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Sample records for exchange factor gnom

  1. Insights into the localization and function of the membrane trafficking regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants.

  2. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Doyle, Siamsa M.; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; ...

    2015-02-02

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering themore » polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF–defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development.« less

  3. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Siamsa M; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; Rigal, Adeline; Viotti, Corrado; Łangowska, Małgorzata; Ma, Qian; Friml, Jiří; Raikhel, Natasha V; Hicks, Glenn R; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-02-17

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering the polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF-defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. Our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development.

  4. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Siamsa M.; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; Rigal, Adeline; Viotti, Corrado; Łangowska, Małgorzata; Ma, Qian; Friml, Jiří; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-02-02

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering the polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF–defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development.

  5. GNOM/FEWER ROOTS is required for the establishment of an auxin response maximum for arabidopsis lateral root initiation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ken-ichi; Goh, Tatsuaki; Toyokura, Koichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Mimura, Tetsuro; Kamiya, Yuji; Fukaki, Hidehiro

    2013-03-01

    Lateral root (LR) formation in vascular plants is regulated by auxin. The mechanisms of LR formation are not fully understood. Here, we have identified a novel recessive mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, named fewer roots (fwr), that drastically reduces the number of LRs. Expression analyses of DR5::GUS, an auxin response reporter, and pLBD16::GUS, an LR initiation marker, suggested that FWR is necessary for the establishment of an auxin response maximum in LR initiation sites. We further identified that the fwr phenotypes are caused by a missense mutation in the GNOM gene, encoding an Arf-GEF (ADP ribosylation factor-GDP/GTP exchange factor), which regulates the recycling of PINs, the auxin efflux carriers. The fwr roots showed enhanced sensitivity to brefeldin A in a root growth inhibition assay, indicating that the fwr mutation reduces the Arf-GEF activity of GNOM. However, the other developmental processes except for LR formation appeared to be unaffected in the fwr mutant, indicating that fwr is a weaker allele of gnom compared with the other gnom alleles with pleiotropic phenotypes. The localization of PIN1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) appeared to be unaffected in the fwr roots but the levels of endogenous IAA were actually higher in the fwr roots than in the wild type. These results indicate that LR initiation is one of the most sensitive processes among GNOM-dependent developmental processes, strongly suggesting that GNOM is required for the establishment of the auxin response maximum for LR initiation, probably through the regulation of local and global auxin distribution in the root.

  6. Critical Success Factors in a TRIDEM Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Mirjam

    2007-01-01

    Computer-mediated-communication (CMC) tools allowing learners to be in contact with native speakers of their target language in other locations are becoming increasingly flexible, often combining different modes of communication in a single web- and internet-based environment. The literature on telecollaborative exchanges reveals, however, that…

  7. Unbiased isotope equilibrium factors from partial isotope exchange experiments in 3-exchange site systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Two methods are available in order to evaluate the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between exchange sites or phases from partial isotope exchange experiments. The first one developed by Northrop and Clayton (1966) is designed for isotope exchanges between two exchange sites (hereafter, the N&C method), the second one from Zheng et al. (1994) is a refinement of the first one to account for a third isotope exchanging site (hereafter, the Z method). In this paper, we use a simple model of isotope kinetic exchange for a 3-exchange site system (such as hydroxysilicates where oxygen occurs as OH and non-OH groups like in muscovite, chlorite, serpentine, or water or calcite) to explore the behavior of the N&C and Z methods. We show that these two methods lead to significant biases that cannot be detected with the usual graphical tests proposed by the authors. Our model shows that biases originate because isotopes are fractionated between all these exchanging sites. Actually, we point out that the variable mobility (or exchangeability) of isotopes in and between the exchange sites only controls the amplitude of the bias, but is not essential to the production of this bias as previously suggested. Setting a priori two of the three exchange sites at isotopic equilibrium remove the bias and thus is required for future partial exchange experiments to produce accurate and unbiased extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors. Our modeling applied to published partial oxygen isotope exchange experiments for 3-exchange site systems (the muscovite-calcite (Chacko et al., 1996), the chlorite-water (Cole and Ripley, 1998) and the serpentine-water (Saccocia et al., 2009)) shows that the extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors (reported as 1000 ln(α)) using either the N&C or the Z methods lead to bias that may reach several δ per mil in a few cases. These problematic cases, may be because experiments were conducted at low temperature and did not reach high

  8. RADGEN: A radiation exchange factor generator for rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    The RADGEN computer program has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to generate input required for the thermal radiation models used in the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer program. The COBRA-SFS program uses radiation exchange factors to describe the net amount of energy transferred from each surface to every other surface in an enclosure. The RADGEN program generates radiation exchange factors for arrays of rods on a square or triangular pitch as well as open channel geometries. This report describes the input requirements for the RADGEN code, which may be executed in a batch or interactive mode, and outlines the solution procedure used to obtain the exchange factors. 4 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Identification of guanine exchange factor key residues involved in exchange activity and Ras interaction.

    PubMed

    Camus, C; Hermann-Le Denmat, S; Jacquet, M

    1995-09-07

    We have carried out a functional analysis of the human HGRF55 exchange factor in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twelve residues conserved among most of all known guanine exchange factors (GEFs) have been independently changed to alanine. Taking advantage of the ability of Hgrf55p to replace the yeast Cdc25p exchange factor, and using the two-hybrid system with RAS2ala22 allele, we have identified key residues for the interaction with Ras and/or its activation. Substitution of arginine 392 to alanine leads to a complete loss of interaction with Ras, though the protein remains stable. Substitution of Asp266 or Arg359 to alanine results in inactive proteins at 39 degrees C, still able however to interact with Ras. The other charged-to-alanine substitutions led to no detectable phenotype when present alone but most of them dramatically increased the temperature sensitive phenotype observed with [Asp266Ala] substitution. Surprisingly, the cysteine to alanine substitution in the highly conserved PCVPF/Y motif proved to be without effect, suggesting that the sulfhydryl group is not essential for stability or interaction with Ras.

  10. The pebble GTP exchange factor and the control of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, L; Somers, W G; Harley, A; Saint, R

    2001-12-01

    Several G proteins of the Rho family have been shown to be required for cytokinesis. The activity of these proteins is regulated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which stimulate GDP/GTP exchange, and by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which suppress activity by stimulating the intrinsic GTPase activity. The role of Rho family members during cytokinesis is likely to be determined by their spatial and temporal interactions with these factors. Here we focus on the role of the pebble (pbl) gene of Drosophila melanogaster, a RhoGEF that is required for cytokinesis. We summarise the evidence that the primary target of PBL is Rho1 and describe genetic approaches to elucidating the function of PBL and identifying other components of the PBL-activated Rho signalling pathway.

  11. Two-photon exchange corrections to the pion form factor

    DOE PAGES

    Peter G. Blunden; Melnitchouk, Wally; Tjon, John A.

    2010-01-06

    Here, we compute two-photon exchange corrections to the electromagnetic form factor of the pion, taking into account the finite size of the pion. Compared to the soft-photon approximation for the infrared divergent contribution which neglects hadron structure effects, the corrections are found to be ≲ 1% for small Q2 (Q2 < 0.1 GeV2), but increase to several percent for Q2 ≳ 1 GeV2 at extreme backward angles.

  12. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods.

  13. Two-photon exchange corrections to the pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Blunden; Melnitchouk, Wally; Tjon, John A.

    2010-01-06

    Here, we compute two-photon exchange corrections to the electromagnetic form factor of the pion, taking into account the finite size of the pion. Compared to the soft-photon approximation for the infrared divergent contribution which neglects hadron structure effects, the corrections are found to be ≲ 1% for small Q2 (Q2 < 0.1 GeV2), but increase to several percent for Q2 ≳ 1 GeV2 at extreme backward angles.

  14. Factors contributing to attitude exchange amongst preservice elementary teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Previous research has shown that elementary education majors often dislike science and lack confidence in their ability to teach it. This is an important problem because students who hold these attitudes are likely to avoid teaching science, or teach it poorly, when they become teachers. It is therefore necessary to identify preservice elementary teachers who hold negative attitudes towards science, and attempt to convert these attitudes to positive before they become teachers. This study was designed to identify students whose attitudes had changed from negative to positive (i.e., attitude exchange had occurred) after participating in a one-semester elementary science education course, and to identify the course factors that were responsible. Four participants were individually interviewed. The transcripts indicated that attitude exchange had occurred for each of the four students. Each student described several features of the course that had a positive influence. These were of three main types: personal attributes of the tutor, specific teaching strategies, and external validation. It was proposed that many of the individual factors were effective because they represented either performance accomplishments or vicarious experience as defined by Bandura (Psychological Review, 84, 1977, 191-215).

  15. Exchange factor method: An alternative basis for zonal analysis of radiating enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, M.E.; Howell, J.R.

    1985-11-01

    In zonal analysis of an enclosure containing a radiatively participating medium, the volume and bounding surface are divided into volume and area elements which are assumed to be isothermal. For a system of M elements consisting of N surfaces and GAMMA volume elements (M = N+GAMMA), M/sup 2/ relationships (direct- or total-exchange areas of conventional zonal analysis) define all possible radiant interchange between element pairs. Due to reciprocity there are at most M(M+1)/2 unique direct-exchange areas. The use of symmetry may greatly reduce the number of unique exchange areas. In the alternative form presented, exchange factors are defined such that a gray medium's gas-to-gas exchange factors describe only the redistribution of radiative source terms. Only surface-to-surface and surface-to-gas (gas-to-surface) relationships are required to wholly define the system in radiative equilibrium. That is, a system in radiative equilibrium may be characterized by as many as GAMMA(GAMMA+1)/2 fewer factors. These same exchange factors may be augmented by gas-to-gas exchange factors to analyze media not in radiative equilibrium. In an isotropically scattering, gray medium, exchange factors are functions of system geometry and total extinction only. The degree of extinction due to scattering does not affect exchange factor. Transformations between direct-exchange areas and exchange factors are developed.

  16. Design of exchange-correlation functionals through the correlation factor approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlíková Přecechtělová, Jana E-mail: Matthias.Ernzerhof@UMontreal.ca

    2015-10-14

    The correlation factor model is developed in which the spherically averaged exchange-correlation hole of Kohn-Sham theory is factorized into an exchange hole model and a correlation factor. The exchange hole model reproduces the exact exchange energy per particle. The correlation factor is constructed in such a manner that the exchange-correlation energy correctly reduces to exact exchange in the high density and rapidly varying limits. Four different correlation factor models are presented which satisfy varying sets of physical constraints. Three models are free from empirical adjustments to experimental data, while one correlation factor model draws on one empirical parameter. The correlation factor models are derived in detail and the resulting exchange-correlation holes are analyzed. Furthermore, the exchange-correlation energies obtained from the correlation factor models are employed to calculate total energies, atomization energies, and barrier heights. It is shown that accurate, non-empirical functionals can be constructed building on exact exchange. Avenues for further improvements are outlined as well.

  17. Sustainable health information exchanges: the role of institutional factors.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Meir; Chinitz, David; Salzberg, Claudia A; Reichman, Katriel

    2013-05-21

    The transfer of patient information between the domains of community and hospital influences the quality, continuity and cost of health care. To supply the need for information flow between community and hospital, computerized Health Information Exchange (HIE) systems have evolved. This paper examines the institutional forces that shape HIE development in Israel and in the United States.In Israel, the vertically integrated Clalit health services developed a different solution for HIE than was developed in the non-vertically integrated Maccabi and Meuhedet health funds. In the United States the fragmented nature of providers - outside of specific networks such as parts of the Kaiser Permanente and Veterans Administration system - have dictated a very different evolution of information flow between community and hospital. More broadly, we consider how institutional factors shape (and will shape) the development of HIEs in different contexts.This paper applies institutional analysis to explain the emergence of different patterns of development of HIE systems in each of the environments. The institutional analysis in this paper can be used to anticipate the future success or failure of incentives to promote digital information sharing at transition of care.

  18. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Lane, B Josh; Mutchler, Charla; Al Khodor, Souhaila; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein). TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  19. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  20. The Exchange Factor Method: AN Alternative Zonal Formulation for Analysis of Radiating Enclosures Containing Participating Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood

    The exchange factor method (EFM) is introduced and compared to the zone method (ZM). In both the EFM and the ZM the region of interest is discretized into volume and surface elements, each considered to be isothermal, which are small enough to give the required resolution. A suitable set of state variables for the system is composed of the surface element radiosities and the gas element emissive powers. The EFM defines exchange factors as dimensionless total-exchange areas for radiant interchange between volume and surface elements by all possible absorption/re-emission paths, but excluding wall reflections. In the EFM, the exchange factors replace the direct-exchange areas of the ZM and are used to write energy balances for each area and volume element in the system. As in the ZM, the radiant energy balance equations result in a set of algebraic equations linear in the system state variables. The distinguishing feature of the EFM is that exchange factors may be measurable quantities. Relationships between the EFM exchange factors and the ZM direct-exchange areas are presented. EFM conservation and reciprocity laws, analogous to those of the ZM, are also included. Temperature and heat flux distributions, predicted using the EFM, for two- and three-dimensional enclosures containing absorbing/emitting, isotropically scattering, and conducting media are included. An application of the EFM is proposed which calls for the measurement of exchange factors in a scale model of the enclosure to be analyzed. The measurement of these factors in an enclosure containing an isotropically scattering medium is discussed. The effects of isotropic scattering and absorption/re-emission processes are shown to be indistinguishable in their contribution to exchange factor paths.

  1. Exchange factor method: an alternative zonal formulation for analysis of radiating enclosures containing participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The exchange factor method (EFM) is introduced and compared to the zone method (ZM). In both the EFM and ZM the region of interest is discretized into volume and surface elements, each considered to be isothermal, which are small enough to give the required resolution. A suitable set of state variables for the system is composed of the surface element radiosities and the gas element emissive powers. The EFM defines exchange factors as dimensionless total-exchange areas for radiant interchange between volume and surface elements by all possible absorption/re-emission paths, but excluding wall reflections. In the EFM, the exchange factors replace the direct-exchange areas of the ZM and are used to write energy balances for each area and volume element in the system. As in the ZM, the radiant energy balance equations result in a set of algebraic equations linear in the system state variables. The distinguishing feature of the EFM is that exchange factors may be measurable quantities. Relationships between the EFM exchange factors and the ZM direct-exchange areas are presented. EFM conservation and reciprocity laws, analogous to those of the ZM, are also included. Temperature and heat flux distributions, predicted using the EFM, for two- and three-dimensional enclosures containing absorbing/emitting, isotropically scattering, and conducting media are included. An application of the EFM is proposed which calls for the measurement of exchange factors in a scale model of the enclosure to be analyzed. The measurement of these factors in an enclosure containing an isotropically scattering medium is discussed. The effects of isotropic scattering and absorption/re-emission processes are shown to be indistinguishable in their contribution to exchange factor paths.

