Science.gov

Sample records for examinations general principles

  1. General principles governing radiological examinations in cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Derwinis, T; Białoszewski, D

    2000-03-30

    A review of the general principles governing radiological procedures in cases of acute trauma to the cervical spine, depending on the patient's clinical status, and on the location and nature of the injury. Various X-ray techniques are presented that can be used to attain better differentiation of the sequelae of spinal injury, along with a general assessment of the clinical value of certain other examinations, such as computer tomography and magnetic resonance, in terms of their suitability in cases of acute trauma to the cervical spine.

  2. [Recommended general principles of good practice relating to psychological examinations in occupational medicine service].

    PubMed

    Waszkowska, Małgorzata; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents general principles of good practice in prophylactic psychological examinations. The principles are based on the binding law and standards of psychological examinations recommended by the Polish Psychological Association. They also take account of a specific nature of such examinations, resulting from their goals and the subject of their concern. Formal guidelines and health indications concerning this kind examinations, their scope, diagnostic methods, tools and documentation are discussed as well.

  3. [General principles of handling tissues and organs intended for examination in histopathology - pathologists requirements for surgeons].

    PubMed

    Trnková, M

    2014-03-01

    Histopathology has continued to develop into a complex discipline of laboratory medicine in the last 30 years. Implementation of new techniques such as immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, molecular pathology and gene profiling yields a large amount of information which is used not only to establish diagnosis, but also for prediction and prognosis. The basic conditions for precision and correctness of this information which directly influence the choice of therapy and the outcome for the patient, and eventually the health and the life of the patient, are obtaining a suitable specimen and the best laboratory processing. The first step in this procedure is collection of samples, fixation and submission to the pathology laboratory - the pre-analytical phase. Knowledge of the principles of this phase and their implementation in daily practice in surgery is of main importance for the quality and quantity of information obtained. We introduce the basic rules for proper handling of different specimens depending on the use of conventional and "new" histopathology methods.

  4. Itch Management: General Principles.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like pain, itch is a challenging condition that needs to be managed. Within this setting, the first principle of itch management is to get an appropriate diagnosis to perform an etiology-oriented therapy. In several cases it is not possible to treat the cause, the etiology is undetermined, there are several causes, or the etiological treatment is not effective enough to alleviate itch completely. This is also why there is need for symptomatic treatment. In all patients, psychological support and associated pragmatic measures might be helpful. General principles and guidelines are required, yet patient-centered individual care remains fundamental. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Archimedes' Principle in General Coordinates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Archimedes' principle is well known to state that a body submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. Herein, Archimedes' principle is derived from first principles by using conservation of the stress-energy-momentum tensor in general coordinates. The resulting expression for the force is…

  6. Archimedes' Principle in General Coordinates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Archimedes' principle is well known to state that a body submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. Herein, Archimedes' principle is derived from first principles by using conservation of the stress-energy-momentum tensor in general coordinates. The resulting expression for the force is…

  7. Teaching professionalism: general principles.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R

    2006-05-01

    There are educational principles that apply to the teaching of professionalism during undergraduate education and postgraduate training. It is axiomatic that there is a single cognitive base that applies with increasing moral force as students enter medical school, progress to residency or registrar training, and enter practice. While parts of this body of knowledge are easier to teach and learn at different stages of an individual's career, it remains a definable whole at all times and should be taught as such. While the principle that self-reflection on theoretical and real issues encountered in the life of a student, resident or practitioner is essential to the acquisition of experiential learning and the incorporation of the values and behaviors of the professional, the opportunities to provide situations where this can take place will change as an individual progresses through the system, as will the sophistication of the level of learning. Teaching the cognitive base of professionalism and providing opportunities for the internalization of its values and behaviors are the cornerstones of the organization of the teaching of professionalism at all levels. Situated learning theory appears to provide practical guidance as to how this may be implemented. While the application of this theory will vary with the type of curriculum, the institutional culture and the resources available, the principles outlined should remain constant.

  8. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosso, Pasquale; Das, Saurya

    2017-08-01

    Various models of quantum gravity suggest a modification of the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, to the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle, between position and momentum. In this work we show how this modification influences the theory of angular momentum in Quantum Mechanics. In particular, we compute Planck scale corrections to angular momentum eigenvalues, the hydrogen atom spectrum, the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. We also examine effects of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle on multi-particle systems.

  9. [Catastrophe medicine. General principles].

    PubMed

    Linde, H

    1980-10-17

    Catastrophe medicine is the organization of masses under difficult conditions. The present article is concerned with the competence and organization in the event of a catastrophe and describes the phasic course of a catastrophe situation. The most important element of effective first aid measures, screening for shock and pain treatment, and first surgical treatment and the principles of ballistic factors are dealt with. Particular attention is given to the evacuation of emergency patients from the scene of the catastrophe. A request is made for " Catastrophe medicine" to be included by the medical faculties and educational institutes in their course of study for paramedical personnel.

  10. The Principle of General Tovariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heunen, C.; Landsman, N. P.; Spitters, B.

    2008-06-01

    We tentatively propose two guiding principles for the construction of theories of physics, which should be satisfied by a possible future theory of quantum gravity. These principles are inspired by those that led Einstein to his theory of general relativity, viz. his principle of general covariance and his equivalence principle, as well as by the two mysterious dogmas of Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics, i.e. his doctrine of classical concepts and his principle of complementarity. An appropriate mathematical language for combining these ideas is topos theory, a framework earlier proposed for physics by Isham and collaborators. Our principle of general tovariance states that any mathematical structure appearing in the laws of physics must be definable in an arbitrary topos (with natural numbers object) and must be preserved under so-called geometric morphisms. This principle identifies geometric logic as the mathematical language of physics and restricts the constructions and theorems to those valid in intuitionism: neither Aristotle's principle of the excluded third nor Zermelo's Axiom of Choice may be invoked. Subsequently, our equivalence principle states that any algebra of observables (initially defined in the topos Sets) is empirically equivalent to a commutative one in some other topos.

  11. Archimedes' principle in general coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-05-01

    Archimedes' principle is well known to state that a body submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. Herein, Archimedes' principle is derived from first principles by using conservation of the stress-energy-momentum tensor in general coordinates. The resulting expression for the force is applied in Schwarzschild coordinates and in rotating coordinates. Using Schwarzschild coordinates for the case of a spherical mass suspended within a perfect fluid leads to the familiar expression of Archimedes' principle. Using rotating coordinates produces an expression for a centrifugal buoyancy force that agrees with accepted theory. It is then argued that Archimedes' principle ought to be applicable to non-gravitational phenomena, as well. Conservation of the energy-momentum tensor is then applied to electromagnetic phenomena. It is shown that a charged body submerged in a charged medium experiences a buoyancy force in accordance with an electromagnetic analogue of Archimedes' principle.

  12. Rowlands' Duality Principle: A Generalization of Noether's Theorem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Sabah E.

    This paper will examine a physical principle that has been used in making valid predictions and generalizes established conservation laws. In a previous paper it was shown how Rowlands' zero-totality condition could be viewed as a generalization of Newton's third law of motion. In this paper it will be argued that Rowlands' Duality Principle is a generalization of Noether's Theorem and that the two principles taken together are truly foundational principles that have tamed Metaphysics.

  13. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  14. 16 CFR 260.6 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.6 General principles. The following general principles apply to all environmental marketing claims, including, but not limited to, those described in § 260.7. In addition, § 260.7... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General principles. 260.6 Section 260.6...

  15. Quantum mechanics and the generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jang Young; Berger, Micheal S.

    2006-12-15

    The generalized uncertainty principle has been described as a general consequence of incorporating a minimal length from a theory of quantum gravity. We consider a simple quantum mechanical model where the operator corresponding to position has discrete eigenvalues and show how the generalized uncertainty principle results for minimum uncertainty wave packets.

  16. 21 CFR 104.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION NUTRITIONAL QUALITY GUIDELINES FOR FOODS General Provisions § 104.5 General principles. (a) A nutritional quality guideline prescribes the minimum level or range of nutrient composition (nutritional... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General principles. 104.5 Section 104.5 Food and...

  17. 21 CFR 104.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION NUTRITIONAL QUALITY GUIDELINES FOR FOODS General Provisions § 104.5 General principles. (a) A nutritional quality guideline prescribes the minimum level or range of nutrient composition (nutritional... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General principles. 104.5 Section 104.5 Food and...

  18. 21 CFR 104.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION NUTRITIONAL QUALITY GUIDELINES FOR FOODS General Provisions § 104.5 General principles. (a) A nutritional quality guideline prescribes the minimum level or range of nutrient composition (nutritional... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General principles. 104.5 Section 104.5 Food and...

  19. 21 CFR 104.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION NUTRITIONAL QUALITY GUIDELINES FOR FOODS General Provisions § 104.5 General principles. (a) A nutritional quality guideline prescribes the minimum level or range of nutrient composition (nutritional... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General principles. 104.5 Section 104.5 Food and...

  20. Sedimentation equilibrium and the generalized Archimedes' principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Alberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The buoyancy concept is critically re-examined for applications to dispersions of nano-particles, such as colloids, proteins, or macromolecules. It is shown that when the size of the buoyant particle is not too different (say, at most a factor of ten) from the size of the dispersed particles, new intriguing phenomena emerge, leading to the violation of the Archimedes' principle. The resulting buoyancy force depends not only on the volume of the particle and on the mass density of the dispersion, but also on the relative size of the particles, on their geometry, and on the interactions between the buoyant particle and the fluid. Explicit expressions for such a generalized Archimedes' principle are obtained and the results are tested against targeted experiments in colloidal dispersions.

  1. Sedimentation equilibrium and the generalized Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Parola, Alberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2013-03-21

    The buoyancy concept is critically re-examined for applications to dispersions of nano-particles, such as colloids, proteins, or macromolecules. It is shown that when the size of the buoyant particle is not too different (say, at most a factor of ten) from the size of the dispersed particles, new intriguing phenomena emerge, leading to the violation of the Archimedes' principle. The resulting buoyancy force depends not only on the volume of the particle and on the mass density of the dispersion, but also on the relative size of the particles, on their geometry, and on the interactions between the buoyant particle and the fluid. Explicit expressions for such a generalized Archimedes' principle are obtained and the results are tested against targeted experiments in colloidal dispersions.

  2. 5 CFR 551.202 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General principles. 551.202 Section 551.202 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.202 General principles. In all...

  3. 39 CFR 268.1 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General principles. 268.1 Section 268.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY OF INFORMATION-EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT § 268.1 General principles. In order to conduct its business, the Postal Service has...

  4. Deriving and applying generally applicable safety principles

    SciTech Connect

    Spray, S.D.

    1998-08-01

    The nuclear detonation safety of modern nuclear weapons depends on a coordinated safety theme incorporating three general safety principles: isolation, inoperability, and incompatibility. The success of this approach has encouraged them to study whether these and/or other principles might be useful in other applications. Not surprisingly, no additional first-principles (based on physical laws) have been identified. However, a more widely applicable definition and application of the principle-based approach has been developed, resulting in a selection of strategies that are basically subsets and varied combinations of the more general principles above. However, identification of principles to be relied on is only one step in providing a safe design. As one other important example, coordinating overall architecture and strategy is essential: the authors term this a safety theme.

  5. [Physical principles and general considerations].

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F; Mollet Sánchez, J; Cerezo López, E

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is based on the application of the physical properties of ultrasound to the skin and cutaneous adnexae. Knowledge of ultrasound semiology, artifacts and the application of Doppler examination allows deeper study of the biology and diseases of the skin and its adnexae.

  6. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles. 358... principles. (a) As more fully described and implemented in subsequent sections of this part, a transmission... independently from its marketing function employees, except as permitted in this part or otherwise permitted by...

  7. Action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. David

    2011-10-15

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela action is discussed in detail.

  8. 21 CFR 104.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on the label or in labeling representing, suggesting, or implying any nutritional or other... CONSUMPTION NUTRITIONAL QUALITY GUIDELINES FOR FOODS General Provisions § 104.5 General principles. (a) A nutritional quality guideline prescribes the minimum level or range of nutrient composition (nutritional...

  9. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General principles. 358.2 Section 358.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR TRANSMISSION PROVIDERS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 358.2 General...

  10. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General principles. 358.2 Section 358.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR TRANSMISSION PROVIDERS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 358.2 General...

  11. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General principles. 358.2 Section 358.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR TRANSMISSION PROVIDERS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 358.2 General...

  12. 18 CFR 358.2 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General principles. 358.2 Section 358.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR TRANSMISSION PROVIDERS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 358.2 General...

  13. Pure connection action principle for general relativity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2011-06-24

    It has already been known for two decades that general relativity can be reformulated as a certain gauge theory, so that the only dynamical field is an SO(3) connection and the spacetime metric appears as a derived object. However, no simple action principle realizing these ideas has been available. A new elegant action principle for such a "pure connection" formulation of GR is described.

  14. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonography is an established method for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. It enables the identification of post-traumatic changes of nerves, neuropathies secondary to compression syndromes, inflammatory or neoplastic nerve lesions as well as the evaluation of postoperative complications. In certain situations, this technique is the imaging method of choice. It is increasingly used in anesthesiology for regional anesthesia. As in the case of other ultrasound imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. This article presents the histological structure of peripheral nerves and their appearance in ultrasonography. It also presents the examination technique, following the example of the median nerve, and includes a series of diagrams and ultrasound images. The interpretation of the shape, echogenicity, thickness and vascularity of nerves is described, as well as their relation to the surrounding tissues. The “elevator technique”, which consists of locating a set nerve at a characteristic anatomic point, and following it proximally or distally, has been explained. The undisputed benefits of the ultrasound examination have been presented, including its advantages over other diagnostic methods. These advantages include the dynamic component of the ultrasound examination and the possibility of correlating the patient's symptoms with the ultrasound images. As an example, the proper anatomy and the ultrasonographic appearance of the median nerve were described. This nerve's course is presented, its divisions, and characteristic reference points, so as to facilitate its location and identification, and enable subsequent use of the aforementioned “elevator technique”. This article opens a series of publications concerning anatomy, technique of examination and pathologies of peripheral nerves

  15. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    Ultrasonography is an established method for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. It enables the identification of post-traumatic changes of nerves, neuropathies secondary to compression syndromes, inflammatory or neoplastic nerve lesions as well as the evaluation of postoperative complications. In certain situations, this technique is the imaging method of choice. It is increasingly used in anesthesiology for regional anesthesia. As in the case of other ultrasound imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. This article presents the histological structure of peripheral nerves and their appearance in ultrasonography. It also presents the examination technique, following the example of the median nerve, and includes a series of diagrams and ultrasound images. The interpretation of the shape, echogenicity, thickness and vascularity of nerves is described, as well as their relation to the surrounding tissues. The "elevator technique", which consists of locating a set nerve at a characteristic anatomic point, and following it proximally or distally, has been explained. The undisputed benefits of the ultrasound examination have been presented, including its advantages over other diagnostic methods. These advantages include the dynamic component of the ultrasound examination and the possibility of correlating the patient's symptoms with the ultrasound images. As an example, the proper anatomy and the ultrasonographic appearance of the median nerve were described. This nerve's course is presented, its divisions, and characteristic reference points, so as to facilitate its location and identification, and enable subsequent use of the aforementioned "elevator technique". This article opens a series of publications concerning anatomy, technique of examination and pathologies of peripheral nerves.

  16. 5 CFR 551.202 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General principles. 551.202 Section 551.202 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... preclude exemption under another category. For example, an engineering technician who fails to meet the...

  17. Teaching General Principles and Applications of Dendrogeomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Tree-ring analysis in geomorphology can be incorporated into a number of undergraduate methods in order to reconstruct the history of a variety of geomorphic processes. Discusses dendrochronology, general principles of dendrogeomorphology, field sampling methods, laboratory techniques, and examples of applications. (TW)

  18. Generalized convective quasi-equilibrium principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert S.

    2016-03-01

    A generalization of Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium principle is presented for a closure formulation of mass-flux convection parameterization. The original principle is based on the budget of the cloud work function. This principle is generalized by considering the budget for a vertical integral of an arbitrary convection-related quantity. The closure formulation includes Arakawa and Schubert's quasi-equilibrium, as well as both CAPE and moisture closures as special cases. The formulation also includes new possibilities for considering vertical integrals that are dependent on convective-scale variables, such as the moisture within convection. The generalized convective quasi-equilibrium is defined by a balance between large-scale forcing and convective response for a given vertically-integrated quantity. The latter takes the form of a convolution of a kernel matrix and a mass-flux spectrum, as in the original convective quasi-equilibrium. The kernel reduces to a scalar when either a bulk formulation is adopted, or only large-scale variables are considered within the vertical integral. Various physical implications of the generalized closure are discussed. These include the possibility that precipitation might be considered as a potentially-significant contribution to the large-scale forcing. Two dicta are proposed as guiding physical principles for the specifying a suitable vertically-integrated quantity.

  19. 39 CFR 602.1 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.1 General principles. It is the policy of the Postal Service to secure full ownership rights for its intellectual...

  20. 39 CFR 602.1 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.1 General principles. It is the policy of the Postal Service to secure full ownership rights for its intellectual...

  1. 23 CFR 660.509 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General principles. 660.509 Section 660.509 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS SPECIAL... permanent defense installations as they do for highways serving private industrial establishments or...

  2. 39 CFR 268.1 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 268.1 General principles. In order to conduct its business, the Postal Service has the... handling it have a legal and ethical obligation to hold it in confidence and to actively protect it from... collected, maintained and used for official Postal Service business. Employees shall be held responsible for...

  3. 39 CFR 268.1 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 268.1 General principles. In order to conduct its business, the Postal Service has the... handling it have a legal and ethical obligation to hold it in confidence and to actively protect it from... collected, maintained and used for official Postal Service business. Employees shall be held responsible for...

  4. Multipartition generalizations of the Schwinger variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldflam, R.; Thaler, R. M.; Tobocman, W.

    1981-04-01

    Generalizations of the Schwinger variational principle are proposed which include rearrangement scattering. Functionals are given for the transition amplitude. The requirement that a functional be stationary with respect to variation of the scattering wave function leads to a set of simultaneous equations for the scattering wave function rather than a single equation. This is consistent with recent formalisms for many-body scattering.

  5. Teaching General Principles and Applications of Dendrogeomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Tree-ring analysis in geomorphology can be incorporated into a number of undergraduate methods in order to reconstruct the history of a variety of geomorphic processes. Discusses dendrochronology, general principles of dendrogeomorphology, field sampling methods, laboratory techniques, and examples of applications. (TW)

  6. 12 CFR 330.3 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... owned by the same bank holding company would be insured separately, per bank.) The deposit accounts of a... buying rates for cable transfers”) quoted for major currencies by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General principles. 330.3 Section 330.3 Banks...

  7. 12 CFR 330.3 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... owned by the same bank holding company would be insured separately, per bank.) The deposit accounts of a... buying rates for cable transfers”) quoted for major currencies by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General principles. 330.3 Section 330.3 Banks...

  8. 12 CFR 330.3 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... owned by the same bank holding company would be insured separately, per bank.) The deposit accounts of a... buying rates for cable transfers”) quoted for major currencies by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General principles. 330.3 Section 330.3 Banks...

  9. 21 CFR 502.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or absence of such ingredient(s) or component(s) in the food has a material bearing on price or... misled about the presence or absence of the ingredient(s) or component(s) in the food. The following... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles. 502.5 Section 502.5 Food...

  10. Lorentz invariance violation and generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Magdy, H.; Ali, A. Farag

    2016-01-01

    There are several theoretical indications that the quantum gravity approaches may have predictions for a minimal measurable length, and a maximal observable momentum and throughout a generalization for Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) is based on a momentum-dependent modification in the standard dispersion relation which is conjectured to violate the principle of Lorentz invariance. From the resulting Hamiltonian, the velocity and time of flight of relativistic distant particles at Planck energy can be derived. A first comparison is made with recent observations for Hubble parameter in redshift-dependence in early-type galaxies. We find that LIV has two types of contributions to the time of flight delay Δ t comparable with that observations. Although the wrong OPERA measurement on faster-than-light muon neutrino anomaly, Δ t, and the relative change in the speed of muon neutrino Δ v in dependence on redshift z turn to be wrong, we utilize its main features to estimate Δ v. Accordingly, the results could not be interpreted as LIV. A third comparison is made with the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR). It is found that an essential ingredient of the approach combining string theory, loop quantum gravity, black hole physics and doubly spacial relativity and the one assuming a perturbative departure from exact Lorentz invariance. Fixing the sensitivity factor and its energy dependence are essential inputs for a reliable confronting of our calculations to UHECR. The sensitivity factor is related to the special time of flight delay and the time structure of the signal. Furthermore, the upper and lower bounds to the parameter, a that characterizes the generalized uncertainly principle, have to be fixed in related physical systems such as the gamma rays bursts.

  11. Responsible gambling: general principles and minimal requirements.

    PubMed

    Blaszczynski, Alex; Collins, Peter; Fong, Davis; Ladouceur, Robert; Nower, Lia; Shaffer, Howard J; Tavares, Hermano; Venisse, Jean-Luc

    2011-12-01

    Many international jurisdictions have introduced responsible gambling programs. These programs intend to minimize negative consequences of excessive gambling, but vary considerably in their aims, focus, and content. Many responsible gambling programs lack a conceptual framework and, in the absence of empirical data, their components are based only on general considerations and impressions. This paper outlines the consensus viewpoint of an international group of researchers suggesting fundamental responsible gambling principles, roles of key stakeholders, and minimal requirements that stakeholders can use to frame and inform responsible gambling programs across jurisdictions. Such a framework does not purport to offer value statements regarding the legal status of gambling or its expansion. Rather, it proposes gambling-related initiatives aimed at government, industry, and individuals to promote responsible gambling and consumer protection. This paper argues that there is a set of basic principles and minimal requirements that should form the basis for every responsible gambling program.

  12. A review of the generalized uncertainty principle.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Diab, Abdel Magied

    2015-12-01

    Based on string theory, black hole physics, doubly special relativity and some 'thought' experiments, minimal distance and/or maximum momentum are proposed. As alternatives to the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), the modified dispersion relation, the space noncommutativity, the Lorentz invariance violation, and the quantum-gravity-induced birefringence effects are summarized. The origin of minimal measurable quantities and the different GUP approaches are reviewed and the corresponding observations are analysed. Bounds on the GUP parameter are discussed and implemented in the understanding of recent PLANCK observations of cosmic inflation. The higher-order GUP approaches predict minimal length uncertainty with and without maximum momenta. Possible arguments against the GUP are discussed; for instance, the concern about its compatibility with the equivalence principles, the universality of gravitational redshift and the free fall and law of reciprocal action are addressed.

  13. Generalized uncertainty principle: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A.; Diab, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we review some highlights from the String theory, the black hole physics and the doubly special relativity and some thought experiments which were suggested to probe the shortest distances and/or maximum momentum at the Planck scale. Furthermore, all models developed in order to implement the minimal length scale and/or the maximum momentum in different physical systems are analyzed and compared. They entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) assuming modified dispersion relation, and therefore are allowed for a wide range of applications in estimating, for example, the inflationary parameters, Lorentz invariance violation, black hole thermodynamics, Saleker-Wigner inequalities, entropic nature of gravitational laws, Friedmann equations, minimal time measurement and thermodynamics of the high-energy collisions. One of the higher-order GUP approaches gives predictions for the minimal length uncertainty. A second one predicts a maximum momentum and a minimal length uncertainty, simultaneously. An extensive comparison between the different GUP approaches is summarized. We also discuss the GUP impacts on the equivalence principles including the universality of the gravitational redshift and the free fall and law of reciprocal action and on the kinetic energy of composite system. The existence of a minimal length and a maximum momentum accuracy is preferred by various physical observations. The concern about the compatibility with the equivalence principles, the universality of gravitational redshift and the free fall and law of reciprocal action should be addressed. We conclude that the value of the GUP parameters remain a puzzle to be verified.

  14. A generalization of Vassiliev's h-principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokřínek, Lukáš

    2007-05-01

    This thesis consists of two parts which share only a slight overlap. The first part is concerned with the study of ideals in the ring C^infty(M,R) of smooth functions on a compact smooth manifold M or more generally submodules of a finitely generated C^infty(M,R)-module V. We define a topology on the space of all submodules of V of a fixed finite codimension d. Its main property is that it is compact Hausdorff and, in the case of ideals in the ring itself, it contains as a subspace the configuration space of d distinct unordered points in M and therefore gives a "compactification" of this configuration space. We present a concrete description of this space for low codimensions. The main focus is then put on the second part which is concerned with a generalization of Vassiliev's h-principle. This principle in its simplest form asserts that the jet prolongation map j^r:C^infty(M,E)toΓ(J^r(M,E)), defined on the space of smooth maps from a compact manifold M to a Euclidean space E and with target the space of smooth sections of the jet bundle J^r(M,E), is a cohomology isomorphism when restricted to certain "nonsingular" subsets (these are defined in terms of a certain subset Rsubseteq J^r(M,E)). Our generalization then puts this theorem in a more general setting of topological C^infty(M,R)-modules. As a reward we get a strengthening of this result asserting that all the homotopy fibres have zero homology.

  15. 14 CFR Sec. 2-1 - Generally accepted accounting principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Generally accepted accounting principles... AIR CARRIERS General Accounting Provisions Sec. 2-1 Generally accepted accounting principles. (a) The accounting provisions contained in this part are based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP...

  16. Dose reduction in paediatric MDCT: general principles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A; Frush, D P

    2007-06-01

    The number of multi-detector array computed tomography (MDCT) examinations performed per annum continues to increase in both the adult and paediatric populations. Estimates from 2003 suggested that CT contributed 17% of a radiology department's workload, yet was responsible for up to 75% of the collective population dose from medical radiation. The effective doses for some CT examinations today overlap with those argued to have an increased risk of cancer. This is especially pertinent for paediatric CT, as children are more radiosensitive than adults (and girls more radiosensitive than boys). In addition, children have a longer life ahead of them, in which radiation induced cancers may become manifest. Radiologists must be aware of these facts and practise the ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle, when it comes to deciding CT protocols and parameters.

  17. General principles of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jose L

    2014-03-01

    Given the impact of antibiotic resistance on human health, its study is of great interest from a clinical view- point. In addition, antibiotic resistance is one of the few examples of evolution that can be studied in real time. Knowing the general principles involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is therefore of interest to clinicians, evolutionary biologists and ecologists. The origin of antibiotic resistance genes now possessed by human pathogens can be traced back to environmental microorganisms. Consequently, a full understanding of the evolution of antibiotic resistance requires the study of natural environments as well as clinical ecosystems. Updated information on the evolutionary mechanisms behind resistance, indicates that ecological connectivity, founder effect and fitness costs are important bottle- necks that modulate the transfer of resistance from environmental microorganisms to pathogens.

  18. Generalized Archimedes' principle in active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, Nitzan; Voituriez, Raphael; Elgeti, Jens; Gov, Nir S.

    2017-09-01

    We show how a gradient in the motility properties of noninteracting pointlike active particles can cause a pressure gradient that pushes a large inert object. We calculate the force on an object inside a system of active particles with position-dependent motion parameters, in one and two dimensions, and show that a modified Archimedes' principle is satisfied. We characterize the system, both in terms of the model parameters and in terms of experimentally measurable quantities: the spatial profiles of the density, velocity and pressure. This theoretical analysis is motivated by recent experiments, which showed that the nucleus of a mouse oocyte (immature egg cell) moves from the cortex to the center due to a gradient of activity of vesicles propelled by molecular motors; it more generally applies to artificial systems of controlled localized activity.

  19. 34 CFR 75.530 - General cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General cost principles. 75.530 Section 75.530 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.530 General cost principles. The general principles to be used in...

  20. 34 CFR 75.530 - General cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General cost principles. 75.530 Section 75.530 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.530 General cost principles. The general principles to be used in...

  1. General principles of surgery applied to cattle.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André

    2005-03-01

    Basic principles of surgery are important to review, even for experienced surgeons. Although aseptic surgical principles are not always applicable in the field, we have to respect some guidelines. Recent research will influence the way that we do things, based on what we have been taught and our experience. Respecting those simple principles can make a big difference in the final outcome.

  2. Generalized uncertainty principle: implications for black hole complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Ong, Yen Chin; Yeom, Dong-han

    2014-12-01

    At the heart of the black hole information loss paradox and the firewall controversy lies the conflict between quantum mechanics and general relativity. Much has been said about quantum corrections to general relativity, but much less in the opposite direction. It is therefore crucial to examine possible corrections to quantum mechanics due to gravity. Indeed, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is one profound feature of quantum mechanics, which nevertheless may receive correction when gravitational effects become important. Such generalized uncertainty principle [GUP] has been motivated from not only quite general considerations of quantum mechanics and gravity, but also string theoretic arguments. We examine the role of GUP in the context of black hole complementarity. We find that while complementarity can be violated by large N rescaling if one assumes only the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, the application of GUP may save complementarity, but only if certain N -dependence is also assumed. This raises two important questions beyond the scope of this work, i.e., whether GUP really has the proposed form of N -dependence, and whether black hole complementarity is indeed correct.

  3. What Do the CLEP General Examinations Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beanblossom, Gary F.

    Factor analysis was used to test the hypothesis that College Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations, when administered to students who have completed 2 years of college, do not measure anything different from that measured by the traditional battery of pre-college aptitude examinations. The CLEP examinations were taken in the fall…

  4. Use of General Principles in Teaching Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Rolando Hernandez; Tomey, Agustin Vicedo

    1991-01-01

    Presents Principles of Biochemistry for use as main focus of a biochemistry course. The nine guiding ideas are the principles of continual turnover, macromolecular organization, molecular recognition, multiplicity of utilization, maximum efficiency, gradual change, interrelationship, transformational reciprocity, and information transfer. In use…

  5. Use of General Principles in Teaching Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Rolando Hernandez; Tomey, Agustin Vicedo

    1991-01-01

    Presents Principles of Biochemistry for use as main focus of a biochemistry course. The nine guiding ideas are the principles of continual turnover, macromolecular organization, molecular recognition, multiplicity of utilization, maximum efficiency, gradual change, interrelationship, transformational reciprocity, and information transfer. In use…

  6. Incorporation of generalized uncertainty principle into Lifshitz field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Faizal, Mir; Majumder, Barun

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we will incorporate the generalized uncertainty principle into field theories with Lifshitz scaling. We will first construct both bosonic and fermionic theories with Lifshitz scaling based on generalized uncertainty principle. After that we will incorporate the generalized uncertainty principle into a non-abelian gauge theory with Lifshitz scaling. We will observe that even though the action for this theory is non-local, it is invariant under local gauge transformations. We will also perform the stochastic quantization of this Lifshitz fermionic theory based generalized uncertainty principle.

  7. Incorporation of generalized uncertainty principle into Lifshitz field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Majumder, Barun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we will incorporate the generalized uncertainty principle into field theories with Lifshitz scaling. We will first construct both bosonic and fermionic theories with Lifshitz scaling based on generalized uncertainty principle. After that we will incorporate the generalized uncertainty principle into a non-abelian gauge theory with Lifshitz scaling. We will observe that even though the action for this theory is non-local, it is invariant under local gauge transformations. We will also perform the stochastic quantization of this Lifshitz fermionic theory based generalized uncertainty principle.

  8. General statement of ethical principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    ACHA recognizes that these guidelines are a work in progress and will change as law and professional standards in the field of college health evolve. At this time, ACHA expects that all members actively uphold the principles and guidelines detailed in this document, as guides for conduct in professional activities and situations when breaches in these practices are evident.

  9. 34 CFR 76.530 - General cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General cost principles. 76.530 Section 76.530 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Allowable Costs § 76.530 General cost principles. Both 34...

  10. 34 CFR 76.530 - General cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General cost principles. 76.530 Section 76.530 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Allowable Costs § 76.530 General cost principles. Both 34...

  11. 32 CFR 1633.7 - General principles of classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General principles of classification. 1633.7... ADMINISTRATION OF CLASSIFICATION § 1633.7 General principles of classification. (a) Each classified registrant in... classifying authority. (b) The classifying authority in considering a registrant's claim for classification...

  12. Generalization of the ERIT principle and method.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero,A.G.

    2007-11-04

    The paper describes the generalization of the method to produce secondary particles with a low-energy and low-intensity primary beam circulating in a Storage Ring with the Emittance-Recovery by Internal-Target (ERIT).

  13. Generalization of the ERIT Principle and Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero,A.

    2008-02-01

    The paper describes the generalization of the method to produce secondary particles with a low-energy and low-intensity primary beam circulating in a Storage Ring with the Emittance-Recovery by Internal-Target (ERIT).

  14. Quantum corrections to newtonian potential and generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardigli, Fabio; Lambiase, Gaetano; Vagenas, Elias

    2017-08-01

    We use the leading quantum corrections to the newtonian potential to compute the deformation parameter of the generalized uncertainty principle. By assuming just only General Relativity as theory of Gravitation, and the thermal nature of the GUP corrections to the Hawking spectrum, our calculation gives, to first order, a specific numerical result. We briefly discuss the physical meaning of this value, and compare it with the previously obtained bounds on the generalized uncertainty principle deformation parameter.

  15. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  16. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  17. 21 CFR 502.5 - General principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS COMMON OR USUAL NAMES FOR NONSTANDARDIZED ANIMAL FOODS § 502.5 General... confusingly similar to the name of any other food that is not reasonably encompassed within the same name...

  18. [Primary care. General principles and specific tasks].

    PubMed

    Belmar, R

    1990-07-01

    The initial rationale for primary health care (PHC) was that it was a necessary strategy for health maintenance, preventing disease, early detection of health problems and providing a diagnosis for a cure. This definition along with modern epidemiology served as the basis for introducing a new concept of "focalization" extending the definition to that of primary family oriented health care to the community. This has cleared the role of the community or population as the denominator rather than the cases in all PHC activities. PHC also refers to intersectorial activities that in addition to including the traditional activities of prevention, curative care, entrance to the health care system, comprehensiveness and equipment, also includes the objectives of equality, humanity, human rights, participation, intersectorial participation and decentralization. These principles and objectives establish a national health model that can be replicated in each community. Each community would have 3 types of dispensaries: 1) a 24 hour primary health care emergency services; 2) a dispensary from 5-8:00 p.m. providing a 3rd rotation; and 3) dispensaries that provide comprehensive health care during regular working hours.

  19. Examining the Social Benefits Principle in Research with Human Participants.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2016-07-04

    The idea that research with human participants should benefit society has become firmly entrenched in various regulations, policies, and guidelines, but there has been little in-depth analysis of this ethical principle in the bioethics literature. In this paper, I distinguish between strong and weak versions and the social benefits principle and examine six arguments for it. I argue that while it is always ethically desirable for research with human subjects to offer important benefits to society (or the public), the reasonable expectation of substantial public benefit should be a necessary condition for regarding research as ethical only when (a) it imposes more than minimal risks on non-consenting subjects; or (b) it is supported by public resources.

  20. [Competency: general principles and applicability in dementia].

    PubMed

    Alvaro, L C

    2012-06-01

    Competency means the capacity to make responsible and balanced decisions. This may be performed in clinical settings (decision-making abilities on treatment or risky diagnostic procedures) and also in daily-life activities (financial matters, nursing home admittance, contracts, etc.). Competency is linked to the ethical principle of autonomy and to a horizontal doctor-patient interaction, far from ancient paternalistic relationships. It is contemplated in the Spanish law as the patient's right to be informed and to make free choices, particularly in cases of dementia. The competency that we assess is the so-called natural or working capacity. It is specific for an action or task. The level of required capacity depends on the decision: higher for critical ones, lower for low-risk decisions. The assessment process requires noting the patient's capacity to understand, analyse, self-refer and apply the information. There are some guides available that may be useful in competency assessments, but nevertheless the final statement must be defined by the physician in charge of the patient and clinical judgement. Capacity is directly related to the level of cognitive deterioration. Nevertheless, specific cognitive tests like MMSE (mini-mental) have a low predictive value. The loss of competency is more associated with the so-called legal standards of incapacity (LS). These encompass a five steps range (LS1-LS5), which may detect the incapacity from the mild levels of dementia. The cortical functions that are the best predictors of incapacity are language and executive dysfunctions. These explain the incapacity in cases of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and have been studied more. Incapacity is common and it influences the clinical decision-making process. We must be particularly cautious with clinical trials of dementia. It also involves other areas of daily life, particularly financially related ones, where limitations are present from the mild cognitive impairment

  1. 23 CFR 627.5 - General principles and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS VALUE ENGINEERING § 627.5 General principles and procedures. (a) State VE programs. State transportation... studies. (2) Studies. Value engineering studies shall follow the widely recognized systematic problem...

  2. 23 CFR 627.5 - General principles and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS VALUE ENGINEERING § 627.5 General principles and procedures. (a) State VE programs. State transportation... studies. (2) Studies. Value engineering studies shall follow the widely recognized systematic problem...

  3. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... enactment of Federal fish and wildlife conservation statutes has generally been associated with the... FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In general the States possess broad trustee and police powers over fish and wildlife within their borders...

  4. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... enactment of Federal fish and wildlife conservation statutes has generally been associated with the... FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In general the States possess broad trustee and police powers over fish and wildlife within their borders...

  5. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... enactment of Federal fish and wildlife conservation statutes has generally been associated with the... FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In general the States possess broad trustee and police powers over fish and wildlife within their borders...

  6. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enactment of Federal fish and wildlife conservation statutes has generally been associated with the... FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In general the States possess broad trustee and police powers over fish and wildlife within their borders...

  7. 43 CFR 24.3 - General jurisdictional principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... enactment of Federal fish and wildlife conservation statutes has generally been associated with the... FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.3 General jurisdictional principles. (a) In general the States possess broad trustee and police powers over fish and wildlife within their borders...

  8. Effect of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle on post-inflation preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Chemissany, Wissam; Das, Saurya; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Vagenas, Elias C. E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca E-mail: evagenas@academyofathens.gr

    2011-12-01

    We examine effects of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, predicted by various theories of quantum gravity to replace the Heisenberg's uncertainty principle near the Planck scale, on post inflation preheating in cosmology, and show that it can predict either an increase or a decrease in parametric resonance and a corresponding change in particle production. Possible implications are considered.

  9. Kinship categories across languages reflect general communicative principles.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Charles; Regier, Terry

    2012-05-25

    Languages vary in their systems of kinship categories, but the scope of possible variation appears to be constrained. Previous accounts of kin classification have often emphasized constraints that are specific to the domain of kinship and are not derived from general principles. Here, we propose an account that is founded on two domain-general principles: Good systems of categories are simple, and they enable informative communication. We show computationally that kin classification systems in the world's languages achieve a near-optimal trade-off between these two competing principles. We also show that our account explains several specific constraints on kin classification proposed previously. Because the principles of simplicity and informativeness are also relevant to other semantic domains, the trade-off between them may provide a domain-general foundation for variation in category systems across languages.

  10. Gauge theories under incorporation of a generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kober, Martin

    2010-10-15

    There is considered an extension of gauge theories according to the assumption of a generalized uncertainty principle which implies a minimal length scale. A modification of the usual uncertainty principle implies an extended shape of matter field equations like the Dirac equation. If there is postulated invariance of such a generalized field equation under local gauge transformations, the usual covariant derivative containing the gauge potential has to be replaced by a generalized covariant derivative. This leads to a generalized interaction between the matter field and the gauge field as well as to an additional self-interaction of the gauge field. Since the existence of a minimal length scale seems to be a necessary assumption of any consistent quantum theory of gravity, the gauge principle is a constitutive ingredient of the standard model, and even gravity can be described as gauge theory of local translations or Lorentz transformations, the presented extension of gauge theories appears as a very important consideration.

  11. Generalized invariance principles and the theory of stability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasalle, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Description of some recent extensions of the invariance principle to more generalized dynamical systems where the state space is not locally compact and the flow is unique only in the forward direction of time. A sufficient condition for asymptotic stability of an invariant set is obtained which does not require that the Liapunov function be positive-definite. A recently developed generalized invariance principle is described which is applicable to functional differential equations, partial differential equations, and, in particular, to certain stability problems arising in thermoelasticity, viscoelasticity, and distributed nonlinear networks.

  12. Fluorescent-protein-based probes: general principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-01-01

    An important application of fluorescent proteins is to derive genetically encoded fluorescent probes that can actively respond to cellular dynamics such as pH change, redox signaling, calcium oscillation, enzyme activities, and membrane potential. Despite the large diverse group of fluorescent-protein-based probes, a few basic principles have been established and are shared by most of these probes. In this article, the focus is on these general principles and strategies that guide the development of fluorescent-protein-based probes. A few examples are provided in each category to illustrate the corresponding principles. Since these principles are quite straightforward, others may adapt them to create fluorescent probes for their own interest. Hopefully, the development of the ever-growing family of fluorescent-protein-based probes will no longer be limited to a small number of laboratories specialized in senor development, leading to the situation that biological studies will be bettered assisted by genetically encoded sensors.

  13. “Stringy” coherent states inspired by generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Roy, Pinaki

    2012-05-01

    Coherent States with Fractional Revival property, that explicitly satisfy the Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP), have been constructed in the context of Generalized Harmonic Oscillator. The existence of such states is essential in motivating the GUP based phenomenological results present in the literature which otherwise would be of purely academic interest. The effective phase space is Non-Canonical (or Non-Commutative in popular terminology). Our results have a smooth commutative limit, equivalent to Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. The Fractional Revival time analysis yields an independent bound on the GUP parameter. Using this and similar bounds obtained here, we derive the largest possible value of the (GUP induced) minimum length scale. Mandel parameter analysis shows that the statistics is Sub-Poissonian. Correspondence Principle is deformed in an interesting way. Our computational scheme is very simple as it requires only first order corrected energy values and undeformed basis states.

  14. Relativistic Particle in Electromagnetic Fields with a Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merad, M.; Zeroual, F.; Falek, M.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we propose to solve the relativistic Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations subjected to the action of a uniform electromagnetic field with a generalized uncertainty principle in the momentum space. In both cases, the energy eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenfunctions are obtained. The limit case is then deduced for a small parameter of deformation.

  15. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION... Labeling § 317.313 Nutrient content claims; general principles. (a) This section applies to meat or meat... nutrient content claim and is subject to the requirements for nutrient content claims. (d) A “substitute...

  16. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION... Labeling § 317.313 Nutrient content claims; general principles. (a) This section applies to meat or meat... nutrient content claim and is subject to the requirements for nutrient content claims. (d) A “substitute...

  17. Quaternionic quantization principle in general relativity and supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kober, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A generalized quantization principle is considered, which incorporates nontrivial commutation relations of the components of the variables of the quantized theory with the components of the corresponding canonical conjugated momenta referring to other space-time directions. The corresponding commutation relations are formulated by using quaternions. At the beginning, this extended quantization concept is applied to the variables of quantum mechanics. The resulting Dirac equation and the corresponding generalized expression for plane waves are formulated and some consequences for quantum field theory are considered. Later, the quaternionic quantization principle is transferred to canonical quantum gravity. Within quantum geometrodynamics as well as the Ashtekar formalism, the generalized algebraic properties of the operators describing the gravitational observables and the corresponding quantum constraints implied by the generalized representations of these operators are determined. The generalized algebra also induces commutation relations of the several components of the quantized variables with each other. Finally, the quaternionic quantization procedure is also transferred to 𝒩 = 1 supergravity. Accordingly, the quantization principle has to be generalized to be compatible with Dirac brackets, which appear in canonical quantum supergravity.

