from 1 K/min to 50 K/min. Major gas evolving reactions began at temperatures just above 100°C and were virtually complete by 650°C. Activation energies for major reactions were obtained with the Kissinger’s method. A rough model for the overall kinetics of the batch-conversion was developed to be eventually applied to a mathematical model of the cold cap.

  11. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  12. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; McKay, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The instrument consists of five subsystems: (1) a programmable furnace which can be loaded with samples of regolith, (2) a mass spectrometer which detects and measures atmospheric gases or gases evolved during heating, (3) a tank of pressurized gas which can be introduced to the regolith material while detecting and measuring volatile reaction products, (4) a mechanism for dumping the regolith sample and repeating the experiment on a fresh sample, and (5) a data system which controls and monitors the furnace, gas system, and mass spectrometer.

  13. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Geologic Samples Containing Organic Materials: Implications for the 2007 Mars Phoenix Scout Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument scheduled to fly onboard the 2007 Mars Phoenix Scout Mission will perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved gas analysis (EGA) of soil samples and ice collected from the surface and subsurface at a northern landing site on Mars. We have been developing a sample characterization data library using a laboratory DSC integrated with a quadrupole mass spectrometer to support the interpretations of TEGA data returned during the mission. The laboratory TEGA test-bed instrument has been modified to operate under conditions similar to TEGA, i.e., reduced pressure (e.g., 100 torr) and reduced carrier gas flow rates. We have previously developed a TEGA data library for a variety of volatile-bearing mineral phases, including Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates. Here we examine the thermal and evolved gas properties of samples that contain organics. One of the primary objectives of the Phoenix Scout Mission is to search for habitable zones by assessing organic or biologically interesting materials in icy soil. Nitrogen is currently the carrier gas that will be used for TEGA. In this study, we examine two possible modes of detecting organics in geologic samples; i.e., pyrolysis using N2 as the carrier gas and combustion using O2 as the carrier gas.

  14. Sulphur-bearing Compounds Detected by MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analysis of Materials from Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D. Jr.; Sutter, B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Brunner, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Steele, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of sample fines (<150 µm) from three sites in Yellowknife Bay, an aeolian bedform termed Rocknest (hereafter "RN") and two samples drilled from the Sheepbed mudstone at sites named John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases. The identity of evolved gases and temperature (T) of evolution can support mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here, we focus on potential constraints on phases that evolved SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 during thermal analysis.

  15. Oxidation and cyclization of organics in Mars-like soils during evolved gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Iñiguez, Enrique; de La Rosa, Jose; McKay, Chris

    Thermal volatilization (TV) of soils has been used as the method of choice in space because of its simplicity and reproducibility. TV was first used by the Viking Landers, which failed to detect organics at ppb levels and subsequently by the Phoenix Lander that did not find organics but instead detected the release of carbon dioxide from 400 to 680° C which was attributed to magnesium or iron carbonate, adsorbed carbon dioxide, or organics present in the soil. Future missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory from NASA and ExoMars from ESA will also use this method to release soil organics to the analytical instruments. The presence of inorganic salts or minerals can strongly modify the release of soil organics leading to their degradation and/or oxidation resulting in loss of sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. The purpose of this work is to study the matrix effects of some minerals and Martian soil analogues in the analysis of organics by TV. Samples were analyzed by TV-MS and/or TV-GC-MS in neutral (He) and reducing (H2 ) atmospheres following the methods reported by Navarro-González eta al., 2006, 2009 and Iñiguez et al., 2009. Our results show that oxidation of organic matter is n promoted by several soil minerals (iron oxides) and inorganic salts (perchlorates, persulphates, sulfates, nitrates) in a neutral atmosphere; however, in a reducing atmosphere the oxidation of organics by the mineral matrix is reduced. Furthermore it was found that the stable organics that were thermally evolved were aromatic in nature (benzene and methyl benzene). Therefore, depending on the mineral matrix there is completion between formation of aromatic compounds versus oxidation. Iñiguez, E., Navarro-González, R., de la Rosa, J., Ureña-Núnez, F., Coll, P., Raulin, F., and McKay, C.P.: 2009, On the oxidation ability of the NASA Mars-1 soil simulant during the thermal volatilization step. Implications for the search of organics on Mars. Geophys Res Lett 36, L21205

  16. Mars Phoenix Scout Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Database: Thermal Database Development and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Niles, P. B.; Stein, T. C.; Hamara, D.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Lander mission in 2008 examined the history of water, searched for organics, and evaluated the potential for past/present microbial habitability in a martian arctic ice-rich soil [1]. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument measured the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and detected volatile bearing mineralogy (perchlorate, carbonate, hydrated mineral phases) in the martian soil [2-7]. The TEGA data are archived at the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences Node but are reported in forms that require further processing to be of use to the non-TEGA expert. The soil and blank TEGA thermal data are reported as duty cycle and must be converted to differential power (mW) to allow for enthalpy calculations of exothermic/endothermic transitions. The exothermic/endothermic temperatures are also used to determine what phases (inorganic/organic) are present in the sample. The objectives of this work are to: 1) Describe how interpretable thermal data can be created from TEGA data sets on the PDS and 2) Provide additional thermal data interpretation of two Phoenix soils (Baby Bear, Wicked Witch) and include interpretations from three unreported soils (Rosy Red 1, 2, and Burning Coals).

  17. Evolved Gas Analyses of the Murray Formation in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Thompson, L. M.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 13 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM-evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HCl) [1- 6]. The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize recent evolved SO2, CO2, O2, and NO gas traces of the Murray formation mudstone, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results relative to understanding the geological history of Gale Crater.

  18. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  19. Evolved gas composition monitoring by repetitive injection gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    White, Robert L

    2015-11-20

    Performance characteristics and applications of a small volume gas chromatograph oven are described. Heating and cooling properties of the apparatus are evaluated and examples are given illustrating the advantages of greatly reducing the air bath volume surrounding fused silica columns. Fast heating and cooling of the oven permit it to be employed for repetitive injection analyses. By using fast gas chromatography separations to achieve short assay cycle times, the apparatus can be employed for on-line species-specific gas stream composition monitoring when volatile species concentrations vary on time scales of a few minutes or longer. This capability facilitates repeated sampling and fast gas chromatographic separations of volatile product mixtures produced during thermal analyses. Applications of repetitive injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry evolved gas analyses to monitoring purge gas effluent streams containing volatile acid catalyzed polymer cracking products are described. The influence of thermal analysis and chromatographic experimental parameters on effluent sampling frequency are delineated.

  20. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Calcite Under Reduced Operating Pressures: Implications for the 2011 MSL Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V. Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is scheduled for launch in 2011. The science objectives for MSL are to assess the past or present biological potential, to characterize the geology, and to investigate other planetary processes that influence habitability at the landing site. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a key instrument on the MSL payload that will explore the potential habitability at the landing site [1]. In addition to searching for organic compounds, SAM will have the capability to characterized evolved gases as a function of increasing temperature and provide information on the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases such as carbonates, sulfates, phyllosilicates, and Fe-oxyhydroxides. The operating conditions in SAM ovens will be maintained at 30 mb pressure with a He carrier gas flowing at 1 sccm. We have previously characterized the thermal and evolved gas behaviors of volatile-bearing species under reduced pressure conditions that simulated operating conditions of the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) that was onboard the 2007 Mars Phoenix Scout Mission [e.g., 2-8]. TEGA ovens operated at 12 mb pressure with a N2 carrier gas flowing at 0.04 sccm. Another key difference between SAM and TEGA is that TEGA was able to perform differential scanning calorimetry whereas SAM only has a pyrolysis oven. The operating conditions for TEGA and SAM have several key parameter differences including operating pressure (12 vs 30 mb), carrier gas (N2 vs. He), and carrier gas flow rate (0.04 vs 1 sccm). The objectives of this study are to characterize the thermal and evolved gas analysis of calcite under SAM operating conditions and then compare it to calcite thermal and evolved gas analysis under TEGA operating conditions.

  1. The Mars Phoenix Thermal Evolved-Gas Analysis: The Role of an Organic Free Blank in the Search for Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, Richard V.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument onboard the 2007 Phoenix Lander will perform differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved-gas analysis of soil samples collected from the surface. Data from the instrument will be compared with Mars analog mineral standards, collected under TEGA Mars-like conditions to identify the volatile-bearing mineral phases [1] (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) found in the Martian soil. Concurrently, the instrument will be looking for indications of organics that might also be present in the soil. Organic molecules are necessary building blocks for life, although their presence in the ice or soil does not indicate life itself. The spacecraft will certainly bring organic contaminants to Mars even though numerous steps were taken to minimize contamination during the spacecraft assembly and testing. It will be essential to distinguish possible Mars organics from terrestrial contamination when TEGA instrument begins analyzing icy soils. To address the above, an Organic Free Blank (OFB) was designed, built, tested, and mounted on the Phoenix spacecraft providing a baseline for distinguishing Mars organics from terrestrial organic contamination. Our objective in this report is to describe some of the considerations used in selecting the OFB material and then report on the processing and analysis of the final candidate material

  2. Simultaneous thermogravimetry and evolved-gas analysis of YBa2Cu3O7 and LaBa2Cu3O7 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Hisao; Tanaka, Shoji

    1992-06-01

    Results are presented from concurrent thermogravimetry (TG) an evolved-gas analysis (EGA) performed on YBa2Cu3O(7-z) and LaBa2Cu3O(7-z) superconductors. The evolved O2 and CO2 gases were monitored by quadruple mass spectrometer. Results showed that CO2 gas began to evolve from YBa2Cu3O(7-z) at 543 C and from LaBa2Cu3O(7-z) at 692 C (although the X-ray diffraction patterns of these samples did not disclose the presence of an impurity phase containing a carbonate group).

  3. Sulfur-bearing phases detected by evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, Amy C.; Franz, Heather B.; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Paul D.; Freissinet, Caroline; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bish, David L.; Blake, David F.; Bower, Hannah E.; Brunner, Anna; Buch, Arnaud; Glavin, Daniel P.; Grotzinger, John P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard V.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Squyres, Steven W.; Steele, Andrew; Stern, Jennifer C.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Wray, James J.

    2014-02-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite detected SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 from ~450 to 800°C during evolved gas analysis (EGA) of materials from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater, Mars. This was the first detection of evolved sulfur species from a Martian surface sample during in situ EGA. SO2 (~3-22 µmol) is consistent with the thermal decomposition of Fe sulfates or Ca sulfites, or evolution/desorption from sulfur-bearing amorphous phases. Reactions between reduced sulfur phases such as sulfides and evolved O2 or H2O in the SAM oven are another candidate SO2 source. H2S (~41-109 nmol) is consistent with interactions of H2O, H2 and/or HCl with reduced sulfur phases and/or SO2 in the SAM oven. OCS (~1-5 nmol) and CS2 (~0.2-1 nmol) are likely derived from reactions between carbon-bearing compounds and reduced sulfur. Sulfates and sulfites indicate some aqueous interactions, although not necessarily at the Rocknest site; Fe sulfates imply interaction with acid solutions whereas Ca sulfites can form from acidic to near-neutral solutions. Sulfides in the Rocknest materials suggest input from materials originally deposited in a reducing environment or from detrital sulfides from an igneous source. The presence of sulfides also suggests that the materials have not been extensively altered by oxidative aqueous weathering. The possibility of both reduced and oxidized sulfur compounds in the deposit indicates a nonequilibrium assemblage. Understanding the sulfur mineralogy in Rocknest materials, which exhibit chemical similarities to basaltic fines analyzed elsewhere on Mars, can provide insight in to the origin and alteration history of Martian surface materials.

  4. Sulfur-Bearing Phases Detected by Evolved Gas Analysis of the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadam, Amy Catherine; Franz, Heather Bryant

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite detected SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 from approx.450 to 800 C during evolved gas analysis (EGA) of materials from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater, Mars. This was the first detection of evolved sulfur species from a Martian surface sample during in situ EGA. SO2(approx. 3-22 micro-mol) is consistent with the thermal decomposition of Fe sulfates or Ca sulfites, or evolution/desorption from sulfur-bearing amorphous phases. Reactions between reduced sulfur phases such as sulfides and evolved O2 or H2O in the SAM oven are another candidate SO2 source. H2S (approx.41-109 nmol) is consistent with interactions of H2O, H2 and/or HCl with reduced sulfur phases and/or SO2 in the SAM oven. OCS (approx.1-5 nmol) and CS2(approx.0.2-1 nmol) are likely derived from reactions between carbon-bearing compounds and reduced sulfur. Sulfates and sulfites indicate some aqueous interactions, although not necessarily at the Rocknest site; Fe sulfates imply interaction with acid solutions whereas Ca sulfites can form from acidic to near-neutral solutions. Sulfides in the Rocknest materials suggest input from materials originally deposited in a reducing environment or from detrital sulfides from an igneous source. The presence of sulfides also suggests that the materials have not been extensively altered by oxidative aqueous weathering. The possibility of both reduced and oxidized sulfur compounds in the deposit indicates a nonequilibrium assemblage. Understanding the sulfur mineralogy in Rocknest materials, which exhibit chemical similarities to basaltic fines analyzed elsewhere on Mars, can provide insight in to the origin and alteration history of Martian surface materials.

  5. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Magnesium Perchlorate: Implications for Perchlorates in Soils at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R.V.; Lauer, H. V.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D.C.; Boynton, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate salts were discovered in the soils around the Phoenix landing site on the northern plains of Mars [1]. Perchlorate was detected by an ion selective electrode that is part of the MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL). The discovery of a mass 32 fragment (likely 02) by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) provided additional confirmation of a strong oxidizer in the soils around the landing site. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts using TEGA-like laboratory testbed instruments. TEGA ovens were fabricated from high purity Ni. Hence, an additional objective of this paper is to determine the effects that Ni might have on the evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts.

  6. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Carl W.

    1994-01-01

    A dual porosity electrode for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  7. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, C.W.

    1994-11-15

    A dual porosity electrode is described for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  8. Analysis and quantitation of volatile organic compounds emitted from plastics used in museum construction by evolved gas analysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samide, Michael J; Smith, Gregory D

    2015-12-24

    Construction materials used in museums for the display, storage, and transportation of artwork must be assessed for their tendency to emit harmful pollution that could potentially damage cultural treasures. Traditionally, a subjective metals corrosion test known as the Oddy test has been widely utilized in museums for this purpose. To augment the Oddy test, an instrumental sampling approach based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectral (MS) detection has been implemented for the first time to qualitatively identify off-gassed pollutants under specific conditions. This approach is compared to other instrumental methods reported in the literature. This novel application of the EGA sampling technique yields several benefits over traditional testing, including rapidity, high sensitivity, and broad detectability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Furthermore, unlike other reported instrumental approaches, the EGA method was used to determine quantitatively the amount of VOCs emitted by acetate resins and polyurethane foams under specific conditions using both an external calibration method as well as surrogate response factors. EGA was successfully employed to rapidly characterize emissions from 12 types of common plastics. This analysis is advocated as a rapid pre-screening method to rule out poorly performing materials prior to investing time and energy in Oddy testing. The approach is also useful for rapid, routine testing of construction materials previously vetted by traditional testing, but which may experience detrimental formulation changes over time. As an example, a case study on batch re-orders of rigid expanded poly(vinyl chloride) board stock is presented.

  9. Abundances of Volatile - Bearing Species from Evolved Gas Analysis of Samples from the Rocknest Aeolian Bedform in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Franc, H. B.; Sutter, B.; McAdam, A.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) recently ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. SAM detected the evolution of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2, indicative of the presence of multiple volatile bearing species (Fig 1). The Rocknest bedform is a windblown deposit selected as representative of both the windblown material in Gale crater as well as the globally-distributed martian dust. Four samples of Rocknest material were analyzed by SAM, all from the fifth scoop taken at this location. The material delivered to SAM passed through a 150 m sieve and is assumed to have been well mixed during the sample acquisition/preparation/handoff process. SAM heated the Rocknest samples to approx.835 C at a ramp rate of 35 C/min with a He carrier gas flow rate of apprx.1.5 standard cubic centimeters per minute and at an oven pressure of 30 mbar [1]. Evolved gases were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This abstract presents the molar abundances of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2 as well as their concentration in rocknest samples using an estimated sample mass.

  10. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a computer-aided drawing of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. delta C-13 Analysis of Mars Analog Carbonates Using Evolved Gas Cavity - Ringdown Spectrometry on the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; McAdam, A. C.; ten Kate, I. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using instrumentation and techniques in development for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return (MSR). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which will fly on MSL, was developed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), together with several partners. SAM consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph CGC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which all analyze gases created by evolved gas analysis (EGA). The two sites studied represent "biotic" and "abiotic" analogs; the "biotic" site being the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, and the "abiotic" site being the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex. The data presented here represent experiments to measure the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates from these two analogs using evolved gas analysis coupled with a commercial cavity ringdown CO2 isotopic analyzer (Picarro) as a proxy for the TLS on SAM.

  12. Characterization of CO2-induced (?) bleaching phenomena in German red bed sediments by combined geochemical and evolved gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, Ulrike; Goepel, Andreas; Pudlo, Dieter; Heide, Klaus; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    We investigated varied coloured Buntsandstein and Rotliegend sandstones in Central Germany (Thuringian Vorderrhön, Altmark) by thermogravimetric/pyrolytic (DEGAS- directly coupled evolved gas analysis) and geochemical (ICP-MS/OES) means to evaluate geochemical/mineralogical characteristics of red bed rocks and their presumably altered, bleached modifications. Commonly bleaching of primary red bed sediments is regarded as a result of fluid-rock reactions by the participation of CO2. This study is performed in the framework of the special research program 'GEOTECHNOLOGIEN' (funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research - BMBF) and is part of two BMBF sponsored projects - 'COMICOR', an analogue study on potential effects of CO2-bearing fluids on Buntsandstein and Rotliegend deposits in Hesse and Thuringia and 'CLEAN', an enhanced gas recovery (EGR) pilot project in cooperation with GDF SUEZ E&P Deutschland GmbH. The intention of CLEAN is to evaluate the feasibility of EGR techniques and the suitability of depleted natural gas reservoirs for potential industrial CO2 sequestration projects. According to rock colour variations two slices of handspecimens (M49, A1) were split into 12 and 15 equally sized samples for analytical work. The medium grained Lower Buntsandstein sample M49 from Thuringia is of fluvial origin and partially bleached with transitions from red (unbleached) to light colours (bleached). Bulk rock geochemistry of red bed and bleached subsamples of M49 are almost similar, including rare earth element (REE) content. Only the content of iron and related metals is depleted in bleached samples compared to the red bed types. All PAAS normalized pattern of M49 show positive Eu and slightly negative Ce anomalies, most likely caused by the presence of apatite and illite in the rocks. The degassing behavior observed by DEGAS of M49 subsamples is mainly controlled by the breakdown of sheet silicates, hydroxides and hydrates, as well as of carbonates and

  13. Abundances and implications of volatile-bearing species from evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul Douglas; Franz, Heather B.; Sutter, Brad; Arevalo, Ricardo D.; Coll, Patrice; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; McAdam, Amy C.; McKay, Christopher P.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Niles, Paul B.; Pavlov, Alex; Squyres, Steven W.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Steele, Andrew; Wray, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity detected evolved gases during thermal analysis of soil samples from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater. Major species detected (in order of decreasing molar abundance) were H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2, all at the µmol level, with HCl, H2S, NH3, NO, and HCN present at the tens to hundreds of nmol level. We compute weight % numbers for the major gases evolved by assuming a likely source and calculate abundances between 0.5 and 3 wt.%. The evolution of these gases implies the presence of both oxidized (perchlorates) and reduced (sulfides or H-bearing) species as well as minerals formed under alkaline (carbonates) and possibly acidic (sulfates) conditions. Possible source phases in the Rocknest material are hydrated amorphous material, minor clay minerals, and hydrated perchlorate salts (all potential H2O sources), carbonates (CO2), perchlorates (O2 and HCl), and potential N-bearing materials (e.g., Martian nitrates, terrestrial or Martian nitrogenated organics, ammonium salts) that evolve NH3, NO, and/or HCN. We conclude that Rocknest materials are a physical mixture in chemical disequilibrium, consistent with aeolian mixing, and that although weathering is not extensive, it may be ongoing even under current Martian surface conditions.

  14. Evolved Gas Measurements Planned for the Lower Layers of the Gale Crater Mound with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Brunner, Anna; McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Conrad, Pamela; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The lower mound strata of Gale Crater provide a diverse set of chemical environments for exploration by the varied tools of the Curiosity Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Orbital imaging and spectroscopy clearly reveal distinct layers of hydrated minerals, sulfates, and clays with abundant evidence of a variety of fluvial processes. The three instruments of the MSL Sample Analysis at aMars (SAM) investigation, the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and the Gas Chromatograph (GC) are designed to analyze either atmospheric gases or volatiles thermally evolved or chemically extracted from powdered rock or soil. The presence or absence of organic compounds in these layers is of great interest since such an in situ search for this type of record has not been successfully implemented since the mid-60s Viking GCMS experiments. However, regardless of the outcome of the analysis for organics, the abundance and isotopic composition of thermally evolved inorganic compounds should also provide a rich data set to complement the mineralogical and elemental information provided by other MSL instruments. In addition, these evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments will help test sedimentary models proposed by Malin and Edgett (2000) and then further developed by Milliken et al (2010) for Gale Crater. In the SAM EGA experiments the evolution temperatures of H2O, CO2, SO2, O2, or other simple compounds as the samples are heated in a helium stream to 1000 C provides information on mineral types and their associations. The isotopic composition of O, H, C, and S can be precisely determined in several evolved compounds and compared with the present day atmosphere. Such SAM results might be able to test mineralogical evidence of changing sedimentary and alteration processes over an extended period of time. For example, Bibring et al (2006) have suggested such a major shift from early nonacidic to later acidic alteration. We will

  15. Evolved Gas Measurements Planned for the Lower Layers of the Gale Crater Mound with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Brunner, A.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The lower mound strata of Gale Crater provide a diverse set of chemical environments for exploration by the varied tools of the Curiosity Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Orbital imaging and spectroscopy clearly reveal distinct layers of hydrated minerals, sulfates, and clays with abundant evidence of a variety of fluvial processes. The three instruments of the MSL Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation, the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and the Gas Chromatograph (GC) are designed to analyze either atmospheric gases or volatiles thermally evolved or chemically extracted from powdered rock or soil. The presence or absence of organic compounds in these layers is of great interest since such an in situ search for this type of record has not been successfully implemented since the mid-70s Viking GCMS experiments. However, regardless of the outcome of the analysis for organics, the abundance and isotopic composition of thermally evolved inorganic compounds should also provide a rich data set to complement the mineralogical and elemental information provided by other MSL instruments. In addition, these evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments will help test sedimentary models proposed by Malin and Edgett (2000) and then further developed by Milliken et al (2010) for Gale Crater. In the SAM EGA experiments the evolution temperatures of H2O, CO2, SO2, O2, or other simple compounds as the samples are heated in a helium stream to 1000C provides information on mineral types and their associations. The isotopic composition of O, H, C, and S can be precisely determined in several evolved compounds and compared with the present day atmosphere. Such SAM results might be able to test mineralogical evidence of changing sedimentary and alteration processes over an extended period of time. For example, Bibring et al (2006) have suggested such a major shift from early nonacidic to later acidic alteration. We will

  16. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of

  17. Nanophase Carbonates on Mars: Does Evolved Gas Analysis of Nanophase Carbonates Reveal a Large Organic Carbon Budget in Near-surface Martian Materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA), which involves heating a sample and monitoring the gases released, has been performed on Mars by the Viking gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instruments, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix lander, and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. All of these instruments detected CO2 released during sample analysis at abundances of ~0.1 to 5 wt% assuming a carbonate source. The source of the CO2 can be constrained by evaluating the temperature of the gas release, a capability of both the TEGA and SAM instruments. The samples analyzed by SAM show that the majority of the CO2is released below 400 °C, much lower than traditional carbonate decomposition temperatures which can be as low as 400 °C for some siderites, with magnesites and calcites decomposing at even higher temperatures. In addition to mineralogy, decomposition temperature can depend on particle size (among other factors). If carbonates formed on Mars under low temperature and relative humidity conditions, the resulting small particle size (nanophase) carbonates could have low decomposition temperatures. We have found that calcite can be synthesized by exposing CaO to water vapor and CO2 and that the resulting mineral has an EGA peak of ~550 °C for CO2, which is about 200 °C lower than for other calcites. Work is ongoing to produce Fe and Mg-bearing carbonates using the same process. Current results suggest that nanophase calcium carbonates cannot explain the CO2 released from martian samples. If the decomposition temperatures of Mg and Fe-bearing nanophase carbonates are not significantly lower than 400 °C, other candidate sources include oxalates and carboxylated organic molecules. If present, the abundance of organic carbon in these samples could be > 0.1 wt % (1000s of ppm), a signficant departure from the paradigm of the organic-poor Mars based on Viking results.

  18. Nanophase Carbonates on Mars: Does Evolved Gas Analysis of Nanophase Carbonates Reveal a Large Organic Carbon Budget in Near-Surface Martian Materials?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Niles, Paul B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Sutter, Brad; Eigenbrode, Jen

    2015-01-01

    Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA), which involves heating a sample and monitoring the gases released, has been performed on Mars by the Viking gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instruments, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix lander, and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. All of these instruments detected CO2 released during sample analysis at abundances of approx. 0.1 to 5 wt% assuming a carbonate source. The source of the CO2 can be constrained by evaluating the temperature of the gas release, a capability of both the TEGA and SAM instruments. The samples analyzed by SAM show that the majority of the CO2 is released below 400C, much lower than traditional carbonate decomposition temperatures which can be as low as 400C for some siderites, with magnesites and calcites decomposing at even higher temperatures. In addition to mineralogy, decomposition temperature can depend on particle size (among other factors). If carbonates formed on Mars under low temperature and relative humidity conditions, the resulting small particle size (nanophase) carbonates could have low decomposition temperatures. We have found that calcite can be synthesized by exposing CaO to water vapor and CO2 and that the resulting mineral has an EGA peak of approx. 550C for CO2, which is about 200C lower than for other calcites. Work is ongoing to produce Fe and Mg-bearing carbonates using the same process. Current results suggest that nanophase calcium carbonates cannot explain the CO2 released from martian samples. If the decomposition temperatures of Mg and Fe-bearing nanophase carbonates are not significantly lower than 400C, other candidate sources include oxalates and carboxylated organic molecules. If present, the abundance of organic carbon in these samples could be greater than 0.1 wt % (1000s of ppm), a signficant departure from the paradigm of the organic-poor Mars based on Viking results.

  19. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis (TEGA) of hyperarid soils doped with microorganisms from the Atacama Desert in southern Peru (Pampas de la Joya): Implications for the Phoenix Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chris

    TEGA is one of several instruments on board of the Phoenix Lander that will perform differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis of soil samples and ice, collected from the surface and subsurface at a northern landing site on Mars. TEGA is a combination of a high-temperature furnace and a mass spectrometer that will be use to analyze samples delivered to instrument via a robotic arm. The samples will be heated at a programmed ramp rate up to 1000° C and the power required for heating will be carefully and continuously monitored (scanning calorimetry). The evolved gases generated during the process will be analyzed with the evolved-gas analyzer (a magnetic sector mass spectrometer) in order to determine the composition of gases released as a function of temperature. Our laboratory has developed a sample characterization method using a pyrolizer integrated to a quadrupole mass spectrometer to support the interpretations of TEGA data. Here we examine the thermal and evolved gas properties of six types of hyperarid soils from the Pampas de La Joya southern Peru, a possible analog to Mars, which has been previously enriched with microorganisms (Salmonella thypimurium, Micrococcus luteus, and Candida albicans) to investigate the effect of soil matrix over TEGA response. Between 20 to 40 mg of soil pre-treated to 500° C for 24 hours to remove traces of organics, was mixed with or without 5mg biomass lyophilized (dry weight). Additionally 20 mg of each one microorganism were analyzed. The samples were placed in the pyrolizer that reached 1200° C at 1 hour. The volatiles released were transferred to the MS using helium as a carrier gas. The quadrupole MS was ran in scan mode from 40-350m/z. As expected, there were significant differences in the evolved gas behaviors for microorganism samples with or without a soil matrix under similar heating conditions. In addition, samples belonging to the most arid environments had significant differences compared with

  20. Thermally evolved gas analysis (TEGA) of hyperarid soils doped with microorganisms from the Atacama Desert in southern Peru: Implications for the Phoenix mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-González, Rafael; McKay, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    TEGA, one of several instruments on board of the Phoenix Lander, performed differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis of soil samples and ice, collected from the surface and subsurface at a northern landing site on Mars. TEGA is a combination of a high temperature furnace and a mass spectrometer (MS) that was used to analyze samples delivered to the instrument via a robotic arm. The samples were heated at a programmed ramp rate up to 1000 °C. The power required for heating can be carefully and continuously monitored (scanning calorimetry). The evolved gases generated during the process can be analyzed with the evolved gas analyzer (a magnetic sector mass spectrometer) in order to determine the composition of gases released as a function of temperature. Our laboratory has developed a sample characterization method using a pyrolyzer integrated to a quadrupole mass spectrometer to support the interpretations of TEGA data. Here we examine the evolved gas properties of six types of hyperarid soils from the Pampas de La Joya in southern Peru (a possible analog to Mars), to which we have added with microorganisms ( Salmonella typhimurium, Micrococcus luteus, and Candida albicans) in order to investigate the effect of the soil matrix on the TEGA response. Between 20 and 40 mg of soil, with or without ˜5 mg of lyophilized microorganism biomass (dry weight), were placed in the pyrolyzer and heated from room temperature to 1200 °C in 1 h at a heating rate of 20 °C/min. The volatiles released were transferred to a MS using helium as a carrier gas. The quadrupole MS was ran in scan mode from 10 to 200 m/z. In addition, ˜20 mg of each microorganism without a soil matrix were analyzed. As expected, there were significant differences in the gases released from microorganism samples with or without a soil matrix, under similar heating conditions. Furthermore, samples from the most arid environments had significant differences compared with less arid soils

  1. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  2. Evolved Gas Analysis and X-Ray Diffraction of Carbonate Samples from the 2009 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition: Implications for Mineralogical Inferences from the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated several geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return (MSR). AMASE-related research comprises both analyses conducted during the expedition and further analyses of collected samples using laboratory facilities at a variety of institutions. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which will be part of the Analytical Laboratory on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). An Evolved Gas Analysis Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) was used during AMASE to represent part of the capabilities of SAM. The other instrument included in the MSL Analytical Laboratory is CheMin, which uses X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during the AMASE 2009. Here, we discuss the preliminary interpretation of EGA and XRD analyses of selected AMASE carbonate samples and implications for mineralogical interpretations from MSL. Though CheMin will be the primary mineralogical tool on MSL, SAM EGA could be used to support XRD identifications or indicate the presence of volatile-bearing minerals which may be near or below XRD detection limits. Data collected with instruments in the field and in comparable laboratory setups (e.g., the SAM breadboard) will be discussed.

  3. Evolved Gas Analysis of Mars Analog Samples from the Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition: Implications for Analyses by the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffey, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T.; Steele, A.; Amundsen, H. E. F.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated several geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-QMS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2011 sites spanned a range of environments relevant to understanding martian surface materials, processes and habitability. They included the basaltic Sverrefjell volcano, which hosts carbonate globules, cements and coatings, carbonate and sulfate units at Colletth0gda, Devonian sandstone redbeds in Bockfjorden, altered basaltic lava delta deposits at Mt. Scott Keltie, and altered dolerites and volcanics at Botniahalvoya. Here we focus on SAM-like EGA-MS of a subset of the samples, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results allow insight into sample organic content as well as some constraints on sample mineralogy.

  4. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  5. SAM-like Evolved Gas Analysis of Mars Analog Samples from the Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition: Implications for Analyses by the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Bristow, T.; Steele, A.; Amundsen, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expeditions (AMASE) have investigated a range of geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques being developed for Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-QMS) system represented the EGA-QMS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. Here we discuss the SAM-like EGA-QMS analyses of a selected subset of samples acquired during several field seasons, together with AMASE CheMin team results. The results enable insight into organic content, organic-mineral associations, and mineralogy. Organic materials evolved from all samples over a range of temperatures. In general, this can indicate that the organics have a range of thermal maturity and/or are bound in different ways to their matrix. Most often, organics that were outside of mineral grains were the dominant pool of organic material inferable from the EGA-QMS, but organics encapsulated within mineral grains, including possibly methane, were also inferred. Organic-mineral associations can influence organic preservation potential and detection. Constraints on these associations, and overall sample organic chemistry, enabled by our SAM-like EGA-QMS analog analyses demonstrate the potential to understand the organic chemical characteristics in materials sampled by MSL, even when utilizing EGA-QMS, the simplest type of solid sample experiment SAM will perform. Any organic chemical information inferred from EGA-QMS analysis could then also be followed by detailed SAM EGA

  6. Field Characterization of the Mineralogy and Organic Chemistry of Carbonates from the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition by Evolved Gas Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] instrument suite, which will be on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser mass spectrometer (TLS); all will be applied to analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-MS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples [e.g., 2]. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2010 focused on two sites that represented biotic and abiotic analogs. The abiotic site was the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex, which contains Mars-analog carbonate cements including carbonate globules which are excellent analogs for the globules in the ALH84001 martian meteorite [e.g., 3, 4]. The biotic site was the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, which featured carbonates precipitated in a methane-supported chemosynthetic community [5]. This contribution focuses on EGA-MS analyses of samples from each site, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results give insight into organic content and organic-mineral associations, as well as some constraints on the minerals present.

  7. Phoenix Mars Mission--the thermal evolved gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, John H; Chaney, Roy C; Hammack, Hilton

    2008-10-01

    The Phoenix spacecraft that was launched to Mars in August 2007 landed safely on the Martian northern arctic region on May 25, 2008. It carried six experiments to study the history of water on the planet and search for organic molecules in the icy subsurface Martian soil. The spacecraft is a lander with an arm and scoop designed to dig a trench though the top soil to reach an expected ice layer near the surface. One of the instruments on board is the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA), which consists of two components, a set of eight very small ovens that will heat samples of the ice soil mixtures from the trench to release imbedded gases and mineral decomposition products, and a mass spectrometer that serves as the analysis tool for the evolved gases, and also for measurements of the composition and isotopic ratios of the gases that comprise the atmosphere of Mars. The mass spectrometer is a miniature magnetic sector instrument controlled by microprocessor-driven power supplies. One feature is the gas enrichment cell that will increase the partial pressures of the noble gases in an atmosphere sample by removing all the active gases, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, to improve the accuracy of their isotopic ratio measurements.

  8. Intercomparison between a single particle soot photometer and evolved gas analysis in an industrial area in Japan: Implications for the consistency of soot aerosol mass concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, T.; Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Taketani, F.; Pan, X.; Irwin, M.; Symonds, J.

    2016-02-01

    Mass concentrations of soot (typically comprising black and elemental carbon; BC and EC, respectively) aerosols, were measured at Yokosuka city, an industrial region in Japan in the early summer of 2014. The results of laser-induced incandescence (LII) and evolved gas analysis (EGA) techniques were compared using a single particle soot photometer (SP2) and semi-continuous elemental/organic carbon analyzer (EC/OC analyzer), respectively. We revisited the procedure of SP2 calibration with a focus on investigating the relationship between LII intensity (SLII) and refractory BC (rBC) mass per particle (mPP) for some BC-proxies in the laboratory, as well as for ambient rBC particles in order to discuss the uncertainty of the SP2. It was found that the mPP-SLII for the fullerene soot and carbon black particles agreed well within 3% and 10%, respectively, with that for ambient rBC particles. This is the first time to suggest the use of carbon black as a reference material. We also found that the mPP-SLII for the aqueous deflocculated Acheson graphite particles with the correction factor given by Baumgardner et al. (2012) was still biased by around +20% to that for ambient rBC particles. EC quantified by the semi-continuous EC/OC analyzer using a thermal-protocol similar to that of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE-like), systematically showed higher concentrations than rBC measured by the SP2. The uncertainties related to SP2 cannot fully account for this difference. This result was likely caused by the contribution of charred organic materials to EC, which can be affected significantly by thermal-protocols for the EGA. The consistency and differences between rBC and EC are discussed with regard to comparing their respective mass concentrations.

  9. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyses at Reduced Pressures: A Mineral Database for the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Lin, I.-C.; Morris, R. V.; Boynton, W. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) may be important phases on the surface of Mars. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was part of the Mars Polar Lander payload, was to detect and identify volatile-bearing phases in the Martian regolith. The TEGA instrument is composed of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) interfaced with an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). The EGA consists of a Herriott cell of a tunable-diode laser (TDL) spectrometer that determines CO, and H2O abundances. The sample chamber in TEGA operates at about 100 mbar (-76 torr) with a N2 carrier gas flow of 0.4 sccm. Essentially no information exists on the effects of reduced pressure on the thermal properties of volatile-bearing minerals. Here we present a database for the thermal behavior of volatile-bearing phases under reduced pressure conditions.

  10. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-08-10

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  11. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH - MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; PIERCE DA; POKORNY R; HRMA PR

    2012-02-07

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  12. In situ evolved gas analysis assisted thermogravimetric (TG-FTIR and TG/DTA–MS) studies on non-activated copper benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Domán, Andrea; Madarász, János; László, Krisztina

    2017-01-01

    The results of a complete thermogravimetric study of copper benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (Cu-BTC or HKUST-1) are reported here together with mass spectrometry (MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses of the evolved gases up to 800 °C. Oxidative and inert conditions were applied to reveal the stoichiometry of the as-received synthesis product. In spite of using a water-ethanol mixture during the synthesis and the filtration, only water is retained in the pores. It is proposed that the thermolytic release of ethanol in the temperature range 150–250 °C originates from ethanol-benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (BTC) esters situated on the surface of the HKUST-1 crystal, and which limit the size of the developing crystals during the synthesis.

  13. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.; Wilhelm, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of <150 µm fines from five sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN") and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  14. Analysis of an evolving email network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chaopin; Kuh, Anthony; Wang, Juan; de Wilde, Philippe

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we study an evolving email network model first introduced by Wang and De Wilde, to the best of our knowledge. The model is analyzed by formulating the network topology as a random process and studying the dynamics of the process. Our analytical results show a number of steady state properties about the email traffic between different nodes and the aggregate networking behavior (i.e., degree distribution, clustering coefficient, average path length, and phase transition), and also confirm the empirical results obtained by Wang and De Wilde. We also conducted simulations confirming the analytical results. Extensive simulations were run to evaluate email traffic behavior at the link and network levels, phase transition phenomena, and also studying the behavior of email traffic in a hierarchical network. The methods established here are also applicable to many other practical networks including sensor networks and social networks.

  15. Insights into the Sulfur Mineralogy of Martian Soil at Rocknest, Gale Crater, Enabled by Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Archer, P., Jr.; Freissinet, C.; Sutter, B.; Glavin, D.; Eigenbrode, J.; Bower, H.; Stern, J.; Mchaffy, P.; Morris, R.; Ming, D.; Rampe, E.; Brunner, A.; Steele, A.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Wray, J.; Grotzinger, J.

    2013-01-01

    The first solid samples analysed by the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) consisted of < 150 m fines sieved from aeolian bedform material at a site named Rocknest. All four samples of this material analyzed by SAM s evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) released H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2 (Fig. 1), as well as H2S and possibly NO. This is the first time evolved SO2 (and evolved H2S) has been detected from thermal analysis of martian materials. The identity of these evolved gases and temperature (T) of evolution can support mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Constraints on phases responsible for evolved CO2 and O2 are detailed elsewhere [1,2,3]. Here, we focus on potential constraints on phases that evolved SO2, H2S, and H2O during thermal analysis.

  16. Early Evolved Gas Results from the Curiosity Rover’s SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Stern, J.; SAM Science Team; MSL Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to explore the habitability of the selected landing site at Gale crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite contributes to this study with a search for organic compounds, an analysis of the composition of inorganic volatiles, and measurements of the isotopic composition light elements. Both atmospheric and solid samples are analyzed. The layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater are important targets for the MSL mission. However, in situ measurements made during the past year of interesting regions close to the Bradbury landing site have revealed a diverse geology and several primary mission objectives have already been realized. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. The MSL cameras, a laser induced breakdown spectrometer, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD instrument CheMin. SAM integrates a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) with a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. Results of SAM atmospheric composition analyses have already been reported (1,2). To date, multiple SAM evolved gas experiments have examined samples from fines scooped from an aeolian drift and from two drilled samples of a mudstone. Major evolved gases are H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, H2S, H2, and a number of minor species. These data help confirm the likely presence of perchlorates, the presence of phylosillicates, and both reduced and oxidized compounds evolved from the same sample. 1) P.R. Mahaffy et al., Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover, Science 343, (2013). 2) C.R. Webster et al., Isotope Ratios of H, C and O in Martian Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Water Measured by the

  17. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M [Peralta, NM

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  18. MSL SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Si-rich Amorphous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Knudson, Christine; Sutter, Brad; Andrejkovicova, Slavka; Archer, P. Douglas; Franz, Heather; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Morris, Richard; Ming, Douglas; Sun, Vivian; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical analyses of several samples from Murray Formation mudstones and Stimson Formation sandstones by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) revealed the presence of Si-rich amorphous or poorly ordered materials. It is possible to identify the presence of high-SiO2 vs. lower SiO2 amorphous materials (e.g., basaltic glasses), based on the position of the resulting wide diffraction features in XRD patterns from the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument, but it is not possible to distinguish between several candidate high-SiO2 amorphous materials such as opal-A or rhyolitic glass. In the Buckskin (BS) sample from the upper Murray Formation, and the Big Sky (BY) and Greenhorn (GH) samples from the Stimson Formation, analyses by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument showed very broad H2O evolutions during sample heating at temperatures >450-500degC which had not been observed from previous samples. BS also had a significant broad evolution <450-500degC. We have undertaken a laboratory study targeted at understanding if the data from SAM can be used to place constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases. SAM-like evolved gas analyses have been performed on several opal and rhyolitic glass samples. Opal-A samples exhibited wide <500degC H2O evolutions, with lesser H2O evolved above 500degC. H2O evolution traces from rhyolitic glasses varied, having either two broad H2O peaks, <300degC and >500degC, or a broad peak centered around 400degC. For samples that produced two evolutions, the lower temperature peak is more intense than the higher temperature peak, a trend also exhibited by opal-A. This trend is consistent with data from BS, but does not seem consistent with data from BY and GH which evolved most of their H2O >500degC. It may be that dehydration of opal-A and/or rhyolitic glass can result in some preferential loss of lower temperature H2O, to produce traces that more closely resemble BY and GH. This is currently under investigation

  19. Summary of Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Hoffman, J.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect evolved volatiles and organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS) that can detect masses in the 2 to 140 dalton range [1]. Five Martian soils were individually heated to 1000 C in the DSC ovens where evolved gases from mineral decompostion products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil.

  20. Reduced and Oxidized Sulfur Compounds Detected by Evolved Gas Analyses of Materials from Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Brunner, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Steele, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate minerals have been directly detected or strongly inferred from several Mars datasets and indicate that aqueous alteration of martian surface materials has occurred. Indications of reduced sulfur phases (e.g., sulfides) from orbital and in situ investigations of martian materials have been fewer in number, but these phases are observed in martian meteorites and are likely because they are common minor phases in basaltic rocks. Here we discuss potential sources for the S-bearing compounds detected by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument’s evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments.

  1. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V [Berkeley, CA; Goldstein, Allen H [Orinda, CA

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  2. Isotopic and Geochemical Investigation of Two Distinct Mars Analog Environments Using Evolved Gas Techniques in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer Claire; Mcadam, Amy Catherine; Ten Kate, Inge L.; Bish, David L.; Blake, David F.; Morris, Richard V.; Bowden, Roxane; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans E. F.