  2. Synaptic functions of the IQSEC family of ADP-ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Um, Ji Won

    2016-06-28

    Postsynaptic scaffolding proteins interact with numerous synaptic proteins to ensure the organization and specialization of functional excitatory and inhibitory synapses. IQSECs (IQ motif and SEC7 domain-containing proteins) are a class of ADP ribosylation factor-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), whose functions are beginning to be understood as both scaffolding and signaling proteins. Specifically, IQSEC1 binds to PSD-95, and IQSEC2 functions as a regulator of AMPA receptor trafficking at excitatory synapses, whereas IQSEC3 interacts with gephyrin to promote inhibitory synapse development. Here, I review the currently known findings on IQSECs and discuss the possible relations between dysfunctions of IQSECs and the pathophysiology of brain disorders.

  3. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  4. Factors controlling sulfur gas exchange in Sphagnum-dominated wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Atmosphere-peatland exchange of reduced sulfur gases was determined seasonally in fen in NH, and in an artificially-acidified fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Canada. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dominated gas fluxes at rates as high as 400 nmol/m(sup -2)hr(sup -1). DMS fluxes measured using enclosures were much higher than those calculated using a stagnant-film model, suggesting that Sphagnum regulated efflux. Temperature controlled diel and seasonal variability in DMS emissions. Use of differing enclosure techniques indicated that vegetated peatlands consume atmospheric carbonyl sulfide. Sulfate amendments caused DMS and methane thiol concentrations in near-surface pore waters to increase rapidly, but fluxes of these gases to the atmosphere were not affected. However, emission data from sites experiencing large differences in rates of sulfate deposition from the atmosphere suggested that chronic elevated sulfate inputs enhance DMS emissions from northern wetlands.

  5. Advanced view factor analysis method for radiation exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E.

    2014-03-01

    A raster-based method for determining complex view factor patterns is presented (HURES model). The model uses Johnson and Watson's view factor analysis method for fisheye lens photographs. The entire sphere is divided into 13 different view factors: open sky; sunny and shaded building walls, vegetation (trees) and ground surfaces above and below 1.2 m from the ground surface. The HURES model gave reasonable view factor results in tests at two urban study sites on summer days: downtown Nanaimo, B.C., Canada and Changwon, Republic of Korea. HURES gave better estimates of open sky view factors determined from fisheye lens photographs than did ENVI-met 3.1 and RayMan Pro. However, all three models underestimated sky view factor. For view factor analysis in outdoor urban areas, the 10° interval of rotation angle at 100 m distance of annuli will be suitable settings for three-dimensional computer simulations. The HURES model can be used for the rapid determination of complex view factor patterns which facilitates the analysis of their effects. Examples of how differing view factor patterns can affect human thermal sensation indices are given. The greater proportion of sunny view factors increased the computed predicted mean vote (PMV) by 1.3 on the sunny side of the street compared with the shady side during mid-morning in downtown Nanaimo. In another example, effects of differing amounts of open sky, sunny ground, sunny buildings and vegetation combined to produce only slight differences in PMV and two other human thermal sensation indices, PET and UTCI.

  6. Small interfering RNAs as a tool to assign Rho GTPase exchange-factor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gampel, Alexandra; Mellor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Rho GTPases control a complex network of intracellular signalling pathways. Whereas progress has been made in identifying downstream signalling partners for these proteins, the characterization of Rho upstream regulatory guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) has been hampered by a lack of suitable research tools. Here we use small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to examine the cellular regulation of the RhoB GTPase, and show that RhoB is activated downstream of the epidermal-growth-factor receptor through the Vav2 exchange factor. These studies demonstrate that siRNAs are an ideal research tool for the assignment of Rho GEF function in vivo. PMID:12113653

  7. Structure of the Sec7 domain of the Arf exchange factor ARNO.

    PubMed

    Cherfils, J; Ménétrey, J; Mathieu, M; Le Bras, G; Robineau, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Antonny, B; Chardin, P

    1998-03-05

    Small G proteins switch from a resting, GDP-bound state to an active, GTP-bound state. As spontaneous GDP release is slow, guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) are required to promote fast activation of small G proteins through replacement of GDP with GTP in vivo. Families of GEFs with no sequence similarity to other GEF families have now been assigned to most families of small G proteins. In the case of the small G protein Arf1, the exchange of bound GDP for GTP promotes the coating of secretory vesicles in Golgi traffic. An exchange factor for human Arf1, ARNO, and two closely related proteins, named cytohesin 1 and GPS1, have been identified. These three proteins are modular proteins with an amino-terminal coiled-coil, a central Sec7-like domain and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. The Sec7 domain contains the exchange-factor activity. It was first found in Sec7, a yeast protein involved in secretion, and is present in several other proteins, including the yeast exchange factors for Arf, Geal and Gea2. Here we report the crystal structure of the Sec7 domain of human ARNO at 2 A resolution and the identification of the site of interaction of ARNO with Arf.

  8. A human exchange factor for ARF contains Sec7- and pleckstrin-homology domains.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Paris, S; Antonny, B; Robineau, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Jackson, C L; Chabre, M

    1996-12-05

    The small G protein ARF1 is involved in the coating of vesicles that bud from the Golgi compartments. Its activation is controlled by as-yet unidentified guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. Gea1, the first ARF exchange factor to be discovered in yeast, is a large protein containing a domain of homology with Sec7, another yeast protein that is also involved in secretion. Here we characterized a smaller human protein (relative molecular mass 47K) named ARNO, which contains a central Sec7 domain that promotes guanine-nucleotide exchange on ARF1. ARNO also contains an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain. The PH domain mediates an enhancement of ARNO exchange activity by negatively charged phospholipid vesicles supplemented with phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. The exchange activity of ARNO is not inhibited by brefeldin A, an agent known to block vesicular transport and inhibit the exchange activity on ARF1 in cell extracts. This suggests that a regulatory component which is sensitive to brefeldin A associates with ARNO in vivo, possibly through the amino-terminal coiled-coil. We propose that other proteins with a Sec7 domain regulate different members of the ARF family.

  9. Structural outline of the detailed mechanism for elongation factor Ts-mediated guanine nucleotide exchange on elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Thirup, Søren S; Van, Lan Bich; Nielsen, Tine K; Knudsen, Charlotte R

    2015-07-01

    Translation elongation factor EF-Tu belongs to the superfamily of guanine-nucleotide binding proteins, which play key cellular roles as regulatory switches. All G-proteins require activation via exchange of GDP for GTP to carry out their respective tasks. Often, guanine-nucleotide exchange factors are essential to this process. During translation, EF-Tu:GTP transports aminoacylated tRNA to the ribosome. GTP is hydrolyzed during this process, and subsequent reactivation of EF-Tu is catalyzed by EF-Ts. The reaction path of guanine-nucleotide exchange is structurally poorly defined for EF-Tu and EF-Ts. We have determined the crystal structures of the following reaction intermediates: two structures of EF-Tu:GDP:EF-Ts (2.2 and 1.8Å resolution), EF-Tu:PO4:EF-Ts (1.9Å resolution), EF-Tu:GDPNP:EF-Ts (2.2Å resolution) and EF-Tu:GDPNP:pulvomycin:Mg(2+):EF-Ts (3.5Å resolution). These structures provide snapshots throughout the entire exchange reaction and suggest a mechanism for the release of EF-Tu in its GTP conformation. An inferred sequence of events during the exchange reaction is presented.

  10. Coming to Canada to Study: Factors that Influence Student's Decisions to Participate in International Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Jennifer; Burrow, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students are participating in study abroad programs. Outcomes associated with these programs have been studied extensively, but relatively little is known about what motivates and influences students to participate. This study investigated factors that motivate and influence students to study on exchange and explored how…

  11. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  12. Mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor gene IQSEC2 cause nonsyndromic intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Shoubridge, Cheryl; Tarpey, Patrick S; Abidi, Fatima; Ramsden, Sarah L; Rujirabanjerd, Sinitdhorn; Murphy, Jessica A; Boyle, Jackie; Shaw, Marie; Gardner, Alison; Proos, Anne; Puusepp, Helen; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E; Turner, Gill; Field, Michael; Walikonis, Randall S; Harvey, Robert J; Hackett, Anna; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Gécz, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    The first family identified as having a nonsyndromic intellectual disability was mapped in 1988. Here we show that a mutation of IQSEC2, encoding a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the ADP-ribosylation factor family of small GTPases, caused this disorder. In addition to MRX1, IQSEC2 mutations were identified in three other families with X-linked intellectual disability. This discovery was made possible by systematic and unbiased X chromosome exome resequencing. PMID:20473311

  13. Global analysis of proton elastic form factor data with two-photon exchange corrections

    SciTech Connect

    J. Arrington; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

    2007-09-01

    We use the world's data on elastic electron-proton scattering and calculations of two-photon exchange effects to extract corrected values of the proton's electric and magnetic form factors over the full Q^2 range of the existing data. Our analysis combines the corrected Rosenbluth cross section and polarization transfer data, and is the first extraction of G_Ep and G_Mp including explicit two-photon exchange corrections and their associated uncertainties. In addition, we examine the angular dependence of the corrected cross sections, and discuss the possible nonlinearities of the cross section as a function of epsilon.

  14. Human Sos1: a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras that binds to GRB2.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Camonis, J H; Gale, N W; van Aelst, L; Schlessinger, J; Wigler, M H; Bar-Sagi, D

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1.

  15. Activation of the exchange factor Ras-GRF by calcium requires an intact Dbl homology domain.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Goonesekera, S D; Feig, L A

    1997-04-21

    Ras-GRF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Ras proteins. Its activity on Ras in cells is enhanced upon calcium influx. Activation follows calcium-induced binding of calmodulin to an IQ motif near the N-terminus of Ras-GRF. Ras-GRF also contains a Dbl homology (DH) domain C-terminal to the IQ motif. In many proteins, DH domains act as exchange factors for Rho-GTPase family members. However, we failed to detect exchange activity of this domain on well characterized Rho family members. Instead, we found that mutations analogous to those that block exchange activity of Dbl prevented Ras-GRF activation by calcium/ calmodulin in vivo. All DH domains are followed immediately by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We found that a mutation at a conserved site within the PH domain following the DH domain also prevented Ras-GRF activation by calcium in vivo. These results suggest that in addition to playing a role as activators of Rho proteins, DH domains can also contribute to the coupling of cellular signals to Ras activation.

  16. Calcium activation of Ras mediated by neuronal exchange factor Ras-GRF.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, C L; Freshney, N W; Rosen, L B; Ghosh, A; Greenberg, M E; Feig, L A

    1995-08-10

    Tyrosine kinase receptors stimulate the Ras signalling pathway by enhancing the activity of the SOS nucleotide-exchange factor. This occurs, at least in part, by the recruitment of an SOS-GRB2 complex to Ras in the plasma membrane. Here we describe a different signalling pathway to Ras that involves activation of the Ras-GRF exchange factor in response to Ca2+ influx. In particular, we show that the ability of Ras-GRF to activate Ras in vivo is markedly enhanced by raised Ca2+ concentrations. Activation is mediated by calmodulin binding to an IQ motif in Ras-GRF, because substitutions in conserved amino acids in this motif prevent both calmodulin binding to Ras-GRF and Ras-GRF activation in vivo. So far, full-length Ras-GRF has been detected only in brain neurons. Our findings implicate Ras-GRF in the regulation of neuronal functions that are influenced by Ca2+ signals.

  17. The kinetics of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Iloro, Ibon; Narváez, Daniel; Guillén, Nancy; Camacho, Carlos M; Guillén, Lalisse; Cora, Elsa; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2008-05-15

    Five highly homologous epidermal growth factor receptor ligands were studied by mass spectral analysis, hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange via attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation analysis. These studies were performed to determine the order of events during the exchange process, the extent of H/D exchange, and associated kinetics of exchange for a comparative analysis of these ligands. Furthermore, the secondary structure composition of amphiregulin (AR) and heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) was determined. All ligands were found to have similar contributions of 3(10)-helix and random coil with varying contributions of beta-sheets and beta-turns. The extent of exchange was 40%, 65%, 55%, 65%, and 98% for EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), AR, HB-EGF, and epiregulin (ER), respectively. The rate constants were determined and classified as fast, intermediate, and slow: for EGF the 0.20 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.09 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.88 x 10(-3) min(-1) (beta-sheets and 3(10)-helix); and for TGF-alpha 0.91 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.27 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.41 x 10(-4) min(-1) (beta-sheets). The time constants for AR 0.47 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.04 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-turns, and beta-sheets); for HB-EGF 0.89 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.14 min(-1) (Arg and 3(10)-helix), and 1.00 x 10(-3) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-sheets, and beta-turns); and for epiregulin 0.16 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.03 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (3(10)-helix and beta-sheets). These results provide essential information toward understanding secondary structure, H/D exchange kinetics, and solvation of these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in their unbound state.

  18. EspM2 is a RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor

    PubMed Central

    Arbeloa, Ana; Garnett, James; Lillington, James; Bulgin, Richard R; Berger, Cedric N; Lea, Susan M; Matthews, Steve; Frankel, Gad

    2010-01-01

    We investigated how the type III secretion system WxxxE effectors EspM2 of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which triggers stress fibre formation, and SifA of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, which is involved in intracellular survival, modulate Rho GTPases. We identified a direct interaction between EspM2 or SifA and nucleotide-free RhoA. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy revealed that EspM2 has a similar fold to SifA and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) effector SopE. EspM2 induced nucleotide exchange in RhoA but not in Rac1 or H-Ras, while SifA induced nucleotide exchange in none of them. Mutating W70 of the WxxxE motif or L118 and I127 residues, which surround the catalytic loop, affected the stability of EspM2. Substitution of Q124, located within the catalytic loop of EspM2, with alanine, greatly attenuated the RhoA GEF activity in vitro and the ability of EspM2 to induce stress fibres upon ectopic expression. These results suggest that binding of SifA to RhoA does not trigger nucleotide exchange while EspM2 is a unique Rho GTPase GEF. PMID:20039879

  19. Recognition and activation of Rho GTPases by Vav1 and Vav2 guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jongyun; Thapar, Roopa; Campbell, Sharon L

    2005-05-03

    Vav proteins are Rho GTPase-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that are distinguished by the tandem arrangement of Dbl homology (DH), Pleckstrin homology (PH), and cysteine rich domains (CRD). Whereas the tandem DH-PH arrangement is conserved among Rho GEFs, the presence of the CRD is unique to Vav family members and is required for efficient nucleotide exchange. We provide evidence that Vav2-mediated nucleotide exchange of Rho GTPases follows the Theorell-Chance mechanism in which the Vav2.Rho GTPase complex is the major species during the exchange process and the Vav2.GDP-Mg(2+).Rho GTPase ternary complex is present only transiently. The GTPase specificity for the DH-PH-CRD Vav2 in vitro follows this order: Rac1 > Cdc42 > RhoA. Results obtained from fluorescence anisotropy and NMR chemical shift mapping experiments indicate that the isolated Vav1 CRD is capable of directly associating with Rac1, and residues K116 and S83 that are in the proximity of the P-loop and the guanine base either are part of this binding interface or undergo a conformational change in response to CRD binding. The NMR studies are supported by kinetic measurements on Rac1 mutants S83A, K116A, and K116Q and Vav2 CRD mutant K533A in that these mutants affect both the initial binding event of Vav2 with Rac1 (k(on)) and the rate-limiting dissociation of Vav2 from the Vav2.Rac1 binary complex (thereby influencing the enzyme turnover number, k(cat)). The results suggest that the CRD domain in Vav proteins plays an active role, affecting both the k(on) and the k(cat) for Vav-mediated nucleotide exchange on Rho GTPases.