  18. A Theory of Language Acquisition Based on General Learning Principles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-17

    AO-AIOS 6" CAMS19-HLLON W4ZV PITTSBURGH PA DEPT OF COMPUTER --ETC P/S 5/10 THEORY OF LANGUAGE ( ACQUISITION BASED ON GENERAL LEARNING PIN--EYC U) ,RM...961 A ~~~~LEVEL/ .... " LEVEL ~r MJ-CS-81 -129 V. A Theory of Language Acquisition Based on General ,00 Learning Principles John R. Anderson Dertment...Approved for public release Distribution Unlimited Carnegie-Mellon University 8 12 16 05o CM-CS-81-129 A Theory of Language Acquisition Based on General

  19. Constraining the generalized uncertainty principle with the atomic weak-equivalence-principle test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dongfeng; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2017-04-01

    Various models of quantum gravity imply the Planck-scale modifications of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle into a so-called generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). The GUP effects on high-energy physics, cosmology, and astrophysics have been extensively studied. Here, we focus on the weak-equivalence-principle (WEP) violation induced by the GUP. Results from the WEP test with the 85Rb-87Rb dual-species atom interferometer are used to set upper bounds on parameters in two GUP proposals. A 1045-level bound on the Kempf-Mangano-Mann proposal and a 1027-level bound on Maggiore's proposal, which are consistent with bounds from other experiments, are obtained. All these bounds have huge room for improvement in the future.

  20. Remarks on Generalized Uncertainty Principle Induced from Constraint System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eune, Myungseok; Kim, Wontae

    2014-12-01

    The extended commutation relations for generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) have been based on the assumption of the minimal length in position. Instead of this assumption, we start with a constrained Hamiltonian system described by the conventional Poisson algebra and then impose appropriate second class constraints to this system. Consequently, we can show that the consistent Dirac brackets for this system are nothing, but the extended commutation relations describing the GUP.

  1. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  2. Generalized cluster decomposition principle illustrated in waveguide quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2017-06-01

    We show that the form of the cluster decomposition principle, commonly used in quantum field theory, needs to be significantly generalized. As an illustration, we consider the general structure of two-photon S matrix for a waveguide coupled to a local quantum system that supports multiple ground states. The presence of the multiple ground states results in a noncommutative aspect of the system with respect to the exchange of the orders of photons. Consequently, the two-photon S matrix significantly differs from the standard form in quantum field theory.

  3. Generalized uncertainty principle in Bianchi type I quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, B.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2007-07-01

    We study a quantum Bianchi type I model in which the dynamical variables of the corresponding minisuperspace obey the generalized Heisenberg algebra. Such a generalized uncertainty principle has its origin in the existence of a minimal length suggested by quantum gravity and sting theory. We present approximate analytical solutions to the corresponding Wheeler DeWitt equation in the limit where the scale factor of the universe is small and compare the results with the standard commutative and noncommutative quantum cosmology. Similarities and differences of these solutions are also discussed.

  4. Examining the Generality of Self-Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Prompting students to self-explain during problem solving has proven to be an effective instructional strategy across many domains. However, despite being called "domain general", very little work has been done in areas outside of math and science. In this dissertation, I investigate whether the self-explanation effect holds when applied…

  5. Examining the Generality of Self-Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Prompting students to self-explain during problem solving has proven to be an effective instructional strategy across many domains. However, despite being called "domain general", very little work has been done in areas outside of math and science. In this dissertation, I investigate whether the self-explanation effect holds when applied…

  6. Examining Major Rankings According to the Berlin Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, Nian Cai

    2008-01-01

    While the ranking of higher education institutions (HEIs) has become more and more popular, there are increasing concerns about the quality of such ranking. In response to such legitimate expectations, in May 2006, the International Ranking Expert Group (IREG) developed and endorsed a guideline document--the Berlin Principles on Ranking of Higher…

  7. The Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Black Hole Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    2001-06-01

    In the current standard viewpoint small black holes are believed to emit black body radiation at the Hawking temperature, at least until they approach Planck size, after which their fate is open to conjecture. A cogent argument against the existence of remnants is that, since no evident quantum number prevents it, black holes should radiate completely away to photons and other ordinary stable particles and vacuum, like any unstable quantum system. Here we argue the contrary, that the generalized uncertainty principle may prevent their total evaporation in exactly the same way that the uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from total collapse: the collapse is prevented, not by symmetry, but by dynamics, as a minimum size and mass are approached.

  8. A South African perspective on children's rights: general principles.

    PubMed

    Klinck, M E; Iuris, B; Louw, D A; Peens, B J

    2000-01-01

    South Africa has made rapid progress in the field of human and especially children's rights. This is in sharp contrast with it's apartheid history where even the basic principles of human rights were negated. In this article an overview will be given of the general principles on which the realization of children's rights in South Africa are based. More specifically information on the population, economic status, political climate and recent developments in this field is presented. This is followed by a discussion on the social-economic nature of children's rights, the courts as enforcement mechanisms, and the contents of the best interest standard as described both in convention on the rights of the child and the South African Constitution.

  9. A Stochastic Maximum Principle for General Mean-Field Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buckdahn, Rainer; Li, Juan; Ma, Jin

    2016-12-15

    In this paper we study the optimal control problem for a class of general mean-field stochastic differential equations, in which the coefficients depend, nonlinearly, on both the state process as well as of its law. In particular, we assume that the control set is a general open set that is not necessary convex, and the coefficients are only continuous on the control variable without any further regularity or convexity. We validate the approach of Peng (SIAM J Control Optim 2(4):966–979, 1990) by considering the second order variational equations and the corresponding second order adjoint process in this setting, and we extend the Stochastic Maximum Principle of Buckdahn et al. (Appl Math Optim 64(2):197–216, 2011) to this general case.

  10. General cognitive principles for learning structure in time and space.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael H; Waterfall, Heidi R; Lotem, Arnon; Halpern, Joseph Y; Schwade, Jennifer A; Onnis, Luca; Edelman, Shimon

    2010-06-01

    How are hierarchically structured sequences of objects, events or actions learned from experience and represented in the brain? When several streams of regularities present themselves, which will be learned and which ignored? Can statistical regularities take effect on their own, or are additional factors such as behavioral outcomes expected to influence statistical learning? Answers to these questions are starting to emerge through a convergence of findings from naturalistic observations, behavioral experiments, neurobiological studies, and computational analyses and simulations. We propose that a small set of principles are at work in every situation that involves learning of structure from patterns of experience and outline a general framework that accounts for such learning.

  11. Cosmological constant implementing Mach principle in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavarian, Nadereh; Farhoudi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    We consider the fact that noticing on the operational meaning of the physical concepts played an impetus role in the appearance of general relativity (GR). Thus, we have paid more attention to the operational definition of the gravitational coupling constant in this theory as a dimensional constant which is gained through an experiment. However, as all available experiments just provide the value of this constant locally, this coupling constant can operationally be meaningful only in a local area. Regarding this point, to obtain an extension of GR for the large scale, we replace it by a conformal invariant model and then, reduce this model to a theory for the cosmological scale via breaking down the conformal symmetry through singling out a specific conformal frame which is characterized by the large scale characteristics of the universe. Finally, we come to the same field equations that historically were proposed by Einstein for the cosmological scale (GR plus the cosmological constant) as the result of his endeavor for making GR consistent with the Mach principle. However, we declare that the obtained field equations in this alternative approach do not carry the problem of the field equations proposed by Einstein for being consistent with Mach's principle (i.e., the existence of de Sitter solution), and can also be considered compatible with this principle in the Sciama view.

  12. A general maximum entropy framework for thermodynamic variational principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Roderick C.

    2014-12-01

    Minimum free energy principles are familiar in equilibrium thermodynamics, as expressions of the second law. They also appear in statistical mechanics as variational approximation schemes, such as the mean-field and steepest-descent approximations. These well-known minimum free energy principles are here unified and extended to any system analyzable by MaxEnt, including non-equilibrium systems. The MaxEnt Lagrangian associated with a generic MaxEnt distribution p defines a generalized potential Ψ for an arbitrary probability distribution ̂p, such that Ψ is a minimum at ̂p = p. Minimization of Ψ with respect to ̂p thus constitutes a generic variational principle, and is equivalent to minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between ̂p and p. Illustrative examples of min-Ψ are given for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. An interpretation of changes in Ψ is given in terms of the second law, although min-Ψ itself is an intrinsic variational property of MaxEnt that is distinct from the second law.

  13. A general maximum entropy framework for thermodynamic variational principles

    SciTech Connect

    Dewar, Roderick C.

    2014-12-05

    Minimum free energy principles are familiar in equilibrium thermodynamics, as expressions of the second law. They also appear in statistical mechanics as variational approximation schemes, such as the mean-field and steepest-descent approximations. These well-known minimum free energy principles are here unified and extended to any system analyzable by MaxEnt, including non-equilibrium systems. The MaxEnt Lagrangian associated with a generic MaxEnt distribution p defines a generalized potential Ψ for an arbitrary probability distribution p-hat, such that Ψ is a minimum at (p-hat) = p. Minimization of Ψ with respect to p-hat thus constitutes a generic variational principle, and is equivalent to minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between p-hat and p. Illustrative examples of min–Ψ are given for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. An interpretation of changes in Ψ is given in terms of the second law, although min–Ψ itself is an intrinsic variational property of MaxEnt that is distinct from the second law.

  14. The most general form of deformation of the Heisenberg algebra from the generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Syed; Faizal, Mir; Zaz, Zaid; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Raza, Jamil; Shah, Mushtaq B.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we will propose the most general form of the deformation of Heisenberg algebra motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle. This deformation of the Heisenberg algebra will deform all quantum mechanical systems. The form of the generalized uncertainty principle used to motivate these results will be motivated by the space fractional quantum mechanics, and non-locality in quantum mechanical systems. We also analyse a specific limit of this generalized deformation for one dimensional system, and in that limit, a nonlocal deformation of the momentum operator generates a local deformation of all one dimensional quantum mechanical systems. We analyse the low energy effects of this deformation on a harmonic oscillator, Landau levels, Lamb shift, and potential barrier. We also demonstrate that this deformation leads to a discretization of space.

  15. Explaining Compound Generalization in Associative and Causal Learning Through Rational Principles of Dimensional Generalization

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Fabian A.; Gershman, Samuel J.; Niv, Yael

    2014-01-01

    How do we apply learning from one situation to a similar, but not identical, situation? The principles governing the extent to which animals and humans generalize what they have learned about certain stimuli to novel compounds containing those stimuli vary depending on a number of factors. Perhaps the best studied among these factors is the type of stimuli used to generate compounds. One prominent hypothesis is that different generalization principles apply depending on whether the stimuli in a compound are similar or dissimilar to each other. However, the results of many experiments cannot be explained by this hypothesis. Here we propose a rational Bayesian theory of compound generalization that uses the notion of consequential regions, first developed in the context of rational theories of multidimensional generalization, to explain the effects of stimulus factors on compound generalization. The model explains a large number of results from the compound generalization literature, including the influence of stimulus modality and spatial contiguity on the summation effect, the lack of influence of stimulus factors on summation with a recovered inhibitor, the effect of spatial position of stimuli on the blocking effect, the asymmetrical generalization decrement in overshadowing and external inhibition, and the conditions leading to a reliable external inhibition effect. By integrating rational theories of compound and dimensional generalization, our model provides the first comprehensive computational account of the effects of stimulus factors on compound generalization, including spatial and temporal contiguity between components, which have posed longstanding problems for rational theories of associative and causal learning. PMID:25090430

  16. [General principles of tumour biology in visceral surgery].

    PubMed

    Emons, G; Ghadimi, M; Grade, M

    2015-02-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a tremendous progress in understanding the molecular basis of cancer. In particular, the development and the characteristic features of cancer cells are being increasingly understood. The understanding of these molecular characteristics is mandatory for the development of novel, targeted therapeutic strategies and their integration into clinical practice. In addition, tumour genetics play a critically important role for hereditary cancer syndromes, with respect to both diagnostics and clinical decision-making. The aim of this review is to highlight general principles of tumour genetics from a visceral surgeon's point of view, although a comprehensive summary of all aspects would be beyond the scope of this article due to the complexity of the topic. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Generalized uncertainty principle and analogue of quantum gravity in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Musslimani, Ziad H.; Conti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    The design of optical systems capable of processing and manipulating ultra-short pulses and ultra-focused beams is highly challenging with far reaching fundamental technological applications. One key obstacle routinely encountered while implementing sub-wavelength optical schemes is how to overcome the limitations set by standard Fourier optics. A strategy to overcome these difficulties is to utilize the concept of a generalized uncertainty principle (G-UP) which has been originally developed to study quantum gravity. In this paper we propose to use the concept of G-UP within the framework of optics to show that the generalized Schrödinger equation describing short pulses and ultra-focused beams predicts the existence of a minimal spatial or temporal scale which in turn implies the existence of maximally localized states. Using a Gaussian wavepacket with complex phase, we derive the corresponding generalized uncertainty relation and its maximally localized states. Furthermore, we numerically show that the presence of nonlinearity helps the system to reach its maximal localization. Our results may trigger further theoretical and experimental tests for practical applications and analogues of fundamental physical theories.

  18. Evaluating food fortification options: general principles revisited with folic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, N T; Wilson, D B; Cook, D A; Lewis, C J; Yetley, E A; Rader, J I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This article uses folic acid as an example to illustrate some of the complex issues and general principles that emerge when evaluating fortification of the food supply as one possible means to address a public health recommendation. METHODS. Distributions of current daily folate intakes from conventional foods and dietary supplements were estimated. Intakes that might result from fortification of cereal-grain products and ready-to-eat cereals at various levels for eight age-gender groups were also estimated by using the US Department of Agriculture's 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey. RESULTS. The results illustrate that fortification of the US food supply tends to increase folate intakes of consumers at the high end of the intake distribution curves in the general population to a greater extent than it affects consumers at the low end of the intake distribution curves in the target population. CONCLUSIONS. The effectiveness of food fortification options for a target population and the safety for the general population impose conflicting challenges that must be considered concurrently when making decisions about fortifying the US food supply. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:7733426

  19. First Principles Structure Calculations Using the General Potential Lapw Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    We have developed a completely general first principles self-consistent full-potential linearized-augmented-plane -wave (LAPW) method program within the density functional formalism to calculate electronic band structure, total energy, pressure and other quantities. No symmetry assumptions are used for the crystal structure. Shape unrestricted charge densities and potentials are calculated inside muffin -tin (MT) spheres as well as in the interstitial regions. All contributions to the Hamiltonian matrix elements are completely taken into account. The core states are treated fully relativistically using the spherical part of the potential only. Scalar relativistic effects are included for the band-states, and spin-orbit coupling is included using a second variation procedure. Both core states and valence states are treated self-consistently, the frozen core approximation is not required. The fast Fourier transformation method is used wherever it is applicable, and this greatly improves the efficiency. This state-of-the-art program has been tested extensively to check the accuracy and convergence properties by comparing calculated electronic band structures, ground state properties, equations of state and cohesive energies for bulk W and GaAs with other theoretical calculations and experimental results. It has been successfully applied to calculate and predict structural and metal-insulator phase transitions for close-packed crystal BaSe and BaTe and the geometric structure of the d-band metal W(001) surface. The results are in generally good agreement with experiment.

  20. Community health workers: examining the Helper Therapy principle.

    PubMed

    Roman, L A; Lindsay, J K; Moore, J S; Shoemaker, A L

    1999-04-01

    A community approach to the integration of health and social services for low-income pregnant women is being addressed through Community Integrated Service System (CISS) initiatives of the Maternal Child Health Bureau. This particular CISS program model was designed to enable low-income mothers to function in a Community Health Worker (CHW) role providing social support for at-risk pregnant women. Using Riessman's notion of "helper therapy," the model was also developed to enhance the potential for CHWs to gain helper benefits. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe perceived helper benefits and stressors associated with the CHW role and to examine the usefulness of an instrument developed to assess benefits and stressors. The study findings revealed that the majority of CHWs perceived helper benefits that included positive feelings about self, a sense of belonging, valuable work experience, and access to health information and skills through training or contact with program staff. Stressors such as feeling inadequate to help, however, were associated with the helper role for some CHWs. Preliminary analysis of the Helper's Perception Measure indicated that it may be an effective measure and should be tested with a larger sample of CHWs.

  1. Entropy principle, non-regular processes, and generalized exploitation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triani, V.; Cimmelli, V. A.

    2012-06-01

    The classical Coleman-Noll approach to the exploitation of the entropy principle regards the classical balances of mass, linear and angular momentum and energy as differential constraints for the entropy inequality, and presupposes that the second law of thermodynamics is a restriction on the constitutive equations describing the material properties [B. D. Coleman and W. Noll, "The thermodynamics of elastic materials with heat conduction and viscosity," Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. 13, 167-178 (1963), 10.1007/BF01262690]. In 1996, Muschik and Ehrentraut proved that this presupposition may be confirmed by a rigorous proof, provided that an amendment to the classical second law of thermodynamics, which asserts that, except in equilibria, reversible process directions in state space do not exist, is postulated ["An amendment to the second law," J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 21, 175-192 (1996), 10.1515/jnet.1996.21.2.175]. In their paper, the authors considered regular processes only. In a recent article [V. Triani and V. A. Cimmelli, "Interpretation of second law of thermodynamics in the presence of interfaces," Continuum. Mech. Thermodyn. 24, 165-174 (2012), 10.1007/s00161-011-0231-8], we proved that the result above remains valid in the presence of interfaces across which the unknown fields suffer jump discontinuities. Here, we show that the same conclusions achieved by Muschik and Ehrentraut and Triani and Cimmelli hold when the classical Coleman-Noll and Liu ["Method of Lagrange multipliers for exploitation of the entropy principle," Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. 46, 131-148 (1972), 10.1007/BF00250688] procedures for the exploitation of the second law, are generalized by considering also the gradients of the fundamental balance equations as constraints for the entropy inequality.

  2. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part I: general principles.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to improve the basis upon which advice on pregnancy is given to women with renal disease and to address issues of obstetric management by drawing upon the accumulated world experience. To ensure the proper rapport between the respect for patient's autonomy and the ethical principle of beneficence, the review attempts to impart up-to-date, evidence-based information on the predictable outcomes and hazards of pregnancy in women with chronic renal disease. The physiology of pregnancy from the perspective of the affected kidney will be discussed as well as the principal predictors of maternal and fetal outcomes and general recommendations of management. The available evidence supports the implication that the degree of renal function impairment is the major determinant for pregnancy outcome. In addition, the presence of hypertension further compounds the risks. On the contrary, the degree of proteinuria does not demonstrate a linear correlation with obstetric outcomes. Management and outcome of pregnancies occurring in women on dialysis and after renal transplant are also discussed. Although the outcome of pregnancies under chronic dialysis has markedly improved in the past decade, the chances of achieving a viable pregnancy are much higher after transplantation. But even in renal transplant recipients, the rate of maternal and fetal complications remains high, in addition to concerns regarding possible adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the developing embryo and fetus.

  3. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  4. General principles for prescribing, recording and reporting a therapeutic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Vincent; Pötter, Richard; Wambersie, André

    2004-12-01

    Exchange of clinical information is essential for the development and progress in radiation oncology. This goal can be achieved only through a general harmonization on methods of reporting. The ICRU has been involved for several decades in a continuous effort to harmonize reporting of dose and to standardize methods used to determine the doses and points or volumes where these doses are delivered. Requirements for reporting proton and ion beam therapy should, in principle, be as similar as possible to reporting the current radiation therapy modalities. However, proton and ion therapy have their own clinical and technical uniqueness: in particular, they require definition of new clinical, radiobiological and technical concepts, and strict quality assurance programmes for efficient and safe clinical application. The current ICRU definitions of volumes are reviewed: Gross Tumour Volume (GTV), Clinical Target Volume (CTV), Planning Target Volume (PTV), Organs At Risk (OAR), Planning organ at Risk Volume (PRV), treated volume and reference volume. The irradiation conditions and the absorbed dose should always be reported together with the point(s) and/or volume(s) where the dose is delivered. In addition, the weighting factor W(RBE) introduced to take into account the RBE, and the related weighted dose D(RBE) have to be reported.

  5. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  6. General Principles of Rhythmogenesis in Central Pattern Networks

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Warrick, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular and ionic mechanisms that generate the rhythm in central pattern generator (CPG) networks for simple movements are not well understood. Using vertebrate locomotion, respiration and mastication as exemplars, I describe four main principles of rhythmogenesis: (1) rhythmogenic ionic currents underlie all CPG networks, regardless of whether they are driven by a network pacemaker or an endogenous pacemaker neuron kernel; (2) fast synaptic transmission often evokes slow currents that can affect cycle frequency; (3) there are likely to be multiple and redundant mechanisms for rhythmogenesis in any essential CPG network; and (4) glial cells may participate in CPG network function. The neural basis for rhythmogenesis in simple behaviors has been studied for almost 100 years, yet we cannot identify with certainty the detailed mechanisms by which rhythmic behaviors are generated in any vertebrate system. Early studies focused on whether locomotor rhythms were generated by a chain of coupled reflexes that require sensory feedback, or by a central neural network. By now there is general agreement that for the major rhythmic behaviors (including locomotion, respiration, and mastication, the subjects of this book), there exist CPG networks within the central nervous system that are able to drive the basic rhythmic behavior in the complete absence of sensory feedback. This of course does not eliminate an important role for sensory feedback, which certainly affects cycle frequency and for some behaviors determines the timing of one phase of the behavior. Given the existence of CPGs, the question of rhythmogenesis can be rephrased to ask how these networks determine the timing of the rhythmic behavior. In this chapter, I focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms that could underlie rhythmogenesis in CPG networks, especially those that drive locomotion, respiration, and mastication. PMID:21111210

  7. General principles of rhythmogenesis in central pattern generator networks.

    PubMed

    Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    The cellular and ionic mechanisms that generate the rhythm in central pattern generator (CPG) networks for simple movements are not well understood. Using vertebrate locomotion, respiration and mastication as exemplars, I describe four main principles of rhythmogenesis: (1) rhythmogenic ionic currents underlie all CPG networks, regardless of whether they are driven by a network pacemaker or an endogenous pacemaker neuron kernel; (2) fast synaptic transmission often evokes slow currents that can affect cycle frequency; (3) there are likely to be multiple and redundant mechanisms for rhythmogenesis in any essential CPG network; and (4) glial cells may participate in CPG network function. The neural basis for rhythmogenesis in simple behaviors has been studied for almost 100 years, yet we cannot identify with certainty the detailed mechanisms by which rhythmic behaviors are generated in any vertebrate system. Early studies focused on whether locomotor rhythms were generated by a chain of coupled reflexes that require sensory feedback, or by a central neural network. By now there is general agreement that for the major rhythmic behaviors (including locomotion, respiration, and mastication, the subjects of this book), there exist CPG networks within the central nervous system that are able to drive the basic rhythmic behavior in the complete absence of sensory feedback. This of course does not eliminate an important role for sensory feedback, which certainly affects cycle frequency and for some behaviors determines the timing of one phase of the behavior (Borgmann et al., 2009; Pearson, 2008). Given the existence of CPGs, the question of rhythmogenesis can be rephrased to ask how these networks determine the timing of the rhythmic behavior. In this chapter, I focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms that could underlie rhythmogenesis in CPG networks, especially those that drive locomotion, respiration, and mastication.

  8. Training the endoscopy trainer: From general principles to specific concepts

    PubMed Central

    Coderre, Sylvain; Anderson, John; Rostom, Alaa; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy instruction has progressed a great deal in recent years, evolving from the age-old dictum of ‘see one, do one’ to the current skillful application of sound educational principles. Some of these educational principles are generic and applicable to the teaching of any content at all levels, while others are quite specific to technical skills training. The present review summarizes these important principles under the following headings: creating a learner-centred curriculum; delivering an achievable learning task; and moving from theory to practice. The present article challenges national gastroenterology organizations to embrace these concepts in structured, outcome-based educational programs. PMID:21165376

  9. Path Integral for Dirac oscillator with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Benzair, H.; Boudjedaa, T.; Merad, M.

    2012-12-15

    The propagator for Dirac oscillator in (1+1) dimension, with deformed commutation relation of the Heisenberg principle, is calculated using path integral in quadri-momentum representation. As the mass is related to momentum, we then adapt the space-time transformation method to evaluate quantum corrections and this latter is dependent from the point discretization interval.

  10. Comprehensive Architectural Services--General Principles and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, William Dudley, Jr., Ed.

    A basic primer of comprehensive architectural services has been compiled for use by architects who wish to expand the range of services offered to clients. The titles of the six major parts describe the topic content--(1) The New Role of the Architect, (2) Principles of Comprehensive Architectural Services, (3) The Architect and His Client, (4)…

  11. A Computer Tutorial on the Principles of Stimulus Generalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a computer tutorial that teaches the fundamentals of stimulus generalization in operant learning. Concepts covered include reinforcement, discrimination learning, stimulus continua, generalization, generalization gradients, and peak shift. The tutorial also reviews applications in human and animal situations. The content is appropriate…

  12. Principle of reciprocity solves the most important problems in bioimpedance and in general in bioelectromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    Though the principle of reciprocity was invented by Hermann von Helmholtz already over 150 years ago, and though it is a very powerful tool in solving various important problems in bioelectromagnetism, it is not generally used. In impedance tomography the measurement sensitivity distribution has generally been misunderstood. This can be easily demonstrated with the principle of reciprocity. Some other applications of the principle of reciprocity are also discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles of the IND submission. 312.22... (IND) § 312.22 General principles of the IND submission. (a) FDA's primary objectives in reviewing an... likelihood that the investigations will yield data capable of meeting statutory standards for marketing...

  14. Utilization of the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education in general chemistry by community college instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panther Bishoff, Jennifer

    In recent years, higher education has undergone many changes. The advent of assessment, accountability, and a newfound focus on teaching have required faculty to examine how they are teaching. Administrators and faculty are beginning to recognize that learning is not a "one size fits all" enterprise. To this end, Chickering and Gamson developed an inventory that examined faculty utilization of the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. The seven principles included by the authors included faculty-student interaction, cooperative learning, active learning, giving prompt feedback, emphasizing time on task, communicating high expectations, and respecting diverse talents and ways of learning. It was determined by Chickering and Gamson, as well as many other researchers, that these seven principles were hallmarks of successful undergraduate education. Community colleges are important institutions to study, as many students begin their higher education at two-year colleges. Most students are also required to take one or more science classes for their general education requirements; therefore, many students must take at least one general chemistry course. Both community colleges and chemistry are rarely studied in literature, which makes this study important. Community college general chemistry instructors were surveyed using an online version of Chickering and Gamson's Faculty Inventory for the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. Responses were analyzed, and it was discovered that not only did instructors utilize the principles to a different extent, but there were also differences between genders as well as between the specific actions related to each principle.

  15. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  16. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  17. Oral Sexual Experience among Young Adolescents Receiving General Health Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Howard, Donna E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed young adolescents receiving general health examinations regarding oral sex occurrence. Overall, 18 percent reported having oral sex, and of that 18 percent, 25 percent reported no vaginal sex. Few adolescents used barrier protection during oral sex. Most adolescents thought that penile-anal sex could transmit HIV, but only 68 percent…

  18. 29 CFR 780.138 - Application of the general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.138 Application of the general... incident to or in conjunction with his farming operations. Such arrangements are distinguished from those... incorporated association of farmers that does not itself engage in farming operations is not engaged...

  19. 29 CFR 780.138 - Application of the general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.138 Application of the general... not grown by their employer. On the other hand, where a farmer rents some space in a warehouse or...

  20. 29 CFR 780.138 - Application of the general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.138 Application of the general... not grown by their employer. On the other hand, where a farmer rents some space in a warehouse or...

  1. 29 CFR 780.138 - Application of the general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.138 Application of the general... not grown by their employer. On the other hand, where a farmer rents some space in a warehouse or...

  2. Community and job satisfactions: an argument for reciprocal influence based on the principle of stimulus generalization

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, J.; Montgomery, J.C.

    1982-10-01

    The principle of stimulus generalization provided the underlying argument for a test of hypotheses regarding the association of community and job satisfactions and a critique of related theory and research. Two-stage least squares (2SLS) analysis made possible the examination of reciprocal causation, a notion inherent in the theoretical argument. Data were obtained from 276 employees of a Western U.S. coal mine as part of a work attitudes survey. The 2SLS analysis indicated a significant impact of community satisfaction on job satisfaction and an effect of borderline significance of job on community satisfaction. Theory-based correlational comparisons were made on groups of employees residing in four distinct communities, high and low tenure groups, males and females, and different levels in the mine's hierarchy. The pattern of correlations was generally consistent with predictions, but significance tests for differences yielded equivocal support. When considered in the context of previous studies, the data upheld a reciprocal causal model and the explanatory principle of stimulus generalization for understanding the relation of community and job satisfactions. Sample characteristics necessitate cautious interpretation and the model per se might best be viewed as a heuristic framework for more definitive research.

  3. General principles regarding the use of adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Paula, I Carrasco

    2008-02-01

    With only a few, almost inevitable exceptions, biomedical research has developed within the last 50 years under the tutelage of ethical standards of notable precision. In the vast world of scientific investigation, few disciplines can boast of having realized documents of such ethical rigour, and respect for the integrity and intrinsic value of the human person has been one of the cardinal principles of the researcher. Research is intrinsic to the medical profession; the reward of research is knowledge and its techniques are ordered towards maintenance of human health. Since this end concerns human beings, it demands an extremely rigorous ethical approach. Ethical aspects are present from the first moments of the experimental project and occur on three levels: choice of the objectives, selection and use of the appropriate means for the study, and application of resultant new discoveries. Today, our moral attention cannot be reduced to a cost-benefit analysis. Biomedical sciences and medicine have overlapping areas of interest that can be sources of tension: the good of the subject versus scientific utility; profit versus complexity of research; liberty versus ethical and juridical bonds; the public versus the private; and the individual versus the community. Here, I attempt to formulate some essential principles that should guarantee humane measures for research on humans.

  4. 2 CFR Appendix A to Part 230 - General Principles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... forms of public relations. d. Meetings and conferences except those held to conduct the general... subgrant or subcontract). Equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs and the...

  5. Ethical principles and the rationing of health care: a qualitative study in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Berney, Lee; Kelly, Moira; Doyal, Len; Feder, Gene; Griffiths, Chris; Jones, Ian Rees

    2005-01-01

    Background Researching sensitive topics, such as the rationing of treatments and denial of care, raises a number of ethical and methodological problems. Aim To describe the methods and findings from a number of focus group discussions that examined how GPs apply ethical principles when allocating scarce resources. Design of study A small-scale qualitative study involving purposive sampling, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Setting Twenty-four GPs from two contrasting areas of London: one relatively affluent and one relatively deprived. Method Initial interviews asked GPs to identify key resource allocation issues. The interviews were transcribed and themes were identified. A number of case studies, each illustrative of an ethical issue related to rationing, were written up in the form of vignettes. In focus group discussions, GPs were given a number of these vignettes to debate. Results With respect to the ethical basis for decision making, the findings from this part of the study emphasised the role of social and psychological factors, the influence of the quality of the relationship between GPs and patients and confusion among GPs about their role in decision making. Conclusion The use of vignettes developed from prior interviews with GPs creates a non-threatening environment to discuss sensitive or controversial issues. The acceptance by GPs of general moral principles does not entail clarity of coherence of the application of these principles in practice. PMID:16105371

  6. General principles for the clinical use of the LCP.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael

    2003-11-01

    The basic principles of an internal fixation procedure using a conventional plate and screw system (compression method) are direct, anatomical reduction and stable internal fixation of the fracture. Wide exposure of the bone is usually necessary to gain access to and provide good visibility of the fracture zone to allow reduction and plate fixation to be performed. This procedure requires pre-contouring of the plate to match the anatomy of the bone. The screws are tightened to fix the plate onto the bone, which then compresses the plate onto the bone. The actual stability results from the friction between the plate and the bone. Anatomical reduction of the fracture was the goal of conventional plating technique, but over time a technique for bridging plate osteosynthesis has been developed for multifragmentary shaft fractures that, thanks to a reduction of vascular damage to the bone, permits healing with callus formation, as seen after locked nailing. Since the damage to the soft tissues and the blood supply is less extensive, more rapid fracture healing can be achieved. The newly developed, so-called locked internal fixators (e.g.PC-Fix and Less Invasive Stabilization System (LISS)), consist of plate and screw systems where the screws are locked in the plate. This locking minimizes the compressive forces exerted by the plate on the bone. This method of screw-plate fixation means that the plate does not need to touch the bone at all, which is of particular advantage in so-called Minimal Invasive Percutaneous Osteosynthesis (MIPO). Precise anatomical contouring of a plate is no longer necessary thanks to these new screws and because the plate does not need to be pressed on to the bone to achieve stability. This prevents primary dislocation of the fracture caused by inexact contouring of a plate. The LISS plates are precontoured to match the average anatomical form of the relevant site and, therefore, do not have to be further adapted intraoperatively. The

  7. Vesicle coats: structure, function, and general principles of assembly.

    PubMed

    Faini, Marco; Beck, Rainer; Wieland, Felix T; Briggs, John A G

    2013-06-01

    The transport of proteins and lipids between distinct cellular compartments is conducted by coated vesicles. These vesicles are formed by the self-assembly of coat proteins on a membrane, leading to collection of the vesicle cargo and membrane bending to form a bud. Scission at the bud neck releases the vesicle. X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy (EM) have recently generated models of isolated coat components and assembled coats. Here, we review these data to present a structural overview of the three main coats: clathrin, COPII, and COPI. The three coats have similar function, common ancestry, and structural similarities, but exhibit fundamental differences in structure and assembly. We describe the implications of structural similarities and differences for understanding the function, assembly principles, and evolution of vesicle coats.

  8. Physical anthropology: the search for general processes and principles.

    PubMed

    Lasker, G W

    1970-02-01

    Physical anthropology consists of two interdependent types of study: (1) the biological history of man and (2) general biological processes in man (such as mechanisms of evolution and growth). Popular interest may focus on the former, the fascinating story of the origin of man and of specific people, but the latter affords physical anthropology potential practical value in respect to medicine, dentistry, public health, and population policy. The study of general processes is the study of human beings in particular situations, not for what we can learn about these particular populations but for the sake of generalization about mankind anywhere in comparable situations. This is, of course, the purpose of experimental science in general, but in anthropology the method is usually comparative. Long ago the study of the growth of the two sexes and of children in different countries was started on a comparative basis as was the study of the so-called secular change in adult stature. By 1911 Franz Boas had compared the changes in stature and head form of children of several different immigrant groups in the United States. There have since been comparative studies of the amount and distribution of body fat (but not yet adequate comparative measurements of the relation of tissue components to diet and to diseases). Demographic patterns, inbreeding, outbreeding, and their effects are other general problems. The Human Adaptability Project of the International Biological Program promises studies of human response to heat, cold, altitude, and other conditions on a wide international basis. If supported, these could turn physical anthropology's search in a useful direction. The functional biology of people of even out-of-the-way communities will be compared with each other. These studies can yield general statements concerning human response to types of ecological situation including such sociocultural conditions as those of hunting-gathering tribes and urban slums.

  9. Evolutionary Process: An Organizing Principle for General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, John A.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes a science-oriented general education core, stressing the importance of serious scientific study in understanding contemporary human existence. Describes the four courses comprising the core, which use the evolutionary process as the unifying concept for the study of physics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, anthropology,…

  10. On the generalized action principle for superstrings and supermembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor A.; Sorokin, Dmitrij; Volkov, Dmitrij V.

    1995-02-01

    We revise the twistor-like superfield approach to describing super- p-branes by use of the basic principles of the group-manifold approach [Y. Ne'eman and T. Regge, Phys. Lett. B 74 (1978) 54; Rivista del Nuovo Cim. 1 (1978) 1; R. D'Auria, P. Frè and T. Regge, Rivista del Nuovo Cim. 3 1980 1; L. Castellani, R. D'Auria and P. Frè, Supergravity and superstrings, a geometric perspective, World Scientific, Singapore, 1991 (and references therein)]. A super- p-brane action is constructed solely by geometrical objects as the integral over a ( p + 1)-surface. The Lagrangian is the external product of supervielbein differential forms in world supersurface and target superspace without any use of Lagrange multipliers. This allows one to escape the problem of infinite reducible symmetries and redundant propagating fields. All the constraints on the geometry of world supersurface and the conditions of its embedding into target superspace arise from the action as differential form equations.

  11. General principles of medical interconsultation for hospitalised patients.

    PubMed

    Monte-Secades, R; Montero-Ruiz, E; Gil-Díaz, A; Castiella-Herrero, J

    2016-01-01

    Medical interconsultation for hospitalised patients is a regular activity among internal medicine specialists. However, despite its growing impact and importance, a model that defines its characteristics, objectives and information has not been established. This study, conducted by the Shared Care and Interconsultations Group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, proposes a number of general recommendations concerning the method for requesting and responding to hospital medical interconsultations, as well as a format for these interconsultations.

  12. Students' Misunderstandings about the Energy Conservation Principle: A General View to Studies in Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Erdal; Oktay, Munir

    2007-01-01

    This paper serves to review previously reported studies on students' misunderstandings about the energy conservation principle (the first law of thermodynamics). Generally, studies in literature highlighted students' misunderstandings about the energy conservation principle stem from preliminaries about energy concept in daily life. Since prior…

  13. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  14. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  15. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principles; status of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are...

  16. 20 CFR 604.3 - Able and available requirement-general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... principles. 604.3 Section 604.3 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...—general principles. (a) A State may pay UC only to an individual who is able to work and available for... for an individual under its UC law. (c) The requirement that an individual be able to work and...

  17. General principles of institutional risks influence on pension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepp, A. N.; Shilkov, A. A.; Sheveleva, A. Y.; Mamedbakov, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the tools used to study the influence of institutional factors on investment returns. The research object are the tools used in the evaluation of institutional risks in the pension system, in particular, the correlation model of factors impacting on the `anti-director' index, econometric estimates combining the different determinants of savings, the model of endogenous institutional change, etc. Research work focusing on issues of institutional factors affecting pension systems (authored by La Porta, Guiso, Gianetti, El-Mekkaouide Freitas, Neyapti B., and others) is reviewed. The model is examined in terms of the impact of institutional risks on pension systems, especially with regard to the funded part. The study identified the following factors that affect financial institutions, including pension institutions: management quality, regulation quality, rule of law, political stability, and corruption control.

  18. Category and Word Search: Generalizing Search Principles to Complex Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    complex processing (e.g., LaBerge & Samels, 1974; Shiffrin & Schneider, 1977). In the present paper we examine how well the major phenomena in simple visual...subjects are searching for novel characters ( LaBerge , 1973). The relatively large and rapid CH practice effects for word and category search are analogous...1974) demonstrated interference effects of irrelevant flanking letters. Shaffer and Laberge (1979) showed a similar effect with words and semantic

  19. Laboratory Test Utilization Management: General Principles and Applications in Hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Kaaren K; Wood, Adam J

    2016-03-01

    As the cost of health care continues to rise and reimbursement rates decrease, there is a growing demand and need to cut overall costs, enhance quality of services, and maintain as a top priority the needs and safety of the patient. In this article, we provide an introduction to test utilization and outline a general approach to creating an efficient, cost-effective test utilization strategy. We also present and discuss 2 test utilization algorithms that are evidence-based and may be of clinical utility as we move toward the future of doing the necessary tests at the right time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Generalized uncertainty principle as a consequence of the effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Nassar, Ali

    2017-02-01

    We will demonstrate that the generalized uncertainty principle exists because of the derivative expansion in the effective field theories. This is because in the framework of the effective field theories, the minimum measurable length scale has to be integrated away to obtain the low energy effective action. We will analyze the deformation of a massive free scalar field theory by the generalized uncertainty principle, and demonstrate that the minimum measurable length scale corresponds to a second more massive scale in the theory, which has been integrated away. We will also analyze CFT operators dual to this deformed scalar field theory, and observe that scaling of the new CFT operators indicates that they are dual to this more massive scale in the theory. We will use holographic renormalization to explicitly calculate the renormalized boundary action with counter terms for this scalar field theory deformed by generalized uncertainty principle, and show that the generalized uncertainty principle contributes to the matter conformal anomaly.

  1. Earth Science Principles Pertinent to the General Education Programs in Junior High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Kenneth Tyrone

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, and findings of a study designed to identify principles in astronomy, geology, meterology, oceanography and physical geography pertinent to general education programs in junior high schools. (LC)

  2. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Universe of Chemicals and General Validation Principles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document was developed by the EPA to provide guidance to staff and managers regarding the EDSP universe of chemicals and general validation principles for consideration of computational toxicology tools for chemical prioritization.

  3. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  4. 12 CFR 621.3 - Application of generally accepted accounting principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of generally accepted accounting principles. 621.3 Section 621.3 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS General Rules § 621.3 Application of generally accepted accounting...

  5. A generalized optimization principle for asymmetric branching in fluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Lockerby, Duncan A.

    2016-07-01

    When applied to a branching network, Murray's law states that the optimal branching of vascular networks is achieved when the cube of the parent channel radius is equal to the sum of the cubes of the daughter channel radii. It is considered integral to understanding biological networks and for the biomimetic design of artificial fluidic systems. However, despite its ubiquity, we demonstrate that Murray's law is only optimal (i.e. maximizes flow conductance per unit volume) for symmetric branching, where the local optimization of each individual channel corresponds to the global optimum of the network as a whole. In this paper, we present a generalized law that is valid for asymmetric branching, for any cross-sectional shape, and for a range of fluidic models. We verify our analytical solutions with the numerical optimization of a bifurcating fluidic network for the examples of laminar, turbulent and non-Newtonian fluid flows.

  6. A generalized optimization principle for asymmetric branching in fluidic networks

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, David

    2016-01-01

    When applied to a branching network, Murray’s law states that the optimal branching of vascular networks is achieved when the cube of the parent channel radius is equal to the sum of the cubes of the daughter channel radii. It is considered integral to understanding biological networks and for the biomimetic design of artificial fluidic systems. However, despite its ubiquity, we demonstrate that Murray’s law is only optimal (i.e. maximizes flow conductance per unit volume) for symmetric branching, where the local optimization of each individual channel corresponds to the global optimum of the network as a whole. In this paper, we present a generalized law that is valid for asymmetric branching, for any cross-sectional shape, and for a range of fluidic models. We verify our analytical solutions with the numerical optimization of a bifurcating fluidic network for the examples of laminar, turbulent and non-Newtonian fluid flows. PMID:27493583

  7. Generalized energy principle for flute perturbations in axisymmetric mirror machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lansky, I.M.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1993-01-20

    Axial symmetry is a very desirable property of the mirror devices both for fusion and neutron source applications. The main obstacle to be circumvented in the development of such systems, is the flute instability of axisymmetric mirrors. In recent years there appeared a number of proposals, devoted to the stabilization of the flute perturbations in the framework of axisymmetric magnetic configurations, which are based on the combining of the MHD unstable central cell with various types of end-cell stabilizers. In the present paper we concentrate ourselves just on this scheme, including long solenoid with a uniform field, conjugated with the end stabilizing anchor, intended to provide MHD stability of the system as a whole. The attractive feature of such a configuration is that it allows to exploit finite larmor radius (FLR) effects for the stabilization of the flute perturbations. As is well known, FLR effects, being strong, stabilize all flute modes, except the one with azimuthal number m = 1, corresponding to the ``rigid`` displacement of the plasma column (the ``global`` mode). Consequently, in the conditions when FLR effects dominate, the anchor has to stabilize the ``global` mode only. Bearing in mind a favorable influence of FLR effects we, however, don`t restrict our paper by discussion of only ``global`` mode stability and consider a general case of an arbitrary azimuthal mode.