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques to be deployed on Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). AMASErelated research comprises both analyses conducted during the expedition and further analyses of collected samples using laboratory facilities at a variety of institutions. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL includes pyrolysis ovens, a gas-processing manifold, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), several gas chromatography columns, and a Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). An integral part of SAM development is the deployment of SAM-like instrumentation in the field. During AMASE 2010, two parts of SAM participated as stand-alone instruments. A Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis- Mass Spectrometer (EGA-QMS) system represented the EGA-QMS component of SAM, and a Picarro Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (EGA-CRDS), represented the EGA-TLS component of SAM. A field analog of CheMin, the XRD/XRF on MSL, was also deployed as part of this field campaign. Carbon isotopic measurements of CO2 evolved during thermal decomposition of carbonates were used together with EGA-QMS geochemical data, mineral composition information and contextual observations made during sample collection to distinguish carbonates formation associated with chemosynthetic activity at a fossil methane seep from abiotic processes forming carbonates associated with subglacial basaltic eruptions. Carbon and oxygen isotopes of the basalt-hosted carbonates suggest cryogenic carbonate formation, though more research is necessary to clarify the history of these rocks.

  3. Robotic Arm Camera Image of the South Side of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (Door TA4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is shown with one set of oven doors open and dirt from a sample delivery. After the 'seventh shake' of TEGA, a portion of the dirt sample entered the oven via a screen for analysis. This image was taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or 18th Martian day of the mission.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer: Differential Scanning Calorimeter and Mass Spectrometer Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Scout Phoenix lander will land in the north polar region of Mars in May, 2008. One objective of the Phoenix lander is to search for evidence of past life in the form of molecular organics that may be preserved in the subsurface soil. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was developed to detect these organics by coupling a simultaneous differential thermal analyzer (SDTA) with a mass spectrometer. Martian soil will be heated to approx.1000 C and potential organic decomposition products such as CO2, CH4 etc. will be examined for with the MS. TEGA s SDTA will also assess the presence of endothermic and exothermic reactions that are characteristic of soil organics and minerals as the soil is heated. The MS in addition to detecting organic decompositon products, will also assess the levels of soil inorganic volatiles such as H2O, SO2, and CO2. Organic detection has a high priority for this mission; however, TEGA has the ability to provide valuable insight into the mineralogical composition of the soil. The overall goal of this work is to develop a TEGA database of minerals that will serve as a reference for the interpretation of Phoenix-TEGA. Previous databases for the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander (MPL)-TEGA instrument only went to 725 C. Furthermore, the MPL-TEGA could only detect CO2 and H2O while the Phoenix-TEGA MS can examine up to 144 atomic mass units. The higher temperature Phoenix-TEGA SDTA coupled with the more capable MS indicates that a higher temperature database is required for TEGA interpretation. The overall goal of this work is to develop a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) database of minerals along with corresponding MS data of evolved gases that can used to interpret TEGA data during and after mission operations. While SDTA and DSC measurement techniques are slightly different (SDTA does not use a reference pan), the results are fundamentally similar and thus DSC is a useful technique in providing comparative data for the TEGA

  5. The Search for Water and Other Volatiles in Martian Surface Materials: The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Bailey, S. H.; Bode, R. C.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Ward, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.; Pathare, A. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals and phases (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, sulfates, palagonites, glasses) may be important components of the Martian regolith. However, essentially no information exists on the mineralogical composition of volatile-bearing phases in the regolith. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was part of the Mars Polar Lander payload, was to determine the abundances of two of the most important volatile compounds (i.e., water and carbon dioxide) in the martian soil and to identify the minerals or phases that harbor these volatiles. The TEGA instrument was composed of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) interfaced with evolved gas analysis (EGA). The EGA consisted of a Herriott cell of a tunable-diode laser (TDL) spectrometer that determines CO2 and H2O abundances. The sample chamber was to operate at about 100 mbar (-76 torr) with a N2 carrier gas flow of 0.4 sccm. Specifications of TEGA are described in detail elsewhere in this volume.

  6. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  7. A Change Impact Analysis to Characterize Evolving Program Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha Shyam; Person, Suzette; Branchaud, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Change impact analysis techniques estimate the potential effects of changes made to software. Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution (DiSE) is an intraprocedural technique for characterizing the impact of software changes on program behaviors. DiSE first estimates the impact of the changes on the source code using program slicing techniques, and then uses the impact sets to guide symbolic execution to generate path conditions that characterize impacted program behaviors. DiSE, however, cannot reason about the flow of impact between methods and will fail to generate path conditions for certain impacted program behaviors. In this work, we present iDiSE, an extension to DiSE that performs an interprocedural analysis. iDiSE combines static and dynamic calling context information to efficiently generate impacted program behaviors across calling contexts. Information about impacted program behaviors is useful for testing, verification, and debugging of evolving programs. We present a case-study of our implementation of the iDiSE algorithm to demonstrate its efficiency at computing impacted program behaviors. Traditional notions of coverage are insufficient for characterizing the testing efforts used to validate evolving program behaviors because they do not take into account the impact of changes to the code. In this work we present novel definitions of impacted coverage metrics that are useful for evaluating the testing effort required to test evolving programs. We then describe how the notions of impacted coverage can be used to configure techniques such as DiSE and iDiSE in order to support regression testing related tasks. We also discuss how DiSE and iDiSE can be configured for debugging finding the root cause of errors introduced by changes made to the code. In our empirical evaluation we demonstrate that the configurations of DiSE and iDiSE can be used to support various software maintenance tasks

  8. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  9. Equation-free analysis of a dynamically evolving multigraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holiday, A.; Kevrekidis, I. G.

    2016-09-01

    In order to illustrate the adaptation of traditional continuum numerical techniques to the study of complex network systems, we use the equation-free framework to analyze a dynamically evolving multigraph. This approach is based on coupling short intervals of direct dynamic network simulation with appropriately-defined lifting and restriction operators, mapping the detailed network description to suitable macroscopic (coarse-grained) variables and back. This enables the acceleration of direct simulations through Coarse Projective Integration (CPI), as well as the identification of coarse stationary states via a Newton-GMRES method. We also demonstrate the use of data-mining, both linear (principal component analysis, PCA) and nonlinear (diffusion maps, DMAPS) to determine good macroscopic variables (observables) through which one can coarse-grain the model. These results suggest methods for decreasing simulation times of dynamic real-world systems such as epidemiological network models. Additionally, the data-mining techniques could be applied to a diverse class of problems to search for a succint, low-dimensional description of the system in a small number of variables.

  10. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at <30 mbar while most calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  11. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose

  12. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Lorenz, R. D.; Bailey, S. H.; Williams, M. S.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer is an instrument in the MVACS (Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor) payload on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander. It is due to reach the layered terrain at around 70S latitude on Mars in December 1999. The instrument will heat soil samples acquired with a robotic arm to determine their volatile content with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). Instrument Objectives: The instrument aims to measure the volatile content of the martian soil at depth, specifically to determine the water and CO2 content. These greenhouse gases may be present in large quantities as ices and locked chemically in the soil, particularly at high latitudes. Understanding the martian climate history and the future resource potential of Mars requires that we measure the abundance of volatile-bearing material in the soil and the minerals with which they are associated. Secondary objectives include the identification of other minerals and the detection of oxidizing compounds in the soil. Instrument Description: The instrument comprises a set of eight thermal analyzers, each of which will be used only once. Each analyzer has two identical ovens, one for the sample and one (empty) for a reference. The DSC identifies the temperature and enthalpy of phase transitions by carefully determining the difference in the energy required to heat the reference and sample ovens at a controlled rate. The DSC digitally controls the duty cycle of the power to the ovens to maintain each of them at the programmed ramp temperature. The output of the DSC is simply the difference in power required by the two ovens. The EGA analyzes the evolved gases as the ovens are heated to provide knowledge of correlated gas release associated with the phase transitions. The correlated gas release will aid in the identification of the phase responsible for the phase transition. The EGA will determine water and CO, contents via a high-resolution tunable diode laser

  13. Evaluation of fast disintegrants in terfenadine tablets containing a gas-evolving disintegrant.

    PubMed

    Sallam, E; Ibrahim, H; Dahab, R A; Shubair, M; Khalil, E

    1998-06-01

    Effects of four fast disintegrants on the dissolution of terfenadine tablets containing the gas-evolving disintegrant, CaCO3, were evaluated. In addition, effects of presence of starch along with the fast disintegrants on the dissolution of the tablets were examined. Dissolution data were treated to give dissolution parameters which reflected efficiency of the disintegrant combinations. The four fast disintegrants improved disintegration/dissolution of the original formulation. The relative efficiency of improvement was in the order crospovidone > Ac-Di-Sol > Primojel > low substituted hydroxypropylcellulose. The presence of starch advertently affected the role of the fast disintegrants. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that starch covered the drug-containing granules and other particles of the tablet. pH changes during dissolution of representative tablets in 0.1 N HCl solutions were determined at specific time intervals. The progressive decrease in rates of acid consumption as a function of the amount of starch, along with the SEM studies, suggested that a barrier existed around the tablet particles. The barrier was generated by the swelled starch grains and was responsible for the loss of the dissolution-improving capacity of the fast disintegrants. Furthermore, the barrier interfered with the diffusion of the hydronium ions and therefore, impaired the function of the disintegrant combination.

  14. Metadata Evaluation and Improvement: Evolving Analysis and Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermann, Ted; Kozimor, John; Gordon, Sean

    2017-01-01

    ESIP Community members create and manage a large collection of environmental datasets that span multiple decades, the entire globe, and many parts of the solar system. Metadata are critical for discovering, accessing, using and understanding these data effectively and ESIP community members have successfully created large collections of metadata describing these data. As part of the White House Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI), ESDIS has developed a suite of tools for evaluating these metadata in native dialects with respect to recommendations from many organizations. We will describe those tools and demonstrate evolving techniques for sharing results with data providers.

  15. An analysis of why highly similar enzymes evolve differently.

    PubMed Central

    Majiduddin, Fahd K; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    The TEM-1 and SHV-1 beta-lactamases are important contributors to resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes share 68% amino acid sequence identity and their atomic structures are nearly superimposable. Extended-spectrum cephalosporins were introduced to avoid the action of these beta-lactamases. The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of variant TEM and SHV enzymes that can hydrolyze extended-spectrum antibiotics. Despite being highly similar in structure, the TEM and SHV enzymes have evolved differently in response to the selective pressure of antibiotic therapy. Examples of this are at residues Arg164 and Asp179. Among TEM variants, substitutions are found only at position 164, while among SHV variants, substitutions are found only at position 179. To explain this observation, the effects of substitutions at position 164 in both TEM-1 and SHV-1 on antibiotic resistance and on enzyme catalytic efficiency were examined. Competition experiments were performed between mutants to understand why certain substitutions preferentially evolve in response to the selective pressure of antibiotic therapy. The data presented here indicate that substitutions at position Asp179 in SHV-1 and Arg164 in TEM-1 are more beneficial to bacteria because they provide increased fitness relative to either wild type or other mutants. PMID:12618385

  16. Structural Analysis of an Evolved Transketolase Reveals Divergent Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    Affaticati, Pierre E.; Dai, Shao-Bo; Payongsri, Panwajee; Hailes, Helen C.; Tittmann, Kai; Dalby, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The S385Y/D469T/R520Q variant of E. coli transketolase was evolved previously with three successive smart libraries, each guided by different structural, bioinformatical or computational methods. Substrate-walking progressively shifted the target acceptor substrate from phosphorylated aldehydes, towards a non-phosphorylated polar aldehyde, a non-polar aliphatic aldehyde, and finally a non-polar aromatic aldehyde. Kinetic evaluations on three benzaldehyde derivatives, suggested that their active-site binding was differentially sensitive to the S385Y mutation. Docking into mutants generated in silico from the wild-type crystal structure was not wholly satisfactory, as errors accumulated with successive mutations, and hampered further smart-library designs. Here we report the crystal structure of the S385Y/D469T/R520Q variant, and molecular docking of three substrates. This now supports our original hypothesis that directed-evolution had generated an evolutionary intermediate with divergent binding modes for the three aromatic aldehydes tested. The new active site contained two binding pockets supporting π-π stacking interactions, sterically separated by the D469T mutation. While 3-formylbenzoic acid (3-FBA) preferred one pocket, and 4-FBA the other, the less well-accepted substrate 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde (3-HBA) was caught in limbo with equal preference for the two pockets. This work highlights the value of obtaining crystal structures of evolved enzyme variants, for continued and reliable use of smart library strategies. PMID:27767080

  17. Water resources and shale gas/oil production in the Appalachian Basin: critical issues and evolving developments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.; Williams, John H.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional natural gas and oil resources in the United States are important components of a national energy program. While the Nation seeks greater energy independence and greener sources of energy, Federal agencies with environmental responsibilities, state and local regulators and water-resource agencies, and citizens throughout areas of unconventional shale gas development have concerns about the environmental effects of high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF), including those in the Appalachian Basin in the northeastern United States (fig. 1). Environmental concerns posing critical challenges include the availability and use of surface water and groundwater for hydraulic fracturing; the migration of stray gas and potential effects on overlying aquifers; the potential for flowback, formation fluids, and other wastes to contaminate surface water and groundwater; and the effects from drill pads, roads, and pipeline infrastructure on land disturbance in small watersheds and headwater streams (U.S. Government Printing Office, 2012). Federal, state, regional and local agencies, along with the gas industry, are striving to use the best science and technology to develop these unconventional resources in an environmentally safe manner. Some of these concerns were addressed in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheet 2009–3032 (Soeder and Kappel, 2009) about potential critical effects on water resources associated with the development of gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale of the Hamilton Group (Ver Straeten and others, 1994). Since that time, (1) the extraction process has evolved, (2) environmental awareness related to high-volume hydraulic fracturing process has increased, (3) state regulations concerning gas well drilling have been modified, and (4) the practices used by industry to obtain, transport, recover, treat, recycle, and ultimately dispose of the spent fluids and solid waste materials have evolved. This report updates and expands on Fact Sheet 2009

  18. Vulnerabilities—bibliometric analysis and literature review of evolving concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giupponi, Carlo; Biscaro, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    In this work we analyse the evolution of the vulnerability concept in the research streams of climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk reduction (DRR). We combine a traditional literature review with data mining procedures applied to bibliographic databases to reconstruct the history of the concept within various research topics, showing its evolution and convergences over time. To do that, we integrate different methods combining machine learning algorithms with network and cluster analyses to examine a set of 3757 articles, analysing their distinctive features and similarities on the basis of their contents as well as co-authorships. Bibliometric analyses enable the identification of different communities of articles, pinpointing key papers and authors, while literature review makes it possible to assess the concept of vulnerability evolved within and beyond research communities and scientific networks. Moreover, this work examines the role played by documents published by UN institutions (UNDRO, UNISDR, IPCC) in contributing to the evolution of vulnerability and related concepts. Results show that signs of convergence are evident between the two research streams, and that the IPCC reports have played a major role in proposing solutions for unifying definitions of vulnerability. We observe that the phases of preparation of the IPCC reports are very rich in methodological and terminological developments, while after publication, the literature shows evident signs of propagation of the proposed concepts. The DRR research stream developed before the research stream on CCA, but the latter flourished rapidly and became much larger in terms of number of publications. Nevertheless, in terms of contents, adaptation studies and the IPCC have shown increasing adoption of the concepts developed within the disaster research stream, in particular with regard to the interpretation of vulnerability as one of the dimensions of risk.

  19. Electrochemistry of single nanobubbles. Estimating the critical size of bubble-forming nuclei for gas-evolving electrode reactions.

    PubMed

    German, Sean R; Edwards, Martin A; Chen, Qianjin; Liu, Yuwen; Luo, Long; White, Henry S

    2016-12-12

    In this article, we address the fundamental question: "What is the critical size of a single cluster of gas molecules that grows and becomes a stable (or continuously growing) gas bubble during gas evolving reactions?" Electrochemical reactions that produce dissolved gas molecules are ubiquitous in electrochemical technologies, e.g., water electrolysis, photoelectrochemistry, chlorine production, corrosion, and often lead to the formation of gaseous bubbles. Herein, we demonstrate that electrochemical measurements of the dissolved gas concentration, at the instant prior to nucleation of an individual nanobubble of H2, N2, or O2 at a Pt nanodisk electrode, can be analyzed using classical thermodynamic relationships (Henry's law and the Young-Laplace equation - including non-ideal corrections) to provide an estimate of the size of the gas bubble nucleus that grows into a stable bubble. We further demonstrate that this critical nucleus size is independent of the radius of the Pt nanodisk employed (<100 nm radius), and weakly dependent on the nature of the gas. For example, the measured critical surface concentration of H2 of ∼0.23 M at the instant of bubble formation corresponds to a critical H2 nucleus that has a radius of ∼3.6 nm, an internal pressure of ∼350 atm, and contains ∼1700 H2 molecules. The data are consistent with stochastic fluctuations in the density of dissolved gas, at or near the Pt/solution interface, controlling the rate of bubble nucleation. We discuss the growth of the nucleus as a diffusion-limited process and how that process is affected by proximity to an electrode producing ∼10(11) gas molecules per second. Our study demonstrates the advantages of studying a single-entity, i.e., an individual nanobubble, in understanding and quantifying complex physicochemical phenomena.

  20. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  1. SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Phyllosilicate Minerals and Applications to SAM Analyses of the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, B.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming , D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    While in Yellowknife Bay, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover collected two drilled samples, John Klein (hereafter "JK") and Cumberland ("CB"), from the Sheepbed mudstone, as well as a scooped sample from the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN"). These samples were sieved by Curiosity's sample processing system and then several subsamples of these materials were delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite and the CheMin X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument. CheMin provided the first in situ X-ray diffraction-based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., Fe-saponite) and comprise 20 wt% of the mudstone samples [1]. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry analyses of JK and CB subsamples, as well as RN subsamples, detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases evolved during pyrolysis. The identity of evolved gases and temperature( s) of evolution can augment mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or those phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here we will focus on the SAM H2O data, in the context of CheMin analyses, and comparisons to laboratory SAM-like analyses of several phyllosilicate minerals including smectites.

  2. (Ca,Mg)-Carbonate and Mg-Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site: Evaluation of the Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Data Using Laboratory Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (4.5 wt. %) was detected in the soil at the Phoenix Landing site by the Phoenix Lander s The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer [1]. TEGA operated at 12 mbar pressure, yet the detection of calcium carbonate is based on interpretations derived from thermal analysis literature of carbonates measured under ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (10(exp -3) mbar) conditions [2,3] as well as at 100 and 30 mbar [4,5] and one analysis at 12 mbar by the TEGA engineering qualification model (TEGA-EQM). Thermodynamics (Te = H/ S) dictate that pressure affects entropy ( S) which causes the temperature (Te) of mineral decomposition at one pressure to differ from Te obtained at another pressure. Thermal decomposition analyses of Fe-, Mg-, and Ca-bearing carbonates at 12 mbar is required to enhance the understanding of the TEGA results at TEGA operating pressures. The objectives of this work are to (1) evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of a suite of Fe-, Mg-, Ca-carbonate minerals at 1000 and 12 mbar and (2) discuss possible emplacement mechanisms for the Phoenix carbonate.

  3. Cyanoacetylene in IC 342: An Evolving Dense Gas Component with Starburst Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, David S.; Turner, Jean L.; Schinnerer, Eva

    2011-07-01

    We present the first images of the J = 5-4 and J = 16-15 lines of the dense gas tracer, cyanoacetylene, HC3N, in an external galaxy. The central 200 pc of the nearby star-forming spiral galaxy, IC 342, was mapped using the Very Large Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. HC3N(5-4) line emission is found across the nuclear mini-spiral, but is very weak toward the starburst site, the location of the strongest mid-IR and radio emission. The J = 16-15 and 10-9 lines are also faint near the large H II region complex, but are brighter relative to the 5-4 line, consistent with higher excitation. The brightest HC3N emission is located in the northern arm of the nuclear mini-spiral, 100 pc away from the radio/IR source to the southwest of the nucleus. This location appears less affected by ultraviolet radiation and may represent a more embedded, earlier stage of star formation. HC3N excitation temperatures are consistent with those determined from C18O; the gas is dense 104 - 105 cm-3 and cool, Tk < 40 K. So as to not violate limits on the total H2 mass determined from C18O, at least two dense components are required to model IC 342's giant molecular clouds. These observations suggest that HC3N(5-4) is an excellent probe of the dense, quiescent gas in galaxies. The high excitation combined with faint emission toward the dense molecular gas at the starburst indicates that it currently lacks large masses of very dense gas. We propose a scenario where the starburst is being caught in the act of dispersing or destroying its dense gas in the presence of the large H II region. This explains the high star formation efficiency seen in the dense component. The little remaining dense gas appears to be in pressure equilibrium with the starburst H II region. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  4. Architectural Analysis of Complex Evolving Systems of Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Stratton, William C.; Sibol, Deane E.; Ray, Arnab; Ackemann, Chris; Yonkwa, Lyly; Ganesan, Dharma

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this collaborative project between FC-MD, APL, and GSFC and supported by NASA IV&V Software Assurance Research Program (SARP), was to develop a tool, Dynamic SAVE, or Dyn-SAVE for short, for analyzing architectures of systems of systems. The project team was comprised of the principal investigator (PI) from FC-MD and four other FC-MD scientists (part time) and several FC-MD students (full time), as well as, two APL software architects (part time), and one NASA POC (part time). The PI and FC-MD scientists together with APL architects were responsible for requirements analysis, and for applying and evaluating the Dyn-SAVE tool and method. The PI and a group of FC-MD scientists were responsible for improving the method and conducting outreach activities, while another group of FC-MD scientists were responsible for development and improvement of the tool. Oversight and reporting was conducted by the PI and NASA POC. The project team produced many results including several prototypes of the Dyn-SAVE tool and method, several case studies documenting how the tool and method was applied to APL s software systems, and several published papers in highly respected conferences and journals. Dyn-SAVE as developed and enhanced throughout this research period, is a software tool intended for software developers and architects, software integration testers, and persons who need to analyze software systems from the point of view of how it communicates with other systems. Using the tool, the user specifies the planned communication behavior of the system modeled as a sequence diagram. The user then captures and imports the actual communication behavior of the system, which is then converted and visualized as a sequence diagram by Dyn-SAVE. After mapping the planned to the actual and specifying parameter and timing constraints, Dyn-SAVE detects and highlights deviations between the planned and the actual behavior. Requirements based on the need to analyze two inter

  5. Evolving shale gas management: water resource risks, impacts, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Brian G; Riha, Susan J

    2014-05-01

    Unconventional shale gas development promises to significantly alter energy portfolios and economies around the world. It also poses a variety of environmental risks, particularly with respect to the management of water resources. We review current scientific understanding of risks associated with the following: water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing; wastewater treatment, discharge and disposal; methane and fluid migration in the subsurface; and spills and erosion at the surface. Some of these risks are relatively unique to shale gas development, while others are variations of risks that we already face from a variety of industries and activities. All of these risks depend largely on the pace and scale of development that occurs within a particular region. We focus on the United States, where the shale gas boom has been on-going for several years, paying particular attention to the Marcellus Shale, where a majority of peer-reviewed study has taken place. Governments, regulatory agencies, industry, and other stakeholders are challenged with responding to these risks, and we discuss policies and practices that have been adopted or considered by these various groups. Adaptive Management, a structured framework for addressing complex environmental issues, is discussed as a way to reduce polarization of important discussions on risk, and to more formally engage science in policy-making, along with other economic, social and value considerations. Data suggests that some risks can be substantially reduced through policy and best practice, but also that significant uncertainty persists regarding other risks. We suggest that monitoring and data collection related to water resource risks be established as part of planning for shale gas development before activity begins, and that resources are allocated to provide for appropriate oversight at various levels of governance.

  6. Optical gas analysis in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pockrand, I.

    Infrared optical gas analysis methods for analysis and monitoring of gases for narcosis and artificial respiration are described. The advantages of IR absorption measurements for gas concentration determination are demonstrated. The medical quality, requirements for measuring equipment for continuous breathing gas analysis are fulfilled by IR systems. Desirable improvements mainly concern weight and volume of the measuring head, and the simultaneous determination of all relevant gases with a single measuring head. This requires an extension of the practically usable spectral range into the middle IR, where the volatile anesthetics show substantially stronger absorption bands. This extension is only successful if for the longer wavelength spectral range efficient emitters and stable, fast detectors can be used, whose power characteristics approach these of presently available component in the range between 3 and 4.5 micrometers.

  7. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis at Mars Ambient Conditions Using the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyser (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.; Quadlander, G. A.; Kerry, K. E.; Bode, R. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ward, M. G.; Pathare, A. V.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    We are conducting DSC/EGA experiments at Mars ambient temperature and pressure using the TEGA engineering model. These tests illustrate the outstanding capabilities of a TEGA-like instrument on the surface of Mars.

  8. X-radiation from clusters of galaxies: Spectral evidence for a hot evolved gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Smith, B. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    OSO-8 observations of the X-ray flux in the range 2-60 keV from the Virgo, Perseus, and Coma Clusters provide strong evidence for the thermal origin of the radiation, including iron line emission. The data are adequately described by emission from an isothermal plasma with an iron abundance in near agreement with cosmic levels. A power law description is generally less acceptable and is ruled out in the case of Perseus. Implications on the origin of the cluster gas are discussed.

  9. X-radiation from clusters of galaxies - Spectral evidence for a hot evolved gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Smith, B. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    OSO-8 observations of the X-ray flux in the range between 2 and 60 keV from the Virgo, Perseus, and Coma clusters provide strong evidence for the thermal origin of the radiation, including iron-line emission. The data are adequately described by emission from an isothermal plasma with an iron abundance in near agreement with cosmic levels. A power-law description is generally less acceptable and is ruled out in the case of Perseus. Implications of the origin of the cluster gas are discussed.

  10. Micromachined Gas Chromatography Microsystem For Complex Gas Analysis (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-07

    Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS), Applications • Gas Analysis Using µGC • The “Actuator”: Integrated Gas Micropump • Concluding Remarks, Future...mode Analysis mode • No previous gas micropump meets the WIMS µGC requirements. • Size and power...leakage. • Single mode operation Summary of Previous Gas Micropumps NSF ERC for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS) 22 • Goal: Develop a miniature

  11. Possible Calcite and Magnesium Perchlorate Interaction in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument detected a calcium carbonate phase decomposing at high temperatures (approx.700 C) from the Wicked Witch soil sample [1]. TEGA also detected a lower temperature CO2 release between 400 C and 680 C [1]. Possible explanations given for this lower temperature CO2 release include thermal decomposition of Mg or Fe carbonates, a zeolitictype desorption reaction, or combustion of organic compounds in the soil [2]. The detection of 0.6 wt % soluble perchlorate by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on Phoenix [3] has implications for the possibility of organic molecules in the soil. Ming et al. [4] demonstrated that perchlorates could have oxidized organic compounds to CO2 in TEGA, preventing detection of their characteristic mass fragments. Here, we propose that a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate present in martian soil reacted to produce the 400 C - 680 C TEGA CO2 release. The parent salts of the perchlorate on Mars are unknown, but geochemical models using WCL data support the possible dominance of Mg-perchlorate salts [5]. Mg(ClO4)2 6H2O is the stable phase at ambient martian conditions [6], and breaks down at lower temperatures than carbonates giving off Cl2 and HCl gas [7,8]. Devlin and Herley [7] report two exotherms at 410-478 C and 473-533 C which correspond to the decomposition of Mg(ClO4)2.

  12. A Description and Analysis of Evolving Data Resources on Small Business

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    A Description and Analysis of Evolving Data Resources on Small Business AMELIA HAVILAND AND BOGDAN SAVYCH WR-293-ICJ September 2005...proceedings_c.pdf Kauffman Symposium on Entrepreneurship Data (Nov 10-11, 2004) Conference Summary Document available by request from A. Haviland NAS PANELS

  13. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-27

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  14. The Detection of Evolved Oxygen from the Rocknest Eolian Bedform Material by the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) instrument at the Mars Curiosity Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Ming, D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A.; Mahaffy, P.; Stern, J.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; McKay, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected an O2 gas release from the Rocknest eolain bedform (Fig. 1). The detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander s Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) [1] suggests that perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 release detected by SAM. The perchlorate would also serve as a source of chlorine in the chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS) [2,3]. Chlorates (ClO3-) [4,5] and/or superoxides [6] may also be sources of evolved O2 from the Rocknest materials. The work objectives are to 1) evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Rocknest materials, 2) compare these O2 release temperatures with a series of perchlorates and chlorates, and 3) evaluate superoxide O2- sources and possible perchlorate interactions with other Rocknest phases during QMS analysis.

  15. Disentangling different types of El Niño episodes by evolving climate network analysis.

    PubMed

    Radebach, Alexander; Radebach, A; Donner, Reik V; Donner, R V; Runge, Jakob; Runge, J; Donges, Jonathan F; Donges, J F; Kurths, Jürgen; Kurths, J

    2013-11-01

    Complex network theory provides a powerful toolbox for studying the structure of statistical interrelationships between multiple time series in various scientific disciplines. In this work, we apply the recently proposed climate network approach for characterizing the evolving correlation structure of the Earth's climate system based on reanalysis data for surface air temperatures. We provide a detailed study of the temporal variability of several global climate network characteristics. Based on a simple conceptual view of red climate networks (i.e., networks with a comparably low number of edges), we give a thorough interpretation of our evolving climate network characteristics, which allows a functional discrimination between recently recognized different types of El Niño episodes. Our analysis provides deep insights into the Earth's climate system, particularly its global response to strong volcanic eruptions and large-scale impacts of different phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  16. Near-wall measurements of the bubble- and Lorentz-force-driven convection at gas-evolving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczyzmalski, Dominik; Weier, Tom; Kähler, Christian J.; Cierpka, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Chemical energy storage systems, e.g., in the form of hydrogen or methanol, have a great potential for the establishment of volatile renewable energy sources due to the large energy density. The efficiency of hydrogen production through water electrolysis is, however, limited by gas bubbles evolving at the electrode's surface and can be enhanced by an accelerated bubble detachment. In order to characterize the complex multi-phase flow near the electrode, simultaneous measurements of the fluid velocities and the size and trajectories of hydrogen bubbles were performed in a water electrolyzer. The liquid phase velocity was measured by PIV/PTV, while shadowgraphy was used to determine the bubble trajectories. Special measurement and evaluation techniques had to be applied as the measurement uncertainty is strongly affected by the high void fraction close to the wall. In particular, the application of an advanced PTV scheme allowed for more precise fluid velocity measurements closer to electrode. Based on these data, stability characteristics of the near-wall flow were evaluated and compared to that of a wall jet. PTV was used as well to investigate the effect of Lorentz forces on the near-wall fluid velocities. The results show a significantly increased wall parallel liquid phase velocity with increasing Lorentz forces. It is presumed that this enhances the detachment of hydrogen bubbles from the electrode surface and, consequently, decreases the fractional bubble coverage and improves the efficiency. In addition, the effect of large rising bubbles with path oscillations on the near-wall flow was investigated. These bubbles can have a strong impact on the mass transfer near the electrode and thus affect the performance of the process.

  17. Risk-Based Prioritization of Research for Aviation Security Using Logic-Evolved Decision Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhawer, S. W.; Bott, T. F.; Sorokach, M. R.; Jones, F. P.; Foggia, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing advanced technologies to reduce terrorist risk for the air transportation system. Decision support tools are needed to help allocate assets to the most promising research. An approach to rank ordering technologies (using logic-evolved decision analysis), with risk reduction as the metric, is presented. The development of a spanning set of scenarios using a logic-gate tree is described. Baseline risk for these scenarios is evaluated with an approximate reasoning model. Illustrative risk and risk reduction results are presented.

  18. Development Roadmap of an Evolvable and Extensible Multi-Mission Telecom Planning and Analysis Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Tung, Ramona H.; Lee, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development roadmap and discuss the various challenges of an evolvable and extensible multi-mission telecom planning and analysis framework. Our long-term goal is to develop a set of powerful flexible telecommunications analysis tools that can be easily adapted to different missions while maintain the common Deep Space Communication requirements. The ability of re-using the DSN ground models and the common software utilities in our adaptations has contributed significantly to our development efforts measured in terms of consistency, accuracy, and minimal effort redundancy, which can translate into shorter development time and major cost savings for the individual missions. In our roadmap, we will address the design principles, technical achievements and the associated challenges for following telecom analysis tools (i) Telecom Forecaster Predictor - TFP (ii) Unified Telecom Predictor - UTP (iii) Generalized Telecom Predictor - GTP (iv) Generic TFP (v) Web-based TFP (vi) Application Program Interface - API (vii) Mars Relay Network Planning Tool - MRNPT.

  19. Gas chromatographic analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Laurens, J B; de Coning, J P; Swinley, J M

    2001-03-09

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low-microg/l levels included oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen. This paper describes the use of a system utilising backflush column switching to protect the columns and detectors in the analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride. Two separate channels were used for the analysis of H2, O2, N2, CO, CO2 and SF6 impurities with pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection.

  20. Insights into the growth rate of spatially evolving plane turbulent free-shear layers from 2D vortex-gas simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2017-02-01

    Although the free-shear or mixing layer has been a subject of extensive research over nearly a century, there are certain fundamental issues that remain controversial. These include the influence of initial and downstream conditions on the flow, the effect of velocity ratio across the layer, and the nature of any possible coupling between small scale dynamics and the large scale evolution of layer thickness. In the spirit of the temporal vortex-gas simulations of Suryanarayanan et al. ["Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics," Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)], we revisit the simple 2D inviscid vortex-gas model with extensive computations and detailed analysis, in order to gain insights into some of the above issues. Simulations of the spatially evolving vortex-gas shear layer are carried out at different velocity ratios using a computational model based on the work of Basu et al. ["Vortex sheet simulation of a plane canonical mixing layer," Comput. Fluids 21, 1-30 (1992) and "Modelling plane mixing layers using vortex points and sheets," Appl. Math. Modell. 19, 66-75 (1995)], but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the origin of the free shear layer and at the exit to the computational domain can affect flow evolution in their respective downstream and upstream neighbourhoods, the latter being particularly strong in the single stream limit. In between these neighbourhoods at the ends is a regime of universal self-preserving growth rate given by a universal function of velocity ratio. The computed growth rates are generally located within the scatter of experimental data on plane mixing layers and closely agree with recent high Reynolds number experiments and 3D large eddy simulation studies. These findings support the view that observed free-shear layer growth can be largely explained by the 2D vortex dynamics of

  1. Molecular evolution in court: analysis of a large hepatitis C virus outbreak from an evolving source

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogenetic analyses are used increasingly in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks and transmission cases involving rapidly evolving RNA viruses. Here, we present the results of such an analysis that contributed to the conviction of an anesthetist as being responsible for the infection of 275 of his patients with hepatitis C virus. Results We obtained sequences of the NS5B and E1-E2 regions in the viral genome for 322 patients suspected to have been infected by the doctor, and for 44 local, unrelated controls. The analysis of 4,184 cloned sequences of the E1-E2 region allowed us to exclude 47 patients from the outbreak. A subset of patients had known dates of infection. We used these data to calibrate a relaxed molecular clock and to determine a rough estimate of the time of infection for each patient. A similar analysis led to an estimate for the time of infection of the source. The date turned out to be 10 years before the detection of the outbreak. The number of patients infected was small at first, but it increased substantially in the months before the detection of the outbreak. Conclusions We have developed a procedure to integrate molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of rapidly evolving viral populations into a forensic setting adequate for molecular epidemiological analysis of outbreaks and transmission events. We applied this procedure to a large outbreak of hepatitis C virus caused by a single source and the results obtained played a key role in the trial that led to the conviction of the suspected source. PMID:23870105

  2. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals phenol tolerance mechanism of evolved Chlorella strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Cheng, Dujia; Wang, Liang; Gao, Juan; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-03-01

    The growth of microalgae is inhibited by high concentration phenol due to reactive oxygen species. An evolved strain tolerated to 500mg/L phenol, Chlorella sp. L5, was obtained in previous study. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analysis was performed for Chlorella sp. L5 and its original strain (Chlorella sp. L3). The tolerance mechanism of Chlorella sp. L5 for high concentration phenol was explored on genome scale. It was identified that the up-regulations of the related genes according to antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX, CAT and GR) and carotenoids (astaxanthin, lutein and lycopene) biosynthesis had critical roles to tolerate high concentration phenol. In addition, most of genes of PS I, PS II, photosynthetic electron transport chain and starch biosynthesis were also up-regulated. It was consistent to the experimental results of total carbohydrate contents of Chlorella sp. L3 and Chlorella sp. L5 under 0mg/L and 500mg/L phenol.

  3. Permanent gas analysis using gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Fan, Hui; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Wong, Derek; Wetz, David; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-04-03

    The analysis of complex mixtures of permanent gases consisting of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, inert gases, and toxic species plays an increasingly important role in today's economy. A new gas chromatography detector based on vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy (GC-VUV), which simultaneously collects full scan (115-240 nm) VUV and UV absorption of eluting analytes, was applied to analyze mixtures of permanent gases. Sample mixtures ranged from off-gassing of decomposing Li-ion and Li-metal batteries to natural gas samples and water samples taken from private wells in close proximity to unconventional natural gas extraction. Gas chromatography separations were performed with a porous layer open tubular column. Components such as C1-C5 linear and branched hydrocarbons, water, oxygen, and nitrogen were separated and detected in natural gas and the headspace of natural gas-contaminated water samples. Of interest for the transport of lithium batteries were the detection of flammable and toxic gases, such as methane, ethylene, chloromethane, dimethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, CS2, and methylproprionate, among others. Featured is the capability for deconvolution of co-eluting signals from different analytes.

  4. Greenhouse Gas Analysis by GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, E. M.; Easton, Z. M.; Macek, P.

    2015-12-01

    Current methods to analyze greenhouse gases rely on designated complex, multiple-column, multiple-detector gas chromatographs. A novel method was developed in partnership with Shimadzu for simultaneous quantification of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in environmental gas samples. Gas bulbs were used to make custom standard mixtures by injecting small volumes of pure analyte into the nitrogen-filled bulb. Resulting calibration curves were validated using a certified gas standard. The use of GC/MS systems to perform this analysis has the potential to move the analysis of greenhouse gasses from expensive, custom GC systems to standard single-quadrupole GC/MS systems that are available in most laboratories, which wide variety of applications beyond greenhouse gas analysis. Additionally, use of mass spectrometry can provide confirmation of identity of target analytes, and will assist in the identification of unknown peaks should they be present in the chromatogram.

  5. REMNANT GAS IN EVOLVED CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HERSCHEL PACS OBSERVATIONS of 10-100 Myr OLD DISK SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Geers, Vincent C.; Meyer, Michael R.; Benz, Arnold O.; Gorti, Uma; Mamajek, Eric; Hollenbach, David

    2012-08-10

    We present Herschel PACS spectroscopy of the [O I] 63 {mu}m gas line for three circumstellar disk systems showing signs of significant disk evolution and/or planet formation: HR 8799, HD 377, and RX J1852.3-3700. [O I] is undetected toward HR 8799 and HD 377 with 3{sigma} upper limits of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} W m{sup -2} and 9.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} W m{sup -2}, respectively. We find an [O I] detection for RX J1852.3-3700 at (12.3 {+-} 1.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} W m{sup -2}. We use thermo-chemical disk models to model the gas emission, using constraints on the [O I] 63 {mu}m and ancillary data to derive gas mass upper limits and constrain gas-to-dust ratios. For HD 377 and HR 8799, we find 3{sigma} upper limits on the gas mass of 0.1-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }. For RX J1852.3-3700, we find two distinct disk scenarios that could explain the detection of [O I] 63 {mu}m and CO(2-1) upper limits reported in the literature: (1) a large disk with gas co-located with the dust (16-500 AU), resulting in a large tenuous disk with {approx}16 M{sub Circled-Plus} of gas, or (2) an optically thick gas disk, truncated at {approx}70 AU, with a gas mass of 150 M{sub Circled-Plus }. We discuss the implications of these results for the formation and evolution of planets in these three systems.

  6. The evolving role of the dynamic thermal analysis in the early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salhab, M; Al Sarakbi, W; Mokbel, K

    2005-01-01

    It is now recognised that the breast exhibits a circadian rhythm which reflects its physiology. There is increasing evidence that rhythms associated with malignant cells proliferation are largely non-circadian and that a circadian to ultradian shift may be a general correlation to neoplasia. Cancer development appears to generate its own thermal signatures and the complexity of these signatures may be a reflection of its degree of development. The limitations of mammography as a screening modality especially in young women with dense breasts necessitated the development of novel and more effective screening strategies with a high sensitivity and specificity. Dynamic thermal analysis of the breast is a safe, non invasive approach that seems to be sensitive for the early detection of breast cancer. This article focuses on dynamic thermal analysis as an evolving method in breast cancer detection in pre-menopausal women with dense breast tissue. Prospective multi-centre trials are required to validate this promising modality in screening. The issue of false positives require further investigation using molecular genetic markers of malignancy and novel techniques such as mammary ductoscopy. PMID:15819982

  7. Gas Analysis and Control Methods for Thermal Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    September 2013 Gas Analysis and Control Methods for Thermal Batteries Frank C. Krieger and Michael S. Ding Sensors and Electron Devices...certified gas cylinder calibration tests. These measured gas pressures all include the 0.5813 total volume fraction of argon gas in the certified gas...volume fraction of argon gas in the certified gas cylinder. .....................................................................8 Table 4. Moles of

  8. Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of the Hot, Evolved Star GD 605

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, M.; Chayer, P.; Oliveira, C. M.; Wesemael, F.; Fontaine, G.

    2008-05-01

    We present an analysis of the atmospheric properties of the evolved, hydrogen-rich object GD 605 using FUSE, IUE, and optical spectra in conjunction with non-LTE (NLTE) model atmospheres and synthetic spectra. We also present an analysis of the interstellar medium along the line of sight toward this star. Our effective temperature determination relies on the constraints on the ionization balance O IV/O V imposed by the FUSE data, while the surface gravity relies on a match to the Balmer lines in the optical spectrum. Our analysis yields Teff ~ 85,000 K, log g ~ 5.25, and a helium abundance close to the solar value. These parameters suggest that GD 605 is in a post-AGB evolutionary phase and belongs to the class of hydrogen-rich central star of planetary nebulae, subclass O(H). Apart from lines of hydrogen and helium, about two dozen photospheric lines are observed in the FUSE data, which are dominated by the O VI λλ1031.9 and 1037.6 transitions. In addition, we detect lines associated with the following ions: N IV, O IV, O V, Si IV, S VI, Ar VII, as well as Fe VII. Synthetic spectra based on NLTE line-blanketed model atmospheres reproduce most of the line profiles observed in what appears to be an atmosphere deficient in heavy elements. Our calculations do not fully reproduce the strength of the strongest ultraviolet lines seen, the O VI doublet, perhaps a sign that some contribution to this structure may arise in the interstellar medium or in a circumstellar environment. We discuss various scenarios to account for the absence of a visible nebula and the dearth of heavy elements in the atmosphere of GD 605. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  9. Probabilistic Analysis of Gas Turbine Field Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine thermodynamic cycle was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of the several uncertainties in the performance parameters, which are indices of gas turbine health. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for the overall thermal efficiency and net specific power output due to the thermodynamic random variables. These results can be used to quickly identify the most critical design variables in order to optimize the design, enhance performance, increase system availability and make it cost effective. The analysis leads to the selection of the appropriate measurements to be used in the gas turbine health determination and to the identification of both the most critical measurements and parameters. Probabilistic analysis aims at unifying and improving the control and health monitoring of gas turbine aero-engines by increasing the quality and quantity of information available about the engine's health and performance.

  10. Gas cylinder release rate testing and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despres, Joseph; Sweeney, Joseph; Yedave, Sharad; Chambers, Barry

    2012-11-01

    There are varying cylinder technologies employed for the storage of gases, each resulting in a potentially different hazard level to the surroundings in the event of a gas release. Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type I (SAGS I) store and deliver gases subatmospherically, while Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type II (SAGS II) deliver gases subatmospherically, but store them at high pressure. Standard high pressure gas cylinders store and deliver their contents at high pressure. Due to the differences in these cylinder technologies, release rates in the event of a leak or internal component failure, can vary significantly. This paper details the experimental and theoretical results of different Arsine (AsH3) gas cylinder release scenarios. For the SAGS II experimental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to determine the spatial concentration profiles when a surrogate gas, CF4, was released via a simulated leak within an ion implanter. Various SAGS I and SAGS II cylinder types and failure modes were tested. Additionally, theoretical analysis was performed to support an understanding of the different potential AsH3 leak rates. The results of this work show that the effects of a leak from the various cylinder types can be quite different, with the concentrations resulting from cylinders containing high pressure gas often being in excess of IDLH levels.