  20. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock7 mediates HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion via Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D W; Didier, S; Chan, A; Paulino, V; Van Aelst, L; Ruggieri, R; Tran, N L; Byrne, A T; Symons, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive primary brain tumour, remains an incurable disease. Rho GTPases and their activators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), have central roles in GBM invasion. Anti-angiogenic therapies may stimulate GBM invasion via HGF/c-Met signalling. We aim to identify mediators of HGF-induced GBM invasion that may represent targets in a combination anti-angiogenic/anti-invasion therapeutic paradigm. Methods: Guanine nucleotide exchange factor expression was measured by microarray analysis and western blotting. Specific depletion of proteins was accomplished using siRNA. Cell invasion was determined using matrigel and brain slice assays. Cell proliferation and survival were monitored using sulforhodamine B and colony formation assays. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor and GTPase activities were determined using specific affinity precipitation assays. Results: We found that expression of Dock7, a GEF, is elevated in human GBM tissue in comparison with non-neoplastic brain. We showed that Dock7 mediates serum- and HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion. We also showed that Dock7 co-immunoprecipitates with c-Met and that this interaction is enhanced upon HGF stimulation in a manner that is dependent on the adaptor protein Gab1. Dock7 and Gab1 also co-immunoprecipitate in an HGF-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gab1 is required for HGF-induced Dock7 and Rac1 activation and glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: Dock7 mediates HGF-induced GBM invasion. Targeting Dock7 in GBM may inhibit c-MET-mediated invasion in tumours treated with anti-angiogenic regimens. PMID:24518591

  1. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  2. Health Information Exchange Implementation: Lessons Learned and Critical Success Factors From a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    implementation of a health system to the statewide HIE were found. The most significant perceived success was accomplishing the implementation, although many interviewees also underscored the value of a project champion with decision-making power. In terms of lessons learned, social reasons were found to be very significant motivators for early implementation, frequently outweighing economic motivations. It was clear that understanding the guides early in the project would have mitigated some of the challenges that emerged, and early communication with the electronic health record vendor so that they have a solid understanding of the undertaking was critical. An HIE implementations evaluation framework was found to be useful for assessing challenges, motivations, value propositions for participating, and success factors to consider for future implementations. Conclusions This case study illuminates five critical success factors for implementation of a health system onto a statewide HIE. This study also reveals that organizations have varied motivations and value proposition perceptions for engaging in the exchange of health information, few of which, at the early stages, are economically driven. PMID:25599991

  3. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-09-28

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure, and dynamics. More recently, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and nonbonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  4. Human Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 11 (ARHGEF11) Regulates Dendritic Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Yutaka; Takaki, Manabu; Sakamoto, Shinji; Okamoto, Sojiro; Kishimoto, Makiko; Okahisa, Yuko; Itoh, Masahiko; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of synaptic connectivity during perinatal and adolescent periods have been hypothesized to be related to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 11 (ARHGEF11) is a specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF) for RhoA, which is a critical regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and organization of dendritic spines and inhibitor of spine maintenance. ARHGEF11 variants are reported to be associated with a higher risk for the onset of schizophrenia in a Japanese population; however, how ARHGEF11 contributes to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in dendritic spines is unknown. Therefore, we first studied the distribution, binding, and function of ARHGEF11 in the dendritic spines of the rat cerebral cortex. After subcellular fractionation of the rat cerebral cortex, ARHGEF11 was detected with synaptophysin and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the P2 fractions including synaptosomal fractions containing presynaptic and postsynaptic density proteins. Endogenous ARHGEF11 was coimmunoprecipitated with synaptophysin or PSD-95. In cortical primary neurons at 28 days in vitro, immunostaining revealed that ARHGEF11 located in the dendrites and dendritic spines and colocalized with PSD-95 and synaptophysin. Overexpression of exogenous ARHGEF11 significantly decreased the number of spines (p = 0.008). These results indicate that ARHGEF11 is likely to be associated with synaptic membranes and regulation of spine. PMID:28036092

  5. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 can be a new biomarker of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1), which couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation, is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor. Studies have shown that GEF-H1 can be involved in various cancer pathways; however, the clinical significance of GEF-H1 expression and functions in melanoma has not been established. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and GEF-H1 functions in melanoma. A total of 60 cases of different grades of melanoma samples were used to detect the expression of GEF-H1. Results showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels of GEF-H1 were significantly higher in high-grade melanomas. Furthermore, patients with high GEF-H1 expression had a shorter overall survival (22 months) than patients with low level of GEF-H1 expression (33.38 months). We also found that GEF-H1 can promote the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma cells. In summary, these results suggested that GEF-H1 may be a valuable biomarker for assessing the degree and prognosis of melanoma following surgery. PMID:27462139

  6. Renormalization versus strong form factors for one-boson-exchange potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle Cordón, A.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the one-boson-exchange potential from the point of view of renormalization theory. We show that the nucleon-meson Lagrangian, while predicting the NN force, does not predict the NN scattering matrix nor the deuteron properties unambiguously due to the appearance of short distance singularities. While the problem has traditionally been circumvented by introducing vertex functions via phenomenological strong form factors, we propose to impose physical renormalization conditions on the scattering amplitude at low energies. Working in the large Nc approximation with π, σ, ρ, and ω mesons we show that, once these conditions are applied, results for low-energy phases of proton-neutron scattering as well as deuteron properties become largely insensitive to the form factors and to the vector mesons yielding reasonable agreement with the data and for realistic values of the coupling constants.

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis Uses Specific Domain Rearrangements and Allelic Exchange to Generate Diversity in Surface Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart G.; Mitchell, Helen L.; Seers, Christine A.; Gladman, Simon L.; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter M.; Chandry, P. Scott; Cross, Keith J.; Cleal, Steven M.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of chronic periodontitis. The virulence of P. gingivalis is reported to be strain related and there are currently a number of strain typing schemes based on variation in capsular polysaccharide, the major and minor fimbriae and adhesin domains of Lys-gingipain (Kgp), amongst other surface proteins. P. gingivalis can exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of P. gingivalis strains sourced from international locations over a 25-year period and to determine if variability in surface virulence factors has a phylogenetic basis. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 13 strains and comparison made to 10 previously sequenced strains. A single nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a shallow tri-lobed phylogeny. There was a high level of reticulation in the phylogenetic network, demonstrating extensive horizontal gene transfer between the strains. Two highly conserved variants of the catalytic domain of the major virulence factor the Kgp proteinase (KgpcatI and KgpcatII) were found. There were three variants of the fourth Kgp C-terminal cleaved adhesin domain. Specific variants of the cell surface proteins FimA, FimCDE, MfaI, RagAB, Tpr, and PrtT were also identified. The occurrence of all these variants in the P. gingivalis strains formed a mosaic that was not related to the SNP-based phylogeny. In conclusion P. gingivalis uses domain rearrangements and genetic exchange to generate diversity in specific surface virulence factors. PMID:28184216

  8. [Separation of coagulation factor VIII with high activity using gigaporous anion exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kang, Limei; Zhang, Yan; Luo, Jian; Li, You; Zhou, Yuefang; Yu, Rong; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-06-01

    A purification process to obtain coagulation factor VIII (F VIII) with high activity from human plasma was established. Based on the analysis of the size ratio between F VIII and matrix porous medium and its effect on the protein activity, a novel purification process designed was superporous ion exchange chromatography (IEC). The operating conditions of gigaporous and traditional anion exchange chromatography were optimized separately. The chromogenic substrate, gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were used to monitor the bioactivity and purity of the chromatographic products. The results showed that the superporous medium could not only protect structure of macro-protein but also enhance its mass transfer, finally giving FVIII product with high activity. The yield of F VIII in superporous chromatography was about five times of commercially agarose chromatography and the specific activity was up to 154 IU/mg protein. Furthermore, we studied the regeneration process of the superporous medium, washing the column with 5 column volumes of 1 mol/L NaOH at a low flow rate, to ensure the chromatographic stability. This purification process is simple, reproducible and suitable for large-scale production.

  9. Investigation of the structural stability of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor by hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Chi, Ya-Hui; Kumar, Thallampuranam Krishnaswamy S; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Lin, Dong-Hai; Zhu, Guang; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Yu, Chin

    2002-12-24

    The conformational stability of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-1) is investigated using amide proton exchange and temperature-dependent chemical shifts, monitored by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The change in free energy of unfolding (DeltaG(u)) of hFGF-1 is estimated to be 5.00 +/- 0.09 kcal.mol(-)(1). Amide proton-exchange rates of 74 residues (in hFGF-1) have been unambiguously measured, and the exchange process occurs predominately according to the conditions of the EX2 limit. The exchange rates of the fast-exchanging amide protons exposed to the solvent have been measured using the clean SEA-HSQC technique. The amide proton protection factor and temperature coefficient estimates show reasonably good correlation. Residues in beta-strands II and VI appear to constitute the stability core of the protein. Among the 12 beta-strands constituting the beta-barrel architecture of hFGF-1, beta-strand XI, located in the heparin binding domain, exhibits the lowest average protection factor value. Amide protons involved in the putative folding nucleation site in hFGF-1, identified by quench-flow NMR studies, do not represent the slow-exchanging core. Residues in portions of hFGF-1 experiencing high conformational flexibility mostly correspond to those involved in receptor recognition and binding.

  10. Social and Political Factors Predicting the Presence of Syringe Exchange Programs in 96 US Metropolitan Areas

    PubMed Central

    Tempalski, Barbara; Flom, Peter L.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Friedman, Judith J.; McKnight, Courtney; Friedman, Risa

    2007-01-01

    Community activism can be important in shaping public health policies. For example, political pressure and direct action from grassroots activists have been central to the formation of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the United States. We explored why SEPs are present in some localities but not others, hypothesizing that programs are unevenly distributed across geographic areas as a result of political, socioeconomic, and organizational characteristics of localities, including needs, resources, and local opposition. We examined the effects of these factors on whether SEPs were present in different US metropolitan statistical areas in 2000. Predictors of the presence of an SEP included percentage of the population with a college education, the existence of local AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) chapters, and the percentage of men who have sex with men in the population. Need was not a predictor. PMID:17267732

  11. Theoretical calculation of nitrogen isotope equilibrium exchange fractionation factors for various NOy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Wendell W.; Michalski, Greg

    2015-09-01

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio (15N/14N) of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and its oxidation products (NOy = NOx + PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate = C2H3NO5) + HNO3 + NO3 + HONO + N2O5 + ⋯ + particulate nitrates) has been suggested as a tool for partitioning NOx sources; however, the impact of nitrogen (N) equilibrium isotopic fractionation on 15N/14N ratios during the conversion of NOx to NOy must also be considered, but few fractionation factors for these processes have been determined. To address this limitation, computational quantum chemistry calculations of harmonic frequencies, reduced partition function ratios (15β), and N equilibrium isotope exchange fractionation factors (αA/B) were performed for various gaseous and aqueous NOy molecules in the rigid rotor and harmonic oscillator approximations using the B3LYP and EDF2 density functional methods for the mono-substitution of 15N. The calculated harmonic frequencies, 15β, and αA/B are in good agreement with available experimental measurements, suggesting the potential to use computational methods to calculate αA/B values for N isotope exchange processes that are difficult to measure experimentally. Additionally, the effects of solvation (water) on 15β and αA/B were evaluated using the IEF-PCM model, and resulted in lower 15β and αA/B values likely due to the stabilization of the NOy molecules from dispersion interactions with water. Overall, our calculated 15β and αA/B values are accurate in the rigid rotor and harmonic oscillator approximations and will allow for the estimation of αA/B involving various NOy molecules. These calculated αA/B values may help to explain the trends observed in the N stable isotope ratio of NOy molecules in the atmosphere.

  12. A Minimal Rac Activation Domain in the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Dock180†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Ramachandran, Sekar; Cerione, Richard A.; Erickson, Jon W.

    2011-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, thereby resulting in downstream effector recognition. Two metazoan families of GEFs have been described: Dbl-GEF family members that share conserved Dbl homology (DH) and Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains and the more recently described Dock180 family members that share little sequence homology with the Dbl family and are characterized by conserved Dock homology regions 1 and 2 (DHR-1 and -2). While extensive characterization of the Dbl family has been performed, less is known about how Dock180 family members act as GEFs, with only a single x-ray structure having recently been reported for the Dock9-Cdc42 complex. In order to learn more about the mechanisms used by the founding member of the family, Dock180, to act as a Rac-specific GEF, we set out to identify and characterize its limit functional GEF domain. A C-terminal portion of the DHR-2 domain, composed of approximately 300 residues (designated as Dock180DHR-2c), is shown to be necessary and sufficient for robust Rac-specific GEF activity both in vitro and in vivo. We further show that Dock180DHR-2c binds to Rac in a manner distinct from Rac-GEFs of the Dbl family. Specifically, Ala27 and Trp56 of Rac appear to provide a bipartite binding site for the specific recognition of Dock180DHR-2c, whereas, for Dbl family Rac-GEFs, Trp56 of Rac is the sole primary determinant of GEF specificity. Based on our findings, we are able to define the core of Dock180 responsible for its Rac-GEF activity as well as highlight key recognition sites that distinguish different Dock180 family members and determine their corresponding GTPase specificities. PMID:21033699

  13. Specificity and Membrane Partitioning of Grsp1 Signaling Complexes with Grp1 Family ARF Exchange Factors

    PubMed Central

    DiNitto, Jonathan P.; Lee, Meng-Tse; Malaby, Andrew W.; Lambright, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Arf exchange factor Grp1 selectively binds phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3), which is required for recruitment to the plasma membrane in stimulated cells. The mechanisms for phosphoinositide recognition by the PH domain, catalysis of nucleotide exchange by the Sec7 domain, and autoinhibition by elements proximal to the PH domain are well characterized. The N-terminal heptad repeats in Grp1 have also been shown to mediate homodimerization in vitro as well as heteromeric interactions with heptad repeats in the FERM domain-containing protein Grsp1 both in vitro and in cells (1). Here, we have characterized the oligomeric state of Grsp1 and Grp1 family proteins (Grp1, ARNO, and Cytohesin-1) as well as the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and specificity of Grsp1 complexes with Grp1, ARNO and Cytohesin-1. At low micromolar concentrations, Grp1 and ARNO are homodimeric whereas Cytohesin-1 and Grsp1 are monomeric. When mixed with Grsp1, Grp1 homodimers and Cytohesin-1 monomers spontaneously re-equilibrate to form heterodimers whereas approximately 50% of ARNO remains homodimeric under the same conditions. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments suggest that the Grsp1 heterodimers with Grp1 and Cytohesin-1 adopt a largely anti-parallel orientation. Finally, formation of Grsp1-Grp1 heterodimers does not substantially influence Grp1 binding to the head groups of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 or PtdIns(4,5)P2 nor does it influence partitioning with liposomes containing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, PtdIns(4,5)P2 and/or phosphatidyl serine. PMID:20527794

  14. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the Drosophila mesoderm requires the Rho GTP exchange factor Pebble.