  8. [General principles of wound management in emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Zacher, M T; Högele, A M; Hanschen, M; von Matthey, F; Beer, A-K; Gebhardt, F; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2016-04-01

    Wound management is one of the major tasks in emergency departments. The surrounding intact skin but not the wound itself should be disinfected before starting definitive wound treatment. Hair should first be removed by clipping to 1-2 mm above the skin with scissors or clippers as shaving the area with a razor damages the hair follicles and increases the risk of wound infections. Administration of local anesthetics should be performed directly through the exposed edges of the wound. After wound examination, irrigation is performed with Ringer's solution, normal saline or distilled water. The next step is débridement of contaminated and devitalized tissue. There are several wound closure techniques available, including adhesive tapes, staples, tissue adhesives and numerous forms of sutures. Management of specific wounds requires particular strategies. A bleeding control problem frequently occurs with scalp lacerations. Superficial scalp lacerations can be closed by alternative wound closure methods, for example by twisting and fixing hair and the use of tissue adhesives, i.e. hair apposition technique (HAT). For strongly bleeding lacerations of the scalp, the epicranial aponeurosis should be incorporated into the hemostasis. Aftercare varies depending on both the characteristics of the wound and those of the patient and includes adequate analgesia as well as minimizing the risk of infection. Sufficient wound aftercare starts with the treating physician informing the patient about the course of events, potential complications and providing relevant instructions.

  9. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    nonmonetary variables was developed. In it the radiologist, radiographer and examination-specific equipment costs were allocated to the examinations applying estimated cost equivalents. Some minor cost items were replaced by a general cost factor (GCF). The program is suitable for internal cost accounting of radiological departments as well as regional planning. If more accurate cost information is required, cost assignment employing the actual consumption of the resources and applying the principles of activity-based cost accounting is recommended. As an application of the cost accounting formula the average costs of the radiological examinations were calculated. In conventional radiography the average proportion of the cost factors in the total material was: personnel costs 43%, equipment costs 26%, material costs 7%, real estate costs 11%, administration and overheads 14%. The average total costs including radiologist costs in the hospitals were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 188, contrast medium examinations 695, ultrasound 296, mammography 315, roentgen examinations with mobile equipment 1578. The average total costs without radiologist costs in the public health centres were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 107, contrast medium examinations 988, ultrasound 203, mammography 557. The average currency rate of exchange in 1991 was USD 1 = FIM 4.046. The following formula is proposed for calculating the cost of a radiological examination (or a group of examinations) performed with a certain piece of equipment during a period of time (e.g. 1 year): a2/ sigma ax*ax+ b2/ sigma bx*bx+ d1/d5*dx+ e1 + [(c1+ c2) + d4 + (e2 - e3) + f5 + g1+ g2+ i]/n.

  10. General health screening as part of a periodontal examination.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Sarah L

    2010-12-21

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes are common systemic illnesses with reliable, predictive risk factors. CVD is the number one killer worldwide accounting for nearly 30% of deaths and type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in many western industrialized countries. Both of these illnesses can go undiagnosed in an alarming number of people for significant periods of time. The relationship between oral health and systemic health has become the focus of much discussion and research in recent times. It is now widely accepted that periodontal disease is associated with systemic illnesses such as CVD and type 2 diabetes. Cigarette smoking and obesity are major risk factors accounting for a large portion of the global disease burden. Many periodontal patients may be at risk of systemic conditions but be asymptomatic and undiagnosed. With an aging population who are mostly retaining their natural dentition, the need for periodontal management will continue to rise in the future. Dental professionals are well placed to perform general health screening for their patients. Therefore, risk assessment during the periodontal examination may facilitate the early identification of the large proportion of people who are unaware of their risk status. As identification and intervention of patients with increased risk factors is key to lowering the systemic disease burden, general health screening during periodontal examinations may present an important opportunity for many patients.

  11. General health screening as part of a periodontal examination

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes are common systemic illnesses with reliable, predictive risk factors. CVD is the number one killer worldwide accounting for nearly 30% of deaths and type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in many western industrialized countries. Both of these illnesses can go undiagnosed in an alarming number of people for significant periods of time. The relationship between oral health and systemic health has become the focus of much discussion and research in recent times. It is now widely accepted that periodontal disease is associated with systemic illnesses such as CVD and type 2 diabetes. Cigarette smoking and obesity are major risk factors accounting for a large portion of the global disease burden. Many periodontal patients may be at risk of systemic conditions but be asymptomatic and undiagnosed. With an aging population who are mostly retaining their natural dentition, the need for periodontal management will continue to rise in the future. Dental professionals are well placed to perform general health screening for their patients. Therefore, risk assessment during the periodontal examination may facilitate the early identification of the large proportion of people who are unaware of their risk status. As identification and intervention of patients with increased risk factors is key to lowering the systemic disease burden, general health screening during periodontal examinations may present an important opportunity for many patients. PMID:21523218

  12. Comparison of Principles of Technology and Traditional Physics Secondary Students' Scores on a Physics Examination.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Beacher Bert

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate comparatively the performance of students enrolled in principles of technology and traditional physics classes in Alabama on a physics examination. The subjects included 226 students enrolled in the first year of the principles of technology course at eight pilot school systems in Alabama during the 1988 -89 year as well as 251 students enrolled in randomly selected, intact physics classes from the same school systems. Data were collected utilizing demographic questionnaires developed by the researcher and a physics examination developed by a jury of Auburn University physics professors. Six graduate assistants, including the researcher, administered the examination and the demographic questionnaires in the school systems. Data pertaining to the students' standardized scores were obtained from school counselors. The data were statistically analyzed by a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) test and by a multivariate analysis of partial variance model. Results from the statistical analyses indicate that no significant difference in the two groups of students exist after adjustment for pre-existing differences and selected student and teacher variables. Significant interactions between course and both mathematics and science scores exists. While the physics students' scores were above the grand mean for both mathematics and science and the principles of technology students' scores were below the mean in both cases, the interactions indicate that the relationship between the scores on mathematics and science and course vary more than would be expected by chance for the two groups of students. The most significant conclusion was that the principles of technology course appears to be academically sound and may be the kind of course to successfully bridge the gap between academics and vocational education for a large segment of students.

  13. [Principles of rational cooperation of general practitioners and other specialists with nephrologist].

    PubMed

    Sułowicz, Władysław

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents general principles of rational cooperation of general practitioners and other specialists with nephrologist dedicate special attention concerning the slowing progression of renal failure and beneficts for patients as a result of early referral to nephrologist. The management of patients with chronic renal failure in the predialysis period and their preparation for renal replacement therapy was also described.

  14. 20 CFR 604.3 - Able and available requirement-general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Able and available requirement-general... LABOR REGULATIONS FOR ELIGIBILITY FOR UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION § 604.3 Able and available requirement—general principles. (a) A State may pay UC only to an individual who is able to work and available for...

  15. When, why, and how to examine the heart during thoracic CT: Part 1, basic principles.

    PubMed

    Bruzzi, John F; Rémy-Jardin, Martine; Delhaye, Damien; Teisseire, Antoine; Khalil, Chadi; Rémy, Jacques

    2006-02-01

    MDCT systems with fast scanning capabilities can acquire images of the thorax with reduced cardiac motion artifacts, enabling improved evaluation of the heart and surrounding structures in the course of routine thoracic CT. This article describes the principles of including an evaluation of the heart in the course of a chest CT examination in terms of both examination technique and image interpretation. In addition, both the normal appearances and some of the most common abnormal appearances of the cardiac structures will be described. Details concerning the cardiac structures can inform interpretation of thoracic CT studies and can influence the patient's clinical management. Both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced scans can detect significant cardiac disorders that may otherwise go undetected. In certain situations, a CT examination of the entire chest, complemented by cardiac gating, can provide a more dedicated analysis of the heart and coronary arteries, providing both morphologic and functional information.

  16. [Mastitis in general practice. Is bacteriologic examination useful?].

    PubMed

    Aabø, O; Matheson, I; Aursnes, I; Horgen, M; Lagerløv, P; Melby, K

    1990-06-20

    For a period of 22 months, postpartial women in Oslo were asked to consult one of several specific general practitioners in the event of mastitis. Clinical symptoms, bacteriological findings in breast milk and treatment were recorded in 43 patients. Patients with a favourable (n = 35) and with an unfavourable outcome (n = 8) defined as abscess, relapse and/or relief of symptoms after more than seven days, were compared. Unfavourable outcome was characterized by higher score of clinical symptoms and a higher isolation frequency of Staphylococcus aureus. The occurrence of fever did not differ between the groups. Bacteriological findings in milk from both breasts were compared with the findings from 100 milk donors. Staphylococcus aureus was more frequently isolated in milk from affected breasts than from unaffected and control breasts (17/40 versus 4/40 versus 4/100). Most of the Staphylococcus aureus strains (70%) were betalactamase producers. Coagulase negative staphylococci were a frequent finding in all milk samples, whereas Gram-negative bacteria were frequent only in the controls. The presence of pathogenic bacteria, as well as high bacterial counts, were associated with a higher number of symptoms. However, the predictive value of the bacteriological examination was low. Our study indicates that bacteriological examination of breast milk is justified only in patients with severe, acute symptoms and recurrences when betalactamase producing Staphylococcus aureus are suspected.

  17. Communication: Maximum caliber is a general variational principle for nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazoglou, Michael J.; Walther, Valentin; Dixit, Purushottam D.; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-08-01

    There has been interest in finding a general variational principle for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We give evidence that Maximum Caliber (Max Cal) is such a principle. Max Cal, a variant of maximum entropy, predicts dynamical distribution functions by maximizing a path entropy subject to dynamical constraints, such as average fluxes. We first show that Max Cal leads to standard near-equilibrium results—including the Green-Kubo relations, Onsager's reciprocal relations of coupled flows, and Prigogine's principle of minimum entropy production—in a way that is particularly simple. We develop some generalizations of the Onsager and Prigogine results that apply arbitrarily far from equilibrium. Because Max Cal does not require any notion of "local equilibrium," or any notion of entropy dissipation, or temperature, or even any restriction to material physics, it is more general than many traditional approaches. It also applicable to flows and traffic on networks, for example.

  18. A General Stochastic Maximum Principle for SDEs of Mean-field Type

    SciTech Connect

    Buckdahn, Rainer; Djehiche, Boualem; Li Juan

    2011-10-15

    We study the optimal control for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) of mean-field type, in which the coefficients depend on the state of the solution process as well as of its expected value. Moreover, the cost functional is also of mean-field type. This makes the control problem time inconsistent in the sense that the Bellman optimality principle does not hold. For a general action space a Peng's-type stochastic maximum principle (Peng, S.: SIAM J. Control Optim. 2(4), 966-979, 1990) is derived, specifying the necessary conditions for optimality. This maximum principle differs from the classical one in the sense that here the first order adjoint equation turns out to be a linear mean-field backward SDE, while the second order adjoint equation remains the same as in Peng's stochastic maximum principle.

  19. What buoyancy really is. A generalized Archimedes' principle for sedimentation and ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Parola, Alberto

    Particle settling is a pervasive process in nature, and centrifugation is a much versatile separation technique. Yet, the results of settling and ultracentrifugation experiments often appear to contradict the very law on which they are based: Archimedes Principle - arguably, the oldest Physical Law. The purpose of this paper is delving at the very roots of the concept of buoyancy by means of a combined experimental-theoretical study on sedimentation profiles in colloidal mixtures. Our analysis shows that the standard Archimedes' principle is only a limiting approximation, valid for mesoscopic particles settling in a molecular fluid, and we provide a general expression for the actual buoyancy force. This "Generalized Archimedes Principle" accounts for unexpected effects, such as denser particles floating on top of a lighter fluid, which in fact we observe in our experiments.

  20. Application of the generalized quasi-complementary energy principle to the fluid-solid coupling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Li-Fu; Liu, Zong-Min; Guo, Qing-Yong

    2009-03-01

    The fluid-solid coupling theory, an interdisciplinary science between hydrodynamics and solid mechanics, is an important tool for response analysis and direct design of structures in naval architecture and ocean engineering. By applying the corresponding relations between generalized forces and generalized displacements, convolutions were performed between the basic equations of elasto-dynamics in the primary space and corresponding virtual quantities. The results were integrated and then added algebraically. In light of the fact that body forces and surface forces are both follower forces, the generalized quasi-complementary energy principle with two kinds of variables for an initial value problem is established in non-conservative systems. Using the generalized quasi-complementary energy principle to deal with the fluid-solid coupling problem and to analyze the dynamic response of structures, a method for using two kinds of variables simultaneously for calculation of force and displacement was derived.

  1. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  2. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  3. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  4. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a decision on any petition filed under section 409...

  5. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  6. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  7. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  8. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  9. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  10. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching a...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 238 - General Principles of Reliability-Based Maintenance Programs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. E Appendix E to Part 238—General Principles of Reliability-Based Maintenance... minimum total cost, including maintenance costs and the costs of residual failures. (b) Reliability-based... result of the undetected failure of a hidden function. (c) In a reliability-based maintenance...

  12. The Basic Principles and Methods of the Music Curriculum for the General Education School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabalevskii, Dmitrii

    1988-01-01

    Delineates the foundations of Dmitri Kabalevskii's music curriculum for general education in the Soviet Union. Stresses teaching music as part of life itself. Bases teaching principles and methods on the song, dance, and march, termed "The Three Whales." Offers extensive lesson plans focusing on first grade music activities. (CH)

  13. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... of old target and new target. (a) In general—(1) Deemed transaction. Elections are available under...

  14. 26 CFR 1.338-1 - General principles; status of old target and new target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reinsurance transaction for the insurance contracts deemed transferred from old target to new target. See... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles; status of old target and new target. 1.338-1 Section 1.338-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  15. Generalized uncertainty principle corrections to the simple harmonic oscillator in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saurya; Robbins, Matthew P. G.; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We compute Wigner functions for the harmonic oscillator including corrections from generalized uncertainty principles (GUPs), and study the corresponding marginal probability densities and other properties. We show that the GUP corrections to the Wigner functions can be significant, and comment on their potential measurability in the laboratory.

  16. 77 FR 7125 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on General Principles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on... States (U.S.) positions that will be discussed at the 27th session of the Codex Committee on General Principles (CCGP) of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), which will be held in Paris, France, April...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 238 - General Principles of Reliability-Based Maintenance Programs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Maintenance Programs E Appendix E to Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. E Appendix E to Part 238—General Principles of Reliability-Based Maintenance... reliability beyond the design reliability. (e) When a maintenance program is developed, it includes tasks that...

  18. Using Domain-General Principles to Explain Children's Causal Reasoning Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, James L.; Thompson, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    A connectionist model of causal attribution is presented, emphasizing the use of domain-general principles of processing and learning previously employed in models of semantic cognition. The model categorizes objects dependent upon their observed 'causal properties' and is capable of making several types of inferences that 4-year-old children have…

  19. The Basic Principles and Methods of the Music Curriculum for the General Education School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabalevskii, Dmitrii

    1988-01-01

    Delineates the foundations of Dmitri Kabalevskii's music curriculum for general education in the Soviet Union. Stresses teaching music as part of life itself. Bases teaching principles and methods on the song, dance, and march, termed "The Three Whales." Offers extensive lesson plans focusing on first grade music activities. (CH)

  20. Generalized uncertainty principle and the maximum mass of ideal white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, Reza

    2016-11-15

    The effects of a generalized uncertainty principle on the structure of an ideal white dwarf star is investigated. The equation describing the equilibrium configuration of the star is a generalized form of the Lane–Emden equation. It is proved that the star always has a finite size. It is then argued that the maximum mass of such an ideal white dwarf tends to infinity, as opposed to the conventional case where it has a finite value.

  1. 26 CFR 1.336-1 - General principles, nomenclature, and definitions for a section 336(e) election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General principles, nomenclature, and... § 1.336-1 General principles, nomenclature, and definitions for a section 336(e) election. (a... election. This section provides the definitions and nomenclature. Generally, except to the...

  2. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions.

    PubMed

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s (1)S excited state of the helium atom.

  3. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J.

    2011-10-15

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s {sup 1} S excited state of the helium atom.

  4. Energy distribution of massless particles on black hole backgrounds with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhongheng

    2009-10-15

    We derive new formulas for the spectral energy density and total energy density of massless particles in a general spherically symmetric static metric from a generalized uncertainty principle. Compared with blackbody radiation, the spectral energy density is strongly damped at high frequencies. For large values of r, the spectral energy density diminishes when r grows, but at the event horizon, the spectral energy density vanishes and therefore thermodynamic quantities near a black hole, calculated via the generalized uncertainty principle, do not require any cutoff parameter. We find that the total energy density can be expressed in terms of Hurwitz zeta functions. It should be noted that at large r (low local temperature), the difference between the total energy density and the Stefan-Boltzmann law is too small to be observed. However, as r approaches an event horizon, the effect of the generalized uncertainty principle becomes more and more important, which may be observable. As examples, the spectral energy densities in the background metric of a Schwarzschild black hole and of a Schwarzschild black hole plus quintessence are discussed. It is interesting to note that the maximum of the distribution shifts to higher frequencies when the quintessence equation of state parameter w decreases.

  5. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-04-15

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  6. General Principles of Radiation Protection in Fields of Diagnostic Medical Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    After the rapid development of medical equipment including CT or PET-CT, radiation doses from medical exposure are now the largest source of man-made radiation exposure. General principles of radiation protection from the hazard of ionizing radiation are summarized as three key words; justification, optimization, and dose limit. Because medical exposure of radiation has unique considerations, diagnostic reference level is generally used as a reference value, instead of dose limits. In Korea, medical radiation exposure has increased rapidly. For medical radiation exposure control, Korea has two separate control systems. Regulation is essential to control medical radiation exposure. Physicians and radiologists must be aware of the radiation risks and benefits associated with medical exposure, and understand and implement the principles of radiation protection for patients. The education of the referring physicians and radiologists is also important. PMID:26908991

  7. On the reduction principle for differential equations with piecewise constant argument of generalized type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, M. U.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we introduce a new type of differential equations with piecewise constant argument (EPCAG), more general than EPCA [K.L. Cooke, J. Wiener, Retarded differential equations with piecewise constant delays, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 99 (1984) 265-297; J. Wiener, Generalized Solutions of Functional Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1993]. The Reduction Principle [V.A. Pliss, The reduction principle in the theory of the stability of motion, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Mat. 27 (1964) 1297-1324 (in Russian); V.A. Pliss, Integral Sets of Periodic Systems of Differential Equations, Nauka, Moskow, 1977 (in Russian)] is proved for EPCAG. The structure of the set of solutions is specified. We establish also the existence of global integral manifolds of quasilinear EPCAG in the so-called critical case and investigate the stability of the zero solution.

  8. General Principles of Radiation Protection in Fields of Diagnostic Medical Exposure.

    PubMed

    Do, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    After the rapid development of medical equipment including CT or PET-CT, radiation doses from medical exposure are now the largest source of man-made radiation exposure. General principles of radiation protection from the hazard of ionizing radiation are summarized as three key words; justification, optimization, and dose limit. Because medical exposure of radiation has unique considerations, diagnostic reference level is generally used as a reference value, instead of dose limits. In Korea, medical radiation exposure has increased rapidly. For medical radiation exposure control, Korea has two separate control systems. Regulation is essential to control medical radiation exposure. Physicians and radiologists must be aware of the radiation risks and benefits associated with medical exposure, and understand and implement the principles of radiation protection for patients. The education of the referring physicians and radiologists is also important.

  9. Covariant energy–momentum and an uncertainty principle for general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstock, F.I.; Dupre, M.J.

    2013-12-15

    We introduce a naturally-defined totally invariant spacetime energy expression for general relativity incorporating the contribution from gravity. The extension links seamlessly to the action integral for the gravitational field. The demand that the general expression for arbitrary systems reduces to the Tolman integral in the case of stationary bounded distributions, leads to the matter-localized Ricci integral for energy–momentum in support of the energy localization hypothesis. The role of the observer is addressed and as an extension of the special relativistic case, the field of observers comoving with the matter is seen to compute the intrinsic global energy of a system. The new localized energy supports the Bonnor claim that the Szekeres collapsing dust solutions are energy-conserving. It is suggested that in the extreme of strong gravity, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be generalized in terms of spacetime energy–momentum. -- Highlights: •We present a totally invariant spacetime energy expression for general relativity incorporating the contribution from gravity. •Demand for the general expression to reduce to the Tolman integral for stationary systems supports the Ricci integral as energy–momentum. •Localized energy via the Ricci integral is consistent with the energy localization hypothesis. •New localized energy supports the Bonnor claim that the Szekeres collapsing dust solutions are energy-conserving. •Suggest the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be generalized in terms of spacetime energy–momentum in strong gravity extreme.

  10. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-09-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice.

  11. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-12-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice.

  12. A generalization of the Boltzmann superposition principle to polymer networks undergoing scission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.; Aklonis, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Methods reported by Moacanin et al. (1975) and Moacanin and Aklonis (1971) are generalized with the objective to include strains (or stress) applied in an arbitrary manner to linearly viscoelastic materials. An imposition of changes in both the strain and the density of elastically effective chains in discrete increments is considered. In accordance with the Boltzmann superposition principle, each strain increment may be treated as a new independent experiment which adds linearly to the total response of the system.

  13. Real processing II: Extremal principles of irreversible thermodynamics, relations, generalizations and time dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Bernhard

    We start presenting the extremal principles we will consider: The Statement of Helmholtz 1868 and Rayleigh (SHR) 1913, generalized by Reiser 1996, the Statement of Kelvin (SK) 1849, the Principle of Minimal Entropy Production (PME) of Prigogine 1947 for linear processes, that of Prigogine and Glansdorff 1954 for non-linear processes and finally, the Principle of Maximal Entropy (MEF) of Jaynes, 1957. First we show the relation between SHR and SK. This is a particular example for the property of Irreversible Thermodynamics (TIP) to treat all kinds of movements of fluids, compounds or any type of energy under the engineering term loss, or accurately spoken, entropy production. This possibility to treat different physical effects in the same manner causes by its simplification, considerable economical advantages of treating processes in the frame of TIP. For example, whereas a balance like the momentum balance (Navier-Stokes equation) has to distinguish between inertial, viscous or pressure effects, the PME treats the movements these effects cause with one term, and no pressure coupling or non-linearity is enclosed. Then we generalize the SK from potential velocity fields to general ones and show that it fits into the MEF. We continue with the generalization of the SHR from 1996 to compressible and non-Newtonian fluids. Further, we notice that these principles hold for time-dependent (non-stationary) processes. Therefore, the general fluid dynamical part of the PME 1947 can be generalized from stationary to time-dependent processes. We show that this is possible not only for velocity fields but also for scalar fields using as an example, the temperature in the case of heat conduction. We see that scalar fields need a transformation well known in mathematics. Comparing the PME 1954 with the completely generalized SHR we see that it holds also for non-linear processes. The same holds for the generalized SK. We close the consideration of extremal principles with the

  14. Variational principle of Bogoliubov and generalized mean fields in many-particle interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzemsky, A. L.

    2015-07-01

    The approach to the theory of many-particle interacting systems from a unified standpoint, based on the variational principle for free energy is reviewed. A systematic discussion is given of the approximate free energies of complex statistical systems. The analysis is centered around the variational principle of Bogoliubov for free energy in the context of its applications to various problems of statistical mechanics. The review presents a terse discussion of selected works carried out over the past few decades on the theory of many-particle interacting systems in terms of the variational inequalities. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss some of the general principles which form the mathematical background to this approach and to establish a connection of the variational technique with other methods, such as the method of the mean (or self-consistent) field in the many-body problem. The method is illustrated by applying it to various systems of many-particle interacting systems, such as Ising, Heisenberg and Hubbard models, superconducting (SC) and superfluid systems, etc. This work proposes a new, general and pedagogical presentation, intended both for those who are interested in basic aspects and for those who are interested in concrete applications.

  15. Nonlinear Schrödinger equation from generalized exact uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnicki, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by the generalized uncertainty principle, which adds gravitational effects to the standard description of quantum uncertainty, we extend the exact uncertainty principle approach by Hall and Reginatto (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 3289), and obtain a (quasi)nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This quantum evolution equation of unusual form, enjoys several desired properties like separation of non-interacting subsystems or plane-wave solutions for free particles. Starting with the harmonic oscillator example, we show that every solution of this equation respects the gravitationally induced minimal position uncertainty proportional to the Planck length. Quite surprisingly, our result successfully merges the core of classical physics with non-relativistic quantum mechanics in its extremal form. We predict that the commonly accepted phenomenon, namely a modification of a free-particle dispersion relation due to quantum gravity might not occur in reality.

  16. Infinite dimensional Morse theory and Fermat's principle in general relativity. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker

    1995-12-01

    The following theorem may be viewed as the general relativistic version of Fermat's principle. Among all lightlike curves connecting a given point p to a given timelike curve γ in a Lorentzian manifold, the geodesics are characterized by stationary arrival time. Here ``arrival time'' refers to a smooth parametrization of γ. In this article the first steps are taken to make infinite dimensional Morse theory applicable to this variational problem. The space of trial curves is made into a Hilbert manifold by imposing an H2 Sobolev condition and Fermat's principle is reformulated in this infinite dimensional setting. Moreover, a Morse index theorem is presented. The mathematical formalism developed here aims at applications to the gravitational lens effect.

  17. Emergent features and perceptual objects: re-examining fundamental principles in analogical display design.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jerred; Bennett, Kevin B; Flach, John M

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of design principles for analogical visual displays, based on the concepts of emergent features and perceptual objects, are described. An interpretation of previous empirical findings for three displays (bar graph, polar graphic, alphanumeric) is provided from both perspectives. A fourth display (configural coordinate) was designed using principles of ecological interface design (i.e. direct perception). An experiment was conducted to evaluate performance (accuracy and latency of state identification) with these four displays. Numerous significant effects were obtained and a clear rank ordering of performance emerged (from best to worst): configural coordinate, bar graph, alphanumeric and polar graphic. These findings are consistent with principles of design based on emergent features; they are inconsistent with principles based on perceptual objects. Some limitations of the configural coordinate display are discussed and a redesign is provided. Practitioner Summary: Principles of ecological interface design, which emphasise the quality of very specific mappings between domain, display and observer constraints, are described; these principles are applicable to the design of all analogical graphical displays.

  18. Generalized uncertainty principle in f(R) gravity for a charged black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2011-02-15

    Using f(R) gravity in the Palatini formularism, the metric for a charged spherically symmetric black hole is derived, taking the Ricci scalar curvature to be constant. The generalized uncertainty principle is then used to calculate the temperature of the resulting black hole; through this the entropy is found correcting the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in this case. Using the entropy the tunneling probability and heat capacity are calculated up to the order of the Planck length, which produces an extra factor that becomes important as black holes become small, such as in the case of mini-black holes.

  19. On the origin of generalized uncertainty principle from compactified M5-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Beesham, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that compactification in M-theory can lead to a deformation of field theory consistent with the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). We observe that the matter fields in the M3-brane action contain higher derivative terms. We demonstrate that such terms can also be constructed from a reformulation of the field theory by the GUP. In fact, we will construct the Heisenberg algebra consistent with this deformation, and explicitly demonstrate it to be the Heisenberg algebra obtained from the GUP. Thus, we use compactification in M-theory to motivate for the existence of the GUP.

  20. [Protection of genetic data in Spain. Analysis based on the general principles of personal data protection].

    PubMed

    García Amez, Javier

    2006-01-01

    The genetic data is Spain is not regulated specifically, rather, we must look at the regulation on the protection of data of a personal nature. This is turn, establishes a series of general principles to apply to any type of data. Analysing this with other regulations that are dispersed both in the national and international regulations, we can deduce the rights and obligations in this field. This highlights the fact that one can't dispose of the genetic data in the same manner as the personal data.

  1. Supramolecular chemistry—general principles and selected examples from anion recognition and metallosupramolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Markus

    2007-12-01

    This review gives an introduction into supramolecular chemistry describing in the first part general principles, focusing on terms like noncovalent interaction, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular function. In the second part those will be illustrated by simple examples from our laboratories. Supramolecular chemistry is the science that bridges the gap between the world of molecules and nanotechnology. In supramolecular chemistry noncovalent interactions occur between molecular building blocks, which by molecular recognition and self-assembly form (functional) supramolecular entities. It is also termed the “chemistry of the noncovalent bond.” Molecular recognition is based on geometrical complementarity based on the “key-and-lock” principle with nonshape-dependent effects, e.g., solvatization, being also highly influential. Self- assembly leads to the formation of well-defined aggregates. Hereby the overall structure of the target ensemble is controlled by the symmetry features of the certain building blocks. Finally, the aggregates can possess special properties or supramolecular functions, which are only found in the ensemble but not in the participating molecules. This review gives an introduction on supramolecular chemistry and illustrates the fundamental principles by recent examples from our group.

  2. Supramolecular chemistry-general principles and selected examples from anion recognition and metallosupramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus

    2007-12-01

    This review gives an introduction into supramolecular chemistry describing in the first part general principles, focusing on terms like noncovalent interaction, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular function. In the second part those will be illustrated by simple examples from our laboratories. Supramolecular chemistry is the science that bridges the gap between the world of molecules and nanotechnology. In supramolecular chemistry noncovalent interactions occur between molecular building blocks, which by molecular recognition and self-assembly form (functional) supramolecular entities. It is also termed the "chemistry of the noncovalent bond." Molecular recognition is based on geometrical complementarity based on the "key-and-lock" principle with nonshape-dependent effects, e.g., solvatization, being also highly influential. Self-assembly leads to the formation of well-defined aggregates. Hereby the overall structure of the target ensemble is controlled by the symmetry features of the certain building blocks. Finally, the aggregates can possess special properties or supramolecular functions, which are only found in the ensemble but not in the participating molecules. This review gives an introduction on supramolecular chemistry and illustrates the fundamental principles by recent examples from our group.

  3. Impacts of generalized uncertainty principle on black hole thermodynamics and Salecker-Wigner inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfik, A.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the impacts of Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) proposed by some approaches to quantum gravity such as String Theory and Doubly Special Relativity on black hole thermodynamics and Salecker-Wigner inequalities. Utilizing Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the Hawking temperature, Bekenstein entropy, specific heat, emission rate and decay time are calculated. As the evaporation entirely eats up the black hole mass, the specific heat vanishes and the temperature approaches infinity with an infinite radiation rate. It is found that the GUP approach prevents the black hole from the entire evaporation. It implies the existence of remnants at which the specific heat vanishes. The same role is played by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in constructing the hydrogen atom. We discuss how the linear GUP approach solves the entire-evaporation-problem. Furthermore, the black hole lifetime can be estimated using another approach; the Salecker-Wigner inequalities. Assuming that the quantum position uncertainty is limited to the minimum wavelength of measuring signal, Wigner second inequality can be obtained. If the spread of quantum clock is limited to some minimum value, then the modified black hole lifetime can be deduced. Based on linear GUP approach, the resulting lifetime difference depends on black hole relative mass and the difference between black hole mass with and without GUP is not negligible.

  4. General chemistry students' understanding of climate science principles relating to chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versprille, A. N.; Towns, M.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin, B.; McKenzie, L. C.; Kirchhoff, M.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the NSF funded Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Science project, we are developing the chemistry of climate science inventory for use in general chemistry courses. The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), which integrates federal research on climate and global change, has set out a climate literacy framework, Climate Literacy: the Essential Principles of Climate Science (US Climate Change Science Program, 2009). Developed by collaboration among NOAA, NASA, AAAS, and a distinguished group of scientists and educators, this Framework defines a set of essential principles and scientific thinking skills that a climate literate person should understand. We have based our interview protocol on misconceptions identified in the research literature and the essential principles of climate change outlined in the CCSP document that pertain to chemistry. We have interviewed 24 undergraduates to elicit their understanding of the Earth's energy system, global warming, climate change, greenhouse gases, climate, and weather. Our analysis and findings indicate that the fundamental science necessary to understand the Earth's energy system and climate change are not well understood by the undergraduates in this sample. Details of the interviews, analysis, and synthesis of findings will be shared.

  5. When psychologists work with religious clients: applications of the general principles of ethical conduct.

    PubMed

    Yarhouse, M A; VanOrman, B T

    1999-12-01

    Psychologists become more effective and relevant when they appreciate that many clients hold religious values and commitments. Greater awareness of religion and religious values in the lives of clients may aid clinicians' efforts to provide more accurate assessments and effective treatment plans. The authors use the American Psychological Association's (1992) "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" as a framework to examine many of the ethical issues relevant when psychologists work with religious clients. This article also provides suggestions for ways in which clinicians may obtain the skills needed to offer competent assessments and interventions with religiously committed clients.

  6. Game-Based Approaches, Pedagogical Principles and Tactical Constraints: Examining Games Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra-Olivares, Jaime; García-López, Luis M.; Calderón, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of modification strategies based on the pedagogical principles of the Teaching Games for Understanding approach on tactical constraints of four 3v3 soccer small-sided games. The Game performance of 21 U-10 players was analyzed in a game similar to the adult game; one based on keeping-the-ball;…

  7. Web-Assisted Courses for Business Education: An Examination of Two Sections of Principles of Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priluck, Randi

    2004-01-01

    This research investigates student responses to two technologically different teaching methods for two sections of a Principles of Marketing course. A traditional method of teaching using lectures, in-class discussions, assignments, and exams is compared to a "Web-assisted" method in which 7 of the 14 class sessions met asynchronously online.…

  8. Web-Assisted Courses for Business Education: An Examination of Two Sections of Principles of Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priluck, Randi

    2004-01-01

    This research investigates student responses to two technologically different teaching methods for two sections of a Principles of Marketing course. A traditional method of teaching using lectures, in-class discussions, assignments, and exams is compared to a "Web-assisted" method in which 7 of the 14 class sessions met asynchronously online.…

  9. Game-Based Approaches, Pedagogical Principles and Tactical Constraints: Examining Games Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra-Olivares, Jaime; García-López, Luis M.; Calderón, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of modification strategies based on the pedagogical principles of the Teaching Games for Understanding approach on tactical constraints of four 3v3 soccer small-sided games. The Game performance of 21 U-10 players was analyzed in a game similar to the adult game; one based on keeping-the-ball;…

  10. Structural Evolutions of STOCK Markets Controlled by Generalized Entropy Principles of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi Jiao; Feng, Qing Yi; Chai, Li He

    As one of the most important financial markets and one of the main parts of economic system, the stock market has become the research focus in economics. The stock market is a typical complex open system far from equilibrium. Many available models that make huge contribution to researches on market are strong in describing the market however, ignoring strong nonlinear interactions among active agents and weak in reveal underlying dynamic mechanisms of structural evolutions of market. From econophysical perspectives, this paper analyzes the complex interactions among agents and defines the generalized entropy in stock markets. Nonlinear evolutionary dynamic equation for the stock markets is then derived from Maximum Generalized Entropy Principle. Simulations are accordingly conducted for a typical case with the given data, by which the structural evolution of the stock market system is demonstrated. Some discussions and implications are finally provided.

  11. General proof of the entropy principle for self-gravitating fluid in f ( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiongjun; Guo, Minyong; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-08-01

    The discussions on the connection between gravity and thermodynamics attract much attention recently. We consider a static self-gravitating perfect fluid system in f ( R) gravity, which is an important theory could explain the accelerated expansion of the universe. We first show that the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of f ( R) theories can be obtained by thermodynamical method in spherical symmetric spacetime. Then we prove that the maximum entropy principle is also valid for f ( R) gravity in general static spacetimes beyond spherical symmetry. The result shows that if the constraint equation is satisfied and the temperature of fluid obeys Tolmans law, the extrema of total entropy implies other components of gravitational equations. Conversely, if f ( R) gravitational equation hold, the total entropy of the fluid should be extremum. Our work suggests a general and solid connection between f ( R) gravity and thermodynamics.

  12. Drugs Are Not Enough: Some Principles of Psychopharmacology for General Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ross, W. Donald

    1963-01-01

    There is no necessary antagonism between the judicious use of drugs and a psychotherapeutic approach to patients in general medical practice. A table is presented with a simple pragmatic classification of types of drugs for altering emotional and mental states. Three general principles are given for the use of such drugs, illustrated by examples of the use and misuse of tranquillizers. Some differentiation is made between sedatives and tranquillizers and between different types of tranquillizers, particularly with reference to the need to consider depressive features in patients. Suggestions are made for the use of drugs for mild depressions and for depressions accompanying organic disease. One may have to take an “experimental” approach to new drugs to determine which to them are of value in relation to the particular emotional states of one's own patients. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14060167

  13. 49 CFR 1200.2 - Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). 1200.2 Section 1200.2 Transportation... COMMERCE ACT § 1200.2 Adoption of generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial... Financial Accounting Standards by the FASB, and provided that the Office of Economics,...

  14. General Principles for the welfare of animals in production systems: the underlying science and its application.

    PubMed

    Fraser, David; Duncan, Ian J H; Edwards, Sandra A; Grandin, Temple; Gregory, Neville G; Guyonnet, Vincent; Hemsworth, Paul H; Huertas, Stella M; Huzzey, Juliana M; Mellor, David J; Mench, Joy A; Spinka, Marek; Whay, H Rebecca

    2013-10-01

    In 2012, the World Organisation for Animal Health adopted 10 'General Principles for the Welfare of Animals in Livestock Production Systems' to guide the development of animal welfare standards. The General Principles draw on half a century of scientific research relevant to animal welfare: (1) how genetic selection affects animal health, behaviour and temperament; (2) how the environment influences injuries and the transmission of diseases and parasites; (3) how the environment affects resting, movement and the performance of natural behaviour; (4) the management of groups to minimize conflict and allow positive social contact; (5) the effects of air quality, temperature and humidity on animal health and comfort; (6) ensuring access to feed and water suited to the animals' needs and adaptations; (7) prevention and control of diseases and parasites, with humane euthanasia if treatment is not feasible or recovery is unlikely; (8) prevention and management of pain; (9) creation of positive human-animal relationships; and (10) ensuring adequate skill and knowledge among animal handlers. Research directed at animal welfare, drawing on animal behaviour, stress physiology, veterinary epidemiology and other fields, complements more established fields of animal and veterinary science and helps to create a more comprehensive scientific basis for animal care and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [General principles of effective communication between physician and patient with selected mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Justyna; Bobińska, Kinga; Filip, Maria; Gałecki, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Faced with the growing frequency of mental disorders occurrence and considering the necessity of improving the patient care, it is particularly important that physicians of different specialties knew the general principles of effective communication with patients who are mentally ill. Equally important is to spread the knowledge of the symptomatology of various mental illnesses. Studies published by the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology involving persons between 18 and 64 years old, show that 8 millions Poles suffers or suffered from mental disorders. This represents almost 25% of Polish society. The above data confirm, that basic knowledge of criteria for diagnosing mental disorders and their treatment by primary care physicians, determines the success of the entire health care system. It must be taken into consideration that frequently patients seeing general practitioner (GP) are suffering from more than one mental illness or it is accompanied by somatic disease. Adequate communication determines effective treatment. Simple yet exact message, ability to adapt it to patient and problems reported by him, is a valuable means in daily medical practice. It reduces the risk of iatrogenic disorder, encourages the efficiency of the entire therapeutic process. Good cooperation with the patient is also determined by patience, empathy, understanding, and competence. The aim of this study is to present the principles of effective communication between doctor and patient suffering from selected mental disorders. The article defines the concept of communication. It shows symptomatology of primary psychiatric disorders. Moreover, the most common difficulties in relationship between the doctor and the patient had been pointed.

  16. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  17. Pearson's principle inspired generalized strategy for the fabrication of metal hydroxide and oxide nanocages.

    PubMed

    Nai, Jianwei; Tian, Yu; Guan, Xin; Guo, Lin

    2013-10-30

    Designing a general route for rational synthesis of a series or families of nanomaterials for emerging applications has become more and more fascinating and vital in the view of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Herein, we explore a general strategy for fabricating uniform nanocages of metal hydroxides (MHs) and metal oxides (MOs). A template-assisted route inspired by Pearson's hard and soft acid-base (HSAB) principle was employed for synthesizing MH nanocages via meticulous selection of the coordinating etchant as well as optimization of the reaction conditions. The concept of "coordinating etching" is successfully achieved in this work. This unique route shows potential in designing well-defined and high-quality MH nanocages with varying components, shell thicknesses, shapes, and sizes at room temperature. Consequently, porous MO nanocages can be obtained readily just through appropriate thermal treament of the respective MH nanocages. The overall strategy present in this work extends the application of the HSAB principle in nanoscience and offers a unqiue clue for rational fabrication of hollow (porous) and/or amorphous structures on the nanoscale, where these nanocages may present promising potential for various applications.

  18. Using a problem-solving strategy to train students to apply general principles and to improve students' epistemology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, B.

    2011-12-01

    General studies science classes at many universities, such as physical science, Earth science, or astronomy, stress memorization and repetition of concepts. This approach leaves students with little appreciation for how science is used to explain phenomena from general principles. We present a novel instructional technique for an Earth science class in which the students are instructed in the use of a general problem solving strategy, adapted from a quantitative problem solving strategy developed by physics education research, in order to train the students in how to apply general principles. Using the Epistemological Beliefs Assessment for Physical Science, we have found that explicit training in problem solving significantly improves students' epistemology.

  19. Patients with coronary artery disease unsuitable for revascularization: definition, general principles, and a classification.

    PubMed

    Jolicoeur, E Marc; Cartier, Raymond; Henry, Tim D; Barsness, Greg W; Bourassa, Martial G; McGillion, Micheal; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2012-01-01

    In the present report, we review the phenotypes of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients unsuitable for revascularization procedures. We then analyze these phenotypes and propose a simple angiographic-based classification for patients with CAD unsuitable for revascularization. Under this classification, the following four distinct angiographic phenotypes are proposed: (1) suspected cardiac syndrome X; (2) limited territory at risk; (3) diffuse thread-like coronary atherosclerosis; and (4) end-stage CAD. It is hoped that such a classification system, as well as the general principles described in this report, will help to standardize the collection of epidemiological data on patients with refractory angina (RFA) and advanced CAD. It is also hoped that this system will be useful to extend the principles of clinical equipoise to the development of clinical trials of innovative therapies or devices for the treatment of RFA. Finally, we anticipate that the elaboration of this system, the first of its type in the literature, will stimulate discussion of what we feel to be a subject that has received insufficient attention in the literature, and ultimately to improved management of a challenging patient population. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Massive vector particles tunneling from black holes influenced by the generalized uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Qian

    2016-12-01

    This study considers the generalized uncertainty principle, which incorporates the central idea of large extra dimensions, to investigate the processes involved when massive spin-1 particles tunnel from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes under the effects of quantum gravity. For the black hole, the quantum gravity correction decelerates the increase in temperature. Up to O (1Mf/2), the corrected temperatures are affected by the mass and angular momentum of the emitted vector bosons. In addition, the temperature of the Kerr black hole becomes uneven due to rotation. When the mass of the black hole approaches the order of the higher dimensional Planck mass Mf, it stops radiating and yields a black hole remnant.

