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Sample records for exam mlc reserved

  1. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  2. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Cancer Institute. What You Need To Know About Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers: How To Check Your ...

  3. Testicular self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Screening - testicular cancer - self-exam; Testicular cancer - screening - self-exam ... A testicular self-exam is done to check for testicular cancer . Testicles have blood vessels and other structures that can make ...

  4. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  5. Radio frequency noise from an MLC: a feasibility study of the use of an MLC for linac-MR systems

    PubMed Central

    Lamey, M; Yun, J; Burke, B; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-01-01

    Currently several groups are actively researching the integration of a megavoltage teletherapy unit with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for real-time image-guided radiotherapy. The use of a multileaf collimator (MLC) for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for linac-MR units must be investigated. The MLC itself will likely reside in the fringe field of the MR and the motors will produce radio frequency (RF) noise. The RF noise power spectral density from a Varian 52-leaf MLC motor, a Varian Millennium MLC motor and a brushless fan motor has been measured as a function of the applied magnetic field using a near field probe set. For the Varian 52-leaf MLC system, the RF noise produced by 13 of 52 motors is studied as a function of distance from the MLC. Data are reported in the frequency range suitable for 0.2–1.5 T linac-MR systems. Below 40 MHz the Millennium MLC motor tested showed more noise than the Varian 52-leaf motor or the brushless fan motor. The brushless motor showed a small dependence on the applied magnetic field. Images of a phantom were taken by the prototype linac-MR system with the MLC placed in close proximity to the magnet. Several orientations of the MLC in both shielded and non-shielded configurations were studied. For the case of a non-shielded MLC and associated cables, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was reduced when 13 of 52 MLC leaves were moved during imaging. When the MLC and associated cables were shielded, the measured SNR of the images with 13 MLC leaves moving was experimentally the same as the SNR of the stationary MLC image. When the MLC and cables are shielded, subtraction images acquired with and without MLC motion contains no systematic signal. This study illustrates that the small RF noise produced by functioning MLC motors can be effectively shielded to avoid SNR degradation. A functioning MLC can be incorporated into a linac-MR unit. PMID:20090187

  6. Radio frequency noise from an MLC: a feasibility study of the use of an MLC for linac-MR systems.

    PubMed

    Lamey, M; Yun, J; Burke, B; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-02-21

    Currently several groups are actively researching the integration of a megavoltage teletherapy unit with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for real-time image-guided radiotherapy. The use of a multileaf collimator (MLC) for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for linac-MR units must be investigated. The MLC itself will likely reside in the fringe field of the MR and the motors will produce radio frequency (RF) noise. The RF noise power spectral density from a Varian 52-leaf MLC motor, a Varian Millennium MLC motor and a brushless fan motor has been measured as a function of the applied magnetic field using a near field probe set. For the Varian 52-leaf MLC system, the RF noise produced by 13 of 52 motors is studied as a function of distance from the MLC. Data are reported in the frequency range suitable for 0.2-1.5 T linac-MR systems. Below 40 MHz the Millennium MLC motor tested showed more noise than the Varian 52-leaf motor or the brushless fan motor. The brushless motor showed a small dependence on the applied magnetic field. Images of a phantom were taken by the prototype linac-MR system with the MLC placed in close proximity to the magnet. Several orientations of the MLC in both shielded and non-shielded configurations were studied. For the case of a non-shielded MLC and associated cables, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was reduced when 13 of 52 MLC leaves were moved during imaging. When the MLC and associated cables were shielded, the measured SNR of the images with 13 MLC leaves moving was experimentally the same as the SNR of the stationary MLC image. When the MLC and cables are shielded, subtraction images acquired with and without MLC motion contains no systematic signal. This study illustrates that the small RF noise produced by functioning MLC motors can be effectively shielded to avoid SNR degradation. A functioning MLC can be incorporated into a linac-MR unit.

  7. Exams: The Secret Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    This year, many high-school teachers in the district where the author teaches experienced exam anxiety because midterms--as they had come to know and love them--were no more. For a variety of reasons, the semester exam schedule looked very different. More to the point is the new philosophy about exam content and format that underpinned the…

  8. Challenges When Introducing Electronic Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuikka, Matti; Kitola, Markus; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Time pressures often necessitate the use of more efficient exam tools, such as electronic exams (e-exams), instead of traditional paper exams. However, teachers may face challenges when introducing e-exams in a higher education context. This paper describes what kinds of challenges teachers may face when introducing e-exams, based on experiences…

  9. My Favorite Exam Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    My favorite exam question comes from the final exam in an introductory mechanics course: "A rolling 31 ton railroad boxcar collides with a stationary flatcar. The coupling mechanism activates so the cars latch together and roll down the track attached. Of the initial kinetic energy, 38% dissipates as heat, sound, vibrations, mechanical…

  10. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exam question which challenges college freshmen, enrolled in chemistry, to derive temperature dependence of an equilibrium constant. The question requires cognitive response at the level of synthesis. (Author/SA)

  11. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides exam questions and solutions for a problem in amplification sequence of reactions, and a problem in applying group theory techniques and making spectral assignments and structural determination by qualitative arguments in the bonding in metal complexes. (CS)

  12. Physical exam frequency

    MedlinePlus

    How often you need a physical exam; Health maintenance visit; Health screening; Checkup ... All adults should visit their health care provider from time to time, even if they are healthy. The purpose of these visits is to: Screen for diseases ...

  13. Stop "Going Over" Exams! The Multiple Benefits of Team Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Gary

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the use of team exams as a means of postexam feedback and explains the benefits of their use. Team exams are a simple procedure for those who use exams in their classrooms. Team exams can be a valuable experiential exercise in management classes but offer educational benefits in any class. Among the benefits of team exams…

  14. MLC tracking for Elekta VMAT: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Poludniowski, G; Webb, S

    2011-12-07

    A model has been developed to simulate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for Elekta control systems. The model was experimentally validated for static-tumour VMAT delivery and has been applied to the investigation of motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) delivery tracking for a series of VMAT lung treatment plans at various control point spacings for five patients. The relative increase in treatment time with dMLC tracking was calculated for four 1D rigid-body motion trajectories, and the effect of the control point spacing, the MLC leaf speed and an increased number of dose levels on the dMLC tracking delivery time evaluated. It has been observed that a faster leaf speed is advantageous for motion trajectories with shorter time periods and larger amplitudes. The accuracy of dMLC tracking was found to increase with a decreased control point spacing and is dependent on the amplitude and time period of the motion trajectory of the target. dMLC tracking is shown to be a promising emerging technology which can confer advantage over breath-hold motion-compensation techniques which more drastically reduce the efficiency of VMAT and are more invasive for the patient.

  15. MLC tracking for Elekta VMAT: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. A.; Poludniowski, G.; Webb, S.

    2011-12-01

    A model has been developed to simulate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for Elekta control systems. The model was experimentally validated for static-tumour VMAT delivery and has been applied to the investigation of motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) delivery tracking for a series of VMAT lung treatment plans at various control point spacings for five patients. The relative increase in treatment time with dMLC tracking was calculated for four 1D rigid-body motion trajectories, and the effect of the control point spacing, the MLC leaf speed and an increased number of dose levels on the dMLC tracking delivery time evaluated. It has been observed that a faster leaf speed is advantageous for motion trajectories with shorter time periods and larger amplitudes. The accuracy of dMLC tracking was found to increase with a decreased control point spacing and is dependent on the amplitude and time period of the motion trajectory of the target. dMLC tracking is shown to be a promising emerging technology which can confer advantage over breath-hold motion-compensation techniques which more drastically reduce the efficiency of VMAT and are more invasive for the patient.

  16. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two exam questions are presented. One suitable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate courses in organic chemistry, is on equivalent expressions for the description of several pericyclic reactions. The second, for general chemistry students, asks for an estimation of the rate of decay of a million-year-old Uranium-238 sample. (BB)

  17. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a take-home exam story problem based on stoichiometry. Requires the student to determine the percentage of phosphoric acid in a large container of nitric acid if a man fell into it. Provides assumptions, clues, and an acceptable solution. (MVL)

  18. SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Stathakis, S; Defoor, D; Linden, P; Kirby, N; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the frequency of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) leaf failures, investigate methods to predict them and reduce linac downtime. Methods: A Varian HD120 MLC was used in our study. The hyperterminal MLC errors logged from 06/2012 to 12/2014 were collected. Along with the hyperterminal errors, the MLC motor changes and all other MLC interventions by the linear accelerator engineer were recorded. The MLC dynalog files were also recorded on a daily basis for each treatment and during linac QA. The dynalog files were analyzed to calculate root mean square errors (RMS) and cumulative MLC travel distance per motor. An in-house MatLab code was used to analyze all dynalog files, record RMS errors and calculate the distance each MLC traveled per day. Results: A total of 269 interventions were recorded over a period of 18 months. Of these, 146 included MLC motor leaf change, 39 T-nut replacements, and 84 MLC cleaning sessions. Leaves close to the middle of each side required the most maintenance. In the A bank, leaves A27 to A40 recorded 73% of all interventions, while the same leaves in the B bank counted for 52% of the interventions. On average, leaves in the middle of the bank had their motors changed approximately every 1500m of travel. Finally, it was found that the number of RMS errors increased prior to an MLC motor change. Conclusion: An MLC dynalog file analysis software was developed that can be used to log daily MLC usage. Our eighteen-month data analysis showed that there is a correlation between the distance an MLC travels, the RMS and the life of the MLC motor. We plan to use this tool to predict MLC motor failures and with proper and timely intervention, reduce the downtime of the linac during clinical hours.

  19. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  20. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    PubMed Central

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Rani, Roopa A.; Kumar, Anil; Reddy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm2 to 14 × 14 cm2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD) and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS). In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm2 within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD) data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams. †Radiation Oncology Planning System (ROPS) is supplied by Tirumala Jyothi Computer Systems described at https

  1. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  2. Preparing Students for the AP Psychology Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Placement Psychology exam is one of the fastest growing exams offered by the College Board. The average percent of change in the number of students taking this exam over the past five years is 12.4%. With 238,962 students taking the exam in 2013, the AP Psychology exam is the sixth largest exam, surpassing AP Biology and AP World…

  3. MLC1 protein: a likely link between leukodystrophies and brain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Brignone, Maria S.; Lanciotti, Angela; Camerini, Serena; De Nuccio, Chiara; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Visentin, Sergio; Ambrosini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLCs) disease is a rare inherited, autosomal recessive form of childhood-onset spongiform leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, deterioration of motor functions, epileptic seizures and mental decline. Brain edema, subcortical fluid cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation are the histopathological hallmarks of MLC. Mutations in either the MLC1 gene (>75% of patients) or the GlialCAM gene (<20% of patients) are responsible for the disease. Recently, the GlialCAM adhesion protein was found essential for the membrane expression and function of the chloride channel ClC-2 indicating MLC disease caused by mutation in GlialCAM as the first channelopathy among leukodystrophies. On the contrary, the function of MLC1 protein, which binds GlialCAM, its functional relationship with ClC-2 and the molecular mechanisms underlying MLC1 mutation-induced functional defects are not fully understood yet. The human MLC1 gene encodes a 377-amino acid membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane domains which shows very low homology with voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel subunits. The high expression of MLC1 in brain astrocytes contacting blood vessels and meninges and brain alterations observed in MLC patients have led to hypothesize a role for MLC1 in the regulation of ion and water homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that MLC1 establishes structural and/or functional interactions with several ion/water channels and transporters and ion channel accessory proteins, and that these interactions are affected by MLC1 mutations causing MLC. Here, we review data on MLC1 functional properties obtained in in vitro and in vivo models and discuss evidence linking the effects of MLC1 mutations to brain channelopathies. PMID:25883547

  4. Dynamic tumor tracking using the Elekta Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F. Nill, Simeon Bedford, James L.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Elekta Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) for dynamic real-time tumor tracking. Methods: The authors have developed a new control software which interfaces to the Agility MLC to dynamically program the movement of individual leaves, the dynamic leaf guides (DLGs), and the Y collimators (“jaws”) based on the actual target trajectory. A motion platform was used to perform dynamic tracking experiments with sinusoidal trajectories. The actual target positions reported by the motion platform at 20, 30, or 40 Hz were used as shift vectors for the MLC in beams-eye-view. The system latency of the MLC (i.e., the average latency comprising target device reporting latencies and MLC adjustment latency) and the geometric tracking accuracy were extracted from a sequence of MV portal images acquired during irradiation for the following treatment scenarios: leaf-only motion, jaw + leaf motion, and DLG + leaf motion. Results: The portal imager measurements indicated a clear dependence of the system latency on the target position reporting frequency. Deducting the effect of the target frequency, the leaf adjustment latency was measured to be 38 ± 3 ms for a maximum target speed v of 13 mm/s. The jaw + leaf adjustment latency was 53 ± 3 at a similar speed. The system latency at a target position frequency of 30 Hz was in the range of 56–61 ms for the leaves (v ≤ 31 mm/s), 71–78 ms for the jaw + leaf motion (v ≤ 25 mm/s), and 58–72 ms for the DLG + leaf motion (v ≤ 59 mm/s). The tracking accuracy showed a similar dependency on the target position frequency and the maximum target speed. For the leaves, the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was between 0.6–1.5 mm depending on the maximum target speed. For the jaw + leaf (DLG + leaf) motion, the RMSE was between 0.7–1.5 mm (1.9–3.4 mm). Conclusions: The authors have measured the latency and geometric accuracy of the Agility MLC, facilitating its future use for clinical

  5. Thermal and electrostrictive expansion characteristics of MLC (multilayer ceramic) capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanchani, R.; Hall, C. A.

    We have measured by strain gauge technique, in-plane thermal expansivity (coefficient of thermal expansion) as a function of temperature and electrostrictive expansion as a function of applied DC voltage for ceramic capacitors with X7R, NPO and N1500 dielectrics. Multilayer Ceramic (MLC) capacitor materials from two commercial suppliers were evaluated. Thermal expansivities of these materials were compared to polyimide-quartz boards and alumina ceramic substrates.

  6. [Computer-assisted histocompatibility assessment in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D; Hajek-Rosenmayr, A

    1987-02-20

    Analysis of the results of mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) for compatibility testing preceding transplantation of bone marrow and other organs has so far required a vast input, both in terms of laboratory staff and work hours. We have developed a computer programme which performs this work rapidly. Graphics of the reaction patterns can be obtained, moreover, and these can prove a helpful tool in interpretation of the results.

  7. RhoA-mediated MLC2 regulates actin dynamics for cytokinesis in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    During oocyte meiosis, the bipolar spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and then migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes the polar body through two successive asymmetric divisions, which are regulated primarily by actin filaments. Myosin light chain2 (MLC2) phosphorylation plays pivotal roles in smooth muscle contraction, stress fiber formation, cell motility and cytokinesis. However, whether MLC2 phosphorylation participates in the oocyte polarization and asymmetric division has not been clarified. The present study investigated the expression and functions of MLC2 during mouse oocyte meiosis. Our result showed that p-MLC2 was localized in the oocyte cortex, with a thickened cap above the chromosomes. Meanwhile, p-MLC2 was also localized in the poles of spindle. Disruption of MLC2 activity by MLC2 knock down (KD) caused the failure of polar body extrusion. Immunofluorescent staining showed that a large proportion of oocytes arrested in telophase stage and failed to undergo cytokinesis after culturing for 12 hours. In the meantime, actin filament staining at oocyte membrane and cytoplasm were reduced in MLC2 KD oocytes. Finally, we found that the phosphorylation of MLC2 protein levels was decreased after disruption of RhoA activity. Above all, our data indicated that the RhoA-mediated MLC2 regulates the actin organization for cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. An experimental evaluation of the Agility MLC for motion-compensated VMAT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. A.; Clowes, P.; Bedford, J. L.; Evans, P. M.; Webb, S.; Poludniowski, G.

    2013-07-01

    An algorithm for dynamic multileaf-collimator (dMLC) tracking of a target performing a known a priori, rigid-body motion during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), has been experimentally validated and applied to investigate the potential of the Agility (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) multileaf-collimator (MLC) for use in motion-compensated VMAT delivery. For five VMAT patients, dosimetric measurements were performed using the Delta4 radiation detector (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the accuracy of dMLC tracking was evaluated using a gamma-analysis, with threshold levels of 3% for dose and 3 mm for distance-to-agreement. For a motion trajectory with components in two orthogonal directions, the mean gamma-analysis pass rate without tracking was found to be 58.0%, 59.0% and 60.9% and was increased to 89.1%, 88.3% and 93.1% with MLC tracking, for time periods of motion of 4 s, 6 s and 10 s respectively. Simulations were performed to compare the efficiency of the Agility MLC with the MLCi MLC when used for motion-compensated VMAT delivery for the same treatment plans and motion trajectories. Delivery time increases from a static-tumour to dMLC-tracking VMAT delivery were observed in the range 0%-20% for the Agility, and 0%-57% with the MLCi, indicating that the increased leaf speed of the Agility MLC is beneficial for MLC tracking during lung radiotherapy.

  17. Are simple IMRT beams more robust against MLC error? Exploring the impact of MLC errors on planar quality assurance and plan quality for different complexity beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazhou; Jin, Xiance; Peng, Jiayuan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Hu, Weigang

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the impact of beam complexities on planar quality assurance and plan quality robustness by introducing MLC errors in intensity-modulate radiation therapy. Forty patients' planar quality assurance (QA) plans were enrolled in this study, including 20 dynamic MLC (DMLC) IMRT plans and 20 static MLC (SMLC) IMRT plans. The total beam numbers were 150 and 160 for DMLC and SMLC, respectively. Six different magnitudes of MLC errors were introduced to these beams. Gamma pass rates were calculated by comparing error-free fluence and error-induced fluence. The plan quality variation was acquired by comparing PTV coverage. Eight complexity scores were calculated based on the beam fluence and the MLC sequence. The complexity scores include fractal dimension, monitor unit, modulation index, fluence map complexity, weighted average of field area, weighted average of field perimeter, and small aperture ratio (<5cm2 and<50 cm2). The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the correlation between these scores and gamma pass rate and plan quality variation. For planar QA, the most significant complexity index was fractal dimension for DMLC (p=-0.40) and weighted segment area for SMLC (p=0.27) at low magnitude MLC error. For plan quality, the most significant complexity index was weighted segment perimeter for DMLC (p=0.56) and weighted segment area for SMLC (p=0.497) at low magnitude MLC error. The sensitivity of planar QA was weakly associated with the field complexity with low magnitude MLC error, but the plan quality robustness was associated with beam complexity. Plans with simple beams were more robust to MLC error. PACS number(s): 87.55.

  18. Developing On-line Exams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsell, Taralynn S.; Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages and limitations of online exams, describes available software tools for creating computer-based tests (CGI, JavaScript, commercial programs, course authoring tools), and offers suggestions for implementation. (JOW)

  19. The dosimetric impact of control point spacing for sliding gap MLC fields.

    PubMed

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Hindmarsh, Jonathan; Seymour, Erin; Kandasamy, Kankean; Sloan, Kirbie; David, Rajesakar; Lee, Christopher

    2016-11-08

    Dynamic sliding gap multileaf collimator (MLC) fields are used to model MLC properties within the treatment planning system (TPS) for dynamic treatments. One of the key MLC properties in the Eclipse TPS is the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) and precise determination of this parameter is paramount to ensuring accurate dose delivery. In this investigation, we report on how the spacing between control points (CPs) for sliding gap fields impacts the dose delivery, MLC positioning accuracy, and measurement of the DLG. The central axis dose was measured for sliding gap MLC fields with gap widths ranging from 2 to 40 mm. It was found that for deliveries containing two CPs, the central axis dose was underestimated by the TPS for all gap widths, with the maximum difference being 8% for a 2 mm gap field. For the same sliding gap fields containing 50 CPs, the measured dose was always within ± 2% of the TPS dose. By directly measuring the MLC trajectories we show that this dose difference is due to a systematic MLC gap error for fields containing two CPs, and that the cause of this error is due to the leaf position offset table which is incorrectly applied when the spacing between CPs is too large. This MLC gap error resulted in an increase in the measured DLG of 0.5 mm for both 6MV and 10 MV, when using fields with 2 CPs compared to 50 CPs. Furthermore, this change in DLG was shown to decrease the mean TPS-calculated dose to the target volume by 2.6% for a clinical IMRT test plan. This work has shown that systematic MLC positioning errors occur for sliding gap MLC fields containing two CPs and that using these fields to model critical TPS parameters, such as the DLG, may result in clinically significant systematic dose calculation errors during subsequent dynamic MLC treatments.

  20. The dosimetric impact of control point spacing for sliding gap MLC fields.

    PubMed

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Hindmarsh, Jonathan; Seymour, Erin; Kandasamy, Kankean; Sloan, Kirbie; David, Rajesakar; Lee, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic sliding gap multileaf collimator (MLC) fields are used to model MLC properties within the treatment planning system (TPS) for dynamic treatments. One of the key MLC properties in the Eclipse TPS is the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) and precise determination of this parameter is paramount to ensuring accurate dose delivery. In this investigation, we report on how the spacing between control points (CPs) for sliding gap fields impacts the dose delivery, MLC positioning accuracy, and measurement of the DLG. The central axis dose was measured for sliding gap MLC fields with gap widths ranging from 2 to 40 mm. It was found that for deliveries containing two CPs, the central axis dose was underestimated by the TPS for all gap widths, with the maximum difference being 8% for a 2 mm gap field. For the same sliding gap fields containing 50 CPs, the measured dose was always within ±2% of the TPS dose. By directly measuring the MLC trajectories we show that this dose difference is due to a systematic MLC gap error for fields containing two CPs, and that the cause of this error is due to the leaf position offset table which is incorrectly applied when the spacing between CPs is too large. This MLC gap error resulted in an increase in the measured DLG of 0.5 mm for both 6 MV and 10 MV, when using fields with 2 CPs compared to 50 CPs. Furthermore, this change in DLG was shown to decrease the mean TPS-calculated dose to the target volume by 2.6% for a clinical IMRT test plan. This work has shown that systematic MLC positioning errors occur for sliding gap MLC fields containing two CPs and that using these fields to model critical TPS parameters, such as the DLG, may result in clinically significant systematic dose calculation errors during subsequent dynamic MLC treatments. PACS number(s): 87.56.nk.

  1. An EPID-based system for gantry-resolved MLC quality assurance for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Fuangord, Todsaporn; Stanton, Cameron J; O'Connor, Daryl J; Keall, Paul J; Greer, Peter B

    2016-09-08

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) positions should be precisely and independently mea-sured as a function of gantry angle as part of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is also ideal that such a QA program has the ability to relate MLC positional accuracy to patient-specific dosimetry in order to determine the clinical significance of any detected MLC errors. In this work we propose a method to verify individual MLC trajectories during VMAT deliveries for use as a routine linear accelerator QA tool. We also extend this method to reconstruct the 3D patient dose in the treatment planning sys-tem based on the measured MLC trajectories and the original DICOM plan file. The method relies on extracting MLC positions from EPID images acquired at 8.41fps during clinical VMAT deliveries. A gantry angle is automatically tagged to each image in order to obtain the MLC trajectories as a function of gantry angle. This analysis was performed for six clinical VMAT plans acquired at monthly intervals for three months. The measured trajectories for each delivery were compared to the MLC positions from the DICOM plan file. The maximum mean error detected was 0.07 mm and a maximum root-mean-square error was 0.8 mm for any leaf of any delivery. The sensitivity of this system was characterized by introducing random and systematic MLC errors into the test plans. It was demonstrated that the system is capable of detecting random and systematic errors on the range of 1-2mm and single leaf calibration errors of 0.5 mm. The methodology developed in the work has potential to be used for efficient routine linear accelerator MLC QA and pretreatment patient-specific QA and has the ability to relate measured MLC positional errors to 3D dosimetric errors within a patient volume.

  2. An EPID-based system for gantry-resolved MLC quality assurance for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Stanton, Cameron J; O'Connor, Daryl J; Keall, Paul J; Greer, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) positions should be precisely and independently measured as a function of gantry angle as part of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is also ideal that such a QA program has the ability to relate MLC positional accuracy to patient-specific dosimetry in order to determine the clinical significance of any detected MLC errors. In this work we propose a method to verify individual MLC trajectories during VMAT deliveries for use as a routine linear accelerator QA tool. We also extend this method to reconstruct the 3D patient dose in the treatment planning system based on the measured MLC trajectories and the original DICOM plan file. The method relies on extracting MLC positions from EPID images acquired at 8.41 fps during clinical VMAT deliveries. A gantry angle is automatically tagged to each image in order to obtain the MLC trajectories as a function of gantry angle. This analysis was performed for six clinical VMAT plans acquired at monthly intervals for three months. The measured trajectories for each delivery were compared to the MLC positions from the DICOM plan file. The maximum mean error detected was 0.07 mm and a maximum root-mean-square error was 0.8 mm for any leaf of any delivery. The sensitivity of this system was characterized by introducing random and systematic MLC errors into the test plans. It was demonstrated that the system is capable of detecting random and systematic errors on the range of 1-2 mm and single leaf calibration errors of 0.5 mm. The methodology developed in the work has potential to be used for efficient routine linear accelerator MLC QA and pretreatment patient-specific QA and has the ability to relate measured MLC positional errors to 3D dosimetric errors within a patient volume. PACS number(s): 87.55.Qr.

  3. Combining MLC and SVM Classifiers for Learning Based Decision Making: Analysis and Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ren, Jinchang; Jiang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) and support vector machines (SVM) are two commonly used approaches in machine learning. MLC is based on Bayesian theory in estimating parameters of a probabilistic model, whilst SVM is an optimization based nonparametric method in this context. Recently, it is found that SVM in some cases is equivalent to MLC in probabilistically modeling the learning process. In this paper, MLC and SVM are combined in learning and classification, which helps to yield probabilistic output for SVM and facilitate soft decision making. In total four groups of data are used for evaluations, covering sonar, vehicle, breast cancer, and DNA sequences. The data samples are characterized in terms of Gaussian/non-Gaussian distributed and balanced/unbalanced samples which are then further used for performance assessment in comparing the SVM and the combined SVM-MLC classifier. Interesting results are reported to indicate how the combined classifier may work under various conditions.

  4. Combining MLC and SVM Classifiers for Learning Based Decision Making: Analysis and Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Ren, Jinchang; Jiang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) and support vector machines (SVM) are two commonly used approaches in machine learning. MLC is based on Bayesian theory in estimating parameters of a probabilistic model, whilst SVM is an optimization based nonparametric method in this context. Recently, it is found that SVM in some cases is equivalent to MLC in probabilistically modeling the learning process. In this paper, MLC and SVM are combined in learning and classification, which helps to yield probabilistic output for SVM and facilitate soft decision making. In total four groups of data are used for evaluations, covering sonar, vehicle, breast cancer, and DNA sequences. The data samples are characterized in terms of Gaussian/non-Gaussian distributed and balanced/unbalanced samples which are then further used for performance assessment in comparing the SVM and the combined SVM-MLC classifier. Interesting results are reported to indicate how the combined classifier may work under various conditions. PMID:26089862

  5. From Exam to Education: The Math Exam/Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, Carmen; Koch, Christina; Konrad, Bernhard; Lindstrom, Michael; Moyles, Iain; Thompson, Will

    2016-01-01

    The Math Exam/Education Resources (MER) is an open online learning resource hosted at The University of British Columbia (UBC), aimed at providing mathematics education resources for students and instructors at UBC. In this paper, there will be a discussion of the motivation for creating this resource on the MediaWiki platform, key features of the…

  6. Small field dosimetric characterization of a new 160-leaf MLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Liu, P. Z. Y.; Weston, S.; Suchowerska, N.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this work was to perform a 6 MV small field characterization of the new Agility 160-leaf multi-leaf collimator (MLC) from Elekta. This included profile measurement analysis and central axis relative output measurements using various diode detectors and an air-core fiber optic scintillation dosimeter (FOD). Data was acquired at a depth of 10.0 cm for field sizes of 1.0, 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6 and 0.5 cm. Three experimental data sets, comprised of five readings, were made for both the relative output and profile measurements. Average detector-specific output ratios (\\overline {OR} _{det}^{f_{clin} }) were calculated with respect to a field size of 3.0 cm and small field replacement correction factors (\\mathop k\

  7. SU-E-T-501: Initial Orthovoltage Beam Profile Analysis of a Small Brass MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Loughery, B; Snyder, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To create brass leaves for an orthovoltage MLC and take initial beam profile measurements. Methods The low-energy MLC was designed in previous work. Brass was chosen for its self-lubrication and low cost. Stock brass rectangles (30cm × 1.0cm × 0.5cm) were ordered with pre-cut gear rack along the topmost long edges. Leaf designs were translated into G-code, then cut with a Tormach CNC-1100 mill. Intense bowing was observed in the beam direction, which required straightening via an in-house jig. Straightened leaves were placed into MLC assembly and mounted to a 320 kVp orthovoltage tube. EDR2 film was irradiated in four situations: MLC open so one edge was isocentric, and MLC open more than isocentric, completely closed MLC, and an open field shot with the MLC removed. The first two scans tested penumbra for our rectangular edges due to unfocused design. The final two scans tested transmission and interleaf leakage. All four experiments were set to 120 kVp and 10 mA for two minutes. Results Transmission and interleaf leakage were found to be zero. Interleaf leakage is faintly visible on film, but undetected by our film scanner despite high spatial resolution. Penumbra at isocenter was found to be 0.72mm, which matched the penumbras of true field edges. Penumbra off-isocenter was 1.1mm. Mechanically, leaves are moving smoothly once straightened. Conclusion Beam profiles through our brass MLC are acceptable. Leaves attenuate and move as designed. Looking forward, we intend to animate our MLC to deliver more complicated treatment plans.

  8. Exam Schools from the Inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hockett, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes called "exam schools," academically selective institutions have long been a part of the American secondary-education landscape. The schools are diverse in origin and purpose. No single catalyst describes why or how they began as or morphed into academically selective institutions. A number of them were products of the country's efforts…

  9. Exam Schools Versus Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity and Excellence, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information to two opposing viewpoints, presented in other articles in this issue, on the relative merits and problems of exam schools and magnet schools. The articles were prompted by events in the Boston public school system's elite schools. (LHW)

  10. The β1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase pump interacts with megalencephalic leucoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein 1 (MLC1) in brain astrocytes: new insights into MLC pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brignone, Maria S.; Lanciotti, Angela; Macioce, Pompeo; Macchia, Gianfranco; Gaetani, Matteo; Aloisi, Francesca; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Ambrosini, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Megalencephalic leucoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare congenital leucodystrophy caused by mutations in MLC1, a membrane protein of unknown function. MLC1 expression in astrocyte end-feet contacting blood vessels and meninges, along with brain swelling, fluid cysts and myelin vacuolation observed in MLC patients, suggests a possible role for MLC1 in the regulation of fluid and ion homeostasis and cellular volume changes. To identify MLC1 direct interactors and dissect the molecular pathways in which MLC1 is involved, we used NH2-MLC1 domain as a bait to screen a human brain library in a yeast two-hybrid assay. We identified the β1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase pump as one of the interacting clones and confirmed it by pull-downs, co-fractionation assays and immunofluorescence stainings in human and rat astrocytes in vitro and in brain tissue. By performing ouabain-affinity chromatography on astrocyte and brain extracts, we isolated MLC1 and the whole Na,K-ATPase enzyme in a multiprotein complex that included Kir4.1, syntrophin and dystrobrevin. Because Na,K-ATPase is involved in intracellular osmotic control and volume regulation, we investigated the effect of hypo-osmotic stress on MLC1/Na,K-ATPase relationship in astrocytes. We found that hypo-osmotic conditions increased MLC1 membrane expression and favoured MLC1/Na,K-ATPase-β1 association. Moreover, hypo-osmosis induced astrocyte swelling and the reversible formation of endosome-derived vacuoles, where the two proteins co-localized. These data suggest that through its interaction with Na,K-ATPase, MLC1 is involved in the control of intracellular osmotic conditions and volume regulation in astrocytes, opening new perspectives for understanding the pathological mechanisms of MLC disease. PMID:20926452

  11. Exit Exam as Academic Performance Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al Marzouqi, Ali H.; Hussien, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of exit exams on different elements of the educational process, namely: curriculum development, students and instructors. A 50-question multiple-choice Exit Exam was prepared by Electrical Engineering (EE) faculty members covering a poll of questions from EE core courses. A copy of the Exit Exam applied during each…

  12. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking

    PubMed Central

    Keall, Paul J.; Colvill, Emma; O’Brien, Ricky; Ng, Jin Aun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We report on the clinical process, quality assurance, and geometric and dosimetric results of the first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking which occurred on 28 November 2013 at the Northern Sydney Cancer Centre. Methods: An electromagnetic transponder-based positioning system (Calypso) was modified to send the target position output to in-house-developed MLC tracking code, which adjusts the leaf positions to optimally align the treatment beam with the real-time target position. Clinical process and quality assurance procedures were developed and performed. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking was for a prostate cancer patient being treated with dual-arc VMAT (RapidArc). For the first fraction of the first patient treatment of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking we recorded the in-room time and transponder positions, and performed dose reconstruction to estimate the delivered dose and also the dose received had MLC tracking not been used. Results: The total in-room time was 21 min with 2 min of beam delivery. No additional time was needed for MLC tracking and there were no beam holds. The average prostate position from the initial setup was 1.2 mm, mostly an anterior shift. Dose reconstruction analysis of the delivered dose with MLC tracking showed similar isodose and target dose volume histograms to the planned treatment and a 4.6% increase in the fractional rectal V60. Dose reconstruction without motion compensation showed a 30% increase in the fractional rectal V60 from that planned, even for the small motion. Conclusions: The real-time beam-target correction method, electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking, has been translated to the clinic. This achievement represents a milestone in improving geometric and dosimetric accuracy, and by inference treatment outcomes, in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:24506591

  13. Two cases with megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts and MLC1 mutations in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Yiş, Uluç; Scheper, Gert C; Uran, Nedret; Unalp, Aycan; Cakmakçi, Handan; Hiz-Kurul, Semra; Dirik, Eray; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2010-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts is a rare leukodystrophy that is characterized by macrocephaly and a slowly progressive clinical course. It is one of the most commonly reported leukoencephalopathies in Turkey. Mutations in the MLC1 gene are the main cause of the disease. We report two patients with megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts with confirmed mutations in the MLC1 gene. The mutation in the second patient was novel. We also review identified mutations in the Turkish population.

  14. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  15. Automatic detection of MLC relative position errors for VMAT using the EPID-based picket fence test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophides, Damianos; Davies, Alex; Fleckney, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) ensure the accurate delivery of treatments requiring complex beam fluences like intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. The purpose of this work is to automate the detection of MLC relative position errors  ⩾0.5 mm using electronic portal imaging device-based picket fence tests and compare the results to the qualitative assessment currently in use. Picket fence tests with and without intentional MLC errors were measured weekly on three Varian linacs. The picket fence images analysed covered a time period ranging between 14-20 months depending on the linac. An algorithm was developed that calculated the MLC error for each leaf-pair present in the picket fence images. The baseline error distributions of each linac were characterised for an initial period of 6 months and compared with the intentional MLC errors using statistical metrics. The distributions of median and one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test p-value exhibited no overlap between baseline and intentional errors and were used retrospectively to automatically detect MLC errors in routine clinical practice. Agreement was found between the MLC errors detected by the automatic method and the fault reports during clinical use, as well as interventions for MLC repair and calibration. In conclusion the method presented provides for full automation of MLC quality assurance, based on individual linac performance characteristics. The use of the automatic method has been shown to provide early warning for MLC errors that resulted in clinical downtime.

  16. Automatic detection of MLC relative position errors for VMAT using the EPID-based picket fence test.

    PubMed

    Christophides, Damianos; Davies, Alex; Fleckney, Mark

    2016-12-07

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) ensure the accurate delivery of treatments requiring complex beam fluences like intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. The purpose of this work is to automate the detection of MLC relative position errors  ⩾0.5 mm using electronic portal imaging device-based picket fence tests and compare the results to the qualitative assessment currently in use. Picket fence tests with and without intentional MLC errors were measured weekly on three Varian linacs. The picket fence images analysed covered a time period ranging between 14-20 months depending on the linac. An algorithm was developed that calculated the MLC error for each leaf-pair present in the picket fence images. The baseline error distributions of each linac were characterised for an initial period of 6 months and compared with the intentional MLC errors using statistical metrics. The distributions of median and one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test p-value exhibited no overlap between baseline and intentional errors and were used retrospectively to automatically detect MLC errors in routine clinical practice. Agreement was found between the MLC errors detected by the automatic method and the fault reports during clinical use, as well as interventions for MLC repair and calibration. In conclusion the method presented provides for full automation of MLC quality assurance, based on individual linac performance characteristics. The use of the automatic method has been shown to provide early warning for MLC errors that resulted in clinical downtime.

  17. Dose domain regularization of MLC leaf patterns for highly complex IMRT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y.; Ruan, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke; O’Connor, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The advent of automated beam orientation and fluence optimization enables more complex intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning using an increasing number of fields to exploit the expanded solution space. This has created a challenge in converting complex fluences to robust multileaf collimator (MLC) segments for delivery. A novel method to regularize the fluence map and simplify MLC segments is introduced to maximize delivery efficiency, accuracy, and plan quality. Methods: In this work, we implemented a novel approach to regularize optimized fluences in the dose domain. The treatment planning problem was formulated in an optimization framework to minimize the segmentation-induced dose distribution degradation subject to a total variation regularization to encourage piecewise smoothness in fluence maps. The optimization problem was solved using a first-order primal-dual algorithm known as the Chambolle-Pock algorithm. Plans for 2 GBM, 2 head and neck, and 2 lung patients were created using 20 automatically selected and optimized noncoplanar beams. The fluence was first regularized using Chambolle-Pock and then stratified into equal steps, and the MLC segments were calculated using a previously described level reducing method. Isolated apertures with sizes smaller than preset thresholds of 1–3 bixels, which are square units of an IMRT fluence map from MLC discretization, were removed from the MLC segments. Performance of the dose domain regularized (DDR) fluences was compared to direct stratification and direct MLC segmentation (DMS) of the fluences using level reduction without dose domain fluence regularization. Results: For all six cases, the DDR method increased the average planning target volume dose homogeneity (D95/D5) from 0.814 to 0.878 while maintaining equivalent dose to organs at risk (OARs). Regularized fluences were more robust to MLC sequencing, particularly to the stratification and small aperture removal. The maximum and

  18. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 and regulates cytokinesis of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhui; Wang, Yugang; Wang, Ting; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Li, Xinjian; Zhou, Qin; Majumder, Sadhan; Bi, Erfei; Liu, David X; Huang, Suyun; Lu, Zhimin

    2014-11-21

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is expressed at high levels during embryonic development and tumour progression and is important for cell growth. However, it is not known whether it directly controls cell division. Here, we found that Aurora B phosphorylates PKM2, but not PKM1, at T45; this phosphorylation is required for PKM2's localization and interaction with myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) in the contractile ring region of mitotic cells during cytokinesis. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 at Y118, which primes the binding of ROCK2 to MLC2 and subsequent ROCK2-dependent MLC2 S15 phosphorylation. PKM2-regulated MLC2 phosphorylation, which is greatly enhanced by EGF stimulation or EGFRvIII, K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E mutant expression, plays a pivotal role in cytokinesis, cell proliferation and brain tumour development. These findings underscore the instrumental function of PKM2 in oncogenic EGFR-, K-Ras- and B-Raf-regulated cytokinesis and tumorigenesis.

  19. Operator recognition by the ROK transcription factor family members, NagC and Mlc

    PubMed Central

    Bréchemier-Baey, Dominique; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Oberto, Jacques; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NagC and Mlc, paralogous members of the ROK family of proteins with almost identical helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs, specifically regulate genes for transport and utilization of N-acetylglucosamine and glucose. We previously showed that two amino acids in a linker region outside the canonical helix-turn-helix motif are responsible for Mlc site specificity. In this work we identify four amino acids in the linker, which are required for recognition of NagC targets. These amino acids allow Mlc and NagC to distinguish between a C/G and an A/T bp at positions ±11 of the operators. One linker position, glycine in NagC and arginine in Mlc, corresponds to the major specificity determinant for the two proteins. In certain contexts it is possible to switch repression from Mlc-style to NagC-style, by interchanging this glycine and arginine. Secondary determinants are supplied by other linker positions or the helix-turn-helix motif. A wide genomic survey of unique ROK proteins shows that glycine- and arginine-rich sequences are present in the linkers of nearly all ROK family repressors. Conserved short sequence motifs, within the branches of the ROK evolutionary tree, suggest that these sequences could also be involved in operator recognition in other ROK family members. PMID:25452338

  20. Phosphorylated Myosin Light Chain 2 (p-MLC2) as a Molecular Marker of Antemortem Coronary Artery Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liliang; Li, Yuhua; Lin, Junyi; Jiang, Jieqing; He, Meng; Sun, Daming; Zhao, Ziqin; Shen, Yiwen; Xue, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not uncommon that only mild coronary artery stenosis is grossly revealed after a system autopsy. While coronary artery spasm (CAS) is the suspected mechanism of these deaths, no specific biomarker has been identified to suggest antemortem CAS. Material/Methods To evaluate the potential of using phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (p-MLC2) as a diagnostic marker of antemortem CAS, human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured and treated with common vasoconstrictors, including prostaglandins F2α (PGF2α), acetylcholine (ACh), and 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT). The p-MLC2 level was examined in the cultured cells using Western blot analysis and in a rat model of spasm provocation tests using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Effects of increased p-MLC2 level on VSMCs contractile activities were assessed in vitro using confocal immunofluorescence assay. Four fatal cases with known antemortem CAS were collected and subject to p-MLC2 detection. Results The p-MLC2 was significantly increased in VSMCs after treatments with vasoconstrictors and in the spasm provocation tests. Myofilament was well-organized and densely stained in VSMCs with high p-MLC2 level, but disarrayed in VSMCs with low p-MLC2 level. Three of the 4 autopsied cases showed strongly positive staining of p-MLC2 at the stenosed coronary segment and the adjacent interstitial small arteries. The fourth case was autopsied at the 6th day after death and showed negative-to-mild positive staining of p-MLC2. Conclusions p-MLC2 might be a useful marker for diagnosis of antemortem CAS. Autopsy should be performed as soon as possible to collect coronary arteries for detection of p-MLC2. PMID:27643564

  1. Multiple linear combination (MLC) regression tests for common variants adapted to linkage disequilibrium structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Sun, Lei; Poirier, Julia G.; Paterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By jointly analyzing multiple variants within a gene, instead of one at a time, gene‐based multiple regression can improve power, robustness, and interpretation in genetic association analysis. We investigate multiple linear combination (MLC) test statistics for analysis of common variants under realistic trait models with linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on HapMap Asian haplotypes. MLC is a directional test that exploits LD structure in a gene to construct clusters of closely correlated variants recoded such that the majority of pairwise correlations are positive. It combines variant effects within the same cluster linearly, and aggregates cluster‐specific effects in a quadratic sum of squares and cross‐products, producing a test statistic with reduced degrees of freedom (df) equal to the number of clusters. By simulation studies of 1000 genes from across the genome, we demonstrate that MLC is a well‐powered and robust choice among existing methods across a broad range of gene structures. Compared to minimum P‐value, variance‐component, and principal‐component methods, the mean power of MLC is never much lower than that of other methods, and can be higher, particularly with multiple causal variants. Moreover, the variation in gene‐specific MLC test size and power across 1000 genes is less than that of other methods, suggesting it is a complementary approach for discovery in genome‐wide analysis. The cluster construction of the MLC test statistics helps reveal within‐gene LD structure, allowing interpretation of clustered variants as haplotypic effects, while multiple regression helps to distinguish direct and indirect associations. PMID:27885705

  2. Characterization of a new virulent phage (MLC-A) of Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Capra, M L; Del L Quiberoni, A; Ackermann, H-W; Moineau, S; Reinheimer, J A

    2006-07-01

    A new virulent bacteriophage (MLC-A) was recently isolated in Argentina from a probiotic dairy product containing a strain of Lactobacillus paracasei. Observation of the lysate with an electron microscope revealed bacteriophage particles with an icosahedral capsid of 57 +/- 2 nm; with a collar and a noncontractile tail of 156 +/- 3 nm terminating with a baseplate to which a tail fiber was attached. Therefore, phage MLC-A belongs to the Siphoviridae family. This phage was able to survive the pasteurization process and was resistant to alcohols and sodium hypochlorite (400 mg/kg). Only peracetic acid could inactivate high-titer suspensions of phages in a short time. The maximum rates of phage adsorption to its host cells were obtained at 30 degrees C with a pH between 5 and 7, and in the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The host range of phage MLC-A encompassed L. paracasei and Lactobacillus casei strains, but it was not able to infect Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Lactobacillus gasseri strains. One-step growth kinetics of its lytic development revealed latent and burst periods of 30 and 135 min, respectively, with a burst size of about 69 +/- 4 plaque-forming units per infected cell. Phage MLC-A had a distinctive restriction profile when compared with the 2 well-studied Lactobacillus phages, PL-1 and J-1. The genome size of the MLC-A phage was estimated to be approximately 37 kb. This study presents the description of the first phage specific for L. paracasei isolated in Argentina. The isolation of phage MLC-A indicates that, beside lactic acid bacteria starters, probiotic cultures can also be sensitive to virulent phages in industrial processes.