    PubMed

    Smallhorn, Masha; Murray, Michael J; Saint, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Drosophila pebble (pbl) encodes a Rho-family GTP exchange factor (GEF) required for cytokinesis. The accumulation of high levels of PBL protein during interphase and the developmentally regulated expression of pbl in mesodermal tissues suggested that the primary cytokinetic mutant phenotype might be masking other roles. Using various muscle differentiation markers, we found that Even skipped (EVE) expression in the dorsal mesoderm is greatly reduced in pbl mutant embryos. EVE expression in the dorsalmost mesodermal cells is induced in response to DPP secreted by the dorsal epidermal cells. Further analysis revealed that this phenotype is likely to be a consequence of an earlier defect. pbl mutant mesodermal cells fail to undergo the normal epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and dorsal migration that follows ventral furrow formation. This phenotype is not a secondary consequence of failed cytokinesis, as it is rescued by a mutant form of pbl that does not rescue the cytokinetic defect. In wild-type embryos, newly invaginated cells at the lateral edges of the mesoderm extend numerous protrusions. In pbl mutant embryos, however, cells appear more tightly adhered to their neighbours and extend very few protrusions. Consistent with the dependence of the mesoderm EMT and cytokinesis on actin organisation, the GTP exchange function of the PBL RhoGEF is required for both processes. By contrast, the N-terminal BRCT domains of PBL are required only for the cytokinetic function of PBL. These studies reveal that a novel PBL-mediated intracellular signalling pathway operates in mesodermal cells during the transition from an epithelial to migratory mesenchymal morphology during gastrulation.

  15. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  16. Control of lymphocyte shape and the chemotactic response by the GTP exchange factor Vav.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Cabrero, José R; Dosil, Mercedes; Alvarado-Sánchez, Brenda; Bustelo, Xosé R; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2005-04-15

    Rho GTPases control many facets of cell polarity and migration; namely, the reorganization of the cellular cytoskeleton to extracellular stimuli. Rho GTPases are activated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which induce guanosine diphosphate (GDP) release and the stabilization of the nucleotide-free state. Thus, the role of GEFs in the regulation of the cellular response to extracellular cues during cell migration is a critical step of this process. In this report, we have analyzed the activation and subcellular localization of the hematopoietic GEF Vav in human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha). We show a robust activation of Vav and its redistribution to motility-associated subcellular structures, and we provide biochemical evidence of the recruitment of Vav to the membrane of SDF-1alpha-activated human lymphocytes, where it transiently interacts with the SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Vav abolished lymphocyte polarization, actin polymerization, and migration. SDF-1alpha-mediated cell polarization and migration also were impaired by overexpression of an active, oncogenic Vav, although the mechanism appears to be different. Together, our data postulate a pivotal role for Vav in the transmission of the migratory signal through the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

  17. Proton form factors and two-photon exchange in elastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolenko, D. M.; Arrington, J.; Barkov, L. M.; Vries, H. de; Gauzshtein, V. V.; Golovin, R. A.; Gramolin, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. F.; Zhilich, V. N.; Zevakov, S. A.; Kaminsky, V. V.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Neufeld, V. V.; Rachek, I. A.; Sadykov, R. Sh.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; Holt, R. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Proton electromagnetic form factors are among the most important sources of information about the internal structure of the proton. Two different methods for measuring these form factors, the method proposed by Rosenbluth and the polarization-transfer method, yield contradictory results. It is assumed that this contradiction can be removed upon taking into account the hard part of the contribution of two-photon exchange to the cross section for elastic electron-proton scattering. This contribution can measured experimentally via a precision comparison of the cross sections for the elastic scattering of positrons and electrons on protons. Such a measurement, performed at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk at the beam energies of 1.6 and 1.0 GeV for positron (electron) scattering angles in the ranges of θ{sub e} = 15°–25° and 55°–75° in the first case and in the range of θ{sub e} = 65°–105° in the second case is described in the present article. Preliminary results of this experiment and their comparison with theoretical predictions are described.

  18. Anion-exchange purification of recombinant factor IX from cell culture supernatant using different chromatography supports.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel A; Passos, Douglas F; Ferraz, Helen C; Castilho, Leda R

    2013-11-01

    Both recombinant and plasma-derived factor IX concentrates are used in replacement therapies for the treatment of haemophilia B. In the present work, the capture step for a recombinant FIX (rFIX) purification process was investigated. Different strong anion-exchange chromatography media (the resins Q Sepharose(®) FF and Fractogel(®) TMAE, the monolith CIM(®) QA and the membrane adsorber Sartobind(®) Q) were tested for their rFIX binding capacity under dynamic conditions. In these experiments, crude supernatant from CHO cells was used, thus in the presence of supernatant contaminants and mimicking process conditions. The highest dynamic binding capacity was obtained for the monolith, which was then further investigated. To study pseudoaffinity elution of functional rFIX with Ca(2+) ions, a design of experiments to evaluate the effects of pH, NaCl and CaCl2 on yield and purification factor was carried out. The effect of pH was not statistically significant, and a combination of no NaCl and 45mM CaCl2 yielded a good purification factor combined with a high yield of active rFIX. Under these conditions, activity yield of rFIX was higher than the mass yield, confirming selective elution of functional, γ-carboxylated rFIX. Scaling-up of this process 8 fold resulted in very similar process performance. Monitoring of the undesired activated FIX (FIXa) revealed that the FIXa/FIX ratio (1.94%) was higher in the eluate than in the loaded sample, but was still within an acceptable range. HCP and DNA clearances were high (1256 and 7182 fold, respectively), indicating that the proposed process is adequate for the intended rFIX capture step.

  19. Hierarchical functional specificity of cytosolic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) nucleotide exchange factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jennifer L; Verghese, Jacob; Gibney, Patrick A; Morano, Kevin A

    2014-05-09

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperones play critical roles in protein homeostasis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cytosolic Hsp70 interacts with up to three types of nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) homologous to human counterparts: Sse1/Sse2 (Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110)), Fes1 (HspBP1), and Snl1 (Bag-1). All three NEFs stimulate ADP release; however, it is unclear why multiple distinct families have been maintained throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this study we investigate NEF roles in Hsp70 cell biology using an isogenic combinatorial collection of NEF deletion mutants. Utilizing well characterized model substrates, we find that Sse1 participates in most Hsp70-mediated processes and is of particular importance in protein biogenesis and degradation, whereas Fes1 contributes to a minimal extent. Surprisingly, disaggregation and resolubilization of thermally denatured firefly luciferase occurred independently of NEF activity. Simultaneous deletion of SSE1 and FES1 resulted in constitutive activation of heat shock protein expression mediated by the transcription factor Hsf1, suggesting that these two factors are important for modulating stress response. Fes1 was found to interact in vivo preferentially with the Ssa family of cytosolic Hsp70 and not the co-translational Ssb homolog, consistent with the lack of cold sensitivity and protein biogenesis phenotypes for fes1Δ cells. No significant consequence could be attributed to deletion of the minor Hsp110 SSE2 or the Bag homolog SNL1. Together, these lines of investigation provide a comparative analysis of NEF function in yeast that implies Hsp110 is the principal NEF for cytosolic Hsp70, making it an ideal candidate for therapeutic intervention in human protein folding disorders.

  20. Form factors and the s-wave component of the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Robilotta, M.R.; Isidro Filho, M.P.; Coelho, H.T.; Das, T.K.

    1985-02-01

    We argue that the straightforward introduction of ..pi..N form factors into the s-wave component of the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon potential based on chiral symmetry is not free of problems. These can be avoided by means of a redefinition of the potential which considers its physical content.

  1. Exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in a two-dimensional semimetal in HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bovkun, L. S. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Zholudev, M. S.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Spirin, K. E.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in perpendicular magnetic fields to 12 T in HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells 20 nm wide with a semimetal band structure is studied. The electron effective mass and g-factor at the Fermi level are determined by analyzing the temperature dependence of the amplitude of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillation in weak fields and near odd Landau-level filling factors ν ≤ 9. The experimental values are compared with theoretical calculations performed in the one-electron approximation using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The found dependence of g-factor enhancement on the electron concentration is explained by changes in the contributions of hole- and electron-like states to exchange corrections to the Landau-level energies in the conduction band.

  2. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor RABGEF1 regulates keratinocyte-intrinsic signaling to maintain skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Marichal, Thomas; El Abbas, Sophie; Sibilano, Riccardo; Zurek, Oliwia; Reber, Laurent L.; Pirottin, Dimitri; Kim, Jinah; Chambon, Pierre; Roers, Axel; Antoine, Nadine; Kawakami, Yuko; Bureau, Fabrice; Tam, See-Ying; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes form a structural and immune barrier that is essential for skin homeostasis. However, the mechanisms that regulate epidermal barrier function are incompletely understood. Here we have found that keratinocyte-specific deletion of the gene encoding RAB guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (RABGEF1, also known as RABEX-5) severely impairs epidermal barrier function in mice and induces an allergic cutaneous and systemic phenotype. RABGEF1-deficient keratinocytes exhibited aberrant activation of the intrinsic IL-1R/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathway and MYD88-dependent abnormalities in expression of structural proteins that contribute to skin barrier function. Moreover, ablation of MYD88 signaling in RABGEF1-deficient keratinocytes or deletion of Il1r1 restored skin homeostasis and prevented development of skin inflammation. We further demonstrated that epidermal RABGEF1 expression is reduced in skin lesions of humans diagnosed with either atopic dermatitis or allergic contact dermatitis as well as in an inducible mouse model of allergic dermatitis. Our findings reveal a key role for RABGEF1 in dampening keratinocyte-intrinsic MYD88 signaling and sustaining epidermal barrier function in mice, and suggest that dysregulation of RABGEF1 expression may contribute to epidermal barrier dysfunction in allergic skin disorders in mice and humans. Thus, RABGEF1-mediated regulation of IL-1R/MYD88 signaling might represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27820702

  3. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors for RhoGTPases: good therapeutic targets for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2011-06-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are a family of small proteins which function as molecular switches in a variety of signaling pathways following stimulation of cell surface receptors. RhoGTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration, growth and cell survival. Because of their central role in regulating processes that are dysregulated in cancer, it seems reasonable that defects in the RhoGTPase pathway may be involved in the development of cancer. RhoGTPase activity is regulated by a number of protein families: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). This review discusses the participation of RhoGTPases and their regulators, especially GEFs in human cancers. In particular, we focus on the involvement of the RhoGTPase GEF, Vav1, a hematopoietic specific signal transducer which is involved in human neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma and lung cancer. Finally, we summarize recent advances in the design and application of a number of molecules that specifically target individual RhoGTPases or their regulators or effectors, and discuss their potential for cancer therapy.

  4. The Rho GTP exchange factor Lfc promotes spindle assembly in early mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Christopher J.; Finan, Dina; LaRose, José; Wells, Clark D.; Gish, Gerald; Kulkarni, Sarang; DeSepulveda, Paulo; Wilde, Andrew; Rottapel, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate reorganization of actin and microtubule cytoskeletal structures during both interphase and mitosis. The timing and subcellular compartment in which Rho GTPases are activated is controlled by the large family of Rho GTP exchange factors (RhoGEFs). Here, we show that the microtubule-associated RhoGEF Lfc is required for the formation of the mitotic spindle during prophase/prometaphase. The inability of cells to assemble a functioning spindle after Lfc inhibition resulted in a delay in mitosis and an accumulation of prometaphase cells. Inhibition of Lfc's primary target Rho GTPase during prophase/prometaphase, or expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of Lfc, also prevented normal spindle assembly and resulted in delays in mitotic progression. Coinjection of constitutively active Rho GTPase rescued the spindle defects caused by Lfc inhibition, suggesting the requirement of RhoGTP in regulating spindle assembly. Lastly, we implicate mDia1 as an important effector of Lfc signaling. These findings demonstrate a role for Lfc, Rho, and mDia1 during mitosis. PMID:15976019

  5. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  6. The Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor SGEF Plays a Crucial Role in the Formation of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Welch, Christopher; Bakker, Erik N.; Matlung, Hanke L.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Sharek, Lisa; Doerschuk, Claire; Hahn, Klaus; Burridge, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The passage of leukocytes across the endothelium and into arterial walls is a critical step in the development of atherosclerosis. Previously, we showed in vitro that the RhoG guanine nucleotide exchange factor SGEF (Arhgef26) contributes to the formation of ICAM-1-induced endothelial docking structures that facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. To further explore the in vivo role of this protein during inflammation, we generated SGEF-deficient mice. When crossed with ApoE null mice and fed a Western diet, mice lacking SGEF showed a significant decrease in the formation of atherosclerosis in multiple aortic areas. A fluorescent biosensor revealed local activation of RhoG around bead-clustered ICAM-1 in mouse aortic endothelial cells. Notably, this activation was decreased in cells from SGEF-deficient aortas compared to wild type. In addition, scanning electron microscopy of intimal surfaces of SGEF−/− mouse aortas revealed reduced docking structures around beads that were coated with ICAM-1 antibody. Similarly, under conditions of flow, these beads adhered less stably to the luminal surface of carotid arteries from SGEF−/− mice. Taken together, these results show for the first time that a Rho-GEF, namely SGEF, contributes to the formation of atherosclerosis by promoting endothelial docking structures and thereby retention of leukocytes at athero-prone sites of inflammation experiencing high shear flow. SGEF may therefore provide a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:23372835