  1. Galilean and Lorentz Transformations in a Space with Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachuk, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a space with Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which can be obtained in the frame of the deformed commutation relations. In the space with GUP we have found transformations relating coordinates and times of moving and rest frames of reference in the first order over the parameter of deformation. In the non-relativistic case we find the deformed Galilean transformation which is rotation in Euclidian space-time. This transformation is similar to the Lorentz one but written for Euclidean space-time where the speed of light is replaced by some velocity related to the parameter of deformation. We show that for relativistic particle in the space with GUP the coordinates of the rest and moving frames of reference satisfy the Lorentz transformation with some effective speed of light.

  2. The payment for performance model and its influence on British general practitioners' principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Norman, Armando Henrique; Russell, Andrew J; Macnaughton, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This article explores some effects of the British payment for performance model on general practitioners' principles and practice, which may contribute to issues related to financial incentive modalities and quality of primary healthcare services in low and middle-income countries. Aiming to investigate what general practitioners have to say about the effect of the British payment for performance on their professional ethos we carried out semi-structured interviews with 13 general practitioner educators and leaders working in academic medicine across the UK. The results show a shift towards a more biomedical practice model and fragmented care with nurse practitioners and other health care staff focused more on specific disease conditions. There has also been an increased medicalisation of the patient experience both through labelling and the tendency to prescribe medications rather than non-pharmacological interventions. Thus, the British payment for performance has gradually strengthened a scientific-bureaucratic model of medical practice which has had profound effects on the way family medicine is practiced in the UK.

  3. Complementarity As Generative Principle: A Thought Pattern for Aesthetic Appreciations and Cognitive Appraisals in General

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yan; von Stosch, Alexandra; Park, Mona; Pöppel, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    In experimental aesthetics the relationship between the arts and cognitive neuroscience has gained particular interest in recent years. But has cognitive neuroscience indeed something to offer when studying the arts? Here we present a theoretical frame within which the concept of complementarity as a generative or creative principle is proposed; neurocognitive processes are characterized by the duality of complementary activities like bottom-up and top-down control, or logistical functions like temporal control and content functions like perceptions in the neural machinery. On that basis a thought pattern is suggested for aesthetic appreciations and cognitive appraisals in general. This thought pattern is deeply rooted in the history of philosophy and art theory since antiquity; and complementarity also characterizes neural operations as basis for cognitive processes. We then discuss some challenges one is confronted with in experimental aesthetics; in our opinion, one serious problem is the lack of a taxonomy of functions in psychology and neuroscience which is generally accepted. This deficit makes it next to impossible to develop acceptable models which are similar to what has to be modeled. Another problem is the severe language bias in this field of research as knowledge gained in many languages over the ages remains inaccessible to most scientists. Thus, an inspection of research results or theoretical concepts is necessarily too narrow. In spite of these limitations we provide a selective summary of some results and viewpoints with a focus on visual art and its appreciation. It is described how questions of art and aesthetic appreciations using behavioral methods and in particular brain-imaging techniques are analyzed and evaluated focusing on such issues like the representation of artwork or affective experiences. Finally, we emphasize complementarity as a generative principle on a practical level when artists and scientists work directly together which can

  4. Complementarity As Generative Principle: A Thought Pattern for Aesthetic Appreciations and Cognitive Appraisals in General.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; von Stosch, Alexandra; Park, Mona; Pöppel, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    In experimental aesthetics the relationship between the arts and cognitive neuroscience has gained particular interest in recent years. But has cognitive neuroscience indeed something to offer when studying the arts? Here we present a theoretical frame within which the concept of complementarity as a generative or creative principle is proposed; neurocognitive processes are characterized by the duality of complementary activities like bottom-up and top-down control, or logistical functions like temporal control and content functions like perceptions in the neural machinery. On that basis a thought pattern is suggested for aesthetic appreciations and cognitive appraisals in general. This thought pattern is deeply rooted in the history of philosophy and art theory since antiquity; and complementarity also characterizes neural operations as basis for cognitive processes. We then discuss some challenges one is confronted with in experimental aesthetics; in our opinion, one serious problem is the lack of a taxonomy of functions in psychology and neuroscience which is generally accepted. This deficit makes it next to impossible to develop acceptable models which are similar to what has to be modeled. Another problem is the severe language bias in this field of research as knowledge gained in many languages over the ages remains inaccessible to most scientists. Thus, an inspection of research results or theoretical concepts is necessarily too narrow. In spite of these limitations we provide a selective summary of some results and viewpoints with a focus on visual art and its appreciation. It is described how questions of art and aesthetic appreciations using behavioral methods and in particular brain-imaging techniques are analyzed and evaluated focusing on such issues like the representation of artwork or affective experiences. Finally, we emphasize complementarity as a generative principle on a practical level when artists and scientists work directly together which can

  5. Reform of the College Entrance Examination: Ideology, Principles, and Policy Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    Reform of the College Entrance Examination is trending toward simultaneous unification and diversification. The objective of reforming the entrance exam is to establish a college enrollment examination system that is primarily based on a unified test, which would assess students' abilities, appraise them on multiple levels, and classify them.…

  6. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guidelines, "Examination of the neonate": response from the perspective of general practice medicine].

    PubMed

    Springer, M P

    2002-11-09

    With the publication of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Examination of the neonate', a discussion which has lasted several decades has been brought to an end. Up to now a second neonatal examination by the general practitioner on the third, fourth or fifth day after a midwife-assisted birth was recommended. The arguments in support of this recommendation were based on the following: (a) the limited expertise of midwives in the past, (b) the experience that general practitioners had in examining children, although this experience was not specifically related to the defects for which neonates should be checked, and (c) the government bodies' wish to restrict the number of hospital deliveries by giving greater structure to the organisation of midwife care, which in practice, did not lead to large changes. Based on three studies, the practice guideline recommends that a second examination is of no added value.

  7. [Comments on histopathology examinations in forensic medicine -- the importance, indications and basic principles of preserving the tissues].

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Zbigniew; Pieśniak, Dorota

    2007-01-01

    Histopathology examinations and their usefulness in postmortem diagnosis and medico-legal expertise have always been regarded extremely important by the Faculty of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine at the Medical University of Gdansk. The authors postulate acceptance of indication criteria for histopathology examination in forensic autopsies and propose rules for collecting tissue samples from internal organs and the placenta. They also remind the readers of the principles of proceeding with the preserved material. The present paper may be helpful for doctors other than forensic pathologists, who perform autopsies in institutions other than university departments of forensic medicine.

  8. Cooperative Learning: The Benefits of Participatory Examinations in Principles of Marketing Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Reginald A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes procedures for participatory examinations, a method for achieving student collaboration in marketing education. Suggests that the method teaches students group process, persuasion, teamwork, and other skills needed in the contemporary workplace. (SK)

  9. Cooperative Learning: The Benefits of Participatory Examinations in Principles of Marketing Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Reginald A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes procedures for participatory examinations, a method for achieving student collaboration in marketing education. Suggests that the method teaches students group process, persuasion, teamwork, and other skills needed in the contemporary workplace. (SK)

  10. Over-constraint and a unified mobility method for general spatial mechanisms part 1: Essential principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Daxing; Lu, Wenjuan; Huang, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Compared with the parallel mechanisms, the mobility analysis of the general multi-loop spatial mechanisms(GMSMs) is more difficult to obtain correct results. The reason is that its multi-loop is formed through several times of closings and there also exists motion coupling even strong coupling, where the over-constraints are concealed. However, the mobility analysis for this kind of mechanisms has been paid few attentions. A new systemic methodology for analyzing mobility is proposed for GMSMs also based on the screw theory. The key issue for mobility analysis is to recognize the over-constraint. Firstly, three theorems are given and point out: the reason and site of over-constraint occurrence, calculating the number of over-constraints by the screw theory, and how to analyze the over-constraints for a single-loop mechanism as well. Then, three closing forms for GMSMs are proposed including rigid closure, movable closure and dynamic closure, and for the three different forms the different analysis methods are also given. Especially, for the most difficult issue of GMSMs with the multi-loop closure in many times and the inevitable motion coupling, two important methods are proposed: "recognizing over-constraints by analyzing relative movement" and "recognizing over-constraints by virtual loop". The two methods are well used to solve the issue. Above-mentioned principles are not only systematic and effective but also unified. They provide a theoretical basis for the general multi-loop spatial mechanisms.

  11. Generalizing Murray's law: An optimization principle for fluidic networks of arbitrary shape and scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Patronis, Alexander; Holland, David M.; Lockerby, Duncan A.

    2015-11-01

    Murray's law states that the volumetric flow rate is proportional to the cube of the radius in a cylindrical channel optimized to require the minimum work to drive and maintain the fluid. However, application of this principle to the biomimetic design of micro/nano fabricated networks requires optimization of channels with arbitrary cross-sectional shape (not just circular) and smaller than is valid for Murray's original assumptions. We present a generalized law for symmetric branching that (a) is valid for any cross-sectional shape, providing that the shape is constant through the network; (b) is valid for slip flow and plug flow occurring at very small scales; and (c) is valid for networks with a constant depth, which is often a requirement for lab-on-a-chip fabrication procedures. By considering limits of the generalized law, we show that the optimum daughter-parent area ratio Γ, for symmetric branching into N daughter channels of any constant cross-sectional shape, is Γ=N-2 /3 for large-scale channels, and Γ=N-4 /5 for channels with a characteristic length scale much smaller than the slip length. Our analytical results are verified by comparison with a numerical optimization of a two-level network model based on flow rate data obtained from a variety of sources, including Navier-Stokes slip calculations, kinetic theory data, and stochastic particle simulations.

  12. Using biological markets principles to examine patterns of grooming exchange in Macaca thibetana.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, K N; Berman, C M; Ogawa, H; Li, J

    2011-12-01

    Biological markets principles offer testable hypotheses to explain variation in grooming exchange patterns among nonhuman primates. They predict that when within-group contest competition (WGC) is high and dominance hierarchies steep, grooming interchange with other "commodity" behaviors (such as agonistic support) should prevail. In contrast, when WGC is low and gradients shallow, market theory predicts that grooming reciprocity should prevail. We tested these predictions in a wild, provisioned Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) group across six time periods during which the group had been subjected to varying degrees of range restriction. Data on female-female aggression, grooming, and support were collected using all-occurrences and focal animal sampling techniques, and analyzed using ANCOVA methods and correlation analyses. We found that hierarchical steepness varied significantly across periods, but did not correlate with two indirect indicators of WGC (group size and range restriction) in predicted directions. Contrary to expectations, we found a negative correlation between steepness and group size, perhaps because the responses of group members to external risks (i.e. prolonged and unavoidable exposure to humans) may have overshadowed the effects of WGC. As predicted, grooming reciprocity was significant in each period and negatively correlated with steepness, even after we controlled group size, kinship, rank differences, and proximity. In contrast, there was no evidence for grooming interchange with agonistic support or for a positive relationship between interchange and steepness. We hypothesize that stressful conditions and/or the presence of stable hierarchies during each period may have led to a greater market demand for grooming than support. We suggest that future studies testing these predictions consider more direct measures of WGC and commodities in addition to support, such as feeding tolerance and access to infants. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals

  13. Student performance of the general physical examination in internal medicine: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Haring, Catharina M; Cools, Bernadette M; van der Meer, Jos Wm; Postma, Cornelis T

    2014-04-08

    Many practicing physicians lack skills in physical examination. It is not known whether physical examination skills already show deficiencies after an early phase of clinical training. At the end of the internal medicine clerkship students are expected to be able to perform a general physical examination in every new patient encounter. In a previous study, the basic physical examination items that should standardly be performed were set by consensus. The aim of the current observational study was to assess whether medical students were able to correctly perform a general physical examination regarding completeness as well as technique at the end of the clerkship internal medicine. One hundred students who had just finished their clerkship internal medicine were asked to perform a general physical examination on a standardized patient as they had learned during the clerkship. They were recorded on camera. Frequency of performance of each component of the physical examination was counted. Adequacy of performance was determined as either correct or incorrect or not assessable using a checklist of short descriptions of each physical examination component. A reliability analysis was performed by calculation of the intra class correlation coefficient for total scores of five physical examinations rated by three trained physicians and for their agreement on performance of all items. Approximately 40% of the agreed standard physical examination items were not performed by the students. Students put the most emphasis on examination of general parameters, heart, lungs and abdomen. Many components of the physical examination were not performed as was taught during precourses. Intra-class correlation was high for total scores of the physical examinations 0.91 (p <0.001) and for agreement on performance of the five physical examinations (0.79-0.92 p <0.001). In conclusion, performance of the general physical examination was already below expectation at the end of the internal

  14. Student performance of the general physical examination in internal medicine: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many practicing physicians lack skills in physical examination. It is not known whether physical examination skills already show deficiencies after an early phase of clinical training. At the end of the internal medicine clerkship students are expected to be able to perform a general physical examination in every new patient encounter. In a previous study, the basic physical examination items that should standardly be performed were set by consensus. The aim of the current observational study was to assess whether medical students were able to correctly perform a general physical examination regarding completeness as well as technique at the end of the clerkship internal medicine. Methods One hundred students who had just finished their clerkship internal medicine were asked to perform a general physical examination on a standardized patient as they had learned during the clerkship. They were recorded on camera. Frequency of performance of each component of the physical examination was counted. Adequacy of performance was determined as either correct or incorrect or not assessable using a checklist of short descriptions of each physical examination component. A reliability analysis was performed by calculation of the intra class correlation coefficient for total scores of five physical examinations rated by three trained physicians and for their agreement on performance of all items. Results Approximately 40% of the agreed standard physical examination items were not performed by the students. Students put the most emphasis on examination of general parameters, heart, lungs and abdomen. Many components of the physical examination were not performed as was taught during precourses. Intra-class correlation was high for total scores of the physical examinations 0.91 (p <0.001) and for agreement on performance of the five physical examinations (0.79-0.92 p <0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, performance of the general physical examination was already below

  15. [Confocal laser endomicroscopy principles and performing algorithm in gastric mucosa examination].

    PubMed

    Pirogov, S S; Sokolov, V V; Karpova, E S; Pavlov, P V; Volchenko, N N; Kaprin, A D

    2014-01-01

    Accuracy of endoscopic examination in early gastric cancer and precancerous conditions diagnostics for many years depended only on quality of biopsy. That's why, risk of overlooking gastric focal carcinoma, particularly-- multiple, was relatively high. Last couple of years new endoscopic method--confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) was released for commercial use. This approach provides real-time information about morphology of gastric mucosa during endoscopic examination. CLE is a variation of confocal microscopy--morphologic technique, providing examination of thick specimens or live tissue. CLE system is a single-channel fluorescence microscope, used in endoscopy, where confocal probe incorporated into endoscope or mounted into accessory channel. For proper results of CLE intravenous administration of fluorescence agent is needed. In our study in P.A. Herzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute we have used 10% fluorescein sodium, due to acriflavine use is prohibited in Russian Federation. In 157 patients with suspected early gastric cancer mean time of CLE was 24 ± 3.5 min. In all cases descriptive images were acquired. Mean amount of endomicrosocpic images in one patient was as high as 162 ± 8.3.

  16. [From the Principle of Beneficence to the Principle of Autonomy. Assessment of Patients' Mental Competency in the General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Diana, Restrepo B; Carlos, Cardeño C; Marle, Duque G; Santiago, Jaramillo

    2012-06-01

    Refusing a medical procedure is a valid way of exercising every patient's right to autonomy. From the legal point of view, autonomy is based on the right to privacy. In recent decades the legal right to self-determination has gradually expanded and today patients in full possession of their mental faculties, have the moral and legal right to make their own decisions and these decisions take precedence over physician and family. Often liaison psychiatrists are called in to assess the mental competence of patients in the general hospital. To determine the psychiatrist's role in evaluating these patients. The assessment of a patient's ability to decide and self-determine is a common clinical problem in general hospitals. Evaluation of these patients requires a proper understanding of the philosophical, ethical, and legal issues that guide the appropriate treatment of these complex clinical problems. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. First-principles local density approximation + U and generalized gradient approximation + U study of plutonium oxides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2008-02-28

    The electronic structure and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied from first principles by the all-electron projector-augmented-wave method. The local density approximation+U and the generalized gradient approximation+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by the choice of U as well as the choice of exchange-correlation potential. Also, oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modeling of redox process involving Pu-based materials possible.

  18. General principles for risk assessment of living modified organisms: lessons from chemical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ryan A; Sendashonga, Cyrie

    2003-01-01

    Modern biotechnology has led to the development and use of Living Modified Organisms (LMOs) for agriculture and other purposes. Regulators at the national level are increasingly depending on risk assessment as a tool for assessing potential adverse effects of LMOs on the environment and human health. In addition, the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, an international agreement expected to enter into force in the near future, requires risk assessment as the basis for decision-making regarding import of some LMOs. While LMO risk assessment is relatively new, there are other risk assessment disciplines which have developed over longer time periods. The field of assessment of the environmental and human health risks of chemicals is particularly well developed, and is similar in application to LMO risk assessment. This paper aims to draw lessons for LMO risk assessment from the vast experience with chemical risk assessment. Seven general principles are outlined which should serve as a useful checklist to guide assessments of risks posed by LMOs.

  19. Structural data in synthetic biology approaches for studying general design principles of cellular signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Christina; Serrano, Luis

    2012-11-07

    In recent years, high-throughput discovery of macromolecular protein structures and complexes has played a major role in advancing a more systems-oriented view of protein interaction and signaling networks. The design of biological systems often employs structural information or structure-based protein design to successfully implement synthetic signaling circuits or for rewiring signaling flows. Here, we summarize the latest advances in using structural information for studying protein interaction and signaling networks, and in synthetic biology approaches. We then provide a perspective of how combining structural biology with engineered cell signaling modules--using additional information from quantitative biochemistry and proteomics, gene evolution, and mathematical modeling--can provide insight into signaling modules and the general design principles of cell signaling. Ultimately, this will improve our understanding of cell- and tissue-type-specific signal transduction. Integrating the quantitative effects of disease mutations into these systems may provide a basis for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Expectation for JSPN's contribution following revision of General Principles for Suicide Prevention Policy].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Japan's national suicide prevention efforts following the 1998 surge in the number of suicide deaths can be divided into three stages: the first stage administrated mainly by the health ministry (1998-2005), the second and transitional stage when it was upgraded to a full governmental issue (2005-2006), and the third and present stage following the promulgation of the Basic Act for Suicide Prevention in 2006. In June 2007, the General Principles for Suicide Prevention Policy (GPSP), a guideline on how the national government should act to promote suicide prevention, was announced, urging local governments to tackle the problem of suicide. The GPSP was set to be revised after around five years from its publication, and, thus, a revised GPSP was published in August of 2012. Based on the five years of challenges, the revised GPSP states that suicide prevention strategies should move on to more practical and community-oriented ones. The National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), through its Center for Suicide Prevention, played a coordinating role in putting forward a proposal for the revision, working with 29 academic societies including the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology (JSPN). In February 2013, by further developing the relationships with academic societies, etc., which were forged in the above-mentioned process, NCNP set up the Preparatory Committee for the Evidence-based Suicide Prevention Consortium in order to contribute to suicide prevention strategies from an academic perspective. Meanwhile, in the World Health Organization's 66th World Health Assembly held in May 2013, the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 was approved. Its core principle is "no health without mental health", and it has the following four objectives: (1) to strengthen effective leadership and governance for mental health; (2) to provide comprehensive, integrated, and responsive mental health and social care services in community-based settings; (3) to

  1. Examination of Turkish Junior High-School Students' Perceptions of the General Problem-Solving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process. The Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process were examined in relation to their gender, grade level, age and their grade point with regards to the science course identified in the…

  2. Pleasure and pain: teaching neuroscientific principles of hedonism in a large general education undergraduate course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Stellar, James R; Kraft, Tamar T; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Bajnath, Adesh; Rotella, Francis M; Barrientos, Alicia; Aghanori, Golshan; Olsson, Kerstin; Coke, Tricia; Huang, Donald; Luger, Zeke; Mousavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Dindyal, Trisha; Naqvi, Naveen; Kim, Jung-Yo

    2013-01-01

    In a large (250 registrants) general education lecture course, neuroscience principles were taught by two professors as co-instructors, starting with simple brain anatomy, chemistry, and function, proceeding to basic brain circuits of pleasure and pain, and progressing with fellow expert professors covering relevant philosophical, artistic, marketing, and anthropological issues. With this as a base, the course wove between fields of high relevance to psychology and neuroscience, such as food addiction and preferences, drug seeking and craving, analgesic pain-inhibitory systems activated by opiates and stress, neuroeconomics, unconscious decision-making, empathy, and modern neuroscientific techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging and event-related potentials) presented by the co-instructors and other Psychology professors. With no formal assigned textbook, all lectures were PowerPoint-based, containing links to supplemental public-domain material. PowerPoints were available on Blackboard several days before the lecture. All lectures were also video-recorded and posted that evening. The course had a Facebook page for after-class conversation and one of the co-instructors communicated directly with students on Twitter in real time during lecture to provide momentary clarification and comment. In addition to graduate student Teaching Assistants (TAs), to allow for small group discussion, ten undergraduate students who performed well in a previous class were selected to serve as discussion leaders. The Discussion Leaders met four times at strategic points over the semester with groups of 20-25 current students, and received one credit of Independent Study, thus creating a course within a course. The course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page writing assignment in which each student reviewed three unique, but brief original peer-review research articles (one page each) combined with expository writing on the first

  3. Pleasure and Pain: Teaching Neuroscientific Principles of Hedonism in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Stellar, James R.; Kraft, Tamar T.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Bajnath, Adesh; Rotella, Francis M.; Barrientos, Alicia; Aghanori, Golshan; Olsson, Kerstin; Coke, Tricia; Huang, Donald; Luger, Zeke; Mousavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Dindyal, Trisha; Naqvi, Naveen; Kim, Jung-Yo

    2013-01-01

    In a large (250 registrants) general education lecture course, neuroscience principles were taught by two professors as co-instructors, starting with simple brain anatomy, chemistry, and function, proceeding to basic brain circuits of pleasure and pain, and progressing with fellow expert professors covering relevant philosophical, artistic, marketing, and anthropological issues. With this as a base, the course wove between fields of high relevance to psychology and neuroscience, such as food addiction and preferences, drug seeking and craving, analgesic pain-inhibitory systems activated by opiates and stress, neuroeconomics, unconscious decision-making, empathy, and modern neuroscientific techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging and event-related potentials) presented by the co-instructors and other Psychology professors. With no formal assigned textbook, all lectures were PowerPoint-based, containing links to supplemental public-domain material. PowerPoints were available on Blackboard several days before the lecture. All lectures were also video-recorded and posted that evening. The course had a Facebook page for after-class conversation and one of the co-instructors communicated directly with students on Twitter in real time during lecture to provide momentary clarification and comment. In addition to graduate student Teaching Assistants (TAs), to allow for small group discussion, ten undergraduate students who performed well in a previous class were selected to serve as discussion leaders. The Discussion Leaders met four times at strategic points over the semester with groups of 20–25 current students, and received one credit of Independent Study, thus creating a course within a course. The course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page writing assignment in which each student reviewed three unique, but brief original peer-review research articles (one page each) combined with expository writing on the first

  4. Precautionary Principles: General Definitions and Specific Applications to Genetically Modified Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofstedt, Ragnar E.; Fischhoff, Baruch; Fischhoff, Ilya R.

    2002-01-01

    Precautionary principles have been proposed as a fundamental element of sound risk management. Their advocates see them as guiding action in the face of uncertainty, encouraging the adoption of measures that reduce serious risks to health, safety, and the environment. Their opponents may reject the very idea of precautionary principles, find…

  5. Precautionary Principles: General Definitions and Specific Applications to Genetically Modified Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofstedt, Ragnar E.; Fischhoff, Baruch; Fischhoff, Ilya R.

    2002-01-01

    Precautionary principles have been proposed as a fundamental element of sound risk management. Their advocates see them as guiding action in the face of uncertainty, encouraging the adoption of measures that reduce serious risks to health, safety, and the environment. Their opponents may reject the very idea of precautionary principles, find…

  6. A Comparison of Academic Success: College Credits via General Examination or Course Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losak, John; Lin, Tien-Teh

    1973-01-01

    This study investigated the question of whether those students who earned credits for basic courses through the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations achieved the same level of academic performance in advanced courses as those who took the basic courses in the traditional manner. (Editor)

  7. [GENERAL PRINCIPLE OF THE CORPUS CALLOSUM INTERNAL STRUCTURE IN ADULT HUMAN].

    PubMed

    Boiagina, O

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the corpus callosum is a certain form of order of the nerve fibers, glial cells and blood microvessels and it is actually unexplored. We set the goal to understand the general constructive principle of the myeloarchitectonics of human corpus callosum. We used whole mounts of the corpus callosum (5 men and 5 women aged from 36 to 60 years) after their two-week fixation in 10% formalin solution. The next stage was to dissect plate sections of the corpus callosum brainstem in two mutually perpendicular planes. Some of them were subjected to impregnation in 1% osmium tetroxide solution, according to the method adopted in transmission electron microscopy. To prepare these plate sections of the corpus callosum for further study in the light microscope we used the method of plastination in epoxy resin. After complete polymerization plastinated mounts were used for making slices. For further research at high magnification light microscopy they were thinned up to 0.3 mm thickness and were subjected to coloration using 1% solution of methylene blue on 1% borax solution. They were studied using a binocular microscope МБС-9 and microscope "Konus" equipped with digital camera. It was found that the human corpus callosum consists of a number of transversely oriented bands of nerve fibers (commissural cords). Each of them consists of a tightly appressed stratified sections, fascicular rations, which are separated by interstitial layers. In turn, these interfascicular layers give short lateral spurs that divide fascicular rations into individual segments - subfascicular rations. Multiple cells containing interfascicular oligodendrocytes associated with individual subfascicular sets of nerve tracts are dispersed in the cluster order among myelinated nerve fibers of fascicular rations. Fundamentally important point is that the interstitial layers in the corpus callosum as a whole form a complex three-dimensional network structure which is subordinated to the

  8. NSF Workshop Report: Discovering General Principles of Nervous System Organization by Comparing Brain Maps across Species

    PubMed Central

    Striedter, Georg F.; Belgard, T. Grant; Chen, Chun-Chun; Davis, Fred P.; Finlay, Barbara L.; Güntürkün, Onur; Hale, Melina E.; Harris, Julie A.; Hecht, Erin E.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Holland, Linda Z.; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Karten, Harvey J.; Katz, Paul S.; Kristan, William B.; Macagno, Eduardo R.; Mitra, Partha P.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Preuss, Todd M.; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Stevens, Charles F.; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Tsumoto, Tadaharu; Wilczynski, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to understand nervous system structure and function have received new impetus from the federal Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Comparative analyses can contribute to this effort by leading to the discovery of general principles of neural circuit design, information processing, and gene-structure-function relationships that are not apparent from studies on single species. We here propose to extend the comparative approach to nervous system ‘maps’ comprising molecular, anatomical, and physiological data. This research will identify which neural features are likely to generalize across species, and which are unlikely to be broadly conserved. It will also suggest causal relationships between genes, development, adult anatomy, physiology, and, ultimately, behavior. These causal hypotheses can then be tested experimentally. Finally, insights from comparative research can inspire and guide technological development. To promote this research agenda, we recommend that teams of investigators coalesce around specific research questions and select a set of ‘reference species’ to anchor their comparative analyses. These reference species should be chosen not just for practical advantages, but also with regard for their phylogenetic position, behavioral repertoire, well-annotated genome, or other strategic reasons. We envision that the nervous systems of these reference species will be mapped in more detail than those of other species. The collected data may range from the molecular to the behavioral, depending on the research question. To integrate across levels of analysis and across species, standards for data collection, annotation, archiving, and distribution must be developed and respected. To that end, it will help to form networks or consortia of researchers and centers for science, technology, and education that focus on organized data collection, distribution, and training. These activities could be

  9. NSF workshop report: discovering general principles of nervous system organization by comparing brain maps across species.

    PubMed

    Striedter, Georg F; Belgard, T Grant; Chen, Chun-Chun; Davis, Fred P; Finlay, Barbara L; Güntürkün, Onur; Hale, Melina E; Harris, Julie A; Hecht, Erin E; Hof, Patrick R; Hofmann, Hans A; Holland, Linda Z; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Jarvis, Erich D; Karten, Harvey J; Katz, Paul S; Kristan, William B; Macagno, Eduardo R; Mitra, Partha P; Moroz, Leonid L; Preuss, Todd M; Ragsdale, Clifton W; Sherwood, Chet C; Stevens, Charles F; Stüttgen, Maik C; Tsumoto, Tadaharu; Wilczynski, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to understand nervous system structure and function have received new impetus from the federal Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Comparative analyses can contribute to this effort by leading to the discovery of general principles of neural circuit design, information processing, and gene-structure-function relationships that are not apparent from studies on single species. We here propose to extend the comparative approach to nervous system 'maps' comprising molecular, anatomical, and physiological data. This research will identify which neural features are likely to generalize across species, and which are unlikely to be broadly conserved. It will also suggest causal relationships between genes, development, adult anatomy, physiology, and, ultimately, behavior. These causal hypotheses can then be tested experimentally. Finally, insights from comparative research can inspire and guide technological development. To promote this research agenda, we recommend that teams of investigators coalesce around specific research questions and select a set of 'reference species' to anchor their comparative analyses. These reference species should be chosen not just for practical advantages, but also with regard for their phylogenetic position, behavioral repertoire, well-annotated genome, or other strategic reasons. We envision that the nervous systems of these reference species will be mapped in more detail than those of other species. The collected data may range from the molecular to the behavioral, depending on the research question. To integrate across levels of analysis and across species, standards for data collection, annotation, archiving, and distribution must be developed and respected. To that end, it will help to form networks or consortia of researchers and centers for science, technology, and education that focus on organized data collection, distribution, and training. These activities could be supported

  10. NSF workshop report: discovering general principles of nervous system organization by comparing brain maps across species.

    PubMed

    Striedter, Georg F; Belgard, T Grant; Chen, Chun-Chun; Davis, Fred P; Finlay, Barbara L; Güntürkün, Onur; Hale, Melina E; Harris, Julie A; Hecht, Erin E; Hof, Patrick R; Hofmann, Hans A; Holland, Linda Z; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Jarvis, Erich D; Karten, Harvey J; Katz, Paul S; Kristan, William B; Macagno, Eduardo R; Mitra, Partha P; Moroz, Leonid L; Preuss, Todd M; Ragsdale, Clifton W; Sherwood, Chet C; Stevens, Charles F; Stüttgen, Maik C; Tsumoto, Tadaharu; Wilczynski, Walter

    2014-05-01

    Efforts to understand nervous system structure and function have received new impetus from the federal Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Comparative analyses can contribute to this effort by leading to the discovery of general principles of neural circuit design, information processing, and gene-structure-function relationships that are not apparent from studies on single species. We here propose to extend the comparative approach to nervous system 'maps' comprising molecular, anatomical, and physiological data. This research will identify which neural features are likely to generalize across species, and which are unlikely to be broadly conserved. It will also suggest causal relationships between genes, development, adult anatomy, physiology, and, ultimately, behavior. These causal hypotheses can then be tested experimentally. Finally, insights from comparative research can inspire and guide technological development. To promote this research agenda, we recommend that teams of investigators coalesce around specific research questions and select a set of 'reference species' to anchor their comparative analyses. These reference species should be chosen not just for practical advantages, but also with regard for their phylogenetic position, behavioral repertoire, well-annotated genome, or other strategic reasons. We envision that the nervous systems of these reference species will be mapped in more detail than those of other species. The collected data may range from the molecular to the behavioral, depending on the research question. To integrate across levels of analysis and across species, standards for data collection, annotation, archiving, and distribution must be developed and respected. To that end, it will help to form networks or consortia of researchers and centers for science, technology, and education that focus on organized data collection, distribution, and training. These activities could be supported

  11. Perceptions of Interns and General Medicine Examiners Regarding Cardiovascular Case Presentation in Practical Exams of General Medicine in Final MBBS Summative Examinations.

    PubMed

    Dambal, Archana; Nimbal, Naren; Rekha, M C; Patil, Giridhar; Padaki, Samata; Dambal, Amrut; Pise, Gajanan; Kalsad, S T

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of cardiovascular cases in practical exit exam is limited to simple history taking and physical examination. Standards of assessment are not uniform. This makes assessment less valid and reliable. To explore the perceptions of Internees and General Medicine Examiners about current practices in Cardio Vascular system (CVS) case presentation in final MBBS exit exams and the necessity to change some of the practices. A set questions pertaining to the preparation for exams, validity, reliability, feasibility and educational impact were prepared to guide in obtaining the perceptions of internees and internal medicine examiners. Focus group discussions were conducted. Data Analysis was done by immersion-crystallization process. Most of the internees admitted to feeling concerned because of difficulty in diagnosing murmurs by auscultation. Most of the examiners felt concerned about the logistics involved in arranging practical exams. Both admitted to the lack of uniform standards in assessment. Both agreed that the present system thrived as it was relatively feasible. Some internees suggested that the exam may be conducted in two parts by splitting the syllabus instead of once. Some internees suggested incorporating a student-doctor program to improve practical skills just like the on-going student nurse program. There is a need for overhauling the assessment of cardiovascular system in final MBBS summative exams towards one aligned to the competencies as required in an Indian Medical Graduate. Blueprinting of practical assessment with due weightage assigned to epidemiologically important topics is the need of the hour.

  12. Perceptions of Interns and General Medicine Examiners Regarding Cardiovascular Case Presentation in Practical Exams of General Medicine in Final MBBS Summative Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Nimbal, Naren; Rekha, M C; Patil, Giridhar; Padaki, Samata; Dambal, Amrut; Pise, Gajanan; Kalsad, S T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of cardiovascular cases in practical exit exam is limited to simple history taking and physical examination. Standards of assessment are not uniform. This makes assessment less valid and reliable. Aim To explore the perceptions of Internees and General Medicine Examiners about current practices in Cardio Vascular system (CVS) case presentation in final MBBS exit exams and the necessity to change some of the practices. Materials and Methods A set questions pertaining to the preparation for exams, validity, reliability, feasibility and educational impact were prepared to guide in obtaining the perceptions of internees and internal medicine examiners. Focus group discussions were conducted. Data Analysis was done by immersion-crystallization process. Results Most of the internees admitted to feeling concerned because of difficulty in diagnosing murmurs by auscultation. Most of the examiners felt concerned about the logistics involved in arranging practical exams. Both admitted to the lack of uniform standards in assessment. Both agreed that the present system thrived as it was relatively feasible. Some internees suggested that the exam may be conducted in two parts by splitting the syllabus instead of once. Some internees suggested incorporating a student-doctor program to improve practical skills just like the on-going student nurse program. Conclusion There is a need for overhauling the assessment of cardiovascular system in final MBBS summative exams towards one aligned to the competencies as required in an Indian Medical Graduate. Blueprinting of practical assessment with due weightage assigned to epidemiologically important topics is the need of the hour. PMID:26816933

  13. Ecosystem management: Principles and applications. Volume 2. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.E.; Bourgeron, P.S.

    1994-02-01

    The document provides land managers with practical suggestions for implementing ecosystem management. It contains 28 papers organized into five sections; historical perspectives, ecological principles, sampling design, case studies, and implementation strategies.

  14. Stochastic Geomorphology: A Framework for Creating General Principles on Erosion and Sedimentation in River Basins (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    Stochastic geomorphology refers to the interaction of the stochastic field of sediment supply with hierarchically branching river networks where erosion, sediment flux and sediment storage are described by their probability densities. There are a number of general principles (hypotheses) that stem from this conceptual and numerical framework that may inform the science of erosion and sedimentation in river basins. Rainstorms and other perturbations, characterized by probability distributions of event frequency and magnitude, stochastically drive sediment influx to channel networks. The frequency-magnitude distribution of sediment supply that is typically skewed reflects strong interactions among climate, topography, vegetation, and geotechnical controls that vary between regions; the distribution varies systematically with basin area and the spatial pattern of erosion sources. Probability densities of sediment flux and storage evolve from more to less skewed forms downstream in river networks due to the convolution of the population of sediment sources in a watershed that should vary with climate, network patterns, topography, spatial scale, and degree of erosion asynchrony. The sediment flux and storage distributions are also transformed downstream due to diffusion, storage, interference, and attrition. In stochastic systems, the characteristically pulsed sediment supply and transport can create translational or stationary-diffusive valley and channel depositional landforms, the geometries of which are governed by sediment flux-network interactions. Episodic releases of sediment to the network can also drive a system memory reflected in a Hurst Effect in sediment yields and thus in sedimentological records. Similarly, discreet events of punctuated erosion on hillslopes can lead to altered surface and subsurface properties of a population of erosion source areas that can echo through time and affect subsequent erosion and sediment flux rates. Spatial patterns of

  15. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  16. Doctors as patients: postal survey examining consultants and general practitioners adherence to guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Malcolm; Calnan, Michael; Wall, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To examine the adherence by senior NHS medical staff to the BMA guidelines on the ethical responsibilities of doctors towards themselves and their families. Design Postal semistructured questionnaire. Setting Four randomly selected NHS trusts and three local medical committees in South Thames region. Subjects Consultants and principals in general practice. Main outcome measures Personal use of health services. Results The response rate was 64% (724) for general practitioners and 72% (427) for consultants after three mailings. Most (1106, 96%) respondents were registered with a general practitioner, although little use was made of their services. 159 (26%) general practitioners were registered with a general practitioner in their own practice and 80 (11%) admitted to looking after members of their family. 73 (24%) consultants would never see their general practitioner before obtaining consultant advice. Most consultants and general practitioners admitted to prescribing for themselves and their family. Responses to vignettes for different health problems indicated a general reluctance to take time off, but there were differences between consultants and general practitioners and by sex. Views on improvements needed included the possibility of a “doctor’s doctor,” access to out of area secondary care, an occupational health service for general practitioners, and regular health check ups. Conclusion The guidelines are largely not being followed, perhaps because of the difficulties of obtaining access to general practitioners outside working hours. The occupational health service should be expanded and a general practitioner service for NHS staff piloted. Key messagesSenior doctors are not following the BMA guidelines on looking after their own and their families’ healthThey seem very reluctant to consult their general practitioner They prefer to self treat, carry on working, and consult informallyPotential barriers to access should be removed in order

  17. Predicting Scores on the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations from Scores Earned on the American College Test (ACT) Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmer, Donald N.; Shakiba-Nejad, Hadi

    The study was conducted to provide formulae by which College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examination scores may be predicted from scores earned on the American College Test (ACT) Assessment. Five basic areas of liberal arts achievement are measured by the CLEP General Examinations: English Composition, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural…

  18. Examining the Psychometric Properties of the Achievement Goal Questionnaire in a General Academic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Sara J.; Pieper, Suzanne L.; Barron, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ), when modified for a general academic context, were examined. Previous research has found evidence of a four-factor structure of achievement goal orientation when this measure was used in a course-specific context. This study is an important addition to goal orientation…

  19. Examining Teacher Use of Praise Taught during Behavioral Consultation: Implementation and Generalization Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffee, Gina; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we examined the extent to which teachers implement and generalize a praise intervention learned during behavioral consultation. Four elementary teachers and 15 of their students (3-4 per teacher) participated in the study. In each classroom, 1 student was randomly assigned as the consultation target student, 1 as the generalization…

  20. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  1. Educational Principles and Techniques for Interpreters. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report PNW-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulanger, F. David; Smith, John P.

    This guide, designed for use by educators and interpreters, outlines principles and techniques for effective talks and discussions. Four main headings are included. The first, Introduction, describes the major premises of the guide, mainly (1) teaching is an art as well as a skill; (2) teaching involves a relationship between teacher and learner…

  2. Predictions in the light of your own action repertoire as a general computational principle.

    PubMed

    König, Peter; Wilming, Niklas; Kaspar, Kai; Nagel, Saskia K; Onat, Selim

    2013-06-01

    We argue that brains generate predictions only within the constraints of the action repertoire. This makes the computational complexity tractable and fosters a step-by-step parallel development of sensory and motor systems. Hence, it is more of a benefit than a literal constraint and may serve as a universal normative principle to understand sensorimotor coupling and interactions with the world.

  3. Education in Vietnam: Fundamental Principles and Curricula. General Information Series, No. 3. Indochinese Refugee Education Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA.

    This guide reconstructs the curricula taught in Vietnam at the elementary level. It includes the underlying educational principles and lists the subjects along with the number of hours they are taught. The curriculum for each of the first five compulsory grades is presented separately, and four charts give overall statistics. The intent of the…

  4. The effect of a forensic fellowship program on general psychiatry residents' in-training examination outcomes.

    PubMed

    McBain, Stacy M; Hinton, Jeremy A; Thrush, Carol R; Williams, D Keith; Guise, J Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the establishment and existence of a forensic psychiatry fellowship program was associated with improvements in general psychiatry residents' scores on the Psychiatry Resident In-training Examination (PRITE). Four consecutive years of general psychiatry residents' PRITE scores spanning 2 years before and 2 years after implementation of the forensic fellowship program at our institution were compared. Mixed-model statistical analyses accounting for repeated measurements of individual residents across the periods indicated statistically significant improvement in forensic content scores and several other subspecialty areas in which our institution offers educational fellowship programs. External indicators of program outcomes such as standardized examination scores may provide a useful indication of the effects that an educational fellowship program can have on general psychiatry education.

  5. A Life Below the Threshold?: Examining Conflict Between Ethical Principles and Parental Values in Neonatal Treatment Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Thomas V

    2016-01-01

    Three common ethical principles for establishing the limits of parental authority in pediatric treatment decision-making are the harm principle, the principle of best interest, and the threshold view. This paper considers how these principles apply to a case of a premature neonate with multiple significant co-morbidities whose mother wanted all possible treatments, and whose health care providers wondered whether it would be ethically permissible to allow him to die comfortably despite her wishes. Whether and how these principles help in understanding what was morally right for the child is questioned. The paper concludes that the principles were of some value in understanding the moral geography of the case; however, this case reveals that common bioethical principles for medical decision-making are problematically value-laden because they are inconsistent with the widespread moral value of medical vitalism.

  6. General principles of describing second- and higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashenko, A. T.; Veselovsky, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    General principles of describing secondand higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field are formulated. The potential near a second-order null of the general form can be specified by a linear combination of four basic functions, the list of which is presented. Near secondand higher-order null points, field line equations often cannot be integrated analytically; however, in some cases, it is possible to present a qualitative description of the geometry of null vicinities with consideration of the behavior of field lines near rays outgoing from null, at which the field is radial or equals zero.