  3. SU-E-T-784: Using MLC Log Files for Daily IMRT Delivery Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Stathakis, S; Defoor, D; Linden, P; Kirby, N; Papanikolaou, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify daily intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using multi-leaf collimator (MLC) log files. Methods: The MLC log files from a NovalisTX Varian linear accelerator were used in this study. The MLC files were recorded daily for all patients undergoing IMRT or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The first record of each patient was used as reference and all records for subsequent days were compared against the reference. An in house MATLAB software code was used for the comparisons. Each MLC log file was converted to a fluence map (FM) and a gamma index (γ) analysis was used for the evaluation of each daily delivery for every patient. The tolerance for the gamma index was set to 2% dose difference and 2mm distance to agreement while points with signal of 10% or lower of the maximum value were excluded from the comparisons. Results: The γ between each of the reference FMs and the consecutive daily fraction FMs had an average value of 99.1% (ranged from 98.2 to 100.0%). The FM images were reconstructed at various resolutions in order to study the effect of the resolution on the γ and at the same time reduce the time for processing the images. We found that the comparison of images with the highest resolution (768×1024) yielded on average a lower γ (99.1%) than the ones with low resolution (192×256) (γ 99.5%). Conclusion: We developed an in-house software that allows us to monitor the quality of daily IMRT and VMAT treatment deliveries using information from the MLC log files of the linear accelerator. The information can be analyzed and evaluated as early as after the completion of each daily treatment. Such tool can be valuable to assess the effect of MLC positioning on plan quality, especially in the context of adaptive radiotherapy.

  4. Anatomy-based, patient-specific VMAT QA using EPID or MLC log files.

    PubMed

    Defoor, Dewayne L; Vazquez-Quino, Luis A; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2015-05-08

    In this project, we investigated the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), together with the treatment planning system (TPS) and MLC log files, to determine the delivered doses to the patient and evaluate the agreement between the treatment plan and the delivered dose distribution. The QA analysis results are presented for 15 VMAT patients using the EPID measurements, the ScandiDos Delta4 dosimeter, and the beam fluence calculated from the multileaf collimator (MLC) log file. EPID fluence images were acquired in continuous acquisition mode for each of the patients and they were processed through an in-house MATLAB program to create an opening density matrix (ODM), which was used as the input fluence for the dose calculation in the TPS (Pinnacle3). The EPID used in this study was the aSi1000 Varian on a Novalis TX linac equipped with high-definition MLC. The actual MLC positions and gantry angles were retrieved from the MLC log files and the data were used to calculate the delivered dose distributions in Pinnacle. The resulting dose distributions were then compared against the corresponding planned dose distributions using the 3D gamma index with 3 mm/3% passing criteria. The ScandiDos Delta4 phantom was also used to measure a 2D dose distribution for all the 15 patients and a 2D gamma was calculated for each patient using the Delta4 software. The average 3D gamma using the EPID images was 96.1% ± 2.2%. The average 3D gamma using the log files was 98.7% ± 0.5%. The average 2D gamma from the Delta4 was 98.1% ± 2.1%. Our results indicate that the use of the EPID, combined with MLC log files and a TPS, is a viable method for QA of VMAT plans.

  5. Potential regulation of human muscle plasticity by MLC2 post-translational modifications during bed rest and countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Laurence; Bastide, Bruno; Hedou, Julie; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valérie; Cochon, Laetitia; Dupont, Erwan; Mounier, Yvonne

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of a 60-day bed rest with or without countermeasures on muscular phenotype and post-translational modifications of the regulatory Myosin Light Chain 2 (MLC2) protein. Soleus biopsies were obtained from female subjects before and after bed rest. Control subjects were assigned only to bed rest (BR), BR+Ex subjects were submitted to combined aerobic and resistive exercises, and BR+Nut to nutritional leucine and valine diet. We determined Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC) and MLC2 composition of muscles using 1D SDS-PAGE. MLC2 phosphorylation was measured on 2D gels and O-N-Acetyl Glucosaminylation (O-GlcNAc) level of MLC2 was determined. Our results showed a slow-to-fast shift of MHC and MLC2 isoforms in BR and BR+Nut while BR+Ex combinations prevented these phenotype changes. After BR, the MLC2 phosphorylation state was increased while the global MLC2 glycosylation level was decreased. Exercises prevented the variations of phosphorylation and glycosylation observed after BR whereas nutrition had no effects. These results suggested an interplay between phosphorylation and glycosylation of MLC2, which might be involved in the development of muscle atrophy and associated changes. These findings of differential responses to exercises and nutrition protocols were discussed with implications for future prescription models to preserve muscle against long-term unloading.

  6. Disrupting MLC1 and GlialCAM and ClC-2 interactions in leukodystrophy entails glial chloride channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hoegg-Beiler, Maja B; Sirisi, Sònia; Orozco, Ian J; Ferrer, Isidre; Hohensee, Svea; Auberson, Muriel; Gödde, Kathrin; Vilches, Clara; de Heredia, Miguel López; Nunes, Virginia; Estévez, Raúl; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2014-03-19

    Defects in the astrocytic membrane protein MLC1, the adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the chloride channel ClC-2 underlie human leukoencephalopathies. Whereas GlialCAM binds ClC-2 and MLC1, and modifies ClC-2 currents in vitro, no functional connections between MLC1 and ClC-2 are known. Here we investigate this by generating loss-of-function Glialcam and Mlc1 mouse models manifesting myelin vacuolization. We find that ClC-2 is unnecessary for MLC1 and GlialCAM localization in brain, whereas GlialCAM is important for targeting MLC1 and ClC-2 to specialized glial domains in vivo and for modifying ClC-2's biophysical properties specifically in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the cells chiefly affected by vacuolization. Unexpectedly, MLC1 is crucial for proper localization of GlialCAM and ClC-2, and for changing ClC-2 currents. Our data unmask an unforeseen functional relationship between MLC1 and ClC-2 in vivo, which is probably mediated by GlialCAM, and suggest that ClC-2 participates in the pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts.

  7. Evaluation of two methods of predicting MLC leaf positions using EPID measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Dance, David R.; Fielding, Andrew

    2006-09-15

    In intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT), the position of the field edges and the modulation within the beam are often achieved with a multileaf collimator (MLC). During the MLC calibration process, due to the finite accuracy of leaf position measurements, a systematic error may be introduced to leaf positions. Thereafter leaf positions of the MLC depend on the systematic error introduced on each leaf during MLC calibration and on the accuracy of the leaf position control system (random errors). This study presents and evaluates two methods to predict the systematic errors on the leaf positions introduced during the MLC calibration. The two presented methods are based on a series of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. A comparison with film measurements showed that the EPID could be used to measure leaf positions without introducing any bias. The first method, referred to as the 'central leaf method', is based on the method currently used at this center for MLC leaf calibration. It mimics the manner in which leaf calibration parameters are specified in the MLC control system and consequently is also used by other centers. The second method, a new method proposed by the authors and referred to as the ''individual leaf method,'' involves the measurement of two positions for each leaf (-5 and +15 cm) and the interpolation and extrapolation from these two points to any other given position. The central leaf method and the individual leaf method predicted leaf positions at prescribed positions of -11, 0, 5, and 10 cm within 2.3 and 1.0 mm, respectively, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.3 and 0.2 mm, respectively. The individual leaf method provided a better prediction of the leaf positions than the central leaf method. Reproducibility tests for leaf positions of -5 and +15 cm were performed. The reproducibility was within 0.4 mm on the same day and 0.4 mm six weeks later (1 SD). Measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg., 90 deg., and 270 deg

  8. Physics Exams that Promote Collaborative Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Carl E.; Rieger, Georg W.; Heiner, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam. Their use is rapidly growing in the physics department at the University of British Columbia, as both students and faculty find them rewarding. In a two-stage exam students first complete and turn in the exam individually, and then, working in small groups, answer the exam questions again. During the second stage, the room is filled with spirited and effective debate with nearly every student participating. This provides students with immediate targeted feedback supplied by discussions with their peers. Furthermore, we see indications that the use of this exam format not only ensures consistency across interactive course components, but it also positively impacts how students approach the other collaborative course components. This is accomplished without losing the summative assessment of individual performance that is the expectation of exams for most instructors. In this paper we describe how to implement two-stage exams and provide arguments why they should be part of physics courses that use interactive engagement and social/collaborative learning methods.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's in this article? What ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  10. Making Exam Preparation An Enjoyable Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukosch, Stephan; Schummer, Till

    2006-01-01

    During oral exams at the German distance learning university, we noticed that students fear that they will be faced with questions that they have not anticipated. In our opinion, this is mainly because students have no chance to train and thereby gather positive experiences with exam situations as they are distributed all over Germany and thus it…

  11. From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Williamson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The British current model of education has turned schools into exam factories and further education colleges and universities into skills factories for British industry. In their book, "From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery: the Democratic Route," the authors offer an alternative way of thinking and talking about education, as well as…

  12. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) Print A A A ... español Radiografía: fémur What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A What's in this article? ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  15. Tailoring the Preparticipation Exam to Female Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mimi D.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the basics of the preparticipation exam, focusing on aspects specific to females, such as menstrual dysfunction, disordered eating, and orthopedic problems such as scoliosis and patellofemoral pain. Health history questionnaire and other parts of the exam are included in six tables. (SM)

  16. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Florida's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  17. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Connecticut's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  18. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oklahoma's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  19. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Louisiana's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  20. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Minnesota's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Virginia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alaska's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  3. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New York's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  4. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Ohio's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  5. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Nevada's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  6. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  7. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Washington's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  8. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arizona's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  9. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  10. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Mississippi's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  11. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Jersey's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  12. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Delaware's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  13. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  14. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Indiana's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  15. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Idaho's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  16. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arkansas' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  17. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Missouri's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  18. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Maryland's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  19. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  20. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on California's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Texas' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oregon's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  3. A New Comprehensive Final Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu P.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions

  4. SU-C-BRB-02: Symmetric and Asymmetric MLC Based Lung Shielding and Dose Optimization During Translating Bed TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S; Kakakhel, MB; Ahmed, SBS; Hussain, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The primary aim was to introduce a dose optimization method for translating bed total body irradiation technique that ensures lung shielding dynamically. Symmetric and asymmetric dynamic MLC apertures were employed for this purpose. Methods: The MLC aperture sizes were defined based on the radiological depth values along the divergent ray lines passing through the individual CT slices. Based on these RD values, asymmetrically shaped MLC apertures were defined every 9 mm of the phantom in superior-inferior direction. Individual MLC files were created with MATLAB™ and were imported into Eclipse™ treatment planning system for dose calculations. Lungs can be shielded to an optimum level by reducing the MLC aperture width over the lungs. The process was repeated with symmetrically shaped apertures. Results: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis shows that the asymmetric MLC based technique provides better dose coverage to the body and optimum shielding of the lungs compared to symmetrically shaped beam apertures. Midline dose homogeneity is within ±3% with asymmetric MLC apertures whereas it remains within ±4.5% with symmetric ones (except head region where it drops down to −7%). The substantial over and under dosage of ±5% at tissue interfaces has been reduced to ±2% with asymmetric MLC technique. Lungs dose can be reduced to any desired limit. In this experiment lungs dose was reduced to 80% of the prescribed dose, as was desired. Conclusion: The novel asymmetric MLC based technique assures optimum shielding of OARs (e.g. lungs) and better 3-D dose homogeneity and body-dose coverage in comparison with the symmetric MLC aperture optimization. The authors acknowledge the financial and infrastructural support provided by Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad and Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi during the course of this research project. Authors have no conflict of interest with any national / international

  5. Use of dMLC for implementation of dynamic respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To simulate and evaluate the use of dynamic multileaf collimators (dMLC) in respiratory gating to compensate for baseline drift.Methods: Tumor motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 322 treatment fractions was analyzed with the finite state model. A dynamic respiratory gating window was established in real-time by determining the average positions during the previous two end-of-expiration breathing phases and centering the dMLC aperture on a weighted average of these positions. A simulated dMLC with physical motion constraints was used in dynamic gating treatment simulations. Fluence maps were created to provide a statistical description of radiation delivery for each fraction. Duty cycle was also calculated for each fraction.Results: The average duty cycle was 2.3% greater under dynamic gating conditions. Dynamic gating also showed higher fluences and less tumor obstruction. Additionally, dynamic gating required fewer beam toggles and each delivery period was longer on average than with static gating.Conclusions: The use of dynamic gating showed better performance than static gating and the physical constraints of a dMLC were shown to not be an impediment to dynamic gating.

  6. 6 MV dosimetric characterization of the 160 MLC, the new Siemens multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Martin B; Nill, Simeon; Häring, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-05-01

    New technical developments constantly aim at improving the outcome of radiation therapy. With the use of a computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC), the quality of the treatment and the efficiency in patient throughput is significantly increased. New MLC designs aim to further enhance the advantages. In this article, we present the first detailed experimental investigation of the new 160 MLC, Siemens Medical Solutions. The assessment included the experimental investigation of typical MLC characteristics such as leakage, tongue-and-groove effect, penumbra, leaf speed, and leaf positioning accuracy with a 6 MV treatment beam. The leakage is remarkably low with an average of 0.37% due to a new design principle of slightly tilted leaves instead of the common tongue-and-groove design. But due to the tilt, the triangular tongue-and-groove effect occurs. Its magnitude of approximately 19% is similar to the dose defect measured for MLCs with the common tongue-and-groove design. The average longitudinal penumbra measured at depth d(max) = 15 mm with standard 100 x 100 mm2 fields is 4.1 +/- 0.5 mm for the central range and increases to 4.9 +/- 1.3 mm for the entire field range of 400 x 400 mm2. The increase is partly due to the single-focusing design and the large distance between the MLC and the isocenter enabling a large patient clearance. Regarding the leaf speed, different velocity tests were performed. The positions of the moving leaves were continuously recorded with the kilovoltage-imaging panel. The maximum leaf velocities measured were 42.9 +/- 0.6 mm/s. In addition, several typical intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments were performed and the delivery times compared to the Siemens OPTIFOCUS MLC. An average decrease of 11% in delivery time was observed. The experimental results presented in this article indicate that the dosimetric characteristics of the 160 MLC are capable of improving the quality of dose delivery with respect to precision and dose

  7. Quantifying the gantry sag on linear accelerators and introducing an MLC-based compensation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Weiliang; Gao, Song; Wang, Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Gantry sag is one of the well-known sources of mechanical imperfections that compromise the spatial accuracy of radiation dose delivery. The objectives of this study were to quantify the gantry sag on multiple linear accelerators (linacs), to investigate a multileaf collimator (MLC)-based strategy to compensate for gantry sag, and to verify the gantry sag and its compensation with film measurements. Methods: The authors used the Winston–Lutz method to measure gantry sag on three Varian linacs. A ball bearing phantom was imaged with megavolt radiation fields at 10° gantry angle intervals. The images recorded with an electronic portal imaging device were analyzed to derive the radiation isocenter and the gantry sag, that is, the superior–inferior wobble of the radiation field center, as a function of the gantry angle. The authors then attempted to compensate for the gantry sag by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to the MLC leaf positions. The gantry sag and its compensation were independently verified using film measurements. Results: Gantry sag was reproducible over a six-month measurement period. The maximum gantry sag was found to vary from 0.7 to 1.0 mm, depending on the linac and the collimator angle. The radiation field center moved inferiorly (i.e., away from the gantry) when the gantry was rotated from 0° to 180°. After the MLC leaf position compensation was applied at 90° collimator angle, the maximum gantry sag was reduced to <0.2 mm. The film measurements at gantry angles of 0° and 180° verified the inferior shift of the radiation fields and the effectiveness of MLC compensation. Conclusions: The results indicate that gantry sag on a linac can be quantitatively measured using a simple phantom and an electronic portal imaging device. Reduction of gantry sag is feasible by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to MLC leaf positions at 90° collimator angle. PMID:22482636

  8. Quantifying the gantry sag on linear accelerators and introducing an MLC-based compensation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Du Weiliang; Gao Song; Wang Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Gantry sag is one of the well-known sources of mechanical imperfections that compromise the spatial accuracy of radiation dose delivery. The objectives of this study were to quantify the gantry sag on multiple linear accelerators (linacs), to investigate a multileaf collimator (MLC)-based strategy to compensate for gantry sag, and to verify the gantry sag and its compensation with film measurements. Methods: The authors used the Winston-Lutz method to measure gantry sag on three Varian linacs. A ball bearing phantom was imaged with megavolt radiation fields at 10 deg. gantry angle intervals. The images recorded with an electronic portal imaging device were analyzed to derive the radiation isocenter and the gantry sag, that is, the superior-inferior wobble of the radiation field center, as a function of the gantry angle. The authors then attempted to compensate for the gantry sag by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to the MLC leaf positions. The gantry sag and its compensation were independently verified using film measurements. Results: Gantry sag was reproducible over a six-month measurement period. The maximum gantry sag was found to vary from 0.7 to 1.0 mm, depending on the linac and the collimator angle. The radiation field center moved inferiorly (i.e., away from the gantry) when the gantry was rotated from 0 deg. to 180 deg. After the MLC leaf position compensation was applied at 90 deg. collimator angle, the maximum gantry sag was reduced to <0.2 mm. The film measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg. verified the inferior shift of the radiation fields and the effectiveness of MLC compensation. Conclusions: The results indicate that gantry sag on a linac can be quantitatively measured using a simple phantom and an electronic portal imaging device. Reduction of gantry sag is feasible by applying a gantry angle-specific correction to MLC leaf positions at 90 deg. collimator angle.

  9. SU-E-T-33: An EPID-Based Method for Testing Absolute Leaf Position for MLC Without Backup Jaws

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S; Whitaker, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Methods in common use for MLC leaf position QA are limited to measurements relative to an arbitrary reference position. The authors previously presented an EPID-based method for efficiently testing accuracy of leaf position relative to the mechanical isocenter for MLC with backup jaws. The purpose of this work is to extend that method to the general case of MLC without backup jaws. Methods: A pair of collimator walkout images is used to determine the location of the mechanical isocenter relative to the center of one field using a parameter called X-offset. The method allows for shift of the imager panel to cover subsets of MLC leaves within the limited field of view of the imager. For a shifted panel position, an image of three beam strips defined by a subset of MLC leaves allows determination of the position of each leaf relative to the isocenter. The location of the isocenter is determined by applying X-offset to an image of a single rectangular field obtained at that panel position. The method can also be used to test backup jaws instead of MLC leaves. A software tool was developed to efficiently analyze the images. Results: The software tool reports leaf position and deviation from nominal position, and provides visual displays to facilitate rapid qualitative interpretation. Test results using this method agree well with results using the previous method requiring backup jaws. Test results have been successfully used to recalibrate one model MLC (Elekta MLCi2™). Work in progress includes extension of the software tool to other MLC models, and quantification of reproducibility of the measurements. Conclusion: This work successfully demonstrates a method to efficiently and accurately measure MLC leaf position, or backup jaw position, relative to the mechanical isocenter of the collimator.

  10. Commissioning of 6 MV medical linac for dynamic MLC-based IMRT on Monte Carlo code GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Sakama, Kyoko; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Itami, Jun; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2014-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate tool for calculating dose distributions. In particular, the Electron Gamma shower computer code has been widely used for multi-purpose research in radiotherapy, but Monte Carlo GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) is rare for radiotherapy with photon beams and needs to be verified further under various irradiation conditions, particularly multi-leaf collimator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (MLC-based IMRT). In this study, GEANT4 was used for modeling of a 6 MV linac for dynamic MLC-based IMRT. To verify the modeling of our linac, we compared the calculated data with the measured depth-dose for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field and the measured dose profile for a 35 × 35 cm(2) field. Moreover, 120 MLCs were modeled on the GEANT4. Five tests of MLC modeling were performed: (I) MLC transmission, (II) MLC transmission profile including intra- and inter-leaf leakage, (III) tongue-and-groove leakage, (IV) a simple field with different field sizes by use of MLC and (V) a dynamic MLC-based IMRT field. For all tests, the calculations were compared with measurements of an ionization chamber and radiographic film. The calculations agreed with the measurements: MLC transmissions by calculations and measurements were 1.76 ± 0.01 and 1.87 ± 0.01 %, respectively. In gamma evaluation method (3 %/3 mm), the pass rates of the (IV) and (V) tests were 98.5 and 97.0 %, respectively. Furthermore, tongue-and-groove leakage could be calculated by GEANT4, and it agreed with the film measurements. The procedure of commissioning of dynamic MLC-based IMRT for GEANT4 is proposed in this study.

  11. Expedition 35/36 Final Exams

    NASA Video Gallery

    Three Expedition 35/36 crew members prepare for their final exams in their Sokol launch and entry suits at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy a...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... image is recorded on a computer or special film. The scoliosis X-ray includes the thoracic spine ( ... for scoliosis during regular physical exams, and some schools also test for scoliosis. If scoliosis is suspected, ...

  13. Expedition 32 Final Soyuz Qualification Exams

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 32 Flight Engineers Suni Williams, Yuri Malenchenko and Aki Hoshide take their final Soyuz systems qualification exams at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. The ...

  14. What Is a Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exam?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is a comprehensive dilated eye exam? Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? What You Should Know Protecting Against Vision Loss Staying on TRACK Diabetic Eye Disease FAQ ...

  15. SU-E-T-01: 2-D Characterization of DLG Among All MLC Leaf Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaraswamy, L; Xu, Z; Podgorsak, M; Schmitt, J; Bailey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of dosimetric leaf-gap (DLG) along the travel path of each MLC leaf pair. This study evaluates whether the spatial variations in DLG could cause dose differences between TPS-calculated and measured dose. Methods: The 6MV DLG values were measured for all leaf pairs in the direction of leaf motion using a 2-D diode array and 0.6cc ion chamber. These measurements were performed on two Varian Linacs, employing the Millennium 120-leaf MLC and a 2-D-DLG variation map was created via in-house software. Several test plans were created with sweeping MLC fields using constant gaps from 2mm to 10mm and corrected for 2-D variation utilizing in-house software. Measurements were performed utilizing the MapCHECK at 5.0cm depth for plans with and without the 2-D DLG correction and compared to the TPS calculated dose via gamma analysis (3%/3mm). Results: The measured DLGs for the middle 40 MLC leaf pairs (0.5cm width) were very similar along the central superior-inferior axis, with maximum variation of 0.2mm. The outer 20 MLC leaf pairs (1.0cm width) have DLG values from 0.32mm (mean) to 0.65mm (maximum) lower than the central leaf-pair, depending on off-axis distance. Gamma pass rates for the 2mm, 4mm, and 6mm sweep plans increased by 23.2%, 28.7%, and 26.0% respectively using the 2-D-DLG correction. The most improved dose points occur in areas modulated by the 1.0cm leaf-pairs. The gamma pass rate for the 10mm sweep plan increased by only 7.7%, indicating that the 2D variation becomes less significant for dynamic plans with larger MLC gaps. Conclusion: Fluences residing significantly off-axis with narrow sweeping gaps may exhibit significant variations from planned dose due to large differences between the true DLG exhibited by the 1.0cm leaf-pairs versus the constant DLG value utilized by the TPS for dose calculation.

  16. EPID-based verification of the MLC performance for dynamic IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; Barnes, Michael P.; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: In advanced radiotherapy treatments such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), verification of the performance of the multileaf collimator (MLC) is an essential part of the linac QA program. The purpose of this study is to use the existing measurement methods for geometric QA of the MLCs and extend them to more comprehensive evaluation techniques, and to develop dedicated robust algorithms to quantitatively investigate the MLC performance in a fast, accurate, and efficient manner. Methods: The behavior of leaves was investigated in the step-and-shoot mode by the analysis of integrated electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images acquired during picket fence tests at fixed gantry angles and arc delivery. The MLC was also studied in dynamic mode by the analysis of cine EPID images of a sliding gap pattern delivered in a variety of conditions including different leaf speeds, deliveries at fixed gantry angles or in arc mode, and changing the direction of leaf motion. The accuracy of the method was tested by detection of the intentionally inserted errors in the delivery patterns. Results: The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to find each individual leaf position, gap width, and leaf bank skewness in addition to the deviations from expected leaf positions with respect to the beam central axis with sub-pixel accuracy. For the three tested linacs over a period of 5 months, the maximum change in the gap width was 0.5 mm, the maximum deviation from the expected leaf positions was 0.1 mm and the MLC skewness was up to 0.2 Degree-Sign . The algorithm developed for the sliding gap analysis could determine the velocity and acceleration/deceleration of each individual leaf as well as the gap width. There was a slight decrease in the accuracy of leaf performance with increasing leaf speeds. The analysis results were presented through several graphs. The accuracy of the method was assessed

  17. Brushed permanent magnet DC MLC motor operation in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.; St Aubin, J.; Rathee, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Linac-MR systems for real-time image-guided radiotherapy will utilize the multileaf collimators (MLCs) to perform conformal radiotherapy and tumor tracking. The MLCs would be exposed to the external fringe magnetic fields of the linac-MR hybrid systems. Therefore, an experimental investigation of the effect of an external magnetic field on the brushed permanent magnet DC motors used in some MLC systems was performed. Methods: The changes in motor speed and current were measured for varying external magnetic field strengths up to 2000 G generated by an EEV electromagnet. These changes in motor characteristics were measured for three orientations of the motor in the external magnetic field, mimicking changes in motor orientations due to installation and/or collimator rotations. In addition, the functionality of the associated magnetic motor encoder was tested. The tested motors are used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC (Maxon Motor half leaf and full leaf motors) and the Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC (MicroMo Electronics leaf motor) including a carriage motor (MicroMo Electronics). Results: In most cases, the magnetic encoder of the motors failed prior to any damage to the gearbox or the permanent magnet motor itself. This sets an upper limit of the external magnetic field strength on the motor function. The measured limits of the external magnetic fields were found to vary by the motor type. The leaf motor used with a Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC system tolerated up to 450{+-}10 G. The carriage motor tolerated up to 2000{+-}10 G field. The motors used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC system were found to tolerate a maximum of 600{+-}10 G. Conclusions: The current Varian MLC system motors can be used for real-time image-guided radiotherapy coupled to a linac-MR system, provided the fringe magnetic fields at their locations are below the determined tolerance levels. With the fringe magnetic fields of linac-MR systems expected to be larger than the

  18. Physics Exam Preparation: A Comparison of Three Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakcharoenphol, Witat; Stelzer, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    In this clinical study on helping students prepare for an exam, we compared three different treatments. All students were asked to take a practice exam. One group was then given worked-out solutions for that exam, another group was given the solutions and targeted exercises to do as homework based on the result of their practice exam, and the…

  19. Oral Exams as a Tool for Teaching and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral exams are a fruitful and practical alternative to written exams in small-enrolment Science classes. In an oral exam, the instructor can assess conceptual understanding, problem-solving, scientific communication skills, and a student's philosophy of science. In contrast, a written exam gives a much poorer picture of how students learn and…

  20. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Massachusetts' high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  3. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Rhode Island's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  4. Motion management during IMAT treatment of mobile lung tumors—A comparison of MLC tracking and gated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marianne; Pommer, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking, respiratory amplitude and phase gating, and no compensation for intrafraction motion management during intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods: Motion management with MLC tracking and gating was evaluated for four lung cancer patients. The IMAT plans were delivered to a dosimetric phantom mounted onto a 3D motion phantom performing patient-specific lung tumor motion. The MLC tracking system was guided by an optical system that used stereoscopic infrared (IR) cameras and five spherical reflecting markers attached to the dosimetric phantom. The gated delivery used a duty cycle of 35% and collected position data using an IR camera and two reflecting markers attached to a marker block. Results: The average gamma index failure rate (2% and 2 mm criteria) was <0.01% with amplitude gating for all patients, and <0.1% with phase gating and <3.7% with MLC tracking for three of the four patients. One of the patients had an average failure rate of 15.1% with phase gating and 18.3% with MLC tracking. With no motion compensation, the average gamma index failure rate ranged from 7.1% to 46.9% for the different patients. Evaluation of the dosimetric error contributions showed that the gated delivery mainly had errors in target localization, while MLC tracking also had contributions from MLC leaf fitting and leaf adjustment. The average treatment time was about three times longer with gating compared to delivery with MLC tracking (that did not prolong the treatment time) or no motion compensation. For two of the patients, the different motion compensation techniques allowed for approximately the same margin reduction but for two of the patients, gating enabled a larger reduction of the margins than MLC tracking. Conclusions: Both gating and MLC tracking reduced the effects of the target movements, although the gated delivery showed a better dosimetric accuracy and enabled a larger reduction of the

  5. INSTA-EXAM: A Card-Based Exam Preparation System that Eliminates Repeated Typing and Proofreading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1984-01-01

    A system that rivals today's computer-based exam preparation systems is described. The INSTA-EXAM system is 10 times faster than the more traditional, labor-intensive method of typing directly on stencil masters. Its ability to quickly and efficiently change, update, and delete information makes it especially useful. (RM)

  6. Real-time auto-adaptive margin generation for MLC-tracked radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Glitzner, M; Fast, M F; de Senneville, B Denis; Nill, S; Oelfke, U; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W; Crijns, S P M

    2017-01-07

    In radiotherapy, abdominal and thoracic sites are candidates for performing motion tracking. With real-time control it is possible to adjust the multileaf collimator (MLC) position to the target position. However, positions are not perfectly matched and position errors arise from system delays and complicated response of the electromechanic MLC system. Although, it is possible to compensate parts of these errors by using predictors, residual errors remain and need to be compensated to retain target coverage. This work presents a method to statistically describe tracking errors and to automatically derive a patient-specific, per-segment margin to compensate the arising underdosage on-line, i.e. during plan delivery. The statistics of the geometric error between intended and actual machine position are derived using kernel density estimators. Subsequently a margin is calculated on-line according to a selected coverage parameter, which determines the amount of accepted underdosage. The margin is then applied onto the actual segment to accommodate the positioning errors in the enlarged segment. The proof-of-concept was tested in an on-line tracking experiment and showed the ability to recover underdosages for two test cases, increasing [Formula: see text] in the underdosed area about [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. The used dose model was able to predict the loss of dose due to tracking errors and could be used to infer the necessary margins. The implementation had a running time of 23 ms which is compatible with real-time requirements of MLC tracking systems. The auto-adaptivity to machine and patient characteristics makes the technique a generic yet intuitive candidate to avoid underdosages due to MLC tracking errors.

  7. Real-time auto-adaptive margin generation for MLC-tracked radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; Fast, M. F.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2017-01-01

    In radiotherapy, abdominal and thoracic sites are candidates for performing motion tracking. With real-time control it is possible to adjust the multileaf collimator (MLC) position to the target position. However, positions are not perfectly matched and position errors arise from system delays and complicated response of the electromechanic MLC system. Although, it is possible to compensate parts of these errors by using predictors, residual errors remain and need to be compensated to retain target coverage. This work presents a method to statistically describe tracking errors and to automatically derive a patient-specific, per-segment margin to compensate the arising underdosage on-line, i.e. during plan delivery. The statistics of the geometric error between intended and actual machine position are derived using kernel density estimators. Subsequently a margin is calculated on-line according to a selected coverage parameter, which determines the amount of accepted underdosage. The margin is then applied onto the actual segment to accommodate the positioning errors in the enlarged segment. The proof-of-concept was tested in an on-line tracking experiment and showed the ability to recover underdosages for two test cases, increasing {{V}90 %} in the underdosed area about 47 % and 41 % , respectively. The used dose model was able to predict the loss of dose due to tracking errors and could be used to infer the necessary margins. The implementation had a running time of 23 ms which is compatible with real-time requirements of MLC tracking systems. The auto-adaptivity to machine and patient characteristics makes the technique a generic yet intuitive candidate to avoid underdosages due to MLC tracking errors.

  8. Identification of the specific sequence recognized by Penicillium citrinum MlcR, a GAL4-type transcriptional activator of ML-236B (compactin) biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Baba, S; Nihira, T; Hosobuchi, M

    2008-09-01

    MlcR is a pathway-specific transcriptional activator of the ML-236B biosynthetic genes in Penicillium citrinum. The MlcR-binding sequences were identified by an in vitro gel-shift assay and an in vivo reporter assay for the region between mlcA and mlcC as a model. The gel-shift assay showed that recombinant MlcR bound to the DNA sequence 5'-ACGGCGTTATTCGG-3' and most of the bases in this motif were required for the interaction between MlcR and DNA. In the reporter assay using beta-glucuronidase (GUS), substitution of the bases in this binding sequence resulted in the drastic reduction of GUS activities. These data clearly indicate that this MlcR-binding sequence is essential for the transcriptional activation of mlcA and mlcC in P. citrinum. Similar motifs were found in other loci of the ML-236B biosynthetic gene cluster and the consensus-binding motif for MlcR was predicted to be a direct repeat, 5'-WCGG-N(6)-TCGG-3'.

  9. On the suitability of Elekta’s Agility 160 MLC for tracked radiation delivery: closed-loop machine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; Crijns, S. P. M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    For motion adaptive radiotherapy, dynamic multileaf collimator tracking can be employed to reduce treatment margins by steering the beam according to the organ motion. The Elekta Agility 160 MLC has hitherto not been evaluated for its tracking suitability. Both dosimetric performance and latency are key figures and need to be assessed generically, independent of the used motion sensor. In this paper, we propose the use of harmonic functions directly fed to the MLC to determine its latency during continuous motion. Furthermore, a control variable is extracted from a camera system and fed to the MLC. Using this setup, film dosimetry and subsequent γ statistics are performed, evaluating the response when tracking (MRI)-based physiologic motion in a closed-loop. The delay attributed to the MLC itself was shown to be a minor contributor to the overall feedback chain as compared to the impact of imaging components such as MRI sequences. Delay showed a linear phase behaviour of the MLC employed in continuously dynamic applications, which enables a general MLC-characterization. Using the exemplary feedback chain, dosimetry showed a vast increase in pass rate employing γ statistics. In this early stage, the tracking performance of the Agility using the test bench yielded promising results, making the technique eligible for translation to tracking using clinical imaging modalities.

  10. Exhausting treadmill running causes dephosphorylation of sMLC2 and reduced level of myofilament MLCK2 in slow twitch rat soleus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hortemo, Kristin Halvorsen; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Lunde, Ida G; Sjaastad, Ivar; Lunde, Per Kristian; Sejersted, Ole M

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) is a small protein in the myosin complex, regulating muscle contractile function by modulating Ca2+ sensitivity of myofilaments. MLC2 can be modified by phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation, two reversible and dynamic posttranslational modifications. The slow isoform of MLC2 (sMLC2) is dephosphorylated in soleus muscle during in situ loaded shortening contractions, which correlates with reduction in shortening capacity. Here, we hypothesize that exhausting in vivo treadmill running induces dephosphorylation of MLC2 in slow twitch soleus, but not in fast twitch EDL muscle, and that there are reciprocal changes in MLC2 O-GlcNAcylation. At rest, both phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of MLC2 were lower in slow than fast twitch muscles. One bout of exhausting treadmill running induced dephosphorylation of sMLC2 in soleus, paralleled by reduced levels of the kinase MLCK2 associated to myofilaments, suggesting that the acute reduction in phosphorylation is mediated by dissociation of MLCK2 from myofilaments. O-GlcNAcylation of MLC2 did not change significantly, and seems of limited importance in the regulation of MLC2 phosphorylation during in vivo running. After 6 weeks of treadmill running, the dephosphorylation of sMLC2 persisted in soleus along with reduction in MLCK2 both in myofilament- and total protein fraction. In EDL on the contrary, phosphorylation of MLC2 was not altered after one exercise bout or after 6 weeks of treadmill running. Thus, in contrast to fast twitch muscle, MLC2 dephosphorylation occurs in slow twitch muscle during in vivo exercise and may be linked to reduced myofilament-associated MLCK2 and reduced shortening capacity. PMID:25713325

  11. Fast leaf-fitting with generalized underdose/overdose constraints for real-time MLC tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Douglas Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Real-time multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a promising approach to the management of intrafractional tumor motion during thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. MLC tracking is typically performed in two steps: transforming a planned MLC aperture in response to patient motion and refitting the leaves to the newly generated aperture. One of the challenges of this approach is the inability to faithfully reproduce the desired motion-adapted aperture. This work presents an optimization-based framework with which to solve this leaf-fitting problem in real-time. Methods: This optimization framework is designed to facilitate the determination of leaf positions in real-time while accounting for the trade-off between coverage of the PTV and avoidance of organs at risk (OARs). Derived within this framework, an algorithm is presented that can account for general linear transformations of the planned MLC aperture, particularly 3D translations and in-plane rotations. This algorithm, together with algorithms presented in Sawant et al. [“Management of three-dimensional intrafraction motion through real-time DMLC tracking,” Med. Phys. 35, 2050–2061 (2008)] and Ruan and Keall [Presented at the 2011 IEEE Power Engineering and Automation Conference (PEAM) (2011) (unpublished)], was applied to apertures derived from eight lung intensity modulated radiotherapy plans subjected to six-degree-of-freedom motion traces acquired from lung cancer patients using the kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring system developed at the University of Sydney. A quality-of-fit metric was defined, and each algorithm was evaluated in terms of quality-of-fit and computation time. Results: This algorithm is shown to perform leaf-fittings of apertures, each with 80 leaf pairs, in 0.226 ms on average as compared to 0.082 and 64.2 ms for the algorithms of Sawant et al., Ruan, and Keall, respectively. The algorithm shows approximately 12% improvement in quality-of-fit over the Sawant et al

  12. IMRT treatment planning on 4D geometries for the era of dynamic MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yelin; Murray, Walter; Keall, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    The problem addressed here was to obtain optimal and deliverable dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences from four-dimensional (4D) geometries for dynamic MLC tracking delivery. The envisaged scenario was where respiratory phase and position information of the target was available during treatment, from which the optimal treatment plan could be further adapted in real time. A tool for 4D treatment plan optimization was developed that integrates a commercially available treatment planning system and a general-purpose optimization system. The 4D planning method was applied to the 4D computed tomography planning scans of three lung cancer patients. The optimization variables were MLC leaf positions as a function of monitor units and respiratory phase. The objective function was the deformable dose-summed 4D treatment plan score. MLC leaf motion was constrained by the maximum leaf velocity between control points in terms of monitor units for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction and between phases for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction. For comparison and a starting point for the 4D optimization, three-dimensional (3D) optimization was performed on each of the phases. The output of the 4D IMRT planning process is a leaf sequence which is a function of both monitor unit and phase, which can be delivered to a patient whose breathing may vary between the imaging and treatment sessions. The 4D treatment plan score improved during 4D optimization by 34%, 4%, and 50% for Patients A, B, and C, respectively, indicating 4D optimization generated a better 4D treatment plan than the deformable sum of individually optimized phase plans. The dose-volume histograms for each phase remained similar, indicating robustness of the 4D treatment plan to respiratory variations expected during treatment delivery. In summary, 4D optimization for respiratory phase-dependent treatment planning with dynamic MLC motion tracking improved the 4D treatment plan

  13. Reconstruction of high resolution MLC leaf positions using a low resolution detector for accurate 3D dose reconstruction in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    In pre-treatment dose verification, low resolution detector systems are unable to identify shifts of individual leafs of high resolution multi leaf collimator (MLC) systems from detected changes in the dose deposition. The goal of this study was to introduce an alternative approach (the shutter technique) combined with a previous described iterative reconstruction method to accurately reconstruct high resolution MLC leaf positions based on low resolution measurements. For the shutter technique, two additional radiotherapy treatment plans (RT-plans) were generated in addition to the original RT-plan; one with even MLC leafs closed for reconstructing uneven leaf positions and one with uneven MLC leafs closed for reconstructing even leaf positions. Reconstructed leaf positions were then implemented in the original RT-plan for 3D dose reconstruction. The shutter technique was evaluated for a 6 MV Elekta SLi linac with 5 mm MLC leafs (Agility™) in combination with the MatriXX Evolution detector with detector spacing of 7.62 mm. Dose reconstruction was performed with the COMPASS system (v2.0). The measurement setup allowed one row of ionization chambers to be affected by two adjacent leaf pairs. Measurements were obtained for various field sizes with MLC leaf position errors ranging from 1.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Furthermore, one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam with MLC introduced leaf position errors of 5.0 mm was evaluated to illustrate the impact of the shutter technique on 3D dose reconstruction. Without the shutter technique, MLC leaf position reconstruction showed reconstruction errors up to 6.0 mm. Introduction of the shutter technique allowed MLC leaf position reconstruction for the majority of leafs with sub-millimeter accuracy resulting in a reduction of dose reconstruction errors. The shutter technique in combination with the iterative reconstruction method allows high resolution MLC leaf position reconstruction using low resolution

  14. SU-E-T-646: Quality Assurance of Truebeam Multi-Leaf Collimator Using a MLC QA Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Lu, J; Hong, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a routine quality assurance procedure for Truebeam multi-leaf collimator (MLC) using MLC QA phantom, verify the stability and reliability of MLC during the treatment. Methods: MLC QA phantom is a specialized phantom for MLC quality assurance (QA), and contains five radio-opaque spheres that are embedded in an “L” shape. The phantom was placed isocentrically on the Truebeam treatment couch for the tests. A quality assurance plan was setted up in the Eclipse v10.0, the fields that need to be delivered in order to acquire the necessary images, the MLC shapes can then be obtained by the images. The images acquired by the electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and imported into the PIPSpro software for the analysis. The tests were delivered twelve weeks (once a week) to verify consistency of the delivery, and the images are acquired in the same manner each time. Results: For the Leaf position test, the average position error was 0.23mm±0.02mm (range: 0.18mm∼0.25mm). The Leaf width was measured at the isocenter, the average error was 0.06mm±0.02mm (range: 0.02mm∼0.08mm) for the Leaf width test. Multi-Port test showed the dynamic leaf shift error, the average error was 0.28mm±0.03mm (range: 0.2mm∼0.35mm). For the leaf transmission test, the average inter-leaf leakage value was 1.0%±0.17% (range: 0.8%∼1.3%) and the average inter-bank leakage value was 32.6%±2.1% (range: 30.2%∼36.1%). Conclusion: By the test of 12 weeks, the MLC system of the Truebeam is running in a good condition and the MLC system can be steadily and reliably carried out during the treatment. The MLC QA phantom is a useful test tool for the MLC QA.