  7. Biochemical, Biophysical and Cellular Techniques to Study the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, GIV/Girdin.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Aznar, Nicolas; Swanson, Lee; Lo, I-Chung; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Ear, Jason; Rohena, Cristina; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Joosen, Linda; Dunkel, Ying; Sun, Nina; Nguyen, Peter; Bhandari, Deepali

    2016-12-07

    Canonical signal transduction via heterotrimeric G proteins is spatiotemporally restricted, i.e., triggered exclusively at the plasma membrane, only by agonist activation of G protein-coupled receptors via a finite process that is terminated within a few hundred milliseconds. Recently, a rapidly emerging paradigm has revealed a noncanonical pathway for activation of heterotrimeric G proteins via the nonreceptor guanidine-nucleotide exchange factor, GIV/Girdin. Biochemical, biophysical, and functional studies evaluating this pathway have unraveled its unique properties and distinctive spatiotemporal features. As in the case of any new pathway/paradigm, these studies first required an in-depth optimization of tools/techniques and protocols, governed by rationale and fundamentals unique to the pathway, and more specifically to the large multimodular GIV protein. Here we provide the most up-to-date overview of protocols that have generated most of what we know today about noncanonical G protein activation by GIV and its relevance in health and disease. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Tissue factor de-encryption, thrombus formation, and thiol-disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vivien M Y

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) by forming a complex with factor VIIa (FVIIa) initiates blood coagulation. It was traditionally believed that the separation of FVIIa in circulation from subendothelial TF was the main control that was preventing spontaneous initiation of thrombosis and that circulating cells and endothelium did not express TF protein at rest in healthy individuals. However, TF has been detected in healthy human plasma and animal models of thrombosis, which indicate that TF in circulation can contribute to thrombin generation and fibrin formation after an activation event. Circulating TF-and indeed, most of the TF on the cell surface-is "encrypted" or coagulation inactive. The de-encryption step involves exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), but PS exposure alone is insufficient for full TF activity. Allosteric disulfide bonds control protein function by mediating conformal change through the formation and breaking of disulfide bonds. TF contains a typical surface exposed allosteric bond in the membrane proximal fibronectin type III domain. Thiol-disulfide exchange involving this disulfide is implicated in TF activation with the formation of the disulfide bond corresponding with the active conformation of TF and free thiol or thiol-modified forms corresponding with encryption. Although the exact mechanism by which TF de-encryption occurs remains a subject of debate, thiol blockade and inhibition of oxidoreductases show an important role for thiol-disulfide reactions in platelet-independent pathways of coagulation in vitro and in vivo. In particular, redox active extracellular protein disulfide isomerase is involved in the earliest stages of thrombus initiation and has proven to be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development.

  9. Human body area factors for radiation exchange analysis: standing and walking postures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E

    2011-09-01

    Effective radiation area factors (f (eff)) and projected area factors (f (p)) of unclothed Caucasians' standing and walking postures used in estimating human radiation exchange with the surrounding environment were determined from a sample of adults in Canada. Several three-dimensional (3D) computer body models were created for standing and walking postures. Only small differences in f (eff) and f (p) values for standing posture were found between gender (male or female) and body type (normal- or over-weight). Differences between this study and previous studies were much larger: ≤0.173 in f (p) and ≤0.101 in f (eff). Directionless f (p) values for walking posture also had only minor differences between genders and positions in a stride. However, the differences of mean directional f (p) values of the positions dependent on azimuth angles were large enough, ≤0.072, to create important differences in modeled radiation receipt. Differences in f (eff) values were small: 0.02 between the normal-weight male and female models and up to 0.033 between positions in a stride. Variations of directional f (p) values depending on solar altitudes for walking posture were narrower than those for standing posture. When both standing and walking postures are considered, the mean f (eff) value, 0.836, of standing (0.826) and walking (0.846) could be used. However, f (p) values should be selected carefully because differences between directional and directionless f (p) values were large enough that they could influence the estimated level of human thermal sensation.

  10. Proton Form Factor Puzzle and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) two-photon exchange experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Dipak

    The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental observables that encode information about the internal structure of the nucleon. The electric (GE) and the magnetic ( GM) form factors contain information about the spatial distribution of the charge and magnetization inside the nucleon. A significant discrepancy exists between the Rosenbluth and the polarization transfer measurements of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is the contributions of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. Theoretical calculations estimating the magnitude of the TPE effect are highly model dependent, and limited experimental evidence for such effects exists. Experimentally, the TPE effect can be measured by comparing the ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering cross section to that of the electron-proton [R = sigma(e +p)/sigma(e+p)]. The ratio R was measured over a wide range of kinematics, utilizing a 5.6 GeV primary electron beam produced by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab. This dissertation explored dependence of R on kinematic variables such as squared four-momentum transfer (Q2) and the virtual photon polarization parameter (epsilon). A mixed electron-positron beam was produced from the primary electron beam in experimental Hall B. The mixed beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen (LH2) target. Both the scattered lepton and the recoil proton were detected by the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The elastic events were then identified by using elastic scattering kinematics. This work extracted the Q2 dependence of R at high epsilon(epsilon > 0.8) and the $epsilon dependence of R at approx 0.85 GeV2. In these kinematics, our data confirm the validity of the hadronic calculations of the TPE effect by Blunden, Melnitchouk, and Tjon. This hadronic TPE effect, with additional corrections contributed by higher excitations of the intermediate state nucleon, largely

  11. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and catchment size for Florida lakes in mantled karst terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie Mackin

    2002-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrain of Florida, the size of the catchment delivering ground-water inflow to lakes is often considerably smaller than the topographically defined drainage basin. The size is determined by a balance of factors that act individually to enhance or diminish the hydraulic connection between the lake and the adjacent surficial aquifer, as well as the hydraulic connection between the surficial aquifer and the deeper limestone aquifer. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and the size of the ground-water catchment for lakes in mantled karst terrain were examined by: (1) reviewing the physical and hydrogeological characteristics of 14 Florida lake basins with available ground-water inflow estimates, and (2) simulating ground-water flow in hypothetical lake basins. Variably-saturated flow modeling was used to simulate a range of physical and hydrogeologic factors observed at the 14 lake basins. These factors included: recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, thickness of the unsaturated zone, size of the topographically defined basin, depth of the lake, thickness of the surficial aquifer, hydraulic conductivity of the geologic units, the location and size of karst subsidence features beneath and onshore of the lake, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. Catchment size and the magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with increases in recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, the size of the topographically defined basin, hydraulic conductivity in the surficial aquifer, the degree of confinement of the deeper Upper Floridan aquifer, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The catchment size and magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with decreases in the number and size of karst subsidence features in the basin, and the thickness of the unsaturated zone near the lake. Model results, although qualitative, provided insights into: (1) the types of lake basins in mantled karst terrain that have the potential to generate small and large

  12. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  13. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  14. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  15. Guanyl Nucleotide Exchange Factor Sql2 and Ras2 Regulate Filamentous Growth in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philip; Katzenberger, Jörg D.; Loubradou , Gabriel; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-signaling pathway regulates cell morphology and plays a crucial role during pathogenic development of the plant-pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. Strains lacking components of this signaling pathway, such as the Gα-subunit Gpa3 or the adenylyl cyclase Uac1, are nonpathogenic and grow filamentously. On the other hand, strains exhibiting an activated cAMP pathway due to a dominant-active allele of gpa3 display a glossy colony phenotype and are unable to proliferate in plant tumors. Here we present the identification of sql2 as a suppressor of the glossy colony phenotype of a gpa3Q206L strain. sql2 encodes a protein with similarity to CDC25-like guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which are known to act on Ras proteins. Overexpression of sql2 leads to filamentous growth that cannot be suppressed by exogenous cAMP, suggesting that Sql2 does not act upstream of Uac1. To gain more insight in signaling processes regulated by Sql2, we isolated two genes encoding Ras proteins. Expression of dominant active alleles of ras1 and ras2 showed that Ras2 induces filamentous growth while Ras1 does not affect cell morphology but elevates pheromone gene expression. These results indicate that Ras1 and Ras2 fulfill different functions in U. maydis. Moreover, observed similarities between the filaments induced by sql2 and ras2 suggest that Sql2 is an activator of Ras2. Interestingly, sql2 deletion mutants are affected in pathogenic development but not in mating, indicating a specific function of sql2 during pathogenesis. PMID:12796306

  16. The atypical Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor, dock7, negatively regulates schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Junji; Miyamoto, Yuki; Hamasaki, Hajime; Sanbe, Atsushi; Kusakawa, Shinji; Nakamura, Akane; Tsumura, Hideki; Maeda, Masahiro; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Torii, Tomohiro; Tanoue, Akito

    2011-08-31

    In development of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells proliferate, migrate, and ultimately differentiate to form myelin sheath. In all of the myelination stages, Schwann cells continuously undergo morphological changes; however, little is known about their underlying molecular mechanisms. We previously cloned the dock7 gene encoding the atypical Rho family guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and reported the positive role of Dock7, the target Rho GTPases Rac/Cdc42, and the downstream c-Jun N-terminal kinase in Schwann cell migration (Yamauchi et al., 2008). We investigated the role of Dock7 in Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. Knockdown of Dock7 by the specific small interfering (si)RNA in primary Schwann cells promotes dibutyryl cAMP-induced morphological differentiation, indicating the negative role of Dock7 in Schwann cell differentiation. It also results in a shorter duration of activation of Rac/Cdc42 and JNK, which is the negative regulator of myelination, and the earlier activation of Rho and Rho-kinase, which is the positive regulator of myelination. To obtain the in vivo evidence, we generated Dock7 short hairpin (sh)RNA transgenic mice. They exhibited a decreased expression of Dock7 in the sciatic nerves and enhanced myelin thickness, consistent with in vitro observation. The effects of the in vivo knockdown on the signals to Rho GTPases are similar to those of the in vitro knockdown. Collectively, the signaling through Dock7 negatively regulates Schwann cell differentiation and the onset of myelination, demonstrating the unexpected role of Dock7 in the interplay between Schwann cell migration and myelination.

  17. Two-Photon Exchange in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering: A QCD Factorization Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kivel, Nikolai; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-08-28

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. It is shown that the leading two-photon exchange amplitude behaves as 1/Q{sup 4}, and can be expressed in a model independent way in terms of the leading twist nucleon distribution amplitudes. Using several models for the nucleon distribution amplitudes, we provide estimates for existing data and for ongoing experiments.

  18. Guanine-nucleotide exchange on ribosome-bound elongation factor G initiates the translocation of tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zavialov, Andrey V; Hauryliuk, Vasili V; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Background During the translation of mRNA into polypeptide, elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site of the ribosome. According to the 'classical' model, EF-G in the GTP-bound form promotes translocation, while hydrolysis of the bound GTP promotes dissociation of the factor from the post-translocation ribosome. According to a more recent model, EF-G operates like a 'motor protein' and drives translocation of the peptidyl-tRNA after GTP hydrolysis. In both the classical and motor protein models, GDP-to-GTP exchange is assumed to occur spontaneously on 'free' EF-G even in the absence of a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Results We have made a number of findings that challenge both models. First, free EF-G in the cell is likely to be in the GDP-bound form. Second, the ribosome acts as the GEF for EF-G. Third, after guanine-nucleotide exchange, EF-G in the GTP-bound form moves the tRNA2-mRNA complex to an intermediate translocation state in which the mRNA is partially translocated. Fourth, subsequent accommodation of the tRNA2-mRNA complex in the post-translocation state requires GTP hydrolysis. Conclusion These results, in conjunction with previously published cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the ribosome in various functional states, suggest a novel mechanism for translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome by EF-G. Our observations suggest that the ribosome is a universal guanosine-nucleotide exchange factor for EF-G as previously shown for the class-II peptide-release factor 3. PMID:15985150

  19. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect.

  20. Effect of market factors on the short-time pricing of stock-exchange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The open trade on the world market is estimated using information of one-day exchange prices of nonferrous and precious metals, oil, reduced crude, and gasoline and the main world stock indices in the time period from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2015. It is found that the short-term changes in the prices of nonferrous metals are determined by the prices on the metal market. The changes in the prices of energy carriers and the stock trade on the stock market weakly influence the pricing of nonferrous and precious metals. The prices of metals depend on the situation during trade on commodity exchanges, and the stock market indirectly influences the exchange prices of metals through changes in the share prices of the companies that produce copper, aluminum, and zinc.

  1. Heat-Transfer and Friction Factor Design Data for All-Metal Compact Heat Exchangers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    modeled as a "matrix," similar to a porous media , but the correlation parameters generated didn’t describe the system correctly. Finally, the plate...40. 3. WI.M. Kays, and A.L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers, ?nd Edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 1964. 4. McAdams, Heat Transmision , 3rd Edition

  2. Meson exchange effects in elastic ep scattering at loop level and the electromagnetic form factors of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Zhou, Hai-Qing

    2014-10-01

    A new form of two-photon exchange (TPE) effect is studied to explain the discrepancy between unpolarized and polarized experimental data in elastic ep scattering. The mechanism is based on a simple idea that apart from the usual TPE effects from box and crossed-box diagrams, the mesons may also be exchanged in elastic ep scattering by two-photon coupling at loop level. The detailed study shows such contributions to reduced unpolarized cross section (σun) and polarized observables (Pt,Pl) at fixed Q2 are only dependent on proton's electromagnetic form factors GE ,M and a new unknown universal parameter g. After combining this contribution with the usual TPE contributions from box and crossed-box diagrams, the ratio μpGE/GM extracted from the recent precise unpolarized and polarized experimental data can be described consistently.

  3. Determination of 16O and 18O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Brongersma, H. H.; Kilner, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He+ scattered by 18O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for Ei < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for Ei > 2 keV. The ion fractions P+ were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The 18O/16O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  4. Critical appraisal of some factors pertinent to the functional designs of the gas exchangers.

    PubMed

    Maina, John N

    2017-03-01

    Respiration acquires O2 from the external fluid milieu and eliminates CO2 back into the same. Gas exchangers evolved under certain immutable physicochemical laws upon which their elemental functional design is hardwired. Adaptive changes have occurred within the constraints set by such laws to satisfy metabolic needs for O2, environmental conditions, respiratory medium utilized, lifestyle pursued and phylogenetic level of development: correlation between structure and function exists. After the inaugural simple cell membrane, as body size and structural complexity increased, respiratory organs formed by evagination or invagination: the gills developed by the former process and the lungs by the latter. Conservation of water on land was the main driver for invagination of the lungs. In gills, respiratory surface area increases by stratified arrangement of the structural components while in lungs it occurs by internal subdivision. The minuscule terminal respiratory units of lungs are stabilized by surfactant. In gas exchangers, respiratory fluid media are transported by convection over long distances, a process that requires energy. However, movement of respiratory gases across tissue barriers occurs by simple passive diffusion. Short distances and large surface areas are needed for diffusion to occur efficiently. Certain properties, e.g., diffusion of gases through the tissue barrier, stabilization of the respiratory units by surfactant and a thin tripartite tissue barrier, have been conserved during the evolution of the gas exchangers. In biology, such rare features are called Bauplans, blueprints or frozen cores. That several of them (Bauplans) exist in gas exchangers almost certainly indicates the importance of respiration to life.