  7. Proposal to change General Consideration 5 and Principle 2 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Garrity, George M

    2014-01-01

    A proposal is submitted to the ICSP to change the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), deleting the words Schizophycetes, Cyanophyceae and Cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is covered by the Code. It is further proposed to change the terms Zoological Code and International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in General Consideration 5 and in Principle 2 to International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, respectively.

  8. The linear co-variance between joint muscle torques is not a generalized principle.

    PubMed

    Sande de Souza, Luciane Aparecida Pascucci; Dionísio, Valdeci Carlos; Lerena, Mario Adrian Misailidis; Marconi, Nadia Fernanda; Almeida, Gil Lúcio

    2009-06-01

    In 1996, Gottlieb et al. [Gottlieb GL, Song Q, Hong D, Almeida GL, Corcos DM. Coordinating movement at two joints: A principle of linear covariance. J Neurophysiol 1996;75(4):1760-4] identified a linear co-variance between the joint muscle torques generated at two connected joints. The joint muscle torques changed directions and magnitudes in a synchronized and linear fashion and called it the principle of linear co-variance. Here we showed that this principle cannot hold for some class of movements. Neurologically normal subjects performed multijoint movements involving elbow and shoulder with reversal towards three targets in the sagittal plane without any constraints. The movement kinematics was calculated using the X and Y coordinates of the markers positioned over the joints. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate the joint muscle, interaction and net torques. We found that for the class of voluntary movements analyzed, the joint muscle torques of the elbow and the shoulder were not linearly correlated. The same was observed for the interaction torques. But, the net torques at both joints, i.e., the sum of the interaction and the joint muscle torques were linearly correlated. We showed that by decoupling the joint muscle torques, but keeping the net torques linearly correlated, the CNS was able to generate fast and accurate movements with straight fingertip paths. The movement paths were typical of the ones in which the joint muscle torques were linearly correlated.

  9. Examining the robustness of first-principles calculations for metal hydride reaction thermodynamics by detection of metastable reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Kulkarni, Anant D; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2011-12-28

    First principles calculations have played a useful role in screening mixtures of complex metal hydrides to find systems suitable for H(2) storage applications. Standard methods for this task efficiently identify the lowest energy reaction mechanisms among all possible reactions involving collections of materials for which DFT calculations have been performed. The resulting mechanism can potentially differ from physical reality due to inaccuracies in the DFT functionals used, or due to other approximations made in estimating reaction free energies. We introduce an efficient method to probe the robustness of DFT-based predictions that relies on identifying reactions that are metastable relative to the lowest energy reaction path predicted with DFT. An important conclusion of our calculations is that in many examples DFT cannot unambiguously predict a single reaction mechanism for a well defined metal hydride mixture because two or more mechanisms have reaction energies that differ by a small amount. Our approach is illustrated by analyzing a series of single step reactions identified in our recent work that examined reactions with a large database of solids [Kim et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 7218].

  10. General hypothesis for nanowire synthesis. I. Extended principles and evidential (experimental and theoretical) demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2011-09-01

    Nanowires, nanotubes, and nanodots (quantum dots) are nanomaterials (NMTs). While nanodots are miniaturized nanowires, nanotubes are hollow nanowires. A universal model for basic science of the synthesis and characteristics of NMTs must be established. To achieve this goal, a general hypothesis has been presented. This hypothesis makes use of the concept of droplets from seeds, the fundamentals of the adhesive properties of droplets, and a set of droplet characteristics. Fundamentals underlying the droplet formation from nanoparticle seeds under various physicochemical and thermodynamic conditions have been articulated. A model of thermodynamic imbalance of seeds at the growth temperature has been formulated. The dependence of thermodynamic imbalance on parameters such as surface energy, temperature, seed dimension, etc. has been described. The role of thermodynamic imbalance of seeds and of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) on NMT growth has been examined. Three different NMT growths, namely, FECA-free NMT growth; FECA-mediated non-eutectic NMT growth; and FECA-mediated eutectic NMT growth, have been considered. FECA-free NMT growth, and non-eutectic but FECA-mediated NMT growth, have been assumed to involve nanopores, grains, and grain boundaries in the seed. The basic science of all the NMT growths utilizes the concept of the creation of tiny component droplets (CODs). Extensive evidential (experimental and theoretical) demonstration of the hypothesis has been put forth. Both theoretical and experimental results lend support to the hypothesis. Calculated results address the roles of both the FECA-mediated and FECA-free droplets for NMT growths. The basics of multiple nucleation and biphasic structures have been spelled out. Possible relationship between the activation energy and the precursor decomposition on the droplet surface at the lowest possible temperature has been elucidated. The differences between the eutectic and no-eutectic seeds, the

  11. Cervical screening and general physical examination behaviors of women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Camp, Elizabeth A; Coker, Ann L; Troisi, Rebecca; Robboy, Stanley J; Noller, Kenneth L; Goodman, Karen J; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda T; Hatch, Elizabeth E; Herbst, Arthur L; Kaufman, Raymond H; Adam, Ervin

    2008-04-01

    To estimate whether women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol (DES) report receiving more cervical and general physical examinations compared to unexposed women. 1994 Diethylstilbestrol Adenosis cohort data are used to assess the degree of recommended compliance of cervical screenings found in 3,140 DES-exposed and 826 unexposed women. Participants were enrolled at 4 sites: Houston, Boston, Rochester, and Los Angeles. Logistic regression modeling was used to analyze mailed questionnaire data, which included reported frequency over the preceding 5 years (1990-1994) of Papanicolaou smears and general physical examinations. Diethylstilbestrol-exposed women exceeded the recommended frequency of Papanicolaou smear screenings [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.15, 95% CI (confidence interval) = 1.60-2.88] compared to the unexposed. This association held among those without a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (aOR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.35-2.62). Diethylstilbestrol-exposed women exceeded annual recommendations for physical examinations (aOR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.16-4.43) among women without a history of chronic disease when compared to unexposed women. Most DES-exposed women are receiving cervical cancer screening at least at recommended intervals, but one third of the women are not receiving annual Papanicolaou smear examinations.

  12. Disasters and mass casualties: I. General principles of response and management.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Briggs, Susan M; Ciraulo, David L; Frykberg, Eric R; Hammond, Jeffrey S; Hirshberg, Asher; Lhowe, David W; O'Neill, Patricia A

    2007-07-01

    Disaster planning and response to a mass casualty incident pose unique demands on the medical community. Because they would be required to confront many casualties with bodily injury and surgical problems, surgeons in particular must become better educated in disaster management. Compared with routine practice, triage principles in disasters require an entirely different approach to evaluation and care and often run counter to training and ethical values. An effective response to disaster and mass casualty events should focus on an "all hazards" approach, defined as the ability to adapt and apply fundamental disaster management principles universally to any mass casualty incident, whether caused by people or nature. Organizational tools such as the Incident Command System and the Hospital Incident Command System help to effect a rapid and coordinated response to specific situations. The United States federal government, through the National Response Plan, has the responsibility to respond quickly and efficiently to catastrophic incidents and to ensure critical life-saving assistance. International medical surgical response teams are capable of providing medical, surgical, and intensive care services in austere environments anywhere in the world.

  13. Quantum statistical entropy and minimal length of 5D Ricci-flat black string with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Molin; Gui Yuanxing; Liu Hongya

    2008-12-15

    In this paper, we study the quantum statistical entropy in a 5D Ricci-flat black string solution, which contains a 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole on the brane, by using the improved thin-layer method with the generalized uncertainty principle. The entropy is the linear sum of the areas of the event horizon and the cosmological horizon without any cutoff and any constraint on the bulk's configuration rather than the usual uncertainty principle. The system's density of state and free energy are convergent in the neighborhood of horizon. The small-mass approximation is determined by the asymptotic behavior of metric function near horizons. Meanwhile, we obtain the minimal length of the position {delta}x, which is restrained by the surface gravities and the thickness of layer near horizons.

  14. Operant Principles Applied to the Acquisition and Generalization of Nonlittering Behavior in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Margaret M.

    The investigator felt that littering is a behavior contingent upon certain environmental conditions and that these conditions should be examined systematically. Specifically, this study sought to examine the effects of a behavior modification approach to littering with eight four-year-old subjects. Using token positive reinforcement, token…

  15. Generalized principles of stochasticity can be used to control dynamic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, David; Estévez-Salmerón, Luis; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2012-01-01

    It is increasingly appreciated that phenotypic stochasticity plays fundamental roles in biological systems at the cellular level and that a variety of mechanisms generates phenotypic interconversion over a broad range of time scales. The ensuing dynamic heterogeneity can be used to understand biological and clinical processes involving diverse phenotypes in different cell populations. The same principles can be applied, not only to populations composed of cells, but also to populations composed of molecules, tissues, and multicellular organisms. Stochastic units generating dynamic heterogeneity can be integrated across various length scales. We propose that a graphical tool we have developed, called a metronomogram, will allow us to identify factors that suitably influence the restoration of homeostatic heterogeneity so as to modulate the consequences of dynamic heterogeneity for desired outcomes. PMID:23197162

  16. [Organization of experimental microsurgery research at the General Hospital in Maribor--principles and personal experience].

    PubMed

    Bervar, M; Bunc, G

    1991-01-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the organization of experimental microsurgical activities from the standpoint of their own experience. Their opinion is that elementary microsurgical technique and routine could be obtained only in the experimental laboratory. Each institution dealing with microsurgery should organize such a functional unit. The importance of an experimental laboratory is not only for education, but also for basic microsurgical research. To attain adequate results, specially in nonclinical institutions, it is necessary to follow consequently clearly defined principles of organization and provide adequate conditions. The competence of such a concept is illustrated with the results of the authors' own researches during 1987. They completed 44 microvascular anastomoses in rats, on vessels of approximately 1 mm in diameter and obtained initial and early patency rates of 88.6 and 93.2% respectively. These patency rates could be sufficient for the safe clinical application of the microvascular technique.

  17. [Multimorbidity in general practice and the Ariadne principles. A person-centred approach].

    PubMed

    Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Del Cura-González, Isabel; Prados-Torres, Juan Daniel; Leiva-Fernández, Francisca; López-Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Muth, Christiane

    2017-05-01

    Multimorbidity, defined as the coexistence of two or more chronic conditions in one same individual, has negative consequences for people suffering from it and it poses a real challenge for health systems. In primary care, where most of these patients are attended, the clinical management of multimorbidity can be a complex task due, among others, to the high volume of clinical information that needs to be handled, the scarce scientific evidence available to approach multimorbidity, and the need for coordination among multiple health providers to guarantee continuity of care. Moreover, the adequate implementation of the care plan in these patients requires a process of shared decision making between patient and physician. One of the available tools to support this process, which is specifically directed to patients with multimorbidity in primary care, is described in the present article: the Ariadne principles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diseases of civilization and a nosological principle of medicine in terms of general pathology].

    PubMed

    Khitrov, N K; Saltykov, A B

    2003-01-01

    The last 100-150 years are marked by the spread of so-called "diseases of civilization" (primarily psychosomatic and mental diseases) which earlier have been encountered rarely. These diseases present quite novel pathogenic factors, adaptation to which in the course of evolution is lacking. Development of civilization constantly stimulates the emergence of numerous qualitatively new pathogenic factors, on the one hand, and changes the conditions for impact of conventional factors, on the other hand. This process is becoming more and more intensive and makes the sequence "cause-specific pathogenesis-clinical symptoms-nosological unity-relevant etiotropic and pathogenetic treatment" less obvious. From this follow difficulties in application of routine methods of diagnosis, etiotropic and pathogenetic therapy based on the nosological principle as well as interest to methods of "alternative' (complementary) medicine which are nonspecific and, therefore, in some cases effective against some "diseases of civilization".

  19. Water, Resilience and the Law: From General Concepts and Governance Design Principles to Actionable Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill Clarvis, M.; Allan, A.; Hannah, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has significant ramifications for water law and governance, yet, there is strong evidence that legal regulations have often failed to protect environments or promote sustainable development. Scholars have increasingly suggested that the preservation and restoration paradigms of legislation and regulation are no longer adequate for climate change related challenges in complex and cross-scale social-ecological systems. This is namely due to past assumptions of stationarity, uniformitarianism and the perception of ecosystem change as predictable and reversible. This paper reviews the literature on law and resilience and then presents and discusses a set of practical examples of legal mechanisms from the water resources management sector, identified according to a set of guiding principles from the literature on adaptive capacity, adaptive governance as well as adaptive and integrated water resources management. It then assesses the aptness of these different measures according to scientific evidence of increased uncertainty and changing ecological baselines. A review of the best practice examples demonstrates that there are a number of best practice examples attempting to integrate adaptive elements of flexibility, iterativity, connectivity and subsidiarity into a variety of legislative mechanisms, suggesting that there is not as significant a tension between resilience and the law as many scholars have suggested. However, while many of the mechanisms may indeed be suitable for addressing challenges relating to current levels of change and uncertainty, analysis across a broader range of uncertainty highlights challenges relating to more irreversible changes associated with greater levels of warming. Furthermore the paper identifies a set of pre-requisites that are fundamental to the successful implementation of such mechanisms, namely monitoring and data sharing, financial and technical capacity, particularly in nations that are most at risk with the

  20. Examining the latent structure of worry and generalized anxiety in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Kertz, Sarah J; McHugh, R Kathryn; Lee, Josephine; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2014-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by "pathological" worry, suggesting that GAD worriers differ qualitatively from non-GAD worriers. However, results from taxometric studies of worry in undergraduate and community samples have been mixed and to date, no studies have utilized clinical samples. The current study examined the latent structure of worry and GAD symptoms in a diagnostically heterogeneous clinical sample. Indicators were selected from the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated (n=1175) and the GAD-7 (n=638) and submitted to three taxometric procedures: MAXCOV, MAMBAC, and L-Mode. Results from all three procedures suggested that both worry and generalized anxiety are best conceptualized as dimensional constructs. Findings also indicated that ongoing conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of worry and GAD may be hampered by the application of a categorical framework.

  1. Increasing opportunistic oral cancer screening examinations: findings from focus groups with general dentists in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Psoter, Walter J; Morse, Douglas E; Sánchez-Ayendez, Melba; Vega, Carmen M Vélez; Aguilar, Maria L; Buxó-Martinez, Carmen J; Psoter, Jodi A; Kerr, Alexander R; Lane, Christina M; Scaringi, Vincent J; Elias, Augusto

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to identify educational and training modalities that dentists in Puerto Rico (PR) believe will increase the quality and quantity of opportunistic oral cancer screening examinations (OCS) in dental offices on the island. The study was conducted in three phases: a systematic search of relevant literature, an expert review and consensus panel, and focus groups (FG) involving PR general dentists. To increase OCS by dentists in PR, the FG participants proposed a small group, hands-on OCS training, an integrated oral cancer course, and readily available videos, photographs, and computer simulations to further demonstrate OCS performance and facilitate differential diagnosis. OCS training requirements for licensure and re-licensure, improving OCS dentist-patient communication skills, and establishment of an oral lesion referral center were also viewed favorably. In conclusion, general dentists in our FGs believed the quality and quantity of OCS in Puerto Rico can be increased through the application of specific continuing education and training modalities.

  2. Increasing opportunistic oral cancer screening examinations: findings from focus groups with general dentists in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Psoter, Walter J.; Morse, Douglas E.; Sánchez-Ayendez, Melba; Vega, Carmen M Vélez; Aguilar, Maria L.; Buxó-Martinez, Carmen J; Psoter, Jodi A.; Kerr, Alexander R.; Lane, Christina M.; Scaringi, Vincent J; Elias, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify educational and training modalities that dentists in Puerto Rico (PR) believe will increase the quality and quantity of opportunistic oral cancer screening examinations (OCS) in dental offices on the island. Methods The study was conducted in three phases: a systematic search of relevant literature, an expert review and consensus panel, and focus groups (FG) involving PR general dentists. Results To increase OCS by dentists in PR, the FG participants proposed small group, hands-on OCS training, an integrated oral cancer course, and readily-available videos, photographs, and computer simulations to further demonstrate OCS performance and facilitate differential diagnosis. OCS training requirements for licensure and relicensure, improving OCS dentist-patient communication skills, and establishment of an oral lesion referral center were also viewed favorably. Conclusions General dentists in our FGs believed the quality and quantity of OCS in Puerto Rico can be increased through the application of specific continuing education and training modalities. PMID:24894606

  3. Ehrenfest principle and unitary dynamics of quantum-classical systems with general potential interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjić, M.; Popović, D. B.; Prvanović, S.; Burić, N.

    2014-02-01

    Representation of classical dynamics by unitary transformations has been used to develop a unified description of hybrid classical-quantum systems with a particular type of interaction, and to formulate abstract systems interpolating between classical and quantum ones. We solved the problem of a unitary description of two interpolating systems with general potential interaction. The general solution is used to show that with arbitrary potential interaction between the two interpolating systems the evolution of the so-called unobservable variables is decoupled from that of the observable ones if and only if the interpolation parameters in the two interpolating systems are equal.

  4. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 312.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Investigational New Drug Application... the general investigational plan and the protocols for specific human studies. Subsequent...

  5. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 312.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Investigational New Drug Application... the general investigational plan and the protocols for specific human studies. Subsequent...

  6. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 312.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Investigational New Drug Application... the general investigational plan and the protocols for specific human studies. Subsequent...

  7. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 312.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Investigational New Drug Application... the general investigational plan and the protocols for specific human studies. Subsequent...

  8. 12 CFR 621.3 - Application of generally accepted accounting principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... records of its business transactions as necessary to prepare financial statements and reports, including... books and records in such a manner as to facilitate reconciliation with financial statements and reports... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of generally accepted accounting...

  9. Generalization of the Aoki-Yoshikawa sectoral productivity model based on extreme physical information principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Ilona; Makowski, Marcin; Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan; Syska, Jacek

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a continuous variable generalization of the Aoki-Yoshikawa sectoral productivity model. Information theoretical methods from the Frieden-Soffer extreme physical information statistical estimation methodology were used to construct exact solutions. Both approaches coincide in first order approximation. The approach proposed here can be successfully applied in other fields of research.

  10. The equivalence principle as a stepping stone from special to general relativity: A Socratic dialog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    We show how students can be led to an understanding of the connection between special relativity and general relativity by considering the time dilation effect of clocks placed on the surface of the Earth. This paper is written as a Socratic dialog between a lecturer and a student.

  11. Threatened miscarriage in general practice: diagnostic value of history taking and physical examination.

    PubMed Central

    Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet; Bonsel, Gouke J; Ankum, Willem M; Vos, Jeroen; Bindels, Patrick J E

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasonography, the gold standard for establishing a diagnosis in first-trimester vaginal bleeding, is not always readily avaliable. Medical history and gynaecological examination are then used instead, to make a provisional diagnosis. AIM: To determine the diagnostic value of history taking and physical examination in first-trimester bleeding, to differentiate between patients requiring immediate further diagnostic examination from those in whom an expectant policy will initially suffice. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective population-based cohort study. SETTING: Seventy-four general practices in Amsterdam. METHOD: Two hundred and twenty-five patients with first trimester vaginal bleeding were referred for an early pregnancy assessment. The data from 204 patients were analysed. Two diagnostic models were constructed based on symptoms and the results of gynaecological examination to identify diagnostic subgroups relevant to clinical practice. RESULTS: Model 1, which separates viable pregnancies from other diagnoses, increased pre-test probability from 47% to a post-test probability of 70%. Model 2, which enabled the identification of complete miscarriages, resulted in a post-test probability of 41% of a complete miscarriage, given a pre-test sample probability of 25%. The tentative diagnosis of a general practitioner, based entirely on clinical judgement, turned out to be a poor predictor for the ultrasonographically confirmed diagnosis (pre-test probability of 47% changed to a post-test probability of 58%). CONCLUSION: This study shows that, in first trimester bleeding, neither statistical prediction models based on signs and symptoms, nor clinical judgement, are valid replacements for ultrasonographic assessment in establishing a diagnosis. PMID:12392123

  12. Extending the generality of leaf economic design principles in the cycads, an ancient lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Cao, Kun-Fang; Sack, Lawren; Li, Nan; Wei, Xue-Mei; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    Cycads are the most ancient lineage of living seed plants, but the design of their leaves has received little study. We tested whether cycad leaves are governed by the same fundamental design principles previously established for ferns, conifers and angiosperms, and characterized the uniqueness of this relict lineage in foliar trait relationships. Leaf structure, photosynthesis, hydraulics and nutrient composition were studied in 33 cycad species from nine genera and three families growing in two botanical gardens. Cycads varied greatly in leaf structure and physiology. Similarly to other lineages, light-saturated photosynthetic rate per mass (Am ) was related negatively to leaf mass per area and positively to foliar concentrations of chlorophyll, nitrogen (N), phosphorus and iron, but unlike angiosperms, leaf photosynthetic rate was not associated with leaf hydraulic conductance. Cycads had lower photosynthetic N use efficiency and higher photosynthetic performance relative to hydraulic capacity compared with other lineages. These findings extend the relationships shown for foliar traits in angiosperms to the cycads. This functional convergence supports the modern synthetic understanding of leaf design, with common constraints operating across lineages, even as they highlight exceptional aspects of the biology of this key relict lineage.

  13. 76 FR 69333 - Derivatives Clearing Organization General Provisions and Core Principles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (Commission) is adopting final regulations to implement certain provisions of Title VII and Title VIII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) governing derivatives clearing organization (DCO) activities. More specifically, the regulations establish the regulatory standards for compliance with DCO Core Principles A (Compliance), B (Financial Resources), C (Participant and Product Eligibility), D (Risk Management), E (Settlement Procedures), F (Treatment of Funds), G (Default Rules and Procedures), H (Rule Enforcement), I (System Safeguards), J (Reporting), K (Recordkeeping), L (Public Information), M (Information Sharing), N (Antitrust Considerations), and R (Legal Risk) set forth in Section 5b of the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA). The Commission also is updating and adding related definitions; adopting implementing rules for DCO chief compliance officers (CCOs); revising procedures for DCO applications including the required use of a new Form DCO; adopting procedural rules applicable to the transfer of a DCO registration; and adding requirements for approval of DCO rules establishing a portfolio margining program for customer accounts carried by a futures commission merchant (FCM) that is also registered as a securities broker-dealer (FCM/BD). In addition, the Commission is adopting certain technical amendments to parts 21 and 39, and is adopting certain delegation provisions under part 140.

  14. The effect of generalized uncertainty principle on square well, a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Meng-Sen; Zhao, Ren

    2014-08-15

    According to a special case (β = 0) of the generalized uncertainty relation we derive the energy eigenvalues of the infinite potential well. It is shown that the obtained energy levels are different from the usual result with some correction terms. And the correction terms of the energy eigenvalues are independent of other parameters except α. But the eigenstates will depend on another two parameters besides α.

  15. Do general relativistic effects limit experiments to test the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, Anna M.

    2016-12-01

    The universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle, which are at the basis of general relativity, have been confirmed to 1 part in 1 013. Space experiments with macroscopic test masses of different composition orbiting Earth inside a low altitude satellite aim to improve this precision by 2 orders of magnitude (with the Microscope satellite launched on April 25, 2016) and up to 4 orders of magnitude (with the Galileo Galilei satellite). At such a high precision, many tiny effects must be taken into account in order to be ruled out as the source of a spurious violation signal. In this work, we investigate the general relativistic effects, including those which involve the rotation of both Earth and the test masses, and show that they are by far too small to be considered even in the most challenging experiment.

  16. A Z{sub 3} generalization of Pauli's principle, quark algebra and the Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, Richard

    2012-09-24

    The fundamental difference between bosons and fermions is that they obey two alternative representations of the Z{sub 2} group, resulting in symmetric or anti-symmetric binary commutation relations. Our aim is to explore possibilities offered by ternary Z{sub 3} generalization commutation relations. This leads to cubic and ternary algebras which are a direct generalization of usual commutation relations, with Z{sub 3}-grading replacing the usual Z{sub 2}-grading. Properties and structure of such algebras are discussed, with special interest in a low-dimensional one, with two generators. Invariant cubic forms on such algebras are introduced, and it is shown how the SL(2,C) group arises naturally as the symmetry group preserving these forms. In the case of lowest dimension, with only two generators, it is shown how the cubic combinations of elements of the same Z{sub 3} grade behave like Lorentz spinors, while binary products of elements of this algebra with an element of the conjugate algebra behave like Lorentz vectors. The wave equation generalizing the Dirac operator to the Z{sub 3}-graded case is introduced, whose diagonalization leads to a third-order equation. The solutions of this equation cannot propagate because their exponents always contain non-oscillating real damping factor. We show how certain cubic products can propagate nevertheless. The model suggests the origin of the color SU(3) symmetry obeyed by quark states.

  17. Ablation of multi-wavelet re-entry: general principles and in silico analyses.

    PubMed

    Spector, Peter S; Correa de Sa, Daniel D; Tischler, Ethan S; Thompson, Nathaniel C; Habel, Nicole; Stinnett-Donnelly, Justin; Benson, Bryce E; Bielau, Philipp; Bates, Jason H T

    2012-11-01

    Catheter ablation strategies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias are quite successful when targeting spatially constrained substrates. Complex, dynamic, and spatially varying substrates, however, pose a significant challenge for ablation, which delivers spatially fixed lesions. We describe tissue excitation using concepts of surface topology which provides a framework for addressing this challenge. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of mechanism-based ablation strategies in the setting of complex dynamic substrates. We used a computational model of propagation through electrically excitable tissue to test the effects of ablation on excitation patterns of progressively greater complexity, from fixed rotors to multi-wavelet re-entry. Our results indicate that (i) focal ablation at a spiral-wave core does not result in termination; (ii) termination requires linear lesions from the tissue edge to the spiral-wave core; (iii) meandering spiral-waves terminate upon collision with a boundary (linear lesion or tissue edge); (iv) the probability of terminating multi-wavelet re-entry is proportional to the ratio of total boundary length to tissue area; (v) the efficacy of linear lesions varies directly with the regional density of spiral-waves. We establish a theoretical framework for re-entrant arrhythmias that explains the requirements for their successful treatment. We demonstrate the inadequacy of focal ablation for spatially fixed spiral-waves. Mechanistically guided principles for ablating multi-wavelet re-entry are provided. The potential to capitalize upon regional heterogeneity of spiral-wave density for improved ablation efficacy is described.

  18. Intensive care and pregnancy: Epidemiology and general principles of management of obstetrics ICU patients during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zieleskiewicz, Laurent; Chantry, Anne; Duclos, Gary; Bourgoin, Aurelie; Mignon, Alexandre; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Leone, Marc

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries, the rate of obstetric ICU admissions (admission during pregnancy or the postpartum period) is between 0.5 and 4 per 1000 deliveries and the overall case-fatality rate is about 2%. The most two common causes of obstetric ICU admissions concerned direct obstetric pathologies: obstetric hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. This review summarized the principles of management of critically ill pregnant patient. Its imply taking care of two patients in the same time. A coordinated multidisciplinary team including intensivists, anesthesiologists, obstetricians, pediatricians and pharmacists is therefore necessary. This team must work effectively together with regular staff aiming to evaluate daily the need to maintain the patient in intensive care unit or to prompt delivery. Keeping mother and baby together and fetal well-being must be balanced with the need of specialized advanced life support for the mother. The maternal physiological changes imply various consequences on management. The uterus aorto-caval compression implies tilting left the parturient. In case of cardiac arrest, uterus displacement and urgent cesarean delivery are needed. The high risk of aspiration and difficult tracheal intubation must be anticipated. Even during acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypoxemia and permissive hypercapnia must be avoided due to their negative impact on the fetus. Careful analysis of the benefit-risk ratio is needed before all drug administration. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and perineal fasciitis must be feared and a high level of suspicion of sepsis must be maintained. Finally the potential benefits of an ultrasound-based management are detailed.

  19. Generalization of the variational principle and the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems for excited states of Fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonis, A.

    2017-01-01

    Through the entanglement of a collection of K non-interacting replicas of a system of N interacting Fermions, and making use of the properties of reduced density matrices the variational principle and the theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn are generalized to excited states. The generalization of the variational principle makes use of the natural orbitals of an N-particle density matrix describing the state of lowest energy of the entangled state. The extension of the theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn is based on the ground-state formulation of density functional theory but with a new interpretation of the concept of a ground state: It is the state of lowest energy of a system of KN Fermions that is described in terms of the excited states of the N-particle interacting system. This straightforward implementation of the line of reasoning of ground-state density functional theory to a new domain leads to a unique and logically valid extension of the theory to excited states that allows the systematic treatment of all states in the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of an interacting system.

  20. Lipid Cooperativity as a General Membrane-Recruitment Principle for PH Domains.

    PubMed

    Vonkova, Ivana; Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Deghou, Samy; Anand, Kanchan; Ceschia, Stefano; Doerks, Tobias; Galih, Augustinus; Kugler, Karl G; Maeda, Kenji; Rybin, Vladimir; van Noort, Vera; Ellenberg, Jan; Bork, Peer; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Many cellular processes involve the recruitment of proteins to specific membranes, which are decorated with distinctive lipids that act as docking sites. The phosphoinositides form signaling hubs, and we examine mechanisms underlying recruitment. We applied a physiological, quantitative, liposome microarray-based assay to measure the membrane-binding properties of 91 pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, the most common phosphoinositide-binding target. 10,514 experiments quantified the role of phosphoinositides in membrane recruitment. For most domains examined, the observed binding specificity implied cooperativity with additional signaling lipids. Analyses of PH domains with similar lipid-binding profiles identified a conserved motif, mutations in which-including some found in human cancers-induced discrete changes in binding affinities in vitro and protein mislocalization in vivo. The data set reveals cooperativity as a key mechanism for membrane recruitment and, by enabling the interpretation of disease-associated mutations, suggests avenues for the design of small molecules targeting PH domains.

  1. General principles, diversity of systems, and structure-property relationships in inorganic and organometallic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Allcock, H.R.

    1993-12-31

    Inorganic polymers are an emerging and expanding alternative and supplement to classical organic polymers and biopolymers. However, the synthetic reactions that lead to inorganic polymers differ in many essential ways from those of the organic counterparts. Moreover, the presence of inorganic elements in a polymer imposes new property combinations on the polymers and on the solid state materials derived from those polymers. This tutorial will review general concepts related to synthetic methods and structure-property relationships for a wide variety of polymers that contain silicon, boron, phosphorus, and other inorganic element as part of their structure.

  2. The Effects of Violating Standard Item Writing Principles on Tests and Students: The Consequences of Using Flawed Test Items on Achievement Examinations in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either…

  3. Proposition of an aging indicator from general health examination in France.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, René

    2002-03-01

    We present an indicator of aging based on eight quantitative variables, measured during the periodical health examination offered by French social security to the general population in France. The used sample derived from the population examined each year. We selected a reference group of 24,510 adults older than 25 years (non-smokers, drinking less than 44 g alcohol per day, with body mass index less than 35, and not using medication). A multiple regression analysis by gender was used to select significant variables to predict age from all quantitative variables measured during the health examination. The resulting biological age could be calculated from the measured variables and the aging indicator was defined as the difference between the calculated age and the chronological age. By definition, this indicator is independent of age in the reference population and gives an indication of the difference between an individual's status in the process of aging and the mean status of people of the same chronological age. Associations between this indicator and life style habits such as tobacco and alcohol use, and occupational status were observed. A geographical analysis also exhibited significant variation over France. Such an indicator can be used at the individual level as a pedagogical tool to explain the observed individual health status. It is also of interest for the epidemiological studies, where it could contribute to a better understanding of the aging process and associated factors.

  4. Examining the Attitudes of Secondary General Education and Special Education Teachers toward Inclusion of Children with Autism in General Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Morghan E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic environments, such as general education classrooms, have increasingly become important learning environments for children with autism. The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes of secondary general education and special education teachers toward inclusion of children with autism in general education classrooms. The research…

  5. Examining the Attitudes of Secondary General Education and Special Education Teachers toward Inclusion of Children with Autism in General Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Morghan E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic environments, such as general education classrooms, have increasingly become important learning environments for children with autism. The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes of secondary general education and special education teachers toward inclusion of children with autism in general education classrooms. The research…

  6. The refinement of a cultural standardized patient examination for a general surgery residency program.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Deptula, Peter; Morihara, Sarah; Jackson, David S

    2014-01-01

    Recent articles have documented the importance of cultural competency in surgery. Surgical residency programs have used the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations or cultural standardized patient examinations as a training tool. Past studies evaluating cultural competency have noted the importance of including an observational (control) arm, which would allow for a more objective assessment of a resident's competency in this area. The purpose of our article is to present the results of a follow-up study to a pilot cultural standardized patient examination for surgery residents. All first-year surgery residents were required to participate in the videotaped cultural SP examination as part of the general surgery residency curriculum. Two measures were used to assess resident performance. On the day of the examination, the Cross-Cultural Care Survey was administered. The examination was assessed by the residents themselves, faculty observers, and standardized patients, using a written checklist that was developed to evaluate residents on all 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. The current study includes 20 first-year surgery residents from academic years 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013. The examination of pretest differences in groups found that students born outside of the United States had significantly higher scores on attitude (t = -2.68, df = 18, p = 0.02), but no statistically significant differences were found in skillfulness or knowledge or in the overall rating scale. For the overall rating scale, change from pretest to posttest was statistically significant (t = -2.25, df = 18, p = 0.04). Further analysis revealed that students who were born in the United States demonstrated a significant increase in ratings (t = -3.08, df = 10, p = 0.01) whereas students who were not born in the United States showed little change (t = -0.35, df = 7, p = 0.74). These results show that the means in attitude scales changed little for all

  7. [Proficiency testing for chemical analytical laboratories--general principles concerning organization and assessment of results].

    PubMed

    Ludwicki, J K; Góralczyk, K; Czaja, K; Struciński, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to promote in Poland the effective response to the international food regulations and to enhance the ability of laboratories in proving their analytical quality assurance, some general guidelines for proficiency testing have been presented according to the internationally recognised protocol (IUPAC/ISO/AOAC The International Harmonized Protocol for Proficiency Testing). The objectives of proficiency testing and its importance for accreditation for analytical laboratories were also reviewed with the special emphasis given to those dealing with food analysis. The organization of interlaboratory trials and methods for statistical treatment of results were also described, as well as reporting of results and their statistical evaluation. The proficiency testing according to the above described rules are routinely performed by the Department of Environmental Toxicology of the National Institute of Hygiene for organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in food.

  8. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations with a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation-only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly reduces this error.

  9. An examination of generalized anxiety disorder and dysthymia utilizing the Rorschach inkblot method.

    PubMed

    Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle; Clements, Alyssa; Hilsenroth, Mark; Charnas, Jocelyn; Zodan, Jennifer

    2016-06-30

    This study examined transdiagnostic features of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and dysthymia in an outpatient clinical sample. Fifteen patients who met DSM-IV criteria for GAD and twenty-one patients who met DSM-IV criteria for dysthymia but who did not have comorbid anxiety disorder were evaluated utilizing the Rorschach. Salient clinical variables were then compared. Results showed that patients with GAD scored significantly higher on variables related to cognitive agitation and a desire/need for external soothing. In addition, there was a trend for patients with GAD to produce higher scores on a measure of ruminative focus on negative aspects of the self. Thus, not surprisingly, GAD patients' experienced more distress than the dysthymic patients. The implications of these findings are discussed with regards to better understanding the shared and distinct features of GAD and dysthymia.

  10. Health communication, information technology and the public's attitude toward periodic general health examinations.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodic general health examinations (GHEs) are gradually becoming more popular as they employ subclinical screenings, as a means of early detection. This study considers the effect of information technology (IT), health communications and the public's attitude towards GHEs in Vietnam. Methods: A total of 2,068 valid observations were obtained from a survey in Hanoi and its surrounding areas. Results: In total, 42.12% of participants stated that they were willing to use IT applications to recognise illness symptoms, and nearly 2/3 of them rated the healthcare quality at average level or below. Discussion: The data, which was processed by the BCL model, showed that IT applications (apps) reduce hesitation toward GHEs; however, older people seem to have less confidence in using these apps. Health communications and government's subsidy also increased the likelihood of people attending periodic GHEs. The probability of early check-ups where there is a cash subsidy could reach approximately 80%.

  11. [Physical rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: general principles and high-tech approaches].

    PubMed

    Peresedova, A V; Chernikova, L A; Zavalishin, I A

    2013-01-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation programs are of major importance for the preservation of physical, physiological, social and professional functioning and improvement of quality of life. Currently, it is generally assumed that physical activity is an important component of non-pharmacological rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis. Properly organized exercise is a safe and efficient way to induce improvements in a number of physiological functions. A multidisciplinary rehabilitative approach should be recommended. The main recommendations for the use of exercise for patients with multiple sclerosis have been listed. An important aspect of the modern physical rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis is the usage of high-tech methods. The published results of robot-assisted training to improve the hand function and walking impairment have been represented. An important trend in the rehabilitation of patients with multiple sclerosis is the reduction of postural disorders through training balance coordination. The role of transcranial magnetic stimulation in spasticity reducing is being investigated. The use of telemedicine capabilities is quite promising. Due to the fact that the decline in physical activity can lead to the deterioration of many aspects of physiological functions and, ultimately, to mobility decrease, further research of the role of physical rehabilitation as an important therapeutic approach in preventing the progression of disability in multiple sclerosis is required.

  12. New aspects of absorption line formation in intervening turbulent clouds - I. General principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-07-01

    We study the formation of absorption lines in intervening clouds with stochastic velocity fields, accounting for the fact that actually only one line of sight is observed. Our results show that the introduction of the finite velocity correlation length leads to a new type of absorption line profiles which are asymmetric in general, may have different shifts of the centres of gravity, and look like barely resolved blends, i.e. could be interpreted in a standard Voigt fitting analysis as being caused by several independent clouds with different physical parameters. Numerical results are presented for the HI Lyalpha line with N_Hi=10^12,10^14,10^15 and 10^16cm^-2, T_kin=10^4 K, and different sets of turbulent parameters. The intensity fluctuations within the line profile caused by `turbulent noise' are investigated and the confidence belts for the absorption lines are calculated. We conclude that an exact measurement of the column densities of the absorbing atoms N_a from the observed values of the optical depths tau lambda is actually impossible for the case of the correlated velocity field. One can only determine a range of values within which N_a is to be found with a certain probability.

  13. Neuro-cognitive mechanisms of conscious and unconscious visual perception: From a plethora of phenomena to general principles

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Markus; Ansorge, Ulrich; Haynes, John-Dylan; Hamker, Fred; Mattler, Uwe; Verleger, Rolf; Niedeggen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Psychological and neuroscience approaches have promoted much progress in elucidating the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie phenomenal visual awareness during the last decades. In this article, we provide an overview of the latest research investigating important phenomena in conscious and unconscious vision. We identify general principles to characterize conscious and unconscious visual perception, which may serve as important building blocks for a unified model to explain the plethora of findings. We argue that in particular the integration of principles from both conscious and unconscious vision is advantageous and provides critical constraints for developing adequate theoretical models. Based on the principles identified in our review, we outline essential components of a unified model of conscious and unconscious visual perception. We propose that awareness refers to consolidated visual representations, which are accessible to the entire brain and therefore globally available. However, visual awareness not only depends on consolidation within the visual system, but is additionally the result of a post-sensory gating process, which is mediated by higher-level cognitive control mechanisms. We further propose that amplification of visual representations by attentional sensitization is not exclusive to the domain of conscious perception, but also applies to visual stimuli, which remain unconscious. Conscious and unconscious processing modes are highly interdependent with influences in both directions. We therefore argue that exactly this interdependence renders a unified model of conscious and unconscious visual perception valuable. Computational modeling jointly with focused experimental research could lead to a better understanding of the plethora of empirical phenomena in consciousness research. PMID:22253669

  14. What Makes Vietnamese (Not) Attend Periodic General Health Examinations? A 2016 Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang; Vu, Quang-Hoi; Vuong, Thu-Trang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives General health examinations (GHE) have become an increasingly common measure for preventive medicine in Vietnam. However, little is known about the factors among Viet-namese people who attend or miss GHE. Budget or time constraints remain to be evaluated for better-informed policy making. This study investigates factors affecting behaviors in attending periodic GHE. The main objectives are as follows: (1) to explore empirical relationships between influencing factors and periodic GHE frequencies, and (2) to predict the probabilities of attending GHE under associated conditions. Methods The study used a 2,068-observational dataset, obtained from a Vietnamese survey in 2016. The analysis was then performed using the methods of baseline-category logits for establishing relationships between predictor and response variables. Results Significant relationships were found among the expenditure and time consumption, health priority and sensitivity to health data, insurance status, and frequency of GHE, with most p-values = 0.01. Conclusion Generally, people attended the GHE when they had the resources and health priorities (72.7% probability). Expenditure and time remain key obstacles to the periodic GHE. Health priority and health data are important in improving rates for GHEs. Health insurance should play a positive role in promoting the GHE. PMID:28540159

  15. Self-Organization of Meiotic Recombination Initiation: General Principles and Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Scott; Lange, Julian; Mohibullah, Neeman

    2015-01-01

    Recombination in meiosis is a fascinating case study for the coordination of chromosomal duplication, repair, and segregation with each other and with progression through a cell-division cycle. Meiotic recombination initiates with formation of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at many places across the genome. DSBs are important for successful meiosis but are also dangerous lesions that can mutate or kill, so cells ensure that DSBs are made only at the right times, places, and amounts. This review examines the complex web of pathways that accomplish this control. We explore how chromosome breakage is integrated with meiotic progression and how feedback mechanisms spatially pattern DSB formation and make it homeostatic, robust, and error-correcting. Common regulatory themes recur in different organisms or in different contexts in the same organism. We review this evolutionary and mechanistic conservation but also highlight where control modules have diverged. The framework that emerges helps explain how meiotic chromosomes behave as a self-organizing system. PMID:25421598

  16. Viewing brain processes as Critical State Transitions across levels of organization: Neural events in Cognition and Consciousness, and general principles.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gerhard

    2009-04-01

    In this theoretical and speculative essay, I propose that insights into certain aspects of neural system functions can be gained from viewing brain function in terms of the branch of Statistical Mechanics currently referred to as "Modern Critical Theory" [Stanley, H.E., 1987. Introduction to Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena. Oxford University Press; Marro, J., Dickman, R., 1999. Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions in Lattice Models. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK]. The application of this framework is here explored in two stages: in the first place, its principles are applied to state transitions in global brain dynamics, with benchmarks of Cognitive Neuroscience providing the relevant empirical reference points. The second stage generalizes to suggest in more detail how the same principles could also apply to the relation between other levels of the structural-functional hierarchy of the nervous system and between neural assemblies. In this view, state transitions resulting from the processing at one level are the input to the next, in the image of a 'bucket brigade', with the content of each bucket being passed on along the chain, after having undergone a state transition. The unique features of a process of this kind will be discussed and illustrated.