  15. English-Spanish Verbatim Translation Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    The development and validation of the English-Spanish Verbatim Translation Exam (ESVTE) is described. The test is for use by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the selection of applicants for the positions of Language Specialist or Contract Linguist. The report is divided into eight sections. Section 1 describes the need for the test,…

  16. Redesigning the MCAT exam: balancing multiple perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schwartzstein, Richard M; Rosenfeld, Gary C; Hilborn, Robert; Oyewole, Saundra Herndon; Mitchell, Karen

    2013-05-01

    The authors of this commentary discuss the recently completed review of the current Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which has been used since 1991, and describe the blueprint for the new test that will be introduced in 2015. The design of the MCAT exam reflects changes in medical education, medical science, health care delivery, and the needs of the populations served by graduates of U.S. and Canadian medical schools. The authors describe how balancing the ambitious goals for the new exam and the varying priorities of the testing program's many stakeholders made blueprint design complex. They discuss the tensions and trade-offs that characterized the design process as well as the deliberations and data that shaped the blueprint.The blueprint for the MCAT exam balances the assessment of a broad range of competencies in the natural, social, and behavioral sciences and critical analysis and reasoning skills that are essential to entering students' success in medical school. The exam will include four sections: Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems; Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems; Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior; and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.The authors also offer recommendations for admission committees, advising them to review applicants' test scores, course work, and other academic, personal, and experiential credentials as part of a holistic admission process and in relation to their institutions' educational, scientific, clinical, and service-oriented goals.

  17. History of New York State Regents Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carol Siri

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a brief history of the Regents subject-matter examinations and New York State's efforts to move towards educational equity. New York State was a leader in integrated curriculum and outcomes assessment in high schools for over a century. The first academic exit exam was administered in 1878 and it evolved into the controversial…

  18. Introducing Standardized EFL/ESL Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborda, Jesus Garcia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the features, and a brief comparison, of some of the most well-known high-stakes exams. They are classified in the following fashion: tests that only include multiple-choice questions, tests that include writing and multiple-choice questions, and tests that include speaking questions. The tests reviewed are: BULATS, IELTS,…

  19. New Exams for New Professional Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaptal, Alain; Pouzard, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Recruiting professionals for schools' media resources centres needs to take into account the new dimensions of the information society. This article describes the radical reform of the very high-stakes and competitive national selection of those professionals in France. The new exam is now driven by a problem-solving approach and based on an…

  20. Automatic Assessment of 3D Modeling Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanna, A.; Lamberti, F.; Paravati, G.; Demartini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based assessment of exams provides teachers and students with two main benefits: fairness and effectiveness in the evaluation process. This paper proposes a fully automatic evaluation tool for the Graphic and Virtual Design (GVD) curriculum at the First School of Architecture of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. In particular, the tool is…

  1. Undergraduate range management exam: 1999-2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Undergraduate Range Management Exam (URME) has been administered to undergraduate students at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management since 1983, with students demonstrating their higher order learning skills and synthesis knowledge of the art and science of rangeland management. ...

  2. Determinants of Student Attitudes toward Team Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinig, Bruce A.; Horowitz, Ira; Whittenburg, Gene

    2014-01-01

    We examine how student attitudes toward their group, learning method, and perceived development of professional skills are initially shaped and subsequently evolve through multiple uses of team exams. Using a Tobit regression model to analyse a sequence of 10 team quizzes given in a graduate-level tax accounting course, we show that there is an…

  3. [Why are some high achievers on the course final exam unsuccessful on the proficiency exam in English?].

    PubMed

    Matsunuma, Mitsuyasu

    2009-04-01

    This study examined why some high achievers on the course final exam were unsuccessful on the proficiency exam in English. We hypothesized that the learning motives and learning behaviors (learning strategy, learning time) had different effects on the outcomes of the exams. First, the relation between the variables was investigated using structural equation modeling. Second, the learning behaviors of students who got good marks on both exams were compared with students who did well only on the course final exam. The results were as follows. (a) Learning motives influenced test performance via learning behaviors. (b) Content-attached motives influenced all variables concerning learning behaviors. (c) Content-detached motives influenced all variables concerning learning behaviors that were related only to the course final exam. (d) The students who got good marks on both exams performed the learning behaviors that were useful on the proficiency exam more frequently than the students who did well only on the course final exam.

  4. Implementation of Hospital Examination Reservation System Using Data Mining Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyo Soung; Yoon, Tae Sik; Ryu, Ki Chung; Shin, Il Won; Choe, Yang Hyo; Lee, Kyoung Yong; Lee, Jae Dong; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives New methods for obtaining appropriate information for users have been attempted with the development of information technology and the Internet. Among such methods, the demand for systems and services that can improve patient satisfaction has increased in hospital care environments. Methods In this paper, we proposed the Hospital Exam Reservation System (HERS), which uses the data mining method. First, we focused on carrying clinical exam data and finding the optimal schedule for generating rules using the multi-examination pattern-mining algorithm. Then, HERS was applied by a rule master and recommending system with an exam log. Finally, HERS was designed as a user-friendly interface. Results HERS has been applied at the National Cancer Center in Korea since June 2014. As the number of scheduled exams increased, the time required to schedule more than a single condition decreased (from 398.67% to 168.67% and from 448.49% to 188.49%; p < 0.0001). As the number of tests increased, the difference between HERS and non-HERS increased (from 0.18 days to 0.81 days). Conclusions It was possible to expand the efficiency of HERS studies using mining technology in not only exam reservations, but also the medical environment. The proposed system based on doctor prescription removes exams that were not executed in order to improve recommendation accuracy. In addition, we expect HERS to become an effective system in various medical environments. PMID:25995961

  5. Development and evaluation of aperture-based complexity metrics using film and EPID measurements of static MLC openings

    SciTech Connect

    Götstedt, Julia; Karlsson Hauer, Anna; Bäck, Anna

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Complexity metrics have been suggested as a complement to measurement-based quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). However, these metrics have not yet been sufficiently validated. This study develops and evaluates new aperture-based complexity metrics in the context of static multileaf collimator (MLC) openings and compares them to previously published metrics. Methods: This study develops the converted aperture metric and the edge area metric. The converted aperture metric is based on small and irregular parts within the MLC opening that are quantified as measured distances between MLC leaves. The edge area metric is based on the relative size of the region around the edges defined by the MLC. Another metric suggested in this study is the circumference/area ratio. Earlier defined aperture-based complexity metrics—the modulation complexity score, the edge metric, the ratio monitor units (MU)/Gy, the aperture area, and the aperture irregularity—are compared to the newly proposed metrics. A set of small and irregular static MLC openings are created which simulate individual IMRT/VMAT control points of various complexities. These are measured with both an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device and EBT3 film. The differences between calculated and measured dose distributions are evaluated using a pixel-by-pixel comparison with two global dose difference criteria of 3% and 5%. The extent of the dose differences, expressed in terms of pass rate, is used as a measure of the complexity of the MLC openings and used for the evaluation of the metrics compared in this study. The different complexity scores are calculated for each created static MLC opening. The correlation between the calculated complexity scores and the extent of the dose differences (pass rate) are analyzed in scatter plots and using Pearson’s r-values. Results: The complexity scores calculated by the edge

  6. SU-E-T-583: Optimizing the MLC Model Parameters for IMRT in the RayStation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Yi, B; Xu, H; Yang, X; Prado, K; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the MLC model parameters for IMRT in the RayStation v.4.0 planning system and for a Varian C-series Linac with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC. Methods: The RayStation treatment planning system models rounded leaf-end MLC with the following parameters: average transmission, leaf-tip width, tongue-and-groove, and position offset. The position offset was provided by Varian. The leaf-tip width was iteratively evaluated by comparing computed and measured transverse dose profiles of MLC-defined fields at dmax in water. The profile comparison was also used to verify the MLC position offset. The transmission factor and leaf tongue width were derived iteratively by optimizing five clinical patient IMRT QA Results: brain, lung, pancreas, head-and-neck (HN), and prostate. The HN and prostate cases involved splitting fields. Verifications were performed with Mapcheck2 measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Finally, the MLC model was validated using five test IMRT cases from the AAPM TG119 report. Absolute gamma analyses (3mm/3% and 2mm/2%) were applied. In addition, computed output factors for MLC-defined small fields (2×2, 3×3, 4×4, 6×6cm) of both 6MV and 18MV were compared to those measured by the Radiological Physics Center (RPC). Results: Both 6MV and 18MV models were determined to have the same MLC parameters: 2.5% transmission, tongue-and-groove 0.05cm, and leaftip 0.3cm. IMRT QA analysis for five cases in TG119 resulted in a 100% passing rate with 3mm/3% gamma analysis for 6MV, and >97.5% for 18MV. With 2mm/2% gamma analysis, the passing rate was >94.6% for 6MV and >90.9% for 18MV. The difference between computed output factors in RayStation and RPC measurements was less than 2% for all MLCdefined fields, which meets the RPC's acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The rounded leaf-end MLC model in RayStation 4.0 planning system was verified and IMRT commissioning was clinically acceptable. The IMRT commissioning was well validated using guidance from

  7. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Adaptive MLC Morphing for Online Correction of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Online adaptive MLC morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate target position as well as anatomic changes. A reliable method of adaptive MLC segment to target during prostate cancer IMRT treatment is proposed and evaluated by comparison with daily online-image guidance (IGRT) correction and online-IMRT planning. Methods: The MLC adaptive algorithm involves following steps; move the MLC segments according to target translational shifts, and then morph the segment shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning-target contour and MLC segment. Efficacy of this method was evaluated retrospectively using daily-CBCT images on seven prostate patients treated with seven-beam IMRT treatment to deliver 64Gy in 20 fractions. Daily modification was simulated with three approaches; daily-IGRT correction based on implanted radio-markers, adaptive MLC morphing, and online-IMRT planning, with no-residual variation. The selected dosimetric endpoints and nEUD (normalized equivalent uniform dose to online-IMRT planning) of each organ of interest were determined for evaluation and comparison. Results: For target(prostate), bladder and rectal-wall, the mean±sd of nEUD were 97.6%+3.2%, 103.9%±4.9% and 97.4%±1.1% for daily-IGRT correction; and 100.2%+0.2%, 108.9%±5.1% and 99.8%±1.2% for adaptive MLC morphing, respectively. For daily-IGRT correction, adaptive MLC morphing and online-IMRT planning, target D99 was <95% of the prescription dose in 30%, 0% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the rectal-wall, D5 exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 11.4% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the bladder, Dmax exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 5.6% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. D30 of bladder and rectal-wall were well within the planned-D30 for all three approaches. Conclusion: The proposed method of adaptive MLC morphing can be beneficial for the prostate patient population with large deformation and

  8. Monitoring daily MLC positional errors using trajectory log files and EPID measurements for IMRT and VMAT deliveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, A.; Agnew, C. E.; Grattan, M. W. D.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2014-05-01

    This work investigated the differences between multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning accuracy determined using either log files or electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and then assessed the possibility of reducing patient specific quality control (QC) via phantom-less methodologies. In-house software was developed, and validated, to track MLC positional accuracy with the rotational and static gantry picket fence tests using an integrated electronic portal image. This software was used to monitor MLC daily performance over a 1 year period for two Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators, with the results directly compared with MLC positions determined using leaf trajectory log files. This software was validated by introducing known shifts and collimator errors. Skewness of the MLCs was found to be 0.03 ± 0.06° (mean ±1 standard deviation (SD)) and was dependent on whether the collimator was rotated manually or automatically. Trajectory log files, analysed using in-house software, showed average MLC positioning errors with a magnitude of 0.004 ± 0.003 mm (rotational) and 0.004 ± 0.011 mm (static) across two TrueBeam units over 1 year (mean ±1 SD). These ranges, as indicated by the SD, were lower than the related average MLC positioning errors of 0.000 ± 0.025 mm (rotational) and 0.000 ± 0.039 mm (static) that were obtained using the in-house EPID based software. The range of EPID measured MLC positional errors was larger due to the inherent uncertainties of the procedure. Over the duration of the study, multiple MLC positional errors were detected using the EPID based software but these same errors were not detected using the trajectory log files. This work shows the importance of increasing linac specific QC when phantom-less methodologies, such as the use of log files, are used to reduce patient specific QC. Tolerances of 0.25 mm have been created for the MLC positional errors using the EPID-based automated picket fence test. The software allows diagnosis

  9. Monitoring daily MLC positional errors using trajectory log files and EPID measurements for IMRT and VMAT deliveries.

    PubMed

    Agnew, A; Agnew, C E; Grattan, M W D; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2014-05-07

    This work investigated the differences between multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning accuracy determined using either log files or electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and then assessed the possibility of reducing patient specific quality control (QC) via phantom-less methodologies. In-house software was developed, and validated, to track MLC positional accuracy with the rotational and static gantry picket fence tests using an integrated electronic portal image. This software was used to monitor MLC daily performance over a 1 year period for two Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators, with the results directly compared with MLC positions determined using leaf trajectory log files. This software was validated by introducing known shifts and collimator errors. Skewness of the MLCs was found to be 0.03 ± 0.06° (mean ±1 standard deviation (SD)) and was dependent on whether the collimator was rotated manually or automatically. Trajectory log files, analysed using in-house software, showed average MLC positioning errors with a magnitude of 0.004 ± 0.003 mm (rotational) and 0.004 ± 0.011 mm (static) across two TrueBeam units over 1 year (mean ±1 SD). These ranges, as indicated by the SD, were lower than the related average MLC positioning errors of 0.000 ± 0.025 mm (rotational) and 0.000 ± 0.039 mm (static) that were obtained using the in-house EPID based software. The range of EPID measured MLC positional errors was larger due to the inherent uncertainties of the procedure. Over the duration of the study, multiple MLC positional errors were detected using the EPID based software but these same errors were not detected using the trajectory log files. This work shows the importance of increasing linac specific QC when phantom-less methodologies, such as the use of log files, are used to reduce patient specific QC. Tolerances of 0.25 mm have been created for the MLC positional errors using the EPID-based automated picket fence test. The software allows

  10. SU-D-18A-05: Assessing Elekta MLC Tracking Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Glitzner, M; Crijns, S; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the technical feasibility of using Elekta MLCs in tracked radiotherapy, specifically to show the capability of an Agility MLC to follow model tumor trajectories using object tracking. The system performance of the MLC is to be assessed via dosimetric experiments and temporal response measures. Methods: The system observer in the tracking cascade consisted of a camera serving for this proof of concept; Images of a moving object were acquired continuously and decorrelated for the position information, which was fed forward to the RT computer controlling the MLC via an interface provided by Elekta. The 1D motion (in the direction of the leaves) was induced by a CIRS motion controller. Additionally, the aperture position was observed by means of the light field of the linac. Calculating the phase between aperture and object yielded the mean aperture lag for the current setup. The object was restricted to sinusoidal motion with a period of 10s. For dosimetry, GafChromic radiosensitive film was irradiated with a total dose of 1000MU using an aperture size of 40mm and a motion range of 30mm. Results: Object tracking can substantially reconstruct the geometric dose response of a static target. In the dynamic case, dose is smeared out into the legs of the static distribution, leading to a reduced plateau and increased FWHM of 5mm, compared to the static width of 38mm. The time-lag between object and aperture was determined to be approximately 300ms for the current set-up. Conclusion: We demonstrated a tracking experiment performed on a clinical Elekta linear accelator for the first time. Observed profile variations show the dosimetric impact of tracked delivery. The determined lag is a valuable descriptor for a future tracking cascade employing predictor filters. The performed experiments are generic and possible predecessors for future applications with MR-Linac or ultrasound probes. Conflict of interest: this project is partly funded by Elekta.

  11. Improving IMRT-plan quality with MLC leaf position refinement post plan optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Ying; Zhang Guowei; Berman, Barry L.; Parke, William C.; Yi Byongyong; Yu, Cedric X.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning, reducing the pencil-beam size may lead to a significant improvement in dose conformity, but also increase the time needed for the dose calculation and plan optimization. The authors develop and evaluate a postoptimization refinement (POpR) method, which makes fine adjustments to the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions after plan optimization, enhancing the spatial precision and improving the plan quality without a significant impact on the computational burden. Methods: The authors' POpR method is implemented using a commercial treatment planning system based on direct aperture optimization. After an IMRT plan is optimized using pencil beams with regular pencil-beam step size, a greedy search is conducted by looping through all of the involved MLC leaves to see if moving the MLC leaf in or out by half of a pencil-beam step size will improve the objective function value. The half-sized pencil beams, which are used for updating dose distribution in the greedy search, are derived from the existing full-sized pencil beams without need for further pencil-beam dose calculations. A benchmark phantom case and a head-and-neck (HN) case are studied for testing the authors' POpR method. Results: Using a benchmark phantom and a HN case, the authors have verified that their POpR method can be an efficient technique in the IMRT planning process. Effectiveness of POpR is confirmed by noting significant improvements in objective function values. Dosimetric benefits of POpR are comparable to those of using a finer pencil-beam size from the optimization start, but with far less computation and time. Conclusions: The POpR is a feasible and practical method to significantly improve IMRT-plan quality without compromising the planning efficiency.

  12. Determination of the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning in sliding window and VMAT techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, V. Abella, R.; Calvo, J. F.; Jurado-Bruggemann, D.; Sancho, I.; Carrasco, P.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Several authors have recommended a 2 mm tolerance for multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning in sliding window treatments. In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments, however, the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning remains unknown. In this paper, the authors present the results of a multicenter study to determine the optimal tolerance for both techniques. Methods: The procedure used is based on dynalog file analysis. The study was carried out using seven Varian linear accelerators from five different centers. Dynalogs were collected from over 100 000 clinical treatments and in-house software was used to compute the number of tolerance faults as a function of the user-defined tolerance. Thus, the optimal value for this tolerance, defined as the lowest achievable value, was investigated. Results: Dynalog files accurately predict the number of tolerance faults as a function of the tolerance value, especially for low fault incidences. All MLCs behaved similarly and the Millennium120 and the HD120 models yielded comparable results. In sliding window techniques, the number of beams with an incidence of hold-offs >1% rapidly decreases for a tolerance of 1.5 mm. In VMAT techniques, the number of tolerance faults sharply drops for tolerances around 2 mm. For a tolerance of 2.5 mm, less than 0.1% of the VMAT arcs presented tolerance faults. Conclusions: Dynalog analysis provides a feasible method for investigating the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning in dynamic fields. In sliding window treatments, the tolerance of 2 mm was found to be adequate, although it can be reduced to 1.5 mm. In VMAT treatments, the typically used 5 mm tolerance is excessively high. Instead, a tolerance of 2.5 mm is recommended.

  13. Dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of a commercial dynamic {mu}MLC used in SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Galal, Mohamed M.; Keogh, Sinead; Khalil, Sultan

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to carry out mechanical and dosimetric assessments on a commercial dynamic micromulti leaf collimator system to be used for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Mechanical parameters such as leaf position accuracy with different gantry angles and leaf position reproducibility were measured. Also dosimetric measurements of the interleaf leakage, intraleaf transmission, penumbra width, and light field alignment were carried out. Furthermore, measurements of output factors (S{sub cp}) and in-air factors (S{sub c}) for the {mu}MLC system will be reported. Methods: EBT2 films were used to assess the leaf position error with gantry angle and after stress test, penumbra width and light field alignment. Leaf leakage was quantified using both EBT2 film and a pinpoint ion chamber. With regard to output factors, the pinpoint chamber was placed in a water phantom at 10 cm depth and 100 cm SSD. For in-air output factor measurements, 0.2 cm of brass was placed above the photon diode as build-up. Results: Measurements of mechanical parameters gave values of 0.05 cm (SD 0.035) for the average leaf position accuracy for different gantry angles and after stress test. Dosimetric measurements, yielded values of 0.22 {+-} 0.01 and 0.24 {+-} 0.01 cm, respectively, for side and head leaf penumbras. Also, average leaf abutting, leakage and transmission were found to be 0.65, 0.91, and 0.20%, respectively. Conclusions: (a) The add-on {mu}MLC system in combination with our LINAC has been commissioned to be used for clinical purposes and showed good agreement with published results for different {mu}MLC types. (b) This work has lead to the recommendation that leaves should be recalibrated after ten static beams or after each dynamic arc.

  14. Improving the performance of BICM-ID and MLC systems with different FEC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, T.; Sauer-Greff, W.; Urbansky, R.

    2013-07-01

    In bandwidth limited communication systems, the high data rate transmission with performance close to capacity limits is achieved by applying multilevel modulation schemes in association with powerful forward error correction (FEC) coding, i.e. coded modulation systems. The most important practical approaches to coded modulation systems are multilevel coding with multistage decoding (MLC/MSD) and bit interleaved coded modulation with iterative demapping and decoding (BICM-ID). Multilevel modulation formats such as M-QAM, which can be used as a part of coded modulation systems, have the capability of multilevel protection. Based on this fact, we investigate the methods to improve the performance of BICM-ID using multiple interleavers with different binary channel coding schemes such as convolutional codes, turbo codes and low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Moreover, an MLC system with parallel decoding on levels (PDL) at the receiver is considered. In our contribution, we propose to design the individual coding schemes using the extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts for individual bit levels in the constellation. Our simulation results show that the BICM-ID systems, taking into account different bit-level protections, can provide an improvement of 0.65 dB, 1.2 dB and 1.5 dB for 256-QAM with turbo, LDPC and convolutional codes, respectively. On the other hand, MLC systems with PDL designed using EXIT charts for individual bit levels can slightly improve the performance and eliminate the error floor compared to the systems with MSD.

  15. Group Oral Exams: Exploring Assessment Techniques for New Instructional Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Thomas F.; Menchaca, Velma

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a group oral final exam was designed and administered in a block of two teacher education courses taught within the social constructivist perspective. Advocates such group oral exam practices as consistent with valid assessment guidelines. Discusses limitations. (HB)

  16. Varying MLC end projection size: an effect of the double-focused Siemens multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Buckle, A H

    2006-04-21

    Siemens linacs use multileaf collimators (MLCs) that move in an arc such that the flat faces of the leaf ends are always in the same plane as the radiation focus. An effect of this is that the magnification of the leaf end projection at the isocentric plane normal to the collimator rotation axis varies with the drive position of the leaves. This effect is quantified theoretically and empirically verified. A method is introduced for assessing the importance of the effect for a particular MLC pattern. The significance of the effect is discussed.

  17. On empirical methods to determine scatter factors for irregular MLC shaped beams.

    PubMed

    Georg, Dietmar; Olofsson, Jörgen; Künzler, Thomas; Karlsson, Mikael

    2004-08-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) are in clinical use for more than a decade and are a well accepted tool in radiotherapy. For almost each MLC design different empirical or semianalytical methods have been presented for calculating output ratios in air for irregularly shaped beams. However, until now no clear recommendations have been given on how to handle irregular fields shaped by multileaf collimators for independent monitor unit (MU) verification. The present article compares different empirical methods, which have been proposed for independent MU verification, to determine (1) output ratios in air (Sc) and (2) phantom scatter factors (Sp) for irregular MLC shaped fields. Ten dedicated field shapes were applied to five different types of MLCs (Elekta, Siemens, Varian, Scanditronix, General Electric). All calculations based on empirical relations were compared with measurements and with calculations performed by a treatment planning system with a fluence based algorithm. For most irregular MLC shaped beams output ratios in air could be adequately modeled with an accuracy of about 1%-1.5% applying a method based on the open field aperture defined by the leaf and jaw setting combined with the equivalent square formula suggested by Vadash and Bjärngard [P. Vadash and B. E. Bjärngard, Med. Phys. 20, 733-734 (1993)]. The accuracy of this approach strongly depends on the inherent head scatter characteristics of the accelerator in use and on the irregular field under consideration. Deviations of up to 3% were obtained for fields where leaves obscure central parts of the flattening filter. Simple equivalent square methods for Sp calculations in irregular fields did not provide acceptable results (deviations mostly >3%). Sp values derived from Clarkson integration, based on published tables of phantom scatter correction factors, showed the same accuracy level as calculations performed using a pencil beam algorithm of a treatment planning system (in a homogeneous media

  18. Comparative Analysis of Different Measurement Techniques for MLC Characterization: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Radiation transmission, leakage and beam penumbra are essential dosimetric parameters related to the commissioning of a multileaf collimation system. This work shows a comparative analysis of commonly used film detectors: X-OMAT V2 and EDR2 radiographic films, and GafChromic EBT registered radiochromic film. The results show that X-OMAT over-estimates radiation leakage and 80-20% beam penumbra. However, according to the reference values reported by the manufacturer for these dosimetric parameters, all three films are adequate for MLC dosimetric characterization, but special care must be taken when X-OMAT V2 film is used due to its low energy photon dependence.

  19. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M F; Budgell, G J

    2008-01-21

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0 degrees and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0 degrees it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0 degrees and 360 degrees . The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0 degrees . When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the

  20. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. F.; Budgell, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0° and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0° it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0° and 360°. The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0°. When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the Elekta MLC is stable at all

  1. Dosimetric comparison between cone/Iris-based and InCise MLC-based CyberKnife plans for single and multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Si Young; Lalonde, Ron; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven; Heron, Dwight; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-09-01

    We performed an evaluation of the CyberKnife InCise MLC by comparing plan qualities for single and multiple brain lesions generated using the first version of InCise MLC, fixed cone, and Iris collimators. We also investigated differences in delivery efficiency among the three collimators. Twenty-four patients with single or multiple brain mets treated previously in our clinic on a CyberKnife M6 using cone/Iris collimators were selected for this study. Treatment plans were generated for all lesions using the InCise MLC. Number of monitor units, delivery time, target coverage, conformity index, and dose falloff were compared between MLC- and clinical cone/Iris-based plans. Statistical analysis was performed using the nonparametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney signed-rank test. The planning accuracy of the MLC-based plans was validated using chamber and film measurements. The InCise MLC-based plans achieved mean dose and target coverage comparable to the cone/Iris-based plans. Although the conformity indices of the MLC-based plans were slightly higher than those of the cone/Iris-based plans, beam delivery time for the MLC-based plans was shorter by 30%∼40%. For smaller targets or cases with OARs located close to or abutting target volumes, MLC-based plans provided inferior dose conformity compared to cone/Iris-based plans. The QA results of MLC-based plans were within 5% absolute dose difference with over 90% gamma passing rate using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. The first version of InCise MLC could be a useful delivery modality, especially for clinical situations for which delivery time is a limiting factor or for multitarget cases. PACS number(s): 87.53.Ly, 87.55.D.

  2. Dosimetric comparison between cone/Iris-based and InCise MLC-based CyberKnife plans for single and multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Si Young; Lalonde, Ron; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven; Heron, Dwight; Huq, M Saiful

    2016-09-08

    We performed an evaluation of the CyberKnife InCise MLC by comparing plan qualities for single and multiple brain lesions generated using the first version of InCise MLC, fixed cone, and Iris collimators. We also investigated differences in delivery efficiency among the three collimators. Twenty-four patients with single or multiple brain mets treated previously in our clinic on a CyberKnife M6 using cone/Iris collimators were selected for this study. Treatment plans were generated for all lesions using the InCise MLC. Number of monitor units, delivery time, target coverage, conformity index, and dose falloff were compared between MLC- and clinical cone/Iris-based plans. Statistical analysis was performed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney signed-rank test. The planning accuracy of the MLC-based plans was validated using chamber and film measurements. The InCise MLC-based plans achieved mean dose and target coverage comparable to the cone/Iris-based plans. Although the conformity indices of the MLC-based plans were slightly higher than those of the cone/Iris-based plans, beam delivery time for the MLC-based plans was shorter by 30% ~ 40%. For smaller targets or cases with OARs located close to or abutting target volumes, MLC-based plans provided inferior dose conformity compared to cone/Iris-based plans. The QA results of MLC-based plans were within 5% absolute dose difference with over 90% gamma passing rate using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. The first version of InCise MLC could be a useful delivery modality, especially for clinical situations for which delivery time is a limiting factor or for multitarget cases.

  3. New technologies to manage exam anxiety.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Alessandra; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A Stress Inoculation Training-based protocol tested if multimedia audio-video content induced emotional changes and reduced exam anxiety in university students. Seventy-five participants took part in six experimental sessions consisting of viewing multimedia content and performing relaxation exercises. Participants were randomly assigned to five experimental groups: 1) audio and video narrative on mobile phone (UMTS); 2) audio and video narrative on DVD (DVD), 3) audio narrative on MP3 player (M3), 4) audio narrative on CD (CD), 5) control group (CTRL). Results showed that audio/video content induced a significant reduction in exam anxiety and an increase of relaxation in students, compared to the audio-only contents.

  4. Putting retinal exams for diabetics in the primary care arena.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    Only about half of all diabetics get their recommended annual eye exams. Until now, little progress has been made in boosting the number of diabetics who are compliant in getting this annual exam done. However, a new device that enables the exams to be completed in the PCP's office is getting rave reviews from early users.

  5. Putting retinal exams for diabetics in the primary care arena.

    PubMed

    2001-07-01

    Only about half of all diabetics get their recommended annual eye exams. Until now, little progress has been made in boosting the number of diabetics who are compliant in getting this annual exam done. However, a new device that enables the exams to be completed in the PCP's office is getting rave reviews from early users.

  6. Enhanced Security for Online Exams Using Group Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, I. Y.; Yeom, H. Y.

    2009-01-01

    While development of the Internet has contributed to the spread of online education, online exams have not been widely adopted. An online exam is defined here as one that takes place over the insecure Internet, and where no proctor is in the same location as the examinees. This paper proposes an enhanced secure online exam management environment…

  7. Effect of Paper Color and Question Order on Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tal, Ilanit R.; Akers, Katherine G.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2008-01-01

    To deter cheating, teachers commonly use exams printed on differently colored paper or with varied question orders. Previous studies, however, reported that paper color and question order affect exam performance and suggested that teachers should adjust students' scores accordingly and discontinue the use of alternate exam forms. We conducted 2…

  8. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Maine's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking college…

  9. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Idaho's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking college…

  10. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Kentucky's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  11. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Delaware's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  12. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  13. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Dakota's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  14. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  15. Evaluating Multiple-Choice Exams in Large Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Michael; Stelzer, Tim; Gladding, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The reliability and validity of professionally written multiple-choice exams have been extensively studied for exams such as the SAT, graduate record examination, and the force concept inventory. Much of the success of these multiple-choice exams is attributed to the careful construction of each question, as well as each response. In this study,…

  16. Doctoral Comprehensive Exams in Marketing: Current Practices and Emerging Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Nicole; Beatty, Sharon E.; Foxx, William

    2004-01-01

    Current and emerging issues concerning the written comprehensive exam process are addressed. Both the purpose and structure of this exam are considered. Survey results are presented that describe the purposes of the exam from the perspective of doctoral coordinators. Also included is a description of how marketing departments are currently…

  17. Managing hay fever during the exam period.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda

    Hay-fever symptoms are common and debilitating and can have a detrimental effect on students' examination results. It is important to provide effective treatment using medication that optimises symptom control while ensuring drug side-effects are minimised. Research has confirmed that uncontrolled hay fever or medication side-effects can have a detrimental outcome on exam results. Ideally treatment should commence shortly before the start of the hay-fever season.

  18. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358° arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy × 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45° or 315°. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior–inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The

  19. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  20. SU-E-T-405: Robustness of Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans to Systematic MLC Positional Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, P; Xia, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors (PEs) on the quality of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: Five patients with head-and-neck cancer (HN) and five patients with prostate cancer were randomly chosen for this study. The clinically approved VMAT plans were designed with 2–4 coplanar arc beams with none-zero collimator angles in the Pinnacle planning system. The systematic MLC PEs of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mm on both MLC banks were introduced into the original VMAT plans using an in-house program, and recalculated with the same planned Monitor Units in the Pinnacle system. For each patient, the original VMAT plans and plans with MLC PEs were evaluated according to the dose-volume histogram information and Gamma index analysis. Results: For one primary target, the ratio of V100 in the plans with 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mm MLC PEs to those in the clinical plans was 98.8 ± 2.2%, 97.9 ± 2.1%, 90.1 ± 9.0% for HN cases and 99.5 ± 3.2%, 98.9 ± 1.0%, 97.0 ± 2.5% for prostate cases. For all OARs, the relative difference of Dmean in all plans was less than 1.5%. With 2mm/2% criteria for Gamma analysis, the passing rates were 99.0 ± 1.5% for HN cases and 99.7 ± 0.3% for prostate cases between the planar doses from the original plans and the plans with 1.0 mm MLC errors. The corresponding Gamma passing rates dropped to 88.9 ± 5.3% for HN cases and 83.4 ± 3.2% for prostate cases when comparing planar doses from the original plans and the plans with 2.0 mm MLC errors. Conclusion: For VMAT plans, systematic MLC PEs up to 1.0 mm did not affect the plan quality in term of target coverage, OAR sparing, and Gamma analysis with 2mm/2% criteria.

  1. Development of a Monte Carlo model for the Brainlab microMLC.

    PubMed

    Belec, Jason; Patrocinio, Horacio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2005-03-07

    Stereotactic radiosurgery with several static conformal beams shaped by a micro multileaf collimator (microMLC) is used to treat small irregularly shaped brain lesions. Our goal is to perform Monte Carlo calculations of dose distributions for certain treatment plans as a verification tool. A dedicated microMLC component module for the BEAMnrc code was developed as part of this project and was incorporated in a model of the Varian CL2300 linear accelerator 6 MV photon beam. As an initial validation of the code, the leaf geometry was visualized by tracing particles through the component module and recording their position each time a leaf boundary was crossed. The leaf dimensions were measured and the leaf material density and interleaf air gap were chosen to match the simulated leaf leakage profiles with film measurements in a solid water phantom. A comparison between Monte Carlo calculations and measurements (diode, radiographic film) was performed for square and irregularly shaped fields incident on flat and homogeneous water phantoms. Results show that Monte Carlo calculations agree with measured dose distributions to within 2% and/or 1 mm except for field size smaller than 1.2 cm diameter where agreement is within 5% due to uncertainties in measured output factors.

  2. The MLC tongue-and-groove effect on IMRT dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jun; Pawlicki, Todd; Chen, Yan; Li, Jinsheng; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the tongue-and-groove effect on the IMRT dose distributions for a Varian MLC. We have compared the dose distributions calculated using the intensity maps with and without the tongue-and-groove effect. Our results showed that, for one intensity-modulated treatment field, the maximum tongue-and-groove effect could be up to 10% of the maximum dose in the dose distributions. For an IMRT treatment with multiple gantry angles (≥5), the difference between the dose distributions with and without the tongue-and-groove effect was hardly visible, less than 1.6% for the two typical clinical cases studied. After considering the patient setup errors, the dose distributions were smoothed with reduced and insignificant differences between plans with and without the tongue-and-groove effect. Therefore, for a multiple-field IMRT plan (≥5), the tongue-and-groove effect on the IMRT dose distributions will be generally clinically insignificant due to the smearing effect of individual fields. The tongue-and-groove effect on an IMRT plan with small number of fields (<5) will vary depending on the number of fields in a plan (coplanar or non-coplanar), the MLC leaf sequences and the patient setup uncertainty, and may be significant (>5% of maximum dose) in some cases, especially when the patient setup uncertainty is small (≤2 mm).

  3. Assessment of MLC tracking performance during hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using real-time dose reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, M. F.; Kamerling, C. P.; Ziegenhein, P.; Menten, M. J.; Bedford, J. L.; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.

    2016-02-01

    By adapting to the actual patient anatomy during treatment, tracked multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatment deliveries offer an opportunity for margin reduction and healthy tissue sparing. This is assumed to be especially relevant for hypofractionated protocols in which intrafractional motion does not easily average out. In order to confidently deliver tracked treatments with potentially reduced margins, it is necessary to monitor not only the patient anatomy but also the actually delivered dose during irradiation. In this study, we present a novel real-time online dose reconstruction tool which calculates actually delivered dose based on pre-calculated dose influence data in less than 10 ms at a rate of 25 Hz. Using this tool we investigate the impact of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins on CTV coverage and organ-at-risk dose. On our research linear accelerator, a set of four different CTV-to-PTV margins were tested for three patient cases subject to four different motion conditions. Based on this data, we can conclude that tracking eliminates dose cold spots which can occur in the CTV during conventional deliveries even for the smallest CTV-to-PTV margin of 1 mm. Changes of organ-at-risk dose do occur frequently during MLC tracking and are not negligible in some cases. Intrafractional dose reconstruction is expected to become an important element in any attempt of re-planning the treatment plan during the delivery based on the observed anatomy of the day.

  4. Physics exam preparation: A comparison of three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakcharoenphol, Witat; Stelzer, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    In this clinical study on helping students prepare for an exam, we compared three different treatments. All students were asked to take a practice exam. One group was then given worked-out solutions for that exam, another group was given the solutions and targeted exercises to do as homework based on the result of their practice exam, and the third group was given the solutions, homework, and also an hour of one-on-one tutoring. Participants from all three conditions significantly outperformed the control group on the midterm exam. However, participants that had one-on-one tutoring did not outperform the other two participant groups.

  5. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E.

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  6. SU-E-T-479: IMRT Plan Recalculation in Patient Based On Dynalog Data and the Effect of a Single Failing MLC Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, M; Mitrou, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using Linac dynamic logs (Dynalogs) we evaluate the impact of a single failing MLC motor on the deliverability of an IMRT plan by assessing the recalculated dose volume histograms (DVHs) taking the delivered MLC positions and beam hold-offs into consideration. Methods: This is a retrospective study based on a deteriorating MLC motor (leaf 36B) which was observed to be failing via Dynalog analysis. To investigate further, Eclipse-importable MLC files were generated from Dynalogs to recalculate the actual delivered dose and to assess the clinical impact through DVHs. All deliveries were performed on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator equipped with Millennium-120 MLC. The analysis of Dynalog files and subsequent conversion to Eclipse-importable MLC files were all performed by in-house programming in Python. Effects on plan DVH are presented in the following section on a particular brain-IMRT plan which was delivered with a failing MLC motor which was then replaced. Results: Global max dose increased by 13.5%, max dose to the brainstem PRV increased by 8.2%, max dose to the optic chiasm increased by 7.6%, max dose to optic nerve increased by 8.8% and the mean dose to the PTV increased by 7.9% when comparing the original plan to the fraction with the failing MLC motor. The reason the dose increased was due to the failure being on the B-bank which is the lagging side on a sliding window delivery, therefore any failures on this side will cause an over-irradiation as the B-bank leaves struggles to keep the window from growing. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a single failing MLC motor may jeopardize the entire delivery. This may be due to the bad MLC motor drawing too much current causing all MLCs on the same bank to underperform. This hypothesis will be investigated in a future study.

  7. SU-E-T-425: Spherical Dose Distributions for Radiosurgery Using a Standardized MLC Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, R; Brezovich, I; Wu, X; Fiveash, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a standardized MLC treatment plan to generate small spherical dose distributions. Methods: The static virtual cone plan comprised six table positions with clockwise and counterclockwise arcs having collimator angles 45 and 135 degrees, respectively, at each position. The central two leaves of a 2.5 mm leaf width MLC were set to a constant gap. Control points were weighted proportional to the sine of the gantry angle. Plans were created for the 10 MV flattening-filter-free beam of a TrueBeam STx (Varian Medical Systems) with gaps of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 mm and were delivered to a phantom containing radiochromic film. Dose was calculated using the Eclipse AAA (Varian Medical Systems). A dynamic plan in which the table and gantry moved simultaneously with 1.5 mm gap was also created and delivered using the TrueBeam developer mode. Results: The full-width-half-max (FWHM) varied with leaf gap, ranging from 5.2 to 6.2 mm. Calculated FWHM was smaller than measured by 0.7 mm for the 1 mm gap and ≤ 0.4 mm for the larger gaps. The measured-to-calculated dose ratio was 0.93, 0.96, 1.01, and 0.99 for 1 mm, 1.5 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm gaps, respectively. The dynamic results were the same as the static. The position deviations between the phantom target position and the center of the dose distribution were < 0.4 mm. Conclusion: The virtual cone can deliver spherical dose distributions suitable for radio surgery of small targets such as the trigeminal nerve. The Eclipse AAA accurately calculates the expected dose, particularly for leaf gap ≥ 1.5 mm. The measured dose distribution is slightly larger than the calculation, which is likely due to systematic leaf position error, isocenter variation due to gantry sag and table eccentricity, and inaccuracy in MLC leaf end modeling.

  8. 76 FR 4375 - In the Matter of Certain MLC Flash Memory Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain MLC Flash Memory Devices and Products Containing Same; Notice of... flash memory devices and products containing same by reason of infringement of certain claims of...

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. Objectives: To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Results: Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Conclusions: Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid. PMID:25763079

  10. SU-E-T-122: Dosimetric Comparison Between Cone, HDMLC and MicroMLC for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, N; Caussa, L; Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of three collimation systems, 5mm circular cone (Brainlab) and square fields of 5mm with HDMLC (Varian) and microMLC Moduleaf, Siemens) for trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Methods: A TPS Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB was used to do treatment plans for each collimations system in a square solid water phantom with isocenter at 5cm depth. Single field and treatment plan including 11 arcs with fix field and 100° gantry range was made for each collimation systems. EBT3 films were positioned at isocenter in a coronal plane to measured dose distribution for all geometries. Films were digitized with a Vidar DosimetryPro Red scanner with a resolution of 89dpi and RIT113v6.1 software was used for analysis. Penumbra region (80%–20%), FWHM and dose percentage at 5mm and 10mm from CAX were determined. All profiles were normalized at CAX. Results: For single beam the penumbra (FWHM) was 1.5mm (5.3mm) for the cone, 1.9mm (5.5mm) for HDMLC and 1.8mm (5.4mm) for the microMLC. Dose percentage at 5mm was 6.9% for cone, 12.5% for HDMLC and 8.7% for the microMLC. For treatment plan the penumbra (FWHM) was 2.58mm (5.47mm) for the cone, 2.8mm (5.84mm) for HDMLC and 2.58mm (6.09mm) for the microMLC. Dose perecentage at 5mm was 13.1% for cone, 16.1% for HDMLC, 15.2% for the microMLC. Conclusion: The cone has a dose falloff larger than the microMLC and HDMLC, by its reduced penumbra, this translates into better protection of surrounding healthy tissue, however, the microMLC and HDMLC have similar accuracy to cone.