  5. 75 FR 62137 - Notice of Public Meeting; Proposed Alluvial Valley Floor Coal Exchange Public Interest Factors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Interest Factors; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Bureau... written testimony and comments on the public interest factors (see determination of public interest at...

  6. Controlling factors of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange at a semi-natural peatland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummer, C.; Richter, U.; Smith, J. J.; Delorme, J. P.; Kutsch, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate net biosphere-atmosphere exchange of ammonia. During a three month field campaign from February to May 2014, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser within an eddy-covariance setup. The laser was operated at a semi-natural peatland site that is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 15 ppb. Different concentration patterns could be identified. The variability was closely linked to the timing of management practices and the prevailing local climate, particularly wind direction, temperature and surface wetness with the latter indicating higher non-stomatal uptake under wet conditions leading to decreased concentrations. Average ammonia fluxes were around -15 ng N m-2 s-1 at the beginning of the campaign in February and shifted towards a neutral average exchange regime of -1 to 0 ng N m-2 s-1 in April and May. Intriguingly, during the time of decreasing ammonia uptake, concentrations were considerably rising, which clearly indicated N saturation in the predominant vegetation such as bog heather, purple moor-grass, and cotton grass. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~300 g N ha-1. This stresses the importance of a thorough method inter-comparison, e.g. with denuder systems in combination with dry deposition modeling. As previous results from the latter methods showed an annual uptake of ~9 kg N ha-1 for the same site, the implementation of adequate ammonia compensation point parameterizations become crucial in surface-atmosphere exchange schemes for bog vegetation. Through their high temporal resolution, robustness and continuous measurement mode, quantum cascade lasers will help assessing the effects of atmospheric N loads to vulnerable N-limited ecosystems such as peatlands.

  7. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav3 regulates differentiation of progenitor cells in the developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Luft, Veronika; Reinhard, Jacqueline; Shibuya, Masabumi; Fischer, Klaus D; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The seven main cell types in the mammalian retina arise from multipotent retinal progenitor cells, a process that is tightly regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic signals. However, the molecular mechanisms that control proliferation, differentiation and cell-fate decisions of retinal progenitor cells are not fully understood yet. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav3, a regulator of Rho-GTPases, is involved in retinal development. We demonstrate that Vav3 is expressed in the mouse retina during the embryonic period. In order to study the role of Vav3 in the developing retina, we generate Vav3-deficient mice. The loss of Vav3 results in an accelerated differentiation of retinal ganglion cells and cone photoreceptors during early and late embryonic development. We provide evidence that more retinal progenitor cells express the late progenitor marker Sox9 in Vav3-deficient mice than in wild-types. This premature differentiation is compensated during the postnatal period and late-born cell types such as bipolar cells and Müller glia display normal numbers. Taken together, our data imply that Vav3 is a regulator of retinal progenitor cell differentiation, thus highlighting a novel role for guanine nucleotide exchange factors in retinogenesis.

  8. ARHGEF7 (BETA-PIX) Acts as Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Haebig, Karina; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Miralles, Marta Garcia; Gillardon, Frank; Schulte, Claudia; Riess, Olaf; Ueffing, Marius; Biskup, Saskia; Bonin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations within the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease. The multidomain protein LRRK2 exhibits overall low GTPase and kinase activity in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that the rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF7 and the small GTPase CDC42 are interacting with LRRK2 in vitro and in vivo. GTPase activity of full-length LRRK2 increases in the presence of recombinant ARHGEF7. Interestingly, LRRK2 phosphorylates ARHGEF7 in vitro at previously unknown phosphorylation sites. We provide evidence that ARHGEF7 might act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for LRRK2 and that R1441C mutant LRRK2 with reduced GTP hydrolysis activity also shows reduced binding to ARHGEF7. Conclusions/Significance Downstream effects of phosphorylation of ARHGEF7 through LRRK2 could be (i) a feedback control mechanism for LRRK2 activity as well as (ii) an impact of LRRK2 on actin cytoskeleton regulation. A newly identified familial mutation N1437S, localized within the GTPase domain of LRRK2, further underlines the importance of the GTPase domain of LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. PMID:21048939

  9. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  10. Phospholipase C-gamma1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for dynamin-1 and enhances dynamin-1-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Park, Jong Bae; Bae, Sun Sik; Yun, Sanguk; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Hong, Won-Pyo; Kim, Il-Shin; Kim, Jae Ho; Han, Mi Young; Ryu, Sung Ho; Patterson, Randen L; Snyder, Solomon H; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2004-08-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), which interacts with a variety of signaling molecules through its two Src homology (SH) 2 domains and a single SH3 domain has been implicated in the regulation of many cellular functions. We demonstrate that PLC-gamma1 acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of dynamin-1, a 100 kDa GTPase protein, which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Overexpression of PLC-gamma1 increases endocytosis of the EGF receptor by increasing guanine nucleotide exchange activity of dynamin-1. The GEF activity of PLC-gamma1 is mediated by the direct interaction of its SH3 domain with dynamin-1. EGF-dependent activation of ERK and serum response element (SRE) are both up-regulated in PC12 cells stably overexpressing PLC-gamma1, but knockdown of PLC-gamma1 by siRNA significantly reduces ERK activation. These results establish a new role for PLC-gamma1 in the regulation of endocytosis and suggest that endocytosis of activated EGF receptors may mediate PLC-gamma1-dependent proliferation.

  11. Greenhouse gas exchange in grasslands: impacts of climate, intensity of management and other factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    Grasslands occupy some 40% of the terrestrial land surface. They are generally categorised as natural (occurring mainly in those regions where the rainfall is too low to support forest ecosystems), semi-natural (where management, mainly by grazing, has changed the vegetation composition), and artificial (where forests have been cleared to create new pasture land). The soils of the natural and semi-natural grasslands constitute a large reservoir of carbon, and make a substantial contribution to the soil sink for atmospheric CH_4. The conversion of much of the natural temperate grassland to arable agriculture, e.g. in North America and Europe, resulted in a considerable decrease in soil organic carbon, and its release to the atmosphere as CO_2 has made a substantial contribution to the total atmospheric concentration of this gas. The associated increase in cycling of soil N (released from the organic matter) will have contributed to N_2O emissions, and land disturbance and fertilisation has resulted in a depletion of the soil CH_4 sink. Conversion of tropical forests to pastures has also been a major source of CO_2, and these pastures show elevated emissions of N_2O for some years after conversion. Seasonally flooded tropical grasslands are a significant source of CH_4 emissions. Consideration of grassland ecosystems in their entirety, in relation to GHG exchange, necessitates the inclusion of CH_4 production by fauna - domesticated livestock and wild herbivores, as well as some species of termites - in the overall assessment. Stocking rates on pasture land have increased, and the total CH_4 emissions likewise. The relationship between animal production and CH_4 emissions is dependent on the nutritional quality of the vegetation, as well as on animal numbers. In both temperate and tropical regions, increased N inputs as synthetic fertilisers and manures (and increased N deposition) are producing possibly a more-than-linear response in terms of emissions of N_2O. In

  12. Protein Kinase A (PKA) Type I Interacts with P-Rex1, a Rac Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Vargas, Lydia; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel; Castillo-Kauil, Alejandro; Bruystens, Jessica G. H.; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Taylor, Susan S.; Mochizuki, Naoki; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2016-01-01

    Morphology of migrating cells is regulated by Rho GTPases and fine-tuned by protein interactions and phosphorylation. PKA affects cell migration potentially through spatiotemporal interactions with regulators of Rho GTPases. Here we show that the endogenous regulatory (R) subunit of type I PKA interacts with P-Rex1, a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor that integrates chemotactic signals. Type I PKA holoenzyme interacts with P-Rex1 PDZ domains via the CNB B domain of RIα, which when expressed by itself facilitates endothelial cell migration. P-Rex1 activation localizes PKA to the cell periphery, whereas stimulation of PKA phosphorylates P-Rex1 and prevents its activation in cells responding to SDF-1 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). The P-Rex1 DEP1 domain is phosphorylated at Ser-436, which inhibits the DH-PH catalytic cassette by direct interaction. In addition, the P-Rex1 C terminus is indirectly targeted by PKA, promoting inhibitory interactions independently of the DEP1-PDZ2 region. A P-Rex1 S436A mutant construct shows increased RacGEF activity and prevents the inhibitory effect of forskolin on sphingosine 1-phosphate-dependent endothelial cell migration. Altogether, these results support the idea that P-Rex1 contributes to the spatiotemporal localization of type I PKA, which tightly regulates this guanine exchange factor by a multistep mechanism, initiated by interaction with the PDZ domains of P-Rex1 followed by direct phosphorylation at the first DEP domain and putatively indirect regulation of the C terminus, thus promoting inhibitory intramolecular interactions. This reciprocal regulation between PKA and P-Rex1 might represent a key node of integration by which chemotactic signaling is fine-tuned by PKA. PMID:26797121

  13. A Nucleotide Exchange Factor Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum-to-Cytosol Membrane Penetration of the Nonenveloped Virus Simian Virus 40

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonenveloped simian polyomavirus (PyV) simian virus 40 (SV40) hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control machinery to penetrate the ER membrane and reach the cytosol, a critical infection step. During entry, SV40 traffics to the ER, where host-induced conformational changes render the virus hydrophobic. The hydrophobic virus binds and integrates into the ER lipid bilayer to initiate membrane penetration. However, prior to membrane transport, the hydrophobic SV40 recruits the ER-resident Hsp70 BiP, which holds the virus in a transport-competent state until it is ready to cross the ER membrane. Here we probed how BiP disengages from SV40 to enable the virus to penetrate the ER membrane. We found that nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) Grp170 induces nucleotide exchange of BiP and releases SV40 from BiP. Importantly, this reaction promotes SV40 ER-to-cytosol transport and infection. The human BK PyV also relies on Grp170 for successful infection. Interestingly, SV40 mobilizes a pool of Grp170 into discrete puncta in the ER called foci. These foci, postulated to represent the ER membrane penetration site, harbor ER components, including BiP, known to facilitate viral ER-to-cytosol transport. Our results thus identify a nucleotide exchange activity essential for catalyzing the most proximal event before ER membrane penetration of PyVs. IMPORTANCE PyVs are known to cause debilitating human diseases. During entry, this virus family, including monkey SV40 and human BK PyV, hijacks ER protein quality control machinery to breach the ER membrane and access the cytosol, a decisive infection step. In this study, we pinpointed an ER-resident factor that executes a crucial role in promoting ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration of PyVs. Identifying a host factor that facilitates entry of the PyV family thus provides additional therapeutic targets to combat PyV-induced diseases. PMID:25653441

  14. RIC8 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Galpha subunits that regulates growth and development in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sara J; Inchausti, Regina; Eaton, Carla J; Krystofova, Svetlana; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2011-09-01

    Heterotrimeric (αβγ) G proteins are crucial components of eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Gα subunits. Recently, facilitated GDP/GTP exchange by non-GPCR GEFs, such as RIC8, has emerged as an important mechanism for Gα regulation in animals. RIC8 is present in animals and filamentous fungi, such as the model eukaryote Neurospora crassa, but is absent from the genomes of baker's yeast and plants. In Neurospora, deletion of ric8 leads to profound defects in growth and asexual and sexual development, similar to those observed for a mutant lacking the Gα genes gna-1 and gna-3. In addition, constitutively activated alleles of gna-1 and gna-3 rescue many defects of Δric8 mutants. Similar to reports in Drosophila, Neurospora Δric8 strains have greatly reduced levels of G-protein subunits. Effects on cAMP signaling are suggested by low levels of adenylyl cyclase protein in Δric8 mutants and suppression of Δric8 by a mutation in the protein kinase A regulatory subunit. RIC8 acts as a GEF for GNA-1 and GNA-3 in vitro, with the strongest effect on GNA-3. Our results support a role for RIC8 in regulating GNA-1 and GNA-3 in Neurospora.

  15. Exchange enhancement of the g factor in InAs/AlSb heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Krishtopenko, S. S.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Spirin, K. E.

    2008-07-15

    The evolution of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with twodimensional electron gas in InAs quantum wells 12-18 nm wide with considerable variation in the electron concentration (3-8) x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} due to the effect of negative persistent photoconductivity is studied. The values of the effective Lande factor for electrons g* = -(15-35) are determined. It is shown that the value of the g* factor increases as the quantum well width increases.

  16. Proton Form Factor Puzzle and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Two-Photon Exchange Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rimal, Dipak

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental observables that encode information about the internal structure of the nucleon. This dissertation explored dependence of R on kinematic variables such as squared four-momentum transfer (Q2) and the virtual photon polarization parameter (ε).

  17. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in heterogenous peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2015-05-01

    The drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands create complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater levels (GWLs). To date, the significance of such sites as sources or sinks for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 is still unclear, especially if the sites are used for cropland. As individual control factors such as GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of the plant- and microbially mediated CO2 fluxes in these soils and, inversely, for CH4. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP; ecosystem respiration - Reco; net ecosystem exchange - NEE; CH4) of maize using manual chambers for 4 years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany, where we selected three soil types representing the full gradient of GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the landscape: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data were used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 yr-1 in AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 yr-1 in GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 yr-1 in HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP : Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the

  18. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in a heterogenous peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2014-11-01

    Drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands creates complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater-level (GWL). To date, it remains unclear if such sites are sources or sinks for greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4, especially if used for cropland. As individual control factors like GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of plant- and microbially mediated C gas fluxes of these soils. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP, ecosystem respiration - Reco, net ecosystem exchange - NEE, CH4) of maize using manual chambers for four years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany. Here we selected three soils, which represent the full gradient in pedogenesis, GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the fen peatland: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data was used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 a-1 at AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 a-1 at GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 a-1 at HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP:Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the effects of GWL-dependent N availability on C formation and

  19. Nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates cross-talk between microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Krendel, Mira; Zenke, Frank T; Bokoch, Gary M

    2002-04-01

    Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by microtubules is mediated by the Rho family GTPases. However, the molecular mechanisms that link microtubule dynamics to Rho GTPases have not, as yet, been identified. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)-H1 is regulated by an interaction with microtubules. GEF-H1 mutants that are deficient in microtubule binding have higher activity levels than microtubule-bound forms. These mutants also induce Rho-dependent changes in cell morphology and actin organization. Furthermore, drug-induced microtubule depolymerization induces changes in cell morphology and gene expression that are similar to the changes induced by the expression of active forms of GEF-H1. Furthermore, these effects are inhibited by dominant-negative versions of GEF-H1. Thus, GEF-H1 links changes in microtubule integrity to Rho-dependent regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. Myristoylation-facilitated binding of the G protein ARF1GDP to membrane phospholipids is required for its activation by a soluble nucleotide exchange factor.