  11. Basic gas storage reservoir operations and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nowaczewski, S.F. )

    1994-08-01

    Operation and performance analysis of gas storage reservoirs is described in very basic and general terms. Reservoir selection criteria (capacity, deliverability, location, field type, trap type) are reviewed. Well construction considerations and practices (casing sizing, placement, and cementing) are highlighted with regard to the need for long-lived safe operation. Deliverability estimation and prediction and gas inventory methodologies are described. The benefits of high density, high quality data on gas pressure and composition, production rates and volumes, and geologic information to reservoir performance evaluation and prediction are demonstrated.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals molecular profiles associated with evolving steps of monoclonal gammopathies

    PubMed Central

    López-Corral, Lucía; Corchete, Luis Antonio; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; Mateos, María Victoria; García-Sanz, Ramón; Fermiñán, Encarna; Lahuerta, Juan-José; Bladé, Joan; Oriol, Albert; Teruel, Ana Isabel; Martino, María Luz; Hernández, José; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; Burguillo, Francisco Javier; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2014-01-01

    A multistep model has been proposed of disease progression starting in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance continuing through multiple myeloma, sometimes with an intermediate entity called smoldering myeloma, and ending in extramedullary disease. To gain further insights into the role of the transcriptome deregulation in the transition from a normal plasma cell to a clonal plasma cell, and from an indolent clonal plasma cell to a malignant plasma cell, we performed gene expression profiling in 20 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, 33 with high-risk smoldering myeloma and 41 with multiple myeloma. The analysis showed that 126 genes were differentially expressed in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering myeloma and multiple myeloma as compared to normal plasma cell. Interestingly, 17 and 9 out of the 126 significant differentially expressed genes were small nucleolar RNA molecules and zinc finger proteins. Several proapoptotic genes (AKT1 and AKT2) were down-regulated and antiapoptotic genes (APAF1 and BCL2L1) were up-regulated in multiple myeloma, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, compared to monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. When we looked for those genes progressively modulated through the evolving stages of monoclonal gammopathies, eight snoRNA showed a progressive increase while APAF1, VCAN and MEGF9 exhibited a progressive downregulation. In conclusion, our data show that although monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering myeloma and multiple myeloma are not clearly distinguishable groups according to their gene expression profiling, several signaling pathways and genes were significantly deregulated at different steps of the transformation process. PMID:24816239

  13. The System Dynamics Analysis on the Evolvement of Mechanism of Convention and Exhibition Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin-Ju; Sun, Ming-Jun

    The purpose of this paper is to defines the factors and the way which influence the evolvement of convention and exhibition industry cluster (CEIC for short). From the perspective of system dynamics, the author designed the system flow chart and SD Model to show how the different factors exert positive/negative influencing on the CEIC. The author used Vensim to stimulate the SD Model and to verify its validity and application value. The research shows the evolvement of CEIC is the result of combined strength which comes from both the external and the internal system, the supply factors of the internal system and the market demand from the external system are key strengths for the evolvement of CEIC system. The model had a high fitting precision and a good predicting ability .The research can be used practically and theoretically for the development of convention and exhibition industry (C&E industry for short).

  14. Gas analysis in medicine: New developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenov, K. G.; Miroshnichnko, I. B.; Kostykova, N. Yu.; Kolker, D. B.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Starikova, M. K.; Mishin, P. N.

    2015-11-01

    In this article we discuss the method of early diagnosis of bronchopulmonary diseases based on the analysis of absorption spectra of biomarkers in the human exhaled air. For the analysis of absorption spectra of human exhaled air gas analyzer based on laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) was designed. A method for analysis of exhaled air samples from patients with lung cancer in comparison with the target and comparison group by LPAS was developed. This work is promising for screening of lung cancer.

  15. Applications of breath gas analysis in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Poupart, Guy; Telser, Stefan; Ledochowski, Maximilian; Schmid, Alex; Mechtcheriakov, Sergei

    2004-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath gas provide valuable information about the subjects' physiological and pathophysiological condition. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) allows rapid and online measurements of these substances. We present results of three studies illustrating the potential of breath gas analysis by PTR-MS in various contexts: long-time online monitoring of VOCs in sleeping subjects suggests that VOC profiles are related to sleep stages. Analysis of VOC concentrations in the breath of carbohydrate malabsorbers emphasizes the role played by bacteria in the gut. Finally, we demonstrate the large intra- and intersubject concentration variability of VOCs by considering one particular mass.

  16. Near Real Time Quantitative Gas Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herget, William F.; Tromp, Marianne L.; Anderson, Charles R.

    1985-12-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) - based system has been developed and is undergoing evaluation for near real time multicomponent quantitative analysis of undiluted gaseous automotive exhaust emissions. The total system includes: (1) a gas conditioning system (GCS) for tracer gas injection, gas mixing, and temperature stabilization; and (2) an exhaust gas analyzer (EGA) consisting of a sample cell, an FT-IR system, and a computerized data processing system. Tests have shown that the system can monitor about 20 individual species (concentrations down to the 1-20 ppm range) with a time resolution of one second. Tests have been conducted on a chassis dynamometer system utilizing different autos, different fuels, and different driving cycles. Results were compared with those obtained using a standard constant volume sampling (CVS) system.

  17. THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT OF z = 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: EVIDENCE OF A NON-EVOLVING GAS FRACTION IN MAIN-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Daddi, E.; Sargent, M.; Elbaz, D.; Gobat, R.; Tan, Q.; Aussel, H.; Feruglio, C.; Charmandaris, V.; Dickinson, M.; Reddy, N.

    2012-10-10

    We present observations of the CO[J = 3 {yields} 2] emission toward two massive and infrared luminous Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 3.21 and z = 2.92, using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, placing first constraints on the molecular gas masses (M{sub gas}) of non-lensed LBGs. Their overall properties are consistent with those of typical (main-sequence) galaxies at their redshifts, with specific star formation rates {approx}1.6 and {approx}2.2 Gyr{sup -1}, despite their large infrared luminosities (L{sub IR} Almost-Equal-To (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) derived from Herschel. With one plausible CO detection (spurious detection probability of 10{sup -3}) and one upper limit, we investigate the evolution of the molecular gas-to-stellar mass ratio (M{sub gas}/M{sub *}) with redshift. Our data suggest that the steep evolution of M{sub gas}/M{sub *} of normal galaxies up to z {approx} 2 is followed by a flattening at higher redshifts, providing supporting evidence for the existence of a plateau in the evolution of the specific star formation rate at z > 2.5.

  18. A Possible Organic Contribution to the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D. Jr.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Boynton, W. V.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Mars Lander were the discovery of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in the soils at the landing site in the martian northern plains. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument was one of the tools that made this discovery. After soil samples were delivered to TEGA and transferred into small ovens, the samples could be heated up to approx.1000 C and the gases that evolved during heating were monitored by a mass spectrometer. A CO2 signal was detected at high temperature (approx.750 C) that has been attributed to calcium carbonate decomposition. In addition to this CO2 release, a lower temperature signal was seen. This lower temperature CO2 release was postulated to be one of three things: 1) desorption of CO2, 2) decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or 3) CO2 released due to organic combustion. Cannon et al. [3] present another novel hypothesis involving the interaction of decomposition products of a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate.

  19. XMM-Newton Detection of Hot Gas in Two Evolved Elliptical Planetary Nebulae: the Eskimo Nebula and the Ghost of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Meixner, M.

    2004-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) consist of the stellar material ejected by low- and intermediate-mass stars (1-8 M⊙) at the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase (AGB). As such a star evolves off the AGB phase, the copious mass-loss strips off the stellar envelope and exposes the hot stellar core that ionizes the nebular material. The central stars of PNe present fast stellar winds with terminal velocities 1000-4000 km s-1, while fast collimated outflows with velocities up to 1000 km s-1 are also observed in PNe. The interactions of the fast stellar wind and/or collimated outflows with nebular material can give rise to diffuse X-ray emission from PNe. Diffuse X-ray emission has been detected only in young PNe previously. To investigate the evolution of hot gas in PN interiors, we obtained XMM-Newton observations of NGC 2392 (the Eskimo Nebula) and NGC 3242 (the Ghost of Jupiter), two evolved elliptical PNe. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected in both nebulae. In both cases, the hot gas is confined within the innermost shell, the X-ray spectrum can be described by a thin plasma emission model with temperature ˜2×106 K, and the X-ray luminosity is ˜1×1031 ergs s-1. Furthermore, the X-ray spectrum of NGC 3242 shows evidence of enhanced nitrogen abundance, while the X-ray morphology of NGC 2392 hints a possible association with its fast collimated outflows.

  20. Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Phyllosilicate Minerals at Reduced Pressures: A Mineral Database for the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, A. B.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    Reduced pressure thermal analysis measurements of the phyllosilicates kaolinite and nontronite were taken to observe the effect of pressure on their thermal curves. This is part of the database for the TEGA instrument. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. KAMM; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i. e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. (13), which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  2. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J. R.; Rider, William; Rightley, P. M.; Prestridge, K. P.; Benjamin, R. F.; Vorobieff, P. V.

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i.e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. [13], which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  3. Analysis of the Gas Particle Radiator (GPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a new space radiator concept, the gas particle radiator (GPR), is calculated. The GPR uses a gas containing emitting, submicron particles as the radiating media. A transparent window contains the gas particle mixture around the solid radiator emitting surface. A major advantage of the GPR is that large emissivity (e sub T is greater than or = 0.8) is achieved without the use of emissive coatings. A radiation heat transfer analysis shows that for a modest volume fraction (approx. 10(-4)) of submicron particles and gas thickness (approx. 1 cm) the emissivity, e sub T, is limited by the window transmittance. Besides determining the emissivity, the window is the critical element for making it possible for the GPR to have lower mass than a tube type radiator. The window acts as a bumper to provide meteoroid protection for the radiator wall. The GPR was compared to a proposed titanium wall, potassium heat pipe radiator. For both radiators operating at a power level of 1.01 MW at 775 K it was calculated that the GPR mass was 31 percent lower than the heat pipe radiator.

  4. Steam-injected gas turbine analysis: steam rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, I. G.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of steam rates in steam-injected gas turbines (simple and reheat). In considering a gas turbine of this type, the steam-injection flow is separated from the main gas stream for analysis. Dalton's and Avogadro's laws of partial pressure and gas mixtures are applied. Results obtained provide for the accurate determination of heat input, gas expansion based on partial pressures, and heat-rejection steam-enthalpy points.

  5. Steam-injected gas turbine analysis: Steam rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, I.G.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of steam rates in steam-injected gas turbines (simple and reheat). In considering a gas turbine of this type, the steam-injection flow is separated from the main gas stream for analysis. Dalton`s and Avogadro`s laws of partial pressure and gas mixtures are applied. Results obtained provide for the accurate determination of heat input, gas expansion based on partial pressures, and heat-rejection steam-enthalpy points.

  6. A volcano at work: the rapidly evolving landforms of Mt Etna documented through DEMs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone; Favalli, Massimiliano; Fornaciai, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes are characterized by rapid morphological changes in a continuously evolving landscape. In recent years, airborne LIDAR surveys have been repeatedly carried out to document the constructive and the destructive processes which modify the topography at Mount Etna (Italy), one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. In a few cases, time series of high resolution topographies have been acquired during ongoing effusive eruptions, and this extraordinary data allowed the systematic characterization of the morphology of active lava channels and the identification of a distinctive pulsating dynamic in lava flux. Furthermore, time series of topographies spaced several years allowed the quantification of the growth and of local collapses of summit craters, as well as the erosion of cinder cones formed during flank eruptions in 2001-2002. Overall, the availability of high resolution topographies boosted dramatically our understanding of volcanic processes, also allowing a better assessment of the related hazard. The present contribution is a review of several works spanning nearly a decade.

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis between original and evolved recombinant lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; Le Berre, Véronique; Sokol, Serguei; François, Jean; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-12-01

    The engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for lactose utilization has been attempted with the intent of developing high productivity processes for alcoholic fermentation of cheese whey. A recombinant S. cerevisiae flocculent strain that efficiently ferments lactose to ethanol was previously obtained by evolutionary engineering of an original recombinant that displayed poor lactose fermentation performance. We compared the transcriptomes of the original and the evolved recombinant strains growing in lactose, using cDNA microarrays. Microarray data revealed 173 genes whose expression levels differed more than 1.5-fold. About half of these genes were related to RNA-mediated transposition. We also found genes involved in DNA repair and recombination mechanisms, response to stress, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle control, mitosis regulation, glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation. These transcriptomic data are in agreement with some of the previously identified physiological and molecular differences between the recombinants, and point to further hypotheses to explain those differences.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum... Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle Test... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analysis system....

  9. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum... Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle Test... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exhaust gas analysis system....

  10. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum... Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle Test... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exhaust gas analysis system....

  11. What Causes Environmental Inequalities and Related Health Effects? An Analysis of Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kruize, Hanneke; Droomers, Mariël; van Kamp, Irene; Ruijsbroek, Annemarie

    2014-01-01

    Early environmental justice studies were exposure-oriented, lacked an integrated approach, and did not address the health impact of environmental inequalities. A coherent conceptual framework, needed to understand and tackle environmental inequalities and the related health effects, was lacking. We analyzed the more recent environmental justice literature to find out how conceptual insights have evolved. The conceptual framework of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) was analyzed for additional explanations for environmental inequalities and the related health effects. This paper points out that recent environmental justice studies have broadened their scope by incorporating a broader set of physical and social environmental indicators, and by focusing on different geographic levels and on health impacts of environmental inequalities. The CSDH framework provided additional elements such as the role of structural determinants, the role of health-related behavior in relation to the physical and social environment, access to health care, as well as the life course perspective. Incorporating elements of the CSDH framework into existing environmental justice concepts, and performing more empirical research on the interactions between the different determinants at different geographical levels would further improve our understanding of environmental inequalities and their health effects and offer new opportunities for policy action. PMID:24886752

  12. TRU Drum Headspace Gas Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.

    1998-10-27

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 10,000 Transuranic (TRU) waste drums whose final disposition is the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Each drum, prior to shipment to WIPP, must be inspected and tested to certify that is meets the WIPP requirements for acceptance. One, of many requirements, is the analysis of the TRU drum vapor space for hydrogen, methane, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DOE Carlsbad Area Office has published two documents specifying the analytical methodologies and the quality assurance requirements for analyzing TRU drum vapor space.The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was contracted by the Solid Waste Division of SRS to specify, assemble, and test a system that would satisfy the WIPP requirements for drum headspace gas analysis. Since no single vendor supplies a complete system, analytical instrumentation and supporting components were integrated into a configuration that performed that required analyses. This required both software and hardware design and modifications. The major goal of the design team was to integrate commercially available instrumentation and equipment into a seamless production process. The final output of the process is an analytical report formatted to the specifications outlined in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). SRTC has assembled the necessary analytical instrumentation and installed it in a mobile trailer to perform the TRU drum vapor space analyses. This mobile trailer had previously housed instrumentation for reactor tank inspections. As a cost savings it was decided to renovate and install the instrumentation in this trailer to eliminate the need of building or modifying permanent structures. This also allows for portability to meet future analytical needs on or off site.This task was divided into three sub tasks: headspace gas sampling, gas analysis and system component integration, and sample canister cleaning. The following sections

  13. Examining Evolving Performance on the Force Concept Inventory Using Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semak, M. R.; Dietz, R. D.; Pearson, R. H.; Willis, C. W

    2017-01-01

    The application of factor analysis to the "Force Concept Inventory" (FCI) has proven to be problematic. Some studies have suggested that factor analysis of test results serves as a helpful tool in assessing the recognition of Newtonian concepts by students. Other work has produced at best ambiguous results. For the FCI administered as a…

  14. The interstellar gas experiment: Analysis in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, F.; Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Eugster, O.

    1992-01-01

    The interstellar gas experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils in order to collect neutral interstellar particles which penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. These atoms were entrapped in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric ions and with ambient atmospheric atoms. For the entire duration of the LDEF mission, seven of the foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. In the mass spectrometric analysis of the trapped noble gas component, we detected the He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22 isotopes. In order to infer the isotopic ratios in the interstellar medium from the measured concentrations found in the foil piece, several lines of investigation had to be initiated. The flux of incident noble gas atoms from the ambient atmosphere was estimated by detailed calculations. The contributions proved to be negligible, supporting the experimental evidence. Foil and machine backgrounds for the four isotopes which were measured had to be assessed individually. While this was easy for He-4, spurious foil background of He-3 had to be monitored carefully by analyzing unflown foil pieces. Trapped Ne concentrations are not far above the background. During the flight, a stuck electrical relay precluded the foil-trays from sequencing as designed. Therefore, we could not use the seasonal variation of the direction of the incoming interstellar atoms to make the distinction between interstellar and magnetospheric components of the trapped particles. Instead, we had to try the method of stepwise heating to extract the interstellar component at lower temperatures than we use to extract the magnetospheric component (the interstellars hit the foil with lower energies than most of the magnetospherics). New limiting values for the isotopic composition of the interstellar medium, unavailable yet from any other method of measurement, are emerging from this analysis.

  15. The Interstellar Gas Experiment: Analysis in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, F.; Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Eugster, O.

    1993-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils aboard the LDEF spacecraft in low Earth orbit in order to collect neutral interstellar particles which penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. By mechanical penetration these atoms were imbedded in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric ions and, possibly, with ambient atmospheric atoms. During the entire LDEF mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. After the foils were returned to Earth, a mass spectrometric analysis of the noble gas component of the trapped particles was begun. The isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22 were detected. We have given a first account of the experiment. In order to infer the isotopic ratios in the interstellar medium from the concentrations found in the foils, several lines of investigation had to be initiated. The flux of ambient atmospheric noble gas atoms moving toward the foils due to the orbital motion of LDEF was estimated by detailed calculations. Any of these particles which evaded the baffles in the IGE collector could be entrapped in the foils as a background flux. However, the calculations have shown that this flux is negligible, which was the intent of the experiment hardware design. This conclusion is supported by the measurements. However, both the concentration of trapped helium and its impact energy indicate that the flux of magnetospheric ions which was captured was larger than had been expected. In fact, it appears that the magnetospheric particles constitute the largest fraction of the particles in the foils. Since little is known about this particle flux, their presence in the IGE foils appears fortunate. The analysis of these particles provides information about their isotropic composition and average flux.

  16. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  17. GTRAN- TRANSIENT ANALYSIS OF GAS PIPING SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TROVILLION T A

    1994-01-01

    The GTRAN program was developed to solve transient, as well as steady state, problems for gas piping systems. GTRAN capabilities allow for the analysis of a variety of system configurations and components. These include: multiple pipe junctions; valves that change position with time; fixed restrictions (orifices, manual valves, filters, etc.); relief valves; constant pressure sources; and heat transfer for insulated piping and piping subjected to free or forced convection. In addition, boundary conditions can be incorporated to simulate specific components. The governing equations of GTRAN are the one-dimensional transient gas dynamic equations. The three equations for pressure, velocity, and density are reduced to numerical equations using an implicit Crank-Nicholson finite difference technique. Input to GTRAN includes a description of the piping network, the initial conditions, and any events (e.g. valve closings) occuring during the period of analysis. Output includes pressure, velocity, and density versus time. GTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer. GTRAN was developed in 1983.

  18. Analysis of trapped gas in 1E34 detonators by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, D.K.; Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.

    1980-05-14

    A method was developed to extract and then analyze gas trapped in thermally aged 1E34 detonators. This gas was extracted into an evacuated volume and injected into a gas chromatograph for separation and quantitative analysis. To effect this gas extraction, a device was designed for puncturing the detonator cup and capturing the effused gas. Limited testing of five detonators in this device shows amounts of gas ranging from about 0.5 X 10 {sup -7} to 12 X 10 {sup - 7} moles.

  19. Solar-gas systems impact analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, C. P.; Hahn, E. F.; Loose, J. C.; Poe, T. E.; Hirshberg, A. S.; Haas, S.; Preble, B.; Halpin, J.

    1984-07-01

    The impacts of solar/gas technologies on gas consumers and on gas utilities were measured separately and compared against the impacts of competing gas and electric systems in four climatic regions of the U.S. A methodology was developed for measuring the benefits or penalties of solar/gas systems on a combined basis for consumers sand distribution companies. It is shown that the combined benefits associated with solar/gas systems are generally greatest when the systems are purchased by customers who would have otherwise chosen high-efficiency electric systems (were solar/gas systems not available in the market place). The role of gas utilities in encouraging consumer acceptance of solar/gas systems was also examined ion a qualitative fashion. A decision framework for analyzing the type and level of utility involvement in solar/gas technologies was developed.

  20. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exhaust gas analysis system....

  1. Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases

    EIA Publications

    2004-01-01

    The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

  2. Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets. Focus on Natural Gas. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series. Number 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Jeffrey; Medlock, III, Kenneth B.; Boyd, William C.

    2015-10-15

    This study explores dynamics related to natural gas use at the national, sectoral, and regional levels, with an emphasis on the power sector. It relies on a data set from SNL Financial to analyze recent trends in the U.S. power sector at the regional level. The research aims to provide decision and policy makers with objective and credible information, data, and analysis that informs their discussions of a rapidly changing energy system landscape. This study also summarizes regional changes in natural gas demand within the power sector. The transition from coal to natural gas is occurring rapidly along the entire eastern portion of the country, but is relatively stagnant in the central and western regions. This uneven shift is occurring due to differences in fuel price costs, renewable energy targets, infrastructure constraints, historical approach to regulation, and other factors across states.

  3. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of parallel-evolved Escherichia coli strains under ethanol stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding ethanol tolerance in microorganisms is important for the improvement of bioethanol production. Hence, we performed parallel-evolution experiments using Escherichia coli cells under ethanol stress to determine the phenotypic changes necessary for ethanol tolerance. Results After cultivation of 1,000 generations under 5% ethanol stress, we obtained 6 ethanol-tolerant strains that showed an approximately 2-fold increase in their specific growth rate in comparison with their ancestor. Expression analysis using microarrays revealed that common expression changes occurred during the adaptive evolution to the ethanol stress environment. Biosynthetic pathways of amino acids, including tryptophan, histidine, and branched-chain amino acids, were commonly up-regulated in the tolerant strains, suggesting that activating these pathways is involved in the development of ethanol tolerance. In support of this hypothesis, supplementation of isoleucine, tryptophan, and histidine to the culture medium increased the specific growth rate under ethanol stress. Furthermore, genes related to iron ion metabolism were commonly up-regulated in the tolerant strains, which suggests the change in intracellular redox state during adaptive evolution. Conclusions The common phenotypic changes in the ethanol-tolerant strains we identified could provide a fundamental basis for designing ethanol-tolerant strains for industrial purposes. PMID:20955615

  5. Network Analysis of Breast Cancer Progression and Reversal Using a Tree-Evolving Network Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Ankur P.; Curtis, Ross E.; Kuhn, Irene; Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Bissell, Mina; Xing, Eric P.; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The HMT3522 progression series of human breast cells have been used to discover how tissue architecture, microenvironment and signaling molecules affect breast cell growth and behaviors. However, much remains to be elucidated about malignant and phenotypic reversion behaviors of the HMT3522-T4-2 cells of this series. We employed a “pan-cell-state” strategy, and analyzed jointly microarray profiles obtained from different state-specific cell populations from this progression and reversion model of the breast cells using a tree-lineage multi-network inference algorithm, Treegl. We found that different breast cell states contain distinct gene networks. The network specific to non-malignant HMT3522-S1 cells is dominated by genes involved in normal processes, whereas the T4-2-specific network is enriched with cancer-related genes. The networks specific to various conditions of the reverted T4-2 cells are enriched with pathways suggestive of compensatory effects, consistent with clinical data showing patient resistance to anticancer drugs. We validated the findings using an external dataset, and showed that aberrant expression values of certain hubs in the identified networks are associated with poor clinical outcomes. Thus, analysis of various reversion conditions (including non-reverted) of HMT3522 cells using Treegl can be a good model system to study drug effects on breast cancer. PMID:25057922

  6. Evolving Complex Networks Analysis of Space-Time Multi-Scale Wavelike Fields: Application to African Rainfall Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluoch, Kevin; Marwan, Norbert; Trauth, Martin; Kurths, Juergen

    2013-04-01

    Evolving complex networks analysis is a very recent and very promising attempt to describe, in the most realistic ways, complex systems or multi-system dynamics. The Earth system is comprised of many attractors that are multi-scaled, multi-complexity non-linear systems of systems. Space time propagations responsible for precipitation is one example in which the interactions between the aforementioned properties of complex systems can be applied; especially the spatio-temporal wave likeness of spatial patterning and temporal recurrences representative of the underlying dynamics. Tobler's first law of geography states: "Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things" (Waldo Tobler, 1970 Economic Geography 46: 234-40). Most time-series analysis are pairwise correlations and even when faced with gridded data, the neighborhood characteristics is never used as an input variable. In our point of view, such analysis ignore vital information on the multi-scale non-linear spatial patterns of the continuities and singularities possibly resulting from underlying random processes. This work in progress is an application, mainly inspired by wave theory and non-linear dynamics. It is a systematic method of methods, which exploits the nonlinear multi-scale wave nature of virtually everything in nature including financial data, disease dynamics et cetera and applies it to climate through complex network analysis of rainfall data. The method uses a continuous spatial wavelet transform for non-linear multi-scale decomposition. Such an output carries all vital information pertaining the singularity structures in the data. Similarity measures are obtained by considering the multi-fractal nature of the distribution of discontinuities. The more similar the point-wise generalized dimensions are in-terms of their continuity, fractal, entropy, information and correlation dimensions, the higher the chance that they characterize similar

  7. Iron-rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument in Gale Crater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502°C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (<53μm) with varying Fe amounts (Fe0.66X0.34- to Fe0.99X0.01-CO3, where X refers to Mg and/or Mn) were selected for T/EGA. The carbonates were heated from 25 to 715°C (35°C min-1) and evolved CO2 was measured as a function of temperature. The highest Fe containing carbonates (e.g., Fe0.99X0.01-CO3) yielded CO2 peak temperatures between 466-487°C, which is consistent with the high temperature RN CO2 release. The lower Fe-bearing carbonates (e.g., Fe0.66X0.34CO3) did not have peak CO2 release temperatures that matched the RN peak CO2 temperatures; however, their entire CO2 releases did occur within RN temperature range of the high temperature CO2 release. Results from this laboratory analog analysis demonstrate that the high temperature RN CO2 release is consistent with Fe-rich carbonate (~0.7 to 1 wt.% FeCO3). The similar RN geochemistry with other materials in Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through metamorphic and

  8. Iron-Rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Mertzman, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502 C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (<53 microns) with varying Fe amounts (Fe(0.66)X(0.34)- to Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3, where X refers to Mg and/or Mn) were selected for T/EGA. The carbonates were heated from 25 to 715 C (35 C/min) and evolved CO2 was measured as a function of temperature. The highest Fe containing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3) yielded CO2 peak temperatures between 466-487 C, which is consistent with the high temperature RN CO2 release. The lower Fe-bearing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.66)X(0.34)CO3) did not have peak CO2 release temperatures that matched the RN peak CO2 temperatures; however, their entire CO2 releases did occur within RN temperature range of the high temperature CO2 release. Results from this laboratory analog analysis demonstrate that the high temperature RN CO2 release is consistent with Fe-rich carbonate (approx.0.7 to 1 wt.% FeCO3). The similar RN geochemistry with other materials in Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through

  9. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  10. Disgust: Evolved Function and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tybur, Joshua M.; Lieberman, Debra; Kurzban, Robert; DeScioli, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and that of information processing. Although there is…

  11. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  12. Systems Analysis of In-Space Manufacturing Applications for the International Space Station and the Evolvable Mars Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Andrew C.; De Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance logistics support is a significant challenge for extended human operations in space, especially for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). For missions to Mars (such as NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC)), where timely resupply or abort in the event of emergency will not be possible, maintenance logistics mass is directly linked to the Probability of Loss of Crew (P(LoC)), and the cost of driving down risk is an exponential increase in mass requirements. The logistics support strategies that have maintained human operations in LEO will not be effective for these deep space missions. In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) is a promising technological solution that could reduce logistics requirements, mitigate risks, and augment operational capabilities, enabling Earth- independent human spaceflight. This paper reviews maintenance logistics challenges for spaceflight operations in LEO and beyond, and presents a summary of selected results from a systems analysis of potential ISM applications for the ISS and EMC. A quantitative modeling framework and sample assessment of maintenance logistics and risk reduction potential of this new technology is also presented and discussed.

  13. Attachment B: URS Shale Gas Emissions Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data was provided in response to a request by ANGA for actual current data that could be compared to EPA's assumptions used in the newly proposed Oil and Natural Gas Air Pollution Standards, Subpart quad 0

  14. A historical analysis of natural gas demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbec, Nathan Richard

    This thesis analyzes demand in the US energy market for natural gas, oil, and coal over the period of 1918-2013 and examines their price relationship over the period of 2007-2013. Diagnostic tests for time series were used; Augmented Dickey-Fuller, Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin, Johansen cointegration, Granger Causality and weak exogeneity tests. Directed acyclic graphs were used as a complimentary test for endogeneity. Due to the varied results in determining endogeneity, a seemingly unrelated regression model was used which assumes all right hand side variables in the three demand equations were exogenous. A number of factors were significant in determining demand for natural gas including its own price, lagged demand, a number of structural break dummies, and trend, while oil indicate some substitutability with natural gas. An error correction model was used to examine the price relationships. Natural gas price was found not to have a significant cointegrating vector.

  15. Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum

    SciTech Connect

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

  16. Genomic medicine: evolving science, evolving ethics

    PubMed Central

    Soden, Sarah E; Farrow, Emily G; Saunders, Carol J; Lantos, John D

    2012-01-01

    Genomic medicine is rapidly evolving. Next-generation sequencing is changing the diagnostic paradigm by allowing genetic testing to be carried out more quickly, less expensively and with much higher resolution; pushing the envelope on existing moral norms and legal regulations. Early experience with implementation of next-generation sequencing to diagnose rare genetic conditions in symptomatic children suggests ways that genomic medicine might come to be used and some of the ethical issues that arise, impacting test design, patient selection, consent, sequencing analysis and communication of results. The ethical issues that arise from use of new technologies cannot be satisfactorily analyzed until they are understood and they cannot be understood until the technologies are deployed in the real world. PMID:23173007

  17. Submillimeter observations of evolved stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sopka, R.J.; Hildebrand, R.; Jaffe, D.T.; Gatley, I.; Roellig, T.; Werner, M.; Jura, M.; Zuckerman, B.

    1985-07-01

    Broad-band submillimeter observations of the thermal emission from evolved stars have been obtained with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. These observations, at an effective wavelength of 400 ..mu..m, provide the most direct method for estimating the mass loss rate in dust from these stars and also help to define the long-wavelength thermal spectrum of the dust envelopes. The mass loss rates in dust that we derive range from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup -1/ and are compared with mass loss rates derived from molecular line observations to estimate gas-to-dust ratios in outflowing envelopes. These values are found to be generally compatible with the interstellar gas-to-dust ratio of approx.100 if submillimeter emissivities appropriate to amorphous grain structures are assumed. Our analysis of the spectrum of IRC+10216 confirms previous suggestions that the grain emissivity varies as lambda/sup -1.2/ rather than as lambda/sup -2/ for 10analysis of IRC+10216 are found to be applicable to the similar carbon-rich object CRL 3068. Similar analysis of the spectra of oxygen-rich objects indicates that our submillimeter fluxes for IRC+10011 and NML Cyg are greater than those predicted by previous modeling. This, we argue, is the result of a slower decline in grain emissivity with wavelength than is seen in published silicate grain models. We are not able to distinguish a systematic difference in the dust masses of carbon-rich and oxygen-rich envelopes. We find the largest mass loss rates in dust in the bipolar objects OH 231.8+4.2, CRL 2688, and CRL 618 and in NGC 7027 and VY CMa.

  18. Application of Gas Analysis to Combustor Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, R. R.; Evans, Albert

    1959-01-01

    The performance of turbine-engine combustors usually is given in terms of operating limits and combustion efficiency. The latter property is determined most often by measuring the increase in enthalpy across the combustor through the use of thermocouples. This investigation was conducted to determine the ability of gas-analytical techniques to provide additional information about combustor performance. Gas samples were taken at the outlet and two upstream stations and their compositions determined. In addition to over-all combustion efficiency, estimates of local fuel-air ratios, local combustion efficiencies, and heat-release rates can be made. Conclusions can be drawn concerning the causes of combustion inefficiency and may permit corrective design changes to be made more intelligently. The purpose of this investigation was not to present data for a given combustor but rather to show the types and value of additional information that can be gained from gas-analytical data.

  19. Detection of Evolved Carbon Dioxide in the Rocknest Eolian Bedform by the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) Instrument at the Mars Curiosity Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Ming, D. W.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P.; Stern, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected four releases of carbon dioxide (CO2) that ranged from 100 to 700 C from the Rocknest eolian bedform material (Fig. 1). Candidate sources of CO2 include adsorbed CO2, carbonate(s), combusted organics that are either derived from terrestrial contamination and/or of martian origin, occluded or trapped CO2, and other sources that have yet to be determined. The Phoenix Lander s Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) detected two CO2 releases (400-600, 700-840 C) [1,2]. The low temperature release was attributed to Fe- and/or Mg carbonates [1,2], per-chlorate interactions with carbonates [3], nanophase carbonates [4] and/or combusted organics [1]. The high temperature CO2 release was attributed to a calcium bearing carbonate [1,2]. No evidence of a high temperature CO2 release similar to the Phoenix material was detected in the Rocknest materials by SAM. The objectives of this work are to evaluate the temperature and total contribution of each Rocknest CO2 release and their possible sources. Four CO2 releases from the Rocknest material were detected by SAM. Potential sources of CO2 are adsorbed CO2, (peak 1) and Fe/Mg carbonates (peak 4). Only a fraction of peaks 2 and 3 (0.01 C wt.%) may be partially attributed to combustion of organic contamination. Meteoritic organics mixed in the Rocknest bedform could be present, but the peak 2 and 3 C concentration (approx.0.21 C wt. %) is likely too high to be attributed solely to meteoritic organic C. Other inorganic sources of C such as interactions of perchlorates and carbonates and sources yet to be identified will be evaluated to account for CO2 released from the thermal decomposition of Rocknest material.

  20. Elimination of chromatographic and mass spectrometric problems in GC-MS analysis of Lavender essential oil by multivariate curve resolution techniques: Improving the peak purity assessment by variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Moazeni-Pourasil, Roudabeh Sadat; Sereshti, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    In analysis of complex natural matrices by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), many disturbing factors such as baseline drift, spectral background, homoscedastic and heteroscedastic noise, peak shape deformation (non-Gaussian peaks), low S/N ratio and co-elution (overlapped and/or embedded peaks) lead the researchers to handle them to serve time, money and experimental efforts. This study aimed to improve the GC-MS analysis of complex natural matrices utilizing multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods. In addition, to assess the peak purity of the two-dimensional data, a method called variable size moving window-evolving factor analysis (VSMW-EFA) is introduced and examined. The proposed methodology was applied to the GC-MS analysis of Iranian Lavender essential oil, which resulted in extending the number of identified constituents from 56 to 143 components. It was found that the most abundant constituents of the Iranian Lavender essential oil are α-pinene (16.51%), camphor (10.20%), 1,8-cineole (9.50%), bornyl acetate (8.11%) and camphene (6.50%). This indicates that the Iranian type Lavender contains a relatively high percentage of α-pinene. Comparison of different types of Lavender essential oils showed the composition similarity between Iranian and Italian (Sardinia Island) Lavenders.

  1. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  2. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  3. Raman analyzer for sensitive natural gas composition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachit; Poonacha, Samhitha; Bekal, Anish; Vartak, Sameer; Weling, Aniruddha; Tilak, Vinayak; Mitra, Chayan

    2016-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is of significant importance in industrial gas analysis due to its unique capability of quantitative multigas measurement, especially diatomics (N2 and H2), with a single laser. This paper presents the development of a gas analyzer system based on high pressure Raman scattering in a multipass Raman cell and demonstrates its feasibility for real-time natural gas analysis. A 64-pass Raman cell operated at elevated pressure (5 bar) is used to create multiplicative enhancement (proportional to number of passes times pressure) of the natural gas Raman signal. A relatively low power 532-nm continuous wave laser beam (200 mW) is used as the source and the signals are measured through a cooled charge-coupled device grating spectrometer (30-s exposure). A hybrid algorithm based on background-correction and least-squares error minimization is used to estimate gas concentrations. Individual gas component concentration repeatability of the order of 0.1% is demonstrated. Further, the applicability of the technique for natural gas analysis is demonstrated through measurements on calibrated gas mixtures. Experimental details, analyzer characterization, and key measurements are presented to demonstrate the performance of the technique.

  4. [Pyrolysis-gas chromatographic fingerprints with hierarchical cluster analysis for Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Wang, Cong; Pan, Zaifa; Sun, Fa

    2008-09-01

    The pyrogram fingerprints of Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl. from different regions were studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) and compared with hierarchical cluster analysis. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the fingerprint was examined by evolved gas analysis, and then 450 degrees C was selected as the optimized pyrolysis temperature. An amount of 0.4 mg of raw drug powder was pyrolysed in a vertical microfurnace pyrolyzer, and the products were directly introduced into a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) and a fused-silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm). The pyrogram fingerprints of 10 samples from different regions showed a high similarity and a good reproducibility with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the retention times less than 0.33% and the RSDs of the relative peak areas less than 4.8%. Therefore, each sample was characterized by the peak area of 31 peaks in each pyrogram and these peaks were employed for hierarchical cluster analysis. Furthermore, the discrimination of the sample from different regions was achieved by hierarchical cluster analysis via recognizing the 10 x 31 data matrix. Thus, the results proved it is a simple, rapid and accurate method suitable for the quality control of the traditional Chinese medicines.

  5. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni; Perez, Danielle; Williamson, Richard

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

  7. Blood gas analysis as a determinant of occupationally related disability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.; Zaldivar, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is one of the criteria used by the Department of Labor to award total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis (Black Lung). We have observed that Black Lung claimants often undergo several blood gas analyses with widely differing results that sometimes range from complete normality to life-threatening hypoxemia in the same subject. We concluded that blood gas analysis in occupationally related disability determination is unreliable, in that quality control and instrumentation are variable; that severe hypoxemia is rare in coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and that such hypoxemia is nonspecific and correlates poorly with breathlessness.

  8. Continuous Preconcentrator for Trace Gas Analysis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    117, 8531-8539 (2002). lxix Sokhan, V. P., Nicholson, D., Quirke, N., “Transport properties of nitrogen in single walled carbon nanotubes.”, J...Phys. Chem. B, 110, 1971-1975 (2006). lxxi Iijima, S., “Helical microtubules of graphitic carbon ”, Nature, 354, 56-58 (1991). lxxii Harris, P.J.F...ix and electronic noses,x,xi,xii,xiii,xiv have been significantly advanced. However, miniaturized gas sensors/detectors typically have limited

  9. Analysis of the administration's natural gas decontrol plan (S. 615)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-11

    This letter addresses three questions: the short-run impacts of Natural Gas Consumers Regulatory Reform Amendments of 1983 (S.615) on gas supply and prices, defined as the period 1983-87; the extent to which increases in the price of old (low-priced) gas will be compensated by decreases in the price of other categories of gas; and an analysis of the provisions of S.615 designed to influence the renegotiation of existing producer/pipeline contracts. Scope, methods and results are appended. Specifically, results are primarily based on a GAO-developed natural gas supply/demand model which may contain a margin of error. Agency comments were not sought. (PSB)

  10. Analysis on using biomass lean syngas in micro gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărculescu, C.; Cenuşă, V. E.; Alexe, F. N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis on small systems for converting biomass/wastes into power using Micro Gas Turbines (MGT) fed with gaseous bio-fuels produced by air- gasification. The MGT is designed for burning various fossil liquid and gas fuels, having catalogue data related to natural gas use. Fuel switch changes their performances. The present work is focused on adapting the MGT for burning alternative low quality gas fuel produced by biomass air gasification. The heating values of these gas fuels are 3 to 5 times lower than the methane ones, leading to different air demand for the stoichiometric burning. Validated numerical computation procedures were used to model the MGT thermodynamic process. Our purpose was to analyze the influence of fuel change on thermodynamic cycle performances.

  11. Organic Combustion in the Presence of Ca-Carbonate and Mg-Perchlorate: A Possible Source for the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Douglas; Ming, D.; Niles, P.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Lander were the detection of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in landing site soils. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Phoenix lander could heat samples up to approx.1000 C and monitor evolved gases with a mass spectrometer. TEGA detected a low (approx.350 C) and high (approx.750 C) temperature CO2 release. The high temp release was attributed to the thermal decomposition of Ca-carbonate (calcite). The low temperature CO2 release could be due to desorption of CO2, decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or the combustion of organic material. A new hypothesis has also been proposed that the low temperature CO2 release could be due to the early breakdown of calcite in the presence of the decomposition products of certain perchlorate salts [3]. We have investigated whether or not this new hypothesis is also compatible with organic combustion. Magnesium perchlorate is stable as Mg(ClO4)2-6H2O on the martian surface [4]. During thermal decomposition, this perchlorate salt releases H2O, Cl2, and O2 gases. The Cl2 can react with water to form HCl which then reacts with calcite, releasing CO2 below the standard thermal decomposition temperature of calcite. However, when using concentrations of perchlorate and calcite similar to what was detected by Phoenix, the ratio of high:low temperature CO2 evolved is much larger in the lab, indicating that although this process might contribute to the low temp CO2 release, it cannot account for all of it. While H2O and Cl2 cause calcite decomposition, the O2 evolved during perchlorate decomposition can lead to the combustion of any reduced carbon present in the sample [5]. We investigate the possible contribution of organic molecules to the low temperature CO2 release seen on Mars.

  12. Signal Analysis of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding is a process in which the input parameters such as current, voltage and travel speed, can be easily controlled and/or monitored. However, weld quality is not solely a function of these parameters. An adaptive method of observing weld quality is desired to improve weld quality assurance. The use of dynamic electrical properties of the welding arc as a weld quality monitor was studied. The electrical properties of the arc are characterized by the current voltage transfer function. The hardware and software necessary to collect the data at a maximum rate of 45 kHz and to allow the off-line processing of this data are tested. The optimum input current waveform is determined. Bead-on-plate welds to observe such characteristics of the weld as the fundamental frequency of the puddle are studied. Future work is planned to observe changes of the arc response with changes in joint geometry, base metal chemistry, and shielding gas composition are discussed.

  13. Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Major

    1999-11-05

    The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

  14. Development of a gas systems analysis model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of developing a Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) are to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, PC based model of domestic gas industry activity. The system is capable of assessing the impacts of various changes in the natural gas system within North America. The individual and collective impacts due to changes in technology and economic conditions are explicitly modeled in GSAM. Major gas resources are all modeled, including conventional, tight, Devonian Shale, coalbed methane, and low-quality gas sources. The modeling system asseses all key components of the gas industry, including available resources, exploration, drilling, completion, production, and processing practices, both for now and in the future. The model similarly assesses the distribution, storage, and utilization of natural gas in a dynamic market-based analytical structure. GSAM is designed to provide METC managers with a tool to project the impacts of future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) benefits in order to determine priorities in a rapidly changing, market-driven gas industry.

  15. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  16. The Use of Gas Chromatography for Biogas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Amanda; Seeley, John; Aurandt, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    Energy from natural gas accounts for 24 percent of energy consumed in the US. Natural gas is a robust form of energy which is rich in methane content and is low in impurities. This quality suggests that it is a very clean and safe gas; it can be used in providing heat, a source for cooking, and in powering vehicles. The downside is that it is a non-renewable resource. On the contrary, methane rich gas that is produced by the breakdown of organic material in an anaerobic environment, called biogas, is a renewable energy source. This research focuses on the gas analysis portion of the creation of the anaerobic digestion and verification laboratory where content and forensic analysis of biogas is performed. Gas Chromatography is implemented as the optimal analytical tool for quantifying the components of the biogas including methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes. In addition, the problems associated with the undesirable components are discussed. Anaerobic digestion of primary sludge has consistently produced about 55 percent methane; future goals of this research include studying different substrates to increase the methane yield and decrease levels of impurities in the gas.