  17. River and Wetland Food Webs in Australia's Wet-Dry Tropics: General Principles and Implications for Management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M. M.; Bunn, S. E.; Davies, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    The tropical rivers of northern Australia are internationally recognised for their high ecological and cultural values. They have largely unmodified flow regimes and are comparatively free of the impacts associated with intensive land use. However, there is growing demand for agricultural development and existing pressures, such as weeds and feral animals, threaten their ecological integrity. Using the international literature to provide a conceptual framework and drawing on limited published and unpublished data on rivers in northern Australia, we have derived five general principles about food webs and related ecosystem processes that both characterise tropical rivers of northern Australia and have important implications for their management. These are: (1) Seasonal hydrology is a strong driver of ecosystem processes and food web structure; (2) Hydrological connectivity is largely intact and underpins important terrestrial-aquatic food web subsidies; (3) River and wetland food webs are strongly dependent on algal production; (4) A few common macroconsumers species have a strong influence on benthic food webs; (5) Omnivory is widespread and food chains are short. These principles have implications for the management and protection of tropical rivers and wetlands of northern Australia and provide a framework for the formation of testable hypotheses in future research programs.

  18. Evaluation research in occupational health services: general principles and a systematic review of empirical studies

    PubMed Central

    Hulshof, C. T.; Verbeek, J. H.; van Dijk, F. J.; van der Weide, W. E.; Braam, I. T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the nature and extent of evaluation research in occupational health services (OHSs). METHODS: Literature review of evaluation research in OHSs. On the basis of a conceptual model of OHS evaluation, empirical studies are categorised into aspects of input, process, output, outcome, and OHS core activities. RESULTS: Many methods to evaluate OHSs or OHS activities exist, depending on the objective and object of evaluation. The amount of empirical studies on evaluation of OHSs or OHS activities that met the non-restrictive inclusion criteria, was remarkably limited. Most of the 52 studies were more descriptive than evaluative. The methodological quality of most studies was not high. A differentiated picture of the evidence of effectiveness of OHSs arises. Occupational health consultations and occupational rehabilitation are hardly studied despite much time spent on the consultation by occupational physicians in most countries. The lack of effectiveness and efficiency of the pre-employment examination should lead to its abandonment as a means of selection of personnel by OHSs. Periodic health monitoring or surveillance, and education on occupational health hazards can be carried out with reasonable process quality. Identification and evaluation of occupational health hazards by a workplace survey can be done with a high output quality, which, however, does not guarantee a favourable outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Although rigorous study designs are not always applicable or feasible in daily practice, much more effort should be directed at the scientific evaluation of OHSs and OHS instruments. To develop evidence-based occupational health care the quality of evaluation studies should be improved. In particular, process and outcome of consultation and rehabilitation activities of occupational physicians need to be studied more.   PMID:10474531

  19. Examining uptake of online education on obstructive sleep apnoea in general practitioners: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Paul, Christine; Rose, Shiho; Hensley, Michael; Pretto, Jeffrey; Hardy, Margaret; Henskens, Frans; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Carey, Mariko

    2016-07-19

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects up to 28 % of the adult population in Western countries. The detection and management of OSA by general practitioners (GPs) can be poor. The study aimed to examine what influence enhanced invitations had on uptake of on-line learning modules for OSA by GPs, and whether recent referrals of patients to sleep specialists influenced uptake. Practicing GPs in regional Australia were identified and randomised to receive either an enhanced or standard invitation letter to a new on-line education module for OSA. The enhanced letter included indication that the module was eligible for professional accreditation and described the prevalence and burden of sleep disorders. Some included extra emphasis if the GP had recently referred a patient for diagnostic investigation of OSA. Two reminder letters were sent. Of 796 eligible GPs who received the letters, sixteen (2 %) accessed the website and four completed the modules over the four-month study period. GPs who received an enhanced invitation letter were not significantly more likely to access the website compared to GPs who received the standard invitation letter. Recent referral of a patient for diagnostic investigation was also not a significant factor in influencing use of the module. GP interest in on-line education about OSA appears low, and emphasis of relevant recent past patient(s) and the opportunity for professional education points was not successful in increasing engagement. There is a need to identify effective approaches to improving the detection and management of OSA in general practice.

  20. The development of a cultural standardized patient examination for a general surgery residency program.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Young, Keane G M; Honda, Andrea F; Belcher, Gary F; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competency and cross-cultural care issues in surgery resident education are areas of recognized need. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has developed 6 core competencies addressing training to provide high quality care. Of these, cultural training is addressed under 3: patient care, professionalism, and interpersonal and communication skills. Our study sought to develop a measurable tool-a cultural standardized patient (SP) examination-that integrates cross-cultural care issues within the core competencies. All first year surgery residents (PGY-1) were required to participate in the videotaped cultural SP examination as part of the general surgery residency curriculum. Two measures were utilized to assess resident performance. On the same day, we administered a Cross-Cultural Care Survey. The SP examination was assessed by trained surgery teaching faculty using a written checklist that was developed to evaluate residents on all 6 ACGME competencies. Of the 26 eligible participants over 2 years, we were able to analyze the pre- and post-test results for 24 residents. The post-test score of the "attitude toward cross-cultural care" subscale of the Cross-Cultural Care Survey was significantly lower than the pre-test score (p = 0.012; Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). There were significant differences by ethnicity on all 3 subscales of the Cross-Cultural Care Survey (attitude = p < 0.05, knowledge = p < 0.01, skills = p < 0.05) on the pre-test. However, only the knowledge subscale scores remained significantly different between ethnicities on the post-test (p < 0.01). After additional assessment, evaluation, and refinement, our goal is to incorporate cross-cultural health care training as a permanent part of our curriculum. Our hope is that efforts to provide training in cross-cultural healthcare leads to high quality care and positive outcomes for the patient. This will not only enhance our training program, but may also become a

  1. Health communication, information technology and the public’s attitude toward periodic general health examinations

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodic general health examinations (GHEs) are gradually becoming more popular as they employ subclinical screenings, as a means of early detection. This study considers the effect of information technology (IT), health communications and the public’s attitude towards GHEs in Vietnam. Methods: A total of 2,068 valid observations were obtained from a survey in Hanoi and its surrounding areas. Results: In total, 42.12% of participants stated that they were willing to use IT applications to recognise illness symptoms, and nearly 2/3 of them rated the healthcare quality at average level or below. Discussion: The data, which was processed by the BCL model, showed that IT applications (apps) reduce hesitation toward GHEs; however, older people seem to have less confidence in using these apps. Health communications and government’s subsidy also increased the likelihood of people attending periodic GHEs. The probability of early check-ups where there is a cash subsidy could reach approximately 80%. PMID:28163904

  2. An examination of distress intolerance in undergraduate students high in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Emma M; Pawluk, Elizabeth J; Koerner, Naomi; Goodwill, Alasdair M

    2015-01-01

    People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) engage in maladaptive coping strategies to reduce or avoid distress. Evidence suggests that uncertainty and negative emotions are triggers for distress in people with GAD; however, there may also be other triggers. Recent conceptualizations have highlighted six types of experiences that people report having difficulty withstanding: uncertainty, negative emotions, ambiguity, frustration, physical discomfort, and the perceived consequences of anxious arousal. The present study examined the extent to which individuals high in symptoms of GAD are intolerant of these distress triggers, compared to individuals high in depressive symptoms, and individuals who are low in GAD and depressive symptoms. Undergraduate students (N = 217) completed self-report measures of GAD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and distress intolerance. Individuals high in GAD symptoms reported greater intolerance of all of the distress triggers compared to people low in symptoms of GAD and depression. Individuals high in GAD symptoms reported greater intolerance of physical discomfort compared to those high in depressive symptoms. Furthermore, intolerance of physical discomfort was the best unique correlate of GAD status, suggesting that it may be specific to GAD (versus depression). These findings support continued investigation of the transdiagnosticity and specificity of distress intolerance.

  3. Maltreatment and Delinquency in China: Examining and Extending the Intervening Process of General Strain Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunjiao; Wong, Dennis S W; Yu, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of 1,163 adolescents from four middle schools in China, this study explores the intervening process of how adolescent maltreatment is related to delinquency within the framework of general strain theory (GST) by comparing two models. The first model is Agnew's integrated model of GST, which examines the mediating effects of social control, delinquent peer affiliation, state anger, and depression on the relationship between maltreatment and delinquency. Based on this model, with the intent to further explore the mediating effects of state anger and depression and to investigate whether their effects on delinquency can be demonstrated more through delinquent peer affiliation and social control, an extended model (Model 2) is proposed by the authors. The second model relates state anger to delinquent peer affiliation and state depression to social control. By comparing the fit indices and the significance of the hypothesized paths of the two models, the study found that the extended model can better reflect the mechanism of how maltreatment contributes to delinquency, whereas the original integrated GST model only receives partial support because of its failure to find the mediating effects of state negative emotions.

  4. Care for overweight children attending the 5-year preventive child health examination in general practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Merethe Kousgaard; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse general practitioners' (GPs) care for children with a weight-for-height above normal based on the GPs' clinical evaluation, that is, 'GP-assessed overweight'. This study is a cross-sectional survey targeting GPs' care for children with GP-assessed overweight at the 5-year preventive child health examination (PCHE). Out of 1135 children attending the 5-year PCHE, 171 were assessed overweight by the GP. According to the Danish body mass index (kg/m(2)) growth charts, 147 children were overweight. The GPs addressed their concern about the child's weight to the parents in 58% of the 171 cases with GP-assessed overweight. The national guideline was reported consulted in 6% of the cases. Diet, physical activity and dispositions were evaluated by the GPs in 68%, 57% and 34% of cases, respectively. An appointment for a follow-up was made in 12% of cases. Various care activities were carried out for most children with GP-assessed overweight at the 5-year PCHE. However, the GP did not raise concern about the child's weight with the parents in almost one third of the children. It seems that there is a potential for improving the overweight care at the 5-year PCHE beginning with the involvement of the parents.

  5. First-principle calculation of reduced masses in vibrational analysis using generalized internal coordinates: some crucial aspects and examples.

    PubMed

    Stare, Jernej

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present and analyze the most essential aspects of reduced masses along generalized internal coordinates. The definition of reduced masses in the internal coordinate formalism is established through the Wilson G-matrix concept and includes sophisticated relations between internal and Cartesian coordinates. Moreover, reduced masses in internal coordinates are, in general, no longer constant but coordinate-dependent. Based on the approach presented earlier [Stare, J.; Balint-Kurti, G. G. J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 7204-7214] and on our experience with reduced masses discussed in this paper, we have developed a robust program for the calculation of Wilson G-matrix elements and their functional coordinate dependence. The approach is based on the first principles and can be used in virtually any (internal) coordinate set. Since the program allows for projection of any kind of nuclear motion on the selected internal coordinates, the method is particularly suitable for ab initio or DFT potential energy functions calculated by partial geometry optimization. Moreover, reduced masses obtained by this program can be used as a decision tool for selecting the most appropriate internal coordinates for the considered vibrational problem and for the inclusion or omission of the kinetic coupling terms in the vibrational Hamiltonian.

  6. The effects of violating standard item writing principles on tests and students: the consequences of using flawed test items on achievement examinations in medical education.

    PubMed

    Downing, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either standard or flawed by three independent raters, blinded to all item performance data. Flawed test questions violated one or more standard principles of effective item writing. Thirty-six to sixty-five percent of the items on the four tests were flawed. Flawed items were 0-15 percentage points more difficult than standard items measuring the same construct. Over all four examinations, 646 (53%) students passed the standard items while 575 (47%) passed the flawed items. The median passing rate difference between flawed and standard items was 3.5 percentage points, but ranged from -1 to 35 percentage points. Item flaws had little effect on test score reliability or other psychometric quality indices. Results showed that flawed multiple-choice test items, which violate well established and evidence-based principles of effective item writing, disadvantage some medical students. Item flaws introduce the systematic error of construct-irrelevant variance to assessments, thereby reducing the validity evidence for examinations and penalizing some examinees.

  7. Over-constraints and a unified mobility method for general spatial mechanisms Part 2: Application of the principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenjuan; Zeng, Daxing; Huang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The pre-research on mobility analysis presented a unified-mobility formula and a methodology based on reciprocal screw theory by HUANG, which focused on classical and modern parallel mechanisms. However its range of application needs to further extend to general multi-loop spatial mechanism. This kind of mechanism is not only more complex in structure but also with strong motion coupling among loops, making the mobility analysis even more complicated, and the relevant research has long been ignored. It is focused on how to apply the new principle for general spatial mechanism to those various multi-loop spatial mechanisms, and some new meaningful knowledge is further found. Several typical examples of the general multi-loop spatial mechanisms with motion couple even strong motion couple are considered. These spatial mechanisms include different closing way: over-constraint appearing in rigid closure, in movable closure, and in dynamic closure as well; these examples also include two different new methods to solve this kind of issue: the way to recognize over-constraints by analyzing relative movement between two connected links and by constructing a virtual loop to recognize over-constraints. In addition, over-constraint determination tabulation is brought to analyze the motion couple. The researches above are all based upon the screw theory. All these multi-loop spatial mechanisms with different kinds of structures can completely be solved by following the directions and examples, and the new mobility theory based on the screw theory is also proved to be valid. This study not only enriches and develops the theory and makes the theory more universal, but also has a special meaning for innovation in mechanical engineering.

  8. Argumentation as a Lens to Examine Student Discourse in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry for College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri Kumarihamy

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation work entails three related studies on the investigation of Peer-Led Guided Inquiry student discourse in a General Chemistry I course through argumentation. The first study, "Argumentation and participation patterns in general chemistry peer-led sessions," is focused on examining arguments and participation patterns in…

  9. Argumentation as a Lens to Examine Student Discourse in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry for College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri Kumarihamy

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation work entails three related studies on the investigation of Peer-Led Guided Inquiry student discourse in a General Chemistry I course through argumentation. The first study, "Argumentation and participation patterns in general chemistry peer-led sessions," is focused on examining arguments and participation patterns in…

  10. Endoscopic Scores for Evaluation of Crohn's Disease Activity at Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy: General Principles and Current Applications.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bruno; Pinho, Rolando; de Ferro, Susana Mão; Almeida, Nuno; Cotter, José; Saraiva, Miguel Mascarenhas

    2016-01-01

    The small bowel is affected in the vast majority of patients with Crohn's Disease (CD). Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has a very high sensitivity for the detection of CD-related pathology, including early mucosal lesions and/or those located in the proximal segments of the small bowel, which is a major advantage when compared with other small bowel imaging modalities. The recent guidelines of European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) advocate the use of validated endoscopic scoring indices for the classification of inflammatory activity in patients with CD undergoing SBCE, such as the Lewis Score or the Capsule Endoscopy Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CECDAI). These scores aim to standardize the description of lesions and capsule endoscopy reports, contributing to increase inter-observer agreement and enabling a stratification of the severity of the disease. On behalf of the Grupo de Estudos Português do Intestino Delgado (GEPID) - Portuguese Small Bowel Study Group, we aimed to summarize the general principles and clinical applications of current endoscopic scoring systems for SBCE in the setting of CD, covering the topic of suspected CD as well as the evaluation of disease extent (with potential prognostic and therapeutic impact), evaluation of mucosal healing in response to treatment and evaluation of post-surgical recurrence in patients with previously established diagnosis of CD.

  11. Chemical potential for the interacting classical gas and the ideal quantum gas obeying a generalized exclusion principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential μ in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state μ = μ(n, T) where n is the particle density and T the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are presented with detailed calculations. The first one refers to the explicit calculation of μ for the interacting classical gas exemplified by van der Waals gas. For this purpose, we used the method described by van Kampen (1961 Physica 27 783). The second one refers to the calculation of μ for ideal quantum gases that obey a generalized Pauli's exclusion principle that leads to statistics that go beyond the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac cases. The audience targeted in this work corresponds mainly to advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical-chemical sciences but it is not restricted to them. In regard of this, we have put a special emphasis on showing some additional details of calculations that usually do not appear explicitly in textbooks.

  12. First-principles model potentials for lattice-dynamical studies: general methodology and example of application to ferroic perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hermet, Patrick; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ghosez, Philippe; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-31

    We present a scheme to construct model potentials, with parameters computed from first principles, for large-scale lattice-dynamical simulations of materials. We mimic the traditional solid-state approach to the investigation of vibrational spectra, i.e., we start from a suitably chosen reference configuration of the compound and describe its energy as a function of arbitrary atomic distortions by means of a Taylor series. Such a form of the potential-energy surface is general, trivial to formulate for any material, and physically transparent. Further, such models involve clear-cut approximations, their precision can be improved in a systematic fashion, and their simplicity allows for convenient and practical strategies to compute/fit the potential parameters. We illustrate our scheme with two challenging cases in which the model potential is strongly anharmonic, namely, the ferroic perovskite oxides PbTiO3 and SrTiO3. Studying these compounds allows us to better describe the connection between the so-called effective-Hamiltonian method and ours (which may be seen as an extension of the former), and to show the physical insight and predictive power provided by our approach-e.g., we present new results regarding the factors controlling phase-transition temperatures, novel phase transitions under elastic constraints, an improved treatment of thermal expansion, etc.

  13. The Examining of Generalization Quantitative Scientific Findings by Using the Jackknife Method: An Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyari, Murat; Buyukozturk, Sener

    2009-01-01

    The outcomes which cannot be generalized are specific for a sample but are unable to be reflected to the rest of the population. The parameters that are reached at the end of the statistics that are scarce in sample arise doubts in the aspect of generalization. In these cases, parameter estimation may not be very stable and outlier values can…

  14. Inclusive Classrooms: An Examination of the Attitudes and Perspectives of K-5 General Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion has altered the teaching and learning environment in many ways. General education teachers face increasing challenges as their role becomes more complex to meet the demands of teaching both general and special education students in the same classroom. Teachers are pivotal in the success of inclusion and exploring how teachers feel about…

  15. Inclusive Classrooms: An Examination of the Attitudes and Perspectives of K-5 General Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion has altered the teaching and learning environment in many ways. General education teachers face increasing challenges as their role becomes more complex to meet the demands of teaching both general and special education students in the same classroom. Teachers are pivotal in the success of inclusion and exploring how teachers feel about…

  16. Perceived Influencers of the Decline on Performance of Students in Botswana General Certificate of Secondary Education's Agriculture Examination Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibanda, Clyde; Hulela, Keba; Tselaesele, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate factors perceived to contribute to the decline of students' performance in the Botswana's General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) agriculture results. Ninety-one agriculture examiners were randomly sampled out of 100 teachers who were invited to mark the 2012 end of year examination scripts. A…

  17. Examining Teachers' Self-Described Responses to Student Behavior through the Lens of Catholic Social Teaching Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucci, Angela Marie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how teacher beliefs about the tenets of Catholic Social Teaching (CST)--dignity of the human person, seeking the common good, and preferential option for the poor and vulnerable--affected self-described responses to student behavior problems. In-depth interviews with seven secondary Catholic school teachers were analyzed…

  18. To Pay or Not to Pay: Examining Underlying Principles in the Debate on Financial Support for Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Janice

    2007-01-01

    In many countries one approach to supporting family-and-friend caregivers is direct financial or monetary support. Debates about the benefits and consequences of such policies pervade the literature. Building on the premise that values underlie public policy, the paper examines four policy paradoxes in the literature and uses selected examples…

  19. Examining the Effects of Combining Self-Explanation Principles with an Educational Game on Learning Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have indicated that although computer games have the potential to promote students' motivation and engagement, the work on how to design effective games that fulfil educational purposes is still in its infancy. This study aimed to examine how integration of self-explanation into a computer game affected primary schoolers'…

  20. Examining the Effects of Combining Self-Explanation Principles with an Educational Game on Learning Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have indicated that although computer games have the potential to promote students' motivation and engagement, the work on how to design effective games that fulfil educational purposes is still in its infancy. This study aimed to examine how integration of self-explanation into a computer game affected primary schoolers'…

  1. To Pay or Not to Pay: Examining Underlying Principles in the Debate on Financial Support for Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Janice

    2007-01-01

    In many countries one approach to supporting family-and-friend caregivers is direct financial or monetary support. Debates about the benefits and consequences of such policies pervade the literature. Building on the premise that values underlie public policy, the paper examines four policy paradoxes in the literature and uses selected examples…

  2. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  3. Recognition of dementia in general practice: comparison of general practitioners' opinions with assessments using the mini-mental state examination and the Blessed dementia rating scale.

    PubMed

    Mant, A; Eyland, E A; Pond, D C; Saunders, N A; Chancellor, A H

    1988-09-01

    In a study of 226 elderly residents in a retirement village in Sydney, Australia, general practitioners' opinions about dementia status had high positive and negative predictive values and high specificity, but low sensitivity when evaluated against the mini-mental state examination and the Blessed dementia rating scale. General practitioners were found to disagree with these two measures more often when patients were in advanced old age, and when they considered the patients to be depressed. We conclude that the general practitioner can increase his or her sensitivity to dementia in the elderly by use of either measure.

  4. Examining the ethical boundaries of harm reduction: from addictions to general psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Nitzan, Uri; Fennig, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Harm reduction is a general term for pragmatic interventions aimed at reducing problematic behaviors. Emerging from addiction treatments, it is based on the understanding that people will continue to behave in ways that pose a risk to them and their communities, and that an important goal of any treatment program is to minimize the harm associated with these behaviors. Despite its evidence based background, harm reduction is not readily applied in general psychiatry. This is mainly due to the complex ethical dilemmas arising within harm reduction practices, as well as a lack of scientific knowledge and theoretical frameworks essential for dealing with such ethical dilemmas. In this paper we introduce the fundamental theoretical and scientific base of harm reduction strategies, and present three clinical examples of the complex ethical dilemmas arising when working within a harm reduction practice. We finally present a theoretical framework for dealing with the ethical dilemmas and argue this may make harm reduction strategies more accessible in general psychiatry.

  5. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  6. Curriculum Guide for General Education Development or High School Equivalency Examination in Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shobha; Escalona, Margaret Boyter

    This curriculum guide was developed as part of the Worker Education Program for workers in the garment industry. The program was jointly developed by the workers, their employer, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. It contains the materials required to teach a course to help Spanish-speaking individuals pass the General Educational…

  7. An integrative examination of general personality dysfunction in a large community sample.

    PubMed

    Hengartner, Michael Pascal; De Fruyt, Filip; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the severity of general personality dysfunction has gained broad interest in personality disorder (PD) research. We analysed data of 511 participants aged 20-41 years from a comprehensive psychiatric survey in the general population of Zurich, Switzerland. We added the trait-scores from all DSM-IV PDs, as assessed by a self-report questionnaire, to provide a measure of general personality dysfunction. Adjusting for the Big Five personality domains as a proxy for stylistic PD elements, this composite PD score exhibited strong associations with neuroticism and schizotypy. General personality dysfunction additionally revealed a moderate detrimental association with psychosocial functioning and a strong effect on coping resources, on heavy drinking and drug use and on most psychopathological syndromes. Of particular interest is the strong association with total psychopathological distress and co-occurrence of multiple disorders, suggesting that increasing PD severity relates to the degree of global impairment independent of specific PD traits. Discussed herein are implications for public mental health policies, classification, conceptualization and treatment of PDs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  9. Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leue, Anja; Lange, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) by means of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule has received a remarkable popularity in the social sciences. Using a meta-analytic tool--namely, reliability generalization (RG)--population reliability scores of both scales have been investigated on the basis of a random…

  10. An Examination of Stimulus Control in Fluency-Based Strategies: SAFMEDS and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meindl, James N.; Ivy, Jonathan W.; Miller, Neal; Neef, Nancy A.; Williamson, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Fluency-based strategies such as Say All Fast a Minute Each Day Shuffled (SAFMEDS) effectively promote fluent responding (i.e., high rate and accuracy). It is possible, however, that the stimulus control developed through these activities inhibits stimulus generalization. We investigated this concern in a two-part study with college students.…

  11. Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leue, Anja; Lange, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) by means of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule has received a remarkable popularity in the social sciences. Using a meta-analytic tool--namely, reliability generalization (RG)--population reliability scores of both scales have been investigated on the basis of a random…

  12. An examination of underlying physical principles. The interaction of power-line electromagnetic fields with the human body.

    PubMed

    King, R W

    1998-01-01

    A detailed examination of the scientific foundations contained in a number of recent articles has revealed some serious errors. The careful application of advanced mathematical-physical methods to study the penetration of externally applied electric fields into the organs and cells of the human body has obtained new and significant results [8, 9, 32]. Specifically, Eqs. (11) and (12) establish a definite relationship between an incident low-frequency electric field and the current, current density, and electric field induced in the body when the arms are in contact with it and the incident field is parallel to its length. Corresponding formulas with the arms raised are available [10] as are formulas for the current density and electric field in the organs of the body [9]. It is these currents and electric fields that must be used by biomedical research workers to determine their effect on living cells. The proposed interpretation of epidemiological data [31] indicates a risk of leukemia in children when the incident 50-60-Hz electric field generated by a high-voltage transmission line is Einc > or = 61 V/m. (23). The corresponding maximum electric field at approximately 10 m from a 440-kV transmission line is Einc approximately 2100 V/m [8, 9]. The electric fields induced in the different organs of the body by these electric fields are in the range 25.2 < or = E1z < or = 119 microV/m for Einc2z = 61 V/m and 0.87 < or = E1z < or = 4.1 mV/m for Einc2z = 2100 V/m [9]. These are in the range of applied fields in in vitro experiments, which showed significant effects on cells [4], and should serve as guidelines for such experiments.

  13. [Clinical techniques for use in neurological physical examinations. I. General organisation, cranial and peripheral spinal nerves].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, P L; Rodríguez-Pupo, L; Rodríguez-García, D

    The purpose of this work is to focus on the main practical aspects of the techniques used for the physical examination of the nervous system and to present an approach for the practice of this study in adult patients. We recommend clinicians to carry out a brief but consistent and effective exploration in a systematic, flexible and orderly manner to check for alterations in the functioning of the nervous system. Should any anomalies be detected, then a more detailed and thorough neurological exploration must be performed selectively. The techniques and data from this examination are organised into five broad categories: mental status, cranial nerves, motor function, reflex function and sensory function. The practical aspects of the main techniques used in the physical exploration are reviewed and we also describe the technique to be employed for palpating the main peripheral nerves. The study offers a detailed description of the chief clinical techniques used in the physical exploration of the cranial nerves and for the palpation of the peripheral nerves; we also present an approach to performing the neurological examination. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of physically examining the nervous system in contemporary medicine and the need to continually perfect the way these techniques are performed in order to achieve an efficient clinical practice.

  14. Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Schmidt, Christa K.; Meek, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Explored variability in reliability scores on a career scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (K. Taylor and N. Betz, 1983). Of the 49 studies examined, 41% reported score reliabilities. Of the five subscales, Problem Solving shows the lowest score reliability. Higher score reliability is associated with age, racial/ethnic…

  15. Investigation of errors by radiological technologists and evaluation of preventive measures: general and mobile X-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Masahiro; Shinoda, Naoki; Miyamoto, Akira; Hirata, Masaharu; Ishidate, Miyako; Kuraishi, Masahiko; Doi, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    The first objective in this study was to identify the errors of incidents and accidents that occurred in general and mobile X-ray examinations. Based on the analysis of results, the second purpose in this study was to propose useful measures to prevent such errors. As much as 553 radiological technologists in the Gunma Prefecture were surveyed on their experience with errors related to general and mobile X-ray examinations. The questionnaire asked for descriptions of errors experienced during examinations and the responses given (multiple answers possible), and evaluations of the degree of busyness on a five-point scale. A total of 115 questionnaires were returned. Analysis revealed that there was no significant relationship between errors and degree of busyness for either general or mobile examinations. The most frequent error both in general and in mobile examinations was to X-ray a patient mistakenly, the cause of which was cited as failure to confirm the patient's name. After the use of solution priority number to evaluate proposed preventive measures, such as finger-pointing and call, independent double-checks, and verbal self-confirmation would be the simplest and most easily implemented countermeasure.

  16. Simplified basic periodontal examination (BPE) in children and adolescents: a guide for general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cole, Emma; Ray-Chaudhuri, Arijit; Vaidyanathan, Mina; Johnson, Joanna; Sood, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Dental plaque-induced periodontal diseases are common in children and adults. Guidelines were previously not available for the periodontal screening of under 18s. However, new guidelines have been introduced by the British Society of Periodontology and the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry which set out recommendations for the periodontal screening and management of under 18s in primary dental care. This article provides a practical guide for general dental practitioners on how to use the BPE in children and adolescents, and highlights the importance of early detection and management of periodontal diseases in this age group. A failure to use the modified BPE in a young patient who is later diagnosed with periodontitis may leave a dentist vulnerable to a medico-legal complaint or claim. New BPE guidelines for children and adolescents have been introduced by the BSPD and BSP; it is important that all dentists are aware of these guidelines and how to implement them in general practice.

  17. [Demand for neuropediatric services at a general referral hospital. IV. Psychomotor development and physical examination].

    PubMed

    López-Pisón, J; Baldellou, A; Rebage, V; Arana, T; Lobera, M P; Peña-Segura, J L

    1997-12-01

    Diagnosis in neuropediatrics requires a detailed personal and family history and thorough physical examination. In this paper we study the psychomotor development and physical examination of children evaluated during a 5 year period, from May 1990 to May 1995 by a neuropediatrician newly appointed to the Hospital Miguel Servet in Zaragoza, which previously did not have such a specialist. Psychomotor retardation was seen in 19% of the children. In 50% of the children evaluated, significant data was obtained from the physical examination. The commonest finding, observed in 14% of the children, was of anomalous behaviour or an impression of mental deficiency. In decreasing order of frequency other data were: Diffuse pyramidal involvement, cranial nerve involvement, anomalous phenotype, microcephaly, microsomy, signs of neuromuscular involvement, hemiparesia, macrocephaly, skin markings, scoliosis, signs of extrapyramidal involvement, signs of cerebellar involvement, macrosomy and sensory disorders. Diagnosis in neuropediatrics is directed or established, sometimes exclusively, by an extensive personal and family history and adequate interpretation of this, which in the end depends on the skill of the clinician.

  18. The Role of Self-Regulated Learning in Explaining Examination Performance of College Students in First-Semester General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Many college students struggle with first-semester general chemistry. Prior studies have shown that a student's prior knowledge of chemistry, a cognitive factor, does not account for the total variance when measured by examination scores. This study explored the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) to identify the degree of success or failure of…

  19. Examining the Professional, Technical, and General Knowledge Competencies Needed by Beginning School-Based Agricultural Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Barrick, R. Kirby

    2013-01-01

    The philosophy behind the kind of teacher education one receives affects the preparedness of beginning agricultural education teachers. The purpose of this philosophical study was to examine and summarize the professional knowledge, technical knowledge, and general knowledge competencies needed in a comprehensive teacher education program to…

  20. Examining the Perceptions of Secondary School General Education Administrators Regarding the Supervision and Management of Special Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes a report of the results of a quantitative and qualitative research project that examined the perceptions of 58 secondary general education administrators regarding the supervision and management of special education programs in their buildings. Data were gathered through an online survey that requested participants to…

  1. Examining the Relationships between Secondary General Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion, Professional Development, and Support from Special Education Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wogamon, Lynn S.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational research study examined the relationships between secondary general education teachers' attitudes toward inclusion, hours of professional development in topics related to special education and hours of support from special education personnel addressing the needs of students with disabilities received weekly. The research also…

  2. The Role of Self-Regulated Learning in Explaining Examination Performance of College Students in First-Semester General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Many college students struggle with first-semester general chemistry. Prior studies have shown that a student's prior knowledge of chemistry, a cognitive factor, does not account for the total variance when measured by examination scores. This study explored the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) to identify the degree of success or failure of…

  3. Examining the Perceptions of Secondary School General Education Administrators Regarding the Supervision and Management of Special Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes a report of the results of a quantitative and qualitative research project that examined the perceptions of 58 secondary general education administrators regarding the supervision and management of special education programs in their buildings. Data were gathered through an online survey that requested participants to…

  4. Examining the Relationship between Referee Self-Efficacy and General Self-Efficacy Levels of Football, Basketball and Handball Referees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaçam, Aydin; Pulur, Atilla

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between referee self-efficacy and general self-efficacy levels of football, basketball and handball referees in terms of gender, refereeing branch, age and refereeing experience. Study group was created within a convenience sampling method. 195 referees, 14% (n = 27) female and 86% (n = 168)…

  5. Examining the Relationships between Secondary General Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion, Professional Development, and Support from Special Education Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wogamon, Lynn S.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational research study examined the relationships between secondary general education teachers' attitudes toward inclusion, hours of professional development in topics related to special education and hours of support from special education personnel addressing the needs of students with disabilities received weekly. The research also…

  6. An examination of the prescribed therapeutic experience of five-year-olds in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Grace, J. F.; Goulds, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The number and therapeutic grouping of prescriptions given to children before reaching their fifth birthday were examined. The records of 92 children were looked at. Between them they had received 1,241 individual prescriptions of which 33 per cent were for antibiotics, and 31 per cent for an antihistamine or cough linctus. Ninety-six per cent of the children had received at least one course of antibiotics and the average child 4·5 courses (SD ± 3·9); 89 per cent had received an antihistamine or cough linctus, and 50 per cent a skin preparation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7452589

  7. Auxiliary principle technique and iterative algorithm for a perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Mijanur; Pang, Chin-Tzong; Ishtyak, Mohd; Ahmad, Rais

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we introduce a perturbed system of generalized mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems involving multi-valued mappings in Hilbert spaces. To calculate the approximate solutions of the perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems, firstly we develop a perturbed system of auxiliary generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems, and then by using the celebrated Fan-KKM technique, we establish the existence and uniqueness of solutions of the perturbed system of auxiliary generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems. By deploying an auxiliary principle technique and an existence result, we formulate an iterative algorithm for solving the perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems. Lastly, we study the strong convergence analysis of the proposed iterative sequences under monotonicity and some mild conditions. These results are new and generalize some known results in this field.

  8. Examining the reciprocal relation between academic motivation and substance use: effects of family relationships, self-esteem, and general deviance.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J A; Duncan, S C

    1997-12-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relation between academic motivation and cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use across four annual assessments during adolescence. Data were obtained from 435 adolescents, 13 to 17 years of age at the first assessment, and their mothers. The results of generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis suggested inverse reciprocal relations across time between academic motivation and both cigarette and marijuana use. Reciprocal relations between academic motivation and alcohol use were not found, possibly due to the normative use of this substance. The examination of mediational mechanisms, including general deviance, self-esteem and family relationships, suggested that the relation between marijuana use and, for younger adolescents, cigarette use and academic motivation is not direct but is indirect, mediated through the general deviance of the adolescent. Deviance, self-esteem, and, for the youngest adolescents, family relationships mediated the relation between academic motivation and subsequent marijuana use.

  9. On the Relation Between General Intelligence and Psychopathic Traits: An Examination of Inpatient Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kavish, Nicholas; Bailey, Cassandra; Sharp, Carla; Venta, Amanda

    2017-08-23

    A substantial literature has investigated relations between intelligence and psychopathic traits. At the construct level, findings have been mixed, with a small negative relation found. At the facet level however, a positive relation between verbal intelligence and the interpersonal facet of psychopathy, and a negative relation between verbal intelligence and the lifestyle factor of psychopathy emerge. To date, this research has largely neglected adolescents and prior research has focused on clinical and incarcerated populations, while failing to control for psychopathology. The current study sought to address these limitations by examining the relation between intelligence and psychopathy at the construct, facet, and trait level in a sample of inpatient adolescents. At the bivariate level, verbal intelligence was related to dishonest charm, unemotionality, impulsiveness, and manipulation. In regression analyses, however, verbal intelligence lost significance as a predictor of all but impulsiveness. Gender and severity of psychopathology accounted for most significant relations.

  10. Specificity of the bilingual advantage for memory: examining cued recall, generalization, and working memory in monolingual, bilingual, and trilingual toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Natalie H.; Grenell, Amanda; Barr, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of the bilingual advantage in memory was examined by testing groups of monolingual, bilingual, and trilingual 24-month-olds on tasks tapping cued recall, memory generalization and working memory. For the cued recall and memory generalization conditions, there was a 24-h delay between time of encoding and time of retrieval. In addition to the memory tasks, parent-toddler dyads completed a picture-book reading task, in order to observe emotional responsiveness, and a parental report of productive vocabulary. Results indicated no difference between language groups on cued recall, working memory, emotional responsiveness, or productive vocabulary, but a significant difference was found in the memory generalization condition with only the bilingual group outperforming the baseline control group. These results replicate and extend results from past studies (Brito and Barr, 2012, 2014; Brito et al., 2014) and suggest a bilingual advantage specific to memory generalization. PMID:25520686

  11. New tests of the distal speech rate effect: examining cross-linguistic generalization.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Laura C; Morrill, Tuuli H; Banzina, Elina

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings [Dilley and Pitt, 2010. Psych. Science. 21, 1664-1670] have shown that manipulating context speech rate in English can cause entire syllables to disappear or appear perceptually. The current studies tested two rate-based explanations of this phenomenon while attempting to replicate and extend these findings to another language, Russian. In Experiment 1, native Russian speakers listened to Russian sentences which had been subjected to rate manipulations and performed a lexical report task. Experiment 2 investigated speech rate effects in cross-language speech perception; non-native speakers of Russian of both high and low proficiency were tested on the same Russian sentences as in Experiment 1. They decided between two lexical interpretations of a critical portion of the sentence, where one choice contained more phonological material than the other (e.g., /str'na/ "side" vs. /str'na/ "country"). In both experiments, with native and non-native speakers of Russian, context speech rate and the relative duration of the critical sentence portion were found to influence the amount of phonological material perceived. The results support the generalized rate normalization hypothesis, according to which the content perceived in a spectrally ambiguous stretch of speech depends on the duration of that content relative to the surrounding speech, while showing that the findings of Dilley and Pitt (2010) extend to a variety of morphosyntactic contexts and a new language, Russian. Findings indicate that relative timing cues across an utterance can be critical to accurate lexical perception by both native and non-native speakers.

  12. Mechanistic applicability domains for nonanimal-based prediction of toxicological end points: general principles and application to reactive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Aptula, Aynur O; Roberts, David W

    2006-08-01

    In light of new legislation (e.g., the REACH program in the European Union), several initiatives have recently emerged to increase acceptance of (quantitative) structure-activity relationships [(Q)SARs] to reduce reliance on animal (in vivo) testing. Among the principles for assessing the validity of (Q)SARs is the need for a defined domain of applicability, i.e., identification of the range of compounds for which the (Q)SAR can confidently be applied for purposes of toxicity prediction. Here, we attempt to develop a "natural" classification into applicability domains based on considering how a compound and the target organism between them "decide" on the nature and extent of the toxic effect. With particular emphasis on reactive toxicity, we present rules, based on organic reaction mechanistic principles, for classifying reactive toxicants into their appropriate mechanistic applicability domains.

  13. Sleeping like a baby: Examining relations between habitual infant sleep, recall memory, and generalization across cues at 10 months.

    PubMed

    Lukowski, Angela F; Milojevich, Helen M

    2013-06-01

    Previous research suggests that sleep is related to cognitive functioning in infants and adults. In the present study, we examined whether individual differences in infant sleep habits over the seven days prior to elicited imitation testing were associated with variability in (a) the encoding of 2-step event sequences and (b) memory for the presented information and generalization across cues after a 2-h delay in 10-month-olds. Significant correlations indicated that both daytime napping and nighttime sleep were related to encoding and generalization across cues after the 2-h delay; significant findings were not found in relation to baseline or delayed recall performance. We suggest that individual differences in infant sleep habits may be one mechanism underlying the observed variability in recall memory and generalization as these abilities are coming online late in the first year of life.

  14. Relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice. A case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cwojdzińska-Jankowska, Izabela; Plewa, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder which results in the development of multiple cysts in the kidneys and other parenchymal organs. The two genes in which mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are PKD1 and PKD2. Approximately 50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease will develop end-stage renal disease by the age of 60. Early stages of the disease are usually asymptomatic and at the moment of establishing a definitive diagnosis, complications and associated disorders, including end-stage renal disease, occur frequently. About 95% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease have an affected parent and about 5% have a de novo mutation. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. The first symptoms of disease usually develop in the third or fourth decades of life. Imaging examinations of relatives at risk allow for an early detection when no clinical symptoms are present as well as enable treatment of complications and associated disorders. Ultrasound examination as a basic and minimally invasive imaging technique can be easily used in general practice. In the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, sonography allows for a certain and reliable diagnosis of this disease. Additionally, it enables to perform follow-up examinations both of the patient and their family. The possibility of ultrasound imaging in general practice broadens clinical examination and facilitates establishing a proper diagnosis. The paper presents a case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Its aim was to present the relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice.

  15. Correlation Between An Email Based Board Review Program and American Board of Pediatrics General Pediatrics Certifying Examination Scores

    PubMed Central

    Langenau, Erik E.; Fogel, Joshua; Schaeffer, Henry A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of a weekly email based board review course on individual resident performance on the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) General Pediatrics Certifying Examination for pediatric residents and, specifically, residents with low ABP In-training Examination (ITE) scores. Methods Weekly board-type questions were emailed to all pediatric residents from 2004–2007. Responses to board-type questions were tracked, recorded, and correlated with ITE scores and ABP General Pediatrics Certifying Examination Scores. Results With regard to total number of questions answered, only total number of questions answered correctly had a significant positive correlation with standard board scores (n = 71, r = 0.24, p = 0.047). For “at risk” residents with ITE scores ≤ 200 (n = 21), number of questions answered in PL 3 year (r = 0.51, p = 0.018) and number of questions answered correctly for all PL years (r = 0.59, p = 0.005) had significant positive correlations with standard board scores. Conclusions Participating regularly in the email-based board review course, answering board style questions, and answering correctly to board style questions were associated with higher standard board scores. This benefit existed for all but was especially prominent among those with poor in-training examination scores. PMID:20101279

  16. Measurement scales in clinical research of the upper extremity, part 1: general principles, measures of general health, pain, and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Badalamente, Marie; Coffelt, Laureen; Elfar, John; Gaston, Glenn; Hammert, Warren; Huang, Jerry; Lattanza, Lisa; Macdermid, Joy; Merrell, Greg; Netscher, David; Panthaki, Zubin; Rafijah, Greg; Trczinski, Douglas; Graham, Brent

    2013-02-01

    Measurement is a fundamental cornerstone in all aspects of scientific discovery, including clinical research. To be useful, measurement instruments must meet several key criteria, the most important of which are satisfactory reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Part 1 of this article reviews the general concepts of measurement instruments and describes the measurement of general health, pain, and patient satisfaction.

  17. Application of HACCP principles to control visitor health threats on dairy farms open to the general public.

    PubMed

    Barten, M; Noordhuizen, J P M; Lipman, L J A

    2008-10-01

    An increasing number of Dutch dairy farmers have diversified their activities, often opening their farm up to visitors (tourist accommodation, farm shop, contact with livestock, etc). It is essential to prevent these visitors from having accidents or becoming ill, which could result in financial claims and might harm the reputation of the agricultural sector. This article describes how the hazard analysis critical control points concept and principles (HACCP) can be applied to these activities and integrated with on-farm operational herd health and production management programmes.