  11. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Iris Z.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Materials and methods. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a VMAT arc, MLC leaves with the highest speed (1.87-1.95 cm/s) were set to move at the maximal allowable speed (2.3 cm/s), which resulted in a leaf position difference of less than 2 mm. The modified plans were considered as ‘standard’ plans, and the original plans were treated as the ‘slowing MLC’ plans for simulating ‘standard’ plans with leaves moving at relatively lower speed. The measurement of each ‘slowing MLC’ plan using MapCHECK®2 was compared with calculated planar dose of the ‘standard’ plan with respect to absolute dose Van Dyk distance-to-agreement (DTA) comparisons using 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. Results All ‘slowing MLC’ plans passed the 90% pass rate threshold using 3%/3 mm criteria while one brain and three anal VMAT cases were below 90% with 2%/2 mm criteria. For ten out of eleven cases, DVH comparisons between ‘standard’ and ‘slowing MLC’ plans demonstrated minimal dosimetric changes in targets and organs-at-risk. Conclusions For highly modulated VMAT plans, pass rate threshold (90%) using 3%/3mm criteria is not sensitive in detecting MLC leaf errors that will not trigger the MLC leaf interlock. However, the consequential effects of non-beam hold MLC errors on target and OAR doses are negligible, which supports the reliability of current patient-specific IMRT quality assurance (QA) method for VMAT plans. PMID:27069458

  12. Engagement with Online Pre-Exam Formative Tests Improves Exam Performance and Feedback Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Sheila A.; Polwart, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The National Union of Students (NUS) National Student Experience Report identified examination feedback as an area where students had particular concerns. This finding was echoed in the authors' institution and triggered an action research project to investigate ways of improving students' perceptions of pre- and post-exam feedback. We report the…

  13. Washington Readies for High School Exit Exam: State Already Enacted Various Alternatives to Passing Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author reports that sophomores who take the Washington Assessment of Student Learning this week will be the first who must pass the state exam to graduate. The long-awaited testing has caused anxiety across the state, as hopes that Washington will enter a new era of educational accountability are balanced by fears of turmoil…

  14. SU-E-T-312: Dosimetric Consideration for the Agility MLC When Planning Rotational SRT/SBRT Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X; Harris, J; Spitznagel, D; Walker, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the radiation transmission of the Agility MLC and make recommendation based on the MLC dosimetric characteristics for SRT, SBRT and VMAT planning Method and Materials: Agility MLC is the newest model from Elekta and has no back up diaphragm behind leaves for this generation. Leaves are single focused with rounded end; composed of leafs each 0.5cm wide, 9cm thick, constructed from tungsten alloy and provide low transmission <0.5%. Total radiation transmission from leaves and diaphragm is <0.13%. A 360degree arc was generated using iCom tools; leaves were programmed closed while keeping the diaphragm fully open to maximize the MLC transmission effect. Gafchromic EBT films were sandwiched between 4cm of solid water and situated at midplane to take dose measurement. 5000MU was delivered using 6MV VersaHD, various collimator angles, and a 5cm central axis offset was tested also. Films were scanned with Epson 10000XL scanner and analyzed using DoseLab Pro. Results: Due to the rounded leaf end and nature of rotation therapy, dose accumulation through the leaf gap is significant. By offsetting the leaf gap from central axis, this accumulation can be greatly reduced. There are dark bands showing accumulation of interleaf transmission which is improved by increasing collimator angle from 0 to 45dgree. However for 45 degree, in most cases, there are larger volumes sweeping under MLC alone, which needs considered planning. Conclusions: While inter-leaf leakage is minimized by using collimator angles greater than 0 degrees, the location of the leaf gap must also be managed. The leaf gap position becomes critically important when the treatment area is off axis such is the case when more than one PTV is being treated. With VMAT for SRT, SBRT becoming a more popular planning technique, special attention needs to be paid when initially setting up the field geometry.

  15. High-Dose Spatially Fractionated GRID Radiation Therapy (SFGRT): A Comparison of Treatment Outcomes With Cerrobend vs. MLC SFGRT

    SciTech Connect

    Neuner, Geoffrey; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Vander Walde, Noam; Goloubeva, Olga; Ha, Jonathan; Yu, Cedric X.; Regine, William F.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Spatially fractionated GRID radiotherapy (SFGRT) using a customized Cerrobend block has been used to improve response rates in patients with bulky tumors. The clinical efficacy of our own multileaf collimator (MLC) technique is unknown. We undertook a retrospective analysis to compare clinical response rates attained using these two techniques. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with bulky tumors (median diameter, 7.6 cm; range, 4-30 cm) treated with SFGRT were reviewed. Between 2003 and late 2005, the Cerrobend block technique (n = 39) was used. Between late 2005 and 2008, SFGRT was delivered using MLC-shaped fields (n = 40). Dose was prescribed to dmax (depth of maximum dose) and was typically 15 Gy. Eighty percent of patients in both groups received external beam radiotherapy in addition to SFGRT. The two-sided Fisher-Freeman-Halton test was used to compare pain and mass effect response rates between the two groups. Results: Sixty-one patients (77%) were treated for palliative intent and 18 (23%) for curative intent. The majority of patients had either lung or head-and-neck primaries in both groups; the most frequent site of SFGRT application was the neck. The majority of patients complained of either pain (65%) or mass effect (58%) at intake. Overall response rates for pain and mass response were no different between the Cerrobend and MLC groups: pain, 75% and 74%, respectively (p = 0.50), and mass effect, 67% and 73%, respectively (p = 0.85). The majority of toxicities were Grade 1 or 2, and only 3 patients had late Grade 3-4 toxicities. Conclusions: MLC-based and Cerrobend-based SFGRT have comparable and encouraging response rates when used either in the palliative or curative setting. MLC-based SGFRT should allow clinics to more easily adopt this novel treatment approach for the treatment of bulky tumors.

  16. SU-E-T-114: Analysis of MLC Errors On Gamma Pass Rates for Patient-Specific and Conventional Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, D; Ehler, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a 3D patient-specific phantom is better able to detect known MLC errors in a clinically delivered treatment plan than conventional phantoms. 3D printing may make fabrication of such phantoms feasible. Methods: Two types of MLC errors were introduced into a clinically delivered, non-coplanar IMRT, partial brain treatment plan. First, uniformly distributed random errors of up to 3mm, 2mm, and 1mm were introduced into the MLC positions for each field. Second, systematic MLC-bank position errors of 5mm, 3.5mm, and 2mm due to simulated effects of gantry and MLC sag were introduced. The original plan was recalculated with these errors on the original CT dataset as well as cylindrical and planar IMRT QA phantoms. The original dataset was considered to be a perfect 3D patient-specific phantom. The phantoms were considered to be ideal 3D dosimetry systems with no resolution limitations. Results: Passing rates for Gamma Index (3%/3mm and no dose threshold) were calculated on the 3D phantom, cylindrical phantom, and both on a composite and field-by-field basis for the planar phantom. Pass rates for 5mm systematic and 3mm random error were 86.0%, 89.6%, 98% and 98.3% respectively. For 3.5mm systematic and 2mm random error the pass rates were 94.7%, 96.2%, 99.2% and 99.2% respectively. For 2mm systematic error with 1mm random error the pass rates were 99.9%, 100%, 100% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: A 3D phantom with the patient anatomy is able to discern errors, both severe and subtle, that are not seen using conventional phantoms. Therefore, 3D phantoms may be beneficial for commissioning new treatment machines and modalities, patient-specific QA and end-to-end testing.

  17. DNA binding sites for the Mlc and NagC proteins: regulation of nagE, encoding the N-acetylglucosamine-specific transporter in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    The NagC and Mlc proteins are homologous transcriptional regulators that control the expression of several phosphotransferase system (PTS) genes in Escherichia coli. NagC represses nagE, encoding the N-acetylglucosamine-specific transporter, while Mlc represses three PTS operons, ptsG, manXYZ and ptsHIcrr, involved in the uptake of glucose. NagC and Mlc can bind to each others operator, at least in vitro. A binding site selection procedure was used to try to distinguish NagC and Mlc sites. The major difference was that all selected NagC binding sites had a G or a C at positions +11/–11 from the centre of symmetry. This is also the case for most native NagC sites, but not the nagE operator, which thus looks like a potential Mlc target. The nagE operator does exhibit a higher affinity for Mlc than NagC, but no regulation of nagE by physiological concentrations of Mlc was detected in vivo. Regulation of wild-type nagE by NagC is achieved because of the chelation effect due to a second high affinity NagC operator covering the nagB promoter. Replacing the A/T at +11/–11 with C/G allows repression by NagC in the absence of the nagB operator. PMID:11139621

  18. Evaluation of MLC leaf positioning accuracy for static and dynamic IMRT treatments using DAVID in vivo dosimetric system.

    PubMed

    Karagoz, Gulay; Zorlu, Faruk; Yeginer, Mete; Yildiz, Demet; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2016-03-01

    Accuracy and precision of leaf positioning in multileaf collimators (MLCs) are significant factors for the accuracy of IMRT treatments. This study aimed to investigate the accuracy and repeatability of the MLC leaf positioning via the DAVID in vivo dosimetric system for dynamic and static MLC systems. The DAVID system was designed as multiwire transmission ionization chamber which is placed in accessory holder of linear accelerators. Each wire of DAVID system corresponds to a MLC leaf-pair to verify the leaf positioning accuracy during IMRT treatment and QA. In this study, verifications of IMRT plans of five head and neck (H&N) and five prostate patients treated in a Varian DHX linear accelerator with 80-leaf MLC were performed using DAVID system. Before DAVID-based dosimetry, Electronics Portal Imaging Device (EPID) and PTW 2D ARRAY dosimetry system were used for 2D verification of each plan. The measurements taken by DAVID system in the first day of the treatments were used as reference for the following measurements taken over the next four weeks. The deviations in leaf positioning were evaluated by "Total Deviation (TD)" parameter calculated by DAVID software. The delivered IMRT plans were originally prepared using dynamic MLC method. The same plans were subsequently calculated based on static MLC method with three different intensity levels of five (IL5), 10 (IL10) and 20 (IL20) in order to compare the performances of MLC leaf positioning repeatability for dynamic and static IMRT plans. The leaf positioning accuracy is also evaluated by analyzing DynaLog files based on error histograms and root mean square (RMS) errors of leaf pairs' positions. Moreover, a correlation analysis between simultaneously taken DAVID and EPID measurements and DynaLog file recordings was subsequently performed. In the analysis of DAVID outputs, the overall deviations of dynamic MLC-based IMRT calculated from the deviations of the four weeks were found as 0.55%±0.57% and 1.48%±0

  19. Evaluation of MLC leaf positioning accuracy for static and dynamic IMRT treatments using DAVID in vivo dosimetric system.

    PubMed

    Karagoz, Gulay; Zorlu, Faruk; Yeginer, Mete; Yildiz, Demet; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2016-03-08

    Accuracy and precision of leaf positioning in multileaf collimators (MLCs) are significant factors for the accuracy of IMRT treatments. This study aimed to inves-tigate the accuracy and repeatability of the MLC leaf positioning via the DAVID invivo dosimetric system for dynamic and static MLC systems. The DAVID system was designed as multiwire transmission ionization chamber which is placed in accessory holder of linear accelerators. Each wire of DAVID system corresponds to a MLC leaf-pair to verify the leaf positioning accuracy during IMRT treatment and QA. In this study, verifications of IMRT plans of five head and neck (H&N) and five prostate patients treated in a Varian DHX linear accelerator with 80-leaf MLC were performed using DAVID system. Before DAVID-based dosimetry, Electronics Portal Imaging Device (EPID) and PTW 2D ARRAY dosimetry system were used for 2D verification of each plan. The measurements taken by DAVID system in the first day of the treatments were used as reference for the following measurements taken over the next four weeks. The deviations in leaf positioning were evaluated by "Total Deviation (TD)" parameter calculated by DAVID software. The delivered IMRT plans were originally prepared using dynamic MLC method. The same plans were subsequently calculated based on static MLC method with three different intensity levels of five (IL5), 10 (IL10) and 20 (IL20) in order to compare the performances of MLC leaf positioning repeatability for dynamic and static IMRT plans. The leaf positioning accuracy is also evaluated by analyzing DynaLog files based on error histograms and root mean square (RMS) errors of leaf pairs' positions. Moreover, a correlation analysis between simultaneously taken DAVID and EPID measurements and DynaLog file recordings was subsequently performed. In the analysis of DAVID outputs, the overall deviations of dynamic MLC-based IMRT calculated from the deviations of the four weeks were found as 0.55% ± 0.57% and 1.48% ± 0

  20. Verification of dosimetric accuracy on the TrueBeam STx: Rounded leaf effect of the high definition MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Kielar, Kayla N.; Mok, Ed; Hsu, Annie; Wang Lei; Luxton, Gary

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system is determined during commissioning and is used to model the effect of the rounded leaf-end of the multileaf collimator (MLC). This parameter attempts to model the physical difference between the radiation and light field and account for inherent leakage between leaf tips. With the increased use of single fraction high dose treatments requiring larger monitor units comes an enhanced concern in the accuracy of leakage calculations, as it accounts for much of the patient dose. This study serves to verify the dosimetric accuracy of the algorithm used to model the rounded leaf effect for the TrueBeam STx, and describes a methodology for determining best-practice parameter values, given the novel capabilities of the linear accelerator such as flattening filter free (FFF) treatments and a high definition MLC (HDMLC). Methods: During commissioning, the nominal MLC position was verified and the DLG parameter was determined using MLC-defined field sizes and moving gap tests, as is common in clinical testing. Treatment plans were created, and the DLG was optimized to achieve less than 1% difference between measured and calculated dose. The DLG value found was tested on treatment plans for all energies (6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV FFF) and modalities (3D conventional, IMRT, conformal arc, VMAT) available on the TrueBeam STx. Results: The DLG parameter found during the initial MLC testing did not match the leaf gap modeling parameter that provided the most accurate dose delivery in clinical treatment plans. Using the physical leaf gap size as the DLG for the HDMLC can lead to 5% differences in measured and calculated doses. Conclusions: Separate optimization of the DLG parameter using end-to-end tests must be performed to ensure dosimetric accuracy in the modeling of the rounded leaf ends for the Eclipse treatment planning system. The difference in leaf gap modeling versus physical

  1. The Red Effect, Anxiety, and Exam Performance: A Multistudy Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smajic, Adnan; Merritt, Stephanie; Banister, Christina; Blinebry, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have established a negative relationship between the color red and academic performance. This research examined whether this effect would generalize to classroom performance and whether anxiety and negative affect might mediate the effect. In two studies, students taking classroom exams were randomly assigned an exam color. We…

  2. X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study A A A What's in this article? What ... edad ósea What It Is A bone age study helps doctors estimate the maturity of a child's ...

  3. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  4. Automating Exams for a Statistics Course: II. A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michener, R. Dean; And Others

    A specific application of the process of automating exams for any introductory statistics course is described. The process of automating exams was accomplished by using the Statistical Test Item Collection System (STICS). This system was first used to select a set of questions based on course requirements established in advance; afterward, STICS…

  5. X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study Print A A A What's in this ... la edad ósea What It Is A bone age study helps doctors estimate the maturity of a ...

  6. Anxiety and Piano Exams: Turkish Prospective Music Teachers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güven, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the test anxiety levels of prospective music teachers and their opinions regarding anxiety in piano exams. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) and semi-structured interviews were used to meet the purpose. Interviews were conducted with students prior to and after the piano exam. As a result of the study it was…

  7. Reworking Exams to Teach Chemistry Content and Reinforce Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley, John M.

    2007-01-01

    One meaningful approach to demonstrate to students the value of reworking exams is to offer an incentive to do so. This paper describes the strategy and effects of offering partial credit to students who rework answers originally answered incorrectly on an exam. This has proved largely successful for the last 10 years in several classes at the…

  8. The AP Exam and the Introductory College Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushkin, David B.

    1995-01-01

    Explores reasons why students take introductory physics courses at the university regardless of their Advanced Placement (AP) exam performance. Briefly describes the nature of AP physics, the examination format and reporting of scores, and the results of a survey of physics departments regarding their policies towards AP exam scores and placement…

  9. Exit Exams Face Pinch in Common-Core Push

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    With many states crafting assessments based on the common-core standards--and an increasing emphasis on college and career readiness--some are rethinking the kind of tests high school students must pass to graduate, or whether to use such exit exams at all. Twenty-five states, enrolling a total of 34.1 million students, make exit exams a…

  10. X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) A A ... Radiografía: tibia y peroné What It Is An X-ray of the tibia and fibula is a safe ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) Print A ... Radiografía: tibia y peroné What It Is An X-ray of the tibia and fibula is a safe ...

  12. Gender Differences in STEM Related Advanced Placement Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences between boys and girls in their performance on STEM related AP exams. Specifically, gender differences were examined for the following STEM related AP exams: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Physics B, Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, Physics C: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Computer Science…

  13. Should I Give the Exam before or after the Break?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to help faculty make decisions about when to administer an exam in relation to an in-semester break. Students in multiple sections of an undergraduate educational psychology class were assigned to take an exam either before or after a scheduled 5-day break (Thursday-Monday). A multiple regression analysis revealed the break…

  14. Crib Sheets and Exam Performance in a Data Structures Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamouda, Sally; Shaffer, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the use of "crib sheets" or "cheat sheets" and performance on in-class exams. Our extensive survey of the existing literature shows that it is not decisive on the questions of when or whether crib sheets actually help students to either perform better on an exam or better learn…

  15. Relationships between Preclinical Course Grades and Standardized Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yinin; Martindale, James R.; LeGallo, Robin D.; White, Casey B.; McGahren, Eugene D.; Schroen, Anneke T.

    2016-01-01

    Success in residency matching is largely contingent upon standardized exam scores. Identifying predictors of standardized exam performance could promote primary intervention and lead to design insights for preclinical courses. We hypothesized that clinically relevant courses with an emphasis on higher-order cognitive understanding are most…

  16. Prior-to-Exam: What Activities Enhance Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, C. J.; Healy, Therese

    2013-01-01

    Can instructors impact their student performance by recommending an activity just prior to taking an exam? In this study, college students were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (study, exercise, or meditation) or a control group. Each group was given two different types of tests; a traditional concept exam, and a non-traditional…

  17. Academic Background and Course Involvement as Predictors of Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Hardy, Sam A.; Thompson, Ross A.; Wang, Sherry C.

    2007-01-01

    We examined how academic background and course involvement differentially predicted students' performance on lecture- and text-based exam questions (N = 114; 34% men; 76% freshmen). Results showed that academic background and course involvement predicted performance on lecture-based questions and overall exam performance, whereas academic…

  18. Relationships between preclinical course grades and standardized exam performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinin; Martindale, James R; LeGallo, Robin D; White, Casey B; McGahren, Eugene D; Schroen, Anneke T

    2016-05-01

    Success in residency matching is largely contingent upon standardized exam scores. Identifying predictors of standardized exam performance could promote primary intervention and lead to design insights for preclinical courses. We hypothesized that clinically relevant courses with an emphasis on higher-order cognitive understanding are most strongly associated with performance on United States Medical Licensing Examination Step exams and National Board of Medical Examiners clinical subject exams. Academic data from students between 2007 and 2012 were collected. Preclinical course scores and standardized exam scores were used for statistical modeling with multiple linear regression. Preclinical courses were categorized as having either a basic science or a clinical knowledge focus. Medical College Admissions Test scores were included as an additional predictive variable. The study sample comprised 795 graduating medical students. Median score on Step 1 was 234 (interquartile range 219-245.5), and 10.2 % (81/795) scored lower than one standard deviation below the national average (205). Pathology course score was the strongest predictor of performance on all clinical subject exams and Step exams, outperforming the Medical College Admissions Test in strength of association. Using Pathology score <75 as a screening metric for Step 1 score <205 results in sensitivity and specificity of 37 and 97 %, respectively, and a likelihood ratio of 11.9. Performance in Pathology, a clinically relevant course with case-based learning, is significantly related to subsequent performance on standardized exams. Multiple linear regression is useful for identifying courses that have potential as risk stratifiers.

  19. Problematizing High School Certificate Exam in Pakistan: A Washback Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Raana

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the Higher-Secondary School Certificate (HSC) exam in Pakistan that has been in place in its present form for more than thirty years. The author recounts her experience as a teacher of English in a representative high school in Pakistan and, reflecting on the impact of high school public exam, she argues that the…

  20. Matching marine reserve design to reserve objectives.

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Benjamin S; Warner, Robert R

    2003-01-01

    Recent interest in using marine reserves for marine resource management and conservation has largely been driven by the hope that reserves might counteract declines in fish populations and protect the biodiversity of the seas. However, the creation of reserves has led to dissension from some interested groups, such as fishermen, who fear that reserves will do more harm than good. These perceived differences in the effect of marine reserves on various stakeholder interests has led to a contentious debate over their merit. We argue here that recent findings in marine ecology suggest that this debate is largely unnecessary, and that a single general design of a network of reserves of moderate size and variable spacing can meet the needs and goals of most stakeholders interested in marine resources. Given the high fecundity of most marine organisms and recent evidence for limited distance of larval dispersal, it is likely that reserves can both maintain their own biodiversity and service nearby non-reserve areas. In particular, spillover of larger organisms and dispersal of larvae to areas outside reserves can lead to reserves sustaining or even increasing local fisheries. Ultimately, the success of any reserve network requires attention to the uncertainty and variability in dispersal patterns of marine organisms, clear statements of goals by all stakeholder groups and proper evaluation of reserve performance. PMID:14561299

  1. AFFORDABLE MULTI-LAYER CERAMIC (MLC) MANUFACTURING FOR POWER SYSTEMS (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Barringer, Ph.D.

    2002-11-27

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is attempting to develop high-performance, cost-competitive solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems. Recognizing the challenges and limitations facing the development of SOFC stacks comprised of electrode-supported cells and metallic interconnects, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) has chosen to pursue an alternate path to commercialization. MTI is developing a multi-layer, co-fired, planar SOFC stack that will provide superior performance and reliability at reduced costs relative to competing designs. The MTI approach combines state-of-the-art SOFC materials with the manufacturing technology and infrastructure established for multi-layer ceramic (MLC) packages for the microelectronics industry. The rationale for using MLC packaging technology is that high quality, low-cost manufacturing has been demonstrated at high volumes. With the proper selection of SOFC materials, implementation of MLC fabrication methods offers unique designs for stacks (cells and interconnects) that are not possible through traditional fabrication methods. The MTI approach eliminates use of metal interconnects and ceramic-metal seals, which are primary sources of stack performance degradation. Co-fired cells are less susceptible to thermal cycling stresses by using material compositions that have closely matched coefficients of thermal expansion between the cell and the interconnect. The development of this SOFC stack technology was initiated in October 1999 under the DOE cosponsored program entitled ''Affordable Multi-layer Ceramic Manufacturing for Power Systems (AMPS)''. The AMPS Program was conducted as a two-phase program: Phase I--Feasibility Assessment (10/99--9/00); and Phase II--Process Development for Co-fired Stacks (10/00-3/02). This report provides a summary of the results from Phase I and a more detailed review of the results for Phase II. Phase I demonstrated the feasibility for fabricating multi-layer, co-fired cells and interconnects and

  2. Does requiring graded online homework improve physics exam performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Norma

    2012-02-01

    In a first experiment with using Mastering Physics in a first semester calculus-based course, homework and exam performance was tracked periodically during the semester. As expected, the use of novel technology (and its ability to track which students were persistently working at problem exercises) motivated many students to become more involved with work on assigned physics problems. Although there did appear to be a significant correlation between exam averages and homework scores in the upper half of the exam average distribution, individuals spanning the full range of exam averages (down to 45 percent) earned homework scores as high as those who had performed outstandingly well in exams. In this work, we present results and proposed plausible explanations for the apparent anomaly.

  3. Writing about testing worries boosts exam performance in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L

    2011-01-14

    Two laboratory and two randomized field experiments tested a psychological intervention designed to improve students' scores on high-stakes exams and to increase our understanding of why pressure-filled exam situations undermine some students' performance. We expected that sitting for an important exam leads to worries about the situation and its consequences that undermine test performance. We tested whether having students write down their thoughts about an upcoming test could improve test performance. The intervention, a brief expressive writing assignment that occurred immediately before taking an important test, significantly improved students' exam scores, especially for students habitually anxious about test taking. Simply writing about one's worries before a high-stakes exam can boost test scores.

  4. SU-C-BRB-04: Characteristics and Performance Evaluation of the First Commercial MLC for a Robotic Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerweger, C; Prins, P; Coskan, H; Heijmen, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess characteristics and performance of the “Incise™” MLC (41 leaf pairs, 2.5mm width, FFF linac) mounted on the robotic SRS/SBRT platform “CyberKnife M6™” in a pre-clinical 5 months (11/2014–03/2015) test period. Methods: Beam properties were measured with unshielded diodes and EBT3 film. The CyberKnife workspace for MLC was analyzed by transforming robot node coordinates (cranial / body paths) into Euler geometry. Bayouth tests for leaf / bank position accuracy were performed in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after exercising the MLC for 10+ minutes. Total system and delivery accuracy were assessed in End-to-End tests and dosimetric verification of exemplary plans. Stability over time was evaluated in Picket-Fence-and adapted Winston-Lutz-tests (AQA) for different collimator angles. Results: Penumbrae (80–20%, with 100%=2*dose at inflection point; SAD 80cm; 10cm depth) parallel / perpendicular to leaf motion were 2.87/2.64mm for the smallest (0×76×0.75cm{sup 2}) and 5.34/4.94mm for the largest (9.76×9.75cm{sup 2}) square field. MLC circular field penumbrae exceeded fixed cones by 10–20% (e.g. 60mm: 4.0 vs. 3.6mm; 20mm: 3.6 vs. 2.9mm). Interleaf leakage was <0.5%. Clinically accessible workspace with MLC covered (non-coplanar) gantry angles of [-113°;+112°] (cranial) and [-108°;+102°] (body), and collimator angles of [-100°;+107°] (cranial) and [-91°;+100°] (body). Average leaf position offsets were ≤0.2mm in 14 standard A/P Bayouth tests and ≤0.6mm in 8 non-standard direction tests. Pre-test MLC exercise increased jaggedness (range ±0.3mm vs. ±0.5mm) and allowed to identify one malfunctioning leaf motor. Total system accuracy with MLC was 0.39±0.06mm in 6 End-to-End tests. Picket-Fence and AQA showed no adverse trends during the test period. Conclusion: The Incise™ MLC for CyberKnife M6™ displayed high accuracy and mechanical stability over the test period. The

  5. Comparison of two Classification methods (MLC and SVM) to extract land use and land cover in Johor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni Deilmai, B.; Ahmad, B. Bin; Zabihi, H.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping is essential for the analysis of the land use and land cover, which influence many environmental processes and properties. For the purpose of the creation of land cover maps, it is important to minimize error. These errors will propagate into later analyses based on these land cover maps. The reliability of land cover maps derived from remotely sensed data depends on an accurate classification. In this study, we have analyzed multispectral data using two different classifiers including Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). To pursue this aim, Landsat Thematic Mapper data and identical field-based training sample datasets in Johor Malaysia used for each classification method, which results indicate in five land cover classes forest, oil palm, urban area, water, rubber. Classification results indicate that SVM was more accurate than MLC. With demonstrated capability to produce reliable cover results, the SVM methods should be especially useful for land cover classification.

  6. SU-E-T-119: Dosimetric and Mechanical Characteristics of Elekta Infinity LINAC with Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Xu, Q; Xue, J; Zhai, Y; An, L; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured with scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.1±0.24, 5.6±0.07, and 5.9±0.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.

  7. Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy; Jensen, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Students in an introductory biology course who were given open-book exams during the semester earned significantly higher grades on these exams, but significantly lower grades on the closed-book final exam, than students who took in-class, closed-book exams throughout the semester. Exam format was also associated with changes in academic behavior;…

  8. Immunosuppressant MPA Modulates Tight Junction through Epigenetic Activation of MLCK/MLC-2 Pathway via p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niamat; Pantakani, D. V. Krishna; Binder, Lutz; Qasim, Muhammad; Asif, Abdul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an important immunosuppressive drug (ISD) prescribed to prevent graft rejection in the organ transplanted patients, however, its use is also associated with adverse side effects like sporadic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. Recently, we reported the MPA induced tight junctions (TJs) deregulation which involves MLCK/MLC-2 pathway. Here, we investigated the global histone acetylation as well as gene-specific chromatin signature of several genes associated with TJs regulation in Caco-2 cells after MPA treatment. Results: The epigenetic analysis shows that MPA treatment increases the global histone acetylation levels as well as the enrichment for transcriptional active histone modification mark (H3K4me3) at promoter regions of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2. In contrast, the promoter region of occludin was enriched for transcriptional repressive histone modification mark (H3K27me3) after MPA treatment. In line with the chromatin status, MPA treatment increased the expression of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2 both at transcriptional and translational level, while occludin expression was negatively influenced. Interestingly, the MPA induced gene expression changes and functional properties of Caco-2 cells could be blocked by the inhibition of p38MAPK using a chemical inhibitor (SB203580). Conclusions: Collectively, our results highlight that MPA disrupts the structure of TJs via p38MAPK-dependent activation of MLCK/MLC-2 pathway that results in decreased integrity of Caco-2 monolayer. These results led us to suggest that p38MAPK-mediated lose integrity of epithelial monolayer could be the possible cause of GI disturbance (barrier dysfunction) in the intestine, leading to leaky style diarrhea observed in the organ-transplanted patients treated with MPA. PMID:26733876

  9. A dosimetric evaluation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm and Millennium 120 MLC for cranial intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; José, Sol San; Puertas, Enrique; Fernández, Jaime; Casals, Joan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a convolution-based algorithm (anisotropic analytical algorithm [AAA]) implemented in the Eclipse planning system for intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) planning of small cranial targets by using a 5-mm leaf-width multileaf collimator (MLC). Overall, 24 patient-based IMRS plans for cranial lesions of variable size (0.3 to 15.1 cc) were planned (Eclipse, AAA, version 10.0.28) using fixed field-based IMRS produced by a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a 120 MLC (5-mm width on central leaves). Plan accuracy was evaluated according to phantom-based measurements performed with radiochromic film (EBT2, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Film 2D dose distributions were performed with the FilmQA Pro software (version 2011, Ashland, OH) by using the triple-channel dosimetry method. Comparison between computed and measured 2D dose distributions was performed using the gamma method (3%/1 mm). Performance of the MLC was checked by inspection of the DynaLog files created by the linear accelerator during the delivery of each dynamic field. The absolute difference between the calculated and measured isocenter doses for all the IMRS plans was 2.5% ± 2.1%. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high average passing rates of 98.9% ± 1.4% (red channel) and 98.9% ± 1.5% (blue and green channels). DynaLog file analysis revealed a maximum root mean square error of 0.46 mm. According to our results, we conclude that the Eclipse/AAA algorithm provides accurate cranial IMRS dose distributions that may be accurately delivered by a Varian linac equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC.

  10. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators.

  11. A dosimetric evaluation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm and Millennium 120 MLC for cranial intensity-modulated radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; José, Sol San; Puertas, Enrique; Fernández, Jaime; Casals, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a convolution-based algorithm (anisotropic analytical algorithm [AAA]) implemented in the Eclipse planning system for intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) planning of small cranial targets by using a 5-mm leaf-width multileaf collimator (MLC). Overall, 24 patient-based IMRS plans for cranial lesions of variable size (0.3 to 15.1cc) were planned (Eclipse, AAA, version 10.0.28) using fixed field-based IMRS produced by a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a 120 MLC (5-mm width on central leaves). Plan accuracy was evaluated according to phantom-based measurements performed with radiochromic film (EBT2, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Film 2D dose distributions were performed with the FilmQA Pro software (version 2011, Ashland, OH) by using the triple-channel dosimetry method. Comparison between computed and measured 2D dose distributions was performed using the gamma method (3%/1mm). Performance of the MLC was checked by inspection of the DynaLog files created by the linear accelerator during the delivery of each dynamic field. The absolute difference between the calculated and measured isocenter doses for all the IMRS plans was 2.5% ± 2.1%. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high average passing rates of 98.9% ± 1.4% (red channel) and 98.9% ± 1.5% (blue and green channels). DynaLog file analysis revealed a maximum root mean square error of 0.46mm. According to our results, we conclude that the Eclipse/AAA algorithm provides accurate cranial IMRS dose distributions that may be accurately delivered by a Varian linac equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC.

  12. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Christian D.; Eddy, Sarah L.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved groups. In this study, we examined whether and to what extent the characteristics of instructor-generated tests impact the exam performance of male and female and middle/high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) students enrolled in introductory biology courses. We collected exam scores for 4810 students from 87 unique exams taken across 3 yr of the introductory biology series at a large research university. We determined the median Bloom’s level and the percentage of constructed-response questions for each exam. Despite controlling for prior academic ability in our models, we found that males and middle/high-SES students were disproportionately favored as the Bloom’s level of exams increased. Additionally, middle/high-SES students were favored as the proportion of constructed-response questions on exams increased. Given that we controlled for prior academic ability, our findings do not likely reflect differences in academic ability level. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and how they might impact how we assess our students. PMID:27252299

  13. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christian D; Eddy, Sarah L; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved groups. In this study, we examined whether and to what extent the characteristics of instructor-generated tests impact the exam performance of male and female and middle/high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) students enrolled in introductory biology courses. We collected exam scores for 4810 students from 87 unique exams taken across 3 yr of the introductory biology series at a large research university. We determined the median Bloom's level and the percentage of constructed-response questions for each exam. Despite controlling for prior academic ability in our models, we found that males and middle/high-SES students were disproportionately favored as the Bloom's level of exams increased. Additionally, middle/high-SES students were favored as the proportion of constructed-response questions on exams increased. Given that we controlled for prior academic ability, our findings do not likely reflect differences in academic ability level. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and how they might impact how we assess our students.

  14. Comparability of Semester and Exit Exam Grades: Long-Term Effect of the Implementation of State-Wide Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A goal in many countries is to institute state-wide exams to base student assessment more firmly on norms for all classes. This raises the question as to the extent to which greater standardization of grading practice can be reached by implementing state-wide exit exams. Since there is a lack of longitudinal studies, we analyzed the effect of the…

  15. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Christian D.; Eddy, Sarah L.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved…

  16. The Impact of Statewide Exit Exams: A Descriptive Case Study of Three German States with Differing Low Stakes Exam Regimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ackeren, Isabell; Block, Rainer; Klein, E. Dominique; Kuhn, Svenja M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present results from a study investigating the impact of three state exit exam systems on teaching and learning in college-preparatory schools. The study compares one state with a traditionally more centralized exam regime, one state that is more de-centralized and one state that has recently switched to more centralized…

  17. Ameliorative effect of melatonin against increased intestinal permeability in diabetic rats: possible involvement of MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Zou, Duobing; Tang, Songtao; Fan, Tingting; Su, Huan; Hu, Ruolei; Zhou, Qing; Gui, Shuyu; Zuo, Li; Wang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The increased intestinal permeability and functional impairment play an important role in type 2 diabetes (T2D), and melatonin may possess enteroprotection properties. Therefore, we used streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to investigate the regulation of intestinal permeability by melatonin. Rats were randomly divided into three groups, including control, diabetes mellitus (DM), and DM rats treated with melatonin. Melatonin was administered (10 mg/kg/day) by gavage for 24 weeks. The DM rats significantly increased the serum fasting blood glucose and lipid levels, which were alleviated by melatonin treatment. Importantly, the intestinal epithelial permeability was significantly increased in DM rats but was ameliorated following treatment with melatonin. These findings also indicated the expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phosphorylation of MLC targeting subunit (MYPT) induced myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation level was markedly elevated in hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic status. They were partly associated with down-regulated membrane type 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2) expression, and up-regulated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) expression and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. However, the changes in target protein expression were reversed by melatonin. In conclusion, our results show melatonin beneficial effects on impaired intestinal epithelial permeability in T2D by suppressing ERK/MLCK- and ROCK/MCLP-dependent MLC phosphorylation.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of MLC601 in Iranian Patients after Stroke: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, A. A.; Abolfazli, R.; Hatemian, A.; Ghragozlee, K.; Ghaffar-Pour, M.; Karimi, M.; Shahbegi, S.; Pakdaman, H.; Tabasi, M.; Tabatabae, A. L.; Nourian, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the safety and efficacy of MLC601 (NeuroAid) as a traditional Chinese medicine on motor recovery after ischemic stroke. Methods. This study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on 150 patients with a recent (less than 3 month) ischemic stroke. All patients were given either MLC601 (100 patients) or placebo (50 patients), 4 capsules 3 times a day, as an add-on to standard stroke treatment for 3 months. Results. Sex, age, elapsed time from stroke onset, and risk factors in the treatment group were not significantly different from placebo group at baseline (P > .05). Repeated measures analysis showed that Fugl-Meyer assessment was significantly higher in the treatment group during 12 weeks after stroke (P < .001). Good tolerability to treatment was shown, and adverse events were mild and transient. Conclusion. MLC601 showed better motor recovery than placebo and was safe on top of standard ischemic stroke medications especially in the severe and moderate cases. PMID:21776364

  19. Investigation of the sag in linac secondary collimator and MLC carriage during arc deliveries.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2012-06-21

    In modern radiotherapy, it is vitally important to monitor the performance of all linac components including the collimation system. In this study, a simple measurement method and accurate algorithm are introduced for investigation of the secondary and tertiary collimator sag during radiotherapy arc treatments. The method is based on cine EPID images of a ball bearing marker fixed to the gantry head and determines the jaw and MLC sag in all directions relative to the reference at zero gantry angle. Analysis was performed using different field sizes and collimator angles, different linacs and different gantry rotation directions. The accuracy of the method was tested and was less than 0.02 mm. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method was 0.005 and 0.09 mm, respectively. The setup is easy and quick and the algorithm is fast and fully automatic with sub-pixel accuracy. This method is suitable to be included in the routine quality assurance of linacs to monitor the collimator system performance.

  20. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries.

  1. Performance Analysis of Exam Gloves Used for Aseptic Rodent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP–PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham ‘exertion’ activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP–PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP–PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  2. Using colposcopy in the rape exam: health care, forensic, and criminal justice issues.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Marilyn Sawyer; Fisher, Bonnie S; Karjane, Heather M

    2005-01-01

    In the setting of a forensic examination following rape, colposcopy allows practitioners to identify and photograph genital injury not readily visible to the unaided eye, thereby clarifying the location and extent of injury as well as providing evidence for court proceedings. Since the 1980s, the technique once reserved for victims of child abuse has been used across the lifespan and has been shown to identify genital injury in up to 87% of women who have been raped. The role of colposcopic findings as evidence in court testimony, however, remains controversial. This paper explores the history of colposcopy in the rape exam and describes the epidemiology of genital injury in consensual sex as well as rape.

  3. An MLC-based linac QA procedure for the characterization of radiation isocenter and room lasers' position

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Florin; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Hacker, Fred L.; Chin, Lee M.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2006-06-15

    We have designed and implemented a new stereotactic linac QA test with stereotactic precision. The test is used to characterize gantry sag, couch wobble, cone placement, MLC offsets, and room lasers' positions relative to the radiation isocenter. Two MLC star patterns, a cone pattern, and the laser line patterns are recorded on the same imaging medium. Phosphor plates are used as imaging medium due to their sensitivity to red light. The red light of room lasers erases some of the irradiation information stored on the phosphor plates enabling accurate and direct measurements for the position of room lasers and radiation isocenter. Using film instead of the phosphor plate as imaging medium is possible, however, it is less practical. The QA method consists of irradiating four phosphor plates that record the gantry sag between the 0 deg.and 180 deg.gantry angles, the position and stability of couch rotational axis, the sag between the 90 deg.and 270 deg.gantry angles, the accuracy of cone placement on the collimator, the MLC offsets from the collimator rotational axis, and the position of laser lines relative to the radiation isocenter. The estimated accuracy of the method is {+-}0.2 mm. The observed reproducibility of the method is about {+-}0.1 mm. The total irradiation/illumination time is about 10 min per image. Data analysis, including the phosphor plate scanning, takes less than 5 min for each image. The method characterizes the radiation isocenter geometry with the high accuracy required for the stereotactic radiosurgery. In this respect, it is similar to the standard ball test for stereotactic machines. However, due to the usage of the MLC instead of the cross-hair/ball, it does not depend on the cross-hair/ball placement errors with respect to the lasers and it provides more information on the mechanical integrity of the linac/couch/laser system. Alternatively, it can be used as a highly accurate QA procedure for the nonstereotactic machines. Noteworthy is its

  4. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a {gamma}-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the {gamma}-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation

  5. An MLC-based linac QA procedure for the characterization of radiation isocenter and room lasers' position.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Florin; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Hacker, Fred L; Chin, Lee M; Ramakrishna, Naren; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2006-06-01

    We have designed and implemented a new stereotactic linac QA test with stereotactic precision. The test is used to characterize gantry sag, couch wobble, cone placement, MLC offsets, and room lasers' positions relative to the radiation isocenter. Two MLC star patterns, a cone pattern, and the laser line patterns are recorded on the same imaging medium. Phosphor plates are used as imaging medium due to their sensitivity to red light. The red light of room lasers erases some of the irradiation information stored on the phosphor plates enabling accurate and direct measurements for the position of room lasers and radiation isocenter. Using film instead of the phosphor plate as imaging medium is possible, however, it is less practical. The QA method consists of irradiating four phosphor plates that record the gantry sag between the 0 degrees and 180 degrees gantry angles, the position and stability of couch rotational axis, the sag between the 90 degrees and 270 degrees gantry angles, the accuracy of cone placement on the collimator, the MLC offsets from the collimator rotational axis, and the position of laser lines relative to the radiation isocenter. The estimated accuracy of the method is +/- 0.2 mm. The observed reproducibility of the method is about +/- 0.1 mm. The total irradiation/ illumination time is about 10 min per image. Data analysis, including the phosphor plate scanning, takes less than 5 min for each image. The method characterizes the radiation isocenter geometry with the high accuracy required for the stereotactic radiosurgery. In this respect, it is similar to the standard ball test for stereotactic machines. However, due to the usage of the MLC instead of the cross-hair/ball, it does not depend on the cross-hair/ball placement errors with respect to the lasers and it provides more information on the mechanical integrity of the linac/couch/laser system. Alternatively, it can be used as a highly accurate QA procedure for the nonstereotactic machines

  6. FLEX: A Modular Software Architecture for Flight License Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsan, Taner; Saka, Hamit Emre; Sahin, Ceyhun

    This paper is about the design and implementation of an examination system based on World Wide Web. It is called FLEX-Flight License Exam Software. We designed and implemented flexible and modular software architecture. The implemented system has basic specifications such as appending questions in system, building exams with these appended questions and making students to take these exams. There are three different types of users with different authorizations. These are system administrator, operators and students. System administrator operates and maintains the system, and also audits the system integrity. The system administrator can not be able to change the result of exams and can not take an exam. Operator module includes instructors. Operators have some privileges such as preparing exams, entering questions, changing the existing questions and etc. Students can log on the system and can be accessed to exams by a certain URL. The other characteristic of our system is that operators and system administrator are not able to delete questions due to the security problems. Exam questions can be inserted on their topics and lectures in the database. Thus; operators and system administrator can easily choose questions. When all these are taken into consideration, FLEX software provides opportunities to many students to take exams at the same time in safe, reliable and user friendly conditions. It is also reliable examination system for the authorized aviation administration companies. Web development platform - LAMP; Linux, Apache web server, MySQL, Object-oriented scripting Language - PHP are used for developing the system and page structures are developed by Content Management System - CMS.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling and simulations of the High Definition (HD120) micro MLC and validation against measurements for a 6 MV beam

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, C.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Heath, E.; Teixeira, N.; Vaz, P.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The most recent Varian micro multileaf collimator (MLC), the High Definition (HD120) MLC, was modeled using the BEAMNRC Monte Carlo code. This model was incorporated into a Varian medical linear accelerator, for a 6 MV beam, in static and dynamic mode. The model was validated by comparing simulated profiles with measurements. Methods: The Varian Trilogy (2300C/D) accelerator model was accurately implemented using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulation program BEAMNRC and validated against off-axis and depth dose profiles measured using ionization chambers, by adjusting the energy and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the initial electron beam. The HD120 MLC was modeled by developing a new BEAMNRC component module (CM), designated HDMLC, adapting the available DYNVMLC CM and incorporating the specific characteristics of this new micro MLC. The leaf dimensions were provided by the manufacturer. The geometry was visualized by tracing particles through the CM and recording their position when a leaf boundary is crossed. The leaf material density and abutting air gap between leaves were adjusted in order to obtain a good agreement between the simulated leakage profiles and EBT2 film measurements performed in a solid water phantom. To validate the HDMLC implementation, additional MLC static patterns were also simulated and compared to additional measurements. Furthermore, the ability to simulate dynamic MLC fields was implemented in the HDMLC CM. The simulation results of these fields were compared with EBT2 film measurements performed in a solid water phantom. Results: Overall, the discrepancies, with and without MLC, between the opened field simulations and the measurements using ionization chambers in a water phantom, for the off-axis profiles are below 2% and in depth-dose profiles are below 2% after the maximum dose depth and below 4% in the build-up region. On the conditions of these simulations, this tungsten-based MLC has a density of 18.7 g

  8. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Visser, R; Godart, J; Wauben, D J L; Langendijk, J A; Van't Veld, A A; Korevaar, E W

    2016-05-21

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU's for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  9. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU’s for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  10. Exam Question Exchange: A Popular Approach to Reaction Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael P. S.; Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate physical chemistry question and its acceptable solution. This question, presented to share exam questions with other teachers, shows the analogy between molecular kinetics and population dynamics. (HM)

  11. Remedial Study plus Retake Exams Equals Better Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Winkle, Lon J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes adaptation of the Retake System to larger lecture classes and tests the importance of remedial study in improving exam performance for 410 students enrolled in an interdisciplinary (chemistry, physics, and biology) science course for nonscience majors. (HM)

  12. Crib sheets and exam performance in a data structures course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Sally; Shaffer, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the use of "crib sheets" or "cheat sheets" and performance on in-class exams. Our extensive survey of the existing literature shows that it is not decisive on the questions of when or whether crib sheets actually help students to either perform better on an exam or better learn the material. We report on our own detailed analysis for a body of crib sheets created for the final exam in a junior-level Data Structures and Algorithms course. We wanted to determine whether there is any feature of the crib sheets that correlates to good exam scores. Exam performance was compared against a number of potential indicators for quality in a crib sheet. We have found that students performed significantly better on questions at the comprehension level of Bloom's taxonomy when their crib sheet contained good information on the topic, while performance on questions at higher levels of the taxonomy did not show correlation to crib sheet contents. We have also seen that students at certain levels of performance on the final exam (specifically, medium-to-high performance) did relatively better on certain questions than other students at that performance level when they had good coverage of that question's topic on their crib sheet.