  17. Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

    1986-08-01

    For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Phase space analysis of some interacting Chaplygin gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we discuss a phase space analysis of various interacting Chaplygin gas models in general relativity. Linear and nonlinear sign changeable interactions are considered. For each case appropriate late time attractors of field equations are found. The Chaplygin gas is one of the dark fluids actively considered in modern cosmology due to the fact that it is a joint model of dark energy and dark matter.

  19. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-05-19

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification.

  1. Sampling and analysis of natural gas trace constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Attari, A.; Chao, S.

    1993-09-01

    Major and minor components of natural gas are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), using a thermal conductivity (TC). The best results obtained by these methods can report no better than 0.01 mole percent of each measured component. Even the extended method of analysis by flame ionization detector (FID) can only improve on the detection limit of hydrocarbons. The gas industry needs better information on all trace constituents of natural gas, whether native or inadvertently added during gas processing that may adversely influence the operation of equipment or the safety of the consumer. The presence of arsenic and mercury in some gas deposits have now been documented in international literature as causing not only human toxicity but also damaging to the field equipment. Yet, no standard methods of sampling and analysis exist to provide this much needed information. In this paper the authors report the results of a three-year program to develop an extensive array of sampling and analysis methods for speciation and measurement of trace constituents of natural gas. A cryogenic sampler operating at near 200 K ({minus}99 F) and at pipeline pressures up to 12.4 {times} 10{sup 6}Pa (1800 psig) has been developed to preconcentrate and recover all trace constituents with boiling points above butanes. Specific analytical methods have been developed for speciating and measurement of many trace components (corresponding to US EPA air toxics) by GC-AED and GC-MS, and for determining various target compounds by other techniques. Moisture, oxygen and sulfur contents are measured on site using dedicated field instruments. Arsenic, mercury and radon are sampled by specific solid sorbents for subsequent laboratory analysis.

  2. Coupled gas discharge and pulse circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Dadelszen, Michael; Rothe, Dietmar E.

    1991-04-01

    Two examples of the importance of accurate coupling of driving electric circuits to discharge models, when simulating fast pulse discharges, are presented. The first example uses a commercial electric field analysis code, TETRAelf, to simulate a pulsed discharge TEA CO2 laser and demonstrates the value of including displacement current effects in the modeling of the avalanche phase of the discharge. The second example uses a commercial electric circuit analysis package, ECA, to simulate a three-electrode, long-pulse, 2-J, XeCl excimer laser. Both the saturable magnetic cores and the discharge kinetics are included in the simulation. Comparisons are made between the numerical results and experimental data.

  3. Considering the Role of Natural Gas in the Deep Decarbonization of the U.S. Electricity Sector. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series: Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Wesley; Beppler, Ross; Zinaman, Owen; Logan, Jeffrey

    2016-02-12

    Natural gas generation in the U.S. electricity sector has grown substantially in recent years, while the sector's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have generally declined. This relationship highlights the concept of natural gas as a potential enabler of a transition to a lower-carbon future. This work considers that concept by using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Renewable Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. ReEDS is a long-term capacity expansion model of the U.S. electricity sector. We examine the role of natural gas within the ReEDS modeling framework as increasingly strict carbon emission targets are imposed on the electricity sector. In addition to various natural gas price futures, we also consider scenarios that emphasize a low-carbon technology in order to better understand the role of natural gas if that low-carbon technology shows particular promise. Specifically, we consider scenarios with high amounts of energy efficiency (EE), low nuclear power costs, low renewable energy (RE) costs, and low carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs. Within these scenarios we find that requiring the electricity sector to lower CO2 emissions over time increases near-to-mid-term (through 2030) natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - left). The long-term (2050) role of natural gas generation in the electricity sector is dependent on the level of CO2 emission reduction required. Moderate reductions in long-term CO2 emissions have relatively little impact on long-term natural gas generation, while more stringent CO2 emission limits lower long-term natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - right). More stringent carbon targets also impact other generating technologies, with the scenarios considered here seeing significant decreases in coal generation, and new capacity of nuclear and renewable energy technologies over time. Figure 1 also demonstrates the role of natural gas in the context of scenarios where a specific low-carbon technology is advantaged. In 2030

  4. Systems analysis of hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hermelee, A.; Beller, M.; D'Acierno, J.

    1981-11-01

    The potential for hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines is analyzed for a specific site from both mid-term (1985) and long-term perspectives. The concept of supplementing natural gas with the addition of hydrogen in the existing gas pipeline system serves to provide a transport and storage medium for hydrogen while eliminating the high investment costs associated with constructing separate hydrogen pipelines. This paper examines incentives and barriers to the implementation of this concept. The analysis is performed with the assumption that current developmental programs will achieve a process for cost-effectively separating pure hydrogen from natural gas/hydrogen mixtures to produce a separable and versatile chemical and fuel commodity. The energy systems formulation used to evaluate the role of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure is the Reference Energy System (RES). The RES is a network diagram that provides an analytic framework for incorporating all resources, technologies, and uses of energy in a uniform manner. A major aspect of the study is to perform a market analysis of traditional uses of resources in the various consuming sectors and the potential for hydrogen substitution in these sectors. The market analysis will focus on areas of industry where hydrogen is used as a feedstock rather than for its fuel-use opportunities to replace oil and natural gas. The sectors of industry where hydrogen is currently used and where its use can be expanded or substituted for other resources include petroleum refining, chemicals, iron and steel, and other minor uses.

  5. Mass spectrometric analysis of evolved CO2 during 9.6-μm CO2 irradiation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, John; Fried, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Carbon dioxide laser irradiation induces chemical changes in dental hard tissues including, dehydration, decomposition, disproportionation, and vaporization. Such changes can lead to either an increase or decrease in susceptibility to acid dissolution and adversely affect the bond strength to restorative materials. The objective of this study was to measure the evolved molecular species produced during laser irradiation. Samples of bovine enamel were irradiated by a 9.6 micrometers TEA CO2 laser in a vacuum chamber connected to a quadruple mass spectrometer. At irradiation intensities above 0.37 J/cm2 an increase in evolved CO2 and H2O were detected indicative of thermal decomposition of the mineral phase. The respective ion yields changed markedly with increasing number of laser pulses suggesting that the decomposition was complete after less than ten laser pulses at irradiation intensities from 0.4 to 0.8 J/cm2. Above irradiation intensities of 1.0 J/cm2 there is continual emission after 50 laser pulses indicative of vaporization and material removal. At higher ablative fluence, higher mass species were detected due to the ejection of hydroxyapatite. This study demonstrates that mass spectroscopy can be used to directly probe laser induced physical and chemical changes in dental hard tissue during laser ablation.

  6. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-02

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (<1000 °C). The in situ gas-cooled sampling probe mapped the chemistry inside the high-temperature reactor, while suppressing the thermal decomposition of the analytes. It thus allows a more accurate study of the mechanism of progressive thermocatalytic cracking of precursors compared to previously reported conventional residual gas analyses of the reactor exhaust gas and hence paves the way for the controlled production of novel nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering.

  7. Gas emission analysis based on Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiaofu; Lian, Xu; Jin, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Solar occultation flux (SOF), a new optical technology to detect the gas based on the traditional Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) developed quickly recently. In this paper, the system and the data analysis is investigated. First a multilayer transmission model of solar radiation is simulated. Then the retrieval process is illustrated. In the proceeding of the data analysis, the Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear square fitting is used to obtain the gas column concentration and the related emission ratio. After the theory certification, the built up system is conducted in a fertilizer plant in Hefei city .The results show SOF is available in the practice and the retrieved gas column concentration can give important information about the pollution emission and dispersion

  8. Thermal Analysis and Testing of Fastrac Gas Generator Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine is being developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help meet the goal of substantially reducing the cost of access to space. This engine relies on a simple gas-generator cycle, which burns a small amount of RP-1 and oxygen to provide gas to drive the turbine and then exhausts the spent fuel. The Fastrac program envisions a combination of analysis, design and hot-fire evaluation testing. This paper provides the supporting thermal analysis of the gas generator design. In order to ensure that the design objectives were met, the evaluation tests have started on a component level and a total of 15 tests of different durations were completed to date at MSFC. The correlated thermal model results will also be compared against hot-fire thermocouple data gathered.

  9. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  10. Optimization and analysis of gas turbine engine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbrink, D. J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    A gas turbine engine blade design is optimized using STAEBL. To validate the STAEBL analysis, the optimized blade design is analyzed using MARC, MHOST and BEST3D. The results show good agreement between STAEBL, MARC, and MHOST. The conclusion is that STAEBL can be used to optimize an engine blade design.

  11. Oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II: an analysis of second-shell residues and hydrogen-bonding networks.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Leslie; Vinyard, David J; Khan, Sahr; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-04-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) is a Mn4O5Ca cluster embedded in the Photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. As the site of water oxidation, the OEC is connected to the lumen by channels that conduct water, oxygen, and/or protons during the catalytic cycle. The hydrogen-bond networks found in these channels also serve to stabilize the oxidized intermediates, known as the S states. We review recent developments in characterizing these networks via protein mutations, molecular inhibitors, and computational modeling. On the basis of these results, we highlight regions of the PSII protein in which changes have indirect effects on the S1, S2, and S3 oxidation states of the OEC while still allowing photosynthetic activity.

  12. Genomic analysis of isolates from the United Kingdom 2012 pertussis outbreak reveals that vaccine antigen genes are unusually fast evolving.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Katie L; Harris, Simon R; Fry, Norman K; Hurst, Laurence D; Gorringe, Andrew R; Parkhill, Julian; Preston, Andrew

    2015-07-15

    A major outbreak of whooping cough, or pertussis, occurred in 2012 in the United Kingdom (UK), with nearly 10 000 laboratory-confirmed cases and 14 infant deaths attributed to pertussis. A worldwide resurgence of pertussis has been linked to switch to the use of acellular pertussis vaccines and the evolution of Bordetella pertussis away from vaccine-mediated immunity. We have conducted genomic analyses of multiple strains from the UK outbreak. We show that the UK outbreak was polyclonal in nature, caused by multiple distinct but closely related strains. Importantly, we demonstrate that acellular vaccine antigen-encoding genes are evolving at higher rates than other surface protein-encoding genes. This was true even prior to the introduction of pertussis vaccines but has become more pronounced since the introduction of the current acellular vaccines. The fast evolution of vaccine antigen-encoding genes has serious consequences for the ability of current vaccines to continue to control pertussis.

  13. Fast and Furious: Analysis of the Luminous and Rapidly-Evolving Type Ic-BL Supernova iPTF16asu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, Lindsey; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Corsi, Alessandra; Cenko, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    Wide-field surveys have discovered a growing number of rapidly-evolving supernovae and transients in the luminosity gap between regular core-collapse and super-luminous supernovae. The physical origin of these events is not yet well understood. Here, we present data and analysis of iPTF16asu, a rapidly-evolving Type Ic-BL supernova in this luminosity gap. With a rest-frame rise-time of just 4 days and a peak absolute magnitude of -20.4 mag, iPTF16asu's light curve is somewhat more luminous but otherwise similar to previous events, including SN2011kl which was associated with an ultra-long gamma-ray burst. The spectrum of iPTF16asu near peak shows a featureless, blue continuum, again similar to previous events, and develops into a Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. Combining information from the light curve, spectroscopy, and X-ray and radio upper limits, we compare iPTF16asu to other events in this part of transient phase-space, and also to physical models proposed to explain rapidly-evolving supernovae.

  14. Studying evolved stars with Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Santos, João Manuel

    2016-07-01

    A systematic inspection of the far-infrared (FIR) properties of evolved stars allows not only to constrain physical models, but also to understand the chemical evolution that takes place in the end of their lives. In this work we intend to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSE) on a sample of stars in the THROES catalogue from AGB/post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae using photometry and spectroscopy provided by the PACS instrument on-board Herschel telescope. In the first part we are interested in obtaining an estimate of the size of FIR emitting region and to sort our targets in two classes: point-like and extended. Secondly, we focus on the molecular component of the envelope traced by carbon monoxide (CO) rotational lines. We conduct a line survey on a sample of evolved stars by identifying and measuring flux of both 12CO and 13CO isotopologues in the PACS range, while looking at the overall properties of the sample. Lastly, we will be interested in obtaining physical parameters of the CSE, namely gas temperature, mass and mass-loss rate on a sample of carbon stars. For that, we make use of PACS large wavelength coverage, which enables the simultaneous study of a large number of CO transitions, to perform the rotational diagram analysis. We report the detection of CO emission in a high number of stars from the catalogue, which were mostly classified as point-like targets with a few exceptions of planetary nebulae. High J rotational number transitions were detected in a number of targets, revealing the presence of a significant amount of hot gas (T ˜ 400-900 K) and high mass-loss rates. We conclude that Herschel/PACS is in a privileged position to detect a new population of warmer gas, typically missed in sub-mm/mm observations.

  15. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits.

    PubMed

    Milano, Nicola; Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults.

  16. Superconducting integrated terahertz receiver for spectral analysis of gas compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinev, N. V.; Filippenko, L. V.; Kalashnikov, K. V.; Kiselev, O. S.; Vaks, V. L.; Domracheva, E. G.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    A new highly sensitive device for analysis of gas compounds in terahertz frequency range based on the superconducting integrated receiver is being developed. Such receiver for spectral research of Earth atmosphere from balloon-borne instrument was developed earlier in Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and successfully operated during several flight missions. In this work, the laboratory setup for gas spectroscopy in the range of 450-700 GHz with the noise temperature below 150 K and spectral resolution better than 0.5 MHz is presented. First results of measurements of NH3 and H2O absorption spectra are obtained.

  17. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  18. Chemical abundances and kinematics of 257 G-, K-type field giants. Setting a base for further analysis of giant-planet properties orbiting evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Benamati, L.; Santos, N. C.; Alves, S.; Lovis, C.; Udry, S.; Israelian, G.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Mortier, A.; Sozzetti, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    We performed a uniform and detailed abundance analysis of 12 refractory elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Co, Sc, Mn, and V) for a sample of 257 G- and K-type evolved stars from the CORALIE planet search programme. To date, only one of these stars is known to harbour a planetary companion. We aimed to characterize this large sample of evolved stars in terms of chemical abundances and kinematics, thus setting a solid base for further analysis of planetary properties around giant stars. This sample, being homogeneously analysed, can be used as a comparison sample for other planet-related studies, as well as for different type of studies related to stellar and Galaxy astrophysics. The abundances of the chemical elements were determined using an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis relative to the Sun, with the spectral synthesis code MOOG and a grid of Kurucz ATLAS9 atmospheres. To separate the Galactic stellar populations, both a purely kinematical approach and a chemical method were applied. We confirm the overabundance of Na in giant stars compared to the field FGK dwarfs. This enhancement might have a stellar evolutionary character, but departures from LTE may also produce a similar enhancement. Our chemical separation of stellar populations also suggests a `gap' in metallicity between the thick-disc and high-α metal-rich stars, as previously observed in dwarfs sample from HARPS. The present sample, as most of the giant star samples, also suffers from the B - V colour cut-off, which excludes low-log g stars with high metallicities, and high-log g star with low [Fe/H]. For future studies of planet occurrence dependence on stellar metallicity around these evolved stars, we suggest to use a subsample of stars in a `cut-rectangle' in the log g-[Fe/H] diagram to overcome the aforementioned issue.

  19. Analyzing Evolving Social Network 2 (EVOLVE2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    over time, and how changes in topology affect evolution of influence and groups -Understand the impact of dynamics and network flows on the...incorporate time. The research had two major threads: • Understand how networks evolve over time, and how changes in topology affect evolution of...1958 14 Meissner Effect 1958 307 Random-Phase Approximation ... Superconductivity 1959 40 Evidence for Anisotropy of the Superconducting Energy... 1989

  20. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  1. Geospatial Analysis of Oil and Gas Wells in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riqueros, N. S.; Kang, M.; Jackson, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    California currently ranks third in oil production by U.S. state and more than 200,000 wells have been drilled in the state. Oil and gas wells provide a potential pathway for subsurface migration, leading to groundwater contamination and emissions of methane and other fluids to the atmosphere. Here we compile available public databases on oil and gas wells from the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey, and other state and federal sources. We perform geospatial analysis at the county and field levels to characterize depths, producing formations, spud/completion/abandonment dates, land cover, population, and land ownership of active, idle, buried, abandoned, and plugged wells in California. The compiled database is designed to serve as a quantitative platform for developing field-based groundwater and air emission monitoring plans.

  2. Handling of co-products in life cycle analysis in an evolving co-product market: A case study with corn stover removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn stover (cobs and residue) is an important part of the life cycle of corn, either as fuel or as animal feed, but most life cycle analysis (LCA) models treat them separately from starch ethanol. This paper compares four stover and corn grain based ethanol pathways to show how the greenhouse gas (...

  3. Phylotranscriptomic Analysis Based on Coalescence was Less Influenced by the Evolving Rates and the Number of Genes: A Case Study in Ericales

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Wu, Wei; Yan, Hai-Fei; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing have generated a vast amount of transcriptomic data that are being increasingly used in phylogenetic reconstruction. However, processing the vast datasets for a huge number of genes and even identifying optimal analytical methodology are challenging. Through de novo sequenced and retrieved data from public databases, we identified 221 orthologous protein-coding genes to reconstruct the phylogeny of Ericales, an order characterized by rapid ancient radiation. Seven species representing different families in Ericales were used as in-groups. Both concatenation and coalescence methods yielded the same well-supported topology as previous studies, with only two nodes conflicting with previously reported relationships. The results revealed that a partitioning strategy could improve the traditional concatenation methodology. Rapidly evolving genes negatively affected the concatenation analysis, while slowly evolving genes slightly affected the coalescence analysis. The coalescence methods usually accommodated rate heterogeneity better and required fewer genes to yield well-supported topologies than the concatenation methods with both real and simulated data. PMID:26819541

  4. Electronic Nose Functionality for Breath Gas Analysis during Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Michael E.; Hummel, Thomas; Fetter, Viktor; Helwig, Andreas; Lenic, Joachim; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkow, Dimitrij; Chouker, Alexander; Schelling, Gustav

    2017-02-01

    The presence of humans in space represents a constant threat for their health and safety. Environmental factors such as living in a closed confinement, as well as exposure to microgravity and radiation, are associated with significant changes in bone metabolism, muscular atrophy, and altered immune response, which has impacts on human performance and possibly results in severe illness. Thus, maintaining and monitoring of crew health status has the highest priority to ensure whole mission success. With manned deep space missions to moon or mars appearing at the horizon where short-term repatriation back to earth is impossible the availability of appropriate diagnostic platforms for crew health status is urgently needed. In response to this need, the present experiment evaluated the functionality and practicability of a metal oxide based sensor system (eNose) together with a newly developed breath gas collecting device under the condition of altering acceleration. Parabolic flights were performed with an Airbus A300 ZeroG at Bordeaux, France. Ambient air and exhaled breath of five healthy volunteers was analyzed during steady state flight and parabolic flight maneuvres. All volunteers completed the study, the breath gas collecting device valves worked appropriately, and breathing through the collecting device was easy and did not induce discomfort. During breath gas measurements, significant changes in metal oxide sensors, mainly sensitive to aromatic and sulphur containing compounds, were observed with alternating conditions of acceleration. Similarly, metal oxide sensors showed significant changes in all sensors during ambient air measurements. The eNose as well as the newly developed breath gas collecting device, showed appropriate functionality and practicability during alternating conditions of acceleration which is a prerequisite for the intended use of the eNose aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for breath gas analysis and crew health status

  5. Micromechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite including the effects of matrix viscoplasticity and evolving damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. H.; Jones, R. H.; Boyd, J. G.

    1994-03-01

    A THERMOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS of a metal matrix continuous fiber composite is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of matrix inelasticity and interface cracking. Due to these nonlinearities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modeled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modeled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a typical SiC-Ti composite at elevated temperature. Preliminary results indicate that rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for interface fracture, thus contributing to improved macroscopic ductility of the composite.

  6. Exergy analysis for a gas turbine cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.D.; Pang, H.S.; Kim, S.M.; Kwak, H.Y.

    1996-10-01

    A general exergy balance equation that is applicable to any component of thermal systems has been formulated in this study. One of distinct features of this formulation is that the exergy involved in the component of any thermal system can be decomposed into exergy flows, entropy production flows, and the appropriate exergy rate terms such as fuel and available work. The exergy analysis based on this equation permits one to predict the thermal efficiency of the system, the exergy destruction in each component as well as the mass flow rate, the composition, and the temperature of the exhaust gases. The authors have examined the performance of a 1,000 kW gas turbine cogeneration system when it is operated at part and full-load conditions through this analysis. They have also tested the effect of the inlet air temperature and the relative humidity of the inlet air on the performance of the system. The predicted values of the performances for the system have been compared with the actual performance data provided by the gas turbine manufacturer. It has been found that the measured data of net power and the properties of exhaust gases are in good agreement with calculation ones, differing by less than 3%. The exergy balance equation may be utilized in the exergoeconomic analysis to estimate the production costs depending on various input costs in a gas turbine cogeneration system.

  7. A varying polytropic gas universe and phase space analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we will consider a phenomenological model of a dark fluid that is able to explain an accelerated expansion of our low redshift universe and the phase transition to this accelerated expanding universe. Recent developments in modern cosmology towards understanding of the accelerated expansion of the large scale universe involve various scenarios and approaches. Among these approaches, one of well-known and accepted practice is modeling of the content of our universe via dark fluid. There are various models of dark energy fluid actively studied in recent literature and polytropic gas is among them. In this work, we will consider a varying polytropic gas which is a phenomenological modification of polytropic gas. Our model of varying polytropic dark fluid has been constructed to analogue to a varying Chaplygin gas actively discussed in the literature. We will consider interacting models, where dark matter is a pressureless fluid, to have a comprehensive picture. Phase space analysis is an elegant mathematical tool to earn general understanding of large scale universe and easily see an existence of a solution to cosmological coincidence problem. Imposing some constraints on parameters of the models, we found late time attractors for each case analytically. Cosmological consequences for the obtained late time attractors are discussed.

  8. Performance analysis and optimization of power plants with gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharati-Givi, Maryam

    The gas turbine is one of the most important applications for power generation. The purpose of this research is performance analysis and optimization of power plants by using different design systems at different operation conditions. In this research, accurate efficiency calculation and finding optimum values of efficiency for design of chiller inlet cooling and blade cooled gas turbine are investigated. This research shows how it is possible to find the optimum design for different operation conditions, like ambient temperature, relative humidity, turbine inlet temperature, and compressor pressure ratio. The simulated designs include the chiller, with varied COP and fogging cooling for a compressor. In addition, the overall thermal efficiency is improved by adding some design systems like reheat and regenerative heating. The other goal of this research focuses on the blade-cooled gas turbine for higher turbine inlet temperature, and consequently, higher efficiency. New film cooling equations, along with changing film cooling effectiveness for optimum cooling air requirement at the first-stage blades, and an internal and trailing edge cooling for the second stage, are innovated for optimal efficiency calculation. This research sets the groundwork for using the optimum value of efficiency calculation, while using inlet cooling and blade cooling designs. In the final step, the designed systems in the gas cycles are combined with a steam cycle for performance improvement.

  9. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

  10. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

  11. Automotive Gas Turbine Power System-Performance Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    1997-01-01

    An open cycle gas turbine numerical modelling code suitable for thermodynamic performance analysis (i.e. thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, cycle state points, working fluid flowrates etc.) of automotive and aircraft powerplant applications has been generated at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Technology Division. The use this code can be made available to automotive gas turbine preliminary design efforts, either in its present version, or, assuming that resources can be obtained to incorporate empirical models for component weight and packaging volume, in later version that includes the weight-volume estimator feature. The paper contains a brief discussion of the capabilities of the presently operational version of the code, including a listing of input and output parameters and actual sample output listings.

  12. IDP camp evolvement analysis in Darfur using VHSR optical satellite image time series and scientific visualization on virtual globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, Dirk; Lang, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of transferable, object-based image analysis algorithms for dwelling extraction in a camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Darfur, Sudan along with innovative means for scientific visualisation of the results. Three very high spatial resolution satellite images (QuickBird: 2002, 2004, 2008) were used for: (1) extracting different types of dwellings and (2) calculating and visualizing added-value products such as dwelling density and camp structure. The results were visualized on virtual globes (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer) revealing the analysis results (analytical 3D views,) transformed into the third dimension (z-value). Data formats depend on virtual globe software including KML/KMZ (keyhole mark-up language) and ESRI 3D shapefiles streamed as ArcGIS Server-based globe service. In addition, means for improving overall performance of automated dwelling structures using grid computing techniques are discussed using examples from a similar study.

  13. IDP camp evolvement analysis in Darfur using VHSR optical satellite image time series and scientific visualization on virtual globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, Dirk; Lang, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of transferable, object-based image analysis algorithms for dwelling extraction in a camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Darfur, Sudan along with innovative means for scientific visualisation of the results. Three very high spatial resolution satellite images (QuickBird: 2002, 2004, 2008) were used for: (1) extracting different types of dwellings and (2) calculating and visualizing added-value products such as dwelling density and camp structure. The results were visualized on virtual globes (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer) revealing the analysis results (analytical 3D views,) transformed into the third dimension (z-value). Data formats depend on virtual globe software including KML/KMZ (keyhole mark-up language) and ESRI 3D shapefiles streamed as ArcGIS Server-based globe service. In addition, means for improving overall performance of automated dwelling structures using grid computing techniques are discussed using examples from a similar study.

  14. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J R

    1989-03-01

    -Cassini entry probe, which is being jointly planned by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), might be launched as early as 1994. As in the Pioneer mission, limited time--perhaps only 3-4 h--will be available for the completion of all analyses while the probe descends through the atmosphere. A conventional GC or GC-MS system would be able to analyze no more than two aerosol and two gas samples during the probe's descent. Conventional GC also is limited by the sensitivity of the detector and by the sample volume. For the Titan mission, the sensitivity problems will be worse because the atmospheric pressure at the time of instrument deployment is expected to be < 3 torr. Consequently, the sample volume might not be large enough to satisfy the detector sensitivity requirements. Because of such limitations, alternative GC analysis techniques have been investigated for future NASA missions. Multiplex gas chromatography has been investigated as a possible candidate for chemical analysis within a spacecraft or other restricted environment, and chemical modulators have been developed and used when needed with this technique to reduce the size and weight of the instrumentation. Also, several new multiplex techniques have been developed for use in specific applications.

  15. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    -Cassini entry probe, which is being jointly planned by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), might be launched as early as 1994. As in the Pioneer mission, limited time--perhaps only 3-4 h--will be available for the completion of all analyses while the probe descends through the atmosphere. A conventional GC or GC-MS system would be able to analyze no more than two aerosol and two gas samples during the probe's descent. Conventional GC also is limited by the sensitivity of the detector and by the sample volume. For the Titan mission, the sensitivity problems will be worse because the atmospheric pressure at the time of instrument deployment is expected to be < 3 torr. Consequently, the sample volume might not be large enough to satisfy the detector sensitivity requirements. Because of such limitations, alternative GC analysis techniques have been investigated for future NASA missions. Multiplex gas chromatography has been investigated as a possible candidate for chemical analysis within a spacecraft or other restricted environment, and chemical modulators have been developed and used when needed with this technique to reduce the size and weight of the instrumentation. Also, several new multiplex techniques have been developed for use in specific applications.

  16. In Silico and Biochemical Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Photosynthetic Antenna: Identification of Subunits which Evolved upon Land Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Caffarri, Stefano; Nogue, Fabien; Bassi, Roberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes the photosynthetic antenna system is composed of subunits encoded by the light harvesting complex (Lhc) multigene family. These proteins play a key role in photosynthesis and are involved in both light harvesting and photoprotection. The moss Physcomitrella patens is a member of a lineage that diverged from seed plants early after land colonization and therefore by studying this organism, we may gain insight into adaptations to the aerial environment. Principal Findings In this study, we characterized the antenna protein multigene family in Physcomitrella patens, by sequence analysis as well as biochemical and functional investigations. Sequence identification and analysis showed that some antenna polypeptides, such as Lhcb3 and Lhcb6, are present only in land organisms, suggesting they play a role in adaptation to the sub-aerial environment. Our functional analysis which showed that photo-protective mechanisms in Physcomitrella patens are very similar to those in seed plants fits with this hypothesis. In particular, Physcomitrella patens also activates Non Photochemical Quenching upon illumination, consistent with the detection of an ortholog of the PsbS protein. As a further adaptation to terrestrial conditions, the content of Photosystem I low energy absorbing chlorophylls also increased, as demonstrated by differences in Lhca3 and Lhca4 polypeptide sequences, in vitro reconstitution experiments and low temperature fluorescence spectra. Conclusions This study highlights the role of Lhc family members in environmental adaptation and allowed proteins associated with mechanisms of stress resistance to be identified within this large family. PMID:18446222

  17. [Analysis of the phthalates in cosmetics by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Xing

    2004-05-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) for the detection of the six phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP)) in the cosmetics was developed. The phthalates were extracted from cosmetics with methanol under ultrasonication and then separated with high-speed centrifugation. The supernatant was dehydrated and filtrated through membrane with 0.5 microm pore diameter. The filtrate was injected into the GC system for analysis. Then the positive results observed in the GC-FID chromatogram were confirmed by gas chromatography-electron impact-mass detection (GC-EI-MS) analysis. Retention times of the peaks could be applied for qualitative analysis. External standard method was used for quantitative analysis. The recoveries of the six phthalates were between 82.90% and 109.50%. The relative standard deviations were between 2.1% and 4.6%. The detection limits of the method were: 0.1 ng for DMP, DEP, DBP and BBP, and 0.5 ng for DEHP and DOP, respectively. The method presented the advantages of high precision, high sensitivity, small sample size, and simple pretreatment. The method can be used to test the six phthalates in the cosmetics.

  18. Instability Analysis of a Low-Density Gas Jet Injected into a High-Density Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Anthony Layiwola

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of buoyancy on the absolute instability of low-density gas jets injected into high-density gas mediums. Most of the existing analyses of low-density gas jets injected into a high-density ambient have been carried out neglecting effects of gravity. In order to investigate the influence of gravity on the near-injector development of the flow, a linear temporal stability analysis and a spatio-temporal stability analysis of a low-density round jet injected into a high-density ambient gas were performed. The flow was assumed to be isothermal and locally parallel; viscous and diffusive effects were ignored. The variables were represented as the sum of the mean value and a normal-mode small disturbance. An ordinary differential equation governing the amplitude of the pressure disturbance was derived. The velocity and density profiles in the shear layer, and the Froude number (signifying the effects of gravity) were the three important parameters in this equation. Together with the boundary conditions, an eigenvalue problem was formulated. Assuming that the velocity and density profiles in the shear layer to be represented by hyperbolic tangent functions, the eigenvalue problem was solved for various values of Froude number. The temporal growth rates and the phase velocity of the disturbances were obtained. It was found that the presence of variable density within the shear layer resulted in an increase in the temporal amplification rate of the disturbances and an increase in the range of unstable frequencies, accompanied by a reduction in the phase velocities of the disturbances. Also, the temporal growth rates of the disturbances were increased as the Froude number was reduced (i.e. gravitational effects increased), indicating the destabilizing role played by gravity. The spatio-temporal stability analysis was performed to determine the nature of the absolute instability of the jet. The roles of the density ratio

  19. Gas chromatographic technologies for the analysis of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Marriot, P J; Shellie, R; Cornwell, C

    2001-11-30

    Essential oil analysis has basically had one technical goal: to achieve the best possible separation performance by using the most effective, available technology of the day. The result achieved from this may then be used to answer the research or industrial analysis questions which necessitated the analysis. This may be for comparative purposes, where one oil is contrasted with other(s) for quality control or investigation of adulteration, to discover new components, or to characterise the chemical classes of compounds present. Clearly, today the analyst turns to chromatography as the provider of separation and then may supplement that with mass spectrometry to aid identification. The power of GC-MS means that advances in both the separation technique, and improvements in mass spectrometry detection - along with improved data handling tools - will immediately be relevant to the essential oil area. This present review outlines the developmental nature of instrumental approaches to essential oil analysis using gas chromatography. Mass spectrometry will be included to the extent that it represents the hyphenation of choice for most analysts when analysing essential oils. Thus single-column and multi-dimensional analysis will be covered, as will sample handling or introduction techniques prior to the analysis step, where these techniques provide some measure of separation. The recent demonstration of comprehensive gas chromatography will be discussed as the potentially most powerful separation method for essential oils. This brief review is not intended to be a comprehensive dissertation on the field of essential oil analysis since that would require sufficient space to occupy a book in its own right. Rather, it will outline selected considerations and developments, to help explain where new technology has been applied to advantage in this field.

  20. Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Methods for Analysis of Gasoline/Oxygenate Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    determination of various oxygenated compounds in gasoline by gas chromotography have been developed.(3-6) These include gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the...ID-Ai33 0i6 EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS i/t OF GASOLINE/OXYGEN.. (U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX ARMY FUELS...0 EVALUATION OF GAS -CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE/OXYGENATE BLENDS INTERIM REPORT

  1. Role of faecal gas analysis for the diagnosis of IBD.

    PubMed

    Probert, Chris S J

    2011-08-01

    The diagnosis of IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) is based on the clinical evaluation of symptoms and signs leading to a series of investigations. The investigations used are often unpleasant for patients; they are invasive, costly and potentially dangerous. Patients often report that the odour of flatus, or the gas emitted from faeces, is abnormal during a flare of their IBD. Our group has characterized the VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in the headspace gas emitted from faecal samples from healthy subjects, from patients with infectious diarrhoea and from those with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, both in relapse and remission. Painstaking analysis of gas chromatography-MS data (VOC profiling) has revealed patterns of compounds that are strongly associated with specific infectious diseases and with IBD. These compounds represent a change in the microflora and/or the metabolism of bacteria and/or the epithelium in disease states. These profiles offer a potential for rapid non-invasive assessment of a range of infectious and non-infectious gastrointestinal diseases. The study of VOCs may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD.

  2. Thermal/Pyrolysis Gas Flow Analysis of Carbon Phenolic Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    Provided in this study are predicted in-depth temperature and pyrolysis gas pressure distributions for carbon phenolic materials that are externally heated with a laser source. Governing equations, numerical techniques and comparisons to measured temperature data are also presented. Surface thermochemical conditions were determined using the Aerotherm Chemical Equilibrium (ACE) program. Surface heating simulation used facility calibrated radiative and convective flux levels. Temperatures and pyrolysis gas pressures are predicted using an upgraded form of the SINDA/CMA program that was developed by NASA during the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP). Multispecie mass balance, tracking of condensable vapors, high heat rate kinetics, real gas compressibility and reduced mixture viscosity's have been added to the algorithm. In general, surface and in-depth temperature comparisons are very good. Specie partial pressures calculations show that a saturated water-vapor mixture is the main contributor to peak in-depth total pressure. Further, for most of the cases studied, the water-vapor mixture is driven near the critical point and is believed to significantly increase the local heat capacity of the composite material. This phenomenon if not accounted for in analysis models may lead to an over prediction in temperature response in charring regions of the material.

  3. [Blood gas analysis in dogs in veterinary practice. A review].

    PubMed

    Wagner, J; Rieker, T; Siegling-Vlitakis, C

    2015-01-01

    Blood gas analysis is useful to obtain information about acid-base state and gas exchange of the lung. Interpretation is based on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. This approach has its limitations especially in interpretation of complex disturbances of acid-base status and has been complemented by base excess and anion gap. Peter Stewart described a model of quantitative approach to the acid-base disturbances which has been further developed and is known as the strong ion approach. This model differs from the traditional approach in the assessment of metabolic disorders of acid base status. Both models complement each other but also have their advantages and disadvantages. For simple disorders of the acid-base state the Henderson-Hasselbalch approach can be used, however in complex disturbances of acid-base balance, especially with abnormalities of serum albumin and phosphate concentrations, the strong ion approach is recommended. With the understanding of both models and of the clinical presentation of blood gas abnormalities, optimal case management and therapy can be provided.

  4. Gas Analysis by Fourier Transform Mm-Wave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Brent J.; Steber, Amanda L.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Pate, Brooks H.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy of low pressure, room temperature gases offers high chemical selectivity and sensitivity with the potential for a wide range of applications in gas analysis. A strength of the technique is the potential to identify molecules that have not been previously studied by rotational spectroscopy by comparing experimental results to predictions of the spectroscopic parameters from quantum chemistry -6 so called library-free detection. The development of Fourier transform mm-wave spectrometers using high peak power (30 mW) active multiplier chain mm-wave sources brings new measurement capabilities to the analysis of complex gas mixtures. Strategies for gas analysis based on high-throughput mm-wave spectroscopy and arbitrary waveform generator driven mm-wave sources are described. Several new measurement capabilities come from the intrinsic time-domain measurement technique. High-sensitivity double-resonance measurements can be performed to speed the analysis of a complex gas sample containing several species. This technique uses a "pi-pulse" to selectively invert the population of two selected rotational energy levels and the effect of this excitation pulse on all other transitions in the spectrometer operating range is monitored using segmented chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy. This method can lead to automated determination of the molecular rotational constants. Rapid pulse duration scan experiments can be used to estimate the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the molecule from an unknown spectrum. Coherent pulse echo experiments, using the traditional Hahn sequence or two-color population recovery methods, can be used to determine the collisional relaxation rate of the unknown molecule. This rate determination improves the ability to estimate the mass of the unknown molecule from the determination of the Doppler dephasing rate. By performing a suite of automated, high-throughput measurements, there is the

  5. Gas-liquid chromatography in lunar organic analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) is a powerful and sensitive method for the separation and detection of organic compounds at nanogram levels. The primary requirement for successful analyses is that the compounds of interest must be volatile under the chromatographic conditions employed. Nonvolatile organic compounds must be converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. The derivatives of choice must be both amenable to chromatographic separation and be relatively stable. The condition of volatility necessitates the development of efficient derivatization reactions for important groups of compounds as amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleosides, etc. Trimethylsilylation and trifluoroacetylation represent specific areas of recent prominence. Some relevant practical aspects of GLC are discussed.

  6. An analysis of rate-sensitive skin in gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.; Schell, E.J.

    1983-10-01

    This paper documents the analysis of rate dependent skin in a gas well. Three build-up tests and an isochronal test are analyzed in some detail. The results indicate the rate dependent skin is due to nondarcy flow near the wellbore. Evidence is presented that suggest the non-darcy flow results from calcium carbonate scale partially plugging the perforations. Also, the summary of a pressure build-up study is included on the wells recently drilled in Champlin's Stratton-Agua Dulce Field.

  7. Analysis of rate-sensitive skin in gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.; Schell, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    This study documents the analysis of rate dependent skin in a gas well. Three build-up tests and an isochronal test are analyzed in some detail. The results indicate the rate dependent skin is due to non-Darcy flow near the well bore. Evidence is presented that suggest the non-Darcy flow results from calcium carbonate scale partially plugging the perforations. Also, the summary of a pressure build-up study is included on the wells recently drilled in Champlin's Stratton-Agua Dulce field.

  8. Comparison of Boolean analysis and standard phylogenetic methods using artificially evolved and natural mt-tRNA sequences from great apes.

    PubMed

    Ari, Eszter; Ittzés, Péter; Podani, János; Thi, Quynh Chi Le; Jakó, Eena

    2012-04-01

    Boolean analysis (or BOOL-AN; Jakó et al., 2009. BOOL-AN: A method for comparative sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 52, 887-97.), a recently developed method for sequence comparison uses the Iterative Canonical Form of Boolean functions. It considers sequence information in a way entirely different from standard phylogenetic methods (i.e. Maximum Parsimony, Maximum-Likelihood, Neighbor-Joining, and Bayesian analysis). The performance and reliability of Boolean analysis were tested and compared with the standard phylogenetic methods, using artificially evolved - simulated - nucleotide sequences and the 22 mitochondrial tRNA genes of the great apes. At the outset, we assumed that the phylogeny of Hominidae is generally well established, and the guide tree of artificial sequence evolution can also be used as a benchmark. These offer a possibility to compare and test the performance of different phylogenetic methods. Trees were reconstructed by each method from 2500 simulated sequences and 22 mitochondrial tRNA sequences. We also introduced a special re-sampling method for Boolean analysis on permuted sequence sites, the P-BOOL-AN procedure. Considering the reliability values (branch support values of consensus trees and Robinson-Foulds distances) we used for simulated sequence trees produced by different phylogenetic methods, BOOL-AN appeared as the most reliable method. Although the mitochondrial tRNA sequences of great apes are relatively short (59-75 bases long) and the ratio of their constant characters is about 75%, BOOL-AN, P-BOOL-AN and the Bayesian approach produced the same tree-topology as the established phylogeny, while the outcomes of Maximum Parsimony, Maximum-Likelihood and Neighbor-Joining methods were equivocal. We conclude that Boolean analysis is a promising alternative to existing methods of sequence comparison for phylogenetic reconstruction and congruence analysis.

  9. Methods Evolved by Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  10. Evolving window zone selection method followed by independent component analysis as useful chemometric tools to discriminate between grapefruit juice, orange juice and blends.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M; Le Gall, G; Colquhoun, I J; Lees, M; Rutledge, D N

    2007-08-06

    This study investigates the use of high resolution 1H NMR as a suitable alternative to the standard chromatographic method for the determination of adulteration of orange juice (Citrus sinensis) with grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi) based on flavonoid glycoside content. Fifty-nine orange juices (OJ), 23 grapefruit juices (GJ) and 10 blends (OG), obtained from local retail outlets were used to assess the performance of the 1H NMR method. The work presented here introduces the Evolving Window Zone Selection (EWZS) function that holds promise for the automatic detection of spectral regions tailored to discriminate predefined groups. This technique was applied on the pre-processed 1H NMR spectra of the 92 juices. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a good alternative to Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for recovering linearly-mixed unobserved multidimensional independent signals and has been used in this study to build supervised models that classify the samples into three categories, OJ, GJ, OG. The regions containing the known flavonoid glycoside markers were selected as well as another zone containing the signals of sucrose, alpha-glucose and other components that were tentatively attributed. ICA was applied on three different groups of selected variables and showed good results for both discrimination and interpretation of the signals. Up to 97.8% of the juices were correctly attributed. This method gave better results than the commonly used PCA method. In addition, the time required to carry out the 1H NMR analysis was less than half the time of the standard chromatographic method.

  11. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO2− anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO2− rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples. PMID:21953257

  12. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  13. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-05

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min.

  14. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

    2010-01-01

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation

  15. Self Evolving Modular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Kazuhiro; Kawabata, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Tetsuo

    We propose a novel modular network called the Self-Evolving Modular Network (SEEM). The SEEM has a modular network architecture with a graph structure and these following advantages: (1) new modules are added incrementally to allow the network to adapt in a self-organizing manner, and (2) graph's paths are formed based on the relationships between the models represented by modules. The SEEM is expected to be applicable to evolving functions of an autonomous robot in a self-organizing manner through interaction with the robot's environment and categorizing large-scale information. This paper presents the architecture and an algorithm for the SEEM. Moreover, performance characteristic and effectiveness of the network are shown by simulations using cubic functions and a set of 3D-objects.

  16. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  17. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Christopher R; He, Lilin; Agamalian, Michael; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, Mark; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

  18. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.

  19. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; ...

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in sizemore » following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.« less

  20. Determination of siloxanes and VOC in landfill gas and sewage gas by canister sampling and GC-MS/AES analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigkofler, M.; Niessner, R.