  18. An extremum principle for computation of the zone of tooth contact and generalized transmission error of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    For a given set of forces transmitted by the gears, each of the three components of the generalized transmission error of spiral bevel gears is shown to be stationary with respect to small independent variations in the positions of the endpoints of the lines of tooth contact about their true values. The tangential generalized transmission error component is shown to take on a minimum value at the true endpoint positions. A computational procedure based on the method of steepest descent is described for computing the true line of contact endpoint positions and the three components of the generalized transmission error. A method for computing the Fourier series coefficients of the tooth meshing harmonics of the three generalized transmission error components also is provided.

  19. The role of self-regulated learning in explaining examination performance of college students in first-semester general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Scott

    Many college students struggle with first-semester general chemistry. Prior studies have shown that a student's prior knowledge of chemistry, a cognitive factor, does not account for the total variance when measured by examination scores. This study explored the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) to identify the degree of success or failure of students with two outcome variables (i.e., American Chemical Society Comprehensive First-Term General Chemistry Examination (Form 2009) and hour-examination averages). The SRL construct consists of three interrelated components (i.e., cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational). SRL theory focuses on the idea of reciprocal determinism, in which the impact of one component of self-regulation affects the other two components. In the quantitative portion of this mixed methods study, eight measures of SRL were used to determine the `level' of self-regulation for each student. SRL variables were used in regression analysis and provided additional and unique variances. Cluster analysis techniques identified two distinct groups of students (i.e., adaptive and maladaptive). Generally, adaptive learners were associated with higher levels of SRL and success in the course; maladaptive learners had lower levels of SRL and struggled with the course demands. For the qualitative portion of the study, student volunteers (n = 8) were interviewed to gauge their views on the role of instruction in influencing their examination performances. The findings indicated that perceptions of teaching methods, demands of the course, course structure, feedback, and assessments were associated with the students' levels of self-regulation. Interviews revealed four SRL styles. Rote memorizers tended to fragment instruction and then memorize each fragment, while algorithmic memorizers tended to imitate the step-by-step problem-solving strategies of the instructor or the textbook. Globalizers were intrinsically motivated to learn the material but tended to

  20. First principles approach to the Abraham-Minkowski controversy for the momentum of light in general linear non-dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Tomás; Rubilar, Guillermo F.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2015-02-01

    We study the problem of the definition of the energy-momentum tensor of light in general moving non-dispersive media with linear constitutive law. Using the basic principles of classical field theory, we show that for the correct understanding of the problem, one needs to carefully distinguish situations when the material medium is modeled either as a background on which light propagates or as a dynamical part of the total system. In the former case, we prove that the (generalized) Belinfante-Rosenfeld (BR) tensor for the electromagnetic field coincides with the Minkowski tensor. We derive a complete set of balance equations for this open system and show that the symmetries of the background medium are directly related to the conservation of the Minkowski quantities. In particular, for isotropic media, the angular momentum of light is conserved despite of the fact that the Minkowski tensor is non-symmetric. For the closed system of light interacting with matter, we model the material medium as a relativistic non-dissipative fluid and we prove that it is always possible to express the total BR tensor of the closed system either in the Abraham or in the Minkowski separation. However, in the case of dynamical media, the balance equations have a particularly convenient form in terms of the Abraham tensor. Our results generalize previous attempts and provide a first principles basis for a unified understanding of the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski controversy without ad hoc arguments.

  1. Examining the Use of First Principles of Instruction by Instructional Designers in a Short-Term, High Volume, Rapid Production of Online K-12 Teacher Professional Development Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendenhall, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Merrill (2002a) created a set of fundamental principles of instruction that can lead to effective, efficient, and engaging (e[superscript 3]) instruction. The First Principles of Instruction (Merrill, 2002a) are a prescriptive set of interrelated instructional design practices that consist of activating prior knowledge, using specific portrayals…

  2. How Is Examination Stress Experienced by Secondary Students Preparing for Their General Certificate of Secondary Education Examinations and How Can It Be Explained?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2011-01-01

    High stakes examinations have been identified as a significant source of stress for secondary school students; however, there is little data accounting for, and explaining, the experiences of examination stress. This study aimed to further the understanding of examination stress in secondary school students by conducting interviews with 34…

  3. How Is Examination Stress Experienced by Secondary Students Preparing for Their General Certificate of Secondary Education Examinations and How Can It Be Explained?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2011-01-01

    High stakes examinations have been identified as a significant source of stress for secondary school students; however, there is little data accounting for, and explaining, the experiences of examination stress. This study aimed to further the understanding of examination stress in secondary school students by conducting interviews with 34…

  4. Applicability of Markets to Global Scheduling in Grids: Critical Examination of General Equilibrium Theory and Market Folklore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakai, Junko; VanDerWijngaart, Rob F.

    2003-01-01

    Markets are often considered superior to other global scheduling mechanisms for distributed computing systems. This claim is supported by: a casual observation from our every-day life that markets successfully equilibrate supply and demand, and the features of markets which originate in the general equilibrium theory, e.g., efficiency and the lack of necessity of 2 central controller. This paper describes why such beliefs in markets are not warranted. It does so by examining the general equilibrium theory, in terms of scope, abstraction, and interpretation. Not only does the general equilibrium theory fail to provide a satisfactory explanation of actual economies, including a computing-resource economy, it also falls short of supplying theoretical foundations for commonly held views of market desirability. This paper also points out that the argument for the desirability of markets involves circular reasoning and that the desirability can be established only vis-a-vis a scheduling goal. Finally, recasting the conclusion of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem as that for global scheduling, we conclude that there exists no market-based scheduler that is rational (in the sense defined in microeconomic theory), takes into account utility of more than one user, and yet yields a Pareto-optimal outcome for arbitrary user utility functions.

  5. Examining the Continuity of Juvenile Sex Offending Into Adulthood and Subsequent Patterns of Sex and General Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Beaudry-Cyr, Maude; Jennings, Wesley G; Zgoba, Kristen M; Tewksbury, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Current sex offending legislation and public opinion present an image of sexual offenders as specialized predators who are likely to exhibit continued sexually deviant behavior over the life-course. Although sex offending continuity and post-release recidivism has been independently assessed in prior research, the potential link between sex offending continuity and post-release recidivism has yet to be investigated. Using data collected at two different time points from a sample of sex offenders who served a prison sentence for an adult sex offense, the present study examines the prevalence of sex offending continuity, and its potential linkages with subsequent sex and general recidivism as well as identifying risk factors related to these outcomes. The multivariate results indicate a low rate of sex offending continuity in general but suggest the presence of identifiable risk factors that predict sex offending continuity. Specifically, non-sexual juvenile offending is the most notable of the numerous risk factors found to be associated with those displaying sex offending continuity from adolescence into adulthood. Subsequent analyses also reveal a significant association between sex offending continuity and sexual recidivism but not general recidivism. Policy implications, study limitations, and directions for future research are also discussed.

  6. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P < .001) and nonteaching hospitals (8.7% [95% CI, 8.3%-9.0%] to 7.1% [95% CI, 6.8%-7.5%], P < .001). In adjusted analyses, the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was not associated with a significant change in death or serious morbidity in either postreform year 1 (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0

  7. Utilization of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education in General Chemistry by Community College Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panther Bishoff, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, higher education has undergone many changes. The advent of assessment, accountability, and a newfound focus on teaching have required faculty to examine how they are teaching. Administrators and faculty are beginning to recognize that learning is not a "one size fits all" enterprise. To this end, Chickering and Gamson developed an…

  8. Utilization of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education in General Chemistry by Community College Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panther Bishoff, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, higher education has undergone many changes. The advent of assessment, accountability, and a newfound focus on teaching have required faculty to examine how they are teaching. Administrators and faculty are beginning to recognize that learning is not a "one size fits all" enterprise. To this end, Chickering and Gamson developed an…

  9. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size-a general organization principle of the human connectome.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Fövenyi, Laszlo; Liem, Franziskus; Meyer, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years ago, Ringo and colleagues proposed that maintaining absolute connectivity in larger compared with smaller brains is computationally inefficient due to increased conduction delays in transcallosal information transfer and expensive with respect to the brain mass needed to establish these additional connections. Therefore, they postulated that larger brains are relatively stronger connected intrahemispherically and smaller brains interhemispherically, resulting in stronger functional lateralization in larger brains. We investigated neuronal interconnections in 138 large and small human brains using diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tractography. We found a significant interaction between brain size and the type of connectivity. Structural intrahemispheric connectivity is stronger in larger brains, whereas interhemispheric connectivity is only marginally increased in larger compared with smaller brains. Although brain size and gender are confounded, this effect is gender-independent. Additionally, the ratio of interhemispheric to intrahemispheric connectivity correlates inversely with brain size. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size might account for shorter and more symmetrical interhemispheric transfer times in women and for empirical evidence that visual and auditory processing are stronger lateralized in men. The hypothesis additionally shows that differences in interhemispheric and intrahemispheric connectivity are driven by brain size and not by gender, a finding contradicting a recently published study. Our findings are also compatible with the idea that the more asymmetric a region is, the smaller the density of interhemispheric connections, but the larger the density of intrahemispheric connections. The hypothesis represents an organization principle of the human connectome that might be applied also to non-human animals as suggested by our cross-species comparison.

  10. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size—a general organization principle of the human connectome

    PubMed Central

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Fövenyi, Laszlo; Liem, Franziskus; Meyer, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years ago, Ringo and colleagues proposed that maintaining absolute connectivity in larger compared with smaller brains is computationally inefficient due to increased conduction delays in transcallosal information transfer and expensive with respect to the brain mass needed to establish these additional connections. Therefore, they postulated that larger brains are relatively stronger connected intrahemispherically and smaller brains interhemispherically, resulting in stronger functional lateralization in larger brains. We investigated neuronal interconnections in 138 large and small human brains using diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tractography. We found a significant interaction between brain size and the type of connectivity. Structural intrahemispheric connectivity is stronger in larger brains, whereas interhemispheric connectivity is only marginally increased in larger compared with smaller brains. Although brain size and gender are confounded, this effect is gender-independent. Additionally, the ratio of interhemispheric to intrahemispheric connectivity correlates inversely with brain size. The hypothesis of neuronal interconnectivity as a function of brain size might account for shorter and more symmetrical interhemispheric transfer times in women and for empirical evidence that visual and auditory processing are stronger lateralized in men. The hypothesis additionally shows that differences in interhemispheric and intrahemispheric connectivity are driven by brain size and not by gender, a finding contradicting a recently published study. Our findings are also compatible with the idea that the more asymmetric a region is, the smaller the density of interhemispheric connections, but the larger the density of intrahemispheric connections. The hypothesis represents an organization principle of the human connectome that might be applied also to non-human animals as suggested by our cross-species comparison. PMID:25426059

  11. Re-examining the general positivity model of subjective well-being: the discrepancy between specific and global domain satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Oishi, S; Diener, E

    2001-08-01

    Three studies were conducted to examine the role of global life satisfaction in the discrepancy between specific and global domain satisfaction. Participants rated both global (e.g., education) and the corresponding, specific domain (e.g., professors, textbooks) satisfactions. In 3 studies, we found that individuals with higher life satisfaction evaluated global domain as a whole as more satisfying than those with lower life satisfaction, given the same level of satisfaction with specific domains. In Study 3, we also found that, given the same level of satisfaction during the previous 2 weeks, individuals with higher life satisfaction rated the global domains in general as more satisfying than those with lower life satisfaction. Overall, the association between globallife satisfaction and evaluative enhancement of global domains was most consistent in "self" and "social relationships." Finally, the effect of global life satisfaction on evaluative enhancement remained significant, controlling for extraversion and neuroticism.

  12. Mood regulation and quality of life in social anxiety disorder: An examination of generalized expectancies for negative mood regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Sharon C.; Porter, Eliora; Robinaugh, Donald J.; Marks, Elizabeth H.; Marques, Luana M.; Otto, Michael W.; Pollack, Mark H.; Simon, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined negative mood regulation expectancies, anxiety symptom severity, and quality of life in a sample of 167 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 165 healthy controls with no DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Participants completed the Generalized Expectancies for Negative Mood Regulation Scale (NMR), the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. SAD symptom severity was assessed using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Individuals with SAD scored significantly lower than controls on the NMR. Among SAD participants, NMR scores were negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms and SAD severity, and positively correlated with quality of life. NMR expectancies positively predicted quality of life even after controlling for demographic variables, comorbid diagnoses, anxiety symptoms, and SAD severity. Individuals with SAD may be less likely to engage in emotion regulating strategies due to negative beliefs regarding their effectiveness, thereby contributing to poorer quality of life. PMID:22343166

  13. Mood regulation and quality of life in social anxiety disorder: an examination of generalized expectancies for negative mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sharon C; Porter, Eliora; Robinaugh, Donald J; Marks, Elizabeth H; Marques, Luana M; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H; Simon, Naomi M

    2012-04-01

    The present study examined negative mood regulation expectancies, anxiety symptom severity, and quality of life in a sample of 167 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 165 healthy controls with no DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Participants completed the Generalized Expectancies for Negative Mood Regulation Scale (NMR), the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. SAD symptom severity was assessed using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Individuals with SAD scored significantly lower than controls on the NMR. Among SAD participants, NMR scores were negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms and SAD severity, and positively correlated with quality of life. NMR expectancies positively predicted quality of life even after controlling for demographic variables, comorbid diagnoses, anxiety symptoms, and SAD severity. Individuals with SAD may be less likely to engage in emotion regulating strategies due to negative beliefs regarding their effectiveness, thereby contributing to poorer quality of life.

  14. An outline for a vocabulary of nominal properties and examinations--basic and general concepts and associated terms.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Gunnar; Dybkaer, René; Forsum, Urban; Fuentes-Arderiu, Xavier; Schadow, Gunther; Pontet, Françoise

    2010-11-01

    Scientists of disciplines in clinical laboratory sciences have long recognized the need for a common language for efficient and safe request of investigations, reporting of results, and communication of experience and scientific achievements. Widening the scope, most scientific disciplines, not only clinical laboratory sciences, rely to some extent on various nominal examinations, in addition to measurements. The 'International vocabulary of metrology--Basic and general concepts and associated terms' (VIM) is designed for metrology, science of measurement. The aim of the proposed vocabulary is to suggest definitions and explanations of concepts and terms related to nominal properties, i.e., properties that can be compared for identity with other properties of the same kind-of-property, but that have no magnitude.

  15. First-principles calculation of defect free energies: General aspects illustrated in the case of bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, D.; Posselt, M.; Schiwarth, M.

    2015-08-01

    Modeling of nanostructure evolution in solids requires comprehensive data on the properties of defects such as the vacancy and foreign atoms. Since most processes occur at elevated temperatures, not only the energetics of defects in the ground state, but also their temperature-dependent free energies must be known. The first-principles calculation of contributions of phonon and electron excitations to free formation, binding, and migration energies of defects is illustrated in the case of bcc Fe. First of all, the ground-state properties of the vacancy, the foreign atoms Cu, Y, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, V, Mo, Si, Al, Co, O, and the O-vacancy pair are determined under constant volume (CV) as well as zero-pressure (ZP) conditions, and relations between the results of both kinds of calculations are discussed. Second, the phonon contribution to defect free energies is calculated within the harmonic approximation using the equilibrium atomic positions determined in the ground state under CV and ZP conditions. In most cases, the ZP-based free formation energy decreases monotonously with temperature, whereas for CV-based data both an increase and a decrease were found. The application of a quasiharmonic correction to the ZP-based data does not modify this picture significantly. However, the corrected data are valid under zero-pressure conditions at higher temperatures than in the framework of the purely harmonic approach. The difference between CV- and ZP-based data is mainly due to the volume change of the supercell since the relative arrangement of atoms in the environment of the defects is nearly identical in the two cases. A simple transformation similar to the quasiharmonic approach is found between the CV- and ZP-based frequencies. Therefore, it is not necessary to calculate these quantities and the corresponding defect free energies separately. In contrast to ground-state energetics, the CV- and ZP-based defect free energies do not become equal with increasing supercell

  16. Utility of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Mini-Mental State Examination in predicting general intellectual abilities.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Michael A; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether scores from 2 commonly used cognitive screening tests can help predict general intellectual functioning in older adults. Cutoff scores for determining cognitive impairment have been validated for both the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). However, less is known about how the 2 measures relate to general intellectual functioning as measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). A sample of 186 older adults referred for neuropsychological assessment completed the MoCA, MMSE, and WAIS-IV. Regression equations determined how accurately the screening measures could predict the WAIS-IV Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ). We also determined how predictive the MoCA and MMSE were when combined with 2 premorbid estimates of FSIQ: the Test of Premorbid Functioning (TOPF) (a reading test of phonetically irregular words) and a predicted TOPF score based on demographic variables. MoCA and MMSE both correlated moderately with WAIS-IV FSIQ. Hierarchical regression models containing the MoCA or MMSE combined with TOPF scores accounted for 58% and 49%, respectively, of the variance in obtained FSIQ. Both regression equations accurately estimated FSIQ to within 10 points in >75% of the sample. Both the MoCA and MMSE provide reasonable estimates of FSIQ. Prediction improves when these measures are combined with other estimates of FSIQ. We provide 4 equations designed to help clinicians interpret these screening measures.

  17. [The Relation between the Height of Radiographic Table and Workloads of Radiologic Technologist in General X-ray Examinations].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Noriko; Arimura, Hisao; Fukano, Yuuichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Yabuuchi, Hidetake

    2015-12-01

    Workloads of radiological technologists under different conditions of heights of radiographic table and/or X-ray tube assembly were calculated using a software for preventing musculoskeletal complaint to investigate optimal working environment for general X-ray examinations. In the patient positioning, compressive force of lumbar disc decreased at higher radiographic table within the range of 45-90 cm. On the other hand, workload of the shoulder joint increased with increase in the height of radiographic table. Load of the shoulder joint similarly increased as the height of the X-ray tube assembly increased. Compressive force of lumbar disc reduced by approximately 10-30% as the height ratio of the radiographic table to body height increased by approximately 40%, compared to the lowest table of 45 cm. Muscle load of a 50-years-old woman was approximately double compared to a 30-year-old man, even in the same workload. It is important to keep suitable height of radiographic table for reduction of the workloads of lumbar rather than shoulder joint, because floating-type radiographic table is generally used.

  18. Argumentation as a Lens to Examine Student Discourse in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry for College General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, Ushiri Kumarihamy

    This dissertation work entails three related studies on the investigation of Peer-Led Guided Inquiry student discourse in a General Chemistry I course through argumentation. The first study, Argumentation and participation patterns in general chemistry peer-led sessions, is focused on examining arguments and participation patterns in small student groups without peer leader intervention. The findings of this study revealed that students were mostly engaged in co-constructed arguments, that a discrepancy in the participation of the group members existed, and students were able to correct most of the incorrect claims on their own via argumentation. The second study, Exploration of peer leader verbal behaviors as they intervene with small groups in college general chemistry, examines the interactive discourse of the peer leaders and the students during peer leader intervention. The relationship between the verbal behaviors of the peer leaders and the student argumentation is explored in this study. The findings of this study demonstrated that peer leaders used an array of verbal behaviors to guide students to construct chemistry concepts, and that a relationship existed between student argument components and peer leader verbal behaviors. The third study, Use of Tolumin's Argumentation Scheme for student discourse to gain insight about guided inquiry activities in college chemistry , is focused on investigating the relationship between student arguments without peer leader intervention and the structure of published guided inquiry ChemActivities. The relationship between argumentation and the structure of the activities is explored with respect to prompts, questions, and the segmented Learning Cycle structure of the ChemActivities. Findings of this study revealed that prompts were effective in eliciting arguments, that convergent questions produced more arguments than directed questions, and that the structure of the Learning Cycle successfully scaffolded arguments. A

  19. Heterogeneity-mediated cellular adaptation and its trade-off: searching for the general principles of diseases.

    PubMed

    Heng, Henry H

    2017-02-01

    Big-data-omics have promised the success of precision medicine. However, most common diseases belong to adaptive systems where the precision is all but difficult to achieve. In this commentary, I propose a heterogeneity-mediated cellular adaptive model to search for the general model of diseases, which also illustrates why in most non-infectious non-Mendelian diseases the involvement of cellular evolution is less predictable when gene profiles are used. This synthesis is based on the following new observations/concepts: 1) the gene only codes "parts inheritance" while the genome codes "system inheritance" or the entire blueprint; 2) the nature of somatic genetic coding is fuzzy rather than precise, and genetic alterations are not just the results of genetic error but are in fact generated from internal adaptive mechanisms in response to environmental dynamics; 3) stress-response is less specific within cellular evolutionary context when compared to known biochemical specificities; and 4) most medical interventions have their unavoidable uncertainties and often can function as negative harmful stresses as trade-offs. The acknowledgment of diseases as adaptive systems calls for the action to integrate genome- (not simply individual gene-) mediated cellular evolution into molecular medicine. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Designing and Interpreting Limiting Dilution Assays: General Principles and Applications to the Latent Reservoir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Daniel I. S.; Elliott, Oliver; Hill, Alison L.; Henrich, Timothy J.; Siliciano, Janet M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Limiting dilution assays are widely used in infectious disease research. These assays are crucial for current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 cure research in particular. In this study, we offer new tools to help investigators design and analyze dilution assays based on their specific research needs. Limiting dilution assays are commonly used to measure the extent of infection, and in the context of HIV they represent an essential tool for studying latency and potential curative strategies. Yet standard assay designs may not discern whether an intervention reduces an already miniscule latent infection. This review addresses challenges arising in this setting and in the general use of dilution assays. We illustrate the major statistical method for estimating frequency of infectious units from assay results, and we offer an online tool for computing this estimate. We recommend a procedure for customizing assay design to achieve desired sensitivity and precision goals, subject to experimental constraints. We consider experiments in which no viral outgrowth is observed and explain how using alternatives to viral outgrowth may make measurement of HIV latency more efficient. Finally, we discuss how biological complications, such as probabilistic growth of small infections, alter interpretations of experimental results. PMID:26478893

  1. Averting a Disaster with Groundwater Depletion in India: The General Case of Water Management Principles and Development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, U.

    2013-12-01

    Many countries, including the USA, China, and India are experiencing chronic groundwater depletion. In part this unsustainable water use results from climatic factors that reduce surface water availability and also the recharge to the aquifer system. However, a more critical factor is uncontrolled use for agriculture and energy and mineral processing. Interestingly in places such as India endowments have been politically created that lead to ever increasing use, through the provision of free energy for pumping. Reversing the situation is considered politically challenging, and the concept of metering and payment for what is essentially economic use of water is also considered difficult to apply. In this talk I use the Indian situation as a general example and discuss the role central planning strategies for demand and resource management can play recognizing the private action by millions of users as an inevitable tool that needs to be leveraged without necessarily the high transaction costs that come with monitoring and fee collection for monitored use. Specifically, targeting and stimulating potential cropping strategies and on farm water and energy management emerge as a choice in a difficult management environment. In a broader development context, I argue that the role of private sector aggregators in developing farm to market procurement strategies can play a role in both improving rural economies and providing a trajectory for more efficient water use through technology and crop choice.

  2. General principles for the formation and proliferation of a wall-free (L-form) state in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Romain; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Errington, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is a defining structural feature of the bacterial kingdom. Curiously, some bacteria have the ability to switch to a wall-free or ‘L-form’ state. Although known for decades, the general properties of L-forms are poorly understood, largely due to the lack of systematic analysis of L-forms in the molecular biology era. Here we show that inhibition of peptidoglycan precursor synthesis promotes the generation of L-forms from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We show that the L-forms generated have in common a mechanism of proliferation involving membrane blebbing and tubulation, which is dependent on an altered rate of membrane synthesis. Crucially, this mode of proliferation is independent of the essential FtsZ based division machinery. Our results suggest that the L-form mode of proliferation is conserved across the bacterial kingdom, reinforcing the idea that it could have been used in primitive cells, and opening up its use in the generation of synthetic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04629.001 PMID:25358088

  3. Examining different measures of multimorbidity, using a large prospective cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Miller, Graeme; Henderson, Joan

    2014-07-11

    Prevalence estimates of multimorbidity vary widely due to inconsistent definitions and measurement methods. This study examines the independent effects on prevalence estimates of how 'disease entity' is defined-as a single chronic condition or chapters/domains in the International Classification of Primary Care (V.2; ICPC-2), International Classification of Disease (10th revision; ICD-10) or the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS), the number of disease entities required for multimorbidity, and the number of chronic conditions studied. National prospective cross-sectional study. Australian general practice. 8707 random consenting deidentified patient encounters with 290 randomly selected general practitioners. Prevalence estimates of multimorbidity using different definitions. Data classified to ICPC-2 chapters, ICD-10 chapters or CIRS domains produce similar multimorbidity prevalence estimates. When multimorbidity was defined as two or more (2+) disease entities: counting individual chronic conditions and groups of chronic conditions produced similar estimates; the 12 most prevalent chronic conditions identified about 80% of those identified using all chronic conditions. When multimorbidity was defined as 3+ disease entities: counting individual chronic conditions produced significantly higher estimates than counting groups of chronic conditions; the 12 most prevalent chronic conditions identified only two-thirds of patients identified using all chronic conditions. Multimorbidity defined as 2+ disease entities can be measured using different definitions of disease entity with as few as 12 prevalent chronic conditions, but lacks specificity to be useful, especially in older people. Multimorbidity, defined as 3+, requires more measurement conformity and inclusion of all chronic conditions, but provides greater specificity than the 2+ definition. The proposed concept of "complex multimorbidity", the co-occurrence of three or more chronic conditions affecting three

  4. Comparability of Computer and Paper-and-Pencil Scores for Two CLEP General Examinations. College Board Report No. 91-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzeo, John; And Others

    Two studies investigated the comparability of scores from paper-and-pencil and computer-administered versions of the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations in mathematics and English composition. The first study used a prototype computer-administered version on each examination for 94 students for mathematics and 116 for…

  5. An examination of the relationship between personality and aggression using the general aggression and five factor models.

    PubMed

    Hosie, Julia; Gilbert, Flora; Simpson, Katrina; Daffern, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between personality and aggression using the general aggression (GAM, Anderson and Bushman [2002] Annual Review of Psychology, 53, 27-51) and five factor models (FFMs) (Costa and McCrae [1992] Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources). Specifically, it examined Ferguson and Dyck's (Ferguson and Dyck [2012] Aggression and Violent Behavior, 17, 220-228) criticisms that the GAM has questionable validity in clinical populations and disproportionately focuses on aggression-related knowledge structures to the detriment of other inputs, specifically personality variables. Fifty-five male offenders attending a community forensic mental health service for pre-sentence psychiatric and/or psychological evaluation were assessed for aggressive script rehearsal, aggression-supportive normative beliefs, FFM personality traits, trait anger and past aggressive behavior. With regard to relationships between five factor variables and aggression, results suggested that only agreeableness and conscientiousness were related to aggression. However, these relationships were: (1) weak in comparison with those between script rehearsal, normative beliefs and trait anger with aggression and (2) were not significant predictors in hierarchical regression analysis when all of the significant univariate predictors, including GAM-specified variables were regressed onto life history of aggression; normative beliefs supporting aggression, aggressive script rehearsal, and trait anger were significantly related to aggression in this regression analysis. These results provide further support for the application of the GAM to aggressive populations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Principles of Catholic Social Teaching, Critical Pedagogy, and the Theory of Intersectionality: An Integrated Framework to Examine the Roles of Social Status in the Formation of Catholic Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eick, Caroline Marie; Ryan, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the relevance of an analytic framework that integrates principles of Catholic social teaching, critical pedagogy, and the theory of intersectionality to explain attitudes toward marginalized youth held by Catholic students preparing to become teachers. The framework emerges from five years of action research data collected…

  7. Relationships between study habits, burnout, and general surgery resident performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Matthew R; Thrush, Carol R; McDaniel, Faith K; Gill, Roop; Kimbrough, Mary K; Shames, Brian D; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Galante, Joseph M; Wittgen, Catherine M; Ansari, Parswa; Allen, Steven R; Nussbaum, Michael S; Hess, Donald T; Knight, David C; Bentley, Frederick R

    2017-09-01

    The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is used by programs to evaluate the knowledge and readiness of trainees to sit for the general surgery qualifying examination. It is often used as a tool for resident promotion and may be used by fellowship programs to evaluate candidates. Burnout has been associated with job performance and satisfaction; however, its presence and effects on surgical trainees' performance are not well studied. We sought to understand factors including burnout and study habits that may contribute to performance on the ABSITE examination. Anonymous electronic surveys were distributed to all residents at 10 surgical residency programs (n = 326). Questions included demographics as well as study habits, career interests, residency characteristics, and burnout scores using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, which assesses burnout because of both exhaustion and disengagement. These surveys were then linked to the individual's 2016 ABSITE and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and 2 scores provided by the programs to determine factors associated with successful ABSITE performance. In total, 48% (n = 157) of the residents completed the survey. Of those completing the survey, 48 (31%) scored in the highest ABSITE quartile (≥75th percentile) and 109 (69%) scored less than the 75th percentile. In univariate analyses, those in the highest ABSITE quartile had significantly higher USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores (P < 0.001), significantly lower burnout scores (disengagement, P < 0.01; exhaustion, P < 0.04), and held opinions that the ABSITE was important for improving their surgical knowledge (P < 0.01). They also read more frequently to prepare for the ABSITE (P < 0.001), had more disciplined study habits (P < 0.001), were more likely to study at the hospital or other public settings (e.g., library, coffee shop compared with at home; P < 0.04), and used active rather than passive study

  8. General Chemistry, Principles and Modern Applications, Seventh Edition (by Ralph H. Petrucci and William S. Harwood) and General Chemistry, Fifth Edition (by Kenneth W. Whitten, Raymond E. Davis, and M. Larry Peck)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poskozim, Paul S.

    1997-05-01

    General Chemistry, Principles and Modern Applications, Seventh Edition Ralph H. Petrucci and William S. Harwood. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1997. xxvi + 989 pp. Figs. and tables. 20.6 x 26.0 cm. 85. General Chemistry, Fifth Edition Kenneth W. Whitten, Raymond E. Davis, and M. Larry Peck. Saunders: New York, 1996. xlv + 1051 pp. Figs. and tables. 22.2 x 26.0 cm. 85. Modern texts of general chemistry are considerably better than they were thirty years ago, and the two books reviewed here, Petrucci and Whitten, clearly follow this trend. Both are well-written teaching instruments with lots of student-friendly features. I speak from experience, having taught out of earlier editions of both, and having heard the comments expressed by students about them. Both are used annually by tens of thousands of students. The successful formulas for writing good general chemistry texts are currently being used in at least a half dozen clonelike cousins, making adoption decisions more difficult.

  9. Study of the Knowledge and Attitude about Principles and Practices of Orthodontic Treatment among General Dental Practitioners and Non-orthodontic Specialties

    PubMed Central

    Sastri, Murlidhar R; Tanpure, Vijaysinh Ramchandra; Palagi, Firoz Babu; Shinde, Sagar Kundlik; Ladhe, Kapil; Polepalle, Tejaswin

    2015-01-01

    Background: General dental practitioners and non-orthodontic specialty can play an essential role of education and motivation of their patients about the principles and practice of orthodontic treatment; which can be very beneficial to the patient’s lifestyle. It is, therefore, important to identify their level of knowledge and attitude toward orthodontic treatment. This study was planned to study this aspect in the form of comparative analysis in general dental practitioners and other specialties (except orthodontia) in dentistry. Materials and Methods: The study was done on 78 dentists, which was divided into two groups. Group I consisted of 46 general dental practitioners and Group II consisted of 32 non-orthodontic specialties. The study was carried out with the help of 21 questionnaires, which consisted of 13 questions of orthodontic knowledge and 08 questions about the attitude toward orthodontic practice. The scores were calculated, and statistical analysis was done with the help of IBM SPSS statistics 20, using Student’s t-test. Results: The comparative analysis showed highly significant difference of knowledge and attitude score between general dental practitioners and non-orthodontic specialties (Student’s t-test, P < 0.001). Also the comparison was made between male and female practitioners, who showed more scores in case of male practitioners; but the difference was not significant statistically (Student’s t-test, P > 0.01). Conclusion: The results of the study were moderately satisfactory, and it showed the need for increased clinically oriented education of practice and concepts of orthodontic treatment. PMID:25878478

  10. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th–10th Grades

    PubMed Central

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population—adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to represent these constructs with minimal error and to examine whether residual variance unaccounted for by oral language can be captured by specific factors of syntax and vocabulary. A 1-, 3-, 4-, and bifactor model were tested with 1,792 students in 18 schools in 2 large urban districts in the Southeast. Students were individually administered measures of expressive and receptive vocabulary, syntax, and decoding fluency in mid-year. At the end of the year students took the state reading test as well as a group-administered, norm-referenced test of reading comprehension. The bifactor model fit the data best in all 7 grades and explained 72% to 99% of the variance in reading comprehension. The specific factors of syntax and vocabulary explained significant unique variance in reading comprehension in 1 grade each. The decoding fluency factor was significantly correlated with the reading comprehension and oral language factors in all grades, but, in the presence of the oral language factor, was not significantly associated with the reading comprehension factor. Results support a bifactor model of lexical knowledge rather than the 3-factor model of the Simple View of Reading, with the vast amount of variance in reading comprehension explained by a general oral language factor. PMID:26346839

  11. Disruption of long-range gene regulation in human genetic disease: a kaleidoscope of general principles, diverse mechanisms and unique phenotypic consequences.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shipra; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2014-07-01

    The precise control of gene expression programs is crucial for the establishment of the diverse gene activity patterns required for the correct development, patterning and differentiation of the myriad of cell types within an organism. The crucial importance of non-coding regions of the genome in the control of gene regulation is well established and depends on a diverse group of sequence fragments called cis-regulatory elements that reside in these regions. Advances in novel genome-wide techniques have greatly increased the ability to identify potential regulatory elements. In contrast, their functional characterisation and the determination of their diverse modes of action remain a major bottleneck. Greater knowledge of gene expression control is of major importance for human health as disruption of gene regulation has become recognised as a significant cause of human disease. Appreciation of the role of cis-regulatory polymorphism in natural variation and susceptibility to common disease is also growing. While novel techniques such as GWAS and NGS provide the ability to collect large genomic datasets, the challenge for the twenty-first century will be to extract the relevant sequences and how to investigate the functional consequences of disease-associated changes. Here, we review how studies of transcriptional control at selected paradigm disease gene loci have revealed general principles of cis-regulatory logic and regulatory genome organisation, yet also demonstrate how the variety of mechanisms can combine to result in unique phenotypic outcomes. Integration of these principles with the emerging wealth of genome-wide data will provide enhanced insight into the workings of our regulatory genome.

  12. The Utility of General and School-Specific Personality Traits and an Examination of Their Relationship over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschleman, Kevin J.; Burns, Gary

    2012-01-01

    A university student sample was used to compare school-specific (i.e., personality at school) and general personality (i.e., personality across all life domains) over eight weeks. School-specific and general personality incrementally predicted change in school-specific criteria (i.e., school satisfaction and school citizenship behaviors). Less…

  13. The Utility of General and School-Specific Personality Traits and an Examination of Their Relationship over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschleman, Kevin J.; Burns, Gary

    2012-01-01

    A university student sample was used to compare school-specific (i.e., personality at school) and general personality (i.e., personality across all life domains) over eight weeks. School-specific and general personality incrementally predicted change in school-specific criteria (i.e., school satisfaction and school citizenship behaviors). Less…

  14. School Functioning and Psychological Well-Being of International Baccalaureate and General Education Students: A Preliminary Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Suldo, Shannon M.; Hardesty, Robin B.; Shaffer, Emily J.

    2006-01-01

    The current study compared the school and psychological functioning of 122 gifted and high-achieving students to that of 176 general education students educated in the same school. Relative to their peers in general education, gifted and high-achieving students served in the school's International Baccalaureate (IB) program reported more positive…

  15. The neural circuits for arithmetic principles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Han; Chen, Chuansheng; Chen, Hui; Cui, Jiaxin; Zhou, Xinlin

    2017-02-15

    Arithmetic principles are the regularities underlying arithmetic computation. Little is known about how the brain supports the processing of arithmetic principles. The current fMRI study examined neural activation and functional connectivity during the processing of verbalized arithmetic principles, as compared to numerical computation and general language processing. As expected, arithmetic principles elicited stronger activation in bilateral horizontal intraparietal sulcus and right supramarginal gyrus than did language processing, and stronger activation in left middle temporal lobe and left orbital part of inferior frontal gyrus than did computation. In contrast, computation elicited greater activation in bilateral horizontal intraparietal sulcus (extending to posterior superior parietal lobule) than did either arithmetic principles or language processing. Functional connectivity analysis with the psychophysiological interaction approach (PPI) showed that left temporal-parietal (MTG-HIPS) connectivity was stronger during the processing of arithmetic principle and language than during computation, whereas parietal-occipital connectivities were stronger during computation than during the processing of arithmetic principles and language. Additionally, the left fronto-parietal (orbital IFG-HIPS) connectivity was stronger during the processing of arithmetic principles than during computation. The results suggest that verbalized arithmetic principles engage a neural network that overlaps but is distinct from the networks for computation and language processing.

  16. Bernoulli's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2004-01-01

    Some teachers have difficulty understanding Bernoulli's principle particularly when the principle is applied to the aerodynamic lift. Some teachers favor using Newton's laws instead of Bernoulli's principle to explain the physics behind lift. Some also consider Bernoulli's principle too difficult to explain to students and avoid teaching it…

  17. Bernoulli's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2004-01-01

    Some teachers have difficulty understanding Bernoulli's principle particularly when the principle is applied to the aerodynamic lift. Some teachers favor using Newton's laws instead of Bernoulli's principle to explain the physics behind lift. Some also consider Bernoulli's principle too difficult to explain to students and avoid teaching it…

  18. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  19. Information Literacy: Philosophy, Principles, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Ross J.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a philosophical framework for the development of information literacy programs integrated into school curriculums; reports on research in Australia that examines the impact of integrated information literacy programs on secondary school student learning and attitudes; and explores general principles for information literacy instructional…

  20. Generalized-stacking-fault energy and twin-boundary energy of hexagonal close-packed Au: A first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Huiyuan; Huang, Tianlong; Xue, Xuena; Qiu, Feng; Jiang, Qichuan

    2015-05-22

    Although solid Au is usually most stable as a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, pure hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Au has been successfully fabricated recently. However, the phase stability and mechanical property of this new material are unclear, which may restrict its further applications. Here we present the evidence that hcp → fcc phase transformation can proceed easily in Au by first-principles calculations. The extremely low generalized-stacking-fault (GSF) energy in the basal slip system implies a great tendency to form basal stacking faults, which opens the door to phase transformation from hcp to fcc. Moreover, the Au lattice extends slightly within the superficial layers due to the self-assembly of alkanethiolate species on hcp Au (0001) surface, which may also contribute to the hcp → fcc phase transformation. Compared with hcp Mg, the GSF energies for non-basal slip systems and the twin-boundary (TB) energies for and twins are larger in hcp Au, which indicates the more difficulty in generating non-basal stacking faults and twins. The findings provide new insights for understanding the nature of the hcp → fcc phase transformation and guide the experiments of fabricating and developing materials with new structures.

  1. Generalized-stacking-fault energy and twin-boundary energy of hexagonal close-packed Au: A first-principles calculation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Huiyuan; Huang, Tianlong; Xue, Xuena; Qiu, Feng; Jiang, Qichuan

    2015-01-01

    Although solid Au is usually most stable as a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, pure hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Au has been successfully fabricated recently. However, the phase stability and mechanical property of this new material are unclear, which may restrict its further applications. Here we present the evidence that hcp → fcc phase transformation can proceed easily in Au by first-principles calculations. The extremely low generalized-stacking-fault (GSF) energy in the basal slip system implies a great tendency to form basal stacking faults, which opens the door to phase transformation from hcp to fcc. Moreover, the Au lattice extends slightly within the superficial layers due to the self-assembly of alkanethiolate species on hcp Au (0001) surface, which may also contribute to the hcp → fcc phase transformation. Compared with hcp Mg, the GSF energies for non-basal slip systems and the twin-boundary (TB) energies for and twins are larger in hcp Au, which indicates the more difficulty in generating non-basal stacking faults and twins. The findings provide new insights for understanding the nature of the hcp → fcc phase transformation and guide the experiments of fabricating and developing materials with new structures. PMID:25998415

  2. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the C: The Use of Microbial Mats to Demonstrate General Principles of Scientific Inquiry and Microbial Ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on Earth. As Earth's earliest ecosystems, they are centrally important to understanding the history of life on our planet and are useful models for the search for life elsewhere. As relatively compact (but complete) ecosystems, microbial mats are also extremely useful for educational activities. Mats may be used to demonstrate a wide variety of concepts in general and microbial ecology, including the biogeochemical cycling of elements, photosynthesis and respiration, and the origin of the Earth's present oxygen containing atmosphere. Microbial mats can be found in a number of common environments accessible to teachers, and laboratory microbial mats can be constructed using materials purchased from biological supply houses. With funding from NASA's Exobiology program, we have developed curriculum and web-based activities centered on the use of microbial mats as tools for demonstrating general principles in ecology, and the scientific process. Our web site (http://microbes.arc.nasa.gov) includes reference materials, lesson plans, and a "Web Lab", featuring living mats maintained in a mini-aquarium. The site also provides information as to how research on microbial mats supports NASA's goals, and various NASA missions. A photo gallery contains images of mats, microscopic views of the organisms that form them, and our own research activities. An animated educational video on the web site uses computer graphic and video microscopy to take students on a journey into a microbial mat. These activities are targeted to a middle school audience and are aligned with the National Science Standards.

  3. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the C: The Use of Microbial Mats to Demonstrate General Principles of Scientific Inquiry and Microbial Ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on Earth. As Earth's earliest ecosystems, they are centrally important to understanding the history of life on our planet and are useful models for the search for life elsewhere. As relatively compact (but complete) ecosystems, microbial mats are also extremely useful for educational activities. Mats may be used to demonstrate a wide variety of concepts in general and microbial ecology, including the biogeochemical cycling of elements, photosynthesis and respiration, and the origin of the Earth's present oxygen containing atmosphere. Microbial mats can be found in a number of common environments accessible to teachers, and laboratory microbial mats can be constructed using materials purchased from biological supply houses. With funding from NASA's Exobiology program, we have developed curriculum and web-based activities centered on the use of microbial mats as tools for demonstrating general principles in ecology, and the scientific process. Our web site (http://microbes.arc.nasa.gov) includes reference materials, lesson plans, and a "Web Lab", featuring living mats maintained in a mini-aquarium. The site also provides information as to how research on microbial mats supports NASA's goals, and various NASA missions. A photo gallery contains images of mats, microscopic views of the organisms that form them, and our own research activities. An animated educational video on the web site uses computer graphic and video microscopy to take students on a journey into a microbial mat. These activities are targeted to a middle school audience and are aligned with the National Science Standards.