  13. Does Question Structure Affect Exam Performance in the Geosciences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Craig, L.; Streule, M. J.; Passmore, E.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The jump to university level exams can be challenging for some students, often resulting in poor marks, which may be detrimental to their confidence and ultimately affect their overall degree class. Previous studies have found that question structure can have a strong impact on the performance of students in college level exams (see Gibson et al., 2015, for a discussion of its impact on physics undergraduates). Here, we investigate the effect of question structure on the exam results of geology and geophysics undergraduate students. Specifically, we analyse the performance of students in questions that have a 'scaffolded' framework and compare them to their performance in open-ended questions and coursework. We also investigate if observed differences in exam performance are correlated with the educational background and gender of students, amongst other factors. It is important for all students to be able to access their degree courses, no matter what their backgrounds may be. Broadening participation in the geosciences relies on removing systematic barriers to achievement. Therefore we recommend that exams are either structured with scaffolding in questions at lower levels, or students are explicitly prepared for this transition. We also recommend that longitudinal studies of exam performance are conducted within individual departments, and this work outlines one approach to analysing performance data.

  14. SU-E-T-175: Evaluation of the Relative Output Ratio for Collimator Jaw and MLC Defined Small Static 6MV Photon Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, G; Thwaites, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate relative output ratio of collimator jaw and MLC defined small photon fields. Methods: Relative output ratios were measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film for a 6 MV photon beam on a Novalis Tx with HD120 MLC. Beam collimation was achieved by the jaws for 1.0 cm and 3.0 cm and MLC defined square field sizes between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm with varying jaw settings between 2.0 and 4.0 cm. Film pieces were exposed to 4 Gy. Experiments were repeated with each session consisting of five consecutive exposures for the given MLC and/or jaw collimation and with the MLC and the jaws reset for each exposure. Films were scanned using EPSON 10000XL flatbed scanner approximately 24 hours after exposure in 48 bit RGB format at 150 dpi. Film calibration data were corrected for daily linac output variations. Doses were evaluated using the green channel with square ROI sizes of 0.1 – 0.6 cm. Converted doses were normalised for output ratio calculation using the 3.0 cm field as a machine specific reference field size. Mean output ratio and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated for each experimental session. Results: For the Novalis 6 MV photon beam the output ratios between 0.719 and 0.872 have been measured for the jaw/MLC combinations tested. For a jaw setting of 4.0 cm field, the mean CV of the output ratios increased from 0.77% to 1.48% with decreasing MLC field size from 1.0 cm to 0.5 cm. For a nominal MLC 1.0 cm field, the CV increased to 1.00% from 0.77% with reducing jaw field size from 4.0 cm to 2.0 cm. Conclusion: The relative output ratio and the associated CV were dependent on the collimator jaw and MLC settings. The field size dependent CV showed similar trends to those reported in the literature.

  15. Determination of kQ using MLC-collimated rectangular fields for absolute dosimetry of the CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Gersh, Jacob A; Willett, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Traditional CyberKnife (CK) calibration uses TG-51, which requires kQ to be defined using the standard reference condition of 100 cm SSD in a 10 cm×10 cm field. Since the CK is calibrated using a 6 cm fixed-aperture collimating cone at 80 cm SAD, the BJR-25 method is commonly used to relate circular-field PDDs to square-field PDDs for kQ determination. Using the InCise MLC system, the CK is able to deliver rectangular fields, allowing a more direct measurement of %dd(10 cm) using conventional reference conditions. We define the PDD correction factor (CPDD) as the ratio of %dd(10 cm) measured using CK reference conditions to that measured using standard TG-51 reference conditions. Using four ionization chambers (A1SL, CC08, CC13, and A19), %dd(10 cm) is measured using a 6 cm fixed cone at 80 cm SSD and at 100 cm SSD using an effective 10 cm×10 cm MLC-collimated field. These values are used to calculate CPDD, while the latter is used to directly calculate a kQ value. This direct kQ value is then compared to values determined using the BJR-25 method. Using the MLC system, this study demonstrates conversion between the %dd(10 cm) measured using CyberKnife reference conditions and TG-51 reference conditions. These values provide the means for derivation of a kQ curve as a function of direct measurements of %dd(10 cm) using a 6 cm fixed-aperture collimating cone at 80 cm SSD. PACS number: 87.55.Qr.

  16. Role of connexin 43 in vascular hyperpermeability and relationship to Rock1-MLC20 pathway in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Guang-Ming; Zhu, Yu; Peng, Xiao-Yong; Li, Tao; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Connexin (Cx)43 has been shown to participate in several cardiovascular diseases. Increased vascular permeability is a common and severe complication in sepsis or septic shock. Whether or not Cx43 takes part in the regulation of vascular permeability in severe sepsis is not known, and the underlying mechanism has not been described. With cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) from pulmonary veins, the role of Cx43 in increased vascular permeability and its relationship to the RhoA/Rock1 pathway were studied. It was shown that vascular permeability in the lungs, kidneys, and mesentery in sepsis rats and LPS-stimulated monolayer pulmonary vein VECs was significantly increased and positively correlated with the increased expression of Cx43 and Rock1 in these organs and cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone (10 mg/kg iv) and the Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 (2 mg/kg iv) alleviated the vascular leakage of lung, mesentery, and kidney in sepsis rats. Overexpressed Cx43 increased the phosphorylation of 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC20) and the expression of Rock1 and increased the vascular permeability and decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance of pulmonary vein VECs. Cx43 RNA interference decreased the phosphorylation of MLC20 and the expression of Rock1 and decreased LPS-stimulated hyperpermeability of cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 alleviated LPS- and overexpressed Cx43-induced hyperpermeability of monolayer pulmonary vein VECs. This report shows that Cx43 participates in the regulation of vascular permeability in sepsis and that the mechanism is related to the Rock1-MLC20 phosphorylation pathway.

  17. SU-E-P-36: Evaluation of MLC Positioning Errors in Dynamic IMRT Treatments by Analyzing Dynalog Files

    SciTech Connect

    Olasolo, J; Pellejero, S; Gracia, M; Gallardo, N; Martin, M; Lozares, S; Maneru, F; Bragado, L; Miquelez, S; Rubio, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of MLC positioning in Varian linear accelerator, in dynamic IMRT technique, from the analysis of dynalog files generated by the MLC controller. Methods: In Clinac accelerators (pre-TrueBeam technology), control system has an approximately 50ms delay (one control cycle time). Then, the system compares the measured position to the planned position corresponding to the next control cycle. As it has been confirmed by Varian technical support, this effect causes that measured positions appear in dynalogs one cycle out of phase with respect to the planned positions. Around 9000 dynalogs have been analyzed, coming from the three linear accelerators of our center (one Trilogy and two Clinac 21EX) equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC. In order to compare our results to recent publications, leaf positioning errors (RMS and 95th percentile) are calculated with and without delay effect. Dynalogs have been analyzed using a in-house Matlab software. Results: The RMS errors were 0.341, 0.339 and 0.348mm for each Linac; being the average error 0.343 mm. The 95th percentiles of the error were 0.617, 0.607 and 0.625; with an average of 0.617mm. A recent multi-institution study carried out by Kerns et al. found a mean leaf RMS error of 0.32mm and a 95th percentile error value of 0.64mm.Without delay effect, mean leaf RMS errors obtained were 0.040, 0.042 and 0.038mm for each treatment machine; being the average 0.040mm. The 95th percentile error values obtained were 0.057, 0.058 and 0.054 mm, with an average of 0.056mm. Conclusion: Results obtained for the mean leaf RMS error and the mean 95th percentile were consistent with the multi-institution study. Calculated error statistics with delay effect are significantly larger due to the speed proportional and systematic leaf offset. Consequently it is proposed to correct this effect in dynalogs analysis to determine the MLC performance.

  18. The impact of continuously-variable dose rate VMAT on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Christopher; McWilliam, Alan; Johnstone, Emily; Rowbottom, Carl

    2012-11-06

    A recent control system update for Elekta linear accelerators includes the ability to deliver volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with continuously variable dose rate (CVDR), rather than a number of fixed binned dose rates (BDR). The capacity to select from a larger range of dose rates allows the linac to maintain higher gantry speeds, resulting in faster, smoother deliveries. The purpose of this study is to investigate two components of CVDR delivery - the increase in average dose rate and gantry speed, and a determination of their effects on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry. Initially, ten VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5head and neck) were delivered to a Delta4 dosimetric phantom using both the BDR and CVDR systems. The plans were found to be dosimetrically robust using both delivery methods, although CVDR was observed to give higher gamma pass rates at the 2%/2 mm gamma level for prostates (p < 0.01). For the dual arc head-and-neck plans, CVDR delivery resulted in improved pass rates at all gamma levels (2%/2 mm to 4%/4 mm) for individual arc verifications (p < 0.01), but gave similar results to BDR when both arcs were combined. To investigate the impact of increased gantry speed on MLC positioning, a dynamic leaf-tracking tool was developed using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Comparing the detected MLC positions to those expected from the plan, CVDR was observed to result in a larger mean error compared to BDR (0.13 cm and 0.06 cm, respectively, p < 0.01). The EPID images were also used to monitor beam stability during delivery. It was found that the CVDR deliveries had a lower standard deviation of the gun-target (GT) and transverse (AB) profiles (p < 0.01). This study has determined that CVDR may offer a dosimetric advantage for VMAT plans. While the higher gantry speed of CVDR appears to increase deviations in MLC positioning, the relative effect on dosimetry is lower than the positive impact of a flatter and more

  19. A Pilot Study of an Electronic Exam System at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibowo, Santoso; Grandhi, Srimannarayana; Chugh, Ritesh; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2016-01-01

    This study sought academic staff and students' views of electronic exams (e-exams) system and the benefits and challenges of e-exams in general. The respondents provided useful feedback for future adoption of e-exams at an Australian university and elsewhere too. The key findings show that students and academic staff are optimistic about the…

  20. Employing Computer-Administered Exams in General Psychology: Student Anxiety and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schult, Carolyn A.; McIntosh, John L.

    2004-01-01

    Computer-administered exams offer many advantages, but instructors may be reluctant to use them due to concerns that computer anxiety may increase student test anxiety. Introductory psychology students (N = 265) completed surveys prior to their first exam about their anxiety related to the upcoming exam, computers in general, and taking exams on…

  1. Will students pass a competitive exam that they failed in their dreams?

    PubMed

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Grosliere, Laure; Le Corvec, Thibault; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Lascols, Olivier; Duguet, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    We tested whether dreams can anticipate a stressful exam and how failure/success in dreams affect next-day performance. We collected information on students' dreams during the night preceding the medical school entrance exam. Demographic, academic, sleep and dream characteristics were compared to the students' grades on the exam. Of the 719 respondents to the questionnaire (of 2324 total students), 60.4% dreamt of the exam during the night preceding it. Problems with the exam appeared in 78% of dreams and primarily involved being late and forgetting answers. Reporting a dream about the exam on the pre-exam night was associated with better performance on the exam (p=.01). The frequency of dreams concerning the exam during the first term predicted proportionally higher performance on the exam (R=0.1, p=.01). These results suggest that the negative anticipation of a stressful event in dreams is common and that this episodic simulation provides a cognitive gain.

  2. Dose-to-water conversion for the backscatter-shielded EPID: A frame-based method to correct for EPID energy response to MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwan, Benjamin J. O’Connor, Daryl J.; King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a frame-by-frame correction for the energy response of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) to radiation that has transmitted through the multileaf collimator (MLC) and to integrate this correction into the backscatter shielded EPID (BSS-EPID) dose-to-water conversion model. Methods: Individual EPID frames were acquired using a Varian frame grabber and iTools acquisition software then processed using in-house software developed inMATLAB. For each EPID image frame, the region below the MLC leaves was identified and all pixels in this region were multiplied by a factor of 1.3 to correct for the under-response of the imager to MLC transmitted radiation. The corrected frames were then summed to form a corrected integrated EPID image. This correction was implemented as an initial step in the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model which was then used to compute dose planes in a water phantom for 35 IMRT fields. The calculated dose planes, with and without the proposed MLC transmission correction, were compared to measurements in solid water using a two-dimensional diode array. Results: It was observed that the integration of the MLC transmission correction into the BSS-EPID dose model improved agreement between modeled and measured dose planes. In particular, the MLC correction produced higher pass rates for almost all Head and Neck fields tested, yielding an average pass rate of 99.8% for 2%/2 mm criteria. A two-sample independentt-test and fisher F-test were used to show that the MLC transmission correction resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the mean and the standard deviation of the gamma values, respectively, to give a more accurate and consistent dose-to-water conversion. Conclusions: The frame-by-frame MLC transmission response correction was shown to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model. The correction may be applied as a preprocessing step

  3. Effect of MLC tracking latency on conformal volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans in 4D stereotactic lung treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, James L.; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; McDonald, Fiona M.A.; Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The latency of a multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking system used to overcome respiratory motion causes misalignment of the treatment beam with respect to the gross tumour volume, which may result in reduced target coverage. This study investigates the magnitude of this effect. Material and methods Simulated superior–inferior breathing motion was used to construct histograms of isocentre offset with respect to the gross tumour volume (GTV) for a variety of tracking latencies. Dose distributions for conformal volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) arcs were then calculated at a range of offsets and summed according to these displacement histograms. The results were verified by delivering the plans to a Delta4 phantom on a motion platform. Results In the absence of an internal target margin, a tracking latency of 150 ms reduces the GTV D95% by approximately 2%. With a margin of 2 mm, the same drop in dose occurs for a tracking latency of 450 ms. Lung V13Gy is unaffected by a range of latencies. These results are supported by the phantom measurements. Conclusions Assuming that internal motion can be modelled by a rigid translation of the patient, MLC tracking of conformal VMAT can be effectively accomplished in the absence of an internal target margin for substantial breathing motion (4 s period and 20 mm peak–peak amplitude) so long as the system latency is less than 150 ms. PMID:26277856

  4. Asymmetric programming: a highly reliable metadata allocation strategy for MLC NAND flash memory-based sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Liu, Zhaoqing; Qiao, Liyan

    2014-10-10

    While the NAND flash memory is widely used as the storage medium in modern sensor systems, the aggressive shrinking of process geometry and an increase in the number of bits stored in each memory cell will inevitably degrade the reliability of NAND flash memory. In particular, it's critical to enhance metadata reliability, which occupies only a small portion of the storage space, but maintains the critical information of the file system and the address translations of the storage system. Metadata damage will cause the system to crash or a large amount of data to be lost. This paper presents Asymmetric Programming, a highly reliable metadata allocation strategy for MLC NAND flash memory storage systems. Our technique exploits for the first time the property of the multi-page architecture of MLC NAND flash memory to improve the reliability of metadata. The basic idea is to keep metadata in most significant bit (MSB) pages which are more reliable than least significant bit (LSB) pages. Thus, we can achieve relatively low bit error rates for metadata. Based on this idea, we propose two strategies to optimize address mapping and garbage collection. We have implemented Asymmetric Programming on a real hardware platform. The experimental results show that Asymmetric Programming can achieve a reduction in the number of page errors of up to 99.05% with the baseline error correction scheme.

  5. MLC positional accuracy evaluation through the Picket Fence test on EBT2 films and a 3D volumetric phantom.

    PubMed

    Antypas, Christos; Floros, Ioannis; Rouchota, Maritina; Armpilia, Christina; Lyra, Maria

    2015-03-08

    The accuracy of MLC positions during radiotherapy is important as even small positional deviations can translate into considerable dose delivery errors. This becomes crucial when radiosensitive organs are located near the treated volume and especially during IMRT, where dose gradients are steep. A test commonly conducted to measure the positional accuracy of the MLCs is the Picket Fence test. In this study two alterations of the Picket Fence test were performed and evaluated, the first one using radiochromic EBT2 films and the second one the Delta4PT diode array phantom and its software. Our results showed that EBT2 films provide a relatively fast, qualitative visual inspection of the significant leaf dispositions. When slight inaccuracies need to be revealed or precise numerical results for each leaf position are needed, Delta4PT provides the desired accuracy of 1 mm. In treatment modalities where a higher accuracy is required in the delivered dose distribution, such as in IMRT, precise numerical values of the measurements for the MLC positional inspection are required.

  6. A new concept of multileaf collimator (the shuttling MLC)--an interpreter for high-efficiency IMRT.

    PubMed

    Webb, S

    2000-11-01

    This paper proposes a radically new concept for a multileaf collimator for a photon linear accelerator for delivering IMRT with high monitor-unit efficiency. The concept is to consider each M (rows) x N (columns) two-dimensional intensity-modulated beam (2D IMB) as a set of N/2 M (rows) x 2 (columns) areas of modulation. Each area is then delivered by a set of M shuttling attenuating elements (called here the shuttling MLC) with a very high monitor-unit efficiency. The elements shuttle between each of the two columns comprising the M x 2 area and the modulation is provided by the variation in dwell time of the elements. The principles of this shuttling multileaf collimator are discussed and examples illustrating its operation are given. The main achievement reported in this paper is the development and robust testing of an interpreter which describes the position-time course of movement of the elements as a function of monitor units. This interpreter fully accounts for leakage transmission through the elements. It completely avoids the across-the-rows tongue-and-groove underdose. A large number of ID and 2D IMBs have been subjected to this interpreter and it is shown that for random patterns of fluence the SMLC is more monitor-unit efficient than the Bortfeld-Boyer technique (the most efficient with a conventional MLC) when the modulation is highly structured.

  7. Asymmetric Programming: A Highly Reliable Metadata Allocation Strategy for MLC NAND Flash Memory-Based Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Liu, Zhaoqing; Qiao, Liyan

    2014-01-01

    While the NAND flash memory is widely used as the storage medium in modern sensor systems, the aggressive shrinking of process geometry and an increase in the number of bits stored in each memory cell will inevitably degrade the reliability of NAND flash memory. In particular, it's critical to enhance metadata reliability, which occupies only a small portion of the storage space, but maintains the critical information of the file system and the address translations of the storage system. Metadata damage will cause the system to crash or a large amount of data to be lost. This paper presents Asymmetric Programming, a highly reliable metadata allocation strategy for MLC NAND flash memory storage systems. Our technique exploits for the first time the property of the multi-page architecture of MLC NAND flash memory to improve the reliability of metadata. The basic idea is to keep metadata in most significant bit (MSB) pages which are more reliable than least significant bit (LSB) pages. Thus, we can achieve relatively low bit error rates for metadata. Based on this idea, we propose two strategies to optimize address mapping and garbage collection. We have implemented Asymmetric Programming on a real hardware platform. The experimental results show that Asymmetric Programming can achieve a reduction in the number of page errors of up to 99.05% with the baseline error correction scheme. PMID:25310473

  8. Successful use of a competency step exam in a perfusion education program.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Beckley, Philip D; Tallman, Richard D; Spiwak, Allison S

    2006-03-01

    The perfusion education program at The Ohio State University uses a step exam to rank students and identify incompetent students in regard to the program learning objectives. The step exam determines student progress from the didactic to the clinical phase. Each student must pass the competency step exam to gain entry to the clinical rotations. The development, use, and results of the step exam are reported. The design and knowledge matrix establish the content validity of the exam. Single test question discrimination and difficulty statistics identify valid exam items. Examples of the exam's predictive ability are presented. The step exam is a 200-question exam using multiple choice items. The exam is modeled after several health-related national certification exam processes. The exam has content validity based on the published, written objectives for the education program. Each item on the exam has a history of use and meets criteria for difficulty, discrimination, and distraction. The use of a high-stake competency exam in clinical science and medical education programs is controversial and technically challenging. A step exam to have high-stake consequences must be reliable, meet requirements for content validity, and hopefully exhibit predictive validity.

  9. Forensic anogenital exam interventions: potential contributions of cognitive appraisal theory.

    PubMed

    Waibel-Duncan, Mary Katherine; Sandier, Howard M

    2002-02-01

    This manuscript proposes that Smith and Lazarus's cognitive appraisal theory offers a useful conceptual guide for exploring the mechanisms underlying psychoeducation's apparent efficacy at reducing children's forensic anogenital exam distress. After presenting an overview of Smith and Lazarus's cognitive emotional relational theory of emotions, the authors suggest how this model of cognition-emotion associations might inform the refinement and evaluation of current preparatory interventions as well as the design of future patient/family education programs. Empirical evidence from the broader pediatric literature and direct observations of children's anogenital exam experiences suggest how cognitive appraisal theory translates into clinical research and practice. Avenues for future research are proposed.

  10. Successful Use of a Competency Step Exam in a Perfusion Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Jeffrey B.; Beckley, Philip D.; Tallman, Richard D.; Spiwak, Allison S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The perfusion education program at The Ohio State University uses a step exam to rank students and identify incompetent students in regard to the program learning objectives. The step exam determines student progress from the didactic to the clinical phase. Each student must pass the competency step exam to gain entry to the clinical rotations. The development, use, and results of the step exam are reported. The design and knowledge matrix establish the content validity of the exam. Single test question discrimination and difficulty statistics identify valid exam items. Examples of the exam’s predictive ability are presented. The step exam is a 200-question exam using multiple choice items. The exam is modeled after several health-related national certification exam processes. The exam has content validity based on the published, written objectives for the education program. Each item on the exam has a history of use and meets criteria for difficulty, discrimination, and distraction. The use of a high-stake competency exam in clinical science and medical education programs is controversial and technically challenging. A step exam to have high-stake consequences must be reliable, meet requirements for content validity, and hopefully exhibit predictive validity. PMID:16637522

  11. Reserve Compensation System Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-30

    Project Readiness coinci- dental with the development of the RCSS data reports. The Army Guard, the Army Reserve, and the Marine Corps Reserve provided...Management Analysis, and Dental . iary. Both authorized and actual strengths of the tir National Guard have risen since FY 70. Actual ANG accession...Information, and Dental . AIR FORCE RESERVE EKLIS7ED STRENGTH SNORTAGES* SELECTED CAREER MNAGEflENT FIELDS CAREER NANAGEflENT FIELD REO INV SHORTAGES

  12. Cheating on Exams: The Case of Israeli Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniver, Erez

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of cheating on exams, which harms both the reputation of an academic institution and the students who don't cheat, is becoming increasingly common. We attempt to shed light on this phenomenon using data from a survey of graduates of the College of Management Academic Studies in Israel. Three aspects of the problem are examined: 1)…

  13. Spanish-English Verbatim Translation Exam. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    The development and validation of the Spanish-English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE) is described. The test is for use by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the selection of applicants for the positions of Language Specialist or Contract Linguist. The report is divided into eight sections. Section 1 describes the need for the test,…

  14. Using Oral Exams to Assess Communication Skills in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke-Smalley, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Business, like many other fields in higher education, continues to rely largely on conventional testing methods for assessing student learning. In the current article, another evaluation approach--the oral exam--is examined as a means for building and evaluating the professional communication and oral dialogue skills needed and utilized by…

  15. Rumor Has It: Investigating Teacher Licensure Exam Advice Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Doyle, Kira; Petchauer, Emery

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, including the United States, England, Korea, Hong Kong, and Japan, individuals must pass some form of examination for entry into or completion of a teacher education program (Wang, Coleman, Coley, & Phelps, 2003). These exams are meant to act as gatekeeping mechanisms for teacher quality. In the majority of the countries…

  16. Tougher Exam for GED Spurs Ups and Downs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Participation in the GED testing program plunged by nearly 44 percent during the most recent recorded year, a drop-off that the exam's sponsor attributes to an earlier rush by teenagers and adults to secure high school diplomas through the test before its minimum passing scores were raised. The overall number of teenagers and adults who took the…

  17. Cheating: A Problem with Take-Home Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry J.; McBee, Janice K.

    Using multiple choice tests and a statistical method designed to identify flagrant cheaters, the authors undertook to determine (1) the magnitude of cheating on take-home and open-book exams; (2) whether the amount of cheating varied according to three types of examinations (closed-book, open-book or take-home); and (3) if cheating was affected by…

  18. Teachers' Interpretations of Exit Exam Scores and College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' interpretations of Virginia's high school exit exam policy through the teachers' responses to a survey. The survey was administered to teachers from one school district in Northern Virginia. The teachers selected for the survey taught a subject in which students must pass a Standards of Learning (SOL) test in order to…

  19. Student-Produced Videos for Exam Review in Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulsizer, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Videos have been used in classrooms for decades, but student-produced video has recently become a viable, economical option to enhance learning. Students were asked to create videos to be used for their exam review in two different undergraduate mathematics courses: Differential Equation and Complex Analysis. Students were then surveyed about…

  20. Strategies Instruction to Improve the Preparation for English Oral Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abad, José Vicente; Alzate, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of an inter-institutional research study that assessed the impact of strategies instruction on students' preparation for and performance in oral exams. Two teacher-researchers at different universities trained 26 students in their respective B1-English-level courses in using language learning strategies. The study…

  1. Faculty Productivity and the Complexity of Student Exam Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A study of 560 research university faculty of biology, chemistry, history, and psychology compared faculty publication rates of books and journal articles with the complexity of their exam questions. Results found that the teachers who published books and who published fewer articles asked more critical-thinking questions. It is suggested that…

  2. Eye Exam: Is a Laser Retina Scan Worthwhile?

    MedlinePlus

    ... necessary? My optometrist offers the test, but I'm not sure if I need it. Answers from Dennis Robertson, M.D. During a traditional eye exam, an eye ... covered by your medical insurance. With Dennis Robertson, M.D. References Khandhadia S. Use of Optomap for retinal ...

  3. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Skin Self-Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Moriarty, Cortney M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined psychosocial factors associated with skin self-exam (SSE) performance by young adults. Participants and Methods: The authors administered surveys to 218 US college students (aged 18-26 years) attending a large midwestern university. Results: Contrary to prior research, men (44%) and women (49%) were relatively…

  4. Preparticipation Exams: How to Detect a Teenage Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Parnell

    1990-01-01

    Sport-specific preparticipation examinations do not address social problems (drug abuse, suicide, murder, accidents, and sex) epidemic among teenagers, but they are often the only contact these youth have with a physician. This article discusses these risk factors and presents methods for assessing them during preparticipation exams. (SM)

  5. Getting Interpersonal on a University Entrance Exam Impromptu Writing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myskow, Gordon; Gordon, Kana

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the types of audience engagement strategies used by a Japanese secondary school student in an after school course preparing for a high-stakes impromptu academic writing task on a university entrance exam. The study uses appraisal theory--the branch of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) concerned with the patterning of…

  6. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  7. [Evaluation of cytopathologic exam for diagnosis of oral chronic paracoccidioidomycosis].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Marcelo Sivieri; Sousa, Suzana C O M; Correia, Dalmo

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of evaluating exfoliative cytology for the diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis oral lesions, eight patients that presented the disease were studied. The presence of fungi was demonstrated in all these cases. It was concluded that the oral exfoliative cytology exam can be effectively used in the diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis and contribute to the therapeutic control of oral forms of this mycosis.

  8. An Alternative Approach to Proficiency Testing: The Practical Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, Walter; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a beginning course in French that includes a component designed to prepare students to function in the common cultural situations they are likely to encounter in France. Describes an accompanying exam testing oral proficiency which allows a group of 30 students to be thoroughly tested in three hours. (SED)

  9. Unified (Russian) State Exam in English: Reading Comprehension Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solnyshkina, Marina I.; Harkova, Elena V.; Kiselnikov, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    The article summarizes the study of Reading Comprehension Tasks utilized in preparation for Unified (Russian) State Exam. The corpus of reading tasks was analyzed with the use of the classification algorithm developed by Weir and Urquhart (1998), and aimed at determining the level of engagement (local or global) and type of engagement (literal or…

  10. From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery: The Democratic Route

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Williamson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    "From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery" passionately calls for educators to challenge the dominant market-led model of education and instead build a more democratic one, better able to face threats such as environmental damage; intensified global competition; corrosive social inequalities in and between nations in the world;…

  11. The CPA Exam as a Postcurriculum Accreditation Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barilla, Anthony G.; Jackson, Robert E.; Mooney, J. Lowell

    2008-01-01

    Business schools often attain accreditation to demonstrate program efficacy. J. A. Marts, J. D. Baker, and J. M. Garris (1988) hypothesized that candidates from Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB)-accredited accounting programs perform better on the CPA exam than do candidates from non-AACSB-accredited…

  12. The New AP Chemistry Exam: Its Rationale, Content, and Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Paul D.; Kugel, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013-2014 academic year marks the rollout of the redesigned advanced placement (AP) chemistry course and exam. There have been many questions as to why the course was redesigned and how the new examination will differ from its legacy version. In this article we give a brief overview of the legacy course and examine why a redesign occurred in…

  13. TH-C-12A-06: Feasibility of a MLC-Based Inversely Optimized Multi-Field Grid Therapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J; Zhao, B; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Qin, Y; Wen, N; Ryu, S; Chetty, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy (GT), which generates highly spatially modulated dose distributions, can deliver single- or hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for large tumors without causing significant toxicities. GT may be applied in combination with immunotherapy, in light of recent preclinical data of synergetic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. However, conventional GT uses only one field, which does not have the advantage of multi-fields in 3D conformal-RT or IMRT. We have proposed a novel MLC-based, inverse-planned multi-field 3D GT technique. This study aims to test its deliverability and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: A lattice of small spheres was created as the boost volume within a large target. A simultaneous boost IMRT plan with 8-Gy to the target and 20-Gy to the boost volume was generated in the Eclipse treatment planning system (AAA v10) with a HD120 MLC. Nine beams were used, and the gantry and couch angles were selected so that the spheres were perfectly aligned in every beams eye view. The plan was mapped to a phantom with dose scaled. EBT3 films were calibrated and used to measure the delivered dose. Results: The IMRT plan generated a highly spatially modulated dose distribution in the target. D95%, D50%, D5% for the spheres and the targets in Gy were 18.5, 20.0, 21.4 and 7.9, 9.8, 16.1, respectively. D50% for a 1cm ring 1cm outside the target was 2.9-Gy. Film dosimetry showed good agreement between calculated and delivered dose, with an overall gamma passing rate of 99.6% (3%/1mm). The point dose differences for different spheres varied from 1–6%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the deliverability and dose calculation accuracy of the MLC-based inversely optimized multi-field GT technique, which achieved a brachytherapy-like dose distribution. Single-fraction high dose can be delivered to the spheres in a large target with minimal dose to the surrounding normal tissue.

  14. NOTE: Does the option to rotate the Elekta Beam Modulator MLC during VMAT IMRT delivery confer advantage?—a study of 'parked gaps'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2010-06-01

    When delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique on an Elekta accelerator equipped with the Elekta Beam Modulator multileaf collimator (MLC), the orientation of the MLC, relative to the accelerator head, is generally fixed during the delivery. However, it has the ability to rotate about its axis as the gantry simultaneously rotates. This note shows that this can confer a potential advantage when planning and delivering IMRT via VMAT. A computer model has been built in which the MLC rotation angle could be varied with each control point (gantry location) within the constraints of the specified MLC rotation speed and the time available for rotation. The model was used to optimize the orientation trajectory in such a way as to minimize the number of parked gaps between leaves which are needed for some gantry orientations but not for others (and which cannot reach the shielding safety of surrounding jaws in the time available). The presented work started with the simple situation of collimating gantry-successive single convex shapes. As a broad statement some 40% reduction in such parked gaps could be achieved. The study was then extended to investigate the optimized trajectories for multiple separate concave shapes with, once again, a saving in unwanted parked gaps or unwanted over-irradiation.

  15. Does the option to rotate the Elekta Beam Modulator MLC during VMAT IMRT delivery confer advantage?--a study of 'parked gaps'.

    PubMed

    Webb, S

    2010-06-07

    When delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique on an Elekta accelerator equipped with the Elekta Beam Modulator multileaf collimator (MLC), the orientation of the MLC, relative to the accelerator head, is generally fixed during the delivery. However, it has the ability to rotate about its axis as the gantry simultaneously rotates. This note shows that this can confer a potential advantage when planning and delivering IMRT via VMAT. A computer model has been built in which the MLC rotation angle could be varied with each control point (gantry location) within the constraints of the specified MLC rotation speed and the time available for rotation. The model was used to optimize the orientation trajectory in such a way as to minimize the number of parked gaps between leaves which are needed for some gantry orientations but not for others (and which cannot reach the shielding safety of surrounding jaws in the time available). The presented work started with the simple situation of collimating gantry-successive single convex shapes. As a broad statement some 40% reduction in such parked gaps could be achieved. The study was then extended to investigate the optimized trajectories for multiple separate concave shapes with, once again, a saving in unwanted parked gaps or unwanted over-irradiation.

  16. Assessment of the acceptability of the Elekta multileaf collimator (MLC) within the Corvus planning system for static and dynamic delivery of intensity modulated beams (IMBs).

    PubMed

    Linthout, Nadine; Verellen, Dirk; Van Acker, Swana; Van de Vondel, Iwein; Coppens, Luc; Storme, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The sliding window technique used for static and dynamic segmentation of intensity modulated beams is evaluated. Dynamic delivery is preferred since the resulting distributions correspond better with the calculated distributions, the treatment beam is used more efficiently and the delivery is less sensitive to small variations in the accuracy of the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  17. MLC Libraries--A School Library's Journey with Students, Staff and Web 2.0 Technologies: Blogs, Wikis and E-Books--Where Are We Going Next?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viner, Jane; Lucas, Amanda; Ricchini, Tracey; Ri, Regina

    2010-01-01

    This workshop paper explores the Web 2.0 journey of the MLC Libraries' teacher-librarians, librarian, library and audio visual technicians. Our journey was initially inspired by Will Richardson and supported by the School Library Association of Victoria (SLAV) Web 2.0 professional development program. The 12 week technological skills program…

  18. The value of patient selection in demonstrating treatment effect in stroke recovery trials: lessons from the CHIMES study of MLC601 (NeuroAiD)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Fan; Wong, K. S. Lawrence; Chen, Christopher L. H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective The CHIMES Study compared MLC601 to placebo in patients with ischemic stroke of intermediate severity in the preceding 72 hours. We aimed to verify if patient selection based on two prognostic factors (ie, stroke severity and time to treatment) improves detection of a treatment effect with MLC601. Methods Analyses were performed using data from the CHIMES Study, an international, randomized, placebo‐controlled, double‐blind trial comparing MLC601 to placebo in patients with ischemic stroke of intermediate severity in the preceding 72 hours. Three subgroups, that is, onset to treatment time (OTT) ≥48 hours; baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) ≥10; both OTT ≥48 hours and baseline NIHSS ≥10, were analyzed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤1 and a composite endpoint of mRS ≤1, Barthel Index ≥95, and NIHSS ≤1 at month 3. Results Placebo response rates were lower (ie, worse natural outcome) among subgroups with prognostic factors. Conversely, MLC601 treatment effects were significantly higher in the subgroups with prognostic factors than for the entire cohort, being highest among patients with both OTT ≥48 hours and baseline NIHSS of 10 to 14: odds ratios of 2.18 (95% CI 1.02 to 4.65) for month 3 mRS ≤1 and 3.88 (95% CI 1.03 to 14.71) for the composite endpoint. Conclusions : Patients who have moderately severe strokes and longer OTT demonstrate better treatment effects with MLC601. These factors can guide patient selection in future trials. PMID:26291445

  19. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  20. SU-E-J-109: Testing the KV Imaging Center Congruence with Radiation Isocenter of Small MLC and SRS Cone Field On Two Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fu,; Chen, Y; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Orthogonal kV image pairs are used for target localization when fiducial markers are implanted. CBCT is used to verify cone SRS setup. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the isocenter congruence between radiation fields and kV imaging center. This study used a simple method to evaluate the isocenter congruence, and compared the results for MLC and cone fields on two different Linacs. Methods: Varian OBI block was attached on the couch. It has a central 1mm BB with markers on three surfaces to align with laser. KV and MV images were taken at four cardinal angles. A 3x3cm2 MLC field and a 20mm cone field were irradiated respectively. On each kV image, the distance from BB center to the kV graticule center were measured. On the MV image of MLC field, the center of radiation field was determined manually, while for cone field, the Varian AM maintenance software was used to analyze the distance between BB and radiation field. The subtraction of the two distances gives the discrepancy between kV and radiation centers. Each procedure was repeated on five days at Trilogy and TrueBeam respectively. Results: The maximum discrepancy was found in the longitudinal direction at 180° gantry angel. It was 1.5±0.1mm for Trilogy and 0.6±0.1mm for TrueBeam. For Trilogy, although radiation center wobbled only 0.7mm and image center wobbled 0.8mm, they wobbled to the opposite direction. KV Pair using gantry 180° should be avoided in this case. Cone vs. kV isocenter has less discrepancy than MLC for Trilogy. Conclusion: Radiation isocenter of MLC and cone field is different, so is between Trilogy and TrueBeam. The method is simple and reproducible to check kV and radiation isocenter congruence.

  1. SU-E-T-363: Error Detection Comparison of EPID and MLC Log File Based IMRT QA Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Defoor, D; Obeidat, M; Linden, P; Kirby, N; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study we will compare the ability of three QA methods (Delta4, MU-EPID, Dynalog QA) to detect specific errors. Methods: A Varian Novalis Tx with a HD120 MLC and aS1000 Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) was used in our study. Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) errors, gantry angle and dose errors were introduced into 5 volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) plans. 3D dose distributions calculated with data from the EPID and Dynalog QA methods were compared with the planned dose distribution. The gamma passing percentages as well as percentage error of planning target volume (PTV) dose were used for passing determination. Baselines for gamma passing percentages and PTV dose were established by measuring the original plan 5 times consecutively. Standard passing thresholds as well as thresholds derived from receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis and 2 standard deviation (SD) criteria were used. Results: When applying the standard 95% pass rate at 3%/3mm gamma analysis 14, 21 and 8 of 30 errors were detected by the Delta4, MU-EPID and Dynalog QA methods respectively. Thresholds set at 2 SD from our base line measurements resulted in the detection of 18, 9 and 14 of 30 errors for the Delta4, MU-EPID and Dynalog QA methods respectively. When using D2 of the PTV as a metric the Dynalog QA detected 20 of 30 errors while the EPID method detected 14 of 30 errors. Using D98 of the PTV, Dynalog QA detected 13 of 30 while the EPID detected 3 of 30 errors. Conclusion: Although MU-EPID detected the most errors at the standard 95% cutoff it also produced the most false detections in the baseline data. The Dynalog QA was the most effective when the ROC adjusted passing threshold was used. D2 was more effective as a metric for detecting errors than D98.

  2. Comparison of microtitre plates with flat-bottomed and round-bottomed wells for mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC).

    PubMed

    Herva, E

    1977-04-01

    To compare microtitre plates with flat-bottomed and round-bottomed wells and to standardize a method for mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), the effects of cell number, culture time, 3H-thymidine concentration and labelling time were studied. On both plates, allogeneic cells induced increased RNA synthesis beginning at about 30 hours and increased DNA synthesis beginning at about 50 hours, if suitable cell numbers were used. On plates with flat-bottomed wells, 1.5 X 10(5) responding and stimulating cells per well had near-exponential growth on day four and five, often through day six; on plates with round-bottomed wells the corresponding cell number was 0.25-1.0 (optimally 0.5) X 10(5). Near these cell numbers, the response depended closely on the number of responding cells. On plates with flat-bottomed wells, stimulating cells had a dose-dependent effect on the response, whereas on plates with round-bottomed wells, increasing the stimulating cell dose did not consistently strengthen the response. Both plate types proved suitable for MLC experiments; plates with round-bottomed wells have the obvious advantage of requiring smaller cell numbers. 3H-thymidine (spec, act 2000 mCi/mmol) self-suppressed its incorporation, which increased only slightly or even decreased if labelling time exceeded 12-18 hours. Relative responses remained virtually unaltered, however, with 3H-concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 micronCi/ml and with labelling times of 8 and 24 hours.

  3. ACS exams as an example of scholarship-based assessment in a discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Thomas; Grunert, Megan

    2012-02-01

    The Examinations Institute of the American Chemical Society has been producing norm-referenced exams for over 75 years and these efforts are reviewed here. The process by which exam-writing committees produce these exams involves both the setting of the content and trial testing of items prior to establishing the released exam. Beyond this process, the Institute has engaged in research based on data derived from various tests.

  4. 76 FR 6189 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner... Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee will...