    1999-10-15

    Biogases such as landfill gas and sewage gas undergo a combustion process which is generating electric energy. Since several trace compounds such as siloxanes (also halogenated and sulfur compounds) are known to cause severe problems to these gas combustion engines, they are of particular interest. In this work, a new technique for sampling, identification, and quantification of siloxanes and volatile organic carbon (VOC) in landfill gas and sewage gas is presented. After sample collection using evacuated stainless steel canisters biogas was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy (GC-MS/AES). Using gas canisters, the sampling process was simplified (no vacuum pump needed), and multiple analysis was possible. The simultaneous application of MSD and AED allowed a rapid screening of silicon compounds in the complex biogases. Individual substances were identified independently both by MSD analysis and by determination of their elemental constitution. Quantification of trace compounds was achieved using a 30 component external standard containing siloxanes, organochlorine and organosulfur compounds, alkanes, terpenes, and aromatic compounds. Precision, linearity, and detection limits have been studied. In real samples, concentrations of silicon containing compounds (trimethylsilanol, hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethyltetrasiloxane, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane, octamethylcyclotetrasilioxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane) in the mg/m{sub 3} range have been observed.

  1. CFD analysis of gas explosions vented through relief pipes.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2006-09-21

    Vent devices for gas and dust explosions are often ducted to safe locations by means of relief pipes. However, the presence of the duct increases the severity of explosion if compared to simply vented vessels (i.e. compared to cases where no duct is present). Besides, the identification of the key phenomena controlling the violence of explosion has not yet been gained. Multidimensional models coupling, mass, momentum and energy conservation equations can be valuable tools for the analysis of such complex explosion phenomena. In this work, gas explosions vented through ducts have been modelled by a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) approach in which the laminar, flamelet and distributed combustion models have been implemented. Numerical test have been carried out by varying ignition position, duct diameter and length. Results have evidenced that the severity of ducted explosions is mainly driven by the vigorous secondary explosion occurring in the duct (burn-up) rather than by the duct flow resistance or acoustic enhancement. Moreover, it has been found out that the burn-up affects explosion severity due to the reduction of venting rate rather than to the burning rate enhancement through turbulization.

  2. Inert gas analysis of ventilation-perfusion matching during hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, D D; Ott, S M; Sherrard, D J; Hlastala, M P

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoxemia during hemodialysis was investigated by the multiple inert gas elimination technique in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated dogs. Profound leukopenia occurred in the first hour of a 2-h hemodialysis with a cuprophan membrane and dialysate that contained acetate. Arterial partial pressure of O2 and CO2 and oxygen consumption remained unchanged during dialysis. Pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination and lung respiratory exchange ratio decreased with the initiation of dialysis, remained depressed throughout the duration of dialysis, and returned to predialysis levels after the cessation of dialysis. Cardiac output diminished during dialysis but did not return to base-line levels after dialysis. Multiple indices calculated from inert gas analysis revealed no ventilation-perfusion mismatching during dialysis. The shunt and perfusion to regions of low alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) were unchanged during dialysis. There was no change in the mean or standard deviation of the profile of the percentage of total perfusion to regions of the lung that had VA/Q near 1.0; nor was there any increase in the directly calculated arterial-alveolar partial pressure differences for the inert gases during dialysis. Dead space became mildly elevated during dialysis. These results show that during dialysis with controlled ventilation there is no ventilation-perfusion mismatching that leads to hypoxemia. During spontaneous ventilation any hypoxemia must occur due to hypoventilation secondary to the CO2 exchange by the dialyzer and subsequent reduction in pulmonary CO2 exchange. PMID:6715542

  3. Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1991-01-01

    Helium tests of the main propulsion system in the Space Shuttle and on hydrogen leaks are examined. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers (MS) to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long tubes to sample gas from the payload bay, mid-body, aft engine compartment, and external tank. The purpose is to improve the HGDS, especially in its potential for locating cryogen leaks. Pre-existing leak data was analyzed for transient information to determine if the leak location could be pinpointed from test data. A rapid response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested. Large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MS was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MS data. One conclusion is that the backup HGDS sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second.

  4. Venus lower atmospheric composition - Analysis by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen (69.3 ppm), argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfur dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the cloud tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these results, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors.

  5. Percolation analysis of a disordered spinor Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Sk Noor; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of an on-site disorder potential in a gas of spinor (spin-1) ultracold atoms loaded in an optical lattice corresponding to both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-dependent interactions. Starting with a disordered spinor Bose-Hubbard model (SBHM) on a two-dimensional square lattice, we observe the appearance of a Bose glass phase using the fraction of the lattice sites having finite superfluid order parameter and non integer local densities as an indicator. A precise distinction between three different types of phases namely, superfluid, Mott insulator and Bose glass is done via a percolation analysis thereby demonstrating that a reliable enumeration of phases is possible at particular values of the parameters of the SBHM. Finally, we present the phase diagram based on the above information for both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions.

  6. The carbon isotopic composition of catalytic gas: A comparative analysis with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Elrod, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Tee idea that natural gas is the thermal product of organic decomposition has persisted for over half a century. Crude oil is thought to be an important source of gas, cracking to wet gas above 150 C, and dry gas above 200 C. But there is little evidence to support this view. For example, crude oil is proving to be more stable than previously thought and projected to remain intact over geologic time at typical reservoir temperature. Moreover, when oil does crack, the products do not resemble natural gas. Oil to gas could be catalytic, however, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sediments. This would explain the low temperatures at which natural gas forms, and the high amounts of methane. This idea gained support recently when the natural progression of oil to dry gas was duplicated in the laboratory catalytically. The authors report here the isotopic composition of catalytic gas generated from crude oil and pure hydrocarbons between 150 and 200 C. {delta}{sup 13}C for C{sub 1} through C{sub 5} was linear with 1/n (n = carbon number) in accordance with theory and typically seen in natural gases. Over extended reaction, isobutane and isopentane remained lighter than their respective normal isomers and the isotopic differentials were constant as all isomers became heavier over time. Catalytic methane, initially {minus}51.87{per_thousand} (oil = {minus}22.5{per_thousand}), progressed to a final composition of {minus}26.94{per_thousand}, similar to the maturity trend seen in natural gases: {minus}50{per_thousand} to {minus}20{per_thousand}. Catalytic gas is thus identical to natural gas in molecular and isotopic composition adding further support to the view that catalysis by transition metals may be a significant source of natural gas.

  7. Direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Sakurai, Hiromu; Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Günther, Detlef

    2015-09-03

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique was applied to the direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in ambient air. The ultra-trace semiconductor gases such as arsine (AsH3) and phosphine (PH3) were converted to particles by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonia (NH3) gases within a gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The converted particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS through a gas exchange device (GED), which could penetrate the particles as well as exchange to Ar from either non-reacted gases such as an air or remaining gases of O3 and NH3. The particle size distribution of converted particles was measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the results supported the elucidation of particle agglomeration between the particle converted from semiconductor gas and the particle of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which was produced as major particle in GPD. Stable time-resolved signals from AsH3 and PH3 in air were obtained by GPD-GED-ICPMS with continuous gas introduction; however, the slightly larger fluctuation, which could be due to the ionization fluctuation of particles in ICP, was observed compared to that of metal carbonyl gas in Ar introduced directly into ICPMS. The linear regression lines were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) of 1.5 pL L(-1) and 2.4 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, were estimated. Since these LODs revealed sufficiently lower values than the measurement concentrations required from semiconductor industry such as 0.5 nL L(-1) and 30 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, the GPD-GED-ICPMS could be useful for direct and high sensitive analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in air.

  8. Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Processes for Potential Use on Army Coal-Fired Boilers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT N-93 September 1980 ANALYSIS OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (FGD) PROCESSES FOR POTENTIAL USE ON ARMY COAL-FIRED BOILERS TECHNICAL LIBRARY...REFERENCE: Technical Report N-93, Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Ppooesses for Potential Use on Army Coal-Fired Boilers Please take a few...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 1. REPORT NUMBER CERL-TR-N-93 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO «. TITLE (end Subtitle) ANALYSIS OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (FGD

  9. Technology and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: An IntegratedScenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, J.G.; Latiner, S.; Markel, R.J.; Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes an analysis of possible technology-based scenarios for the U.S. energy system that would result in both carbon savings and net economic benefits. We use a modified version of the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System (LBNL-NEMS) to assess the potential energy, carbon, and bill savings from a portfolio of carbon saving options. This analysis is based on technology resource potentials estimated in previous bottom-up studies, but it uses the integrated LBNL-NEMS framework to assess interactions and synergies among these options. The analysis in this paper builds on previous estimates of possible "technology paths" to investigate four major components of an aggressive greenhouse gas reduction strategy: (1) the large scale implementation of demand-side efficiency, comparable in scale to that presented in two recent policy studies on this topic; (2) a variety of "alternative" electricity supply-side options, including biomass cofiring, extension of the renewable production tax credit for wind, increased industrial cogeneration, and hydropower refurbishment. (3) the economic retirement of older and less efficient existing fossil-find power plants; and (4) a permit charge of $23 per metric ton of carbon (1996 $/t),l assuming that carbon trading is implemented in the US, and that the carbon permit charge equilibrates at this level. This level of carbon permit charge, as discussed later in the report, is in the likely range for the Clinton Administration's position on this topic.

  10. Gas-insulated substation spacer surface degradation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.Y.; Braun, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of the project was to develop surface analysis techniques which can correlate the performance of spacers in SF{sub 6} insulated switchgear with changes in their dielectric and chemical characteristics after exposure to SF{sub 6} arcing byproducts and low energy flashovers. Critical material parameters responsible for spacer performance were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and electrical surface resistance measurements. Results related to arc byproduct resistance and tracking resistance of seven types of filled epoxy spacer materials are presented. Degradation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the differing material behaviour. The study shows that the interaction of certain types of filler and resin systems with the SF{sub 6} spark and the decomposed gas is responsible for the degradation in impulse withstand performance. A practical technique using surface electrical resistance to detect degraded spacer after exposure to large quantities of arc byproducts has been developed and the construction of a probe for spacer surface assessment was described. 15 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. A Content Analysis of Students' Explanations of Gas Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2007-01-01

    Students were asked to answer a multiple-choice, particulate-level question on gas properties and also explain their understanding on gas particles at the microscopic levels when the gas sample was cooled. The question was considered to be troublesome by some students as the question did not depict the critical attribute to change and some…

  12. Design and performance analysis of gas and liquid radial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xu

    In the first part of the research, pumps running in reverse as turbines are studied. This work uses experimental data of wide range of pumps representing the centrifugal pumps' configurations in terms of specific speed. Based on specific speed and specific diameter an accurate correlation is developed to predict the performances at best efficiency point of the centrifugal pump in its turbine mode operation. The proposed prediction method yields very good results to date compared to previous such attempts. The present method is compared to nine previous methods found in the literature. The comparison results show that the method proposed in this paper is the most accurate. The proposed method can be further complemented and supplemented by more future tests to increase its accuracy. The proposed method is meaningful because it is based both specific speed and specific diameter. The second part of the research is focused on the design and analysis of the radial gas turbine. The specification of the turbine is obtained from the solar biogas hybrid system. The system is theoretically analyzed and constructed based on the purchased compressor. Theoretical analysis results in a specification of 100lb/min, 900ºC inlet total temperature and 1.575atm inlet total pressure. 1-D and 3-D geometry of the rotor is generated based on Aungier's method. 1-D loss model analysis and 3-D CFD simulations are performed to examine the performances of the rotor. The total-to-total efficiency of the rotor is more than 90%. With the help of CFD analysis, modifications on the preliminary design obtained optimized aerodynamic performances. At last, the theoretical performance analysis on the hybrid system is performed with the designed turbine.

  13. Theoretical and experimental analysis of a multiphase screw pump, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Raebiger, K.; Maksoud, T.M.A.; Ward, J.; Hausmann, G.

    2008-09-15

    In the investigation of the pumping behaviour of multiphase screw pumps, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions, theoretical and experimental analyses were performed. A new theoretical screw pump model was developed, which calculates the time-dependent conditions inside the several chambers of a screw pump as well as the exchange of mass and energy between these chambers. By means of the performed experimental analysis, the screw pump model was verified, especially at very high gas volume fractions from 90% to 99%. The experiments, which were conducted with the reference fluids water and air, can be divided mainly into the determination of the steady state pumping behaviour on the one hand and into the analysis of selected transient operating conditions on the other hand, whereas the visualisation of the leakage flows through the circumferential gaps was rounded off the experimental analysis. (author)

  14. Harmonisation of coupled calibration curves to reduce correlated effects in the analysis of natural gas by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vargha, Gergely; Milton, Martin; Cox, Maurice; Kamvissis, Sarantis

    2005-01-14

    Quantitative analysis of natural gas depends on the calibration of a gas chromatograph with certified gas mixtures and the determination of a response relationship for each species by regression analysis. The uncertainty in this calibration is dominated by variations in the amount of the sample used for each analysis that are strongly correlated for all species measured in the same run. The "harmonisation" method described here minimises the influence of these correlations on the calculated calibration curves and leads to a reduction in the root-mean-square residual deviations from the fitted curve of a factor between 2 and 5. Consequently, it removes the requirement for each run in the calibration procedure to be carried out under the same external conditions, and opens the possibility that new data, measured under different environmental or instrumental conditions, can be appended to an existing calibration database.

  15. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-09-08

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  16. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  17. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  18. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; González-Díaz, Oscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  19. Highly-evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The ways in which the IUE has proved useful in studying highly evolved stars are reviewed. The importance of high dispersion spectra for abundance analyses of the sd0 stars and for studies of the wind from the central star of NGC 6543 and the wind from the 0 type component of Vela X-1 is shown. Low dispersion spectra are used for absolute spectrophotometry of the dwarf nova, Ex Hya. Angular resolution is important for detecting and locating UV sources in globular clusters.

  20. Gas film disturbance characteristics analysis of high-speed and high-pressure dry gas seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan; Jiang, Jinbo; Peng, Xudong

    2016-08-01

    The dry gas seal(DGS) has been widely used in high parameters centrifugal compressor, but the intense vibrations of shafting, especially in high-speed condition, usually result in DGS's failure. So the DGS's ability of resisting outside interference has become a determining factor of the further development of centrifugal compressor. However, the systematic researches of which about gas film disturbance characteristics of high parameters DGS are very little. In order to study gas film disturbance characteristics of high-speed and high-pressure spiral groove dry gas seal(S-DGS) with a flexibly mounted stator, rotor axial runout and misalignment are taken into consideration, and the finite difference method and analytical method are used to analyze the influence of gas film thickness disturbance on sealing performance parameters, what's more, the effects of many key factors on gas film thickness disturbance are systematically investigated. The results show that, when sealed pressure is 10.1MPa and seal face average linear velocity is 107.3 m/s, gas film thickness disturbance has a significant effect on leakage rate, but has relatively litter effect on open force; Excessively large excitation amplitude or excessively high excitation frequency can lead to severe gas film thickness disturbance; And it is beneficial to assure a smaller gas film thickness disturbance when the stator material density is between 3.1 g/cm3 to 8.4 g/cm3; Ensuring sealing performance while minimizing support axial stiffness and support axial damping can help to improve dynamic tracking property of dry gas seal. The proposed research provides the instruction to optimize dynamic tracking property of the DGS.

  1. Comparison of gas chromatographic hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Krupp, E M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Fariñas, N Rodríguez; Moreno, M Jiménez; Wallace, D; Ropero, M J Patiño

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of three hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis in different sample matrices using gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) and pyrolysis atomic fluorescence (GC-pyro-AFS) detection. Aqueous ethylation with NaBEt(4) was required in all cases. All systems were validated with respect to precision, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% RSD, confirmed by the Snedecor F-test. All methods proved to be robust according to a Plackett-Burnham design for 7 factors and 15 experiments, and calculations were carried out using the procedures described by Youden and Steiner. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (DORM-2 and DOLT-3) were analyzed after closed-vessel microwave extraction with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). No statistically significant differences were found to the certified values (p=0.05). The suitability for water samples analysis with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic spiked waters. Absolute detection and quantification limits were in the range of 2-6 pg for GC-pyro-AFS, 1-4 pg for GC-MS, with 0.05-0.21 pg for GC-ICP-MS showing the best limits of detection for the three systems employed. However, all systems are sufficiently sensitive for mercury speciation in environmental samples, with GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS offering isotope analysis capabilities for the use of species-specific isotope dilution analysis, and GC-pyro-AFS being the most cost effective alternative.

  2. Evolving Robust Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Nasimul; Monjo, Taku; Moscato, Pablo; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Design and implementation of robust network modules is essential for construction of complex biological systems through hierarchical assembly of ‘parts’ and ‘devices’. The robustness of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is ascribed chiefly to the underlying topology. The automatic designing capability of GRN topology that can exhibit robust behavior can dramatically change the current practice in synthetic biology. A recent study shows that Darwinian evolution can gradually develop higher topological robustness. Subsequently, this work presents an evolutionary algorithm that simulates natural evolution in silico, for identifying network topologies that are robust to perturbations. We present a Monte Carlo based method for quantifying topological robustness and designed a fitness approximation approach for efficient calculation of topological robustness which is computationally very intensive. The proposed framework was verified using two classic GRN behaviors: oscillation and bistability, although the framework is generalized for evolving other types of responses. The algorithm identified robust GRN architectures which were verified using different analysis and comparison. Analysis of the results also shed light on the relationship among robustness, cooperativity and complexity. This study also shows that nature has already evolved very robust architectures for its crucial systems; hence simulation of this natural process can be very valuable for designing robust biological systems. PMID:25616055

  3. Characterizing Environmental Transformation of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Nano-Fiber Composites using Thermal Analysis and Related Hyphenated Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (TGA/GCMS), for the evolved gas analysis, has given insight to the stability and kinetics of structural changes and determining adsorbed organics to nanomaterials and nanocomposites. TGA is als...

  4. Analysis and Applications of Radiometric Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sergey F. Gimelshein & Natalia E. Gimelshein (ERC, Inc...Forces in Rarefied Gas Flows Sergey F. Gimelshein∗, Natalia E. Gimelshein∗, Andrew D. Ketsdever† and Nathaniel P. Selden∗∗ ∗ERC, Inc, Edwards AFB, CA 93524...geometries. Keywords: Radiometric force, shear, ES-BGK equation PACS: 51.10.+y INTRODUCTION Rarefied gas flow surrounding a thin vane with a temperature

  5. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy for gas analysis for production of primary reference gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K.; Rademann, K.; Panne, U.; Maiwald, M.

    2017-02-01

    Due to its direct correlation to the number of spins within a sample quantitative NMR spectroscopy (qNMR) is a promising method with absolute comparison abilities in complex systems in technical, as well as metrological applications. Most of the samples studied with qNMR are in liquid state in diluted solutions, while gas-phase applications represent a rarely applied case. Commercially available NMR equipment was used for purity assessment of liquid and liquefied hydrocarbons serving as raw materials for production of primary reference gas standards. Additionally, gas-phase studies were performed within an online NMR flow probe, as well as in a high-pressure NMR setup to check feasibility as verification method for the composition of gas mixtures.

  6. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy for gas analysis for production of primary reference gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Rademann, K; Panne, U; Maiwald, M

    2017-02-01

    Due to its direct correlation to the number of spins within a sample quantitative NMR spectroscopy (qNMR) is a promising method with absolute comparison abilities in complex systems in technical, as well as metrological applications. Most of the samples studied with qNMR are in liquid state in diluted solutions, while gas-phase applications represent a rarely applied case. Commercially available NMR equipment was used for purity assessment of liquid and liquefied hydrocarbons serving as raw materials for production of primary reference gas standards. Additionally, gas-phase studies were performed within an online NMR flow probe, as well as in a high-pressure NMR setup to check feasibility as verification method for the composition of gas mixtures.

  7. D/H in Volatiles Evolved from Scooped and Drilled Samples in Rocknest and Yellowknife Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Brunner, A.; McAdam, A.; Webster, C. R.; Flesch, G.; Stern, J. C.; Franz, H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Leshin, L. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Curiosity's definitive detection of clays in the Yellowknife Bay of Gale crater came from CheMin X-ray diffraction patterns and the high temperature release of water in the SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments. The SAM Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) is able to measure the D/H ratio in evolved water and the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) in evolved hydrogen and evolved water as a function of the sample temperature. While other hydrogen containing species are present in the EGA data these two molecules dominate the total H release. A contribution to the low temperature water evolved from these clays comes from interlayer water and the high temperature water from the dehydroxylation of the clay minerals. We report on the differences between the D/H ratios in the low and high temperature EGA data and the differences in the D/H in the evolved water and in a high temperature hydrogen peak that is evident in the EGA data. It is possible that the D/H in the low temperature water released may reflect more recent atmospheric exchange while the high temperature release the D/H of the water which helped form these clays.

  8. An econometric analysis of the market for natural gas futures

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    This research tests a form of the efficient markets hypothesis in the market for natural gas futures. Unlike other studies of future markets, the test for market efficiency is conducted at numerous locations which comprise the natural gas spot market in addition to the delivery location specified in the futures contract. Natural gas spot and futures prices are found to be nonstationary and accordingly are modeled using recently developed maximum likelihood cointegrated with nearly all of the spot market prices across the national network of gas pipelines. The hypothesis of market efficiency can be rejected in 3 of the 13 spot markets. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  10. Systematic literature review and network meta-analysis in highly active relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis and rapidly evolving severe multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Eline; Papadimitropoulou, Katerina; Jarrett, James; Bending, Matthew; Firth, Zoe; Allen, Felicity; Adlard, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system. Relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) is the most common clinical form of MS and affects ∼85% of cases at onset. Highly active (HA) and rapidly evolving severe (RES) RRMS are 2 forms of RRMS amenable to disease-modifying therapies (DMT). This study explored the efficacy of fingolimod relative to other DMTs for the treatment of HA and RES RRMS. Methods A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted to identify published randomised controlled trials in HA and RES RRMS. Identified evidence was vetted, and a Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed to evaluate the relative efficacy of fingolimod versus dimethyl fumarate (DMF) in HA RRMS and versus natalizumab in RES RRMS. Results For HA RRMS, the SLR identified 2 studies with relevant patient subgroup data: 1 comparing fingolimod with placebo and the other comparing DMF with placebo. 3 studies were found for RES RRMS: 1 comparing fingolimod with placebo and 2 studies comparing natalizumab with placebo. NMA results in the HA population showed a favourable numerical trend of fingolimod versus DMF assessed for annualised relapse rate (ARR) and 3-month confirmed disability progression. For the RES population, the results identified an increase of ARR and 3-month confirmed disability progression for fingolimod versus natalizumab (not statistically significant). Sparse study data and the consequently high uncertainty around the estimates restricted our ability to demonstrate statistical significance in the studied subgroups. Conclusions Data limitations are apparent when conducting an informative indirect comparison for the HA and RES RRMS subgroups as the subgroups analyses were retrospective analyses of studies powered to indicate differences across entire study populations. Comparisons across treatments in HA or RES RRMS will be associated with high levels of uncertainty until new data are

  11. Methodology Used for Gas Analysis and Control of Trace Chemical Contaminants at a Hyperbaric Facility. 1. Gas Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    specifications, or other date is not to be regarded by implication or otherwise, as in any manner licens - ing the holder or any 6ther person or corporation...cylinder. There are many types and brands of regulators on the market, but not all are suitable for trace or high purity gas analysis work. An

  12. 78 FR 19444 - Pawnee National Grassland, Colorado; Oil and Gas Leasing Analysis Environmental Impact Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Pawnee National Grassland, Colorado; Oil and Gas Leasing Analysis... Pawnee National Grassland Record of Decision (ROD) for the Revision of the Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP), which included the Oil and Gas Leasing Analysis on the Pawnee National Grassland...

  13. Economics of lifecycle analysis and greenhouse gas regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2009-11-01

    Interest in alternatives to fossil fuels has risen significantly during the current decade. Although a variety of different alternative technologies have experienced rapid growth, biofuels have emerged as the main alternative transportation fuel. Energy policies in several countries envision blending biofuels with fossil fuels as the main mechanism to increase energy independence and energy security. Climate change policies in several regions are also riding on the same hope for reducing emissions from transportation. The main advantage of biofuels is that they are technically mature, cheaper to produce and more convenient to use relative to other alternative fuels. However, the impact of current biofuels on the environment and on economic welfare, is controversial. In my dissertation I focus on three topics relevant to future energy and climate policies. The first is the economics of lifecycle analysis and its application to the assessment of environmental impact of biofuel policies. The potential of biofuel for reducing greenhouse gas emissions was brought to the fore by research that relied on the methodology called lifecycle analysis (LCA). Subsequent research however showed that the traditional LCA fails to account for market-mediated effects that will arise when biofuel technologies are scaled up. These effects can increase or decrease emissions at each stage of the lifecycle. I discuss how the LCA will differ depending on the scale, a single firm versus a region and why LCA of the future should be distinguished from LCA of the past. I describe some approaches for extending the LCA methodology so that it can be applied under these different situations. The second topic is the economic impact of biofuels. Biofuels reduce the demand for oil and increase the demand for agricultural goods. To high income countries which tend to be both large importers of oil and large exporters of agricultural goods, this implies two major benefits. One of the one hand it reduces

  14. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of pans with luminol chemilumnescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.; Bornick, R.; Chen, Yu-Harn; Marley, N.

    1996-12-31

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) are important air pollutants in tropospheric chemistry. PANs are known to be potent phytotoxins at low ppb concentrations and are lachrymators. They can also transport the more reactive nitrogen dioxide long distances, because they are in equilibrium with that NO{sub x} species. Since PANs are trapped peroxyradicals, they are a direct measure of the peroxyradical levels and the of {open_quotes}photochemical age{close_quotes} of an air parcel. The PANs are typically measured in the atmosphere by using electron capture detection methods. These methods suffer from large background signals and detector responses to oxygen and water vapor. This paper describes the combination of a capillary gas chromatographic column with a modified luminol chemiluminescent nitrogen dioxide detector (Scintrex, Luminox) for rapid and sensitive detection of nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxypropionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyryl nitrate. Detection limits for this approach in the low tens of parts per trillion have been observed with total analysis times of less than three minutes. We will discuss the potential application of this method to other compounds, particularly, organonitrates, in a pyrolysis system and/or with ozone addition to the sampling streams.

  15. Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    This report provides an overview of the activities to date and schedule for future testing, validation, and authorized enhancements of Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The goal of this report is to inform DOE managers of progress in model development and to provide a benchmark for ongoing and future research. Section II of the report provides a detailed discussion on the major GSAM development programs performed and completed during the period of performance, July 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. Key improvements in the new GSAM version are summarized in Section III. Programmer's guides for GSAM main modules were produced to provide detailed descriptions of all major subroutines and main variables of the computer code. General logical flowcharts of the subroutines are also presented in the guides to provide overall picture of interactions between the subroutines. A standard structure of routine explanation is applied in every programmer's guide. The explanation is started with a brief description or main purpose of the routine, lists of input and output files read and created, and lists of invoked/child and calling/parent routines. In some of the guides, interactions between the routine itself and its parent and child routines are presented in the form of graphical flowchart. The explanation is then proceeded with step by step description of computer code in the subroutine where each step delegates a section of related code. Between steps, if a certain section of code needs further explanation, a Note is inserted with relevant explanation.

  16. Multiphysics methods development for high temperature gas reactor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, Volkan

    Multiphysics computational methods were developed to perform design and safety analysis of the next generation Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. A suite of code modules was developed to solve the coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics field equations. The thermal-hydraulics module is based on the three dimensional solution of the mass, momentum and energy equations in cylindrical coordinates within the framework of the porous media method. The neutronics module is a part of the PARCS (Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator) code and provides a fine mesh finite difference solution of the neutron diffusion equation in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates. Coupling of the two modules was performed by mapping the solution variables from one module to the other. Mapping is performed automatically in the code system by the use of a common material mesh in both modules. The standalone validation of the thermal-hydraulics module was performed with several cases of the SANA experiment and the standalone thermal-hydraulics exercise of the PBMR-400 benchmark problem. The standalone neutronics module was validated by performing the relevant exercises of the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 benchmark problems. Additionally, the validation of the coupled code system was performed by analyzing several steady state and transient cases of the OECD/NEA PBMR-400 benchmark problem.

  17. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  18. Stability analysis of an encapsulated microbubble against gas diffusion.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2010-03-01

    Linear stability analysis is performed for a mathematical model of diffusion of gases from an encapsulated microbubble. It is an Epstein-Plesset model modified to account for encapsulation elasticity and finite gas permeability. Although bubbles, containing gases other than air, are considered, the final stable bubble, if any, contains only air, and stability is achieved only when the surrounding medium is saturated or oversaturated with air. In absence of encapsulation elasticity, only a neutral stability is achieved for zero surface tension, the other solution being unstable. For an elastic encapsulation, different equilibrium solutions are obtained depending on the saturation level and whether the surface tension is smaller or higher than the elasticity. For an elastic encapsulation, elasticity can stabilize the bubble. However, imposing a non-negativity condition on the effective surface tension (consisting of reference surface tension and the elastic stress) leads to an equilibrium radius which is only neutrally stable. If the encapsulation can support a net compressive stress, it achieves actual stability. The linear stability results are consistent with our recent numerical findings. Physical mechanisms for the stability or instability of various equilibriums are provided.

  19. Simple gas chromatographic system for analysis of microbial respiratory gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    Dual column ambient temperature system, consisting of pair of capillary columns, microbead thermistor detector and micro gas-sampling valve, is used in remote life-detection equipment for space experiments. Performance outweighs advantage gained by utilizing single-column systems to reduce weight, conserve carrier gas and operate at lower power levels.

  20. Performance analysis of the continuous trace gas preconcentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Han, Y.-L.

    2011-03-01

    In gas molecule detection systems, certain trace gas components can go undetected. This is due to ultralow yet dangerous concentrations combined with limitations of the detection methods. To remedy this problem, a preconcentrator can be included in a system to increase the trace gas concentrations, before the gas samples enter the detection unit. The widely used adsorption/desorption preconcentrators enable detection by interrupting the sampled gas flow for significant periods, in order to accumulate detectable periodic concentrations of trace gas molecules. The recently patented continuous trace gas preconcentrator (CTGP) provides a unique approach for enhancing the trace gas concentration, without stopping the flow. In this study, a performance model is developed for the CTGP, by application of the Poiseuille flow coefficients for long tubes. Based on the Cercignani-Lampis scattering kernel, Sharipov calculated the Poiseuille flow coefficients for various geometries and numerous operating Knudsen numbers. The concentrations of sampled molecules were analyzed in this study using Sharipov's flow coefficients. The results presented here reinforce the potential benefits of the CTGP.

  1. Thermal stress analysis of a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed to enable improved engine performance is studied. Flexible numerical analysis schemes suitable for the determination of transient temperature profiles and thermal stress distributions in the seal are outlined. An estimation of the stresses to which a test seal is subjected during simulated engine deceleration from sea level takeoff to idle conditions is made. Experimental evidence has indicated that the surface layer of the seal is probably subjected to excessive tensile stresses during cyclic temperature loading. This assertion is supported by the analytical results presented. Brief consideration is given to means of mitigating this adverse stressing.

  2. Evaluation of soil gas sampling and analysis techniques at a former petrochemical plant site.

    PubMed

    Hers, I; Li, L; Hannam, S

    2004-07-01

    Methods for soil gas sampling and analysis are evaluated as part of a research study on soil vapour intrusion into buildings, conducted at a former petro-chemical plant site ("Chatterton site"). The evaluation process was designed to provide information on reliability and selection of appropriate methods for soil gas sampling and analysis, and was based on a literature review of data and methods, and experiments completed as part of the research study. The broader context of this work is that soil gas characterization is increasingly being used for input into risk assessment of contaminated sites, particularly when evaluating the potential intrusion of soil vapour into buildings. There are only a limited number of research studies and protocols addressing soil gas sampling and analysis. There is significant variability in soil gas probe design and sample collection and analysis methods used by practitioners. The experimental studies conducted to evaluate soil gas methods address the permeation or leakage of gases from Tedlar bags, time-dependent sorption of volatile organic compound (VOC)-vapours onto probe surfaces and sampling devices, and analytical and quality control issues for light gas and VOC analyses. Through this work, common techniques for soil gas collection and analysis are described together with implications for data quality arising from the different methods used. Some of the potential pitfalls that can affect soil gas testing are identified, and recommendations and guidance for improved protocols are provided.

  3. Numerical analysis on nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiru; Diao, Dongfeng; Yang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles can be taken as additives and added into various fluids to improve their lubricating performances. At present, researches in this area are mainly concentrated on the improvement effects of nanoparticles on the lubricating performances of liquid such as oil and water. Nanoparticles will also affect gas lubrication, but few related studies have been reported. Nanoparticles-laden gas film (NLGF) is formed when adding nanoparticles into gas bearing. Then, the lubricating performances of gas bearing including pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity will change. The variations of pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity in nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing are investigated by numerical method. Taking account of the compressibility of gas and the interactions between gas and nanoparticles, a computational fluid dynamics model based on Navier-Stokes equations is applied to simulate the NLGF flow. The effects of inlet nanoparticles volume fraction and orifice radius on film pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of the NLGF are calculated. The numerical calculation results show that both of the film land pressure and the maximum film pressure both increase when the nanoparticles are added into gas bearing, and the film pressures increase with the rising of the inlet nanoparticles volume fraction. The nanoparticles have an enhancement effect on load-carrying capacity of the studied bearing, and the enhancement effect becomes greater as the film thickness decrease. Therefore, nanoparticles can effectively improve the lubricating performance of gas bearing. The proposed research provides a theoretical basis for the design of new-type nanoparticles-laden gas film bearings.

  4. Why did heterospory evolve?

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kurt B; Burd, Martin

    2016-10-11

    The primitive land plant life cycle featured the production of spores of unimodal size, a condition called homospory. The evolution of bimodal size distributions with small male spores and large female spores, known as heterospory, was an innovation that occurred repeatedly in the history of land plants. The importance of desiccation-resistant spores for colonization of the land is well known, but the adaptive value of heterospory has never been well established. It was an addition to a sexual life cycle that already involved male and female gametes. Its role as a precursor to the evolution of seeds has received much attention, but this is an evolutionary consequence of heterospory that cannot explain the transition from homospory to heterospory (and the lack of evolutionary reversal from heterospory to homospory). Enforced outcrossing of gametophytes has often been mentioned in connection to heterospory, but we review the shortcomings of this argument as an explanation of the selective advantage of heterospory. Few alternative arguments concerning the selective forces favouring heterospory have been proposed, a paucity of attention that is surprising given the importance of this innovation in land plant evolution. In this review we highlight two ideas that may lead us to a better understanding of why heterospory evolved. First, models of optimal resource allocation - an approach that has been used for decades in evolutionary ecology to help understand parental investment and other life-history patterns - suggest that an evolutionary increase in spore size could reach a threshold at which small spores yielding small, sperm-producing gametophytes would return greater fitness per unit of resource investment than would large spores and bisexual gametophytes. With the advent of such microspores, megaspores would evolve under frequency-dependent selection. This argument can account for the appearance of heterospory in the Devonian, when increasingly tall and complex

  5. Gas purge microsyringe extraction for quantitative direct gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Piao, Xiangfan; Qiu, Jinxue; Wang, Xiaoping; Ren, Chunyan; Li, Donghao

    2011-03-25

    Sample pretreatment before chromatographic analysis is the most time consuming and error prone part of analytical procedures, yet it is a key factor in the final success of the analysis. A quantitative and fast liquid phase microextraction technique termed as gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) has been developed for simultaneous direct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals without cleanup process. Use of a gas flowing system, temperature control and a conventional microsyringe greatly increased the surface area of the liquid phase micro solvent, and led to quantitative recoveries of both volatile and semivolatile chemicals within short extraction time of only 2 min. Recoveries of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and alkylphenols (APs) determined were 85-107%, and reproducibility was between 2.8% and 8.5%. In particular, the technique shows high sensitivity for semivolatile chemicals which is difficult to achieve in other sample pretreatment techniques such as headspace-liquid phase microextraction. The variables affecting extraction efficiency such as gas flow rate, extraction time, extracting solvent type, temperature of sample and extracting solvent were investigated. Finally, the technique was evaluated to determine PAHs, APs and OCPs from plant and soil samples. The experimental results demonstrated that the technique is economic, sensitive to both volatile and semivolatile chemicals, is fast, simple to operate, and allows quantitative extraction. On-site monitoring of volatile and semivolatile chemicals is now possible using this technique due to the simplification and speed of sample treatment.

  6. Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensor for Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Chan, J; Carter, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-07-12

    A hollow waveguide mid-infrared gas sensor operating from 1000 cm{sup -1} to 4000 cm{sup -1} has been developed, optimized, and its performance characterized by combining a FT-IR spectrometer with Ag/Ag-halide hollow core optical fibers. The hollow core waveguide simultaneously serves as a light guide and miniature gas cell. CH{sub 4} was used as test analyte during exponential dilution experiments for accurate determination of the achievable limit of detection (LOD). It is shown that the optimized integration of an optical gas sensor module with FT-IR spectroscopy provides trace sensitivity at the few hundreds of parts-per-billion concentration range (ppb, v/v) for CH{sub 4}.

  7. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  8. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  9. Evolving synergetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  10. The Physics Analysis of a Gas Attenuator with Argon as a Working Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov,, D.D.

    2010-12-07

    A gas attenuator is an important element of the LCLS facility. The attenuator must operate in a broad range of x-ray energies, provide attenuation coefficient between 1 and 10{sup 4} with the accuracy of 1% and, at the same time, be reliable and allow for many months of un-interrupted operation. S. Shen has recently carried out a detailed design study of the attenuator based on the use of nitrogen as a working gas. In this note we assess the features of the attenuator based on the use of argon. We concentrate on the physics issues, not the design features.

  11. Impact of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry on food analysis.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Purcaro, Giorgia; Maimone, Mariarosa; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry has been on the separation-science scene for about 15 years. This three-dimensional method has made a great positive impact on various fields of research, and among these that related to food analysis is certainly at the forefront. The present critical review is based on the use of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the untargeted (general qualitative profiling and fingerprinting) and targeted analysis of food volatiles; attention is focused not only on its potential in such applications, but also on how recent advances in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry will potentially be important for food analysis. Additionally, emphasis is devoted to the many instances in which straightforward gas chromatography with mass spectrometry is a sufficiently-powerful analytical tool. Finally, possible future scenarios in the comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry food analysis field are discussed.

  12. GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2008-05-28

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  13. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  14. Integrated Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options and Related Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased concerns over air pollution (combined with detrimental health effects) and climate change have called for more stringent emission reduction strategies for criteria air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions. However, stringent regulatory policies can possibly have a...

  15. Analysis of temperature and pressure changes in liquefied natural gas (LNG) cryogenic tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.-S.; Wegrzyn, J.; Prasad, V.

    2004-10-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a transportation fuel for heavy vehicles such as trucks and transit buses, to lessen the dependency on oil and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The LNG stations are properly designed to prevent the venting of natural gas (NG) from LNG tanks, which can cause evaporative greenhouse gas emissions and result in fluctuations of fuel flow and changes of fuel composition. Boil-off is caused by the heat added into the LNG fuel during the storage and fueling. Heat can leak into the LNG fuel through the shell of tank during the storage and through hoses and dispensers during the fueling. Gas from tanks onboard vehicles, when returned to LNG tanks, can add additional heat into the LNG fuel. A thermodynamic and heat transfer model has been developed to analyze different mechanisms of heat leak into the LNG fuel. The evolving of properties and compositions of LNG fuel inside LNG tanks is simulated. The effect of a number of buses fueled each day on the possible total fuel loss rate has been analyzed. It is found that by increasing the number of buses, fueled each day, the total fuel loss rate can be reduced significantly. It is proposed that an electric generator be used to consume the boil-off gas or a liquefier be used to re-liquefy the boil-off gas to reduce the tank pressure and eliminate fuel losses. These approaches can prevent boil-off of natural gas emissions, and reduce the costs of LNG as transportation fuel.

  16. APPLICATIONS OF CFD METHOD TO GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-19

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was applied to the estimation of maximum benzene concentration for the vapor space inside a large-scaled and high-level radioactive waste tank at Savannah River site (SRS). The objective of the work was to perform the calculations for the benzene mixing behavior in the vapor space of Tank 48 and its impact on the local concentration of benzene. The calculations were used to evaluate the degree to which purge air mixes with benzene evolving from the liquid surface and its ability to prevent an unacceptable concentration of benzene from forming. The analysis was focused on changing the tank operating conditions to establish internal recirculation and changing the benzene evolution rate from the liquid surface. The model used a three-dimensional momentum coupled with multi-species transport. The calculations included potential operating conditions for air inlet and exhaust flows, recirculation flow rate, and benzene evolution rate with prototypic tank geometry. The flow conditions are assumed to be fully turbulent since Reynolds numbers for typical operating conditions are in the range of 20,000 to 70,000 based on the inlet conditions of the air purge system. A standard two-equation turbulence model was used. The modeling results for the typical gas mixing problems available in the literature were compared and verified through comparisons with the test results. The benchmarking results showed that the predictions are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and literature data. Additional sensitivity calculations included a reduced benzene evolution rate, reduced air inlet and exhaust flow, and forced internal recirculation. The modeling results showed that the vapor space was fairly well mixed and that benzene concentrations were relatively low when forced recirculation and 72 cfm ventilation air through the tank boundary were imposed. For the same 72 cfm air inlet flow but without forced recirculation

  17. Assessment of the Persistence of Vapour Evolved from Neat CH contamination on Prairie Terrain (Record of FPP-81-1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    EVOLVED FROM NEAT CH CONTAMINATION 0, N PRAIRIE TERRAIN (U) (Record of FPP 31-1) Reproduced From Best Available COPY by BTI ~ EWE COP To be...Analysis The vapour samplers from the bubblers and the ground contamination samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and vapour dosages calculated...The total methoxycycloheptatriene fraction was analyzed for, and the vapour dosages and percent recovery are based on this analysis. Stain sizes on

  18. Analysis of operation of the gas turbine in a poligeneration combined cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartela, Łukasz; Kotowicz, Janusz

    2013-12-01

    In the paper the results of analysis of an integrated gasification combined cycle IGCC polygeneration system, of which the task is to produce both electricity and synthesis gas, are shown. Assuming the structure of the system and the power rating of a combined cycle, the consumption of the synthesis gas for chemical production makes it necessary to supplement the lack of synthesis gas used for electricity production with the natural gas. As a result a change of the composition of the fuel gas supplied to the gas turbine occurs. In the paper the influence of the change of gas composition on the gas turbine characteristics is shown. In the calculations of the gas turbine the own computational algorithm was used. During the study the influence of the change of composition of gaseous fuel on the characteristic quantities was examined. The calculations were realized for different cases of cooling of the gas turbine expander's blades (constant cooling air mass flow, constant cooling air index, constant temperature of blade material). Subsequently, the influence of the degree of integration of the gas turbine with the air separation unit on the main characteristics was analyzed.

  19. Molecular genetic and physical analysis of gas vesicles in buoyant enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Monson, Rita E.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Different modes of bacterial taxis play important roles in environmental adaptation, survival, colonization and dissemination of disease. One mode of taxis is flotation due to the production of gas vesicles. Gas vesicles are proteinaceous intracellular organelles, permeable only to gas, that enable flotation in aquatic niches. Gene clusters for gas vesicle biosynthesis are partially conserved in various archaea, cyanobacteria, and some proteobacteria, such as the enterobacterium, S erratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006). Here we present the first systematic analysis of the genes required to produce gas vesicles in S39006, identifying how this differs from the archaeon H alobacterium salinarum. We define 11 proteins essential for gas vesicle production. Mutation of gvpN or gvpV produced small bicone gas vesicles, suggesting that the cognate proteins are involved in the morphogenetic assembly pathway from bicones to mature cylindrical forms. Using volumetric compression, gas vesicles were shown to comprise 17% of S39006 cells, whereas in E scherichia coli heterologously expressing the gas vesicle cluster in a deregulated environment, gas vesicles can occupy around half of cellular volume. Gas vesicle production in S39006 and E . coli was exploited to calculate the instantaneous turgor pressure within cultured bacterial cells; the first time this has been performed in either strain. PMID:26743231

  20. [Point care testing in blood gas and electrolyte analysis : examples of implementation and cost analysis].