  4. The effect of introducing radiographer reporting on the availability of reports for Accident and Emergency and General Practitioner examinations: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Brealey, S D; Scuffham, P A

    2005-06-01

    This study explores whether the introduction of selectively trained radiographers reporting Accident and Emergency (A&E) X-ray examinations of the appendicular skeleton affected the availability of reports for A&E and General Practitioner (GP) examinations at a typical district general hospital. This was achieved by analysing monthly data on A&E and GP examinations for 1993-1997 using structural time-series models. Parameters to capture stochastic seasonal effects and stochastic time trends were included in the models. The main outcome measures were changes in the number, proportion and timeliness of A&E and GP examinations reported. Radiographer reporting X-ray examinations requested by A&E was associated with a 12% (p=0.050) increase in the number of A&E examinations reported and a 37% (pexaminations. Radiographer reporting of A&E X-ray examinations was also associated with a 14% (p=0.067) decrease in the time taken for GP examinations to be reported. That is, radiographer reporting A&E X-ray examinations allowed an increase in the time available to radiologists to report on examinations requested by GPs. An increase in the proportion of GP examinations reported by radiologists was associated with longer reporting times for A&E examinations. In conclusion, selectively trained radiographers reporting on A&E X-ray examinations significantly improved the availability of reports for A&E and GP examinations.

  5. Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbard, Lisa; Sung, Shannon; Wells, Breche´

    2016-01-01

    Flipped learning has come to the forefront in education. It maximizes learning by moving content delivery online, where learning can be self-paced, allowing for class time to focus on student-centered active learning. This five-year cross-sectional study assessed student performance in a college general chemistry for majors sequence taught by a…

  6. Implementation of Gas Chromatography and Microscale Distillation into the General Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum as Vehicles for Examining Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an NSF-funded Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) project that seeks, in part, to increase student exposure to scientific instrumentation, a gas chromatography experiment has been integrated into the second-semester general chemistry laboratory curriculum. The experiment uses affordable, commercially available equipment…

  7. Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbard, Lisa; Sung, Shannon; Wells, Breche´

    2016-01-01

    Flipped learning has come to the forefront in education. It maximizes learning by moving content delivery online, where learning can be self-paced, allowing for class time to focus on student-centered active learning. This five-year cross-sectional study assessed student performance in a college general chemistry for majors sequence taught by a…

  8. Implementation of Gas Chromatography and Microscale Distillation into the General Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum as Vehicles for Examining Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an NSF-funded Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) project that seeks, in part, to increase student exposure to scientific instrumentation, a gas chromatography experiment has been integrated into the second-semester general chemistry laboratory curriculum. The experiment uses affordable, commercially available equipment…

  9. Factors Associated with General and Sexual Alcohol-Related Consequences: An Examination of College Students Studying Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Justin F.; Pedersen, Eric R.; Mirza, Tehniat; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    This study contributes to the scarce research on U.S. college students studying abroad by documenting general and sexual negative alcohol-related risks and factors associated with such risk. The manner of drinking (quantity vs. frequency), pre-departure expectations surrounding alcohol use while abroad, culture-related social anxiety, and…

  10. Examining Gender with General Creativity and Preferences for Creative Persons in College Students within the Sciences and the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charyton, Christine; Basham, Kimberly M.; Elliott, John O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to investigate gender similarities and differences in general creativity constructs with their preferences for creative persons. Data were collected from 247 participants (87 engineering, 24 psychology students with a psychology major, 51 psychology students with a major other than psychology, 30 English, and 55…

  11. An Examination of the Relationship between General Life Stress, Racism-Related Stress, and Psychological Health among Black Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieterse, Alex L.; Carter, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the relationship among general life stress, racism-related stress, and psychological health in a sample of 220 Black men. Participants completed a personal data form, the Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, T. Kamarck, & R. Mermelstein, 1983), a modified version of the Schedule of Racist Events (H. Landrine & E. A. Klonoff,…

  12. Examining the Factor Structure and Discriminant Validity of the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) Among Spanish Postpartum Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguado, Jaume; Campbell, Alistair; Ascaso, Carlos; Navarro, Purificacion; Garcia-Esteve, Lluisa; Luciano, Juan V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested alternative factor models of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in a sample of Spanish postpartum women, using confirmatory factor analysis. The authors report the results of modeling three different methods for scoring the GHQ-12 using estimation methods recommended for categorical and binary data.…

  13. Examining the Factor Structure and Discriminant Validity of the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) Among Spanish Postpartum Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguado, Jaume; Campbell, Alistair; Ascaso, Carlos; Navarro, Purificacion; Garcia-Esteve, Lluisa; Luciano, Juan V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested alternative factor models of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in a sample of Spanish postpartum women, using confirmatory factor analysis. The authors report the results of modeling three different methods for scoring the GHQ-12 using estimation methods recommended for categorical and binary data.…

  14. Biochemistry in the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 Content Outline: Organ Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1997-01-01

    Examines the Organ Systems part of the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 Content Outline for its biochemical components. The General Principles part of the Content Outline of the examination does not match the basic science teaching in medical schools with organ system curricula. Suggests a place where the basic principles in…

  15. Time in Computerized Tests: A Multitrait, Multimethod Investigation of General-Knowledge and Mathematical-Reasoning On-Line Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafaeli, Sheizaf; Tractinsky, Noam

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of time-related measures in computerized ability tests focuses on a study of college students that used two intelligence test item types to develop a multitrait, multimethod assessment of response time measures. Convergent and discriminant validation are discussed, correlations between response time and accuracy are examined, and…

  16. Emotional Reactions to Stress among Adolescent Boys and Girls: An Examination of the Mediating Mechanisms Proposed by General Strain Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigfusdottir, Inga-Dora; Silver, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of negative life events on anger and depressed mood among a sample of 7,758 Icelandic adolescents, measured as part of the National Survey of Icelandic Adolescents (Thorlindsson, Sigfusdottir, Bernburg, & Halldorsson, 1998). Using multiple linear regression and multinomial logit regression, we find that (a)…

  17. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the Classroom: The Use of Microbial Mats to Illustrate and Demonstrate General Principles of Scientific Inquiry and Microbial Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Bucaria, R.

    2004-12-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on Earth. As Earth's earliest ecosystems, they are centrally important to understanding the history of life on our planet and are useful models for the search for life elsewhere. As relatively small (but complete) ecosystems, microbial mats are also extremely useful for educational activities. Mats may be used to demonstrate a wide variety of concepts in general and microbial ecology, including the biogeochemical cycling of elements, photosynthesis and respiration, and the and the origin of the Earth's present oxygen containing atmosphere. Microbial mats can be found in a number of common environments accessible to teachers, and laboratory microbial mats can even be constructed using materials purchased from biological supply houses. With funding from NASA's Exobiology program, provided as a supplement to our research funding, we are developing curriculum and web-based activities centered on the use of microbial mats as tools for demonstrating general principles in ecology, and the scientific process. A web site with useful background information and links is now on-line. The curriculum, now in the pilot phase, is an integrated module having Science, Math and Language Art threads. A "Web Lab", featuring living mats maintained in a mini-aquarium, and complete with remotely-operable instrumentation not commonly available in classrooms, will be available to classrooms over the Internet. Using that system, the responses of the mat community to changes in environmental parameters, (e.g., light, pH, flow, and temperature) can be monitored using microsensors. Students will be able to develop hypotheses and propose experiments in the Web Lab to test them. Data from these experiments will be posted in real time and students will be able to collect the data, analyze it, and post results and conclusions back to the web page in a true implementation of the scientific inquiry process. The web site

  18. University Examinations and Standardized Testing: Principles, Experience, and Policy Options. World Bank Technical Paper Number 78. Proceedings of a Seminar on the Uses of Standardized Tests and Selection Examinations (Beijing, China, April 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyneman, Stephen P., Ed.; Fagerlind, Ingemar, Ed.

    In September 1984, the Chinese government asked the Economic Development Institute of the World Bank to assist the officials of the Chinese Ministry of Education in thinking through some policy options for examinations and standardized testing. This document summarizes the descriptions of testing programs and advice provided to these Chinese…

  19. The MEDIGATE graphical user interface for entry of physical findings: design principles and implementation. Medical Examination Direct Iconic and Graphic Augmented Text Entry System.

    PubMed

    Yoder, J W; Schultz, D F; Williams, B T

    1998-10-01

    The solution to many of the problems of the computer-based recording of the medical record has been elusive, largely due to difficulties in the capture of those data elements that comprise the records of the Present Illness and of the Physical Findings. Reliable input of data has proven to be more complex than originally envisioned by early work in the field. This has led to more research and development into better data collection protocols and easy to use human-computer interfaces as support tools. The Medical Examination Direct Iconic and Graphic Augmented Text Entry System (MEDIGATE System) is a computer enhanced interactive graphic and textual record of the findings from physical examinations designed to provide ease of user input and to support organization and processing of the data characterizing these findings. The primary design objective of the MEDIGATE System is to develop and evaluate different interface designs for recording observations from the physical examination in an attempt to overcome some of the deficiencies in this major component of the individual record of health and illness.

  20. Factors Associated With General and Sexual Alcohol-Related Consequences: An Examination of College Students Studying Abroad.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Justin F; Pedersen, Eric R; Mirza, Tehniat; Labrie, Joseph W

    2010-12-01

    This study contributes to the scarce research on U.S. college students studying abroad by documenting general and sexual negative alcohol-related risks and factors associated with such risk. The manner of drinking (quantity vs. frequency), predeparture expectations surrounding alcohol use while abroad, culture-related social anxiety, and perceived disparity between home and host cultures differentially predicted consequences abroad. The findings include important implications for student affairs professionals in developing study abroad-specific interventions and resources to maintain student well-being while abroad.

  1. Factors Associated With General and Sexual Alcohol-Related Consequences: An Examination of College Students Studying Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Hummer, Justin F.; Pedersen, Eric. R.; Mirza, Tehniat; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    This study contributes to the scarce research on U.S. college students studying abroad by documenting general and sexual negative alcohol-related risks and factors associated with such risk. The manner of drinking (quantity vs. frequency), predeparture expectations surrounding alcohol use while abroad, culture-related social anxiety, and perceived disparity between home and host cultures differentially predicted consequences abroad. The findings include important implications for student affairs professionals in developing study abroad–specific interventions and resources to maintain student well-being while abroad. PMID:23505594

  2. Secondary generalization of focal-onset seizures: examining the relationship between seizure propagation and epilepsy surgery outcome.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Samuel B; Venkataraman, Arun

    2017-04-01

    Surgical intervention often fails to achieve seizure-free results in patients with intractable epilepsy. Identifying features of the epileptic brain that dispose certain patients to unfavorable outcomes is critical for improving surgical candidacy assessments. Recent research by Martinet, Ahmad, Lepage, Cash, and Kramer (J Neurosci 35: 9477-9490, 2015) suggests that pathways of secondary seizure generalization distinguish patients with favorable (i.e., seizure free) vs. unfavorable (i.e., seizure persistent) surgical outcomes, lending insights into the network mechanisms of epilepsy surgery failure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Provoked and spontaneous confabulations in Alzheimer's disease: An examination of their prevalence and relation with general cognitive and executive functioning.

    PubMed

    El Haj, Mohamad; Larøi, Frank

    2017-01-01

    A dissociation can be made between confabulations that are produced when the subject is directly questioned (i.e., provoked confabulations) and context-free, unprovoked confabulations (i.e., spontaneous confabulations). Unlike provoked confabulations, there is a paucity of research on spontaneous confabulations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our paper assessed this issue by assessing both types of confabulation in participants with mild to moderate AD and controls. Provoked confabulations were evaluated with questions probing personal and general knowledge, whereas spontaneous confabulations were rated by nursing and medical staff. Findings showed more provoked confabulations in AD participants than in controls. Only occasional appearance of spontaneous confabulations was observed in the AD participants. Further, spontaneous confabulations in AD participants were significantly correlated with general cognitive functioning, but not with executive functioning. Our findings suggest that spontaneous confabulations in AD are relatively rare, at least in the mild to moderate stage of the disease. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  4. Examining the Effects of General Level Course Elimination and Tracking on Student Growth and Achievement in a Suburban High School Mathematics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a decade of reform driven by the NCLB legislation, there continues to be a significant gap in mathematics achievement between race/ethnicity and socioeconomic groupings of students. This study examines the practice of tracking and an effort to improve mathematics achievement by eliminating the general level mathematics track. The suburban…

  5. The Effect of General and Drug-Specific Family Environments on Comorbid and Drug-Specific Problem Behavior: A Longitudinal Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Marina; Hill, Karl G.; Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hawkins, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the development of alcohol and tobacco dependence is linked and that both are influenced by environmental and intrapersonal factors, many of which likely interact over the life course. The present study examines the effects of general and alcohol- and tobacco-specific environmental influences in the family of…

  6. Is Inclusion Really Beneficial for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities? An Examination of Perspectives from Secondary General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouer, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    The perceptions of general education teachers, "special education teachers," and site administrators' regarding the benefits of "inclusion", or "mainstreaming", for students with mild to moderate disabilities at the secondary level were examined using the lenses of psychological benefit, academic benefit, behavioral…

  7. Examining the Relationship between Referee Self-Efficacy and General Self-Efficacy Levels of Basketball Referees in Terms of Certain Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaçam, Aydin; Pulur, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between referee self-efficacy and general self-efficacy levels of basketball referees in terms of gender, education, age and refereeing experience. The study group was created within a convenience sampling method. 192 referees, 10% (n = 19) female, and 90% (n = 173) male, who performed active…

  8. The Effect of General and Drug-Specific Family Environments on Comorbid and Drug-Specific Problem Behavior: A Longitudinal Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Marina; Hill, Karl G.; Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hawkins, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the development of alcohol and tobacco dependence is linked and that both are influenced by environmental and intrapersonal factors, many of which likely interact over the life course. The present study examines the effects of general and alcohol- and tobacco-specific environmental influences in the family of…

  9. Is Inclusion Really Beneficial for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities? An Examination of Perspectives from Secondary General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouer, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    The perceptions of general education teachers, "special education teachers," and site administrators' regarding the benefits of "inclusion", or "mainstreaming", for students with mild to moderate disabilities at the secondary level were examined using the lenses of psychological benefit, academic benefit, behavioral…

  10. An examination of the Environmental Protection Agency risk assessment principles and practices: a brief commentary on section 4.1.3 of the EPA March 2004 Staff Paper.

    PubMed

    Mundt, K A

    2006-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently issued a Staff Paper that articulates current risk assessment practices. In section 4.1.3, EPA states, "... effects that appear to be adaptive, non-adverse, or beneficial may not be mentioned." This statement may be perceived as precluding risk assessments based on non-default risk models, including the hormetic--or biphasic--dose-response model. This commentary examines several potential interpretations of this statement and the anticipated impact of ignoring hormesis, if present, in light of necessary conservatism for protecting human and environmental health, and the potential for employing alternative risk assessment approaches.

  11. A correlation between low back pain and associated factors: a study involving 772 patients who had undergone general physical examination.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min A; Shim, Woo Seok; Kim, Myung Hee; Gwak, Mi Sook; Hahm, Tae Soo; Kim, Gaab Soo; Kim, Chung Su; Choi, Yoon Ho; Park, Jeong Heon; Cho, Hyun Sung; Kim, Tae Hyeong

    2006-12-01

    Many factors are associated with the development of low back pain. Among them, exercise, obesity, smoking, age, educational level and stress are the most common. This study examined the association of these factors with low back pain. An additional aim was to determine a procedure for preventing low back pain. This study analyzed the responses to a questionnaire sent to 772 individuals who had undergone a medical examination at this hospital in 2003 and excluded the individuals who had shown symptoms or their test results indicated a particular disease. Assuming that there were no variables, individuals who exercised regularly 3-4 times per week would have a lower chance of having low back pain than those who did not exercise regularly. The analysis revealed that individuals with a college degree or higher education have a lower chance of experiencing low back pain than those with only a high school education or even college drop-outs. When the other variables were constant, age, extent of obesity (body mass index), smoking and level of stress were not found to affect the development of low back pain. The level of education was associated with the development of low back pain. However, regular exercise 3-4 times per week or more would be most effective in reducing the incidence and duration of low back pain.

  12. EXAMINING THE GENERALITY OF CHILDREN'S PREFERENCE FOR CONTINGENT REINFORCEMENT VIA EXTENSION TO DIFFERENT RESPONSES, REINFORCERS, AND SCHEDULES

    PubMed Central

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2010-01-01

    Studies that have assessed whether children prefer contingent reinforcement (CR) or noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) have shown that they prefer CR. Preference for CR has, however, been evaluated only under continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedules. The prevalence of intermittent reinforcement (INT) warrants an evaluation of whether preference for CR persists as the schedule of reinforcement is thinned. In the current study, we evaluated 2 children's preference for contingent versus noncontingent delivery of highly preferred edible items for academic task completion under CRF and INT schedules. Children (a) preferred CR to NCR under the CRF schedule, (b) continued to prefer CR as the schedule of reinforcement became intermittent, and (c) exhibited a shift in preference from CR to NCR as the schedule became increasingly thin. These findings extend the generality of and provide one set of limits to the preference for CR. Applied implications, variables controlling preferences, and future research are discussed. PMID:21358901

  13. Examining Individual Differences in Interpersonal Influence: On the Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Opinion Leadership Scale (GOLS).

    PubMed

    Batinic, Bernad; Appel, Markus; Gnambs, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Opinion leadership describes an individual's tendency to informally influence others' attitudes and overt behaviors. In contrast to contemporary views of opinion leadership as a highly domain-specific trait, this paper introduces a multi-faceted personality trait, generalized opinion leadership (GOL) that characterizes exceptionally influential individuals independent of a specific subject area. Two studies report on the psychometric properties of a scale to assess GOL. Study 1 is based on three independent samples (N = 1,575, N = 1,275, and N = 231) and demonstrates the factorial structure of the instrument and its measurement invariance across sex, age, and educational levels. Study 2 (N = 310) analyzes multitrait-multiinformant data to highlight the scale's discriminant validity with regard to innovativeness and trendsetting.

  14. Examining the generality of children's preference for contingent reinforcement via extension to different responses, reinforcers, and schedules.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2010-01-01

    Studies that have assessed whether children prefer contingent reinforcement (CR) or noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) have shown that they prefer CR. Preference for CR has, however, been evaluated only under continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedules. The prevalence of intermittent reinforcement (INT) warrants an evaluation of whether preference for CR persists as the schedule of reinforcement is thinned. In the current study, we evaluated 2 children's preference for contingent versus noncontingent delivery of highly preferred edible items for academic task completion under CRF and INT schedules. Children (a) preferred CR to NCR under the CRF schedule, (b) continued to prefer CR as the schedule of reinforcement became intermittent, and (c) exhibited a shift in preference from CR to NCR as the schedule became increasingly thin. These findings extend the generality of and provide one set of limits to the preference for CR. Applied implications, variables controlling preferences, and future research are discussed.

  15. Race and General Strain Theory: Examining the Impact of Racial Discrimination and Fear on Adolescent Marijuana and Alcohol Use.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jennifer L

    2016-10-14

    To extend our knowledge of general strain theory by exploring how under-researched strains such as racial discrimination, witnessing violence, physical victimization and verbal bullying affect adolescent substance use while considering differences according to racial identification. This research utilized data from wave three of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Statistical analysis was primarily composed of path analysis using full information maximum likelihood parameter estimates. The findings reveal that reporting fear decreased alcohol and marijuana use among adolescents and that racial discrimination, witnessing violence, and being the victim of verbal bullying indirectly affected marijuana and alcohol use through fear. No support was found for depression as a mediating variable. Physical victimization was the only social strain that had a direct positive effect on marijuana and alcohol use but only for Hispanics and African Americans. The results suggest that strains may be operating differently and there may be differential levels of exposure to certain strains according to one's race.

  16. Reading Habits of General Surgery Residents and Association With American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination Performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry J; Kim, Dennis Y; Kaji, Amy H; Gifford, Edward D; Reid, Christopher; Sidwell, Richard A; Reeves, Mark E; Hartranft, Thomas H; Inaba, Kenji; Jarman, Benjamin T; Are, Chandrakanth; Galante, Joseph M; Amersi, Farin; Smith, Brian R; Melcher, Marc L; Nelson, M Timothy; Donahue, Timothy; Jacobsen, Garth; Arnell, Tracey D; de Virgilio, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Few large-scale studies have quantified and characterized the study habits of surgery residents. However, studies have shown an association between American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) scores and subsequent success on the American Board of Surgery Qualifying and Certifying examinations. To identify the quantity of studying, the approach taken when studying, the role that ABSITE preparation plays in resident reading, and factors associated with ABSITE performance. An anonymous 39-item questionnaire including demographic information, past performance on standardized examinations, reading habits, and study sources during the time leading up to the 2014 ABSITE and opinions pertaining to the importance of the ABSITE was administered August 1, 2014, to August 25, 2014, to 371 surgery residents in 15 residency programs nationwide. Scores from the 2014 ABSITE. A total of 273 residents (73.6%) responded to the survey. Seven respondents did not provide their January 2014 ABSITE score, leaving 266 for statistical analysis. Most respondents were male (162 of 266 [60.9%]), with a mean (SD) age of 29.8 (2.6) years. The median number of minutes spent studying per month was 240 (interquartile range, 120-600 minutes) for patient care or clinical duties and 120 for the ABSITE (interquartile range, 30-360 minutes). One hundred sixty-four of 266 respondents (61.7%) reported reading consistently throughout the year for patient care or clinical duties. With respect to ABSITE preparation, 72 of 266 residents (27.1%) reported reading consistently throughout the year, while 247 of 266 residents (92.9%) reported preparing between 1 and 8 weeks prior to the examination. Univariate analysis (with results reported as effect on median ABSITE percentile scores [95% CIs]) identified the following factors as positively correlated with ABSITE scores: prior United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) 1 and 2 scores (per 1-point increase: USMLE 1, 0.1 [0.02-0.14], P =

  17. When it pays to cheat: Examining how generalized food deception increases male and female fitness in a terrestrial orchid.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ryan P; Michaels, Helen J

    2017-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of floral nectar in food deceptive species can reveal insights into the evolutionary consequences of the deceptive strategy. When coupled to pollen tracking, the effects of the deceptive pollination syndrome on both male and female reproductive success may be quantified. Attraction of pollinators in deceit-pollinated species often relies on producing a conspicuous floral display which may increase visibility to pollinators, but in-turn may increase within plant selfing. To understand the role of deception in Orchidaceae reproduction we studied Cypripedium candidum. All species of the Cypripedium genus employ a generalized food deceptive pollination strategy and have been suggested as a model system for the study of pollinator deception. We conducted a nectar addition experiment that randomly assigned the four plants closest to a transect point to receive one of four histochemical dyes. Two individuals selected for nectar addition in each of altogether 25 blocks received 2μl of 25% sucrose solution in the labellum of each flower, while two others received no artificial nectar. Number of fruits produced, fruit mass and fruit abortion were scored at the end of the four-month experiment. Nectar addition increased (p<0.0001) self-pollination and pollen discounting by nearly 3x, while plants not receiving nectar had greater (p<0.0001) numbers of non-self pollinia deposited and lower rates of pollen discounting. There was a non-significant (p = 0.0645) trend for deceptive plants to set more fruit, while presence of nectar did not affect pollen export. This study demonstrates the adaptive advantages of food deception by showing a concurrent reduction in particular male and female functions when a food reward is restored to a deceptive flower. We found generalized food deception to not only decrease inbreeding depression in the system, but concurrently have no effect on pollinator attraction and fruit set when compared with rewarding flowers.

  18. When it pays to cheat: Examining how generalized food deception increases male and female fitness in a terrestrial orchid

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental manipulations of floral nectar in food deceptive species can reveal insights into the evolutionary consequences of the deceptive strategy. When coupled to pollen tracking, the effects of the deceptive pollination syndrome on both male and female reproductive success may be quantified. Attraction of pollinators in deceit-pollinated species often relies on producing a conspicuous floral display which may increase visibility to pollinators, but in-turn may increase within plant selfing. Methodology To understand the role of deception in Orchidaceae reproduction we studied Cypripedium candidum. All species of the Cypripedium genus employ a generalized food deceptive pollination strategy and have been suggested as a model system for the study of pollinator deception. We conducted a nectar addition experiment that randomly assigned the four plants closest to a transect point to receive one of four histochemical dyes. Two individuals selected for nectar addition in each of altogether 25 blocks received 2μl of 25% sucrose solution in the labellum of each flower, while two others received no artificial nectar. Number of fruits produced, fruit mass and fruit abortion were scored at the end of the four-month experiment. Results Nectar addition increased (p<0.0001) self-pollination and pollen discounting by nearly 3x, while plants not receiving nectar had greater (p<0.0001) numbers of non-self pollinia deposited and lower rates of pollen discounting. There was a non-significant (p = 0.0645) trend for deceptive plants to set more fruit, while presence of nectar did not affect pollen export. Conclusions This study demonstrates the adaptive advantages of food deception by showing a concurrent reduction in particular male and female functions when a food reward is restored to a deceptive flower. We found generalized food deception to not only decrease inbreeding depression in the system, but concurrently have no effect on pollinator attraction and fruit

  19. Untangling the Association Between Migraine, Pain, and Anxiety: Examining Migraine and Generalized Anxiety Disorders in a Canadian Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Jayanthikumar, Janany; Agbeyaka, Senyo K

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate: (1) the prevalence and unadjusted and adjusted odds of 12-month generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among adults with migraine in comparison to those without migraine; (2) If debilitating pain and/or limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are mediators of the migraine-GAD association; and (3) Factors associated with past year GAD among adults with migraine. Secondary data analysis of the nationally representative 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (CCHS-MS), a population-based survey of community dwellers with a response rate of 68.9%. The first subsample included those with (n = 2232) and without migraine (n = 19,270), and the second subsample was restricted to those with migraine (n = 2232). GAD was based on the WHO-CIDI scale. Fully, 6% of those with migraines had past year GAD in comparison of 2.1% of those without migraine (P < .001). The socio-demographically adjusted odds of past year GAD were two and a half times higher among those with migraine than those without (OR= 2.46; 95% CI = 2.00, 3.02). A path analysis indicated that debilitating pain and limitations in IADLs were mediators in the relationship between migraine and GAD. In the sample restricted to migraineurs, the factors associated with higher odds of 12-month GAD included having a university degree, having low income, being without a confidant, and being male. Generalized anxiety disorder is robustly associated with migraine and targeted outreach and interventions are warranted. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  20. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment.

  1. “C.R.E.A.T.E.”-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Rotella, Francis M.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M.; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R.

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  2. Effect of the Iranian hospital grading system on patients' and general practitioners' behaviour: an examination of awareness, belief and choice.

    PubMed

    Aryankhesal, Aidin; Sheldon, Trevor

    2010-08-01

    There is considerable international interest in the use of performance measurement and their public release in order to improve the quality of care. However, few studies have assessed stakeholders' awareness and use of performance data. Iranian hospitals have been graded annually since 1998 and hospital hotel charges vary by grade, but this system has never been evaluated. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 104 outpatients at eight Teheran hospitals and 103 general practitioners (GPs) to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards hospital grading system. Only 5.8% of patients (95% CI: 1.3-10.3%) and 11.7% of GPs (95% CI: 5.5-17.9%) were aware of grading results. Patients' awareness was positively associated with their education level (P = 0.016). No patient used the grading results for choosing a hospital and only one GP (1%, 95% CI: 0-2%) reported using hospital grade to influence referral decisions. Patients were more influenced by hospitals' public reputation and that of their specialists. GPs believed that the grading system did not reflect the quality of care in hospitals. When developing performance measurement systems, public release of data should be accompanied by evaluation of its impact on awareness and health-care choices.

  3. History of the national licensing examination for the health professions under the Japanese Government-General of Korea (1910-1945)

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Soon

    2015-01-01

    During the reign of Japanese Government-General of Korea (Joseon) from 1910 to 1945, the main health professionals who were educated about modern medicine were categorized into physicians, dentists, pharmacists, midwives, and nurses. They were clearly distinguished from traditional health professionals. The regulations on new health professionals were enacted, and the licensing system was enforced in earnest. There were two kinds of licensing systems: the license without examination through an educational institution and the license with the national examination. The Japanese Government-General of Korea (Joseon) combined education with a national examination system to produce a large number of health professionals rapidly; however, it was insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for health services. Therefore, the government eased the examination several times and focused on quantitative expansion of the health professions. The proportion of professionals licensed through national examination had increased. This system had produced the maximum number of available professionals at low cost. Furthermore, this system was significant in three respects: first, the establishment of the framework of the national licensing examination still used today for health professionals; second, the protection of people from the poor practices of unqualified practitioners; and third, the standardization of the quality of health. PMID:26013111

  4. Mind your manners. Part II: General results from the National Association of Medical Examiners Manner of Death Questionnaire, 1995.

    PubMed

    Goodin, J; Hanzlick, R

    1997-09-01

    More than 700 physician medical examiner/coroners (ME/Cs) were surveyed to assess differences in manner of death classifications for typical but often controversial death scenarios: 198 physicians participated by choosing the manner of death (homicide, suicide, accident, natural, undetermined) for 23 such scenarios. Sixteen questions related to death certificate training, work location, and manner of death issues were also asked. The classification of manner of death by ME/Cs was highly variable. For some challenging death scenarios, majority agreement was lacking. Agreement was > or = 80% for only 11 of the 23 scenarios and was 100% for only 1. Manner of death classification method was not influenced by forensic pathology board certification status, by whether or not the physician actually completed death certificates, or by previous threats of lawsuits over manner of death classification. However, there were some differences by state. No textbook or individual was widely recognized as authoritative on manner of death issues. Few ME/Cs had formal death certification training in medical school or residency. The data lend credence to the practice of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of classifying manner of death for statistical purposes by using coding and classification rules and selection criteria rather than solely on the basis of the classification of manner chosen by ME/Cs. The data also indicate that caution is in order when one compares manner of death statistics of one ME/C with those of another Published guidelines and more uniform training are needed so that ME/Cs may become more consistent in their manner of death classifications. Further information is presented in Part I (history of manner of death classification) and in Part III (individual death scenarios and their analysis) companion articles in this issue of the Journal.

  5. Code of Ethics: Principles for Ethical Leadership

    PubMed Central

    Flite, Cathy A.; Harman, Laurinda B.

    2013-01-01

    The code of ethics for a professional association incorporates values, principles, and professional standards. A review and comparative analysis of a 1934 pledge and codes of ethics from 1957, 1977, 1988, 1998, 2004, and 2011 for a health information management association was conducted. Highlights of some changes in the healthcare delivery system are identified as a general context for the codes of ethics. The codes of ethics are examined in terms of professional values and changes in the language used to express the principles of the various codes. PMID:23346028

  6. Buridan's Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamport, Leslie

    2012-08-01

    Buridan's principle asserts that a discrete decision based upon input having a continuous range of values cannot be made within a bounded length of time. It appears to be a fundamental law of nature. Engineers aware of it can design devices so they have an infinitessimal probability of not making a decision quickly enough. Ignorance of the principle could have serious consequences.

  7. Principled Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John; Swaffield, Sue; Frost, David

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the "Carpe Vitam: Leadership for Learning" project, accounting for its provenance and purposes, before focusing on the principles for practice that constitute an important part of the project's legacy. These principles framed the dialogic process that was a dominant feature of the project and are presented,…

  8. Comparison of Content on the American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Examination With Conditions Seen in Practice by General Internists.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bradley; Vandergrift, Jonathan; Lipner, Rebecca S; Green, Marianne M

    2017-06-13

    Success on the internal medicine (IM) examination is a central requirement of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM's) Maintenance of Certification program (MOC). Therefore, it is important to understand the degree to which this examination reflects conditions seen in practice, one dimension of content validity, which focuses on the match between content in the discipline and the topics on the examination questions. To assess whether the frequency of questions on IM-MOC examinations were concordant with the frequency of conditions seen in practice. The 2010-2013 IM-MOC examinations were used to calculate the percentage of questions for 186 medical condition categories from the examination blueprint, which balances examination content by considering importance and frequency of conditions seen in practice. Nationally representative estimates of conditions seen in practice by general internists were estimated from the primary diagnosis for 13 832 office visits (2010-2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys) and 108 472 hospital stays (2010 National Hospital Discharge Survey). Prevalence of conditions included on the IM-MOC examination questions. The outcome measure was the concordance between the percentages of IM-MOC examination questions and the percentages of conditions seen in practice during either office visits or hospital stays for each of 186 condition categories (eg, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, liver disease). The concordance thresholds were 0.5 SD of the weighted mean percentages of the applicable 186 conditions seen in practice (0.74% for office visits; 0.51% for hospital stays). If the absolute differences between the percentages of examination questions and the percentages of office visit conditions or hospital stay conditions seen were less than the applicable concordance threshold, then the condition category was judged to be concordant. During the 2010-2013 IM-MOC examination periods, 3600 questions (180 questions per

  9. Basic Principles of Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Baraem; Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Chromatography has a great impact on all areas of analysis and, therefore, on the progress of science in general. Chromatography differs from other methods of separation in that a wide variety of materials, equipment, and techniques can be used. [Readers are referred to references (1-19) for general and specific information on chromatography.]. This chapter will focus on the principles of chromatography, mainly liquid chromatography (LC). Detailed principles and applications of gas chromatography (GC) will be discussed in Chap. 29. In view of its widespread use and applications, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) will be discussed in a separate chapter (Chap. 28). The general principles of extraction are first described as a basis for understanding chromatography.

  10. Entrance surface dose and image quality: comparison of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in general practitioner clinics, public and private hospitals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Ahmad Shariff; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Jamal, Noriah; Spelic, David C; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the entrance surface dose (ESD) and image quality of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations conducted at general practitioner (GP) clinics, and public and private hospitals in Malaysia. The surveyed facilities were randomly selected within a given category (28 GP clinics, 20 public hospitals and 15 private hospitals). Only departmental X-ray units were involved in the survey. Chest examinations were done at all facilities, while only hospitals performed abdominal examinations. This study used the x-ray attenuation phantoms and protocols developed for the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey program in the United States. The ESD was calculated from measurements of exposure and clinical geometry. An image quality test tool was used to evaluate the low-contrast detectability and high-contrast detail performance under typical clinical conditions. The median ESD value for the adult chest X-ray examination was the highest (0.25 mGy) at GP clinics, followed by private hospitals (0.22 mGy) and public hospitals (0.17 mGy). The median ESD for the adult abdominal X-ray examination at public hospitals (3.35 mGy) was higher than that for private hospitals (2.81 mGy). Results of image quality assessment for the chest X-ray examination show that all facility types have a similar median spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability. For the abdominal X-ray examination, public hospitals have a similar median spatial resolution but larger low-contrast detectability compared with private hospitals. The results of this survey clearly show that there is room for further improvement in performing chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in Malaysia.

  11. Evaluation of general practitioners' assessment of overweight among children attending the five-year preventive child health examination: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Merethe Kousgaard; Christensen, Bo; Obel, Carsten; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate general practitioners' (GPs') assessment of potential overweight among children attending the five-year preventive child health examination (PCHE) by comparing their assessment of the children's weight-for-stature with overweight defined by body mass index (BMI) according to paediatric standard definitions. A cross-sectional survey. Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of children's health in general and their growth in particular. The five-year preventive child health examination (PCHE) in general practice in the Central Denmark Region. Children attending the five-year PCHE in general practice, regardless of their weight status. Paediatric standard definitions for childhood overweight based on BMI were used as the gold standard for categorizing weight-for-stature. Identification of overweight was analysed with regard to sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the GPs' assessment of weight-for-stature. A total of 165 GPs conducted 1138 PCHEs. GPs assessed that 171 children had a weight-for-stature above normal. Use of the Danish Standards (DS), i.e. the Danish national growth charts for BMI, as the gold standard yielded a sensitivity of 70.1% (95% CI 62.0-77.3) and a specificity of 92.4% (95% CI 90.6-93.9). The sensitivity was influenced by the GPs' use of BMI and the presence of previous notes regarding abnormal weight development. At the five-year PCHE almost one-third of overweight children were assessed to be normal weight by GPs. Use of BMI and presence of notes on abnormal weight in medical records were positively associated with a higher identification. Hence, utilization of medical record data and BMI charts may refine GPs' assessment of childhood overweight.

  12. Popular apps on the medical category targeting patients and the general public in the United Kingdom: Do they conform to the Health On the Net Foundation principles?

    PubMed

    Ben-Mussa, Ali; Paget, Anthony M

    2016-08-26

    Smartphones with their rising popularity and versatile software 'apps' have great potential for revolutionising healthcare services. However, this was soon overshadowed by concerns highlighted by many studies over quality. These were subject and/or discipline specific and mostly evaluated compliance with a limited number of information portrayal standards originally devised for health websites. Hence, this study aimed to take a broader approach by evaluating the most popular apps categorised as medical in the United Kingdom for compliance with all of those standards systematically using the Health On the Net (HON) Foundation principles.The study evaluated top 50 free and paid apps of the 'medical' category on both iTunes and Google stores for evidence of compliance with an app-adapted version of the HON Foundation code of conduct. The sample included 64 apps, 34/64 (53%) were on Google Play and 36/64 (56%) were free. None of the apps managed to comply with the entire eight principles. Compliance with seven principles was achieved by only one app (1.6%), and the rest were compliant with three, two, and one (14.7%, 27%, and 38%, respectively).In conclusion, this study demonstrated that most popular apps on the medical category that are available in the United Kingdom do not meet the standards for presenting health information to the public, and this is consistent with earlier studies. Improving the situation would require raising the public awareness, providing tools that would assist in quality evaluation, encouraging developers to use robust development process, and facilitating collaboration and engagement among the stakeholders. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. The achievement and maintenance of inter-examiner consistency in the assessment of plaque and gingivitis during a multicentre study based in general dental practices.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Rimini, F M; Zak, E; Brookman, D J; Newman, H N

    1997-03-01

    This study set out to demonstrate that it was possible to train general dental practitioners (gdps) to achieve and maintain high levels of inter-examiner consistency in the use of simple periodontal indices over a 12-month period. The gdps were trained by one trainer in the use of the plaque index (PII) and a modified version of the gingival index (mGI) which assessed gingival bleeding only. All the gdps underwent intensive training and employed a technique, when assessing inter-examiner consistency in the use of the PII, such that the 1st examiner did not disturb in situ plaque from 50% of the circumference of a tooth. The problem of variation due to repeat probing, when assessing inter-examiner consistency for mGI, was overcome by one examiner lightly probing gingival margins and both examiners scoring the results. The problems relating to the multicentre nature of the study included: distance between the centres, the need for strict adherence to the study protocol, consistency in the use of forms and instruments, in the application of periodontal indices, and of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Techniques for overcoming these problems included: the planning and application of a coherent study design, which employed simple indices, a detailed protocol, the recruitment of very well-motivated gdps of similar age and experience as examiners, the recruitment of an experienced trainer who trained the gdps thoroughly and monitored their performance throughout the study, and repeat visits to the practices involved to explain the nature of the study to all their staff members. Initially, the gdps achieved inter-examiner kappa scores of 0.78-0.85 (mean 0.81) for PII and of 0.73-0.94 (mean 0.87) for mGI when assessing 168 sites for each variable. During the following 12 months, individual kappa scores, assessed every 3 months at 42 sites, ranged from 0.51-0.90 for PII and from 0.73-1.00 for mGI. Mean kappa for PII scores achieved by the five gdps fell during the study

  14. Laser principles.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Kaufman, Joely

    2011-01-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the 1960s, the role that lasers play in various medical specialities, including dermatology, has steadily increased. However, within the last 2 decades, the technological advances and the use of lasers in the field of dermatology have virtually exploded. Many treatments have only become possible with the use of lasers. Especially in aesthetic medicine, lasers are an essential tool in the treatment armamentarium. Due to better research and understanding of the physics of light and skin, there is now a wide and increasing array of different lasers and devices to choose from. The proper laser selection for each indication and treatment requires a profound understanding of laser physics and the basic laser principles. Understanding these principles will allow the laser operator to obtain better results and help avoid complications. This chapter will give an in-depth overview of the physical principles relevant in cutaneous laser surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. 48 CFR 49.113 - Cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost principles. 49.113 Section 49.113 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.113 Cost principles. The cost principles and procedures in the...

  16. Fermat's Principle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamat, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A principle is presented to show that, if the time of passage of light is expressible as a function of discrete variables, one may dispense with the more general method of the calculus of variations. The calculus of variations and the alternative are described. The phenomenon of mirage is discussed. (Author/KR)

  17. Fermat's Principle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamat, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A principle is presented to show that, if the time of passage of light is expressible as a function of discrete variables, one may dispense with the more general method of the calculus of variations. The calculus of variations and the alternative are described. The phenomenon of mirage is discussed. (Author/KR)

  18. A longitudinal qualitative study examining the factors impacting on the ability of persons with T1DM to assimilate the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) principles into daily living and how these factors change over time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature reveals that structured education programmes, such as DAFNE, result in many positive outcomes for people with Type 1 diabetes including a decrease in HbA1c levels and reductions in hypoglycaemia. While there is evidence that some of these outcomes are maintained we do not know at present what factors are most important over time. The study aim was to identify the key factors impacting on persons with Type 1 diabetes ability to assimilate the Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (DAFNE) DAFNE principles into their daily lives and how these factors change over time. Methods This is a longitudinal descriptive qualitative study. Interviews were undertaken with 40 participants who had attended DAFNE in one of 5 study sites across the Island of Ireland, at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months after completion of the programme. The interviews lasted from 30 to 60 minutes and were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed in three ways, a within time analysis, a cross sectional analysis for each participant and a thematic analysis which focused on examining changes over time Results Four themes that influenced participants' ability to assimilate DAFNE into their daily lives over time were identified. These were: embedded knowledge, continued responsive support, enduring motivation and being empowered. Support at the 6 month period was found to be crucial to continued motivation. Conclusions Understanding the factors that influence people's ability to assimilate DAFNE principles over time into their daily lives can help health professionals give focused responsive support that helps people with diabetes become more empowered. Understanding that continued support matters, particularly around 6 months, is important as health professionals can influence good management by providing appropriate support and enhancing motivation. Trial registration ISRCTN79759174 PMID:21878104

  19. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the Classroom: The Use of Microbial Mats to Teach General Principles in Microbial Ecology, and Scientific Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beboutl, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2004-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on earth, and may also be useful models for the search for life elsewhere. They are centrally important to Astrobiology. In this lecture, we will present an introduction to microbial mats, as well as an introduction to our web-based educational module on the subject of microbial ecology, featuring living mats maintained in a mini "Web Lab" complete with remotely-operable instrumentation. We have partnered with a number of outreach specialists in order to produce an informative and educational web-based presentation, aspects of which will be exported to museum exhibits reaching a wide audience. On our web site, we will conduct regularly scheduled experimental manipulations, linking the experiments to our research activities, and demonstrating fundamental principles of scientific research.

  20. Earth's Earliest Ecosystems in the Classroom: The Use of Microbial Mats to Teach General Principles in Microbial Ecology, and Scientific Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beboutl, Brad M.; Bucaria, Robin

    2004-01-01

    Microbial mats are living examples of the most ancient biological communities on earth, and may also be useful models for the search for life elsewhere. They are centrally important to Astrobiology. In this lecture, we will present an introduction to microbial mats, as well as an introduction to our web-based educational module on the subject of microbial ecology, featuring living mats maintained in a mini "Web Lab" complete with remotely-operable instrumentation. We have partnered with a number of outreach specialists in order to produce an informative and educational web-based presentation, aspects of which will be exported to museum exhibits reaching a wide audience. On our web site, we will conduct regularly scheduled experimental manipulations, linking the experiments to our research activities, and demonstrating fundamental principles of scientific research.