  5. Uncovering an Existential Barrier to Breast Self-exam Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie; Hart, Joshua; Routledge, Clay

    2008-01-01

    The present research applies an analysis derived from terror management theory to the health domain of breast examination, and in doing so uncovers previously unrecognized factors that may contribute to women’s reluctance to perform breast self-examinations (BSEs). In Study 1, when concerns about mortality were primed, reminders of human beings’ physical nature (i.e., creatureliness) reduced intentions to conduct BSEs compared to reminders of humans’ uniqueness. In Study 2, women conducted shorter exams on a breast model (an experience found to increase death-thought accessibility) when creatureliness was primed compared to a uniqueness and no essay condition. In Study 3, after a creatureliness prime, women performed shorter BSEs when a placebo did not provide an alternative explanation for their discomfort compared to when it did. Advances for theory and breast self-exam promotion are discussed. PMID:19255593

  6. [Indications to complementary radiological exams for pathologies of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Farron, Alain; Theumann, Nicolas

    2006-12-20

    Plain Xrays should stay in pole position for the evaluation of shoulder's pathologies. They allow frequently to make a diagnosis of the lesion. Indications to complementary exams are well established. CT-scan and MRI have to give responses to precise questions, which then will permit to manage the treatment. CT-scan allows to evaluate accurately bone structures. It is very useful for analysing complex fractures of the proximal humerus. It allows also to evaluate the amount of glenoid wear to correct before implanting a prosthesis. Arthro-MRI is used to study soft tissues, cartilage and bone. Therefore, it is the first choice exam to evaluate the rotator cuff tendons, as well as the labrum and ligaments in case of shoulder instability.

  7. Reworking Exams To Teach Chemistry Content and Reinforce Student Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, John M.

    2007-09-01

    One meaningful approach to demonstrate to students the value of reworking exams is to offer an incentive to do so. This paper describes the strategy and effects of offering partial credit to students who rework answers originally answered incorrectly on an exam. This has proved largely successful for the last 10 years in several classes at the collegiate level. In the grading scheme used, the average percentage of the regrade on the final course grade is approximately 2 3%. While the regrade makes little difference in the final course grade for the majority of students, students are very appreciative of the opportunity afforded them, and this often changes their perspective of the class and the morale to a more positive attitude. Teachers in high school and in other disciplines may benefit from this approach.

  8. Assessing Conceptual and Algorithmic Knowledge in General Chemistry with ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the ACS Examinations Institute released an exam for first-term general chemistry in which items are intentionally paired with one conceptual and one traditional item. A second-term, paired-questions exam was released in 2007. This paper presents an empirical study of student performances on these two exams based on national samples of…

  9. Building the ACS Exams Anchoring Concept Content Map for Undergraduate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kristen; Holme, Thomas; Zenisky, April; Caruthers, Heather; Knaus, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The ability to coherently assess content knowledge throughout an entire undergraduate career represents a significant advantage for programmatic assessment strategies. Chemistry, as a discipline, has an unusual tool in this regard because of the nationally standardized exams from the ACS Exams Institute. These exams are norm-referenced and allow…

  10. State High School Exit Exams: Trends in Test Programs, Alternate Pathways, and Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The report draws from Center on Education Policy's eight-year study of high school exit exams to identify long-term trends in state policies and student performance. It highlights a growing trend among states to establish alternate pathways to graduation for students who are struggling to pass exit exams. The report also analyzes exit exam pass…

  11. Faculty Forum--Introductory Psychology Student Performance: Weekly Quizzes Followed by a Cumulative Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric

    2007-01-01

    Students in an introductory psychology course took a quiz a week over each textbook chapter, followed by a cumulative final exam. Students missing a quiz in class could make up a quiz at any time during the semester, and answers to quiz items were available to students prior to the cumulative final exam. The cumulative final exam consisted of half…

  12. Results of a remediation program for students at risk for failure on the NCLEX exam.

    PubMed

    Sifford, Susan; McDaniel, D Mike

    2007-01-01

    Forty-seven nursing students identified as at risk for failure on the NCLEX licensure exam took a commercially available exit exam before and after participation in a remedial test-taking course. Results indicated that participation in the course contributed to a significant increase (p < .001) in exit exam scores.

  13. Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Exam Performance in a College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Steven C.; Dickson, K. Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The authors experimentally investigated the effects of multiple-choice and short-answer format exam items on exam performance in a college classroom. They randomly assigned 50 students to take a 10-item short-answer pretest or posttest on two 50-item multiple-choice exams in an introduction to personality course. Students performed significantly…

  14. A Process of Students and Their Instructor Developing a Final Closed-Book Mathematics Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapke, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study, from a Canadian technical institute's upgrading mathematics course, where students played a role in developing the final closed-book exam that they sat. The study involved a process where students developed practice exams and solutions keys, students sat each other's practice exams, students evaluated classmates'…

  15. An Exploration into Improving Examinees' Acceptance of Participation in an Online Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, I-Fan; Chen, Ruey-Shin; Lu, Hao-Chun

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet and information technology, the issues related to online exams have become the concern of an increasing number of researchers. At present, the biggest challenges for the integration of web communication technology into online exams are the ability to detect cheating behaviors during the exam, and the…

  16. The Relationship between AP® Exam Performance and College Outcomes. Research Report No. 2009-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Xiong, Xinhui

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on the relationship between students' Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) performance in AP English Language, Biology, Calculus, and U.S. History, and their subsequent college success. For each AP Exam studied, students were divided into three groups according to their AP Exam performance (no AP Exam taken, score of 1 or 2, and a…

  17. Hispanic Student Performance on Advanced Placement Exams: A Multiyear, National Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Teresa Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the Advanced Placement exams that Hispanic students complete and to compare their overall performance with the performance of White students from 2000 to 2012. A second purpose was to determine which Advanced Placement exams were the most difficult exams for Hispanic students and which Advanced…

  18. International Students' First Encounters with Exams in the UK: Superficially Similar but Deeply Different

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Nick; Smith, Karen; Riley, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Although end of course exams remain a key mode of assessment in higher education, little research has focused on international students' experiences of exams. There seems to be a tacit assumption in most literature that exam preparation and strategies are universal, although differences in other areas of learning exist. As an exemplar, this…

  19. Do You Prefer to Have the Text or a Sheet with Your Physics Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Kastro M.

    2008-01-01

    Many high school and introductory college physics instructors ponder the choice between "open text" exams versus "facts and formulae sheet" exams. Other alternatives are closed book/closed notes exams or an instructor-prepared sheet of facts and relevant formulas. There is no agreement on merit. Rehfuss strongly opposes allowing students to use…

  20. Correlates of Performance Anxiety in Practical Music Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Gordon; McCambridge, Karen

    2004-01-01

    A sample of 120 young musicians (36 males and 84 females) aged between 15 and 18 years (M = 16.5, SD = 0.97) were administered the EPQ-R short scale and a revised PAI-R, a self-report measure of performance anxiety in practical music exams. Principal components analysis indicated that the PAI-R scores were best represented by a single component…

  1. SU-E-P-21: Impact of MLC Position Errors On Simultaneous Integrated Boost Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chengqiang, L; Yin, Y; Chen, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of MLC position errors on simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: To compare the dosimetric differences between the simulated plans and the clinical plans, ten patients with locally advanced NPC treated with SIB-IMRT were enrolled in this study. All plans were calculated with an inverse planning system (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System{sub )}. Random errors −2mm to 2mm{sub )},shift errors{sub (} 2mm,1mm and 0.5mm) and systematic extension/ contraction errors (±2mm, ±1mm and ±0.5mm) of the MLC leaf position were introduced respectively into the original plans to create the simulated plans. Dosimetry factors were compared between the original and the simulated plans. Results: The dosimetric impact of the random and system shift errors of MLC position was insignificant within 2mm, the maximum changes in D95% of PGTV,PTV1,PTV2 were-0.92±0.51%,1.00±0.24% and 0.62±0.17%, the maximum changes in the D0.1cc of spinal cord and brainstem were 1.90±2.80% and −1.78±1.42%, the maximum changes in the Dmean of parotids were1.36±1.23% and −2.25±2.04%.However,the impact of MLC extension or contraction errors was found significant. For 2mm leaf extension errors, the average changes in D95% of PGTV,PTV1,PTV2 were 4.31±0.67%,4.29±0.65% and 4.79±0.82%, the averaged value of the D0.1cc to spinal cord and brainstem were increased by 7.39±5.25% and 6.32±2.28%,the averaged value of the mean dose to left and right parotid were increased by 12.75±2.02%,13.39±2.17% respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetric effect was insignificant for random MLC leaf position errors up to 2mm. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for MLC extension or contraction errors.We should pay attention to the anatomic changes in target organs and anatomical structures during the course,individual radiotherapy was recommended to ensure adaptive doses.

  2. SU-E-T-347: Effect of MLC Leaf Position Inaccuracy On Dose Distribution for Spinal SBRT with Different Energies and Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    You, T; Dang, J; Dai, C; Yin, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of spinal SBRT when MLC leaf positions deviate from planning positions for different energies and doserates. Methods and Materials: 18 localized spinal metastases patients were selected for SBRT using IMRT planning with 9 posterior beams delivered at gantry angles ranging between 100°–260°. A modern linear accelerator(Varian Turebeam STX with HDMLC 2.5 mm thick leaf at isocenter) IMRT plans were generated using both 6X and 6X-FFF(Flattening filter free) beams with a nominal prescription dose of 6 Gy/fraction to PTV. Doserates ranging from 200–600 MU/min for 6X and 400–1400 MU/min for 6X-FFF, with 200 increments were examined. A fixed amount(0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 mm) of MLC-leaf position deviation was simulated to each plan under following conditions: 1)only along X1 collimator; 2)with increments at both X1 and X2 collimator directions;3)with reductions at both X1 and X2 collimator directions. Dose was recalculated for each modified plans. Both original and modified plans were delivered using Turebeam STX machine and measured using both portal dosimetry and a 3D dosimeter(Delta4 of ScandiDos). Each field’s Result were compared using following three parameters: the 95% iso-dose level Conformal Index(95%CI), the spinal cord maximum dose(SCDmax), and the planned target volume(PTV) mean dose. Results: Dosimetric impacts on the 95%CI, SCDmax and the PTV mean dose are: 1)negligible if MLC-leaf position deviation only along a single collimator direction ≥1.0 mm,2)substantial if MLC-leaf position increment along both collimator directions ≥0.3 mm(95% CI decreases while SCDmax and PTV mean-dose increase), 3)substantial if MLC-leaf position reduction along both collimator directions ≥0.3 mm(95% CI first increases and then decreases while SCDmax and PTV mean-dose decrease). Different energies and doserates demonstrated comparable dosimetric impacts. Conclusion: Substantial dose deviations could happen for spinal SBRT using

  3. Integrating The Integrated Skin Exam film into medical education.

    PubMed

    Lofgreen, Seth; Lehrer, Michael; Bennett, Paige; Garg, Amit; Dunnick, Cory A

    2016-11-15

    AbstractBackgroundThe mortality rate for melanoma continues to rise and the greatest improvement in melanoma survival is attributable to early detection with skin cancer screening exams. However, physicians feel that limited training in the examination of skin and limited clinical time both serve as barriers to adequately assess high-risk lesions.ObjectiveTo test the use of The Integrated Skin Exam film as an instructional tool to teach the examination of skin in a live classroom setting, outside of the purview of the original formal study.MethodsIdentical cross-sectional surveys were administered pre- and post-film to a class of first-year medical students at the time of viewing The Integrated Skin Exam film. Results were compared to the initial assessment of this film as a teaching tool in a research setting.ResultsOf the maximum 182 possible surveys administered, we collected 148 pre-surveys and 142 post-surveys (81.3% and 78.0% 33 response rates, respectively). After viewing the film, students showed improvement in identification of high-risk demographic 34 groups (79.3% vs 58.9%, p<0.001) and high-risk anatomic sites in both women (91.9% vs 59.6%, p<0.001) and men (92% vs 35 62.1%, p<0.001). Students demonstrated increased confidence in the skin cancer examination (SCE) (52.2% vs 6.9%, p<0.001) and a greater proportion (74.4% vs 48.3%, p<0.001) of students believed less than 3 minutes was required to integrate a skin cancer exam (SCE) into the routine examination.ConclusionsThe Integrated Skin Exam film is a valuable training tool as proven by increased knowledge of, and improved attitudes about the 2 SCE after viewing the film. In addition, there was a striking similarity in outcomes when using this film in a live classroom 3 environment compared to the original study setting.

  4. Air Force Health Care Providers Incidence of Performing Testicular Exams and Instruction of Testicular Self-Exam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    MD’s, 68% of PA’s, and 57% of NP’s are performing testicular exams on their patients during routine physicals or sports physicals . Additionally, 80% of...preparticipation physicals and annual physicals , providers are not providing this important health preventive information to men. Background In recent...remained constant, until recently, when it declined slightly, thought to be due to advances in therapy (Boring, Squires, & Tang, 1991). Although the

  5. Improvements in dose accuracy delivered with static-MLC IMRT on an integrated linear accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ji; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Stepaniak, Christopher J.; Farrey, Karl J.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Dose accuracy has been shown to vary with dose per segment and dose rate when delivered with static multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Varian C-series MLC controllers. The authors investigated the impact of monitor units (MUs) per segment and dose rate on the dose delivery accuracy of SMLC-IMRT fields on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC), which delivers dose and manages motion of all components using a single integrated controller. Methods: An SMLC sequence was created consisting of ten identical 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} segments with identical MUs. Beam holding between segments was achieved by moving one out-of-field MLC leaf pair. Measurements were repeated for various combinations of MU/segment ranging from 1 to 40 and dose rates of 100-600 MU/min for a 6 MV photon beam (6X) and dose rates of 800-2400 MU/min for a 10 MV flattening-filter free photon (10XFFF) beam. All measurements were made with a Farmer (0.6 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber placed at the isocenter in a solid-water phantom at 10 cm depth. The measurements were performed on two Varian LINACs: C-series Trilogy and TrueBeam. Each sequence was delivered three times and the dose readings for the corresponding segments were averaged. The effects of MU/segment, dose rate, and LINAC type on the relative dose variation ({Delta}{sub i}) were compared using F-tests ({alpha} = 0.05). Results: On the Trilogy, large {Delta}{sub i} was observed in small MU segments: at 1 MU/segment, the maximum {Delta}{sub i} was 10.1% and 57.9% at 100 MU/min and 600 MU/min, respectively. Also, the first segment of each sequence consistently overshot ({Delta}{sub i} > 0), while the last segment consistently undershot ({Delta}{sub i} < 0). On the TrueBeam, at 1 MU/segment, {Delta}{sub i} ranged from 3.0% to 4.5% at 100 and 600 MU/min; no obvious overshoot/undershoot trend was observed. F-tests showed statistically significant difference [(1 - {beta}) =1.0000] between the

  6. Dosimetric and delivery efficiency investigation for treating hepatic lesions with a MLC-equipped robotic radiosurgery–radiotherapy combined system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lihui Price, Robert A.; Wang, Lu; Meyer, Joshua; Fan, James; Charlie Ma, Chang Ming

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife M6 (CK-M6) Series introduced a multileaf collimator (MLC) for extending its capability from stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) to conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. This work is to investigate the dosimetric quality of plans that are generated using MLC-shaped beams on the CK-M6, as well as their delivery time, via comparisons with the intensity modulated radiotherapy plans that were clinically used on a Varian Linac for treating hepatic lesions. Methods: Nine patient cases were selected and divided into three groups with three patients in each group: (1) the group-one patients were treated conventionally (25 fractions); (2) the group-two patients were treated with SBRT-like hypofractionation (5 fractions); and (3) the group-three patients were treated similar to group-one patients, but with two planning target volumes (PTVs) and two different prescription dose levels correspondingly. The clinically used plans were generated on the ECLIPSE treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered on a Varian Linac (E-V plans). The multiplan (MP) TPS was used to replan these clinical cases with the MLC as the beam device for the CK-M6 (C-M plans). After plans were normalized to the same PTV dose coverage, comparisons between the C-M and E-V plans were performed based on D{sub 99%} (percentage of prescription dose received by 99% of the PTV), D{sub 0.1cm{sup 3}} (the percentage of prescription dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3} of the PTV), and doses received by critical structures. Then, the delivery times for the C-M plans will be obtained, which are the MP TPS generated estimations assuming having an imaging interval of 60 s. Results: The difference in D{sub 99%} between C-M and E-V plans is +0.6% on average (+ or − indicating a higher or lower dose from C-M plans than from E-V plans) with a range from −4.1% to +3.8%, and the difference in D{sub 0.1cm{sup 3}} was −1.0% on average with a range from −5.1% to +2.9%. The PTV

  7. Should the MCAT exam be used for medical school admissions in Canada?

    PubMed

    Eskander, Antoine; Shandling, Maureen; Hanson, Mark D

    2013-05-01

    In light of the structural and content changes to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) to be implemented in 2015 and the recent diversity- and social-accountability-based recommendations of the Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) project, the authors review and reexamine the use of the MCAT exam in Canadian medical school admissions decisions.This Perspective article uses a point-counterpoint format to discuss three main advantages and disadvantages of using the MCAT exam in the medical school admissions process, from a Canadian perspective. The authors examine three questions regarding the FMEC recommendations and the revised MCAT exam: (1) Is the MCAT exam equal and useful in Canadian admissions? (2) Does the MCAT exam affect matriculant diversity? and (3) Is the MCAT exam a strong predictor of future performance? They present the most recent arguments and evidence for and against use of the MCAT exam, with the purpose of summarizing these different perspectives for readers.

  8. SU-E-T-605: Performance Evaluation of MLC Leaf-Sequencing Algorithms in Head-And-Neck IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, J; Lin, H; Chow, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficiency of three multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf-sequencing algorithms proposed by Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al using external beam treatment plans for head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: IMRT plans for head-and-neck were created using the CORVUS treatment planning system. The plans were optimized and the fluence maps for all photon beams determined. Three different MLC leaf-sequencing algorithms based on Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al were used to calculate the final photon segmental fields and their monitor units in delivery. For comparison purpose, the maximum intensity of fluence map was kept constant in different plans. The number of beam segments and total number of monitor units were calculated for the three algorithms. Results: From results of number of beam segments and total number of monitor units, we found that algorithm of Galvin et al had the largest number of monitor unit which was about 70% larger than the other two algorithms. Moreover, both algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al have relatively lower number of beam segment compared to Chen et al. Although values of number of beam segment and total number of monitor unit calculated by different algorithms varied with the head-and-neck plans, it can be seen that algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al performed well with a lower number of beam segment, though algorithm of Galvin et al had a larger total number of monitor units than Siochi et al. Conclusion: Although performance of the leaf-sequencing algorithm varied with different IMRT plans having different fluence maps, an evaluation is possible based on the calculated number of beam segment and monitor unit. In this study, algorithm by Siochi et al was found to be more efficient in the head-and-neck IMRT. The Project Sponsored by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (J2014HGXJ0094) and the Scientific Research Foundation for the

  9. Structural and Electronic Transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells during Potential-step Operating Processes Characterized by In-situ Time-resolved XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Takao, Shinobu; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Uruga, Tomoya; Gayen, Sirshendu; Velaga, Srihari; Saniyal, Milan K.; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic structural and electronic transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C, Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) during the potential-step operating processes between 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE (potential vs RHE) were characterized by in-situ (operando) time-resolved Pt LIII-edge quick-XAFS at 100 ms time-resolution. Potential-dependent surface structures and oxidation states of Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticles on carbon at 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE were also analyzed by in-situ Pt LIII-edge and Pd K-edge quick-XAFS. The Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticle surfaces were restructured and disordered at 1.4 VRHE, which were induced by strong Pt-O bonds as well as alloying effects. The rate constants for the changes of Pt valence, CN(Pt-Pt), CN(Pt-Pd) and CN(Pt-O) (CN: coordination number) in the potential-step operating processes were also determined and discussed in relation to the origin of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of the Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts.

  10. SU-E-T-418: Explore the Sensitive of the Planar Quality Assurance to the MLC Error with Different Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Peng, J; Xie, J; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of the planar quality assurance to MLC errors with different beam complexities in intensity-modulate radiation therapy. Methods: sixteen patients’ planar quality assurance (QA) plans in our institution were enrolled in this study, including 10 dynamic MLC (DMLC) IMRT plans measured by Portal Dosimetry and 6 static MLC (SMLC) IMRT plans measured by Mapcheck. The gamma pass rate was calculated using vender’s software. The field numbers were 74 and 40 for DMLC and SMLC, respectively. A random error was generated and introduced to these fields. The modified gamma pass rate was calculated by comparing the original measured fluence and modified fields’ fluence. A decreasing gamma pass rate was acquired using the original gamma pass rate minus the modified gamma pass rate. Eight complexity scores were calculated in MATLAB based on the fluence and MLC sequence of these fields. The complexity scores include fractal dimension, monitor unit of field, modulation index, fluence map complexity, weighted average of field area, weighted average of field perimeter, and small aperture ratio ( <5cm{sup 2} and <50cm{sup 2}). The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was implemented to analyze the correlation between these scores and decreasing gamma rate. Results: The relation between the decreasing gamma pass rate and field complexity was insignificant for most complexity scores. The most significant complexity score was fluence map complexity for SMLC, which have ρ =0.4274 (p-value=0.0063). For DMLC, the most significant complex score was fractal dimension, which have ρ=−0.3068 (p-value=0.0081). Conclusions: According to the primarily Result of this study, the sensitivity gamma pass rate was not strongly relate to the field complexity.

  11. Melatonin Attenuates Aortic Endothelial Permeability and Arteriosclerosis in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Possible Role of MLCK- and MLCP-Dependent MLC Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-tao; Su, Huan; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-qin; Wang, Chang-jiang; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The development of diabetic macrovascular complications is a multifactorial process, and melatonin may possess cardiovascular protective properties. This study was designed to evaluate whether melatonin attenuates arteriosclerosis and endothelial permeability by suppressing the myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK)/myosin light-chain phosphorylation (p-MLC) system via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway or by suppressing the myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit phosphorylation (p-MYPT)/p-MLC system in diabetes mellitus (DM). Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, including control, high-fat diet, DM, and DM + melatonin groups. Melatonin was administered (10 mg/kg/d) by gavage for 12 weeks. The DM significantly increased the serum fasting blood glucose and lipid levels, as well as insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, which were attenuated by melatonin therapy to various extents. Importantly, the aortic endothelial permeability was significantly increased in DM rats but was dramatically reversed following treatment with melatonin. Our findings further indicated that hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia enhanced the expressions of MLCK, p-MYPT, and p-MLC, which were partly associated with decreased membrane type 1 expression, increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, and increased p38 expression. However, these changes in protein expression were also significantly reversed by melatonin. Thus, our results are the first to demonstrate that the endothelial hyperpermeability induced by DM is associated with increased expressions of MLCK, p-MYPT, and p-MLC, which can be attenuated by melatonin at least partly through the ERK/p38 signaling pathway.

  12. Monte Carlo model of the Elekta SLiplus accelerator: validation of a new MLC component module in BEAM for a 6 MV beam.

    PubMed

    Van de Walle, J; Martens, C; Reynaert, N; Palmans, H; Coghe, M; De Neve, W; De Wagter, C; Thierens, H

    2003-02-07

    A new component module (CM), called MLCE, has been implemented in the BEAM program. The CM takes into account the particular 'tongue-and-groove' design of the Elekta multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and the air gap between the leaves. The model was validated by two series of measurements and simulations. The first benchmarking series focuses on the interleaf leakage and the intraleaf transmission. The measurement showed a total transmission through the MLC of 1.42% of the open field dose. Two Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were made, the first with the new CM MLCE (inclusive of air gap) and the second with the CM MLCQ (exclusive of air gap), which is available in the BEAM distribution. When the air gap between the leaves was determined by varying the parameters of the leaf geometry within tolerance limits on the technical drawing, the total measured transmission of 1.42% was well reproduced by the CM MLCE. In contrast, MC simulations with MLCQ showed that the transmission through the MLC calculated without the interleaf leakage is only 44% of the total transmitted radiation. The relevance of the detailed MLC modelling was demonstrated also by studying the 'adjacent' tongue-and-groove effect, where two adjacent (not opposing) leaves are complementary, opened or closed. The two complementary leaf settings were simulated both with the CM MLCE and MLCQ. A comparison with measurements was made. In regions covered by two or more leaves, the dose increased by 14% for two leaves and by 40% for more than two leaves when the interleaf leakage was included in the transmission. The tongue-and-groove effect was perfectly reproduced by the MLCE module.

  13. SU-E-T-627: Precision Modelling of the Leaf-Bank Rotation in Elekta’s Agility MLC: Is It Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Vujicic, M; Belec, J; Heath, E; Gholampourkashi, S; Cygler, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the method used to determine the leaf bank rotation angle (LBROT) as a parameter for modeling the Elekta Agility multi-leaf collimator (MLC) for Monte Carlo simulations and to evaluate the clinical impact of LBROT. Methods: A detailed model of an Elekta Infinity linac including an Agility MLC was built using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. The Agility 160-leaf MLC is modelled using the MLCE component module which allows for leaf bank rotation using the parameter LBROT. A precise value of LBROT is obtained by comparing measured and simulated profiles of a specific field, which has leaves arranged in a repeated pattern such that one leaf is opened and the adjacent one is closed. Profile measurements from an Agility linac are taken with gafchromic film, and an ion chamber is used to set the absolute dose. The measurements are compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and the LBROT is adjusted until a match is found. The clinical impact of LBROT is evaluated by observing how an MC dose calculation changes with LBROT. A clinical Stereotactic Body Radiation Treatment (SBRT) plan is calculated using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulations with different input values for LBROT. Results: Using the method outlined above, the LBROT is determined to be 9±1 mrad. Differences as high as 4% are observed in a clinical SBRT plan between the extreme case (LBROT not modeled) and the nominal case. Conclusion: In small-field radiation therapy treatment planning, it is important to properly account for LBROT as an input parameter for MC dose calculations with the Agility MLC. More work is ongoing to elucidate the observed differences by determining the contributions from transmission dose, change in field size, and source occlusion, which are all dependent on LBROT. This work was supported by OCAIRO (Ontario Consortium of Adaptive Interventions in Radiation Oncology), funded by the Ontario Research Fund.

  14. SU-E-T-774: Use of a Scintillator-Mirror-Camera System for the Measurement of MLC Leakage Radiation with the CyberKnife M6 System

    SciTech Connect

    Goggin, L; Kilby, W; Noll, M; Maurer, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A technique using a scintillator-mirror-camera system to measure MLC leakage was developed to provide an efficient alternative to film dosimetry while maintaining high spatial resolution. This work describes the technique together with measurement uncertainties. Methods: Leakage measurements were made for the InCise™ MLC using the Logos XRV-2020A device. For each measurement approximately 170 leakage and background images were acquired using optimized camera settings. Average background was subtracted from each leakage frame before filtering the integrated leakage image to replace anomalous pixels. Pixel value to dose conversion was performed using a calibration image. Mean leakage was calculated within an ROI corresponding to the primary beam, and maximum leakage was determined by binning the image into overlapping 1mm x 1mm ROIs. 48 measurements were performed using 3 cameras and multiple MLC-linac combinations in varying beam orientations, with each compared to film dosimetry. Optical and environmental influences were also investigated. Results: Measurement time with the XRV-2020A was 8 minutes vs. 50 minutes using radiochromic film, and results were available immediately. Camera radiation exposure degraded measurement accuracy. With a relatively undamaged camera, mean leakage agreed with film measurement to ≤0.02% in 92% cases, ≤0.03% in 100% (for maximum leakage the values were 88% and 96%) relative to reference open field dose. The estimated camera lifetime over which this agreement is maintained is at least 150 measurements, and can be monitored using reference field exposures. A dependency on camera temperature was identified and a reduction in sensitivity with distance from image center due to optical distortion was characterized. Conclusion: With periodic monitoring of the degree of camera radiation damage, the XRV-2020A system can be used to measure MLC leakage. This represents a significant time saving when compared to the traditional

  15. Development of the Exams Data Analysis Spreadsheet as a Tool to Help Instructors Conduct Customizable Analyses of Student ACS Exam Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The American Chemical Society Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) has recently developed the Exams Data Analysis Spread (EDAS) as a tool to help instructors conduct customizable analyses of their student data from ACS exams. The EDAS calculations allow instructors to analyze their students' performances both at the total score and individual item…

  16. Investigating the Variables in a Mock Exam Study Session Designed to Improve Student Exam Performance in an Undergraduate Behavior Modification and Therapy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotson, Wesley H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify components of an optional mock exam review session (e.g. requiring students to write answers, providing students grading keys for questions) responsible for improvements in student performance on application-based short-essay exams in an undergraduate behavior modification course. Both…

  17. Airborne particulate matter in vitro exposure induces cytoskeleton remodeling through activation of the ROCK-MYPT1-MLC pathway in A549 epithelial lung cells.

    PubMed

    Chirino, Yolanda I; García-Cuellar, Claudia María; García-García, Carlos; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Herrera, Luis A; López-Saavedra, Alejandro; Miranda, Javier; Quintana-Belmares, Raúl; Pérez, Irma Rosas; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia

    2017-03-06

    Airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10μm (PM10) is considered a risk factor for the development of lung cancer. Little is known about the cellular mechanisms by which PM10 is associated with cancer, but there is evidence that its exposure can lead to an acquired invasive phenotype, apoptosis evasion, inflammasome activation, and cytoskeleton remodeling in lung epithelial cells. Cytoskeleton remodeling occurs through actin stress fiber formation, which is partially regulated through ROCK kinase activation, we aimed to investigate if this protein was activated in response to PM10 exposure in A549 lung epithelial cells. Results showed that 10μg/cm(2) of PM10 had no influence on cell viability but increased actin stress fibers, cytoplasmic ROCK expression, and phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase-targeting 1 (MYPT1) and myosin light chain (MLC) proteins, which are targeted by ROCK. The inhibition of ROCK prevented actin stress fiber formation and the phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MLC, suggesting that PM10 activated the ROCK-MYPT1-MLC pathway in lung epithelial cells. The activation of ROCK1 has been involved in the acquisition of malignant phenotypes, and its induction by PM10 exposure could contribute to the understanding of PM10 as a risk factor for cancer development through the mechanisms associated with invasive phenotype.

  18. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. Methods In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Results Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (p<0.001). The most commonly used resources for medical problem solving were journal articles looked up on PubMed or Google®, and books. Conclusions Our study provides evidence, that tablet computer based integrated training and clinical practice enhances medical education and exam performance. Larger, multicenter trials are required to independently validate our data. Residency and fellowship directors are encouraged to consider adding portable computer devices, multimedia content and introduce blended learning to their respective training programs. PMID:28369063

  19. How accurately can students estimate their performance on an exam and how does this relate to their actual performance on the exam?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Research has shown students' beliefs regarding their own abilities in math and science can influence their performance in these disciplines. I investigated the relationship between students' estimated performance and actual performance on five exams in a second semester calculus-based physics class. Students in a second-semester calculus-based physics class were given about 72 hours after the completion of each of five exams, to estimate their individual and class mean score on each exam. Students were given extra credit worth 1% of the exam points for estimating their score correct within 2% of the actual score and another 1% extra credit for estimating the class mean score within 2% of the correct value. I compared students' individual and mean score estimations with the actual scores to investigate the relationship between estimation accuracies and exam performance of the students as well as trends over the semester.

  20. Investigation into the need for ingesting foreign imaging exams into local systems and evaluation of the design challenges of Foreign Exam Management (FEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Lazar; Agrawal, Arun; Bak, Peter; Bender, Duane; Koff, David

    2015-03-01

    The deployment of regional and national Electronic Health Record solutions has been a focus of many countries throughout the past decade. Most of these deployments have taken the approach of "sharing" imaging exams via portals and web-based viewers. The motivation of portal/web-based access is driven by a) the perception that review of imaging exams via portal methods is satisfactory to all users and b) the perceived complexity of ingesting foreign exams into local systems. This research project set out to objectively evaluate who really needs foreign exams within their local systems, what those systems might be and how often this is required. Working on the belief that Foreign Exam Management (FEM) is required to support clinical workflow, the project implemented a FEM capability within an XDSI. b domain to identify the design challenges and nuances associated with FEM.

  1. Treatment planning systems for external whole brain radiation therapy: With and without MLC (multi leaf collimator) optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiyono, T.; Budi, W. S.; Hidayanto, E.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy for brain malignancy is done by giving a dose of radiation to a whole volume of the brain (WBRT) followed by a booster at the primary tumor with more advanced techniques. Two external radiation fields given from the right and left side. Because the shape of the head, there will be an unavoidable hotspot radiation dose of greater than 107%. This study aims to optimize planning of radiation therapy using field in field multi-leaf collimator technique. A study of 15 WBRT samples with CT slices is done by adding some segments of radiation in each field of radiation and delivering appropriate dose weighting using a TPS precise plan Elekta R 2.15. Results showed that this optimization a more homogeneous radiation on CTV target volume, lower dose in healthy tissue, and reduced hotspots in CTV target volume. Comparison results of field in field multi segmented MLC technique with standard conventional technique for WBRT are: higher average minimum dose (77.25% ± 0:47%) vs (60% ± 3:35%); lower average maximum dose (110.27% ± 0.26%) vs (114.53% ± 1.56%); lower hotspot volume (5.71% vs 27.43%); and lower dose on eye lenses (right eye: 9.52% vs 18.20%); (left eye: 8.60% vs 16.53%).

  2. WE-A-304-01: Strategies and Technologies for Cranial Radiosurgery Planning: MLC-Based Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G.

    2015-06-15

    The high fractional doses, stringent requirements for accuracy and precision, and surgical perspective characteristic of intracranial radiosurgery create considerations for treatment planning which are distinct from most other radiotherapy procedures. This session will introduce treatment planning techniques specific to two popular intracranial SRS modalities: Gamma Knife and MLC-based Linac. The basic treatment delivery characteristics of each device will be reviewed with a focus on how those characteristics determine the paradigm used for treatment planning. Basic techniques for treatment planning will be discussed, including considerations such as isodose selection, target and organ-at-risk definition, quality indices, and protection of critical structures. Future directions for SRS treatment planning will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Introduce the basic physical principles of intracranial radiosurgery and how they are realized in the treatment planning paradigms for Gamma Knife and Linac radiosurgery. Demonstrate basic treatment planning techniques. Discuss metrics for evaluating SRS treatment plan quality. Discuss recent and future advances in SRS treatment planning. D. Schlesinger receives research support from Elekta, AB.

  3. Emergency medicine residents’ attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    PubMed Central

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives about the exam and exam preparation in order to generate hypotheses and better inform future preparation efforts. Methods Second- and third-year EM residents at a single institution were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data. Results Thirteen EM residents participated in the study. Eight major themes and 18 sub-themes were identified. These were further characterized as relating to the exam itself or to exam preparation. Residents generally value the in-training exam. Sixty-nine percent noted that it provided an assessment of their current knowledge and deficiencies. Thirty-eight percent noted that it improved familiarity with the qualifying exam. Regarding exam preparation, residents stated that a question format was preferred, especially when accompanying explanations were of high quality. Additionally, practical considerations, such as portability, impacted resident selection of study tools. Conclusion Residents value the in-training exam as a marker of their academic progress and for their ability to gain familiarity with the qualifying exam. They prefer question-based preparation over text-based learning, as long as there is a detailed explanation of each answer. Educators creating structured in-training review may want to focus on question-based material with detailed explanations. PMID:24062620

  4. Language Placement and Beyond: Guidelines for the Design and Implementation of a Computerized Spanish Heritage Language Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudrie, Sara M.; Ducar, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the design, implementation, and analysis of a computerized Spanish heritage language (SHL) placement exam. The exam created by the authors exemplifies how to design a simple yet effective placement exam with limited resources. It is suggested that an SHL placement exam should be developed in-house due not only to the diversity…

  5. Advanced Ultrasonic Diagnosis of Extremity Trauma: The Faster Exam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, S. A.; Henry, S. E.; Moed, B. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Marshburn, T.; Hamilton, D. R.; Logan, J.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Williams, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasound is of prO)len accuracy in abdominal and thoracic trauma and may be useful to diagnose extremity injury in situations where radiography is not available such as military and space applications. We prospectively evaluated the utility of extremity , ultrasound performed by trained, non-physician personnel in patients with extremity trauma, to simulate remote aerospace or military applications . Methods: Patients with extremity trauma were identified by history, physical examination, and radiographic studies. Ultrasound examination was performed bilaterally by nonphysician personnel with a portable ultrasound device using a 10-5 MHz linear probe, Images were video-recorded for later analysis against radiography by Fisher's exact test. The average time of examination was 4 minutes. Ultrasound accurately diagnosed extremity, injury in 94% of patients with no false positive exams; accuracy was greater in mid-shaft locations and least in the metacarpa/metatarsals. Soft tissue/tendon injury was readily visualized . Extremity ultrasound can be performed quickly and accurately by nonphysician personnel with excellent accuracy. Blinded verification of the utility of ultrasound in patients with extremity injury should be done to determine if Extremity and Respiratory evaluation should be added to the FAST examination (the FASTER exam) and verify the technique in remote locations such as military and aerospace applications.

  6. [Difference analysis among majors in medical parasitology exam papers by test item bank proposition].

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Zhi; Ya-Jun, Ma; Cao, Yi; Qian, Fen; Li, Xiang-Yu

    2012-04-30

    The quality index among "Medical Parasitology" exam papers and measured data for students in three majors from the university in 2010 were compared and analyzed. The exam papers were formed from the test item bank. The alpha reliability coefficients of the three exam papers were above 0.70. The knowledge structure and capacity structure of the exam papers were basically balanced. But the alpha reliability coefficients of the second major was the lowest, mainly due to quality of test items in the exam paper and the failure of revising the index of test item bank in time. This observation demonstrated that revising the test items and their index in the item bank according to the measured data can improve the quality of test item bank proposition and reduce the difference among exam papers.

  7. Red vs. green: Does the exam booklet color matter in higher education summative evaluations? Not likely.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Winfred; Cho, Inchul; Muñoz, Gonzalo J

    2016-10-01

    We examined the so-called "red effect" in the context of higher education summative exams under the premise that unlike the conditions or situations where this effect typically has been obtained, the totality of factors, such as higher motivation, familiarity with exam material, and more reliance on domain knowledge that characterize high-stakes testing such as those in operational educational settings, are likely to mitigate any color effects. Using three naturally occurring archival data sets in which students took exams on either red or green exam booklets, the results indicated that booklet color (red vs. green) did not affect exam performance. From a scientific perspective, the results suggest that color effects may be attenuated by factors that characterize high-stakes assessments, and from an applied perspective, they suggest that the choice of red vs. green exam booklets in higher education summative evaluations is likely not a concern.

  8. Washback Effect of University Entrance exams in Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Patricia; Mier, Verónica; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Curricular issues of subject Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences are studied in relation to university entrance exams performed in several Spanish regions between 2009–2014. By using quantitative and qualitative analyses, it has been studied how these exams align with curriculum and how they produce a washback on curriculum and teachers’ work. Additionally, one questionnaire about teachers’ practices has been performed, in order to find out how the exams are influencing teaching methodology development. Main results obtained show that evaluation is producing a bias on the official curriculum, substantially simplifying the specific orientation that should guide applied mathematics. Furthermore, teachers’ practices are influenced by the exams, and they usually approach their teaching methodology to the frequent types of exams. Also, slight differences among the teachers lead to distinguish two behavioral subgroups. Results can also be useful in an international context, because of the importance of standardized exit exams in OECD countries. PMID:27936103

  9. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report is submitted in accordance with section 165(b) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, which requires that the Secretary of Energy submit quarterly reports to Congress on Activities undertaken with respect to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This August 15, 1990, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1990, through June 30, 1990. 3 tabs.

  10. Want to Reduce Guessing and Cheating While Making Students Happier? Give More Exams!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverty, James T.; Bauer, Wolfgang; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Westfall, Gary

    2012-12-01

    It is almost universally agreed that more frequent formative assessment (homework, clicker questions, practice tests, etc.) leads to better student performance and generally better course evaluations. There is, however, only anecdotal evidence that the same would be true for more frequent summative assessment (exams). There maybe many arguments against giving more exams, including the general "pain" associated with examinations, as well as reduced teaching time, since classroom sessions are dedicated to exams rather than lecturing. We present evidence that increasing the number of exams in fact does lead to better learning success, less cheating and guessing on homework, and better student course evaluations.

  11. Comparison of Exams for Active Learning Technologies vs. Traditional Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornstra, Andrew; Djordjevic, Branislav; Dworzecka, Maria

    2017-01-01

    George Mason University has first semester (PHYS-160) and second semester (PHYS-260) physics course which consist of two sections. One is a traditional lecture style format (TRAD) and the other is a newer format which is a take on the ``flipped'' classroom. This newer style is referred to as Active Learning with Technologies (ALT). This course style has been in place for several years and has been studied before within George Mason University for final grade differences. These studies suggested that the ALT sections performed better, but grade weighting consistency, test time, and test content were not strictly controlled. The purpose of this study is to cross-examine the performance of students in these different class formats during Fall 2016 (PHYS-260) and Spring 2015 (PHYS-160) on very nearly identical exams over identical test times while controlling for almost every variable.

  12. A Java speech implementation of the Mini Mental Status Exam.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. S.; Starren, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Folstein Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is a simple, widely used, verbally administered test to assess cognitive function. The Java Speech Application Programming Interface (JSAPI) is a new, cross-platform interface for both speech recognition and speech synthesis in the Java environment. To evaluate the suitability of the JSAPI for interactive, patient interview applications, a JSAPI implementation of the MMSE was developed. The MMSE contains questions that vary in structure in order to assess different cognitive functions. This question variability provided an excellent test-bed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of JSAPI. The application is based on Java platform 2 and a JSAPI interface to the IBM ViaVoice recognition engine. Design and implementations issues are discussed. Preliminary usability studies demonstrate that an automated MMSE maybe a useful screening tool for cognitive disorders and changes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10566396

  13. Porokeratosis ptychotropica: a rare manifestation with typical histological exam*

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Campaner, Adriana Bittencourt; Manzione, Thiago da Silveira; Rodrigues, Maria Clarissa de Faria Soares

    2016-01-01

    Porokeratosis is a disorder of epidermal keratinization characterized clinically by a distinctive ridge-like border, and histologically by cornoid lamellae. The known clinical variants of porokeratosis are: classic porokeratosis of Mibelli, disseminated superficial (actinic) porokeratosis (DSAP), porokeratosis palmaris et plantaris disseminata, linear porokeratosis and punctate porokeratosis. In 1995, a seventh form was described as porokeratosis ptychotropica: a verrucous form resembling psoriasis involving the gluteal cleft presenting on the histological exam multiple cornoid lamellae. There are very few reports in the literature of this clinical variant. The present study describes the case of a healthy male presenting gluteal hyperkeratotic plaques for 22 years. He had been to several dermatologists, none of them had achieved a definitive diagnosis. We present a typical clinical presentation and its dermoscopy findings, in addition to histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27579746

  14. Predicting NCLEX-PN success with the HESI Exit Exam.

    PubMed

    Young, Anne; Willson, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Surveys were mailed to directors of 72 randomly selected practical nursing (PN) schools that administered Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam for Practical Nurses (E2-PN) during the 2006-2007 academic year. Data were collected regarding students' NCLEX-PN outcomes and the schools' benchmarking and remediation policies. The first version of the E2-PN was 99.48% accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Versions two and three of the E2-PN, which were administered to students who were remediated because they did not achieve the faculty-designated benchmark, were also highly accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Most faculties set 850 as their school's E2-PN benchmark, and 73% of the respondents required remediation for students who did not achieve the benchmark score. The most frequently cited remediation strategy was tutoring.