    PubMed

    Magny, E; Beaudeux, J-L; Launay, J-M

    2003-01-01

    An increasing proportion of laboratories manage and organize point of care testing (POCT). The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation made at Lariboisière hospital for three remote blood gas analysers. The most important aspect in this achievement is the comprehensive computerization, making possible real time management of POCT in agreement with the Point of Care unit Management team. In addition, we present a running cost analysis, comparing three Blood gas systems (Rapidlab860, Rapidpoint 400--Bayer Diagnostics and i-Stat Abbott Diagnostics). This study indicates that cost per test hugely varies based on the daily sample demand. In addition to analytical and organizational items, the clinical chemist should consider the testing demand as a key factor in choosing an analyser for POCT.

  1. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants.

  2. Energy Factor Analysis for Gas Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2016-01-01

    Gas heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) can improve water heating efficiency with zero GWP and zero ODP working fluids. The energy factor (EF) of a gas HPWH is sensitive to several factors. In this work, expressions are derived for EF of gas HPWHs, as a function of heat pump cycle COP, tank heat losses, burner efficiency, electrical draw, and effectiveness of supplemental heat exchangers. The expressions are used to investigate the sensitivity of EF to each parameter. EF is evaluated on a site energy basis (as used by the US DOE for rating water heater EF), and a primary energy-basis energy factor (PEF) is also defined and included. Typical ranges of values for the six parameters are given. For gas HPWHs, using typical ranges for component performance, EF will be 59 80% of the heat pump cycle thermal COP (for example, a COP of 1.60 may result in an EF of 0.94 1.28). Most of the reduction in COP is due to burner efficiency and tank heat losses. Gas-fired HPWHs are theoretically be capable of an EF of up to 1.7 (PEF of 1.6); while an EF of 1.1 1.3 (PEF of 1.0 1.1) is expected from an early market entry.

  3. Analysis of Turkish High School Chemistry Textbooks and Teacher-Generated Questions about Gas Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakiboglu, Canan; Yildirir, H.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results of an analysis of high school chemistry textbooks and teacher-generated questions about gas laws. The materials that were analyzed consisted of 456 questions about gas laws found in seven grade 10 chemistry textbooks and 264 teacher-generated examination questions prepared by seven chemistry teachers from three…

  4. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  5. Analysis of Dicke Narrowing in Wall-Coated and Buffer-Gas-Filled Atomic Storage Cells,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    unshifted frequency. For the various reasons outlined the " particle in a box " analysis of motional narrowing in bufferless, wall-coated cells is...buffer gas or a wall, and consequently, one should not need two apparently distinct formalisms, buffer gas and particle in a box , to describe spectral line

  6. Performance analysis of the BNL FACE gas injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Nagy, J.; Alexander, Y.

    1992-12-31

    As described elsewhere in this volume, the criteria for successful operation of a FACE-type crop fumigation system include the spatial uniformity of the gas injected over the crop growing area, the efficiency of gas usage, and the overall cost of the system. Efficiency of gas usage is important not only from a cost standpoint, but also to reduce the distances required to preclude interference between replicate FACE arrays or control plots. The details of the FACE design and analyses of the important fluid mechanical concepts are described below. A more detailed description of the hardware was given. Additional FACE performance and CO{sub 2} distribution data are given. 7 refs., 25 figs.

  7. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  8. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  9. SeTES: A self-teaching expert system for the analysis, design, and prediction of gas production from unconventional gas resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Anderson Kuzma, Heidi; Blasingame, Thomas A.; Wayne Huang, Y.; Santos, Ralph; Boyle, Katie L.; Freeman, Craig M.; Ilk, Dilhan; Cossio, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Srimoyee; Nikolaou, Michael

    2013-08-01

    SeTES is a self-teaching expert system that (a) can incorporate evolving databases involving any type and amount of relevant data (geological, geophysical, geomechanical, stimulation, petrophysical, reservoir, production, etc.) originating from unconventional gas reservoirs, i.e., tight sands, shale or coalbeds, (b) can continuously update its built-in public database and refine the its underlying decision-making metrics and process, (c) can make recommendations about well stimulation, well location, orientation, design, and operation, (d) offers predictions of the performance of proposed wells (and quantitative estimates of the corresponding uncertainty), and (e) permits the analysis of data from installed wells for parameter estimation and continuous expansion of its database. Thus, SeTES integrates and processes information from multiple and diverse sources to make recommendations and support decision making at multiple time-scales, while expanding its internal database and explicitly addressing uncertainty. It receives and manages data in three forms: public data, that have been made available by various contributors, semi-public data, which conceal some identifying aspects but are available to compute important statistics, and a user's private data, which can be protected and used for more targeted design and decision making. It is the first implementation of a novel architecture that allows previously independent analysis methods and tools to share data, integrate results, and intelligently and iteratively extract the most value from the dataset. SeTES also presents a new paradigm for communicating research and technology to the public and distributing scientific tools and methods. It is expected to result in a significant improvement in reserve estimates, and increases in production by increasing efficiency and reducing uncertainty.

  10. Design and performance analysis of gas sorption compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Compressor kinetics based on gas adsorption and desorption processes by charcoal and for gas absorption and desorption processes by LaNi5 were analyzed using a two-phase model and a three-component model, respectively. The assumption of the modeling involved thermal and mechanical equilibria between phases or among the components. The analyses predicted performance well for compressors which have heaters located outside the adsorbent or the absorbent bed. For the rapidly-cycled compressor, where the heater was centrally located, only the transient pressure compared well with the experimental data.

  11. [Derivative gas chromatographic analysis of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sucrose].

    PubMed

    Cai, W M; Liu, H; Sun, X J

    2000-01-01

    As a new sweetener, fructooligosaccharide is paid more and more attention for its health improvement property. It includes trisaccharide, tetrasaccharide and pentasaccharide, and can be produced from sucrose by the fermentation of microorganism. In order to analyze the content of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sugar by gas chromatography, fructooligosaccharide was transformed into trimethylsilyl derivatives. Based on the modified gas chromatograph SP2308, and under the chosen chromatographic conditions with 0.53 mm capillary column of OV-101, the contents of fructose, glucose, sucrose and fructooligosaccharide were determined by programmed temperature chromatography. The recovery of fructooligosaccharide was satisfactory.

  12. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  13. Formation of Magnesium Silicates is Limited around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, J. A., III

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) grains could be produced in the hydrogen dominant gas outflow from evolved stars in addition to amorphous oxide minerals. Astronomical observations have shown the existence of abundant silicate grains around evolved stars and we have long realized that most of the silicate grains are amorphous, based on the observed infrared features. Only high mass loss stars show the feature attributed to magnesium-rich crystalline silicate about 10-20 % respect to total silicates, so far. The lower degree of crystallinity observed in silicates formed in outflows of lower mass-loss-rate stars might be caused by the formation of magnesium silicide in this relatively hydrogen-rich environment. As a result of predominant distribution of magnesium into the silicide, the composition of interstellar amorphous silicates could be magnesium poor compared with silicon. Indeed, the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition (Floss et al. 2006; Keller & Messenger 2007). Infrared observations suggest that there is little or no crystalline forsterite in interstellar environments while there is an abundance of crystalline forsterite in our Solar System. If the forsterite is a result of the oxidation of interstellar magnesium silicide, then it is clear both why crystalline forsterite is stoichiometric olivine and why the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition. In addition, it may also explain why the chemical composition of olivine is iron poor. Unfortunately, magnesium silicide has never been detected via astronomical observation or in the analysis of primitive meteorites. I would suggest that future analysis of meteorites and theoretical calculations could confirm the possibility of the formation of magnesium silicide grains around evolved stars.

  14. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

  15. Performance characteristics of gas analysis systems: what we know and what we need to know.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G; Davison, R C R; Nevill, A M

    2005-02-01

    It is important that sources of variation in gas analysis measurements are identified and described in an accurate and informative manner. In this paper, we discussed the potential sources of error, which should be considered in any measurement study on gas analysis systems. We then covered how errors in various terms associated with gas laws propagate to outcome measurements of gas exchange to help quantify the relative importance of sources of error. Finally, we performed a literature survey to explore the statistical methods researchers have employed to arrive at conclusions on the performance characteristics of gas analysis methods. We found examples of excellent practice in the literature, but there were also gaps in the knowledge of error in gas analysis systems. Consequently, we supplied guidelines for future method comparison studies. These guidelines included (i) a sample size of at least 40 participants and the citation of confidence intervals, (ii) a description of the relationships between systematic and random errors and the size of measured value, (iii) the parallel examination of test-retest error within a method comparison study, and (iv) an a priori-made judgement on how much systematic and random error between methods is acceptable for practical applications. We stressed that this judgement should be based on expert-agreed position statements about acceptable error, which unfortunately have yet to be formulated for gas analysis systems.

  16. Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: Annual report, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.; Coker, D.

    1987-12-01

    Tight gas sands are a vast future source of natural gas. These sands are characterized as having very low porosity and permeability. The main resource development problem is efficiently extracting the gas from the reservoir. Future production depends on a combination of gas price and technological advances. Gas production can be enhanced by fracturing. Studies have shown that many aspects of fracture design and gas production are influenced by properties of the rock matrix. Computer models for stimulation procedures require accurate knowledge of flow properties of both the rock matrix and the fractured regions. In the proposed work, these properties will be measured along with advanced core analysis procedure aimed at understanding the relationship between pore structure and properties. The objective of this project is to develop reliable core analysis techniques for measuring the petrophysical properties of tight gas sands. Recent research has indicated that the flow conditions in the reservoir can be greatly enhanced by the presence of natural fractures, which serve as a transport path for gas from the less permeable matrix. The study is mainly concerned with the dependence of flow in tight gas matrix and healed tectonic fractures on water saturation and confining pressure. This dependency is to be related to the detailed pore structure of tight sands as typified by cores recovered in the Multi-Well experiment. 22 refs., 34 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Experimental clean combustor program, phase 1. [aircraft exhaust/gas analysis - gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Vitti, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program of screening three low emission combustors for conventional takeoff and landing, by testing and analyzing thirty-two configurations is presented. Configurations were tested that met the emission goals at idle operating conditions for carbon monoxide and for unburned hydrocarbons (emission index values of 20 and 4, respectively). Configurations were also tested that met a smoke number goal of 15 at sea-level take-off conditions. None of the configurations met the goal for oxides of nitrogen emissions at sea-level take-off conditions. The best configurations demonstrated oxide of nitrogen emission levels that were approximately 61 percent lower than those produced by the JT9D-7 engine, but these levels were still approximately 24 percent above the goal of an emission index level of 10. Additional combustor performance characteristics, including lean blowout, exit temperature pattern factor and radial profile, pressure loss, altitude stability, and altitude relight characteristics were documented. The results indicate the need for significant improvement in the altitude stability and relight characteristics. In addition to the basic program for current aircraft engine combustors, seventeen combustor configurations were evaluated for advanced supersonic technology applications. The configurations were tested at cruise conditions, and a conceptual design was evolved.

  18. Unique problems associated with seismic analysis of partially gas-saturated unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate stability conditions restrict the occurrence of gas hydrate to unconsolidated and high water-content sediments at shallow depths. Because of these host sediments properties, seismic and well log data acquired for the detection of free gas and associated gas hydrate-bearing sediments often require nonconventional analysis. For example, a conventional method of identifying free gas using the compressional/shear-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) ratio at the logging frequency will not work, unless the free-gas saturations are more than about 40%. The P-wave velocity dispersion of partially gas-saturated sediments causes a problem in interpreting well log velocities and seismic data. Using the White, J.E. [1975. Computed seismic speeds and attenuation in rocks with partial gas saturation. Geophysics 40, 224-232] model for partially gas-saturated sediments, the difference between well log and seismic velocities can be reconciled. The inclusion of P-wave velocity dispersion in interpreting well log data is, therefore, essential to identify free gas and to tie surface seismic data to synthetic seismograms.

  19. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-scale deflection. The precision is defined as two times the standard deviation of five repetitive... mean response to a zero calibration gas shall not exceed ±3 percent of full-scale deflection during a 1... calibration response shall be less than ±3 percent of full scale during a 1-hour period. The...

  20. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  1. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

  2. Thermal analysis of a simple-cycle gas turbine in biogas power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Yomogida, D.E.; Thinh, Ngo Dinh

    1995-09-01

    This paper investigates the technical feasibility of utilizing small simple-cycle gas turbines (25 kW to 125 kW) for biogas power generation through thermal analysis. A computer code, GTPower, was developed to evaluate the performance of small simple-cycle gas turbines specifically for biogas combustion. The 125 KW Solar Gas Turbine (Tital series) has been selected as the base case gas turbine for biogas combustion. After its design parameters and typical operating conditions were entered into GTPower for analysis, GTPower outputted expected values for the thermal efficiency and specific work. For a sensitivity analysis, the GTPower Model outputted the thermal efficiency and specific work. For a sensitivity analysis, the GTPower Model outputted the thermal efficiency and specific work profiles for various operating conditions encountered in biogas combustion. These results will assist future research projects in determining the type of combustion device most suitable for biogas power generation.

  3. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  4. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile.

  5. Design and Uncertainty Analysis for a PVTt Gas Flow Standard

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John D.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Moldover, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A new pressure, volume, temperature, and, time (PVTt) primary gas flow standard at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of between 0.02 % and 0.05 %. The standard spans the flow range of 1 L/min to 2000 L/min using two collection tanks and two diverter valve systems. The standard measures flow by collecting gas in a tank of known volume during a measured time interval. We describe the significant and novel features of the standard and analyze its uncertainty. The gas collection tanks have a small diameter and are immersed in a uniform, stable, thermostatted water bath. The collected gas achieves thermal equilibrium rapidly and the uncertainty of the average gas temperature is only 7 mK (22 × 10−6 T). A novel operating method leads to essentially zero mass change in and very low uncertainty contributions from the inventory volume. Gravimetric and volume expansion techniques were used to determine the tank and the inventory volumes. Gravimetric determinations of collection tank volume made with nitrogen and argon agree with a standard deviation of 16 × 10−6 VT. The largest source of uncertainty in the flow measurement is drift of the pressure sensor over time, which contributes relative standard uncertainty of 60 × 10−6 to the determinations of the volumes of the collection tanks and to the flow measurements. Throughout the range 3 L/min to 110 L/min, flows were measured independently using the 34 L and the 677 L collection systems, and the two systems agreed within a relative difference of 150 × 10−6. Double diversions were used to evaluate the 677 L system over a range of 300 L/min to 1600 L/min, and the relative differences between single and double diversions were less than 75 × 10−6. PMID:27413592

  6. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile amines produced by several strains of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pons, J L; Rimbault, A; Darbord, J C; Leluan, G

    1985-02-08

    A gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric technique is proposed for the analysis of volatile amines which were isolated from Clostridium cultures by vacuum distillation and concentrated as hydrochloride salts. Headspace sampling after alkalinization of the salts under vacuum was the most suitable for subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. With ammonia-loaded helium as carrier gas, methylamines were separated on 4.8% PEG 2OM + 0.3% potassium hydroxide on Carbopack B, and other volatile amines on 28% Pennwalt 223 + 4% potassium hydroxide on Gas-Chrom R. Bacterial volatile amines (dimethylamine, trimethylamine, isobutylamine, 3-methylbutylamine, etc.) were detected with a flame-ionization detector and identified by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry in electron-impact and chemical ionization modes.

  7. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  8. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  9. Development of gas chromatography analysis of fatty acids in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-08-01

    The gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acids has attracted considerable interest. In this analysis, the common derivatives of fatty acids, such as fatty acid methyl esters, can be detected using a flame ionization detector and the mass spectra can indicate the true structure of fatty acids. This paper reviews gas chromatographic methods for obtaining fatty acids from marine organisms. The stationary phase and detector for applications in gas chromatography are discussed. This article also reviews the components of fatty acids in marine animals, marine plants and marine microorganisms.

  10. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging of inhaled SF6 with respiratory gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Alexander-Wigbert; Wolf, Ursula; Fabel, Michael; Weiler, Norbert; Heussel, Claus P; Eberle, Balthasar; David, Matthias; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of inhaled fluorinated inert gases ((19)F-MRI) such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) allows for analysis of ventilated air spaces. In this study, the possibility of using this technique to image lung function was assessed. For this, (19)F-MRI of inhaled SF(6) was compared with respiratory gas analysis, which is a global but reliable measure of alveolar gas fraction. Five anesthetized pigs underwent multiple-breath wash-in procedures with a gas mixture of 70% SF(6) and 30% oxygen. Two-dimensional (19)F-MRI and end-expiratory gas fraction analysis were performed after 4 to 24 inhaled breaths. Signal intensity of (19)F-MRI and end-expiratory SF(6) fraction were evaluated with respect to linear correlation and reproducibility. Time constants were estimated by both MRI and respiratory gas analysis data and compared for agreement. A good linear correlation between signal intensity and end-expiratory gas fraction was found (correlation coefficient 0.99+/-0.01). The data were reproducible (standard error of signal intensity 8% vs. that of gas fraction 5%) and the comparison of time constants yielded a sufficient agreement. According to the good linear correlation and the acceptable reproducibility, we suggest the (19)F-MRI to be a valuable tool for quantification of intrapulmonary SF(6) and hence lung function.

  11. ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

    2010-11-01

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  12. Characterisation of odorants in roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Koshi, Erina; Take, Harumi; Michihata, Toshihide; Maruya, Masachika; Enomoto, Toshiki

    2017-04-01

    Roasted stem tea has a characteristic flavour, which is obtained by roasting tea stems, by-product of green tea production. This research aims to understand the characteristic odorants in roasted stem tea by comparing it to roasted leaf tea. We revealed potent odorants in commercial roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry with aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The difference between roasted stem and leaf tea derived from the same tea plants were investigated using GC-MS. Pyrazine compounds exhibited a roasted odour and high flavour dilution (FD) factors, as determined via AEDA. Roasted stem tea was richer in these pyrazines than roasted leaf tea. Geraniol and linalool exhibited high FD factors and a floral odour, and roasted stem tea was richer in these compounds than roasted leaf tea. These results may have a positive impact on the development of tea products.

  13. [Study of infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis method for methane gas based on data mining].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Ju

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring of methane gas is one of the important factors affecting the coal mine safety. The online real-time monitoring of the methane gas is used for the mine safety protection. To improve the accuracy of model analysis, in the present paper, the author uses the technology of infrared spectroscopy to study the gas infrared quantitative analysis algorithm. By data mining technology application in multi-component infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis algorithm, it was found that cluster analysis partial least squares algorithm is obviously superior to simply using partial least squares algorithm in terms of accuracy. In addition, to reduce the influence of the error on the accuracy of model individual calibration samples, the clustering analysis was used for the data preprocessing, and such denoising method was found to improve the analysis accuracy.

  14. Just fracking: a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Emily; Bell, Derek

    2016-02-01

    This letter presents a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in the area of Pennsylvania lying over the Marcellus Shale, the largest shale gas formation in play in the United States. The extraction of shale gas using unconventional wells, which are hydraulically fractured (fracking), has increased dramatically since 2005. As the number of wells has grown, so have concerns about the potential public health effects on nearby communities. These concerns make shale gas development an environmental justice issue. This letter examines whether the hazards associated with proximity to wells and the economic benefits of shale gas production are fairly distributed. We distinguish two types of distributive environmental justice: traditional and benefit sharing. We ask the traditional question: are there a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells in Pennsylvania? However, we extend this analysis in two ways: we examine income distribution and level of education; and we compare before and after shale gas development. This contributes to discussions of benefit sharing by showing how the income distribution of the population has changed. We use a binary dasymetric technique to remap the data from the 2000 US Census and the 2009-2013 American Communities Survey and combine that data with a buffer containment analysis of unconventional wells to compare the characteristics of the population living nearer to unconventional wells with those further away before and after shale gas development. Our analysis indicates that there is no evidence of traditional distributive environmental injustice: there is not a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells. However, our analysis is consistent with the claim that there is benefit sharing distributive environmental injustice: the income distribution of the population nearer to shale gas wells

  15. Oxygen rich gas generator design and performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloyer, P. W.; Knuth, W. H.; Crawford, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The present oxygen-rich combustion research investigates oxygen gas generator concepts. The theoretical and modeling aspects of a selected concept are presented, together with a refined concept resulting from the findings of the study. This investigation examined a counter-flow gas generator design for O2/H2 mass ratios of 100-200, featuring a near-stoichiometric combustion zone followed by downstream mixing. The critical technologies required to develop a performance model are analyzed and include the following: (1) oxygen flow boiling; (2) two-phase oxygen flow heat transfer; (3) film-cooling in the combustion zone; (4) oxygen-rich combustion with hydrogen; and (5) mixing and dilution.

  16. Survey and Analysis of Marine Gas Turbine Control After 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    the existing experimental data. Beginning in the early seventies, the U.S. Navy initiated The Gas Turbine Ship Propulsion Control Systems Research and...destroyers. Figure 1 shows a block diagram of the ship propulsion control system used. Simulations performed during the program tended to give good...Postgraduate school applied state space techniques to a linearized model of an FFG-7 ship propulsion system (5). Dynamic propulsion system equations were

  17. Analysis of Gas Dissociation Solar Thermal Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    that have accumulated at the facility is effected by using reversible chemical reactions bottom of the reservoir. in a dosed- cycle gaseous working fluid...L.LJ facility at intermediate temperature by using a polyatomic gas in a closed cycle circulation system. For example, S gaseous SO, dissociates at 800... cycle fluid system by passing SO- vapor through a dissociation reactor in a that transfers energy from the collection field to the high temperature solar

  18. Smell of danger: an analysis of LP-gas odorization

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.S.; Turk, A.

    1985-03-01

    LP-gas derives warning properties from the odorants ethyl mercaptan or thiophane. Laboratory tests have implied that the average person has the ability to smell the odors before leaking LP-gas reaches one-fifth its lower limit of flammability. Generally, however, laboratory tests ignore or discard persons with a poor sense of smell, especially the elderly and persons with certain types of hyposmia. Some persons who apparently can smell the warning agents when directed may otherwise fail to notice or identify them. Elderly men seem particularly vulnerable to instances of incidental anosmia and olfactory agnosia. Psychophysical testing of the warning agents has been rather unsophisticated. There exists neither a standard protocol for testing nor adequate specification of the perceptual properties that might make one warning agent better than another. Without such developments, improvement in warning agents will fail to occur. Possible improvements include increases in concentration, the use of blends to insure more uniform delivery of agent and, to decrease the perceptual vulnerability of relatively insensitive people, use of agents with favorable psychophysical (stimulus-response) functions and use of agents with favorable adaptation characteristics. Even without a change in existing products, it seems advisable to learn more about the vulnerability of LP-gas users and to employ educational means to reduce risks.

  19. Optimal Energy Consumption Analysis of Natural Gas Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enbin; Li, Changjun; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There are many compressor stations along long-distance natural gas pipelines. Natural gas can be transported using different boot programs and import pressures, combined with temperature control parameters. Moreover, different transport methods have correspondingly different energy consumptions. At present, the operating parameters of many pipelines are determined empirically by dispatchers, resulting in high energy consumption. This practice does not abide by energy reduction policies. Therefore, based on a full understanding of the actual needs of pipeline companies, we introduce production unit consumption indicators to establish an objective function for achieving the goal of lowering energy consumption. By using a dynamic programming method for solving the model and preparing calculation software, we can ensure that the solution process is quick and efficient. Using established optimization methods, we analyzed the energy savings for the XQ gas pipeline. By optimizing the boot program, the import station pressure, and the temperature parameters, we achieved the optimal energy consumption. By comparison with the measured energy consumption, the pipeline now has the potential to reduce energy consumption by 11 to 16 percent. PMID:24955410

  20. Two-scale analysis of a tight gas sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Davy, C. A.; Nguyen Kim, Thang; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Jeannin, L.; Adler, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    Tight gas sandstones are low porosity media, with a very small permeability (i.e., below 1 mD). Their porosity is below 10%, and it is mainly composed of fine noncemented microcracks, which are present between neighboring quartz grains. While empirical models of permeability are available, their predictions, which do not compare well with macroscopic measurements, are not reliable to assess gas well productivity. The purpose of this work is to compare the permeability measured on centimetric plugs to predictions based on pore structure data. Two macroscopic measurements are performed, namely dry gas permeability and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), together with a series of local measurements including focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), x-ray computed microtomography (CMT), and standard two-dimensional (2D) SEM. Numerical modeling is performed by combining analyses on two scales, namely the microcrack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the individual 3D microcrack scale (given by either FIB-SEM or CMT). The network permeability is calculated by means of techniques developed for fracture networks. This permeability is proportional to the microcrack transmissivity, which is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the microcracks measured by FIB-SEM or CMT. Good correlation with experimental permeability values is only found when using transmissivity from 3D CMT data.

  1. Optimal energy consumption analysis of natural gas pipeline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enbin; Li, Changjun; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There are many compressor stations along long-distance natural gas pipelines. Natural gas can be transported using different boot programs and import pressures, combined with temperature control parameters. Moreover, different transport methods have correspondingly different energy consumptions. At present, the operating parameters of many pipelines are determined empirically by dispatchers, resulting in high energy consumption. This practice does not abide by energy reduction policies. Therefore, based on a full understanding of the actual needs of pipeline companies, we introduce production unit consumption indicators to establish an objective function for achieving the goal of lowering energy consumption. By using a dynamic programming method for solving the model and preparing calculation software, we can ensure that the solution process is quick and efficient. Using established optimization methods, we analyzed the energy savings for the XQ gas pipeline. By optimizing the boot program, the import station pressure, and the temperature parameters, we achieved the optimal energy consumption. By comparison with the measured energy consumption, the pipeline now has the potential to reduce energy consumption by 11 to 16 percent.

  2. Residual gas analysis for long-pulse, advanced tokamak operation.

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Hillis, D L; Bucalossi, J; Douai, D; Oddon, P; Vartanian, S; Colas, L; Manenc, L; Pégourié, B

    2010-10-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer (RGA) system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This "diagnostic RGA" has been used in long-pulse (up to 6 min) discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H(2)/D(2) isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H(2) injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses (>4 min) absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H(2) could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components.

  3. Gene expression analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic development of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suggests that aphid parthenogenesis evolved from meiotic oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity.

  4. [When is a venous blood gas analysis sufficient in the emergency department?

    PubMed

    van Exsel, J A J M; Simons, S O; Kramers, C; Heijdra, Y F

    2017-01-01

    Blood gas analysis plays an important role in the initial assessment of a patient in the emergency ward. We present three different patient cases to illustrate when to opt for a venous or an arterial blood gas analysis. Arterial punctures are more painful and carry a higher risk of complications compared to venous punctures. It is possible to use a venous blood gas to screen for acute acid/base disturbances. Ventilatory compensation or anion gap cannot be calculated reliably with a venous blood gas. On the other hand, the diagnosis diabetic keto-acidosis can be made with a venous blood gas; this mode of sampling can also be used for lactate measurement at the emergency department as an independent prognostic marker for mortality. Venous blood gas analyses are not able to assess oxygenation. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive alternative for arterial blood gas sampling. The use of a venous blood gas to assess a patient's ventilation is limited, whereas it can be used to diagnose carbomonoxide intoxication or methaemoglobinaemia.

  5. Is dark energy evolving?

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay E-mail: sanjay.jhingan@gmail.com

    2013-02-01

    We look for evidence for the evolution in dark energy density by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Distance redshift data from supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) along with WMAP7 distance priors are used to put constraints on curvature parameter Ω{sub k} and dark energy parameters. The data sets are consistent with a flat Universe. The constraints on the dark energy evolution parameters obtained from supernovae (including CMB distance priors) are consistent with a flat ΛCDM Universe. On the other hand, in the parameter estimates obtained from the addition of BAO data the second principal component, which characterize a non-constant contribution from dark energy, is non-zero at 1σ. This could be a systematic effect and future BAO data holds key to making more robust claims.

  6. A Portable and Autonomous Mass Spectrometric System for On-Site Environmental Gas Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, Matthias S; Schmidt, Mark; Oser, Julian; Kipfer, Rolf

    2016-12-20

    We developed a portable mass spectrometric system ("miniRuedi") for quantificaton of the partial pressures of He, Ne (in dry gas), Ar, Kr, N2, O2, CO2, and CH4 in gaseous and aqueous matrices in environmental systems with an analytical uncertainty of 1-3%. The miniRuedi does not require any purification or other preparation of the sampled gases and therefore allows maintenance-free and autonomous operation. The apparatus is most suitable for on-site gas analysis during field work and at remote locations due to its small size (60 cm × 40 cm × 14 cm), low weight (13 kg), and low power consumption (50 W). The gases are continuously sampled and transferred through a capillary pressure reduction system into a vacuum chamber, where they are analyzed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a time resolution of ≲1 min. The low gas consumption rate (<0.1 mL/min) minimizes interference with the natural mass balance of gases in environmental systems, and allows the unbiased quantification of dissolved-gas concentrations in water by gas/water equilibration using membrane contractors (gas-equilibrium membrane-inlet mass spectrometry, GE-MIMS). The performance of the miniRuedi is demonstrated in laboratory and field tests, and its utility is illustrated in field applications related to soil-gas formation, lake/atmosphere gas exchange, and seafloor gas emanations.

  7. Examination of optimal separator shape of polymer electrolyte fuel cell with numerical analysis including the effect of gas flow through gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Gen; Matsukuma, Yosuke; Minemoto, Masaki

    This work concentrates on the effects of channel depth and separator shape on cell output performance, current density distribution and gas flow condition in various conditions with PEFC numerical analysis model including gas flow through GDL. When GDL effective porosity was small, the effect of gas flow through GDL which was changed by channel depth on cell output performance became large. However, current density distribution was ununiform. As GDL permeability became larger, cell output density increased, but current density and gas flow rate distribution were ununiform. From the results of changing the gas flow rate, it was found that the ratio of the minimum gas flow rate to the inlet flow rate depended on channel depth. Furthermore, the optimal separator, which increased output density and made the current density distribution and gas flow rate distribution uniform, was examined. It was also found that cell performance had possible to be developed by improving the turning point of the serpentine separator.

  8. How did the cilium evolve?

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter; Mitchell, David R; Jékely, Gáspár

    2008-01-01

    The cilium is a characteristic organelle of eukaryotes constructed from over 600 proteins. Bacterial flagella are entirely different. 9 + 2 motile cilia evolved before the divergence of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). This chapter explores, compares, and contrasts two potential pathways of evolution: (1) via invasion of a centriolar-like virus and (2) via autogenous formation from a pre-existing microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). In either case, the intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery that is nearly universally required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia derived from the evolving intracellular vesicular transport system. The sensory function of cilia evolved first and the ciliary axoneme evolved gradually with ciliary motility, an important selection mechanism, as one of the driving forces.

  9. Stress analysis and life prediction of gas turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiung, H. C.; Dunn, A. J.; Woodling, D. R.; Loh, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    A stress analysis procedure is presented for a redesign of the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure fuel turbopump turbine blades. The analysis consists of the one-dimensional scoping analysis to support the design layout and the follow-on three-dimensional finite element analysis to confirm the blade design at operating loading conditions. Blade life is evaluated based on high-cycle fatigue and low-cycle fatigue.

  10. Noble Gas Analysis in the Quest to Find "Regolithic" Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, Julia A.; Hermann, S.; Herrin, J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The howardite meteorites consist of approximately 200 polymict breccias of eucrite (basaltic) and diogenite (orthopyroxenitic) material (collectively, the HED group) that originate from the asteroid belt. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy of asteroids and laboratory studies of HEDs have indicated that the asteroid 4-Vesta is the likely parent body, and the partially-demolished south pole may be the source region. Asteroid regolith formation processes may be responsible for a number of observed petrological features including impact melt clasts, reworked clasts and mosaisicm. We have identified such features in a study of 30 howardites and polymict eucrites, and developed a regolith grading scheme based on petrology. However, the true regolithic nature of the howardite suite is not well defined, and previous research has suggested correlations between Ni contents of 300 - 1200 micron / g, a minimal variation in Al2O3 content around 8-9 wt% and the presence of solar wind noble gases are key hallmarks of an ancient regolith on Vesta . Through combined petrological, compositional and noble gas research, we aim to better understand howardite petrological diversity, regolith formation processes on parent asteroids, and to establish what defines a truly "regolithic" howardite. Our research will play an integral part in the interpretation of data gathered by the Dawn mission. Here we report the preliminary results from our noble gas analyses of four howardites: LEW 85313, EET 99408, MET 96500 and PCA 02066. Bulk major element compositional data have been collected, further petrological data for the HED group are reported by our colleagues, whilst trace-element analyses are underway. Our work will investigate the extent of whether previously described Ni, Al2O3 and noble gas characteristics are in fact indicative of a "regolithic" howardite.

  11. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  12. Femtosecond analysis of free molecular rotation in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, N. A.; Khoroshilov, E. V.; Kryukov, I. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Sharkov, A. V.; Blokhin, A. P.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.

    1992-04-01

    The time-resolved S 1→S *n absorption anisotropy decay resulting from rotation of free gas phase POPOP molecules at 593 K and PPO molecules at 483 K was studied after S 0→S *1 excitation by femtosecond linearly polarized pulses at 308 nm. The time evolution of the anisotropy measured through a few picoseconds after excitation is in agreement with the results of calculations made for POPOP and PPO using orientational correlation functions developed for rigid asymmetric top molecules.

  13. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  14. [Cost-benefit analysis to substituting natural gas for coal project in large Chinese cities].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianqiang; Peng, Yingdeng; Guo, Xiurui

    2002-09-01

    Since China's large cities were faced with serious coal-smoke pollution with PM10 and SO2 as the main pollutants, natural gas is becoming one of the most attractive clean replacers of coal. To clarify the wide disputation and doubt on the rationality of burning natural gas instead of coal, cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of urban natural gas substitution projects in Beijing and Chongqing was done respectively, in which, the health benefit was carefully estimated with epidemical dose-response function as the main external benefit. The final result shows that in large cities with intensively concentrated population and economic activities, natural gas consumption as municipal civil energy has obvious priority in terms of large environmental benefit from reducing non-point and low-altitude air pollutant concentration. This paper finally recommends that market oriented system reform in natural gas production and retailing system should be considered.

  15. Analysis of the product gas from biomass gasification by means of laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karellas, S.; Karl, J.

    2007-09-01

    The use of biomass and waste for decentralised combined heat and power production (CHP) requires highly efficient gasification processes. In the Technische Universität München (TUM), an innovative gasification technology has been developed. This allothermal gasifier is producing a hydrogen- rich, high-calorific gas, that can be further used in a microturbine or a fuel cell producing energy. For the operation of such a system, the online analysis of the composition of the product gas is of high importance, since the efficient working of the machines is linked with the gas quality. For this purpose an optical measurement system based on laser spectroscopy has been applied. This system can measure not only the basic components of the product gas (H 2, CH 4, CO, CO 2, H 2O), but it also gives information concerning the content of high hydrocarbons, the so-called tars, in the product gas.

  16. Historical analysis of oil and gas well plugging in New York: is the regulatory system working?

    PubMed

    Bishop, Ronald E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate New York State's regulatory program for plugging inactive oil and gas wells. Analysis of reports from the Division of Mineral Resources, Department of Environmental Conservation, reveals that three-fourths of the state's abandoned oil and gas wells were never plugged. Inadequate enforcement efforts have resulted in steady increases of unplugged oil and gas wells abandoned since 1992. Further, no program exists or is proposed to monitor abandoned wells which were plugged. These results strongly suggest that comprehensive reform and increased agency resources would be required to effectively regulate conventional oil and gas development in New York. Industrial expansion into shale oil and gas development should be postponed to avoid adding stress to an already compromised regulatory system.

  17. Trash to Gas (TtG) Simulant Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, John D., II; Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Space exploration in outer earths orbit is a long-term commitment, where the reuse of discarded materials is a critical component for its success. The Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project under the NASA Advanced Exploration System Program is a project focused on technologies that reduce the amount of consumables that are needed to be sent into space, repurpose items sent to space, or convert wastes to commodities. In particular, Trash to Gas (TtG), part of the LRR project, is a novel space technology capable of converting raw elements from combustible waste including food waste and packaging, paper, wipes and towels, nitrile gloves, fecal matter, urine brine, maximum absorbency garments, and other organic wastes from human space exploration into useful gases. Trash to gas will ultimately reduce mission cost by producing a portion of important consumables in situ. This paper will discuss results of waste processing by steam reforming. Steam reforming is a thermochemical process developed as part of TtG, where waste is heated in the presence of oxygen and steam to produce carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and water. The aim of this experiment is to investigate the processing of different waste simulants and their gaseous products. This will lay a foundation for understating and optimizing the production of useful gases for propulsion and recovery of water for life support.

  18. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  19. Adapting Human Reliability Analysis from Nuclear Power to Oil and Gas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT: Human reliability analysis (HRA), as currently used in risk assessments, largely derives its methods and guidance from application in the nuclear energy domain. While there are many similarities be-tween nuclear energy and other safety critical domains such as oil and gas, there remain clear differences. This paper provides an overview of HRA state of the practice in nuclear energy and then describes areas where refinements to the methods may be necessary to capture the operational context of oil and gas. Many key distinctions important to nuclear energy HRA such as Level 1 vs. Level 2 analysis may prove insignifi-cant for oil and gas applications. On the other hand, existing HRA methods may not be sensitive enough to factors like the extensive use of digital controls in oil and gas. This paper provides an overview of these con-siderations to assist in the adaptation of existing nuclear-centered HRA methods to the petroleum sector.

  20. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modelling and state-space analysis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, Per; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Landfill gas (CO2 and CH4) concentrations and fluxes in soil adjacent to an old, unlined Danish municipal landfill measured over a 48-hour period during the passage of a low-pressure weather system were used to identify processes governing gas fluxes and concentrations. Two different approaches were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas permeability whereas variations in CH4 oxidation rate and molecular coefficients had less influence. Fluxes appeared to be most sensitive to atmospheric pressure at intermediate distances from the landfill edge. Also overall CH4 fluxes out of the soil over longer periods (years) were largest during periods with rapidly decreasing atmospheric pressures resulting in emission of large amounts of CH4 during short periods of time. This effect, however, was less significant for the CO2 fluxes.

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, J. D.; Novascone, S. R.; Perez, D. M.; Spencer, B. W.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code with a recently implemented physics-based model for fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information in the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior predictions with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, significantly higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, Jason D.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Perez, Danielle M.; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Luzzi, Lelio; Uffelen, Paul Van; Williamson, Richard L.

    2014-10-12

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, Jason D.; ...

    2014-10-12

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertaintymore » in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.« less

  4. High-response on-line gas analysis system for hydrogen-reaction combustion products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, A. J.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of testing an on-line quadrupole gas analyzer system are reported. Gas samples were drawn from the exhaust of a hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen rocket which simulated the flow composition and dynamics at the combustor exit of a supersonic combustion ramjet engine. System response time of less than 50 milliseconds was demonstrated, with analytical accuracy estimated to be + or - 5 percent. For more complex chemical systems with interfering atom patterns, analysis would be more difficult. A cooled-gas pyrometer probe was evaluated as a total temperature indicator and as the primary mass flow measuring element for the total sample flow rate.

  5. Improved thermodynamic analysis of gas reactions for compound semiconductor growth by vapor-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatomi, Yuya; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2017-03-01

    An improved thermodynamic analysis method for vapor-phase epitaxy is proposed. In the conventional method, the mass-balance constraint equations are expressed in terms of variations in partial pressure. Although the conventional method is appropriate for gas–solid reactions occurring near the growth surface, it is not suitable for gas reactions that involve changes in the number of gas molecules. We reconsider the constraint equations in order to predict the effect of gas reactions on semiconductor growth processes. To demonstrate the feasibility of the improved method, the growth process of group-III nitrides by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy has been investigated.

  6. Analysis of volatile-phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at depth; barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature, and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been observed. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sampling and analysis plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105 KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1996-08-09

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the equipment,procedures and techniques for obtaining gas and liquid samples from sealed K West fuel canisters. The analytical procedures and quality assurance requirements for the subsequent laboratory analysis of the samples are also discussed.

  8. Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Acidic Indole Auxins in Nicotiana1

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Margret H.

    1969-01-01

    Acidic indole auxins have been extracted from N. glauca, N. langsdorffii and their 2 tumor-prone 4n- and 2n-hybrids. After purification of the extracts and thin-layer chromatography, acidic indoles were subjected to esterification and gas chromatography. The esters of 4 indole acids were detected and determined: indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-carboxylic acid, indole-3-propionic acid and indole-3-butyric acid. The indolic nature of fractionated samples was confirmed by spectrophotofluorometry and the physiological significance of the indole esters proven in a biotest. A substantial increase in extractable indole-3-butyric acid in the tumor-prone hybrids suggests an additional pathway of auxin synthesis in these tissues. PMID:5774173

  9. Gas flow analysis during thermal vacuum test of a spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The pressures indicated by two tubulated ionization gages, one pointing to a spinning spacecraft undergoing thermal vacuum test and the other the walls of the chamber, have been used in a computer program to calculate important parameters of flow kinetics in the vacuum chamber. These parameters calculated as a function of time are: the self-contamination of the spacecraft (defined as the return of outgassed molecules on its critical surfaces either in orbit or while undergoing vacuum test); the spacecraft outgassing including leaks from sealed compartments; and the gas pumping performance of the vacuum chamber. The test indicated the feasibility of this type of evaluation and the improvements in instrumentations and arrangements needed for future tests.

  10. Fractal analysis of the dark matter and gas distributions in the Mare-Nostrum universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gaite, José

    2010-03-01

    We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

  11. Solid-state gas sensors for breath analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Corrado; Paolesse, Roberto; Martinelli, Eugenio; Capuano, Rosamaria

    2014-05-08

    The analysis of volatile compounds is an efficient method to appraise information about the chemical composition of liquids and solids. This principle is applied to several practical applications, such as food analysis where many important features (e.g. freshness) can be directly inferred from the analysis of volatile compounds. The same approach can also be applied to a human body where the volatile compounds, collected from the skin, the breath or in the headspace of fluids, might contain information that could be used to diagnose several kinds of diseases. In particular, breath is widely studied and many diseases can be potentially detected from breath analysis. The most fascinating property of breath analysis is the non-invasiveness of the sample collection. Solid-state sensors are considered the natural complement to breath analysis, matching the non-invasiveness with typical sensor features such as low-cost, easiness of use, portability, and the integration with the information networks. Sensors based breath analysis is then expected to dramatically extend the diagnostic capabilities enabling the screening of large populations for the early diagnosis of pathologies. In the last years there has been an increased attention to the development of sensors specifically aimed to this purpose. These investigations involve both specific sensors designed to detect individual compounds and non-specific sensors, operated in array configurations, aimed at clustering subjects according to their health conditions. In this paper, the recent significant applications of these sensors to breath analysis are reviewed and discussed.

  12. User's manual for the TRW gaspipe 2 program: A vapor-gas front analysis program for heat pipes containing non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Fleischman, G. L.; Marcus, B. D.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program for design and analysis of heat pipes which contain non-condensible gases, either for temperature control or to aid in start-up from the frozen state, is presented. Some of the calculations which are possible with the program are: (1) wall temperature profile along a gas-loaded heat pipe, (2) amount of gas loading necessary to obtain desired evaporator temperature at a desired heat load, (3) heat load versus evaporator temperature for a fixed amount of gas in the pipe, and (4) heat and mass transfer along the pipe, including the vapor-gas front region.

  13. Analysis of QoS Requirements for e-Health Services and Mapping to Evolved Packet System QoS Classes

    PubMed Central

    Skorin-Kapov, Lea; Matijasevic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    E-Health services comprise a broad range of healthcare services delivered by using information and communication technology. In order to support existing as well as emerging e-Health services over converged next generation network (NGN) architectures, there is a need for network QoS control mechanisms that meet the often stringent requirements of such services. In this paper, we evaluate the QoS support for e-Health services in the context of the Evolved Packet System (EPS), specified by the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) as a multi-access all-IP NGN. We classify heterogeneous e-Health services based on context and network QoS requirements and propose a mapping to existing 3GPP QoS Class Identifiers (QCIs) that serve as a basis for the class-based QoS concept of the EPS. The proposed mapping aims to provide network operators with guidelines for meeting heterogeneous e-Health service requirements. As an example, we present the QoS requirements for a prototype e-Health service supporting tele-consultation between a patient and a doctor and illustrate the use of the proposed mapping to QCIs in standardized QoS control procedures. PMID:20976301

  14. Biological and molecular analysis of the pathogenic variant C3 of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) evolved during adaptation to chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla).