    PubMed

    Franco, M; Chardin, P; Chabre, M; Paris, S

    1996-01-19

    We have investigated the role of N-myristoylation in the activation of bovine ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). We previously showed that myristoylation allows some spontaneous GDP-to-GTP exchange to occur on ARF1 at physiological Mg2+ levels in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (Franco, M., Chardin, P., Chabre, M., and Paris, S. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1337-1341). Here, we report that this basal nucleotide exchange can be accelerated (by up to 5-fold) by addition of a soluble fraction obtained from bovine retinas. This acceleration is totally abolished by brefeldin A (IC50 = 2 microM) and by trypsin treatment of the retinal extract, as expected for an ARF-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. To accelerate GDP release from ARF1, this soluble exchange factor absolutely requires myristoylation of ARF1 and the presence of phospholipid vesicles. The retinal extract also stimulates guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)-triphosphate (GTP gamma S) release from ARF1 in the presence of phospholipids, but in this case myristoylation of ARF is not required. These observations, together with our previous findings that both myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of ARF GTP-gamma S but only the myristoylated form of ARFGDP bind to membrane phospholipids, suggest that (i) the retinal exchange factor acts only on membrane-bound ARF, (ii) the myristate is not involved in the protein-protein interaction between ARF1 and the exchange factor, and (iii) N-myristoylation facilitates both spontaneous and catalyzed GDP-to-GTP exchange on ARF1 simply by facilitating the binding of ARFGDP to membrane phospholipids.

  1. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws)) with experimental factor-compensated and T(1) -normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant radio frequency (RF) irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (k(ws)) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI.

  2. Role of protein-phospholipid interactions in the activation of ARF1 by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Arno.

    PubMed

    Paris, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Robineau, S; Bigay, J; Antonny, B; Chabre, M; Chardin, P

    1997-08-29

    Arno is a 47-kDa human protein recently identified as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) with a central Sec7 domain responsible for the exchange activity and a carboxyl-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain (Chardin, P., Paris, S., Antonny, B., Robineau, S., Béraud-Dufour, S., Jackson, C. L., and Chabre, M. (1996) Nature 384, 481-484). Binding of the PH domain to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) greatly enhances Arno-mediated activation of myristoylated ARF1. We show here that in the absence of phospholipids, Arno promotes nucleotide exchange on [Delta17]ARF1, a soluble mutant of ARF1 lacking the first 17 amino acids. This reaction is unaffected by PIP2, which suggests that the PIP2-PH domain interaction does not directly regulate the catalytic activity of Arno but rather serves to recruit Arno to membranes. Arno catalyzes the release of GDP more efficiently than that of GTP from [Delta17]ARF1, and a stable complex between Arno Sec7 domain and nucleotide-free [Delta17]ARF1 can be isolated. In contrast to [Delta17]ARF1, full-length unmyristoylated ARF1 is not readily activated by Arno in solution. Its activation requires the presence of phospholipids and a reduction of ionic strength and Mg2+ concentration. PIP2 is strongly stimulatory, indicating that binding of Arno to phospholipids is involved, but in addition, electrostatic interactions between phospholipids and the amino-terminal portion of unmyristoylated ARF1GDP seem to be important. We conclude that efficient activation of full-length ARF1 by Arno requires a membrane surface and two distinct protein-phospholipid interactions: one between the PH domain of Arno and PIP2, and the other between amino-terminal cationic residues of ARF1 and anionic phospholipids. The latter interaction is normally induced by insertion of the amino-terminal myristate into the bilayer but can also be artificially facilitated by decreasing Mg2+ and salt concentrations.

  3. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Brx: A Link between Osmotic Stress, Inflammation and Organ Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Segars, James H.; Chrousos, George P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Dehydration, and consequent intracellular hyperosmolarity, is a major challenge to land organisms, as it is associated with extraction of water from cells and disturbance of global cellular function. Organisms have thus developed a highly conserved regulatory mechanism that transduces the hyperosmolarity signal from the cell surface to the cell nucleus and adjusts the expression of cellular osmolarity-regulating genes. We recently found that the Rho-type guanine nucleotide exchange factor Brx, or AKAP13, is essential for osmotic stress-stimulated expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), a key transcription factor of intracellular osmolarity. It accomplishes this by first attracting cJun kinase (JNK)-interacting protein (JIP) 4 and then coupling activated Rho-type small G-proteins to cascade components of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, ultimately activating NFAT5. We describe the potential implications of osmotic stress and Brx activation in organ physiology and pathophysiology and connect activation of this system to key human homeostatic states. PMID:21037977

  4. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  5. Factors associated with the effectiveness of plasma exchange for the treatment of NMO-IgG-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Min; Pyun, So Young; Kang, Bong-Hui; Kim, Jimin; Kim, Kwang-Kuk

    2013-08-01

    To identify factors associated with plasma exchange response in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders, the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 31 NMO-IgG-positive patients receiving plasma exchange for steroid-resistant exacerbations were analyzed. Functional improvement was observed in 65% of the patients. A lower baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale score was associated with favorable response (p = 0.040). Patients without cord atrophy had a higher success rate than patients with atrophy (p = 0.016). Levels of NMO-IgG did not differ between responders and non-responders before and after plasma exchange. In conclusion, a minimal pre-existing disability is the primary determinant of the effectiveness of plasma exchange.

  6. Identification of Arabidopsis cyclase-associated protein 1 as the first nucleotide exchange factor for plant actin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP-actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP- and ATP-monomeric actin (Kd approximately 1.3 microM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP-actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux

  7. Insights into the Molecular Activation Mechanism of the RhoA-specific Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect

    Bielnicki, Jakub A.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Derewenda, Urszula; Somlyo, Avril V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-10-09

    PDZRhoGEF (PRG) belongs to a small family of RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors that mediates signaling through select G-protein-coupled receptors via G{alpha}{sub 12/13} and activates RhoA by catalyzing the exchange of GDP to GTP. PRG is a multidomain protein composed of PDZ, regulators of G-protein signaling-like (RGSL), Dbl-homology (DH), and pleckstrin-homology (PH) domains. It is autoinhibited in cytosol and is believed to undergo a conformational rearrangement and translocation to the membrane for full activation, although the molecular details of the regulation mechanism are not clear. It has been shown recently that the main autoregulatory elements of PDZRhoGEF, the autoinhibitory 'activation box' and the 'GEF switch,' which is required for full activation, are located directly upstream of the catalytic DH domain and its RhoA binding surface, emphasizing the functional role of the RGSL-DH linker. Here, using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, we show that the mechanism of PRG regulation is yet more complex and may involve an additional autoinhibitory element in the form of a molten globule region within the linker between RGSL and DH domains. We propose a novel, two-tier model of autoinhibition where the activation box and the molten globule region act synergistically to impair the ability of RhoA to bind to the catalytic DH-PH tandem. The molten globule region and the activation box become less ordered in the PRG-RhoA complex and dissociate from the RhoA-binding site, which may constitute a critical step leading to PRG activation.

  8. Superoxide Inhibits Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Action on Ras, but not on Rho, through Desensitization of Ras to GEF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are molecular switches for various vital cellular signaling pathways. Overactivation of these GTPases often causes development of cancer. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and oxidants function to upregulate these GTPases through facilitation of guanine nucleotide exchange (GNE) of these GTPases. However, the effect of oxidants on GEF functions, or vice versa, has not been known. We show that, via targeting Ras Cys51, an oxidant inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25—the catalytic domain of RasGEFs—on Ras. However, the enhancement of Ras GNE by an oxidant continues regardless of the presence of Cdc25. Limiting RasGEF action by an oxidant may function to prevent the pathophysiological overactivation of Ras in the presence of both RasGEFs and oxidants. The continuous exposure of Ras to nitric oxide and its derivatives can form S-nitrosated Ras (Ras-SNO). This study also shows that an oxidant not only inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25 on Ras-SNO but also fails to enhance Ras-SNO GNE. This lack of enhancement then populates the biologically inactive Ras-SNO in cells, which may function to prevent the continued redox signaling of the Ras pathophysiological response. Finally, this study also demonstrates that, unlike the case with RasGEFs, an oxidant does not inhibit the catalytic action of RhoGEF—Vav or Dbs—on Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA, RhoC, and Cdc42. This result explains the results of the previous study in which, despite the presence of an oxidant, the catalytic action of Dbs in cells continued to enhance RhoC GNE. PMID:24422478

  9. Association of genetic variants in the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor AKAP13 with familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wirtenberger, Michael; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Hemminki, Kari; Klaes, Rüdiger; Schmutzler, Rita K; Bermejo, Justo L; Chen, Bowang; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2006-03-01

    The A-kinase anchor protein 13 (AKAP13, alias BRX and lbc) tethers cAMP-dependent protein kinase to its subcellular environment and catalyses Rho GTPases activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The crucial role of members of the Rho family of GTPases in carcinogenesis is well established and targeting Rho proteins with antineoplastic compounds has become a major effort in the fight against cancer. Thus, genetic alterations within the candidate cancer susceptibility gene AKAP13 would be expected to provoke a constitutive Rho signalling, thereby facilitating the development of cancer. Here, we analysed the potential impact of four polymorphic non-conservative amino acid exchanges (Arg494Trp, Lys526Gln, Asn1086Asp and Gly2461Ser) in AKAP13 on familial breast cancer. We performed a case-control study using genomic DNA of BRCA1/2 mutation-negative German female index patients from 601 unrelated families, among a subset of 356 high-risk families, and 1053 German female unrelated controls. The newfound Lys526Gln polymorphism revealed a significant association with familial breast cancer (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.07-2.35) and an even stronger association with high-risk familial breast cancer (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.19-2.88). Haplotype analyses were in line with genotype results displaying a similar significance as analyses of individual polymorphisms. Due to the pivotal role of AKAP13 in the Rho GTPases signalling network, this variant might affect the susceptibility to other cancers as well.

  10. Essential role for vav Guanine nucleotide exchange factors in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced dendritic spine growth and synapse plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hale, Carly F; Dietz, Karen C; Varela, Juan A; Wood, Cody B; Zirlin, Benjamin C; Leverich, Leah S; Greene, Robert W; Cowan, Christopher W

    2011-08-31

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, TrkB, regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including dendritic spine formation and functional synapse plasticity. However, the signaling mechanisms that link BDNF-activated TrkB to F-actin remodeling enzymes and dendritic spine morphological plasticity remain poorly understood. We report here that BDNF/TrkB signaling in neurons activates the Vav family of Rac/RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factors through a novel TrkB-dependent mechanism. We find that Vav is required for BDNF-stimulated Rac-GTP production in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Vav is partially enriched at excitatory synapses in the postnatal hippocampus but does not appear to be required for normal dendritic spine density. Rather, we observe significant reductions in both BDNF-induced, rapid, dendritic spine head growth and in CA3-CA1 theta burst-stimulated long-term potentiation in Vav-deficient mouse hippocampal slices, suggesting that Vav-dependent regulation of dendritic spine morphological plasticity facilitates normal functional synapse plasticity.

  11. Basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransport activity is regulated by the dissociable Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Angelito A.; Kear, Felicidad T.; Santos, Anna V.P.; Ma, Jianfei; Steplock, Debra; Robey, R. Brooks; Weinman, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    In the renal proximal tubule, the activities of the basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransporter (NBC) and the apical Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3) uniformly vary in parallel, suggesting that they are coordinately regulated. PKA-mediated inhibition of NHE3 is mediated by a PDZ motif–containing protein, the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHE-RF). Given the common inhibition of these transporters after protein kinase A (PKA) activation, we sought to determine whether NHE-RF also plays a role in PKA-regulated NBC activity. Renal cortex immunoblot analysis using anti-peptide antibodies directed against rabbit NHE-RF demonstrated the presence of this regulatory factor in both brush-border membranes (BBMs) and basolateral membranes (BLMs). Using a reconstitution assay, we found that limited trypsin digestion of detergent solubilized rabbit renal BLM preparations resulted in NBC activity that was unaffected by PKA activation. Co-reconstitution of these trypsinized preparations with a recombinant protein corresponding to wild-type rabbit NHE-RF restored the inhibitory effect of PKA on NBC activity in a concentration-dependent manner. NBC activity was inhibited 60% by 10–8M NHE-RF; this effect was not observed in the absence of PKA. Reconstitution with heat-denatured NHE-RF also failed to attenuate NBC activity. To establish further a physiologic role for NHE-RF in NBC regulation, the renal epithelial cell line B-SC-1, which lacks detectable endogenous NHE-RF expression, was engineered to express stably an NHE-RF transgene. NHE-RF–expressing B-SC-1 cells (B-SC-RF) exhibited markedly lower basal levels of NBC activity than did wild-type controls. Inhibition of NBC activity in B-SC-RF cells was enhanced after 10 μM of forskolin treatment, consistent with a postulated role for NHE-RF in mediating the inhibition of NBC activity by PKA. These findings not only suggest NHE-RF involvement in PKA-regulated NBC activity, but also provide a unique molecular mechanism whereby

  12. A General Econometric Model of the Determinants of Library Subscription Prices of Scholarly Journals: The Role of Exchange Rate Risk and Other Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chressanthis, George A.; Chressanthis, June D.