  15. School Shootings Stun Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the impact brought by the school shootings at Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota to the school community. A deeply troubled 16-year-old student shot and killed seven other people and himself at a high school. The nation's deadliest school attack since the 1999 slayings at Colorado's suburban Columbine High School took…

  16. 26 CFR 27 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Reserved 27 PARTS 27-29 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 PARTS 27-29...

  17. 26 CFR 27 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reserved 27 PARTS 27-29 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 PARTS 27-29...

  18. 26 CFR 27 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reserved 27 PARTS 27-29 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 PARTS 27-29...

  19. 26 CFR 27 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reserved 27 PARTS 27-29 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 PARTS 27-29...

  20. 26 CFR 27 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reserved 27 PARTS 27-29 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 PARTS 27-29...

  1. Content validity of manual spinal palpatory exams - A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najm, Wadie I; Seffinger, Michael A; Mishra, Shiraz I; Dickerson, Vivian M; Adams, Alan; Reinsch, Sibylle; Murphy, Linda S; Goodman, Arnold F

    2003-01-01

    Background Many health care professionals use spinal palpatory exams as a primary and well-accepted part of the evaluation of spinal pathology. However, few studies have explored the validity of spinal palpatory exams. To evaluate the status of the current scientific evidence, we conducted a systematic review to assess the content validity of spinal palpatory tests used to identify spinal neuro-musculoskeletal dysfunction. Methods Review of eleven databases and a hand search of peer-reviewed literature, published between 1965–2002, was undertaken. Two blinded reviewers abstracted pertinent data from the retrieved papers, using a specially developed quality-scoring instrument. Five papers met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results Three of the five papers included in the review explored the content validity of motion tests. Two of these papers focused on identifying the level of fixation (decreased mobility) and one focused on range of motion. All three studies used a mechanical model as a reference standard. Two of the five papers included in the review explored the validity of pain assessment using the visual analogue scale or the subjects' own report as reference standards. Overall the sensitivity of studies looking at range of motion tests and pain varied greatly. Poor sensitivity was reported for range of motion studies regardless of the examiner's experience. A slightly better sensitivity (82%) was reported in one study that examined cervical pain. Conclusions The lack of acceptable reference standards may have contributed to the weak sensitivity findings. Given the importance of spinal palpatory tests as part of the spinal evaluation and treatment plan, effort is required by all involved disciplines to create well-designed and implemented studies in this area. PMID:12734016

  2. Army Reserve Transformation: An Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Federal Reserve Restructuring Initiative (FRRI). Critics say these changes have been attempted before, but were unsuccessful. This paper describes the history and current situation of the USAR. It then reviews possible transformational lessons that the USAR can learn from another branch of the Armed Forces, the U.S. Navy Reserve, (USNR) in terms of Naval Reserve recruiting, Naval Reserve advancement, and Naval Reserve culture. Finally, changes for future transformation efforts in the USAR are recommended, foremost among them being a change in organizational culture. (21

  3. Low-Dose Lithium Stabilizes Human Endothelial Barrier by Decreasing MLC Phosphorylation and Universally Augments Cholinergic Vasorelaxation Capacity in a Direct Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bosche, Bert; Molcanyi, Marek; Rej, Soham; Doeppner, Thorsten R.; Obermann, Mark; Müller, Daniel J.; Das, Anupam; Hescheler, Jürgen; Macdonald, R. Loch; Noll, Thomas; Härtel, Frauke V.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium at serum concentrations up to 1 mmol/L has been used in patients suffering from bipolar disorder for decades and has recently been shown to reduce the risk for ischemic stroke in these patients. The risk for stroke and thromboembolism depend not only on cerebral but also on general endothelial function and health; the entire endothelium as an organ is therefore pathophysiologically relevant. Regardless, the knowledge about the direct impact of lithium on endothelial function remains poor. We conducted an experimental study using lithium as pharmacologic pretreatment for murine, porcine and human vascular endothelium. We predominantly investigated endothelial vasorelaxation capacities in addition to human basal and dynamic (thrombin-/PAR-1 receptor agonist-impaired) barrier functioning including myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation (MLC-P). Low-dose therapeutic lithium concentrations (0.4 mmol/L) significantly augment the cholinergic endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation capacities of cerebral and thoracic arteries, independently of central and autonomic nerve system influences. Similar concentrations of lithium (0.2–0.4 mmol/L) significantly stabilized the dynamic thrombin-induced and PAR-1 receptor agonist-induced permeability of human endothelium, while even the basal permeability appeared to be stabilized. The lithium-attenuated dynamic permeability was mediated by a reduced endothelial MLC-P known to be followed by a lessening of endothelial cell contraction and paracellular gap formation. The well-known lithium-associated inhibition of inositol monophosphatase/glycogen synthase kinase-3-β signaling-pathways involving intracellular calcium concentrations in neurons seems to similarly occur in endothelial cells, too, but with different down-stream effects such as MLC-P reduction. This is the first study discovering low-dose lithium as a drug directly stabilizing human endothelium and ubiquitously augmenting cholinergic endothelium

  4. A virtual photon source model of an Elekta linear accelerator with integrated mini MLC for Monte Carlo based IMRT dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Sikora, M; Dohm, O; Alber, M

    2007-08-07

    A dedicated, efficient Monte Carlo (MC) accelerator head model for intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning is needed to afford a highly accurate simulation of tiny IMRT fields. A virtual source model (VSM) of a mini multi-leaf collimator (MLC) (the Elekta Beam Modulator (EBM)) is presented, allowing efficient generation of particles even for small fields. The VSM of the EBM is based on a previously published virtual photon energy fluence model (VEF) (Fippel et al 2003 Med. Phys. 30 301) commissioned with large field measurements in air and in water. The original commissioning procedure of the VEF, based on large field measurements only, leads to inaccuracies for small fields. In order to improve the VSM, it was necessary to change the VEF model by developing (1) a method to determine the primary photon source diameter, relevant for output factor calculations, (2) a model of the influence of the flattening filter on the secondary photon spectrum and (3) a more realistic primary photon spectrum. The VSM model is used to generate the source phase space data above the mini-MLC. Later the particles are transmitted through the mini-MLC by a passive filter function which significantly speeds up the time of generation of the phase space data after the mini-MLC, used for calculation of the dose distribution in the patient. The improved VSM model was commissioned for 6 and 15 MV beams. The results of MC simulation are in very good agreement with measurements. Less than 2% of local difference between the MC simulation and the diamond detector measurement of the output factors in water was achieved. The X, Y and Z profiles measured in water with an ion chamber (V = 0.125 cm(3)) and a diamond detector were used to validate the models. An overall agreement of 2%/2 mm for high dose regions and 3%/2 mm in low dose regions between measurement and MC simulation for field sizes from 0.8 x 0.8 cm(2) to 16 x 21 cm(2) was achieved. An IMRT plan film verification

  5. SU-E-T-569: Evaluation of VMAT Plans Generated with HD120 and Millennium 120 MLC Between Two Matched Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, G; Ballas, L; Chang, E; Chung, E; Chiu, R; Cummings, D; Shiu, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate VMAT treatment plans generated with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC between two matched linacs and to determine if one can back up the other. Methods: The 6x photon beams are matched for our Varian TrueBeam STx and Trilogy linacs, which are equipped with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC, respectively. Three prostate and three brain VMAT plans were used for the evaluation. Five plans (three prostate and two brain plans) were originally generated with the TrueBeam STx and re-computed with the Trilogy. One brain plan was evaluated the other way around. For each plan, the PTV coverage of V95 was made the same between two linacs. The dosimetric differences associated with the plans were compared using: 1) Percentage mean dose differences to the PTV, 2) Homogeneity index, HI = (Dmax − Dmin)/Dmean for the PTV. For prostate plans, the mean dose differences to the rectum were evaluated. While for brain plans, the percentage max dose differences to the lenses (left and right lens) were evaluated. Results: For three prostate plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.5 ± 0.1% and the HI was 0.1 ± 0.0%. The average of the percentage mean dose difference to the rectum was 3.5 ± 0.5%. For three brain plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.2 ± 1.1% and the HI was 0.2 ± 0.1%. The average of the percentage max dose differences to the lenses was 22.9 ± 4.0%. Conclusion: For prostate VMAT plans, changing the treatment from the TrueBeam STx to the Trilogy does not necessarily need re-optimization. But for brain plans, in order to minimize dose to the lenses, it is recommended to re-optimize the plan if changing the treatment between these two linacs.

  6. SU-E-T-282: Remove Field-Size Limitation Using the Combination of Collimator Rotation and Jaw Tracking with MLC Aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu, A; Chiu, R; Cumming, D; Chung, E; Ragab, O; Cui, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: this study is to investigate the use of variable-collimators and/or collimator-rotation to overcome the field-size limitation on TrueBeamSTX. Methods: The maximum static field-size is 22- × 40-cm for TrueBeamSTX and 40- × 40-cm for Trilogy. Maximum displacement between adjacent leaf ends at a single carriage position is 15-cm for TBSTX and 14-cm for Trilogy. Our current practice for IMRT treatment at Trilogy is as follows, if MLC leaves travel more than 13.5 cm in the MLC traveling direction, the treatment fields will be split at isocenter to two groups of IMRT fields to cover the large tumors. However, TrueBeamSTX is not limited in this way because the jaws can track each segments of the MLC aperture. Radiation treatment plans for ten patients (different tumor sites) treated at Trilogy with one dimension of the field is greater than 22 cm and the other dimension is less than or equal to 22 cm. All the plans will be converted with jaws tracking each segment's MLC aperture. If necessary, the collimator rotation will also be applied for the planning. Comparison of the converted plans with the original clinical plans will be evaluated and based on the following criterion: (1) tumor coverage; (2) dose sparing to the critical structures; and (3) treatment time. Results: The tumor coverage is compatible between two plans. The dose of critical structures was evaluated in the cumulative DVH for spinal cord, parotids, and brainstem at V20 and V5. In all patients, the maximum reduction in V20 was never more than 5% and was typically less than 1%. In V5, the maximum reduction was 10% and 3% respectively. The significant difference can be found in using the variable collimator to shorten the treatment time. Conclusion: We conclude that we will use the variable-collimator for all IMRT cases on TrueBeamSTX and as a potential backup machine for Trilogy.

  7. What Does a Student Know Who Earns a Top Score on the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claesgens, Jennifer; Daubenmire, Paul L.; Scalise, Kathleen M.; Balicki, Scott; Gochyyev, Perman; Stacy, Angelica M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of students at a high-performing U.S. public school (n = 64) on the advanced placement (AP) chemistry exam to their performance on the ChemQuery assessment system. The AP chemistry exam was chosen because, as the National Research Council acknowledges, it is the "perceived standard of excellence and school…

  8. Maryland Ranks #1 in the Nation on Advanced Placement Exams for Participation and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Maryland public high school students outperformed all others in the nation on the rigorous Advanced Placement (AP) exams, according to the College Board's fifth annual analysis of the AP program. Maryland ranked first nationwide in the percentage of public school students scoring 3 or higher on at least one AP exam. A score of 3 or higher on the…

  9. AK State Profile. Alaska: Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGOE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE), a comprehensive standards-based exam. Its purpose is to meet a state mandate. A bill to remove the HSGQE as a graduation requirement by July 1, 2011 was presented to the state legislature as SB 109. However, it did not pass both houses of the legislature.…

  10. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  11. The Road to Redemption: Reclaiming the Value in Assessment Retention Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlman, Trey

    2015-01-01

    A good assessment plan combines many direct and indirect measures to validate the collected data. One often controversial assessment measure comes in the form of retention exams. Although assessment retention exams may come with faults, others advocate for their inclusion in program assessment. Objective-based tests may offer insight to…

  12. Does Eating Breakfast Affect the Performance of College Students on Biology Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory W.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the breakfast eating habits of 1,259 college students over an eleven year period to determine if eating breakfast had an impact upon their grade on a General Biology exam. The study determined that there was a significant difference in the performance on the exam with a higher percent of the participants, who had eaten…

  13. College Students' Behavior on Multiple-Choice Self-Tailored Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuk, Jasna; Morse, David T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we observed college students' behavior on two self-tailored, multiple-choice exams. Self-tailoring was defined as an option to omit up to five items from being scored on an exam. Participants, 80 undergraduate college students enrolled in two sections of an educational psychology course, statistically significantly improved their…

  14. The ACS Exams Institute Undergraduate Chemistry Anchoring Concepts Content Map I: General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    To provide tools for programmatic assessment related to the use of ACS Exams in undergraduate chemistry courses, the ACS Exams Institute has built a content map that applies to the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the top two levels, the grain size of the content classification is large and spans the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the…

  15. A Study of Three-option and Four-option Multiple Choice Exams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Terence H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study used to determine differences in exam reliability, difficulty, and student evaluations. Indicates that when a fourth option was added to the three-option items, the exams became more difficult. Includes methods, results discussion, and tables on student characteristics, whole test analyses, and selected items. (RT)

  16. Developing an Online Placement Exam for Spanish Heritage Speakers and L2 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potowski, Kim; Parada, MaryAnn; Morgan-Short, Kara

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and piloting of an adaptive, online placement exam that will be administered to L2 and heritage learners of Spanish at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Particular attention is given to the structure of the exam and the linguistic strategies employed to distinguish heritage speakers from L2 learners.…

  17. Cheating on Multiple-Choice Exams: Monitoring, Assessment, and an Optional Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Leda; Lovaglia, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is unethical. Exam cheating is viewed as more serious than most other forms (Pincus and Schmelkin 2003). The authors review the general cheating problem, introduce a program to conservatively identify likely cheaters on multiple-choice exams, and offer a procedure for handling likely cheaters. Feedback from students who confess…

  18. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  19. Two-Stage Exams Improve Student Learning in an Introductory Geology Course: Logistics, Attendance, and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knierim, Katherine; Turner, Henry; Davis, Ralph K.

    2015-01-01

    Two-stage exams--where students complete part one of an exam closed book and independently and part two is completed open book and independently (two-stage independent, or TS-I) or collaboratively (two-stage collaborative, or TS-C)--provide a means to include collaborative learning in summative assessments. Collaborative learning has been shown to…

  20. Investigating the Relationship between Faculty Cognitive Expectations about Learning Chemistry and the Construction of Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria-Rios, David; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated chemistry faculty's cognitive expectations about learning chemistry and their influence upon the construction of exam questions in a general chemistry curriculum. Faculty cognitive expectations for learning chemistry were measured using QUIMX. Learning objectives and exam questions for a year-long general chemistry sequence…

  1. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  2. Effects of Online Testing on Student Exam Performance and Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowell, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Increased use of course management software to administer course exams online for face-to-face classes raises the question of how well test anxiety and other emotions generalize from the classroom to an online setting. We hypothesized that administering regular course exams in an online format would reduce test anxiety experienced at the time of…

  3. Ethnic and Gender Differences in Advanced Placement Exam Performance: A Multiyear National Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Maria Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze ethnic and gender differences in Advanced Placement (AP) exam performance of U.S. high school students. Specifically, the extent to which differences exist in overall AP exam performance scores within and between four ethnic groups (i.e., Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White) was investigated. Within…

  4. Training Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Be Compliant with a Physical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuvo, Anthony J.; Reagan, Amanda Law; Ackerlund, Julie; Huckfeldt, Rachel; Kelly, Cheri

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to train children with autism spectrum disorders to be compliant with a 10-component physical examination. After a physician assistant administered an exam pretest, noncompliance on steps of the exam were considered with respect to a skill deficit and escape from aversive stimuli. A package of training procedures was…

  5. High School Exit Exams and Dropout in an Era of Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.; Marcotte, Dave E.

    2013-01-01

    A key form of student-level accountability is the requirement for students to pass high school exit exams (HSEEs) in order to receive a diploma. In this paper, we examine the impact of HSEEs on dropout during a period when these exams became more common and rigorous. Further, we study whether offering alternate pathways to graduation for students…

  6. Assessment of the Assessment Tool: Analysis of Items in a Non-MCQ Mathematics Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoshaim, Heba Bakr; Rashid, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Assessment is one of the vital steps in the teaching and learning process. The reported action research examines the effectiveness of an assessment process and inspects the validity of exam questions used for the assessment purpose. The instructors of a college-level mathematics course studied questions used in the final exams during the academic…

  7. Pick-N Multiple Choice-Exams: A Comparison of Scoring Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel; Holzer, Matthias; Kopp, Veronika; Fischer, Martin R.

    2011-01-01

    To compare different scoring algorithms for Pick-N multiple correct answer multiple-choice (MC) exams regarding test reliability, student performance, total item discrimination and item difficulty. Data from six 3rd year medical students' end of term exams in internal medicine from 2005 to 2008 at Munich University were analysed (1,255 students,…

  8. The Use of a Comprehensive Multiple Choice Final Exam in the Macroeconomics Principles Course: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrowsky, Michael C.

    This paper analyzes the results of a pilot study at Glendale Community College (Arizona) to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive multiple choice final exam in the macroeconomic principles course. The "pilot project" involved the administration of a 50-question multiple choice exam to 71 students in three macroeconomics sections.…

  9. Students' Attitudes towards Group-Based Project Exams in Two Engineering Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Bettina; Kolmos, Anette

    2015-01-01

    At Aalborg University, engineering students spend half the time each semester in groups working on projects in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. The projects are assessed through group exams, except for between 2007 and 2013 when the law forbade group-based project exams. Prior to 2007, a survey showed that students preferred the…

  10. Scholars Probe Diverse Effects of Exit Exams: State Graduation Tests Found to Hit Certain Groups Harder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    A study released last week suggesting that California's high school exit exams are affecting some student demographic groups more than others is the latest in a small spate of studies pointing to trade-offs from policies that require high school students to pass state tests to graduate. Twenty-six states have exit exams in place or will by 2012,…

  11. Lack of Follow-Up Exams after Failed School Vision Screenings: An Investigation of Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimel, Linda S.

    2006-01-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School…

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Uncertainty in the Grading of Written Exams in Mathematics and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Hugo Lewi; Habib, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The most common way to grade students in courses at university and university college level is to use final written exams. The aim of final exams is generally to provide a reliable and a valid measurement of the extent to which a student has achieved the learning outcomes for the course. A source of uncertainty in grading students based on an exam…

  13. Verbal Final Exam in Introductory Biology Yields Gains in Student Content Knowledge and Longitudinal Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckie, Douglas B.; Rivkin, Aaron M.; Aubry, Jacob R.; Marengo, Benjamin J.; Creech, Leah R.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    We studied gains in student learning over eight semesters in which an introductory biology course curriculum was changed to include optional verbal final exams (VFs). Students could opt to demonstrate their mastery of course material via structured oral exams with the professor. In a quantitative assessment of cell biology content knowledge,…

  14. Training Metacognition in the Classroom: The Influence of Incentives and Feedback on Exam Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tyler M.; Geraci, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In two semester-long studies, we examined whether college students could improve their ability to accurately predict their own exam performance across multiple exams. We tested whether providing concrete feedback and incentives (i.e., extra credit) for accuracy would improve predictions by improving students' metacognition, or awareness of their…

  15. Improving Consistency in Large Laboratory Courses: A Design for a Standardized Practical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently…

  16. Like Climbing Jacob's Ladder: An Art-Based Exploration of the Comprehensive Exam Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Sara Scott

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive exam process is a rite of passage in the scholarly world, and as such the movements of this process often feel like a guarded secret to graduate students. As a PhD candidate, I left the comprehensive exam process feeling both initiated and inundated. This article is an attempt to uncover the secret that is the comprehensive exam…

  17. Listening Summary Translation Exam (LSTE)-Spanish. Final Project Report. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    The Listening Summary Translation Exam (LSTE)-Spanish is designed to assess the ability to comprehend and summarize in written English recorded conversations spoken in Spanish. Language and topics of the exam are representative of conversations the Federal Bureau of Investigation routinely monitors. This test consists of two subtests, one…

  18. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  19. Assessment Drives Learning: The Effect of Central Exit Exams on Curricular Knowledge and Mathematical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Senkbeil, Martin; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the German PISA 2003 sample to study the effects of central exit examinations on student performance and student attitudes. Unlike earlier studies we use (i) a value-added measure to pin down the effect of central exit exams on learning in the last year before the exam and (ii) separate test scores for mathematical…

  20. Providing the Answers Does Not Improve Performance on a College Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Arnold Lewis; Sinha, Neha

    2013-01-01

    In the context of an upper-level psychology course, even when students were given an opportunity to refer to text containing the answers and change their exam responses in order to improve their exam scores, their performance on these questions improved slightly or not at all. Four experiments evaluated competing explanations for the students'…

  1. Validating the Use of AP® Exam Scores for College Course Placement. Research Report 2013-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Brian F.; Ewing, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) was created to provide access to rigorous, college-level curricula to motivated and prepared high school students. This study evaluated whether the AP Exam scores from the summative exams associated with 10 courses were valid for the placement of students into higher-level college courses in the subject area…

  2. Does Missing Classes Decelerate Student Exam Performance Progress? Empirical Evidence and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tin-Chun

    2014-01-01

    A total of 389 business students in undergraduate introductory microeconomics classes in spring 2007, 2009, and 2011, and fall 2012 participated in an exam performance progress study. Empirical evidence suggested that missing classes decelerates and hampers high-performing students' exam performance progress. Nevertheless, the evidence does…

  3. Changes in Student Attributions Due to the Implementation of Central Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika; Jager, Daniela J.

    2011-01-01

    The central aim of standardized exit exams is to motivate students and teachers to work harder on critical subject matters and thus increase student achievement. However, the effects of the implementation of central exams on student motivation have not been analyzed in a longitudinal section until now. In the present study, the consequences of…

  4. WE-D-213-02: Preparing for Part 2 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    SciTech Connect

    Zambelli, J.

    2015-06-15

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging physics

  5. WE-D-213-00: Preparing for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medicine Physics Exams

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging physics

  6. WE-D-213-01: Preparing for Part 1 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    SciTech Connect

    Simiele, S.

    2015-06-15

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging physics

  7. WE-D-213-03: Preparing for Part 3 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, N.

    2015-06-15

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging physics

  8. The impact of exams anxiety on the level of triglycerides in university female students.

    PubMed

    Maimanee, Tahia A

    2010-04-01

    Anxiety affects the level of blood fats such as the triglycerides according to several studies conducted in various conditions causing anxiety as exam for the university students. The health experts suggested that the anxiety works to stimulate the autonomic nervous system which in turn leads to the appearance of a group of physiologic symptoms. The current study showed the changes happened in the triglycerides' levels in the female university students before and after exams at the intermediate anxiety level compared to other high and low levels of anxiety. In addition, there was a difference in triglycerides' levels in female students of college of Science before and after exam. This difference did not appear in case of other colleges. The exam type had an impact as the significant difference appeared in the triglycerides' levels during the periodical tests and these differences did not appear in the final exam.

  9. Using Poster Sessions as an Alternative to Written Examination--The Poster Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Pamela; Demeo, Stephen; Sweeney, William V.; Marino, Robert; Clarkson, Sandra

    2000-09-01

    Poster sessions are effective communication tools common at scientific meetings. The adaptations of poster sessions to the classroom have been reported to be effective evaluation and learning tools in chemistry and other disciplines. However, poster sessions have never been used to replace a standard hourly exam. We report here the use of a poster session as an oral examination in our introductory Integrated Chemistry/Physics/Mathematics course for entering freshmen. The poster exam replaces one traditional, in-class written examination, providing an alternate method of student assessment. Students' communication and organizational skills, their depth of knowledge of a particular topic, and their conceptual understanding of the topic are probed by the poster exam. Students report that the poster exam is more enjoyable and a more effective learning tool than traditional exams.

  10. WE-AB-BRB-10: Filmless QA of CyberKnife MLC-Collimated and Iris-Collimated Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Current methods of CK field shape QA is based on the use of radiochromic film. Though accurate results can be attained, these methods are prone to error, time consuming, and expensive. The techniques described herein perform similar QA using the FOIL Detector (Field, Output, and Image Localization). A key feature of this in-house QA solution, and central to this study, is an aSi flat-panel detector which provides the user with the means to perform accurate, immediate, and quantitative field analysis. Methods: The FOIL detector is automatically aligned in the CK beam using fiducial markers implanted within the detector case. Once the system is aligned, a treatment plan is delivered which irradiates the flat-panel imager using the field being tested. The current study tests each of the clinically-used fields shaped using the Iris variable-aperture collimation system using a plan which takes 6 minutes to deliver. The user is immediately provided with field diameter and beam profile, as well as a comparison to baseline values. Additionally, the detector is used to acquire and analyze leaf positions of the InCise multi-leaf collimation system. Results: Using a 6-minute plan consisting of 11 beams of 25MU-per-beam, the FOIL detector provided the user with a quantitative analysis of all clinically-used field shapes. The FOIL detector was also able to clearly resolve field edge junctions in a picket fence test, including slight over-travel of individual leaves as well as inter-leaf leakage. Conclusion: The FOIL system provided comparable field diameter and profile data when compared to methods using film; providing results much faster and with 5% of the MU used for film. When used with the MLC system, the FOIL detector provided the means for immediate quantification of the performance of the system through analysis of leaf positions in a picket fence test field. Author is the President/Owner of Spectrum Medical Physics, LLC, a company which maintains contracts

  11. Poor ovarian reserve

    PubMed Central

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  12. Targeting the metastasis suppressor, NDRG1, using novel iron chelators: regulation of stress fiber-mediated tumor cell migration via modulation of the ROCK1/pMLC2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Daohai; Zheng, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-02-01

    The iron-regulated metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), is up-regulated by cellular iron depletion mediated by iron chelators and can inhibit cancer cell migration. However, the mechanism of how NDRG1 achieves this effect remains unclear. In this study, we implemented established and newly constructed NDRG1 overexpression and knockdown models using the DU145, HT29, and HCT116 cancer cell lines to investigate the molecular basis by which NDRG1 exerts its inhibitory effect on cell migration. Using these models, we demonstrated that NDRG1 overexpression inhibits cell migration by preventing actin-filament polymerization, stress fiber assembly and formation. In contrast, NDRG1 knockdown had the opposite effect. Moreover, we identified that NDRG1 inhibited an important regulatory pathway mediated by the Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1)/phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (pMLC2) pathway that modulates stress fiber assembly. The phosphorylation of MLC2 is a key process in inducing stress fiber contraction, and this was shown to be markedly decreased or increased by NDRG1 overexpression or knockdown, respectively. The mechanism involved in the inhibition of MLC2 phosphorylation by NDRG1 was mediated by a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in ROCK1 expression that is a key kinase involved in MLC2 phosphorylation. Considering that NDRG1 is up-regulated after cellular iron depletion, novel thiosemicarbazone iron chelators (e.g., di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) were demonstrated to inhibit ROCK1/pMLC2-modulated actin-filament polymerization, stress fiber assembly, and formation via a mechanism involving NDRG1. These results highlight the role of the ROCK1/pMLC2 pathway in the NDRG1-mediated antimetastatic signaling network and the therapeutic potential of iron chelators at inhibiting metastasis.

  13. Seamless insertion of real pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Zeng, Rongping; Wunderlich, Adam; Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The availability of large medical image datasets is critical in many applications such as training and testing of computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, evaluation of segmentation algorithms, and conducting perceptual studies. However, collection of large repositories of clinical images is hindered by the high cost and difficulties associated with both the accumulation of data and establishment of the ground truth. To address this problem, we are developing an image blending tool that allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a real lesion extracted from a source image into a different location on a target image. In this study we focus on the application of this tool to pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams. We minimize the impact of user skill on the perceived quality of the blended image by limiting user involvement to two simple steps: the user first draws a casual boundary around the nodule of interest in the source, and then selects the center of desired insertion area in the target. We demonstrate examples of the performance of the proposed system on samples taken from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset, and compare the noise power spectrum (NPS) of blended nodules versus that of native nodules in simulated phantoms.

  14. The new AP Physics exams: Integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elby, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    When physics instructors and education researchers emphasize the importance of integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning in problem solving, they usually mean using those types of reasoning serially and separately: first students should analyze the physical situation qualitatively/conceptually to figure out the relevant equations, then they should process those equations quantitatively to generate a solution, and finally they should use qualitative reasoning to check that answer for plausibility (Heller, Keith, & Anderson, 1992). The new AP Physics 1 and 2 exams will, of course, reward this approach to problem solving. But one kind of free response question will demand and reward a further integration of qualitative and quantitative reasoning, namely mathematical modeling and sense-making--inventing new equations to capture a physical situation and focusing on proportionalities, inverse proportionalities, and other functional relations to infer what the equation ``says'' about the physical world. In this talk, I discuss examples of these qualitative-quantitative translation questions, highlighting how they differ from both standard quantitative and standard qualitative questions. I then discuss the kinds of modeling activities that can help AP and college students develop these skills and habits of mind.

  15. Sodium Butyrate Promotes Reassembly of Tight Junctions in Caco-2 Monolayers Involving Inhibition of MLCK/MLC2 Pathway and Phosphorylation of PKCβ2

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Wei; Wu, Xiujuan; Wang, Kang; Wang, Wenjing; Wang, Yumei; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Peng, Luying

    2016-01-01

    As a physiological small molecular product from the microbial fermentation of dietary fibers, butyrate plays an important role in maintaining intestinal health. Our previous works have proved that the effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on the intestinal barrier function is mediated by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the detailed pathway involved remains unknown. Using the calcium switch assay in the Caco-2 cell monolayer model, we found here that NaB activated AMPK mainly by increasing the calcium level, but not the ATP concentration, via promoting store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Upon the activation of AMPK, NaB promoted the reassembly of tight junctions (TJs) based on reducing the phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC2) at Ser19 and increasing phosphorylation of protein kinase C β2 (PKCβ2) at Ser660. Inhibiting (protein kinase C β) PKCβ blocked the reassembly of TJs induced by NaB in the barrier monolayer model. These results indicated that NaB could activate the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) pathway to mediate AMPK phosphorylating, which then inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC2 and promoted the phosphorylation of PKCβ2, respectively, so that the downstream molecules of AMPK coordinately contributed to the reassembly of TJs in the Caco-2 barrier model. These results suggested a potential mechanism of butyrate for intestine homeostasis and protection. PMID:27735862

  16. Involvement of caveolin-1 in low shear stress-induced breast cancer cell motility and adhesion: Roles of FAK/Src and ROCK/p-MLC pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Niya; Li, Shun; Tang, Kai; Bai, Hongxia; Peng, Yueting; Yang, Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells translocating to distant sites are subjected to hemodynamic shear forces during their passage in the blood vessels. Low shear stress (LSS) plays a critical role in the regulation of various aspects of tumor cells functions, including motility and adhesion. Beyond its structural role, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the important component of caveolae, represents a modulator of several cancer-associated functions as tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of Cav-1 in regulating tumor cells response to shear stress remains poorly explored. Here, we characterized the role of LSS and Cav-1 in mediating cell motility and adhesion on human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. We first showed that LSS exposure promoted cell polarity and focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, thus indicating elevated cell migration. Silencing of Cav-1 leaded to a significantly lower formation of stress fibers. However, LSS exposure was able to rescue it via the alteration of actin-associated proteins expression, including ROCK, p-MLC, cofilin and filamin A. Time-lapse migration assay indicated that Cav-1 expression fostered MDA-MB-231 cells motility and LSS triggered cells to rapidly generate new lamellipodia. Furthermore, Cav-1 and LSS significantly influenced cell adhesion. Taken together, our findings provide insights into mechanisms underlying LSS triggered events mediated by downstream Cav-1, including FAK/Src and ROCK/p-MLC pathways, involved in the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, cell motility, FA dynamics and breast cancer cell adhesion.

  17. Minocycline Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 Cells Exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation and Reoxygenation Through Regulation of MLCP/MLC Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Feng, Jin-Zhou; Xu, Guang-Hui; Fu, Jie; Li, Xiao-Gang; Qin, Xin-Yue

    2017-04-01

    Minocycline, a semi-synthetic second-generation derivative of tetracycline, has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects both in animal models and in clinic trials of neurological diseases. In the present study, we first investigated the protective effects of minocycline on oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation-induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and its potential mechanism in the neuronal cell line, PC12 cells. We found that minocycline significantly increased cell viability, promoted neurite outgrowth and enhanced the expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in PC12 cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury. In addition, immunoblots revealed that minocycline reversed the overexpression of phosphorylated myosin light chain (MLC) and the suppression of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury. Moreover, the minocycline-induced neurite outgrowth was significantly blocked by Calyculin A (1 nM), an inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), but not by an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126; 10 μM). These findings suggested that minocycline activated the MLCP/MLC signaling pathway in PC12 cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury, which resulted in the promotion of neurite outgrowth.

  18. Biosphere reserves: Attributes for success.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Chu; Dart, Peter; Hockings, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Biosphere reserves established under the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Program aim to harmonise biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Concerns over the extent to which the reserve network was living up to this ideal led to the development of a new strategy in 1995 (the Seville Strategy) to enhance the operation of the network of reserves. An evaluation of effectiveness of management of the biosphere reserve network was called for as part of this strategy. Expert opinion was assembled through a Delphi Process to identify successful and less successful reserves and investigate common factors influencing success or failure. Ninety biosphere reserves including sixty successful and thirty less successful reserves in 42 countries across all five Man and the Biosphere Program regions were identified. Most successful sites are the post-Seville generation while the majority of unsuccessful sites are pre-Seville that are managed as national parks and have not been amended to conform to the characteristics that are meant to define a biosphere reserve. Stakeholder participation and collaboration, governance, finance and resources, management, and awareness and communication are the most influential factors in the success or failure of the biosphere reserves. For success, the biosphere reserve concept needs to be clearly understood and applied through landscape zoning. Designated reserves then need a management system with inclusive good governance, strong participation and collaboration, adequate finance and human resource allocation and stable and responsible management and implementation. All rather obvious but it is difficult to achieve without commitment to the biosphere reserve concept by the governance authorities.

  19. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance.

  20. Multiple-choice exams: an obstacle for higher-level thinking in introductory science classes.

    PubMed

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F

    2012-01-01

    Learning science requires higher-level (critical) thinking skills that need to be practiced in science classes. This study tested the effect of exam format on critical-thinking skills. Multiple-choice (MC) testing is common in introductory science courses, and students in these classes tend to associate memorization with MC questions and may not see the need to modify their study strategies for critical thinking, because the MC exam format has not changed. To test the effect of exam format, I used two sections of an introductory biology class. One section was assessed with exams in the traditional MC format, the other section was assessed with both MC and constructed-response (CR) questions. The mixed exam format was correlated with significantly more cognitively active study behaviors and a significantly better performance on the cumulative final exam (after accounting for grade point average and gender). There was also less gender-bias in the CR answers. This suggests that the MC-only exam format indeed hinders critical thinking in introductory science classes. Introducing CR questions encouraged students to learn more and to be better critical thinkers and reduced gender bias. However, student resistance increased as students adjusted their perceptions of their own critical-thinking abilities.

  1. Auricular Acupuncture for Exam Anxiety in Medical Students—A Randomized Crossover Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Klausenitz, Catharina; Hacker, Henriette; Hesse, Thomas; Kohlmann, Thomas; Endlich, Karlhans; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Usichenko, Taras

    2016-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in the treatment of preoperative anxiety. The aim was to investigate whether AA can reduce exam anxiety as compared to placebo and no intervention. Forty-four medical students were randomized to receive AA, placebo, or no intervention in a crossover manner and subsequently completed three comparable oral anatomy exams with an interval of 1 month between the exams/interventions. AA was applied using indwelling fixed needles bilaterally at points MA-IC1, MA-TF1, MA-SC, MA-AT1 and MA-TG one day prior to each exam. Placebo needles were used as control. Levels of anxiety were measured using a visual analogue scale before and after each intervention as well as before each exam. Additional measures included the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, duration of sleep at night, blood pressure, heart rate and the extent of participant blinding. All included participants finished the study. Anxiety levels were reduced after AA and placebo intervention compared to baseline and the no intervention condition (p < 0.003). AA was better at reducing anxiety than placebo in the evening before the exam (p = 0.018). Participants were able to distinguish between AA and placebo intervention. Both AA and placebo interventions reduced exam anxiety in medical students. The superiority of AA over placebo may be due to insufficient blinding of participants. PMID:28033320

  2. A Comparison of Two Approaches for Assessing L2 Writing: Process-­Based and Impromptu Timed Writing Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    This study compares learners' writing in an impromptu, timed writing (ITW) exam and in a process-based, timed writing (PBTW) exam to investigate the differences between these two types of assessments. A secondary objective of this study is to examine the test takers' attitudes towards the two exams. Forty participants taking ESL writing classes…

  3. Will I Do as Well on the Final Exam as I Expect? An Examination of Students' Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Immediately prior to an exam, it is common to hear students commenting on whether they anticipate doing as well on the exam as they expect (or, in other words, whether they anticipate performing as well on the exam as the standard at which they believe they should be performing). These anticipations have received little past research attention. In…

  4. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  5. The Relationship between AP[R] Exam Performance and College Outcomes. Research Report No. 2009-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Xiong, Xinhui

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on the relationship between students' Advanced Placement Program[R] (AP[R]) performance in AP English Language, Biology, Calculus, and U.S. History, and their subsequent college success. For each AP Exam studied, students were divided into three groups according to their AP Exam performance (no AP Exam taken, score of 1 or 2,…

  6. 77 FR 21846 - Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... liabilities of depository institutions for the purpose of implementing monetary policy. The Board's Regulation... monetary policy. If the Federal Reserve changes its monetary policy framework, which includes the payment... affect the Federal Reserve's ability to implement monetary policy in the event that all...

  7. Can Creativity Predict Cognitive Reserve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve relies on the ability to effectively cope with aging and brain damage by using alternate processes to approach tasks when standard approaches are no longer available. In this study, the issue if creativity can predict cognitive reserve has been explored. Forty participants (mean age: 61 years) filled out: the Cognitive Reserve…

  8. Operating Reserves and Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-08-01

    This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

  9. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  10. Performance Differences According to Test Mode and Computer Familiarity on a Practice Graduate Record Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Amie L.; Pedulla, Joseph J.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the relationship between test mode (paper and pencil or computerized with and without editorial control) and computer familiarity for 222 undergraduates. Results emphasize the importance of evaluating time constraints when converting exams from paper to computer delivery. (SLD)

  11. Relationship of the Gesell Developmental Exam and the Bracken Basic Concept Scale to Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterner, Anne G.; McCallum, R. Steve

    1988-01-01

    Administered the Gesell Development Exam and the Bracken Basic Concept Scale (BBCS) to kindergarten graduates (N=80). Found the BBCS may be a better predictor of achievement from a current state of readiness. (Author/ABL)

  12. Potential Danger in Pre-populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-09-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so would focus students on other important conceptual aspects of the course. In all cases, I gave a brief survey to get student perspectives on their exam preparation. In addition, I introduced an online pre-exam forum asking students to respond to two short questions about how they might prepare their notes for the exam.

  13. [A retrospective study analysis of urinary hippuric acid levels in occupational toxicology exams].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Kelly Cristina; Sagebin, Fernando Rodrigues; Oliveira, Paola Garcia; Glock, Luiz; Thiesen, Flavia Valladão

    2010-06-01

    Hippuric acid is the primary metabolite of toluene, a solvent widely used in industrial processes with considerable toxic effects, a fact which justifies regularly monitoring individuals with occupational exposure to this solvent. This work aims at evaluating urinary hippuric acid levels found in workers subject to biological monitoring. A retrospective study was carried out with data referring from 2002 to 2005, in which exams results and employment status were analyzed (periodic, post-employment, and pre-employment exams). Results indicate a significant reduction in hippuric acid levels for 2005. Periodic exams presented higher results than pre-employment and post-employment exams. No significant difference was found in individuals grouped according to their status in each of the established intervals, their reference numbers, and maximum biological levels allowed. Hippuric acid levels detected indicate low risk of toluene exposure for the population under evaluation, probably due to a growing concern with the deployment of measures regarding occupational hygiene.

  14. Many Kids with Diabetes Missing Out on Eye Exams, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164258.html Many Kids With Diabetes Missing Out on Eye Exams, Study Finds Those with ... that children and teens with diabetes from poor families and those from racial/ethnic minorities were less ...

  15. Standardized testing. HIT pro exams test competencies in health IT roles.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare needs more than EHRs, it needs people who can implement and maintain them. New federally sponsored health IT exams set workforce competencies, helping job seekers demonstrate knowledge and employers benchmark qualifications.

  16. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  17. Integrity of disposable nitrile exam gloves exposed to simulated movement.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert N; Wong, Weng Kee

    2011-05-01

    Every year, millions of health care, first responder, and industry workers are exposed to chemical and biological hazards. Disposable nitrile gloves are a common choice as both a chemical and physical barrier to these hazards, especially as an alternative to natural latex gloves. However, glove selection is complicated by the availability of several types or formulations of nitrile gloves, such as low-modulus, medical grade, low filler, and cleanroom products. This study evaluated the influence of simulated movement on the physical integrity (i.e., holes) of different nitrile exam glove brands and types. Thirty glove products were evaluated out-of-box and after exposure to simulated whole-glove movement for 2 hr. In lieu of the traditional 1 L water-leak test, a modified water-leak test, standardized to detect a 0.15 ± 0.05 mm hole in different regions of the glove, was developed. A specialized air inflation method simulated bidirectional stretching and whole-glove movement. A worst-case scenario with maximum stretching was evaluated. On average, movement did not have a significant effect on glove integrity (chi-square; p=0.068). The average effect was less than 1% between no movement (1.5%) and movement (2.1%) exposures. However, there was significant variability in glove integrity between different glove types (p≤0.05). Cleanroom gloves, on average, had the highest percentage of leaks, and 50% failed the water-leak test. Low-modulus and medical grade gloves had the lowest percentages of leaks, and no products failed the water-leak test. Variability in polymer formulation was suspected to account for the observed discrepancies, as well as the inability of the traditional 1 L water-leak test to detect holes in finger/thumb regions. Unexpectedly, greater than 80% of the glove defects were observed in the finger and thumb regions. It is recommended that existing water-leak tests be re-evaluated and standardized to account for product variability.

  18. Test Anxiety Levels of Board Exam Going Students in Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Ann Mary, Revina; Marslin, Gregory; Franklin, Gregory; Sheeba, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest report by the National Crime Records Bureau has positioned Tamil Nadu as the Indian state with highest suicide rate. At least in part, this is happening due to exam pressure among adolescents, emphasizing the imperative need to understand the pattern of anxiety and various factors contributing to it among students. The present study was conducted to analyze the level of state anxiety among board exam attending school students in Tamil Nadu, India. A group of 100 students containing 50 boys and 50 girls from 10th and 12th grades participated in the study and their state anxiety before board exams was measured by Westside Test Anxiety Scale. We found that all board exam going students had increased level of anxiety, which was particularly higher among boys and 12th standard board exam going students. Analysis of various demographic variables showed that students from nuclear families presented higher anxiety levels compared to their desired competitive group. Overall, our results showing the prevalence of state anxiety among board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India, support the recent attempt taken by Tamil Nadu government to improve student's academic performance in a healthier manner by appointing psychologists in all government schools. PMID:25143938

  19. Sleep quality during exam stress: the role of alcohol, caffeine and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Academic exam stress is known to compromise sleep quality and alter drug consumption in university students. Here we evaluated if sleeping problems and changes in legal drug consumption during exam stress are interrelated. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to survey sleep quality before, during, and after an academic exam period in 150 university students in a longitudinal questionnaire study. Self-reports of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine consumption were obtained. The Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-20) was used as a measure of stress. Sleep quality and alcohol consumption significantly decreased, while perceived stress and caffeine consumption significantly increased during the exam period. No significant change in nicotine consumption was observed. In particular, students shortened their time in bed and showed symptoms of insomnia. Mixed model analysis indicated that sex, age, health status, as well as the amounts of alcohol and caffeine consumed had no significant influence on global sleep quality. The amount of nicotine consumed and perceived stress were identified as significant predictors of diminished sleep quality. Nicotine consumption had a small-to-very-small effect on sleep quality; perceived stress had a small-to-moderate effect. In conclusion, diminished sleep quality during exam periods was mainly predicted by perceived stress, while legal drug consumption played a minor role. Exam periods may pose an interesting model for the study of stress-induced sleeping problems and their mechanisms.