    PubMed

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Stehlík, Jan; Procházková, Jitka; Orctová, Lidmila; Wullenweber, Julia; Füssy, Zoltan; Kováčik, Josef; Duraisamy, Ganesh S; Ziegler, Angelika; Schubert, Jörg; Steger, Gerhard

    2012-07-01

    Viroid-caused pathogenesis is a specific process dependent on viroid and host genotype(s), and may involve viroid-specific small RNAs (vsRNAs). We describe a new PSTVd variant C3, evolved through sequence adaptation to the host chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) after biolistic inoculation with PSTVd-KF440-2, which causes extraordinary strong ('lethal') symptoms. The deletion of a single adenine A in the oligoA stretch of the pathogenicity (P) domain appears characteristic of PSTVd-C3. The pathogenicity and the vsRNA pool of PSTVd-C3 were compared to those of lethal variant PSTVd-AS1, from which PSTVd-C3 differs by five mutations located in the P domain. Both lethal viroid variants showed higher stability and lower variation in analyzed vsRNA pools than the mild PSTVd-QFA. PSTVd-C3 and -AS1 caused similar symptoms on chamomile, tomato, and Nicotiana benthamiana, and exhibited similar but species-specific distributions of selected vsRNAs as quantified using TaqMan probes. Both lethal PSTVd variants block biosynthesis of lignin in roots of cultured chamomile and tomato. Four 'expression markers' (TCP3, CIPK, VSF-1, and VPE) were selected from a tomato EST library to quantify their expression upon viroid infection; these markers were strongly downregulated in tomato leaf blades infected by PSTVd-C3- and -AS1 but not by PSTVd-QFA.

  15. Quantitative gas chromatographic analysis of volatile fatty acids in spent culture media and body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, A E; Hazen, M J; Van Boven, C P

    1986-01-01

    Gas chromatographic analysis of volatile fatty acids for identification of obligately anaerobic bacteria and for presumptive diagnosis of anaerobic infections is now widely practiced. However, it is difficult to compare data because only a qualitative analysis is done or only chromatograms are presented instead of quantitative data on volatile fatty acid production. We compared three stationary phases for volatile fatty acid analysis of aqueous solutions and four methods of pretreating samples for gas chromatography. Quantitative analysis could be done accurately by using Carbowax as the stationary phase after pretreatment of spent culture media with Dowex columns. If only qualitative analysis is required (e.g., for presumptive diagnosis of anaerobic infections), ether extraction and headspace analysis are equally suitable. The overall variation coefficient for volatile fatty acid production by four reference strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria after 24 h of incubation was approximately 10%. PMID:3958144

  16. Probabilistic Analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Disk Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Two series of low cycle fatigue (LCF) test data for two groups of different aircraft gas turbine engine compressor disk geometries were reanalyzed and compared using Weibull statistics. Both groups of disks were manufactured from titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy. A NASA Glenn Research Center developed probabilistic computer code Probable Cause was used to predict disk life and reliability. A material-life factor A was determined for titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy based upon fatigue disk data and successfully applied to predict the life of the disks as a function of speed. A comparison was made with the currently used life prediction method based upon crack growth rate. Applying an endurance limit to the computer code did not significantly affect the predicted lives under engine operating conditions. Failure location prediction correlates with those experimentally observed in the LCF tests. A reasonable correlation was obtained between the predicted disk lives using the Probable Cause code and a modified crack growth method for life prediction. Both methods slightly overpredict life for one disk group and significantly under predict it for the other.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Blood gas analysis and cooximetry in retired racing Greyhounds

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar-Lopez, Sara; Chisnell, Hope K.; Guillermo Couto, C.; Westendorf-Stingle, Nicole; Marin, Liliana M.; Iazbik, Maria C.; Cooper, Edward S.; Wellman, Maxey L.; Muir, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to evaluate the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (Hb) in healthy retired racing Greyhounds via cooximetry, and to establish reference intervals for blood gases and cooximetry in this breed. Design Prospective clinical study. Setting University Teaching Hospital. Animals Fifty-seven Greyhounds and 30 non-Greyhound dogs. Interventions Venous blood samples were collected from the jugular vein and placed into heparinized tubes. The samples were analyzed within 30 minutes of collection using a blood gas analyzer equipped with a cooximeter. Measurements and Main Results Greyhounds had significantly higher pH, PO2, oxygen saturation, oxyhemoglobin, total Hb, oxygen content, and oxygen capacity and significantly lower deoxyhemoglobin and P50 when compared with non-Greyhound dogs. Conclusion These findings support the fact that this breed is able to carry a higher concentration of total oxygen in the blood. As reported previously, this breed also has lower P50 and, therefore, high oxygen affinity. In light of recent findings suggesting that in certain tissues a high affinity for oxygen is beneficial, this adaptation may be of benefit during strenuous exercise. PMID:21288290

  20. Unsteady Probabilistic Analysis of a Gas Turbine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Marilyn

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have considered an annular cascade configuration subjected to unsteady inflow conditions. The unsteady response calculation has been implemented into the time marching CFD code, MSUTURBO. The computed steady state results for the pressure distribution demonstrated good agreement with experimental data. We have computed results for the amplitudes of the unsteady pressure over the blade surfaces. With the increase in gas turbine engine structural complexity and performance over the past 50 years, structural engineers have created an array of safety nets to ensure against component failures in turbine engines. In order to reduce what is now considered to be excessive conservatism and yet maintain the same adequate margins of safety, there is a pressing need to explore methods of incorporating probabilistic design procedures into engine development. Probabilistic methods combine and prioritize the statistical distributions of each design variable, generate an interactive distribution and offer the designer a quantified relationship between robustness, endurance and performance. The designer can therefore iterate between weight reduction, life increase, engine size reduction, speed increase etc.

  1. Visibility graph network analysis of natural gas price: The case of North American market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei; Wang, Yaqi; Gao, Cuixia

    2016-11-01

    Fluctuations in prices of natural gas significantly affect global economy. Therefore, the research on the characteristics of natural gas price fluctuations, turning points and its influencing cycle on the subsequent price series is of great significance. Global natural gas trade concentrates on three regional markets: the North American market, the European market and the Asia-Pacific market, with North America having the most developed natural gas financial market. In addition, perfect legal supervision and coordinated regulations make the North American market more open and more competitive. This paper focuses on the North American natural gas market specifically. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price time series is converted to a visibility graph network which provides a new direction for macro analysis of time series, and several indicators are investigated: degree and degree distribution, the average shortest path length and community structure. The internal mechanisms underlying price fluctuations are explored through the indicators. The results show that the natural gas prices visibility graph network (NGP-VGN) is of small-world and scale-free properties simultaneously. After random rearrangement of original price time series, the degree distribution of network becomes exponential distribution, different from the original ones. This means that, the original price time series is of long-range negative correlation fractal characteristic. In addition, nodes with large degree correspond to significant geopolitical or economic events. Communities correspond to time cycles in visibility graph network. The cycles of time series and the impact scope of hubs can be found by community structure partition.

  2. Economic evaluation and market analysis for natural gas utilization. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.; Rezaiyan, A.J.

    1995-04-01

    During the past decade, the U.S. has experienced a surplus gas supply. Future prospects are brightening because of increased estimates of the potential size of undiscovered gas reserves. At the same time, U.S. oil reserves and production have steadily declined, while oil imports have steadily increased. Reducing volume growth of crude oil imports was a key objective of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source to liquid products derived from crude oil to help meet market demand. The purpose of this study was to (1) analyze three energy markets to determine whether greater use could be made of natural gas or its derivatives and (2) determine whether those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The following three markets were targeted for possible increases in gas use: transportation fuels, power generation, and chemical feedstock. Gas-derived products that could potentially compete in these three markets were identified, and the economics of the processes for producing those products were evaluated. The processes considered covered the range from commercial to those in early stages of process development. The analysis also evaluated the use of both high-quality natural gas and lower-quality gases containing CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} levels above normal pipeline quality standards.

  3. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  4. Stress analysis of parallel oil and gas steel pipelines in inclined tunnels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaonan; Lu, Hongfang; Wu, Shijuan

    2015-01-01

    Geological conditions along long distance pipelines are complex. In consideration of differences in elevation and terrain obstacles, long distance pipelines are commonly laid through tunnels. Oil and gas pipelines are often laid side by side to reduce construction costs and minimize geological impact. The layout and construction of parallel oil and gas pipelines are more complex than those of single pipelines. In order to reduce safety hazards, it is necessary to carry out stress analysis of the oil and gas pipelines that run through tunnels. In this study, a stress analysis model of pipelines running through a tunnel was developed. On the basis of the finite element method, CAESAR II software was used to analyze the stress and displacement of a section of parallel oil and gas pipelines that run through tunnels and stress and displacement distribution laws were drawn from the analyses. A study of the factors influencing stress recommended that: (1) The buttress interval of the parallel oil and gas pipelines in a tunnel should be 12 m; (2) The angle of inclined pipelines should be no greater than 25°; (3) The stress of oil pipelines enhances more obviously than that of gas pipelines under earthquake action; (4) The average stress can be reduced by adopting "ladder" laying; and (5) Guide bend can be set at the tunnel entrance and exit in order to reduce the stress.

  5. Generational analysis of trends in unprotected sex in France among men who have sex with men: The major role of context-driven evolving patterns

    PubMed Central

    Méthy, Nicolas; Meyer, Laurence; Bajos, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Objective Using a generational approach, this study analyses how unprotected anal intercourse has evolved since 1991 in France across different generations of men who have sex with men (MSM) whose sexual lives began at different periods in the history of the HIV epidemic. Design Data were collected from 18–59 year-old respondents to the French Gay Press surveys Enquêtes Presse Gay, conducted repeatedly between 1991 and 2011 (N = 32,196) using self-administered questionnaires distributed in gay magazines and over the internet. Methods Trends in unprotected anal intercourse (i.e. condomless anal sex) with casual partners of unknown or different HIV serostatus (hereafter “UAId” in this manuscript) were studied. Responses were analysed according to year and then reorganised for age-cohort analyses by generation, based on the year respondents turned 18. Results UAId rates fell from 1991 to 1997, and then rose from 13.4% in 1997 to 25.5% in 2011 among seronegative respondents, and from 24.8% to 63.3%, respectively, among seropositive respondents. Both in seropositive and seronegative respondents, UAId increased over time for all generations, indicative of a strong period effect. Conclusion Analyses of data from several generations of MSM who started their sexual lives at different time points in the HIV epidemic, revealed very similar trends in UAId between generations, among both seropositive and seronegative respondents. This strong period effect suggests that sexual behaviours in MSM are influenced more by contextual than generational factors. The fact that prevention practices are simultaneously observed in different generations and that there are most likely underlying prevention norms among MSM, suggests that PrEP could become widely accepted by all generations of MSM exposed to the risk of HIV. PMID:28170424

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Gas Turbine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of fuel cell systems and hybrid fuel cell systems requires the evolution of analysis strategies for evaluating thermodynamic performance. A gas turbine thermodynamic cycle integrated with a fuel cell was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of the several uncertainties in the thermodynamic performance parameters. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for the overall thermal efficiency and net specific power output due to the uncertainties in the thermodynamic random variables. These results can be used to quickly identify the most critical design variables in order to optimize the design and make it cost effective. The analysis leads to the selection of criteria for gas turbine performance.

  7. Operation, Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Reverse Water Gas Shift process is a candidate technology for water and oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production project. This report focuses on the operation and analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process, which has been constructed at Kennedy Space Center. A summary of results from the initial operation of the RWGS, process along with an analysis of these results is included in this report. In addition an evaluation of a material balance model developed from the work performed previously under the summer program is included along with recommendations for further experimental work.

  8. Ammonia Analysis by Gas Chromatograph/Infrared Detector (GC/IRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Joseph P.; Whitfield, Steve W.

    2003-01-01

    Methods are being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center's Toxicity Lab on a CG/IRD System that will be used to detect ammonia in low part per million (ppm) levels. These methods will allow analysis of gas samples by syringe injections. The GC is equipped with a unique cryogenic-cooled inlet system that will enable our lab to make large injections of a gas sample. Although the initial focus of the work will be analysis of ammonia, this instrument could identify other compounds on a molecular level. If proper methods can be developed, the IRD could work as a powerful addition to our offgassing capabilities.

  9. Integrated exhaust gas analysis system for aircraft turbine engine component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.; Anderson, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated exhaust gas analysis system was designed and installed in the hot-section facility at the Lewis Research Center. The system is designed to operate either manually or automatically and also to be operated from a remote station. The system measures oxygen, water vapor, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen. Two microprocessors control the system and the analyzers, collect data and process them into engineering units, and present the data to the facility computers and the system operator. Within the design of this system there are innovative concepts and procedures that are of general interest and application to other gas analysis tasks.

  10. Cross-interference correction and simultaneous multi-gas analysis based on infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, You-Wen; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Chan, Ka-Lok; Li, Xian-Xin; Wang, Shi-Mei; Huang, Shu-Hua

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we present simultaneous multiple pollutant gases (CO2, CO, and NO) measurements by using the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) technique. A cross-correlation correction method is proposed and used to correct the cross-interferences among the target gases. The calculation of calibration curves is based on least-square fittings with third-order polynomials, and the interference functions are approximated by linear curves. The pure absorbance of each gas is obtained by solving three simultaneous equations using the fitted interference functions. Through the interference correction, the signal created at each filter channel only depends on the absorption of the intended gas. Gas mixture samples with different concentrations of CO2, CO, and NO are pumped into the sample cell for analysis. The results show that the measurement error of each gas is less than 4.5%.

  11. Photoacoustic spectrometry for trace gas analysis and leak detection using different cell geometries.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Dastageer, A; Shwehdi, M H

    2004-01-09

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer with high selectivity and sensitivity has been developed for trace gas analysis and for the detection of gas leak at part per trillion by volume (pptV) level. This PA system comprises of a resonant photoacoustic cell, a pulsed line tunable CO(2) laser as an excitation source and a sensitive electret microphone as a photoacoustic detector with an option to trigger the safety alarm system for early warning of gas leaks. In this work, three resonant PA cells with various geometries have been developed at our laboratory for the detection of photoacoustic signal using pulsed laser system and their comparative performance have been studied. As a special application of this PA system, the detection of sulfur hexa fluoride (SF(6)) gas using these three cells has been carried out for optimizing the sensitivity. Besides this, our PA system can very well be applied for pollution monitoring and detection of hazardous gases in a noisy environment.

  12. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS STUDIES OF TURBULENCE IN OPTICALLY THICK GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, C.; Medeiros, J. R. De; Lazarian, A.; Burkhart, B.; Pogosyan, D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity of principal component analysis (PCA) to the velocity power spectrum in high-opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic position–position–velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post-processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal −3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of the Lazarian and Pogosyan theory. This makes PCA a potentially valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities, provided that proper gauging of the PCA index is made. However, we found the latter to not be easy, as the PCA results change in an irregular way for data with high sonic Mach numbers. This is in contrast to synthetic Brownian noise data used for velocity and density fields that show monotonic PCA behavior. We attribute this difference to the PCA's sensitivity to Fourier phase information.

  13. Quantifying tight-gas sandstone permeability via critical path analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rock permeability has been actively investigated over the past several decades by the geosciences community. However, its accurate estimation still presents significant technical challenges, especially in spatially complex rocks. In this letter, we apply critical path analysis (CPA) to estimate perm...

  14. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  15. Analysis and clustering of natural gas consumption data for thermal energy use forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Alessandro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, after a brief analysis of the connections between the uses of natural gas and thermal energy use, the natural gas consumption data related to Italian market are analyzed and opportunely clustered in order to compute the typical consumption profile in different days of the week in different seasons and for the different class of users: residential, tertiary and industrial. The analysis of the data shows that natural gas consumption profile is mainly related to seasonality pattern and to the weather conditions (outside temperature, humidity and wind chiller). There is also an important daily pattern related to industrial and civil sector that, at a lower degree than the previous one, does affect the consumption profile and have to be taken into account for defining an effective short and mid term thermal energy forecasting method. A possible mathematical structure of the natural gas consumption profile is provided. Due to the strong link between thermal energy use and natural gas consumption, this analysis could be considered the first step for the development of a model for thermal energy forecasting.

  16. Evolving Sensitivity Balances Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jamie X.; Turner, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of Boolean Networks (BNs) to mutations. We are interested in Boolean Networks as a model of Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs). We adopt Ribeiro and Kauffman’s Ergodic Set and use it to study the long term dynamics of a BN. We define the sensitivity of a BN to be the mean change in its Ergodic Set structure under all possible loss of interaction mutations. Insilico experiments were used to selectively evolve BNs for sensitivity to losing interactions. We find that maximum sensitivity was often achievable and resulted in the BNs becoming topologically balanced, i.e. they evolve towards network structures in which they have a similar number of inhibitory and excitatory interactions. In terms of the dynamics, the dominant sensitivity strategy that evolved was to build BNs with Ergodic Sets dominated by a single long limit cycle which is easily destabilised by mutations. We discuss the relevance of our findings in the context of Stem Cell Differentiation and propose a relationship between pluripotent stem cells and our evolved sensitive networks. PMID:22586459

  17. Slippery Texts and Evolving Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The idea of "slippery texts" provides a useful descriptor for materials that mutate and evolve across different media. Eight adult gamers, encountering the slippery text "American McGee's Alice," demonstrate a variety of ways in which players attempt to manage their attention as they encounter a new text with many resonances. The range of their…

  18. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  19. How evolvable are polarization machines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Liedewij; Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    In many different cell types proper polarization is essential for cell function. Polarization mechanisms however, differ between cell types and even closely related species use a variety of polarization machines. Budding yeast, for example, depends on several parallel mechanisms to establish polarity. One mechanism (i) depends on reaction and diffusion of proteins in the membrane. Another one (ii) depends on reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. So why does yeast use several mechanisms simultaneously? Can yeast also polarize robustly in the absence of one of them? We addressed these questions by evolving budding yeast in the absence of mechanism (i) or (ii). We deleted a mechanism by deleting one or two genes that are essential for its function. After the deletion of either mechanism the growth rate of cells was highly decreased (2-5 fold) and their cell shape was highly perturbed. Subsequently, we evolved these cells for 10 days. Surprisingly, the evolved cells rapidly overcame most of their polarity defects. They grow at 0.9x wildtype growth rate and their cell shape is signifigantly less perturbed. Now we will study how these cells rescued polarization. Did they fix the deleted mechanism, strengthen other mechanisms or evolve a completely new one?

  20. Analysis of the benefits of gas technology R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, K.G. Jr.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Six alternative scenarios were developed and analyzed to provide insights into the economic benefits of R and D on gaseous fuel supply and utilization technologies. The scenarios explore changes in the rate of new technology introduction under various assumptions regarding the future prices for oil, coal, and electricity. A long-range energy sector simulation model was used to analyze the scenarios. The model requires an extensive technology data base that was developed for this analysis. 6 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  1. Blood gas analysis in dogs with pulmonary heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Yasuda, K; Sasaki, Y

    1993-04-01

    Blood gases were analyzed in dogs with pulmonary heartworm (HW) disease. The arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) in dogs with mild signs of dirofilariasis (mildly affected group, n = 48, 85.7 +/- 8.2 mmHg) and in dogs with signs of right heart failure (severely affected group, n = 13, 76.4 +/- 11.6 mmHg) was lower (p < 0.01) than in dogs without HW infection (HW-free group, n = 19, 91.5 +/- 7.3 mmHg). Only 2 dogs in the severely affected group had a PaO2 less than 60 mmHg. The arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2, p < 0.01) and mixed venous O2 (p < 0.01) and CO2 (p < 0.01) tensions were lower, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2, p < 0.01) was greater in the severely affected group than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. Arterial pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were lower (p < 0.01) in both affected groups than in the HW-free groups. The anion gap level was not different among the 3 groups. Serum lactic acid level in the severely affected group was higher (p < 0.01) than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. However, a slightly higher serum lactic acid concentration was found only in 2 dogs of the severely affected group (3.84 mmol/l and 3.82 mmol/l). The PaO2 (r = -0.62) and AaDO2 (r = 0.66) correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with mean pulmonary arterial pressure. One week after HW removal, blood gases, pH and HCO3- concentration remained unchanged in the mildly affected group. In the severely affected group, blood gas values were the same, but pH and HCO3- concentration improved slightly.

  2. High resolution gas chromatography analysis of rice bran oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fengxiang; Lin, Qinlu; Chen, Xu; Wei, Xiaojun

    To assess the nutritional value and safety quality of rice bran oil (RBO) ,fatty acids of RBO from 15 species rice come from Hunan Province were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). Crude RBOs were extracted by hexane 3-times using a solvent-to-rice bran ratio of 3:1 (w/w) at 40°C and composition of RBOs was analyzed by HRGC. The result showed that main fatty acids of 15 kinds of RBO include myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), arachidonic acid (C20:1). It is strange that arachidonic acid (C20:1) is not listed in Chinese standard of RBO (GB11192-2003), and it exists in our samples of RBO. The average value of linolenic acid in RBOs is 1.6304% (range from 1.2425% to 2.131%), and it showed higher level comparing with Chinese standard that linolenic acid is less than 1.0%. The average value of USFA and SFA are 76.81% (range 75.96% to 82.06% ) and 20.15% (range 13.72% to 23.06%) respectively, and USFA content is close to olive oil (83.75%), peanut oil (81.75%) and soybean oil (85.86%). USFA in Jingyou 13 RBO is the highest content. The ratio of USFA to SFA content is 4:1 (range from 3.32 to 5.98:1). The ratio of SFA: MUFA: PUFA of 15 RBOs is 1: 2.2: 1.8, and ω6/ω3 ratio is 21.69 (range from16.54 to 27.28) and it is close to the 26:1 which is reported to be helpful to increase SOD activity. The oleic acid /linoleic acid ratio of 15 RBOs is 1.23:1 (rang from 1.04:1 to 1.42:1). Our data analyzed composition of RBOs from 15 species rice of China and will provide new evidence to revise RBO standard. It also helps us to assess nutritional value of RBOs and identify different RBOs from various species rice and places of origin.

  3. Gas storage project development, operation, and analysis: Basis guidelines for gas storage project development, operation, and operations analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nowaczewski, S.F.

    1995-09-01

    Reservoir selection matches location, capacity, and deliverability to market demand; gathering, processing, compression, land acquisition, and pipeline connection significantly impact economics. Geologic considerations include field-wide variations in permeability, porosity, pay thickness. Well deliverability, and the number of wells required to meet targeted field deliverability can be estimated from kh or {phi}h. Analogous reservoir types can be used to estimate kh, {phi}h ranges for particular fields. Capillary pressure data define pore size distribution and gas-water threshold pressure. Existing well location and log data are essential in mapping subtle stratigraphic relationships. Definitions of field type, trap type, and liquid phases are important to the economics of storage development and operations, since safe high pressure storage is of greater benefit. Well construction considerations include location, type (vertical/slant/horizontal), and completion type to maximize drainage and deliverability; casing sizing to eliminate frictional pressure loss; and casing cementing for long-term mechanical integrity. Deliverability prediction uses well/gathering system nodal pressure data. The importance of deliverability maintenance/enhancement is increasing as markets demand ever greater deliverability. By design, a field allows cycling of an expected volume; loss of potential decreases efficiently. Inventory verification relies on well pressure and fluid data, accurate metering, and estimation of losses or leaks and fuel use. Data quality, quantity and management affect results in all these major areas of storage operations.

  4. Development of gas chromatographic system for dissolved organic carbon analysis in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-12-01

    During the first six months of this two-year grant, we have completed the construction of the analytical portion of a prototype gas chromatograph-based system for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon in seawater. We also have begun testing the procedures to be used to cryogenically concentrate and transfer carbon dioxide from the oxidizing atmosphere of the high-temperature furnace into the reducing hydrogen carrier gas of the gas chromatograph. During the second half of the first year, we will construct the high-temperature catalytic oxidation furnace and test the entire system on laboratory-prepared aqueous solutions of various organic compounds. Also during this period, we will take part in an initial scoping study within the Cape Hatteras field area on board the R/V Gyre. This study will involve both the collection of samples of seawater for organic and inorganic carbon analysis and the measurement of surface-water pCO[sub 2].

  5. Development of gas chromatographic system for dissolved organic carbon analysis in seawater. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.

    1992-12-01

    During the first six months of this two-year grant, we have completed the construction of the analytical portion of a prototype gas chromatograph-based system for the analysis of dissolved organic carbon in seawater. We also have begun testing the procedures to be used to cryogenically concentrate and transfer carbon dioxide from the oxidizing atmosphere of the high-temperature furnace into the reducing hydrogen carrier gas of the gas chromatograph. During the second half of the first year, we will construct the high-temperature catalytic oxidation furnace and test the entire system on laboratory-prepared aqueous solutions of various organic compounds. Also during this period, we will take part in an initial scoping study within the Cape Hatteras field area on board the R/V Gyre. This study will involve both the collection of samples of seawater for organic and inorganic carbon analysis and the measurement of surface-water pCO{sub 2}.

  6. Application of gas chromatography to analysis of spirit-based alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Spirit-based beverages are alcoholic drinks; their production processes are dependent on the type and origin of raw materials. The composition of this complex matrix is difficult to analyze, and scientists commonly choose gas chromatography techniques for this reason. With a wide selection of extraction methods and detectors it is possible to provide qualitative and quantitative analysis for many chemical compounds with various functional groups. This article describes different types of gas chromatography techniques and their most commonly used associated extraction techniques (e.g., LLE, SPME, SPE, SFE, and SBME) and detectors (MS, TOFMS, FID, ECD, NPD, AED, O or EPD). Additionally, brief characteristics of internationally popular spirit-based beverages and application of gas chromatography to the analysis of selected alcoholic drinks are presented.

  7. Analysis of the ecological risk of opening new oil and gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anikiev, V.V.; Mansurov, M.N.; Fleishman, B.S.

    1995-01-01

    Practical recommendations that would ensure the ecological safety of opening new marine oil and gas fields should include analysis of ecological risk. Such an analysis should precede the studies of ecological safety and resolve a sequence of problems in evaluating the ecological risk, the probability and scale of accidents at the oil and gas extraction complex, and economic damage that could occur. This paper presents a method of evaluation of risks for fish populations incurred by marine extraction of oil and gas, calculates the required limit of probability of accidents excluding the possibility of degradation of flatfish populations, estimates expenses incurred by accidental oil spills, and presents data on level of pollution. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Dynamic analysis of gas-core reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, K. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis was incorporated into a previously developed model CODYN to obtain a model of open-cycle gaseous core reactor dynamics which can predict the heat flux at the cavity wall. The resulting model was used to study the sensitivity of the model to the value of the reactivity coefficients and to determine the system response for twenty specified perturbations. In addition, the model was used to study the effectiveness of several control systems in controlling the reactor. It was concluded that control drums located in the moderator region capable of inserting reactivity quickly provided the best control.

  9. Life cycle planning: An evolving concept

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.J.R.; Gorman, I.G.

    1994-12-31

    Life-cycle planning is an evolving concept in the management of oil and gas projects. BHP Petroleum now interprets this idea to include all development planning from discovery and field appraisal to final abandonment and includes safety, environmental, technical, plant, regulatory, and staffing issues. This article describes in the context of the Timor Sea, how despite initial successes and continuing facilities upgrades, BHPP came to perceive that current operations could be the victim of early development successes, particularly in the areas of corrosion and maintenance. The search for analogies elsewhere lead to the UK North Sea, including the experiences of Britoil and BP, both of which performed detailed Life of Field studies in the later eighties. These materials have been used to construct a format and content for total Life-cycle plans in general and the social changes required to ensure their successful application in Timor Sea operations and deployment throughout Australia.

  10. Non-uniform Evolving Hypergraphs and Weighted Evolving Hypergraphs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Li; Zhu, Xin-Yun; Suo, Qi; Forrest, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Firstly, this paper proposes a non-uniform evolving hypergraph model with nonlinear preferential attachment and an attractiveness. This model allows nodes to arrive in batches according to a Poisson process and to form hyperedges with existing batches of nodes. Both the number of arriving nodes and that of chosen existing nodes are random variables so that the size of each hyperedge is non-uniform. This paper establishes the characteristic equation of hyperdegrees, calculates changes in the hyperdegree of each node, and obtains the stationary average hyperdegree distribution of the model by employing the Poisson process theory and the characteristic equation. Secondly, this paper constructs a model for weighted evolving hypergraphs that couples the establishment of new hyperedges, nodes and the dynamical evolution of the weights. Furthermore, what is obtained are respectively the stationary average hyperdegree and hyperstrength distributions by using the hyperdegree distribution of the established unweighted model above so that the weighted evolving hypergraph exhibits a scale-free behavior for both hyperdegree and hyperstrength distributions. PMID:27845334

  11. Supersonic Flow of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Mixtures. Volume 2: RAMP - A Computer Code for Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in conjunction with the numerical solution of the flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures was documented. The solution to the set of governing equations was obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form were shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The characteristic directions for the gas-particle system are found to be the conventional gas Mach lines, the gas streamlines and the particle streamlines. The basic mesh construction for the flow solution is along streamlines and normals to the streamlines for axisymmetric or two-dimensional flow. The analysis gives detailed information of the supersonic flow and provides for a continuous solution of the nozzle and exhaust plume flow fields. Boundary conditions for the flow solution are either the nozzle wall or the exhaust plume boundary.

  12. Experimental investigation and analysis of continuous flow through trace gas preconcentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihyun

    2013-11-01

    It was proposed by Muntz et al. in 2004 to study a micro/mesoscale continuous flow through trace gas preconcentrator, which could avoid the time fidelity problem. The preconcentrator for rarefied trace gas analysis, which is one part of a gas detector or analyzer, has been built and consists of a main flow channel, pumping chambers, and separation membranes that are located upper and lower surface of the main flow channel. The preconcentration is not from stop, adsorption, and release, but is caused by the gradually decreasing cross section of the main flow channel until release through the detection unit such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, or optical diagnostics. This has the possibility of achieving concentration increase of various gases in a carrier gas by using relatively simple micro/macroscale mass diffusion separation stages, and is suitable for improving the time accuracy of analytical systems. A series of experiments were conducted in an attempt to validate the available numerical data, such as the concentration and gas flow speed of the newly continuous preconcentration technology. This study involved experimental investigations to obtain a base-line comparison of the existing numerical predictions provided by the prototype preconcentrator.

  13. A multivariate statistical analysis approach to analyze gas chromatography-olfactometry data of tangerine hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas chromatography (GC) hyphenated with olfactometry (O) when a human subject smells the effluent of the GC is a useful technique to identify aroma activity of volatile compounds in a food. Many techniques have been developed, based on olfactory thresholds (CHARM analysis, AEDA), or based on psychop...

  14. Multi-pass gas cell designed for VOCs analysis by infrared spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Wang, Xin; Wei, Haoyun

    2015-10-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted from chemical, petrochemical, and other industries are the most common air pollutants leading to various environmental hazards. Regulations to control the VOCs emissions have been more and more important in China, which requires specific VOCs measurement systems to take measures. Multi-components analysis system, with an infrared spectrometer, a gas handling module and a multi-pass gas cell, is one of the most effective air pollution monitoring facilities. In the VOCs analysis system, the optical multi-pass cell is required to heat to higher than 150 degree Celsius to prevent the condensation of the component gas. Besides that, the gas cell needs to be designed to have an optical path length that matches the detection sensitivity requirement with a compact geometry. In this article, a multi-pass White cell was designed for the high temperature absorption measurements in a specified geometry requirement. The Aberration theory is used to establish the model to accurately calculate the astigmatism for the reflector system. In consideration of getting the optimum output energy, the dimensions of cell geometry, object mirrors and field mirror are optimized by the ray-tracing visible simulation. Then finite element analysis was used to calculate the thermal analysis for the structure of the external and internal elements for high stability. According to the simulation, the cell designed in this paper has an optical path length of 10 meters with an internal volume of 3 liters, and has good stability between room temperature to 227 degree Celsius.

  15. Multi-scale symbolic time reverse analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhai, Lusheng; Jin, Ningde; Wang, Youchen

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows are widely encountered in production processes of petroleum and chemical industry. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of multi-scale gas-liquid two-phase flow structures is of great significance for the optimization of production process and the measurement of flow parameters. In this paper, we propose a method of multi-scale symbolic time reverse (MSTR) analysis for gas-liquid two-phase flows. First, through extracting four time reverse asymmetry measures (TRAMs), i.e. Euclidean distance, difference entropy, percentage of constant words and percentage of reversible words, the time reverse asymmetry (TRA) behaviors of typical nonlinear systems are investigated from the perspective of multi-scale analysis, and the results show that the TRAMs are sensitive to the changing of dynamic characteristics underlying the complex nonlinear systems. Then, the MSTR analysis is used to study the conductance signals from gas-liquid two-phase flows. It is found that the multi-scale TRA analysis can effectively reveal the multi-scale structure characteristics and nonlinear evolution properties of the flow structures.

  16. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  17. Gas chromatographic analysis of polyhydroxybutyrate in activated sludge: a round-robin test.

    PubMed

    Baetens, D; Aurola, A M; Foglia, A; Dionisi, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in particular have become compounds which is routinely investigated in wastewater research. The PHB analysis method has only recently been applied to activated sludge samples where PHA contents might be relatively low. This urges the need to investigate the reproducibility of the gas chromatographic method for PHB analysis. This was evaluated in a round-robin test in 5 European laboratories with samples from lab-scale and full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. It was shown that the standard deviation of measurements in each lab and the reproducibility between the labs was very good. Experimental results obtained by different laboratories using this analysis method can be compared. Sludge samples with PHB contents varying between 0.3 and 22.5 mg PHB/mg sludge were analysed. The gas chromatographic method allows for PHV, PH2MB and PH2MV analysis as well.

  18. Phase behavior and splitting analysis: An operational tool in gas transmission and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez A., F.F.; Infantini S., M.

    1998-12-31

    Most of the natural gas produced by Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA) is associated gas that flows from the gathering systems to the processing plants, before it arrives at the transmission systems. Even if the gas transmission occurs after the necessary processing of the gas has been completed, condensation still happens in the transmission, regulating stations and/or distribution systems. The quantity of condensate will not only depend on composition, pressure and temperature, but also on the unequal splitting phenomenon that takes place at tee junctions in a network system. The splitting phenomenon determines the liquid distribution at the junction. This situation is more drastic when the processing plant is partially or totally shut down in a maintenance program. This work shows how the gas transmission and distribution engineer has to use the phase behavior and splitting analysis as an operational tool, in order to predict and prevent the presence of liquid in the system. Using process simulators, the phase behavior analysis is conducted to determine the bubble and dew point curve and to perform flash calculations at any pressure and temperature. Then, the operational pressure-temperature profile is over-plotted on the phase envelope diagram in order to evaluate the condensation possibility into the gas pipeline. Afterwards, the pressure and temperature drops in regulating stations are incorporated in the phase envelope diagram and the two-phase gas condensate study is completed. Finally, considering the concepts of the splitting phenomenon and the knowledge that it can really happen, the presence of liquid in particular customers can be explained and solved. Operational experiences are included to evaluate the methodology and to present the effectiveness of the results.

  19. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  20. [Method of infrared spectrum analysis of hydrocarbon mixed gas based on multilevel and SVM-subset].

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Xie, Wen-Jun; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2008-02-01

    The hydrocarbon mixed gas was characterized by multi-component and varied density. In order to deal with the difficulties that can not be actually solved with mass mixture gas spectrum data samples, 15 kinds of subset patterns were determined on the basis of investigations and studies, which needed 5 500 spectrum data samples for training and testing. On the basis of this, a method of hydrocarbon mixed gas infrared spectrum analysis based on 2-levels and 15 SVM-subsets was proposed in the light of the idea of working pattern recognition --> mixture gas analysis --> the final result output. In order to solve the problem of new subset working pattern, the SVM online categorization algorithm based on spectrum data relational rule was used. The experimental results show that the component concentration maximal deviation is 0.41% and the maximal average deviation is 0.04%. The method can be used in other mixture gas infrared spectrum analyses, and has the theoretic and application value.

  1. A New Analysis Tool Assessment for Rotordynamic Modeling of Gas Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; SanAndres, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Gas foil bearings offer several advantages over traditional bearing types that make them attractive for use in high-speed turbomachinery. They can operate at very high temperatures, require no lubrication supply (oil pumps, seals, etc.), exhibit very long life with no maintenance, and once operating airborne, have very low power loss. The use of gas foil bearings in high-speed turbomachinery has been accelerating in recent years, although the pace has been slow. One of the contributing factors to the slow growth has been a lack of analysis tools, benchmarked to measurements, to predict gas foil bearing behavior in rotating machinery. To address this shortcoming, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has supported the development of analytical tools to predict gas foil bearing performance. One of the codes has the capability to predict rotordynamic coefficients, power loss, film thickness, structural deformation, and more. The current paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of the code, named XLGFBTH (Texas A&M University). A test rig at GRC is used as a simulated case study to compare rotordynamic analysis using output from the code to actual rotor response as measured in the test rig. The test rig rotor is supported on two gas foil journal bearings manufactured at GRC, with all pertinent geometry disclosed. The resulting comparison shows that the rotordynamic coefficients calculated using XLGFBTH represent the dynamics of the system reasonably well, especially as they pertain to predicting critical speeds.

  2. Techno-economic analysis for the evaluation of three UCG synthesis gas end use approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas; Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Krawczyk, Piotr; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) enables the utilization of coal reserves that are economically not exploitable because of complex geological boundary conditions. In the present study we investigate UCG as a potential economic approach for conversion of deep-seated coals into a synthesis gas and its application within three different utilization options. Related to geological boundary conditions and the chosen gasification agent, UCG synthesis gas composes of varying methane, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide amounts. In accordance to its calorific value, the processed UCG synthesis gas can be utilized in different manners, as for electricity generation in a combined cycle power plant or for feedstock production making use of its various chemical components. In the present study we analyze UCG synthesis gas utilization economics in the context of clean electricity generation with an integrated carbon capture and storage process (CCS) as well as synthetic fuel and fertilizer production (Kempka et al., 2010) based on a gas composition achieved during an in situ UCG trial in the Wieczorek Mine. Hereby, we also consider chemical feedstock production in order to mitigate CO2 emissions. Within a sensitivity analysis of UCG synthesis gas calorific value variations, we produce a range of capital and operational expenditure bandwidths that allow for an economic assessment of different synthesis gas end use approaches. To carry out the integrated techno-economic assessment of the coupled systems and the sensitivity analysis, we adapted the techno-economic UCG-CCS model developed by Nakaten et al. (2014). Our techno-economic modeling results demonstrate that the calorific value has a high impact on the economics of UCG synthesis gas utilization. In the underlying study, the synthesis gas is not suitable for an economic competitive electricity generation, due to the relatively low calorific value of 4.5 MJ/Nm³. To be a profitable option for electricity

  3. Parallel Hybrid Gas-Electric Geared Turbofan Engine Conceptual Design and Benefits Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lents, Charles; Hardin, Larry; Rheaume, Jonathan; Kohlman, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design of a parallel gas-electric hybrid propulsion system for a conventional single aisle twin engine tube and wing vehicle has been developed. The study baseline vehicle and engine technology are discussed, followed by results of the hybrid propulsion system sizing and performance analysis. The weights analysis for the electric energy storage & conversion system and thermal management system is described. Finally, the potential system benefits are assessed.

  4. Results of the GCMS Effluent Gas Analysis for the Brine Processing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Lee, Jeffrey; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Shaw, Hali; Kawashima, Brian; Beeler, David; Harris, Linden

    2015-01-01

    The effluent gas for the Paragon Ionomer Water Processor (IWP), UMPQUA Ultrasonic Brine Dewatering System (UBDS), and the NASA Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB) were analyzed using Headspace GCMS Analysis in the recent AES FY14 Brine Processing Test. The results from the analysis describe the number and general chemical species of the chemicals produced. Comparisons were also made between the different chromatograms for each system, and an explanation of the differences in the results is reported.

  5. PPM mixtures of formaldehyde in gas cylinders: Stability and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.C.; Miller, S.B.; Patterson, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Scott Specialty Gases has been successful in producing stable calibration gases of formaldehyde at low concentration. Critical to this success has been the development of a treatment process for high pressure aluminum cylinders. Formaldehyde cylinders having concentrations of 20ppm and 4ppm were found to show only small decline in concentrations over a period of approximately 12 months. Since no NIST traceable formaldehyde standards (or Standard Reference Material) are available, all Scott's formaldehyde cylinders were originally certified by traditional impinger method. This method involves an extremely tedious purification procedure for 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). A modified version of the impinger method has been developed and does not require extensive reagent purification for formaldehyde analysis. Extremely low formaldehyde blanks have been obtained with the modified method. The HPLC conditions in the original method were used for chromatographic separations. The modified method results in a lower analytical uncertainty for the formaldehyde standard mixtures. Consequently, it is possible to discern small differences between analytical results that are important for stability study.

  6. Coupled oscillators on evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Bagarti, Trilochan

    2016-12-01

    In this work we study coupled oscillators on evolving networks. We find that the steady state behavior of the system is governed by the relative values of the spread in natural frequencies and the global coupling strength. For coupling strong in comparison to the spread in frequencies, the system of oscillators synchronize and when coupling strength and spread in frequencies are large, a phenomenon similar to amplitude death is observed. The network evolution provides a mechanism to build inter-oscillator connections and once a dynamic equilibrium is achieved, oscillators evolve according to their local interactions. We also find that the steady state properties change by the presence of additional time scales. We demonstrate these results based on numerical calculations studying dynamical evolution of limit-cycle and van der Pol oscillators.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Volatile Defensive Secretions of Three Species of Pyrrhocoridae (Insecta: Heteroptera) by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Method

    PubMed Central

    Krajicek, Jan; Havlikova, Martina; Bursova, Miroslava; Ston, Martin; Cabala, Radomir; Exnerova, Alice; Stys, Pavel; Bosakova, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) have evolved a system of well-developed scent glands that produce diverse and frequently strongly odorous compounds that act mainly as chemical protection against predators. A new method of non-lethal sampling with subsequent separation using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection was proposed for analysis of these volatile defensive secretions. Separation was performed on Rtx-200 column containing fluorinated polysiloxane stationary phase. Various mechanical irritation methods (ultrasonics, shaking, pressing bugs with plunger of syringe) were tested for secretion sampling with a special focus on non-lethal irritation. The preconcentration step was performed by sorption on solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with different polarity. For optimization of sampling procedure, Pyrrhocoris apterus was selected. The entire multi-parameter optimization procedure of secretion sampling was performed using response surface methodology. The irritation of bugs by pressing them with a plunger of syringe was shown to be the most suitable. The developed method was applied to analysis of secretions produced by adult males and females of Pyrrhocoris apterus, Pyrrhocoris tibialis and Scantius aegyptius (all Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoridae). The chemical composition of secretion, particularly that of alcohols, aldehydes and esters, is species-specific in all three pyrrhocorid species studied. The sexual dimorphism in occurrence of particular compounds is largely limited to alcohols and suggests their epigamic intraspecific function. The phenetic overall similarities in composition of secretion do not reflect either relationship of species or similarities in antipredatory color pattern. The similarities of secretions may be linked with antipredatory strategies. The proposed method requires only a few individuals which remain alive after the procedure. Thus secretions of a number of species including even the rare ones can be

  8. Geologic, technical, and economic sensitivity analysis in support of the GRI (Gas Research Institute) tight-gas sands R and D program. Annual report, November 1986-October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.R.

    1988-03-01

    During 1986-87, Lewin and Associates, Inc., used the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS) and other analytic models to estimate the potential for tight gas and the effects of changes in economics, technology, and resource assessments. During the reporting period, TGAS was: (1) enhanced in its analytical capabilities in terms of costing and tax routines; (2) used to provide refined estimates of economic tight-gas potential from the Travis Peak formation; and (3) used to support GRI managers in RandD planning, evaluation, and technology transfer (e.g., PAM, Baseline, Hydrocarbon Models, and AGA and EMF submissions). A microcomputer version (PC-TGAS) was developed for dissemination to industry.