  20. Test anxiety levels of board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Mary, Revina Ann; Marslin, Gregory; Franklin, Gregory; Sheeba, Caroline J

    2014-01-01

    The latest report by the National Crime Records Bureau has positioned Tamil Nadu as the Indian state with highest suicide rate. At least in part, this is happening due to exam pressure among adolescents, emphasizing the imperative need to understand the pattern of anxiety and various factors contributing to it among students. The present study was conducted to analyze the level of state anxiety among board exam attending school students in Tamil Nadu, India. A group of 100 students containing 50 boys and 50 girls from 10th and 12th grades participated in the study and their state anxiety before board exams was measured by Westside Test Anxiety Scale. We found that all board exam going students had increased level of anxiety, which was particularly higher among boys and 12th standard board exam going students. Analysis of various demographic variables showed that students from nuclear families presented higher anxiety levels compared to their desired competitive group. Overall, our results showing the prevalence of state anxiety among board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India, support the recent attempt taken by Tamil Nadu government to improve student's academic performance in a healthier manner by appointing psychologists in all government schools.

  1. Examining the Exam: A Critical Look at The California Critical Thinking Skills Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawkes, Don; O'Meara, Bill; Weber, Dave; Flage, Dan

    This paper examines the content of The California Critical Thinking Skills Test (1990). This report is not a statistical review. Instead it brings under scrutiny the content of the exam. This content will be of interest to the general reader, because the issues range from logic to ethics to pedagogy, and to questions of evidential and epistemological support. Anyone interested in clear thought and expression will find these issues of significance. Although the exam has a number of strengths and has the clearest instructions of all the presently available Critical Thinking exams, the content of 9 of the exams 34 questions is defective, namely the content of questions 6, 7, 8, 19, 21, 23, 24, 29, and 33. These questions make errors in critical thinking. Hence, no statistical results pertaining to the administration of these questions to students can be acceptable. The remaining questions are acceptable as to content. But until the problems are corrected, those who may use the exam should remove the defective questions from test administration or from data collection and reporting.The scope of the exam also is quite limited, but this may be unavoidable for any instrument designed to be completed in about an hour. Further, the scores resulting from any such testing can be understood only as a measure of minimal competency (below which remediation likely is needed) for the skills tested, but not as an adequate measure of critical thinking.

  2. Do Resit Exams Promote Lower Investments of Study Time? Theory and Data from a Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; de Jong, Ritske; Lorist, Monicque M.

    2016-01-01

    Although many educational institutions allow students to resit exams, a recently proposed mathematical model suggests that this could lead to a dramatic reduction in study-time investment, especially in rational students. In the current study, we present a modification of this model in which we included some well-justified assumptions about learning and performance on multiple-choice tests, and we tested its predictions in two experiments in which participants were asked to invest fictional study time for a fictional exam. Consistent with our model, the prospect of a resit exam was found to promote lower investments of study time for a first exam and this effect was stronger for participants scoring higher on the cognitive reflection test. We also found that the negative effect of resit exams on study-time investment was attenuated when access to the resit was made uncertain by making it probabilistic or dependent on obtaining a minimal, non-passing grade for the first attempt. Taken together, these results suggest that offering students resit exams may compromise the achievement of learning goals, and they raise the more general implication that second chances promote risky behavior. PMID:27711140

  3. TU-C-17A-05: Dose Domain Optimization of MLC Leaf Patterns for Highly Complicated 4Ï€ IMRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D; Yu, V; Ruan, D; Semwal, H; Cao, M; Low, D; Sheng, K; O’Connor, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Highly conformal non-coplanar 4π radiotherapy plans typically require more than 20 intensity-modulated fields to deliver. A novel method to calculate multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf patterns is introduced to maximize delivery efficiency, accuracy and plan quality. Methods: 4 GBM patients, with a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy, were evaluated using the 4π algorithm using 20 beams. The MLC calculation utilized a least square minimization of the dose distribution, with an anisotropic total variation regularization term to encourage piecewise continuity in the fluence maps. Transforming the fluence to the dose domain required multiplying the fluence with a sparse matrix. Exploiting this property made it feasible to solve the problem using CVX, a MATLAB-based convex modeling framework. The fluence was stratified into even step sizes, and the MLC segments, limited to 300, were calculated. The patients studied were replanned using Eclipse with the same beam angles. Results: Compared to the original 4π plan, the stratified 4π plan increased the maximum/mean dose for, in Gy, by 1.0/0.0 (brainstem), 0.5/0.2 (chiasm), 0.0/0.0 (spinal cord), 1.9/0.3 (L eye), 0.7/0.2 (R eye), 0.4/0.4 (L lens), 0.3/0.3 (R lens), 1.0/0.8 (L Optical Nerve), 0.5/0.3 (R Optical Nerve), 0.3/0.2 (L Cochlea), 0.1/0.1 (R Cochlea), 4.6/0.2 (brain), 2.4/0.1 (brain-PTV), 5.1/0.9 (PTV). Compared to Eclipse, which generated an average of 607 segments, the stratified plan reduced (−) or increased (+) the maximum/mean dose, in Gy, by −10.2/−4.1 (brainstem), −10.5/−8.9 (chiasm), +0.0/−0.1 (spinal cord), −4.9/−3.4 (L eye), −4.1/−2.5 (R eye), −2.8/−2.7 (L lens), −2.1/−1.9 (R lens), −7.6/−6.5 (L Optical Nerve), −8.9/−6.1 (R Optical Nerve), −1.3/−1.9 (L Cochlea), −1.8/−1.8 (R Cochlea), +1.7/−2.1 (brain), +3.2/−2.6 (brain-PTV), +1.8/+0.3 Gy (PTV. The stratified plan was also more homogeneous in the PTV. Conclusion: This novel solver can transform

  4. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Hu, Chen; Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  5. Advanced Placement® Exam Participation: Is AP® Exam Participation and Performance Related to Choice of College Major? Research Report No. 2011-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Ewing, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has found a positive relationship between AP® participation and performance with various college outcomes. Building on this work, the current study investigated the relationship between AP participation and performance with choice of college major. Specifically, this study examined whether students who take an AP Exam in a…

  6. Testing the methodology for dosimetry audit of heterogeneity corrections and small MLC-shaped fields: Results of IAEA multi-center studies

    PubMed Central

    Izewska, Joanna; Wesolowska, Paulina; Azangwe, Godfrey; Followill, David S.; Thwaites, David I.; Arib, Mehenna; Stefanic, Amalia; Viegas, Claudio; Suming, Luo; Ekendahl, Daniela; Bulski, Wojciech; Georg, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a long tradition of supporting development of methodologies for national networks providing quality audits in radiotherapy. A series of co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) has been conducted by the IAEA since 1995 assisting national external audit groups developing national audit programs. The CRP ‘Development of Quality Audits for Radiotherapy Dosimetry for Complex Treatment Techniques’ was conducted in 2009–2012 as an extension of previously developed audit programs. Material and methods. The CRP work described in this paper focused on developing and testing two steps of dosimetry audit: verification of heterogeneity corrections, and treatment planning system (TPS) modeling of small MLC fields, which are important for the initial stages of complex radiation treatments, such as IMRT. The project involved development of a new solid slab phantom with heterogeneities containing special measurement inserts for thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and radiochromic films. The phantom and the audit methodology has been developed at the IAEA and tested in multi-center studies involving the CRP participants. Results. The results of multi-center testing of methodology for two steps of dosimetry audit show that the design of audit procedures is adequate and the methodology is feasible for meeting the audit objectives. A total of 97% TLD results in heterogeneity situations obtained in the study were within 3% and all results within 5% agreement with the TPS predicted doses. In contrast, only 64% small beam profiles were within 3 mm agreement between the TPS calculated and film measured doses. Film dosimetry results have highlighted some limitations in TPS modeling of small beam profiles in the direction of MLC leave movements. Discussion. Through multi-center testing, any challenges or difficulties in the proposed audit methodology were identified, and the methodology improved. Using the experience of these

  7. Strategic Petroleum Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    GAO examined approximately 40 alternative, nontraditional methods of acquiring oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The alternatives identified were compared to the current method of acquiring and financing SPR oil through congressional appropriations that are reported in the budget. When compared to the conventional method of financing oil, most of the proposals have certain benefits or advantages, but all of them have economic or other disadvantages. For example, some proposals would reduce the budget deficit by increasing government revenues but would raise prices to the consumer. Other proposals would reduce short-term expenditures (asset sales, leasing oil or indexed bonds). However, the proposals might increase long-term expenditures by more than the initial reduction in outlays.

  8. Strategic petroleum reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report has examined approximately 40 alternative, nontraditional methods of acquiring oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The alternatives identified are compared to the current method of acquiring and financing SPR oil through congressional appropriations that are reported in the budget. When compared to the conventional method of financing oil, most of the proposals have certain benefits or advantages, but all of them have economic or other disadvantages. For example, some proposals would reduce the budget deficit by increasing government revenues but would raise prices to the consumer. Other proposals would reduce short-term expenditures (asset sales, leasing oil or indexed bonds). However, the proposals might increase long-term expenditures by more than the initial reduction in outlays.

  9. Electronic reserves: copyright and permissions.

    PubMed

    Graves, K J

    2000-01-01

    Electronic reserves present a new service option for libraries to provide needed materials during hours that the library is not open and to user groups located some distance from library collections. Possible changes to current copyright law and publishers permissions policies have delayed the development of electronic reserves in many libraries. This paper reviews the current state of electronic reserves materials in the publishing and library communities and presents the results of a survey of publishers to determine permissions policies for electronic materials. Issues of concern to both libraries and publishers are discussed.

  10. Electronic reserves: copyright and permissions

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic reserves present a new service option for libraries to provide needed materials during hours that the library is not open and to user groups located some distance from library collections. Possible changes to current copyright law and publishers permissions policies have delayed the development of electronic reserves in many libraries. This paper reviews the current state of electronic reserves materials in the publishing and library communities and presents the results of a survey of publishers to determine permissions policies for electronic materials. Issues of concern to both libraries and publishers are discussed. PMID:10658960

  11. Veterinary Science Students, Center Changing a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwater, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Kayenta is a rural community located in northeastern Arizona on a Navajo reservation. On the reservation, many families rely on their livestock for income, and as a result, many reservation high school students show a great interest in agricultural education. Having livestock on the reservation is not just a source of income, but also part of a…

  12. 7 CFR 915.142 - Reserve fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve fund. 915.142 Section 915.142 Agriculture... and Regulations § 915.142 Reserve fund. (a) The establishment of a reserve fund at an amount not to... and functioning of the Avocado Administrative Committee. Such reserve, including funds carried...

  13. A comparison of student performance on discipline-specific versus integrated exams in a medical school course.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Braun, Mark W; O'Loughlin, Valerie D

    2013-12-01

    Curricular reform is a widespread trend among medical schools. Assessing the impact that pedagogical changes have on students is a vital step in review process. This study examined how a shift from discipline-focused instruction and assessment to integrated instruction and assessment affected student performance in a second-year medical school pathology course. We investigated this by comparing pathology exam scores between students exposed to traditional discipline-specific instruction and exams (DSE) versus integrated instruction and exams (IE). Exam content was controlled, and individual questions were evaluated using a modified version of Bloom's taxonomy. Additionally, we compared United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 scores between DSE and IE groups. Our findings indicate that DSE students performed better than IE students on complete pathology exams. However, when exam content was controlled, exam scores were equivalent between groups. We also discovered that the integrated exams were composed of a significantly greater proportion of questions classified on the higher levels of Bloom's taxonomy and that IE students performed better on these questions overall. USMLE step 1 exam scores were similar between groups. The finding of a significant difference in content complexity between discipline-specific and integrated exams adds to recent literature indicating that there are a number of potential biases related to curricular comparison studies that must be considered. Future investigation involving larger sample sizes and multiple disciplines should be performed to explore this matter further.

  14. Oil and gas reserves estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrell, R.; Gajdica, R.; Elliot, D.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Khurana, S.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a summary of a panel session at the 2005 Offshore Technology Conference. Oil and gas reserves estimates are further complicated with the expanding importance of the worldwide deepwater arena. These deepwater reserves can be analyzed, interpreted, and conveyed in a consistent, reliable way to investors and other stakeholders. Continually improving technologies can lead to improved estimates of production and reserves, but the estimates are not necessarily recognized by regulatory authorities as an indicator of "reasonable certainty," a term used since 1964 to describe proved reserves in several venues. Solutions are being debated in the industry to arrive at a reporting mechanism that generates consistency and at the same time leads to useful parameters in assessing a company's value without compromising confidentiality. Copyright 2005 Offshore Technology Conference.

  15. Reserves, resilience and dynamic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Janne; Angelstam, Per; Elmqvist, Thomas; Emanuelsson, Urban; Folke, Carl; Ihse, Margareta; Moberg, Fredrik; Nyström, Magnus

    2003-09-01

    In a world increasingly modified by human activities, the conservation of biodiversity is essential as insurance to maintain resilient ecosystems and ensure a sustainable flow of ecosystem goods and services to society. However, existing reserves and national parks are unlikely to incorporate the long-term and large-scale dynamics of ecosystems. Hence, conservation strategies have to actively incorporate the large areas of land that are managed for human use. For ecosystems to reorganize after large-scale natural and human-induced disturbances, spatial resilience in the form of ecological memory is a prerequisite. The ecological memory is composed of the species, interactions and structures that make ecosystem reorganization possible, and its components may be found within disturbed patches as well in the surrounding landscape. Present static reserves should be complemented with dynamic reserves, such as ecological fallows and dynamic successional reserves, that are part of ecosystem management mimicking natural disturbance regimes at the landscape level.

  16. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975 (Public Law 94-163). Its purposes are to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the third quarter of calendar year 1995, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve; current storage capacity and ullage available; current status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities, major projects and the acquisition of petroleum products; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.

  17. Relationship between manual dexterity and the unified parkinson's disease rating scale-motor exam.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam as a clinical tool for quantifying upper extremity function in persons with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in this study. This study measured two clinical outcomes, the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam, to investigate the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam. [Results] The box-and-block test on the more affected side was positive relationship with the box-and-block test on the less affected side. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-motor exam score had a negative correlation with the box-and-block test results for both sides. [Conclusion] A positive association was noted between manual dexterity and motor function in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam are good clinical measures that quantify upper extremity function and are necessary for the accurate evaluation of patients and to plan intervention strategies.

  18. Relationship between manual dexterity and the unified parkinson’s disease rating scale-motor exam

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam as a clinical tool for quantifying upper extremity function in persons with Parkinson’s disease. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two persons with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease participated in this study. This study measured two clinical outcomes, the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam, to investigate the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam. [Results] The box-and-block test on the more affected side was positive relationship with the box-and-block test on the less affected side. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-motor exam score had a negative correlation with the box-and-block test results for both sides. [Conclusion] A positive association was noted between manual dexterity and motor function in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam are good clinical measures that quantify upper extremity function and are necessary for the accurate evaluation of patients and to plan intervention strategies. PMID:28174461

  19. [Prenuptial medical exams in debate: a proposed eugenic intervention in Brazil, 1910-1940].

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Priscila Bermudes

    2016-12-01

    This text results from research undertaken for a master's degree that focused on the proposed introduction of prenuptial medical exams in the early 1900s in Brazil. This was strongly defended by Brazilian eugenicists as a much-needed means of bringing about the racial improvement of the population. The exam would help prevent the marriage and reproduction of individuals considered degenerate or inferior, seen as inadequate for the eugenic development of future generations. The debate in Brazil between doctors and intellectuals who supported the introduction of a law that would make a prenuptial medical exam mandatory is analyzed, as are the controversies and objections voiced by its critics, ultimately helping ensure it was not adopted in the country.

  20. Inference on cancer screening exam accuracy using population-level administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Brown, P E; Walter, S D

    2016-01-15

    This paper develops a model for cancer screening and cancer incidence data, accommodating the partially unobserved disease status, clustered data structures, general covariate effects, and dependence between exams. The true unobserved cancer and detection status of screening participants are treated as latent variables, and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to estimate the Bayesian posterior distributions of the diagnostic error rates and disease prevalence. We show how the Bayesian approach can be used to draw inferences about screening exam properties and disease prevalence while allowing for the possibility of conditional dependence between two exams. The techniques are applied to the estimation of the diagnostic accuracy of mammography and clinical breast examination using data from the Ontario Breast Screening Program in Canada.

  1. Influence of a revision course and the gender of examiners on the grades of the final ENT exam – a retrospective review of 3961 exams

    PubMed Central

    Grasl, Matthäus C.; Seemann, Rudolf; Hanisch, Michael; Heiduschka, Gregor; Kremser, Karl; Thurnher, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Revision courses should repeat already acquired knowledge and skills and mostly provide a basis for passing the following exam. Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of a previously attended revision course on the grades achieved in a final exam (Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases). Additionally we ask the question whether the gender of the examiners plays a role concerning the marks or not. Methods: 3961 exams at the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Diseases in Vienna were investigated, 725 with revision course (experimental group) and 3236 without previous revision course (comparison group). The revision courses were performed in a standardized way concerning form and content, interactive and case based. Both groups were examined uniform in regard to topics and time duration. 16 male and 6 female examiners were involved. The grading followed a five–level scale. The examination marks were calculated in the arithmetic mean and median value for the entire sample, gender dependence was calculated according to the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney-Test. The inferential statistics included single- and multiple factorial analyses of variance as well as uni- and multivariate regression models. Results: The experimental group achieved a grade average of 2.54 compared with 2.46 for the comparison group. Splitting up into male and female examiners, an average of 2.54 and 2.58 resp. for the experimental group and 2.44 and 2.61 resp. for the comparison group resulted. Female examiner marked significantly lower grades in comparison to their male colleagues (P= 0.001926). Conclusions: The ENT revision course did not improve the grade averages of the final ENT exam. Female examiners grade stricter than male examiners. There was no difference concerning grades 4 (pass) and 5 (fail) but female examiners grade less with mark 1. PMID:26483851

  2. Marine reserves: size and age do matter.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Joachim; Osenberg, Craig W; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Domenici, Paolo; García-Charton, José-Antonio; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Badalamenti, Fabio; Bayle-Sempere, Just; Brito, Alberto; Bulleri, Fabio; Culioli, Jean-Michel; Dimech, Mark; Falcón, Jesús M; Guala, Ivan; Milazzo, Marco; Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Somerfield, Paul J; Stobart, Ben; Vandeperre, Frédéric; Valle, Carlos; Planes, Serge

    2008-05-01

    Marine reserves are widely used throughout the world to prevent overfishing and conserve biodiversity, but uncertainties remain about their optimal design. The effects of marine reserves are heterogeneous. Despite theoretical findings, empirical studies have previously found no effect of size on the effectiveness of marine reserves in protecting commercial fish stocks. Using 58 datasets from 19 European marine reserves, we show that reserve size and age do matter: Increasing the size of the no-take zone increases the density of commercial fishes within the reserve compared with outside; whereas the size of the buffer zone has the opposite effect. Moreover, positive effects of marine reserve on commercial fish species and species richness are linked to the time elapsed since the establishment of the protection scheme. The reserve size-dependency of the response to protection has strong implications for the spatial management of coastal areas because marine reserves are used for spatial zoning.

  3. Adrenocortical reserves in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Agbaht, Kemal; Gullu, Sevim

    2014-02-01

    Explicit data regarding the changes in adrenocortical reserves during hyperthyroidism do not exist. We aimed to document the capability (response) of adrenal gland to secrete cortisol and DHEA-S during hyperthyroidism compared to euthyroidism, and to describe factors associated with these responses. A standard-dose (0.25 mg/i.v.) ACTH stimulation test was performed to the same patients before hyperthyroidism treatment, and after attainment of euthyroidism. Baseline cortisol (Cor(0)), DHEA-S (DHEA-S(0)), cortisol binding globulin (CBG), ACTH, calculated free cortisol (by Coolen's equation = CFC), free cortisol index (FCI), 60-min cortisol (Cor(60)), and DHEA-S (DHEA-S(60)), delta cortisol (ΔCor), delta DHEA-S (ΔDHEA-S) responses were evaluated. Forty-one patients [22 females, 49.5 ± 15.2 years old, 32 Graves disease, nine toxic nodular goiter] had similar Cor(0), DHEA-S(0), CFC, FCI, and DHEA-S(60) in hyperthyroid and euthyroid states. Cor(60), ΔCor, and ΔDHEA-S were lower in hyperthyroidism. In four (10 %) patients the peak ACTH-stimulated cortisol values were lower than 18 μg/dL. When the test repeated after attainment of euthyroidism, all of the patients had normal cortisol response. Regression analysis demonstrated an independent association of Cor(60) with free T3 in hyperthyroidism. However, the predictors of CFC, FCI, and DHEA-S levels were serum creatinine levels in hyperthyroidism, and both creatinine and transaminase levels in euthyroidism. ACTH-stimulated peak cortisol, delta cortisol, and delta DHEA-S levels are decreased during hyperthyroidism, probably due to increased turnover. Since about 10 % of the subjects with hyperthyroidism are at risk for adrenal insufficiency, clinicians dealing with Graves' disease should be alert to the possibility of adrenal insufficiency during hyperthyroid stage.

  4. A unified optimization platform comparison of three radiosurgery techniques: Gamma Knife, BrainLAB micro-MLC, and NOMOS MIMiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheek, Dennis Allen

    The objective of this research is to build a unified optimization treatment planning system in order to accurately compare the three modalities unburdened by underlying assumptions that could alter the outcome of the comparison. The hypothesis for the dissertation is: Three photon radiosurgery delivery mechanisms are utilized for the delivery of necrotic radiation doses to a cranial lesion: the Gamma Knife, micro-MLC intensity modulated radiosurgery, and MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery. Each modality has its own strength and weaknesses in their ability to deliver radiosurgery treatments. We hypothesize the MIMiC based intensity modulated radiosurgery will allow improvements to radiosurgery treatments compared to the conventional Gamma Knife and micro-MLC, as quantified by the following metrics: isodose line display, dose volume histograms, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. The specific aims for the dissertation are: (1) Develop a radiosurgery treatment planning software platform to import image and structure data and to offer evaluation tools. The evaluation tools will include isodose line display, dose volume histogram, Ian Paddick conformality index, homogeneity index, and objective function score. (2) Develop a simulated annealing optimization routine, with an associated objective function, that will determine the optimal treatment plan for the defined solution space. The objective, or cost function will be based on Ian Paddick conformality index. (3) Perform multiple repeat optimizations of each modality for a given lesion in order to gather statistical information about the minimum solution found. This test will quantify the ability of the optimization routine to arrive at a similar local minimum and therefore quantify the reliability of the comparison performed in specific aim five. (4) Investigate the affect of the Gamma Knife's shot limitation on the resulting dose distribution for a given lesion

  5. SU-E-T-35: A General Fill Factor Definition Serving to Characterise the MLC Misalignment Detection Capabilities of Two-Dimensional Detector Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T.S.; Looe, H.K.; Poppe, B.; Harder, D.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a general definition of the fill factor realistically characterizing the “field coverage”, i.e. the MLC misalignment detection capabilities of a detector array. Methods: According to Gago-Arias et al.{sup 1} the fill factor of a 2D array is defined as the ratio of the area enclosed by the FWHM of the fluence response function KM(x) of a single detector and its cell area defined by the detector spacing. More generally - accounting also for the possible overlap between FWHM’s of neighboured detectors - the fill factor is here defined as that fraction of the sum of the detector cell areas in which a defined MLC misalignment is detectable when the induced percentage signal changes exceed a detection threshold d. Ideally the generalized fill factor may reach 100 %. With user code EGS-chamber and a 2 MeV photon slit beam 0.25 mm wide, both types of the fill factor were calculated for an array with total cell area 100 cm{sup 2} for chamber widths 1–9 mm, using =1mm, d=5%. Results: For single chamber width 5 mm, fill factors were 0.49 (FWHM) and 0.61 (generalized). For chamber width 2 mm the FWHM fill factor was 0.13 whereas the generalized fill factor was 0.32. For chamber widths above 7 mm, the FWHM fill factor exceeds unity, and the general fill factor is exactly 1.00. Conclusions: An updated fill factor definition is introduced which, as a generalization of the FWHM-based definition, more closely estimates the performance of small array chambers and gives a realistic value in the case of overlapping sensitive areas of neighboured chambers. References:{sup 1}A. Gago-Arias, L. Brualla-Gonzalez, D.M. Gonzalez-Castano, F. Gomez, M.S. Garcia, V.L. Vega, J.M. Sueiro, J. Pardo-Montero, “Evaluation of chamber response function influence on IMRT verification using 2D commercial detector arrays,” Phys. Med. Biol. 57, 2005–2020 (2012)

  6. SU-E-T-250: Determining VMAT Machine Limitations of An Elekta Linear Accelerator with Agility MLC for Accurate Modeling in RayStation and Robust Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K; Yu, Z; Chen, H; Mourtada, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement VMAT in RayStation with the Elekta Synergy linac with the new Agility MLC, and to utilize the same vendor softwares to determine the optimum Elekta VMAT machine parameters in RayStation for accurate modeling and robust delivery. Methods: iCOMCat is utilized to create various beam patterns with user defined dose rate, gantry, MLC and jaw speed for each control point. The accuracy and stability of the output and beam profile are qualified for each isolated functional component of VMAT delivery using ion chamber and Profiler2 with isocentric mounting fixture. Service graphing on linac console is used to verify the mechanical motion accuracy. The determined optimum Elekta VMAT machine parameters were configured in RayStation v4.5.1. To evaluate the system overall performance, TG-119 test cases and nine retrospective VMAT patients were planned on RayStation, and validated using both ArcCHECK (with plug and ion chamber) and MapCHECK2. Results: Machine output and profile varies <0.3% when only variable is dose rate (35MU/min-600MU/min). <0.9% output and <0.3% profile variation are observed with additional gantry motion (0.53deg/s–5.8deg/s both directions). The output and profile variation are still <1% with additional slow leaf motion (<1.5cm/s both direction). However, the profile becomes less symmetric, and >1.5% output and 7% profile deviation is seen with >2.5cm/s leaf motion. All clinical cases achieved comparable plan quality as treated IMRT plans. The gamma passing rate is 99.5±0.5% on ArcCheck (<3% iso center dose deviation) and 99.1±0.8% on MapCheck2 using 3%/3mm gamma (10% lower threshold). Mechanical motion accuracy in all VMAT deliveries is <1°/1mm. Conclusion: Accurate RayStation modeling and robust VMAT delivery is achievable on Elekta Agility for <2.5cm/s leaf motion and full range of dose rate and gantry speed determined by the same vendor softwares. Our TG-119 and patient results have provided us with the confidence to use VMAT

  7. MiR-31 Regulates Rho-Associated Kinase-Myosin Light Chain (ROCK-MLC) Pathway and Inhibits Gastric Cancer Invasion: Roles of RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Shengnan; Xia, Yuan; Wu, Kejian

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated how the expression of miR-31 can be used to detect gastric cancer (GC) to help illuminate the role of miR-31 and RhoA in GC cells. Material/Methods We carried out our experiments using tissue specimens from 70 GC patients. The relative expression of miR-31 and RhoA mRNA in tissues and cells was detected by RT-PCR. The expression level of RhoA protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. GC cell line BGC-823 was transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC (negative control) group, miR-31 mimics group, miR-31 mimics + RhoA group, miR-31 mimics + ROCK group, and miR-31 mimics + MLCK agonist group. AGS cells were also transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC group, miR-31 inhibitor group, miR-31 inhibitor + RhoA siRNA group, miR-31 inhibitor + ROCK siRNA group, and miR-31 inhibitor + MLCK inhibitor group. Transwell assay was performed to detect the invasion and migration of cells. The protein expression in different transfected groups was detected using Western blotting. Results GC tissues exhibited significantly lower levels of miR-31 expression compared to pericarcinous tissues (p<0.01). Moreover, a significantly higher expression of RhoA in GC tissues was observed (p<0.05). MiR-31 inhibited RhoA expression by binding to 3′UTR of mRNA, whereas miR-31 mimics significantly decreased the number of invaded and migrated cells (p<0.05). The activation of RhoA, ROCK, and phosphorylation of MLC remarkably exacerbate the invasion and migration ability of GC cells (p<0.05). Conclusions We found miR-31 could downregulate the ROCK/MLC pathway by inhibiting the expression of RhoA in order to suppress the invasion and migration of GC cells. PMID:27904131

  8. MiR-31 Regulates Rho-Associated Kinase-Myosin Light Chain (ROCK-MLC) Pathway and Inhibits Gastric Cancer Invasion: Roles of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Shengnan; Xia, Yuan; Wu, Kejian

    2016-12-01

    BACKGROUND This study evaluated how the expression of miR-31 can be used to detect gastric cancer (GC) to help illuminate the role of miR-31 and RhoA in GC cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS We carried out our experiments using tissue specimens from 70 GC patients. The relative expression of miR-31 and RhoA mRNA in tissues and cells was detected by RT-PCR. The expression level of RhoA protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. GC cell line BGC-823 was transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC (negative control) group, miR-31 mimics group, miR-31 mimics + RhoA group, miR-31 mimics + ROCK group, and miR-31 mimics + MLCK agonist group. AGS cells were also transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC group, miR-31 inhibitor group, miR-31 inhibitor + RhoA siRNA group, miR-31 inhibitor + ROCK siRNA group, and miR-31 inhibitor + MLCK inhibitor group. Transwell assay was performed to detect the invasion and migration of cells. The protein expression in different transfected groups was detected using Western blotting. RESULTS GC tissues exhibited significantly lower levels of miR-31 expression compared to pericarcinous tissues (p<0.01). Moreover, a significantly higher expression of RhoA in GC tissues was observed (p<0.05). MiR-31 inhibited RhoA expression by binding to 3'UTR of mRNA, whereas miR-31 mimics significantly decreased the number of invaded and migrated cells (p<0.05). The activation of RhoA, ROCK, and phosphorylation of MLC remarkably exacerbate the invasion and migration ability of GC cells (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS We found miR-31 could downregulate the ROCK/MLC pathway by inhibiting the expression of RhoA in order to suppress the invasion and migration of GC cells.

  9. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial

  10. Extractive reserves in Brazilian Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Fearnside, P.M )

    1989-06-01

    In 1985 an opportunity arose for maintaining tracts of Amazonian forest under sustainable use. Brazil's National Council of Rubber Tappers and the Rural Worker's Union proposed the creation of a set of reserves of a new type, called extractive reserves. The first six are being established in one of the Brazilian states most threatened by deforestatation. The creation of extractive reserves grants legal protection to forest land traditionally used by rubber tappers, Brazil-nut gatherers, and other extractivists. The term extrativismo (extractivism) in Brazil refers to removing nontimber forest products, such as latex, resins, and nuts, without felling the trees. Approximately 30 products are collected for commercial sale. Many more types of forest materials are gathered, for example as food and medicines, for the extractivists' own use. The reserve proposal is attractive for several reasons related to social problems. It allows the rubber tappers to continue their livelihood rather than be expelled by deforestation. However, it is unlikely that sufficient land will be set aside as extractive reserves to employ all the tappers. Displaced rubber tappers already swell the ranks of urban slum dwellers in Brazil's Amazonian cities, and they have become refugees to continue their profession in the forests of neighboring countries, such as Bolivia.

  11. Detecting larval export from marine reserves

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, R. A.; Warner, R. R.; Gaines, S. D.; Paris, C. B.

    2010-01-01

    Marine reserve theory suggests that where large, productive populations are protected within no-take marine reserves, fished areas outside reserves will benefit through the spillover of larvae produced in the reserves. However, empirical evidence for larval export has been sparse. Here we use a simple idealized coastline model to estimate the expected magnitude and spatial scale of larval export from no-take marine reserves across a range of reserve sizes and larval dispersal scales. Results suggest that, given the magnitude of increased production typically found in marine reserves, benefits from larval export are nearly always large enough to offset increased mortality outside marine reserves due to displaced fishing effort. However, the proportional increase in recruitment at sites outside reserves is typically small, particularly for species with long-distance (on the order of hundreds of kilometers) larval dispersal distances, making it very difficult to detect in field studies. Enhanced recruitment due to export may be detected by sampling several sites at an appropriate range of distances from reserves or at sites downcurrent of reserves in systems with directional dispersal. A review of existing empirical evidence confirms the model's suggestion that detecting export may be difficult without an exceptionally large differential in production, short-distance larval dispersal relative to reserve size, directional dispersal, or a sampling scheme that encompasses a broad range of distances from the reserves. PMID:20181570

  12. Lifetime antecedents of cognitive reserve.

    PubMed

    Richards, Marcus; Sacker, Amanda

    2003-08-01

    We used path analysis on data from the British 1946 birth cohort to model lifetime antecedents of cognitive reserve, represented by the NART at 53 years, and compared this model for verbal memory and psychomotor function at this age, cognitive outcomes that are sensitive to age-associated decline. We showed independent paths from childhood cognition, educational attainment and adult occupation to cognitive reserve, with that from childhood cognition the strongest, and that from adult occupation the weakest. A similar pattern was found for the verbal memory and psychomotor outcomes, although the pathways were weaker than those to the NART. The pattern was also mirrored by the paths from paternal occupation to childhood cognition, educational attainment and adult occupation, with that to childhood cognition the strongest, and that to adult occupation the weakest. The direct influence of paternal occupation on cognitive reserve was negligible, and almost entirely mediated by childhood cognitive ability and educational attainment.

  13. Reserve Force Training After the Gulf War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    that problem, the critical variable for reserve units is time management : using the available training time better to improve unit readiness. This...article will offer proposals to improve reserve training through better time management .

  14. 47 CFR 76.227 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 76.227 Section 76.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.227 [Reserved]...

  15. Reserve Growth of Alberta Oil Pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.; Cook, Troy

    2008-01-01

    This Open-File Report is based on a presentation delivered at the Fourth U.S. Geological Survey Workshop on Reserve Growth on March 10-11, 2008. It summarizes the results of a study of reserve growth of oil pools in Alberta Province, Canada. The study is part of a larger effort involving similar studies of fields in other important petroleum provinces around the world, with the overall objective of gaining a better understanding of reserve growth in fields with different geologic/reservoir parameters and different operating environments. The goals of the study were to: 1. Evaluate historical oil reserve data and assess reserve growth. 2. Develop reserve growth models/functions to help forecast hydrocarbon volumes. 3. Study reserve growth sensitivity to various parameters ? for example, pool size, porosity, oil gravity, and lithology. 4. Compare reserve growth in oil pools/fields of Alberta provinces with those from other large petroleum provinces.

  16. 47 CFR 15.119 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 15.119 Section 15.119 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.119 [Reserved]...

  17. 47 CFR 15.122 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 15.122 Section 15.122 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.122 [Reserved]...

  18. Marine reserve effects on fishery profit.

    PubMed

    White, Crow; Kendall, Bruce E; Gaines, Steven; Siegel, David A; Costello, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    Some studies suggest that fishery yields can be higher with reserves than under conventional management. However, the economic performance of fisheries depends on economic profit, not fish yield. The predictions of higher yields with reserves rely on intensive fishing pressures between reserves; the exorbitant costs of harvesting low-density populations erode profits. We incorporated this effect into a bioeconomic model to evaluate the economic performance of reserve-based management. Our results indicate that reserves can still benefit fisheries, even those targeting species that are expensive to harvest. However, in contrast to studies focused on yield, only a moderate proportion of the coast in reserves (with moderate harvest pressures outside reserves) is required to maximize profit. Furthermore, reserve area and harvest intensity can be traded off with little impact on profits, allowing for management flexibility while still providing higher profit than attainable under conventional management.

  19. 47 CFR 25.136 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.136 Section 25.136 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Earth Stations § 25.136 [Reserved]...

  20. 47 CFR 25.215 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.215 Section 25.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.215 [Reserved]...

  1. 47 CFR 25.201 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.201 Section 25.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.201 [Reserved]...

  2. 47 CFR 25.219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.219 Section 25.219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.219 [Reserved]...

  3. 47 CFR 25.252 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.252 Section 25.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.252 [Reserved]...

  4. Portfolios Are Replacing Qualifying Exams as a Step on the Road to Dissertations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that some graduate programs are switching from comprehensive qualifying exams to portfolios compiled by doctoral candidates. Five years ago the graduate program at the University of Kansas' history department was like many others--filled with small cohorts of anxious, fearful procrastinators. Doctoral students were taking an…

  5. REGISTRATION: How Many Engineering Colleges Require Students to Take the FE Exam?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Harold V.

    1989-01-01

    Reports that 26 of 199 responding colleges require the Fundamentals of Engineering examination. States that of the 26, 16 require it to be taken college-wide and 3 require the student to pass. It was estimated that fewer than half of all graduating engineering students take the exam. (MVL)

  6. The Validity Argument of a Web-Based Spanish Listening Exam: Test Usefulness Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardo-Ballester, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This study describes research used for supporting a validity argument for a new Spanish Listening Exam, whose scores are intended to place examinees into appropriate levels of university Spanish classes. This study contributes to the field of argument-based approaches to language assessment by implementing Bachman's (2005) assessment use argument…

  7. The TRIPSE: A Process-Oriented Exam for Large Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nastos, Stash; Rangachari, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIPSE (tri-partite problem solving exercise), a process-oriented exam that mimics the scientific process, was used previously in small classes (15-25). Provided limited data, students frame explanations and design experimental tests that they later revise with additional information. Our 6-year experience using it with larger numbers…

  8. Effect of Curriculum Change on Exam Performance in a 4-Week Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermier, Julie; Way, David; Kasick, David; Kuperschmidt, Rada

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated whether curriculum change could produce improved performance, despite a reduction in clerkship length from 8 to 4 weeks. Methods: The exam performance of medical students completing a 4-week clerkship in psychiatry was compared to national data from the National Board of Medical Examiners' Psychiatry Subject…

  9. Students' Engagement with a Collaborative Wiki Tool Predicts Enhanced Written Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Tom; Elgueta, Herman; Cameron, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    We introduced voluntary wiki-based exercises to a long-running cognitive psychology course, part of the core curriculum for an undergraduate degree in psychology. Over 2 yearly cohorts, students who used the wiki more also scored higher on the final written exam. Using regression analysis, it is possible to account for students' tendency to score…

  10. The Slow Handwriting of Undergraduate Students Constrains Overall Performance in Exam Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Vincent; Dockrell, Julie E.; Barnett, Jo

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduates producing handwritten essays in university exams need to transcribe information onto the page in a rapid and efficient manner under considerable time pressure. In fact, capacity models of the writing process predict that the more automated students can make the transcription process then the more resources will be available for…

  11. Increasing Student Performance on the Independent School Entrance Exam (ISEE) Using the Gap Analysis Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarshar, Shanon Etty

    2013-01-01

    Using the Gap Analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008), this study examined the performance gap experienced by 6th grade students on the math sections of the ISEE (Independent School Entrance Exam). The purpose of the study was to identify and validate the knowledge, motivation, and organization causes of the students' low…

  12. The Instinct Fallacy: The Metacognition of Answering and Revising during College Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couchman, Justin J.; Miller, Noelle E.; Zmuda, Shaun J.; Feather, Kathryn; Schwartzmeyer, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Students often gauge their performance before and after an exam, usually in the form of rough grade estimates or general feelings. Are these estimates accurate? Should they form the basis for decisions about study time, test-taking strategies, revisions, subject mastery, or even general competence? In two studies, undergraduates took a real…

  13. Differential Daily Writing Contingencies and Performance on Major Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hautau, Briana; Turner, Haley C.; Carroll, Erin; Jaspers, Kathryn; Parker, Megan; Krohn, Katy; Williams, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    On 4 of 7 days in each unit of an undergraduate human development course, students responded in writing to specific questions related to instructor notes previously made available to them. The study compared the effects of three writing contingencies on the quality of student writing and performance on major multiple-choice exams in the course. …

  14. Big Business and School-Exams: "Catching Johnny before He Falls"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarker, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the author discusses the involvement of private corporations in administering educational exams. Specifically described are the company, Pearson Plc, a multi-national publishing and media conglomerate, and owner of Edexcel, one of England's three remaining "unitary awarding bodies." The intensification of the involvement of…

  15. Want to Reduce Guessing and Cheating While Making Students Happier? Give More Exams!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, James T.; Bauer, Wolfgang; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Westfall, Gary

    2012-01-01

    It is almost universally agreed that more frequent formative assessment (homework, clicker questions, practice tests, etc.) leads to better student performance and generally better course evaluations. There is, however, only anecdotal evidence that the same would be true for more frequent summative assessment (exams). There maybe many arguments…

  16. VA State Profile. Virginia: Standards of Learning (SOL) End-of-Course Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Virginia's Standards of Learning (SOL) End-of-Course Exams. The purpose of the end-of-course assessments is to measure the achievement of students on the Standards of Learning adopted by the Virginia Board of Education for specific high school courses, and to ensure that students graduating from Virginia…

  17. Sleep Patterns and Academic Performance during Preparation for College Entrance Exam in Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanghai; Ren, Fen; Liu, Zhijun; Xu, Guangxing; Jiang, Fan; Skora, Elizabeth; Lewin, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deficient sleep is linked to detrimental outcomes in health and school performance for adolescents. This study characterized sleep patterns in Chinese adolescents preparing for the College Entrance Exam (CEE) and evaluated the association between sleep patterns, self-rated academic performance, and the CEE scores. Methods: A sample of…

  18. Cheating or Cheated? Surviving Secondary Exit Exams in a Neoliberal Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Hodges, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Cheating on exams is a rampant and highly developed practice among youth in the Arab world, often involving elaborate networks, advanced technology and adult authorities. Rather than viewing cheating as mere laziness or immorality, this article interrogates the social meanings of cheating by comparing the practices and discourses of cheating on…

  19. Brief Daily Writing Activities and Performance on Major Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Haley C.; Bliss, Stacy L.; Hautau, Briana; Carroll, Erin; Jaspers, Kathryn E.; Williams, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although past research indicates that giving brief quizzes, administered either regularly or randomly, may lead to improvement in students' performance on major exams, negligible research has targeted daily writing activities that require the processing of course information at a deeper level than might result from simply reading course materials…

  20. Psychiatry Clerkship Students' Preparation, Reflection, and Results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Gregory W.; Fore-Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Spollen, John J.; Pelic, Christopher; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatry clerkship training involves many learning components, one of which is acquisition of scholarly knowledge. The authors investigate the reading materials and learning methods used by clinical clerks in their preparation for the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Exam (PSE). Methods: Clerkship students…