  9. Geologic, technical and economic-sensitivity analysis in support of the GRI (Gas Research Institute) tight-gas reservoirs program. Annual report, November 1985-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Brashear, J.P.; Haas, M.

    1987-02-01

    During 1985-86, Lewin and Associates, Inc., used the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS) to estimate the potential for tight gas and the effects of changes in economics, technology, and resource assessments. During the reporting period, TGAS was; (1) enhanced in its analytical capabilities in terms of fracture propagation modeling, type curve modeling, run-time efficiencies, and economics routines; (2) used to provide refined estimates of economic tight gas potential from the Travis Peak formation; and (3) used to support GRI managers in RandD planning, evaluation, and technology transfer.

  10. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation.

  11. Evolvable Hardware for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Hornby, Gregory; Larchev, Gregory; Kraus, William

    2004-01-01

    This article surveys the research of the Evolvable Systems Group at NASA Ames Research Center. Over the past few years, our group has developed the ability to use evolutionary algorithms in a variety of NASA applications ranging from spacecraft antenna design, fault tolerance for programmable logic chips, atomic force field parameter fitting, analog circuit design, and earth observing satellite scheduling. In some of these applications, evolutionary algorithms match or improve on human performance.

  12. Seyfert's Sextet (HGC 79): An Evolved Stephan's Quintet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbala, A.; Sulentic, J.; Rosado, M.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Plana, H.

    Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers MOS/SIS (3.6m CFHT)+PUMA (2.1m OAN-SPM, México) and the long-slit spectrograph ALFOSC (2.5m NOT, La Palma) were used to measure the kinematics of gas and stars in Seyfert's Sextet (HCG79). We interpret it as a highly evolved group that formed from sequential acquistion of mostly late-type galaxies that are now slowly coalescing and undergoing strong secular evolution. We find evidence for possible feedback as revealed by accretion and minor merger events in two of the most evolved members.

  13. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  14. Canadian natural gas exports to the US: a monopolistic intertemporal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, T.E.; Goldberg, H.M.; Weyant, J.P.

    1984-10-01

    Active debate over the appropriate level and pricing of energy exports to the US underscores the need for a consistent framework for evaluating gas export quantities and prices that takes into account current and projected Canadian resources and domestic demand as well as US market forces. The authors describe an analytical model, then point out some interesting characteristics of continental gas trade and an intertemporal analysis of supply and demand over the next 20 years. They conclude with planned modifications to the model and future research plans. 10 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Low temperature gamma ray irradiation effects on polymer materials (4)-gas analysis of GFRP and CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, H.; Kasai, N.; Sasuga, T.; Seguchi, T.

    1996-11-01

    Gas analysis was carried out at RT after gamma-irradiation at room temperature and 77K for glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) having the same epoxy resin matrix. Gas yield from CFRP was less than that from GFRP at RT, but comparable at 77 K. The yields of CO and CO 2 showed a large dependence on the irradiation temperature, i.e. they were much less at 77 K. Radiation resistance of GFRP and CFRP towards 77 K irrdiation is expected to be higher than that towards RT irradiation.

  16. DOE Final report [A genetic analysis of the lumenal proteins of the PSII O{sub 2} evolving complex of cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Louis A.

    2001-03-01

    The primary objectives of this proposal were a better understanding of the structure and function of the Mn-stabilizing (MSP) in two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142. In addition, the author was interested in analysis of the other cyanobacteria lumenal PSII proteins, cyt c{sub 550} and the 12 kDa protein. The experimentation involved analysis of targeted random mutagenesis of the genes encoding the three proteins, especially in psbO, the gene encoding MSP. This required mutant screening with a digital imaging spectrometer. Knockout mutants of the other two lumenal proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 were also constructed. In addition, photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution in Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142, a nitrogen-fixing strain that regulates the activity of nitrogenase and photosynthesis in a temporal fashion, was analyzed.

  17. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  18. [New method of mixed gas infrared spectrum analysis based on SVM].

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Xie, Wen-Jun; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2007-07-01

    A new method of infrared spectrum analysis based on support vector machine (SVM) for mixture gas was proposed. The kernel function in SVM was used to map the seriously overlapping absorption spectrum into high-dimensional space, and after transformation, the high-dimensional data could be processed in the original space, so the regression calibration model was established, then the regression calibration model with was applied to analyze the concentration of component gas. Meanwhile it was proved that the regression calibration model with SVM also could be used for component recognition of mixture gas. The method was applied to the analysis of different data samples. Some factors such as scan interval, range of the wavelength, kernel function and penalty coefficient C that affect the model were discussed. Experimental results show that the component concentration maximal Mean AE is 0.132%, and the component recognition accuracy is higher than 94%. The problems of overlapping absorption spectrum, using the same method for qualitative and quantitative analysis, and limit number of training sample, were solved. The method could be used in other mixture gas infrared spectrum analyses, promising theoretic and application values.

  19. Enantiomeric analysis of limonene and carvone by direct introduction of aromatic plants into multidimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Barba, C; Toledano, R M; Santa-María, G; Herraiz, M; Martínez, R M

    2013-03-15

    Analysis of chiral compounds in complex mixtures is achieved by multidimensional gas chromatography using heptakis-(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin stationary phase as the main column of the system to separate specific selected cuts containing components unresolved in the first dimension. The proposed procedure allows rapid analysis of both solid and liquid matrices by direct introduction, into the programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) of a gas chromatograph, of either the plant material or the essential oil, respectively. A comparison between enantiomeric excesses data obtained, from plant leaves (or plant seeds) and the corresponding essential oils, by direct injection (i.e., without sample pretreatment or concentration step) into the multidimensional system is also included. Reported data demonstrate that no racemization occurs during analysis as identical enantiomeric excesses are obtained in both cases for specific chiral compounds.

  20. Accident Analysis Simulation in Modular 300MWt Gas Cooled Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Su’ud

    2017-01-01

    Safety analysis of 300MWt helium gas cooled long-life fast reactors has been performed. The analysis of unprotected loss of flow(ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient overpower (UTOP) are discussed. Some simulations for 300 MWt He gas cooled fast reactors has been performed and the results show that the reactor can anticipate complete pumping failure inherently by reducing power through reactivity feedback and remove the rest of heat through natural circulations. GCFR relatively has hard spectrum so it has relatively small Doppler coefficient. In the UTOP accident case the analysis has been performed against external reactivity up to 0.002dk/k. In addition the steam generator design has also consider excess power during severe UTOP case..

  1. Apparatus for the analysis of surfaces in gas environments using Positron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman; Lim, Lawrence; Joglekar, Prasad; Kalaskar, Sushant; Shastry, Karthik; Weiss, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Positron spectroscopy performed with low energy beams can provide highly surface specific information due to the trapping of positrons in an image potential surface state at the time of annihilation. Here we present design details of a new positron beam system for the analysis of surfaces gas environments. The new system will employ differential pumping to transport the positrons most of the way from the source to the sample under high vacuum. The positrons will then be transported through a thin gas layer surrounding the sample. The positrons will be implanted into the sample at energies less than ~ 10 keV ensuring that a large fraction will diffuse back to the surface before annihilation. The Elemental content of the surface interacting with the gas environment will then be determined from the Doppler broadened gamma spectra. Welch Y1100, NSF DMR 0907679.

  2. Investigation of porous polymer gas chromatographic packings for atmospheric analysis of extraterrestrial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the permanent gases in the atmospheres of mission targets is a major objective. A 16 meter long Porapak N column was used on the Venus probe and required a rather high carrier gas flow rate. The researchers have, therefore, surveyed commercial porous polymer types which had some ability to resolve nitrogen, oxygen, argon and carbon monoxide gases. Porapaks N and Q appeared superior to most. Batch to batch variation, however, was quite wide, so the researchers learned how to synthesize porous polymer and investigated some of the factors affecting the separations. A polymer was synthesized which was superior to all commercial products and allowed at least a 50% reduction in length and flow rate of carrier gas. Similar studies were made concerning the separation of hydrocarbons and new porous polymers have been synthesized which represent significant improvements in time of analysis, column, and carrier gas flow rate.

  3. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  4. Analysis of organic gas phase compounds formed by hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles.

    PubMed

    Madsen, René B; Christensen, Per S; Houlberg, Kasper; Lappa, Elpiniki; Mørup, Anders J; Klemmer, Maika; Olsen, Eva M; Jensen, Mads M; Becker, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B; Glasius, Marianne

    2015-09-01

    This work provides a comprehensive characterization of the gas phase from hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) collected during a 24-h continuous experiment. The gas consisted mainly of CO2, CO, H2, CH4 and C2H6 accounting for 96 v/v% while further analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed additionally 62 compounds of which 54 were tentatively identified. These products included methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, various olefins and several aromatic compounds. The composition provided clear indication of the steady state of the system. Apart from CO2, olefins were the most abundant compound class and could provide a source of revenue.

  5. Doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in equine urine by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, April S Y; Leung, Gary N W; Leung, David K K; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-09-08

    Anabolic steroids are banned substances in equine sports. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been the traditional technique for doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in biological samples. Although liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has become an important technique in doping control, the detection of saturated hydroxysteroids by LC-MS remains a problem due to their low ionization efficiency under electrospray. The recent development in fast-scanning gas-chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has provided a better alternative with a significant reduction in chemical noise by means of selective reaction monitoring. Herein, we present a sensitive and selective method for the screening of over 50 anabolic steroids in equine urine using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Mobile computing acceptance grows as applications evolve.

    PubMed

    Porn, Louis M; Patrick, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    Handheld devices are becoming more cost-effective to own, and their use in healthcare environments is increasing. Handheld devices currently are being used for e-prescribing, charge capture, and accessing daily schedules and reference tools. Future applications may include education on medications, dictation, order entry, and test-results reporting. Selecting the right handheld device requires careful analysis of current and future applications, as well as vendor expertise. It is important to recognize the technology will continue to evolve over the next three years.

  7. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  8. Improving greenhouse gas reduction calculations for bioenergy systems: Incremental life cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Richard A.

    There are many scales that can be employed to calculate net greenhouse gas emissions from bioenergy systems, ranging from single point source (stack gas) measurement, to full, multi-layered life cycle analyses considering all of the inputs and outputs throughout the economy. At an appropriate scale within these extremes, a method can be selected to support verification activities related to project-based trading of greenhouse gas emissions. The boundaries of the analysis must be carefully selected in order to meet the twin goals of the verification activity: (1) to meet scientific standards for emission balance quantification; and (2) to meet cost-effectiveness criteria of the emission trading community. The Incremental Life Cycle Analysis (ILCA) methodology is proposed and implemented for the quantification of greenhouse gas emission reductions arising from substitution of switchgrass for coal in electricity generation. The method utilizes an incremental progression through the fuel life cycle, evaluating each level of the life cycle for the quality the emission estimate produced. The method also reviews the scientific uncertainty underlying emission estimation procedures so that areas of relative weakness can be targeted and improved. The ILCA methodology is applied to the Chariton Valley Biomass Project (CVBP) for case study and evaluation. The CVBP is seeking to replace coal combustion in an existing 650-MW generation facility with switchgrass, cofired at a rate of 5 percent switchgrass to 95 percent coal. When the project reaches full capacity, the ILCA estimates that 239 pounds of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-eq) emissions will be reduced and/or removed from the atmosphere for every million Btu of switchgrass utilized, generating annual greenhouse gas reductions of 305,000 tons CO2-eq, leading to revenue for the project totaling over $1.5 million annually through trading of greenhouse gas emission reduction credits.

  9. Organics and Halocarbons in Volcanic Gas Emissions: Sampling, Analysis, and Estimates of Source Strengths for Diffuse and Fumarolic Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Seward, T. M.; Giże, A. P.; Hall, K.

    2003-12-01

    The well-established interest in organic compounds in volcanic emissions, emerging in the early 1800?s and continuing through modern times, has led to a long history of method development for the analysis of trace organics in volcanic gases. Both the sampling and analysis techniques have often been hampered by strong matrix effects, such as interferences by aerosol and ash scattering in spectroscopy, or the adverse impact of sulfur, acids and water on chromatographic and wet chemical techniques. Established methods exist for the ground-based sampling of fumaroles and diffuse degassing structures, whereas remote OP-FTIR spectroscopy appears promising for the detection and quantification of organic compounds during dangerous eruptive phases. The most successful collection techniques are based on a multiple-fold enrichment of the analytes during sampling, either by the absorption flask technique (''Giggenbach bottle''), or by in-line separation of water and sulfur from the analytes with subsequent trapping onto solid adsorbents. For organic analytes present at relatively high concentrations (e.g., C1-C6 hydrocarbons), the first technique has been used extensively. For labile and trace compounds (pptv to ppbv abundance), the latter technique has proven more reliable provided that the gas is dried sufficiently during sampling and that suitable dry gas volumes are sampled. A poor choice of sampling technique, or its incorrect application, may lead to erroneous results. These are often obvious by the finding of near-air concentrations, since volcanic gases are strongly enriched with respect to ambient air for a large range of compounds. Quantitative and independent testing of the air fraction possibly entrained during sampling must be performed in order to achieve reliable results. By using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS), unambiguous simultaneous identification of compounds can be achieved by two independent analytical techniques

  10. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-02-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought.

  11. Analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields; Duson Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.

    1981-05-01

    The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas field to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals of the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

  12. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  13. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in soil by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar; Marín, Cristóbal; Martínez, Carmen M; Flores, Pilar

    2005-10-05

    A rapid multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of 25 fungicides and insecticides in soil was developed. Soil samples are extracted by sonication with a water-acetonitrile mixture, and the pesticides are partitioned into dichloromethane. Final determination was made by gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD). Confirmation analysis of pesticides was carried out by GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The identification of compounds was based on retention time and on comparison of the primary and secondary ions. The average recovery by the GC-NPD method obtained for these compounds varied from 68.5% to 112.1% with a relative standard deviation between 1.8% and 6.2%. The GC-NPD method presents good linearity over the range assayed 50-2000 microg/L, and the detection limit for the pesticides studied varied from 0.1 to 10.4 microg/kg. The proposed method was used to determine pesticide levels in soil samples from experimental greenhouse pepper cultivation.

  14. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  15. Oil and gas development and coastal income inequality: A comparative analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, C.M.

    1994-11-30

    This research employed parish-and county-level data from the 1970, 1980, and 1990 censuses in a comparative analysis of family income inequality. We examined inequality trends in coastal Louisiana parishes and in Florida panhandle counties where there has been no significant onshore or offshore development. The analysis framework spanned key decades that correspond to expansion and subsequent contraction in oil and gas industry activity. A comparative inequality analysis revealed very different patterns of income inequality for Florida and Louisiana. While Florida inequality primarily trended downward across time, inequality in Louisiana exhibited a great deal of volatility and, by 1990, was higher than in 1970 in several cases.

  16. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  17. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  18. Spatial Risk Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing near Abandoned and Converted Oil and Gas Wells.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Joshua W; Yelderman, Joe C; James, Scott C

    2017-03-01

    Interaction between hydraulically generated fractures and existing wells (frac hits) could represent a potential risk to groundwater. In particular, frac hits on abandoned oil and gas wells could lead to upward leakage into overlying aquifers, provided migration pathways are present along the abandoned well. However, potential risk to groundwater is relatively unknown because few studies have investigated the probability of frac hits on abandoned wells. In this study, actual numbers of frac hits were not determined. Rather, the probability for abandoned wells to intersect hypothetical stimulated reservoir sizes of horizontal wells was investigated. Well data were compiled and analyzed for location and reservoir information, and sensitivity analyses were conducted by varying assumed sizes of stimulated reservoirs. This study used public and industry data for the Eagle Ford Shale play in south Texas, with specific attention paid to abandoned oil and gas wells converted into water wells (converted wells). In counties with Eagle Ford Shale activity, well-data analysis identified 55,720 abandoned wells with a median age of 1983, and 2400 converted wells with a median age of 1954. The most aggressive scenario resulted in 823 abandoned wells and 184 converted wells intersecting the largest assumed stimulated reservoir size. Analysis showed abandoned wells have the potential to be intersected by multiple stimulated reservoirs, and risks for intersection would increase if currently permitted horizontal wells in the Eagle Ford Shale are actually completed. Results underscore the need to evaluate historical oil and gas activities in areas with modern unconventional oil and gas activities.

  19. Investigating ebullition in a sand column using dissolved gas analysis and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Richard T.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Ebullition of gas bubbles through saturated sediments can enhance the migration of gases through the subsurface, affect the rate of biogeochemical processes, and potentially enhance the emission of important greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. To better understand the parameters controlling ebullition, methanogenic conditions were produced in a column experiment and ebullition through the column was monitored and quantified through dissolved gas analysis and reactive transport modeling. Dissolved gas analysis showed rapid transport of CH4 vertically through the column at rates several times faster than the bromide tracer and the more soluble gas CO2, indicating that ebullition was the main transport mechanism for CH4. An empirically derived formulation describing ebullition was integrated into the reactive transport code MIN3P allowing this process to be investigated on the REV scale in a complex geochemical framework. The simulations provided insights into the parameters controlling ebullition and show that, over the duration of the experiment, 36% of the CH4 and 19% of the CO2 produced were transported to the top of the column through ebullition.

  20. Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    potential NSS mission processing timelines. SpaceX is now eligible for an award of specified NSS missions to include the GPS III-2 launch service... SpaceX has also evolved their Falcon 9v1.1 configuration into the Falcon 9 Upgrade. To update the certification baseline, SpaceX and AF built Joint Work...9 v1.1 commercial launch experienced an in-flight mishap resulting in loss of vehicle on June 28, 2015. An official investigation was led by a SpaceX

  1. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis between an evolved abscisic acid-overproducing mutant Botrytis cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain Botrytis cinerea TBC-6

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhongtao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhong, Juan; Luo, Di; Zhou, Jinyan; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Shu, Dan; Tan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical phytohormone which plays an important role in plant stress resistance. Moreover, ABA is also found to regulate the activation of innate immune cells and glucose homeostasis in mammals. Therefore, this ‘stress hormone’ is of great importance to theoretical research and agricultural and medical applications. Botrytis cinerea is a well-known phytopathogenic ascomycete that synthesizes ABA via a pathway substantially different from higher plants. Identification of the functional genes involved in ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea would be of special interest. We developed an ABA-overproducing mutant strain, B. cinerea TBC-A, previously and obtained a 41.5-Mb genome sequence of B. cinerea TBC-A. In this study, the transcriptomes of B. cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain TBC-6 were sequenced under identical fermentation conditions. A stringent comparative transcriptome analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes participating in the metabolic pathways related to ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. This study provides the first global view of the transcriptional changes underlying the very different ABA productivity of the B. cinerea strains and will expand our knowledge of the molecular basis for ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. PMID:27892476

  3. Gas-phase Ion Isomer Analysis Reveals the Mechanism of Peptide Sequence Scrambling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B.; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M→cb) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored. PMID:24313304

  4. Gas-phase ion isomer analysis reveals the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values, which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M → (c)b) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored.

  5. Transport on randomly evolving trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, L.

    2005-11-01

    The time process of transport on randomly evolving trees is investigated. By introducing the notions of living and dead nodes, a model of random tree evolution is constructed which describes the spreading in time of objects corresponding to nodes. It is assumed that at t=0 the tree consists of a single living node (root), from which the evolution may begin. At a certain time instant τ⩾0 , the root produces ν⩾0 living nodes connected by lines to the root which becomes dead at the moment of the offspring production. In the evolution process each of the new living nodes evolves further like a root independently of the others. By using the methods of the age-dependent branching processes we derive the joint distribution function of the numbers of living and dead nodes, and determine the correlation between these node numbers as a function of time. It is proved that the correlation function converges to 3/2 independently of the distributions of ν and τ when q1→1 and t→∞ . Also analyzed are the stochastic properties of the end nodes; and the correlation between the numbers of living and dead end nodes is shown to change its character suddenly at the very beginning of the evolution process. The survival probability of random trees is investigated and expressions are derived for this probability.

  6. Transport on randomly evolving trees.

    PubMed

    Pál, L

    2005-11-01

    The time process of transport on randomly evolving trees is investigated. By introducing the notions of living and dead nodes, a model of random tree evolution is constructed which describes the spreading in time of objects corresponding to nodes. It is assumed that at t=0 the tree consists of a single living node (root), from which the evolution may begin. At a certain time instant tau> or =0, the root produces v> or =0 living nodes connected by lines to the root which becomes dead at the moment of the offspring production. In the evolution process each of the new living nodes evolves further like a root independently of the others. By using the methods of the age-dependent branching processes we derive the joint distribution function of the numbers of living and dead nodes, and determine the correlation between these node numbers as a function of time. It is proved that the correlation function converges to square root of 3/2 independently of the distributions of v and tau when q1-->1 and t-->infinity. Also analyzed are the stochastic properties of the end nodes; and the correlation between the numbers of living and dead end nodes is shown to change its character suddenly at the very beginning of the evolution process. The survival probability of random trees is investigated and expressions are derived for this probability.

  7. Geologic, technical, and economic sensitivity analysis in support of the GRI (Gas Research Institute) Tight Gas Reservoirs Project area. Annual report, November 1984-October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Brashear, J.P.; Haas, M.; Morra, F.

    1985-11-01

    During 1984-1985, Lewin and Associates, Inc., used the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS) as a planning and assessment tool for GRI. During this period TGAS was used to support the GRI Tight Gas Reservoirs Program: (1) evaluation of the benefits of the entire program and its subcomponents; (2) detailed analysis of a single formation (the Travis Peak); and (3) fine grain assessment of the role of information in the decision to drill, develop and produce a tight-gas prospect; (4) assistance in selecting RandD tasks that were most likely to achieve program objectives most cost-effectively and in developing a project-management structure. RandD planning assistance resulted in more quantifiable program objectives and developed a computerized version of several program components to test its usefulness as a management tool. The program analysis demonstrated that RandD in reservoir diagnostics and stimulation technology would make it possible to achieve significant reductions in the cost of gas while adding sizable new quantities of gas to supply. The work has yielded methodology, data and software that are applicable to industry as a whole in addition to serving GRI's needs.

  8. Performance Analysis of Joule-Thomson Cooler Supplied with Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.; Dorosz, P.

    2017-02-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryo-coolers working in closed cycles and supplied with gas mixtures are the subject of intensive research in different laboratories. The replacement of pure nitrogen by nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures allows to improve both thermodynamic parameters and economy of the refrigerators. It is possible to avoid high pressures in the heat exchanger and to use standard refrigeration compressor instead of gas bottles or high-pressure oil free compressor. Closed cycle and mixture filled Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigerator providing 10-20 W of cooling power at temperature range 90-100 K has been designed and manufactured. Thermodynamic analysis including the optimization of the cryo-cooler mixture has been performed with ASPEN HYSYS software. The paper describes the design of the cryo-cooler and provides thermodynamic analysis of the system. The test results are presented and discussed.

  9. The Comet Cometh: Evolving Developmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Johannes; Laubichler, Manfred; Callebaut, Werner

    In a recent opinion piece, Denis Duboule has claimed that the increasing shift towards systems biology is driving evolutionary and developmental biology apart, and that a true reunification of these two disciplines within the framework of evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo) may easily take another 100 years. He identifies methodological, epistemological, and social differences as causes for this supposed separation. Our article provides a contrasting view. We argue that Duboule's prediction is based on a one-sided understanding of systems biology as a science that is only interested in functional, not evolutionary, aspects of biological processes. Instead, we propose a research program for an evolutionary systems biology, which is based on local exploration of the configuration space in evolving developmental systems. We call this approach-which is based on reverse engineering, simulation, and mathematical analysis-the natural history of configuration space. We discuss a number of illustrative examples that demonstrate the past success of local exploration, as opposed to global mapping, in different biological contexts. We argue that this pragmatic mode of inquiry can be extended and applied to the mathematical analysis of the developmental repertoire and evolutionary potential of evolving developmental mechanisms and that evolutionary systems biology so conceived provides a pragmatic epistemological framework for the EvoDevo synthesis.

  10. Modifications to the Finnigan MAT 271 mass spectrometer in the Inorganic Gas Analysis Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, S.D.; Cordes, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    This document presents an overview of the modifications that were done to the Finnigan MAT 271 mass spectrometer used in the Dept. 1823 Inorganic Gas Analysis Lab. Among the alterations to the spectrometer were addition of a new computer, interfaces to the power supply, addition of a multimeter and introduction of a Graphical User Interface software system to run the instrument. The impact of these improvements is also discussed. The appendix details a generic procedure for operating the instrument.

  11. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

  12. Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Controlled Environment: Ethylene Gas Measurement Studies on Radish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Suk Bin

    2001-01-01

    Volatile organic compound(VOC), ethylene gas, was characterized and quantified by GC/FID. 20-50 ppb levels were detected during the growth stages of radish. SPME could be a good analytical tool for the purpose. Low temperature trapping method using dry ice/diethyl ether and liquid nitrogen bath was recommended for the sampling process for GC/PID and GC/MS analysis.

  13. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  14. Design, fabrication and testing of the gas analysis system for the tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Reedy, G.T.; Homa, M.I.; Clemmer, R.G.; Pappas, G.; Slawecki, M.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Bowers, D.L.; Clemmer, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01, required a gas analysis system which detected the form of tritium, the amount of tritium (differential and integral), and the presence and amount of other radioactive species. The system had to handle all contingencies and function for months at a time unattended during weekend operation. The designed system, described herein, consisted of a train of components which could be grouped as desired to match tritium release behavior.

  15. Analysis and design of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on resilient, metallic, cantilever beams is described and analyzed. Compliance and stiffness of the bearing assembly are discussed, and the effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. After the general analysis, a design example is presented for a flat sector-shaped gas bearing. A special case where zero axial movement of the runner can be obtained is pointed out.

  16. Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-19

    degradation involves chemical changes that lead to oxidation of fuel molecules to form a variety of oxygenated species, often resulting in the accumulation...D5304, 2006, “Standard Test Method for Assessing Middle Distillate Fuel Storage Stability by Oxygen Overpressure,” ASTM International, West Conshohocken...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--13-9471 Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas

  17. Risk analysis of 222Rn gas received from East Anatolian Fault Zone in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mucahit; Kulahci, Fatih

    2016-06-01

    In this study, risk analysis and probability distribution methodologies are applied for 222Rn gas data received from Sürgü (Malatya) station located on East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ). 222Rn data are recorded between 21.02.2007 and 06.06.2010 dates. For study are used total 1151 222Rn data. Changes in concentration of 222Rn are modeled as statistically.

  18. Numerical analysis of spin-orbit-coupled one-dimensional Fermi gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the density-matrix renormalization group and the infinite time-evolving block decimation methods we study the interacting spin-orbit-coupled 1D Fermi gas in a transverse magnetic field. We find that the system with an attractive interaction can have a polarized insulator phase, a superconducting (SC) phase, a Luther-Emery (LE) phase, and a band insulator phase as we vary the chemical potential and the strength of the magnetic field. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the triplet pairing order at zero momentum in both the SC and the LE phase, which leads to an algebraically decaying correlation with the same exponent as that of the singlet pairing one. In contrast to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase found in the spin imbalanced system without SOC, pairings at finite momentum in these two phases have larger exponents hence do not dictate the long-range behavior. We also test for the presence of Majorana fermions in this system. Unlike results from the mean-field study, we do not find positive evidence of Majorana fermions.

  19. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  20. Analysis of phytosterols and phytostanols in enriched dairy products by Fast gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Inchingolo, Raffaella; Cardenia, Vladimiro; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa

    2014-10-01

    A Fast gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method for plant sterols/stanols analysis was developed, using a short capillary gas chromatography column (10 m × 0.1 mm internal diameter × 0.1 μm film thickness) coated with 5% diphenyl-polysiloxane. A silylated mixture of the main plant sterols/stanols standards (β-sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, campestanol, sitostanol) was well separated in 1.5 min, with a good peak resolution (>1.4, determined on a critical chromatographic peak pair (β-sitosterol and sitostanol)), repeatability (<13%), and sensitivity (<0.017 ng/mL). The suitability of this Fast chromatography method was tested on plant sterols/stanols-enriched dairy products (yogurt and milk), which were subjected to lipid extraction, cold saponification, and silylation prior to injection. The analytical performance (sensitivity < 0.256 ng/mL and repeatability < 10.36%) and significant reduction of the analysis time and consumables demonstrate that Fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method could be also employed for the plant sterols/stanols analysis in functional dairy products.

  1. The effect of carrying a portable respiratory gas analysis system on energy expenditure during incremental running.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S Andy; Orme, Duncan; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of portable gas analysis system carriage on energy expenditure (EE) during incremental treadmill running. Eight males (Mean ± SD) age 25.0 ± 9.47 y, body mass 78.5 ± 8.39 kg, completed an experimental trial (PT) during which they wore the system in a chest harness and a control trial (CT) when the system was externally supported. Each protocol consisted of 4 min stages at speeds of 0, 4, 7, 10, 12, 14 km h(-1). Increments continued until volitional exhaustion. The EE was greater (3.95 and 7.02% at 7 and 14 km h(-1) respectively) during PT (p < 0.05) but no significant differences were observed during standing, walking or VO(2max.) (4.10 ± 0.53, and 4.28 ± 0.75 l min(-1) for CT and PT respectively), HR or RPE. Portable gas analysis systems therefore only increase EE when running sub-maximally, but VO(2max) is unaffected, suggesting that using portable gas analysis systems in field-based situations is appropriate for maximal aerobic capacity measurement, but the effects of prolonged use on EE remains unclear.

  2. Numerical method for evolving the projected Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Blakie, P Blair

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we describe a method for evolving the projected Gross-Pitaevskii equation (PGPE) for a Bose gas in a harmonic oscillator potential. The central difficulty in solving this equation is the requirement that the classical field is restricted to a small set of prescribed modes that constitute the low energy classical region of the system. We present a scheme, using a Hermite-polynomial based spectral representation, that precisely implements this mode restriction and allows an efficient and accurate solution of the PGPE. We show equilibrium and nonequilibrium results from the application of the PGPE to an anisotropic trapped three-dimensional Bose gas.

  3. A study of volatile organic compounds evolved from the decaying human body.

    PubMed

    Statheropoulos, M; Spiliopoulou, C; Agapiou, A

    2005-10-29

    Two men were found dead near the island of Samos, Greece, in the Mediterranean sea. The estimated time of death for both victims was 3-4 weeks. Autopsy revealed no remarkable external injuries or acute poisoning. The exact cause of death remained unclear because the bodies had advanced decomposition. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) evolved from these two corpses were determined by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis (TD/GC/MS). Over 80 substances have been identified and quantified. The most prominent among them were dimethyl disulfide (13.39 nmol/L), toluene (10.11 nmol/L), hexane (5.58 nmol/L), benzene 1,2,4-trimethyl (4.04 nmol/L), 2-propanone (3.84 nmol/L), 3-pentanone (3.59 nmol/L). Qualitative and quantitative differences among the evolved VOCs and CO2 mean concentration values might indicate different rates of decomposition between the two bodies. The study of the evolved VOCs appears to be a promising adjunct to the forensic pathologist as they may offer important information which can be used in his final evaluation.

  4. Analysis of natural gas: the necessity of multiple standards for calibration.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C

    2003-10-31

    The importance of natural gas as an international trading commodity and the cost to consumers has made the accuracy of determinations for the components of natural gas very important. Pricing of natural gas is based on the heating value of the gas determined from either calorimetry measurements or calculations based on individual component concentrations determined by gas chromatography (GC). Due to the expense of accurate calibration standards, many analysts and laboratories will use a single calibration standard to perform natural gas determinations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether an analyst could accurately measure the components of natural gas, in particular methane, using a single standard, or whether a suite of standards is necessary to calibrate the analytical instrument. A suite of eight gravimetric primary standards was prepared covering a concentration range for methane of 64-94 mol%, with uncertainties of +/-0.05% relative (95% confidence interval). These natural gas primary standards also contained nitrogen, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, and n-hexane with varying concentrations from 0.02 to 14%. A single analytical method was used in which only the amount of sample injected onto the column was altered. The results show that when injecting a 0.5 ml sample volume a second-order regression through the standards is necessary for the determination of methane. The results for nitrogen, ethane and propane also show the same trend. Only those individual standards whose methane concentration is within 1% of the test mixture predicted a concentration within 0.05% of the regression value. Those individual primary standards whose methane concentration is different by more than +/-1% of the test mixture predicted values differing by +/-0.5 to +/-2.0% from the regression value. These differences lie well outside the predicted concentration uncertainty interval of +/-0.20%. A smaller

  5. Impact of arterial blood gas analysis in disability evaluation of the bituminous coal miner with simple pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.L.; Roy, T.M.; Dow, F.T.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1992-04-01

    The Department of Labor has set guidelines for the use of resting arterial blood gas analysis in determination of total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis. To determine the prevalence with which bituminous coal miners fall below the arterial tensions of both oxygen and carbon dioxide published in the Federal Register, we studied 1012 miners who had both reproducible spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis as part of their disability evaluation. Eighty-seven percent of impaired miners could be identified by the spirometric criteria. Thirteen percent of impaired bituminous coal miners had acceptable pulmonary function but were eligible for black lung benefits by the blood gas guidelines. This population would have been missed if blood gas analysis were excluded from the evaluation process. On the other hand, approximately 25% of the blood gas analyses that were performed could be eliminated if a policy was adopted to do this test only on miners with spirometry that exceed the federal guidelines.

  6. Improved parameterization of interatomic potentials for rare gas dimers with density-based energy decomposition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nengjie; Lu, Zhenyu; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Yingkai

    2014-06-01

    We examine interatomic interactions for rare gas dimers using the density-based energy decomposition analysis (DEDA) in conjunction with computational results from CCSD(T) at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The unique DEDA capability of separating frozen density interactions from density relaxation contributions is employed to yield clean interaction components, and the results are found to be consistent with the typical physical picture that density relaxations play a very minimal role in rare gas interactions. Equipped with each interaction component as reference, we develop a new three-term molecular mechanical force field to describe rare gas dimers: a smeared charge multipole model for electrostatics with charge penetration effects, a B3LYP-D3 dispersion term for asymptotically correct long-range attractions that is screened at short-range, and a Born-Mayer exponential function for the repulsion. The resulted force field not only reproduces rare gas interaction energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level, but also yields each interaction component (electrostatic or van der Waals) which agrees very well with its corresponding reference value.

  7. Implementation of an ultrasonic instrument for simultaneous mixture and flow analysis of binary gas systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alhroob, M.; Boyd, G.; Hasib, A.; Pearson, B.; Srauss, M.; Young, J.; Bates, R.; Bitadze, A.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bonneau, P.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Bozza, G.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; DiGirolamo, B.; Favre, G.; Godlewski, J.; Lombard, D.; Zwalinski, L.; Bousson, N.; Hallewell, G.; Mathieu, M.; Rozanov, A.; Deterre, C.; O'Rourke, A.; Doubek, M.; Vacek, V.; Degeorge, C.; Katunin, S.; Langevin, N.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Robinson, D.; Rossi, C.

    2015-07-01

    Precision ultrasonic measurements in binary gas systems provide continuous real-time monitoring of mixture composition and flow. Using custom micro-controller-based electronics, we have developed an ultrasonic instrument, with numerous potential applications, capable of making continuous high-precision sound velocity measurements. The instrument measures sound transit times along two opposite directions aligned parallel to - or obliquely crossing - the gas flow. The difference between the two measured times yields the gas flow rate while their average gives the sound velocity, which can be compared with a sound velocity vs. molar composition look-up table for the binary mixture at a given temperature and pressure. The look-up table may be generated from prior measurements in known mixtures of the two components, from theoretical calculations, or from a combination of the two. We describe the instrument and its performance within numerous applications in the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instrument can be of interest in other areas where continuous in-situ binary gas analysis and flowmetry are required. (authors)

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

    2008-05-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

  9. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of gas flow inside a laser cut kerf under high cut-assist gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, H. C.; Duan, J.; Yue, T. M.

    1999-07-01

    The behaviour of the cut-assist gas jet inside a simulating laser cut kerf for a supersonic and a conical nozzle tip were studied by a shadowgraphic technique under conditions of inlet stagnation pressure from 3 to 7 bar. The effects of the stand-off distance, kerf width, material thickness and the inlet stagnation pressure upon the dynamic characteristics and momentum thrust of the gas flow inside the cut kerf were investigated. It was found that under a gas pressure of 7 bar, the gas jet from a conical nozzle tip expands radially and the jet momentum deteriorates rapidly inside the kerf. The behaviour of the jet is strongly influenced by the stand-off distance and thickness of the workpiece. On the other hand, the gas jet from a supersonic nozzle inside the cut kerf has tidy boundary and uniform distribution of pressure and thrust. The sensitivity to the stand-off distance and the workpiece thickness of the supersonic nozzle are much less as compared with the conical nozzle. With the supersonic nozzle, a dross free clean cut on 5 mm stainless steel can be achieved at an inert cut-assist gas pressure as low as 5 bar instead of the normal operating range of 10 bar or above for the conical nozzle.

  10. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis, volume 1. Task 1: Survey and perspective. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, V. C.; Gaffney, E. F.; Bach, L. J.; Stallone, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to predict the behavior of a rotor system subjected to sudden unbalance. The technique is implemented in the Turbine Engine Transient Rotor Analysis (TETRA) computer program using the component element method. The analysis was particularly aimed toward blade-loss phenomena in gas turbine engines. A dual-rotor, casing, and pylon structure can be modeled by the computer program. Blade tip rubs, Coriolis forces, and mechanical clearances are included. The analytical system was verified by modeling and simulating actual test conditions for a rig test as well as a full-engine, blade-release demonstration.

  11. Rapidly evolving homing CRISPR barcodes.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, Reza; Mali, Prashant; Church, George M

    2017-02-01

    We present an approach for engineering evolving DNA barcodes in living cells. A homing guide RNA (hgRNA) scaffold directs the Cas9-hgRNA complex to the DNA locus of the hgRNA itself. We show that this homing CRISPR-Cas9 system acts as an expressed genetic barcode that diversifies its sequence and that the rate of diversification can be controlled in cultured cells. We further evaluate these barcodes in cell populations and show that they can be used to record lineage history and that the barcode RNA can be amplified in situ, a prerequisite for in situ sequencing. This integrated approach will have wide-ranging applications, such as in deep lineage tracing, cellular barcoding, molecular recording, dissecting cancer biology, and connectome mapping.

  12. The evolving Gleason grading system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Zhou, Qiao

    2016-02-01

    The Gleason grading system for prostate adenocarcinoma has evolved from its original scheme established in the 1960s-1970s, to a significantly modified system after two major consensus meetings conducted by the International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) in 2005 and 2014, respectively. The Gleason grading system has been incorporated into the WHO classification of prostate cancer, the AJCC/UICC staging system, and the NCCN guidelines as one of the key factors in treatment decision. Both pathologists and clinicians need to fully understand the principles and practice of this grading system. We here briefly review the historical aspects of the original scheme and the recent developments of Gleason grading system, focusing on major changes over the years that resulted in the modern Gleason grading system, which has led to a new "Grade Group" system proposed by the 2014 ISUP consensus, and adopted by the 2016 WHO classification of tumours of the prostate.

  13. [The evolving of cardiac interventions].

    PubMed

    Billinger, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Treatment modalities for heart diseases have considerable evolved during the last 20 years. Coronary and valvular heart disease are treated increasingly by less invasive percutaneous catheter based procedures instead of open-heart surgery. In addition, new cutting-edge interventions allow to cure heart disease for which until recently only medical treatment options were available. Whilst many patients benefit from these innovative therapies, rapidly developing technologies potentially carry the risk of overtreatment. In order to select patients for the most appropriate treatment, an intensive interdisciplinary teamwork between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons is a mandatory requirement. Additionally, knowledge transfer between cardiologists, their growing subspecialties and practitioners should be encouraged. Finally, timely scientific evaluation of new therapies and subsequent incorporation in guidelines remains crucial.

  14. Evolving networks by merging cliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Oosawa, Chikoo

    2005-10-01

    We propose a model for evolving networks by merging building blocks represented as complete graphs, reminiscent of modules in biological system or communities in sociology. The model shows power-law degree distributions, power-law clustering spectra, and high average clustering coefficients independent of network size. The analytical solutions indicate that a degree exponent is determined by the ratio of the number of merging nodes to that of all nodes in the blocks, demonstrating that the exponent is tunable, and are also applicable when the blocks are classical networks such as Erdös-Rényi or regular graphs. Our model becomes the same model as the Barabási-Albert model under a specific condition.

  15. Evolving phenotype of Marfan's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, K.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Harris, R.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 20 August 1996
 AIM—To examine evolution of the physical characteristics of Marfan's syndrome throughout childhood.
METHODS—40 children were ascertained during the development of a regional register for Marfan's syndrome. Evolution of the clinical characteristics was determined by repeat evaluation of 10 patients with sporadic Marfan's syndrome and 30 with a family history of the condition. DNA marker studies were used to facilitate diagnosis in those with the familial condition.
RESULTS—Musculoskeletal features predominated and evolved throughout childhood. Gene tracking enabled early diagnosis in children with familial Marfan's syndrome.
CONCLUSIONS—These observations may aid the clinical diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome in childhood, especially in those with the sporadic condition. Gene tracking has a role in the early diagnosis of familial Marfan's syndrome, allowing appropriate follow up and preventive care.

 PMID:9059160

  16. Pseudo-absolute quantitative analysis using gas chromatography - Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Qiu, Changling; McNair, Harold M; Schug, Kevin A

    2017-02-08

    The vacuum ultraviolet detector (VUV) is a new non-destructive mass sensitive detector for gas chromatography that continuously and rapidly collects full wavelength range absorption between 120 and 240 nm. In addition to conventional methods of quantification (internal and external standard), gas chromatography - vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy has the potential for pseudo-absolute quantification of analytes based on pre-recorded cross sections (well-defined absorptivity across the 120-240 nm wavelength range recorded by the detector) without the need for traditional calibration. The pseudo-absolute method was used in this research to experimentally evaluate the sources of sample loss and gain associated with sample introduction into a typical gas chromatograph. Standard samples of benzene and natural gas were used to assess precision and accuracy for the analysis of liquid and gaseous samples, respectively, based on the amount of analyte loaded on-column. Results indicate that injection volume, split ratio, and sampling times for splitless analysis can all contribute to inaccurate, yet precise sample introduction. For instance, an autosampler can very reproducibly inject a designated volume, but there are significant systematic errors (here, a consistently larger volume than that designated) in the actual volume introduced. The pseudo-absolute quantification capability of the vacuum ultraviolet detector provides a new means for carrying out system performance checks and potentially for solving challenging quantitative analytical problems. For practical purposes, an internal standardized approach to normalize systematic errors can be used to perform quantitative analysis with the pseudo-absolute method.

  17. Gas chromatograph analysis on closed air and nitrogen oxide storage atmospheres of recalcitrant seeds of Quercus Alba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of recalcitrant seeds remains an unsolved problem. This study investigated the quantitative gas analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) and air atmospheres on the recalcitrant seeds of Quercus alba by using gas chromatograph. Ten seeds were placed in each sealed atmospheric system of air and 98/2% N...

  18. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  19. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    PubMed

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1 : 49.5 : 49.5, formic acid : methanol : water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase

  20. Use of hydrogen as a carrier gas for the analysis of steroids with anabolic activity by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Guerra, J A; Prado, P; García-Tenorio, S Vargas

    2011-10-14

    Due to the impact in the media and the requirements of sensitivity and robustness, the detection of the misuse of forbidden substances in sports is a really challenging area for analytical chemistry, where any study focused on enhancing the performance of the analytical methods will be of great interest. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of using hydrogen instead of helium as a carrier gas for the analysis of anabolic steroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron ionization. There are several drawbacks related with the use of helium as a carrier gas: it is expensive, is a non-renewable resource, and has limited availability in many parts of the world. In contrast, hydrogen is readily available using a hydrogen generator or high-pressure bottled gas, and allows a faster analysis without loss of efficiency; nevertheless it should not be forgotten that due to its explosiveness hydrogen must be handled with caution. Throughout the study the impact of the change of the carrier gas will be evaluated in terms of: performance of the chromatographic system, saving of time and money, impact on the high vacuum in the analyzer, changes in the fragmentation behaviour of the analytes, and finally consequences for the limits of detection achieved with the method.