    1994-01-01

    Provides regression-based empirical evidence of the effects of variations in exchange rate risk on 1985 library prices of the top-ranked 99 journals in economics. The relationship between individual journal prices and library prices is shown, and other factors associated with increases and decreases in library journal prices are given. (Contains…

  13. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O.G.; Thygesen, Helene H.; Jones, Pamela F.; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Selby, Peter J.; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T. Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J.; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell–cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell–cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  14. Pharmacological dimerization and activation of the exchange factor eIF2B antagonizes the integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sidrauski, Carmela; Tsai, Jordan C; Kampmann, Martin; Hearn, Brian R; Vedantham, Punitha; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Sokabe, Masaaki; Mendez, Aaron S; Newton, Billy W; Tang, Edward L; Verschueren, Erik; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Fraser, Christopher S; Weissman, Jonathan S; Renslo, Adam R; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The general translation initiation factor eIF2 is a major translational control point. Multiple signaling pathways in the integrated stress response phosphorylate eIF2 serine-51, inhibiting nucleotide exchange by eIF2B. ISRIB, a potent drug-like small molecule, renders cells insensitive to eIF2α phosphorylation and enhances cognitive function in rodents by blocking long-term depression. ISRIB was identified in a phenotypic cell-based screen, and its mechanism of action remained unknown. We now report that ISRIB is an activator of eIF2B. Our reporter-based shRNA screen revealed an eIF2B requirement for ISRIB activity. Our results define ISRIB as a symmetric molecule, show ISRIB-mediated stabilization of activated eIF2B dimers, and suggest that eIF2B4 (δ-subunit) contributes to the ISRIB binding site. We also developed new ISRIB analogs, improving its EC50 to 600 pM in cell culture. By modulating eIF2B function, ISRIB promises to be an invaluable tool in proof-of-principle studies aiming to ameliorate cognitive defects resulting from neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07314.001 PMID:25875391

  15. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor OSG-1 Confers Functional Aging via Dysregulated Rho Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhibing; Sesti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Rho signaling regulates a variety of biological processes, but whether it is implicated in aging remains an open question. Here we show that a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Dbl family, OSG-1, confers functional aging by dysregulating Rho GTPases activities in C. elegans. Thus, gene reporter analysis revealed widespread OSG-1 expression in muscle and neurons. Loss of OSG-1 gene function was not associated with developmental defects. In contrast, suppression of OSG-1 lessened loss of function (chemotaxis) in ASE sensory neurons subjected to conditions of oxidative stress generated during natural aging, by oxidative challenges, or by genetic mutations. RNAi analysis showed that OSG-1 was specific toward activation of RHO-1 GTPase signaling. RNAi further implicated actin-binding proteins ARX-3 and ARX-5, thus the actin cytoskeleton, as one of the targets of OSG-1/RHO-1 signaling. Taken together these data suggest that OSG-1 is recruited under conditions of oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging, and contributes to promote loss of neuronal function by affecting the actin cytoskeleton via altered RHO-1 activity. PMID:25527286

  16. Cdc24, the GDP-GTP exchange factor for Cdc42, is required for invasive hyphal growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bassilana, Martine; Blyth, James; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2003-02-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, is particularly problematic for immunocompromised individuals. The reversible transition of this fungal pathogen to a filamentous form that invades host tissue is important for its virulence. Although different signaling pathways such as a mitogen-activated protein kinase and a protein kinase A cascade are critical for this morphological transition, the function of polarity establishment proteins in this process has not been determined. We examined the role of four different polarity establishment proteins in C. albicans invasive growth and virulence by using strains in which one copy of each gene was deleted and the other copy expressed behind the regulatable promoter MET3. Strikingly, mutants with ectopic expression of either the Rho G-protein Cdc42 or its exchange factor Cdc24 are unable to form invasive hyphal filaments and germ tubes in response to serum or elevated temperature and yet grow normally as a budding yeast. Furthermore, these mutants are avirulent in a mouse model for systemic infection. This function of the Cdc42 GTPase module is not simply a general feature of polarity establishment proteins. Mutants with ectopic expression of the SH3 domain containing protein Bem1 or the Ras-like G-protein Bud1 can grow in an invasive fashion and are virulent in mice, albeit with reduced efficiency. These results indicate that a specific regulation of Cdc24/Cdc42 activity is required for invasive hyphal growth and suggest that these proteins are required for pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  17. A High-Throughput Assay for Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Based on the Transcreener GDP Assay.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Melvin; Schabdach, Amanda; Kumar, Meera; Zielinski, Tom; Donover, Preston S; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Lowery, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    Ras homologous (Rho) family GTPases act as molecular switches controlling cell growth, movement, and gene expression by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)- and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound conformations. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate Rho GTPases by accelerating GDP dissociation to allow formation of the active, GTP-bound complex. Rho proteins are directly involved in cancer pathways, especially cell migration and invasion, and inhibiting GEFs holds potential as a therapeutic strategy to diminish Rho-dependent oncogenesis. Methods for measuring GEF activity suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) are limited. We developed a simple, generic biochemical assay method for measuring GEF activity based on the fact that GDP dissociation is generally the rate-limiting step in the Rho GTPase catalytic cycle, and thus addition of a GEF causes an increase in steady-state GTPase activity. We used the Transcreener GDP Assay, which relies on selective immunodetection of GDP, to measure the GEF-dependent stimulation of steady-state GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases using Dbs (Dbl's big sister) as a GEF for Cdc42, RhoA, and RhoB. The assay is well suited for HTS, with a homogenous format and far red fluorescence polarization (FP) readout, and it should be broadly applicable to diverse Rho GEF/GTPase pairs.

  18. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP.

  19. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O G; Thygesen, Helene H; Jones, Pamela F; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M; Selby, Peter J; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-07-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell-cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis.

  20. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A.; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia. PMID:27055101

  1. Assay of Rab17 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabex-5 in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yasunori; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are functionally and morphologically compartmentalized into axons and dendrites, and the localization of specific proteins within these compartments is critical to the proper formation of neuronal networks, which includes neurite morphogenesis and synapse formation. The small GTPase Rab17 is specifically localized in dendrites and is not found in axons, and it regulates the dendrite morphogenesis and postsynaptic development of mouse hippocampal neurons. However, the spatiotemporal regulation of Rab17 is poorly understood. We recently identified Rabex-5, originally described as a Rab5-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a physiological Rab17-GEF that promotes translocation of Rab17 from the cell body to the dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of Rab17 in mouse hippocampal neurons resulted in reductions in dendrite growth, branch numbers, filopodium density, and active synapse numbers. Knockdown of Rab17-GEF Rabex-5 in hippocampal neurons resulted in decreased targeting of Rab17 to the dendrites, which led to a reduction in dendrite growth. In this chapter we describe the assay procedures for analyzing Rab17 and Rabex-5 in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, and we particularly focus on the measurement of total dendrite (or axon) length and total dendrite (or axon) branch numbers, filopodium density, number of active synapses, and dendritic Rab17 signals.

  2. Sil1, a nucleotide exchange factor for BiP, is not required for antibody assembly or secretion.

    PubMed

    Ichhaporia, Viraj P; Sanford, Tyler; Howes, Jenny; Marion, Tony N; Hendershot, Linda M

    2015-02-01

    Sil1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP, and mutations in this gene lead to Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS), a debilitating autosomal recessive disease characterized by multisystem defects. A mouse model for MSS was previously produced by disrupting Sil1 using gene-trap methodology. The resulting Sil1Gt mouse phenocopies several pathologies associated with MSS, although its ability to assemble and secrete antibodies, the best-characterized substrate of BiP, has not been investigated. In vivo antigen-specific immunizations and ex vivo LPS stimulation of splenic B cells revealed that the Sil1Gt mouse was indistinguishable from wild-type age-matched controls in terms of both the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific antibody responses. There was no significant accumulation of BiP-associated Ig assembly intermediates or evidence that another molecular chaperone system was used for antibody production in the LPS-stimulated splenic B cells from Sil1Gt mice. ER chaperones were expressed at the same level in Sil1WT and Sil1Gt mice, indicating that there was no evident compensation for the disruption of Sil1. Finally, these results were confirmed and extended in three human EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from individuals with MSS, leading us to conclude that the BiP cofactor Sil1 is dispensable for antibody production.

  3. Driving factors of interactions between the exchange rate market and the commodity market: A wavelet-based complex network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shaobo; An, Haizhong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Xueyong

    2017-08-01

    In traditional econometrics, a time series must be in a stationary sequence. However, it usually shows time-varying fluctuations, and it remains a challenge to execute a multiscale analysis of the data and discover the topological characteristics of conduction in different scales. Wavelet analysis and complex networks in physical statistics have special advantages in solving these problems. We select the exchange rate variable from the Chinese market and the commodity price index variable from the world market as the time series of our study. We explore the driving factors behind the behavior of the two markets and their topological characteristics in three steps. First, we use the Kalman filter to find the optimal estimation of the relationship between the two markets. Second, wavelet analysis is used to extract the scales of the relationship that are driven by different frequency wavelets. Meanwhile, we search for the actual economic variables corresponding to different frequency wavelets. Finally, a complex network is used to search for the transfer characteristics of the combination of states driven by different frequency wavelets. The results show that statistical physics have a unique advantage over traditional econometrics. The Chinese market has time-varying impacts on the world market: it has greater influence when the world economy is stable and less influence in times of turmoil. The process of forming the state combination is random. Transitions between state combinations have a clustering feature. Based on these characteristics, we can effectively reduce the information burden on investors and correctly respond to the government's policy mix.

  4. Functional characterization of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) motif of GIV protein reveals a threshold effect in signaling.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Kietrsunthorn, Patrick S; Pavlova, Yelena; Adia, Michelle A; Ghosh, Pradipta; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2012-02-07

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are critical signal-transducing molecules controlled by a complex network of regulators. GIV (a.k.a. Girdin) is a unique component of this network and a nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that functions via a signature motif. GIV's GEF motif is involved in the regulation of critical biological processes such as phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, cell migration, and cancer metastasis. Here we investigated how the GEF function of GIV affects the wiring of its signaling pathway to shape different biological responses. Using a structure-guided approach, we designed a battery of GIV mutants with different Gαi-binding and -activating properties and used it to dissect the specific impact of changes in GIV's GEF activity on several cellular responses. In vivo signaling assays revealed a threshold effect of GEF activity for the activation of Akt by GIV in different cell lines and by different stimuli. Akt signaling is minimal at low GEF activity and is sharply increased to reach a maximum above a threshold of GEF activity, suggesting that GIV is a critical signal amplifier and that activation of Akt is ultrasensitive to changes in GIV's GEF activity. A similar threshold dependence was observed for other biological functions promoted by GIV such as remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration. This functional characterization of GIV's GEF motif provides insights into the molecular interactions between nonreceptor GEFs and G proteins and the mechanisms that govern this signal transduction pathway.

  5. The Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio controls leukocyte transendothelial migration by promoting docking structure formation.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, Jos; Kroon, Jeffrey; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van Alphen, Floris P J; de Jong, Renske J; Kostadinova, Elena; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L; van Buul, Jaap D

    2012-08-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration involves the active participation of the endothelium through the formation of apical membrane protrusions that embrace adherent leukocytes, termed docking structures. Using live-cell imaging, we find that prior to transmigration, endothelial docking structures form around 80% of all neutrophils. Previously we showed that endothelial RhoG and SGEF control leukocyte transmigration. In this study, our data reveal that both full-length Trio and the first DH-PH (TrioD1) domain of Trio, which can activate Rac1 and RhoG, interact with ICAM-1 and are recruited to leukocyte adhesion sites. Moreover, upon clustering of ICAM-1, the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio activates Rac1, prior to activating RhoG, in a filamin-dependent manner. We further show that docking structure formation is initiated by ICAM-1 clustering into ring-like structures, which is followed by apical membrane protrusion. Interestingly, we find that Rac1 is required for ICAM-1 clustering, whereas RhoG controls membrane protrusion formation. Finally, silencing endothelial Trio expression or reducing TrioD1 activity without affecting SGEF impairs both docking structure formation and leukocyte transmigration. We conclude that Trio promotes leukocyte transendothelial migration by inducing endothelial docking structure formation in a filamin-dependent manner through the activation of Rac1 and RhoG.

  6. The prognostic value of the Na⁺/ H⁺ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) protein in cancer.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Concetta; Malfettone, Andrea; Dell'Endice, Teresa Stefania; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita

    2014-01-01

    NHERF1 (Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger regulatory factor) is a scaffolding protein, consists of two tandem PDZ domains linked to a carboxyl-terminal ezrin-binding region. NHERF1 recruits macromolecular complexes at the apical membrane of epithelial cells in many epithelial tissues. It is involved in trafficking and regulation of transmembrane ion transporters and G protein-coupled receptors. Further, NHERF1 also linked other molecules involved in cell growth and cancer progression, such as PDGFR, PTEN, β-catenin, EGFR and HER2/neu. In this review, we focus on the role of NHERF1 during cancer development. Evidences of its involvement in cancer development are present in hepatocellular carcinoma, schwannoma, glioblastoma, colorectal cancer and particularly in breast cancer. Recent findings obtained from our laboratory show that cytoplasmic NHERF1 expression increases gradually in breast cancer during carcinogenesis, and its overexpression is associated with aggressive clinical parameters, unfavourable prognosis, and increased tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, also nuclear NHERF1 expression seems to play a role both in carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer. These data suggest that NHERF1 could be a new biomarker of advanced malignancies.

  7. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 µM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of βPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells. PMID:20713598

  8. Critical function of RA-GEF-2/Rapgef6, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rap1, in mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keisuke; Miyake, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Chiba, Koji; Maeta, Kazuhiro; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Edamatsu, Hironori; Kataoka, Tohru; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-02-28

    Small GTPase Rap1 has been implicated in the proper differentiation of testicular germ cells. In the present study, we investigated the functional significance of RA-GEF-2/Rapgef6, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rap1, in testicular differentiation using mice lacking RA-GEF-2. RA-GEF-2 was expressed predominantly on the luminal side of the seminiferous tubules in wild-type mice. No significant differences were observed in the body weights or hormonal parameters of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) and wild-type mice. However, the testes of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) male mice were significantly smaller than those of wild-type mice and were markedly atrophied as well as hypospermatogenic. The concentration and motility of epididymal sperm were also markedly reduced and frequently had an abnormal shape. The pregnancy rate and number of fetuses were markedly lower in wild-type females after they mated with RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) males than with wild-type males, which demonstrated the male infertility phenotype of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) mice. Furthermore, a significant reduction and alteration were observed in the expression level and cell junctional localization of N-cadherin, respectively, in RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) testes, which may, at least in part, account for the defects in testicular differentiation and spermatogenesis in these mice.

  9. Dynamic Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 association and dissociation regulate parathyroid hormone receptor trafficking at membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Wang, Bin; Watkins, Simon C; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-10-07

    Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1) is a cytoplasmic PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zona occludens) protein that assembles macromolecular complexes and determines the localization, trafficking, and signaling of select G protein-coupled receptors and other membrane-delimited proteins. The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR), which regulates mineral ion homeostasis and bone turnover, is a G protein-coupled receptor harboring a PDZ-binding motif that enables association with NHERF1 and tethering to the actin cytoskeleton. NHERF1 interactions with the PTHR modify its trafficking and signaling. Here, we characterized by live cell imaging the mechanism whereby NHERF1 coordinates the interactions of multiple proteins, as well as the fate of NHERF1 itself upon receptor activation. Upon PTHR stimulation, NHERF1 rapidly dissociates from the receptor and induces receptor aggregation in long lasting clusters that are enriched with the actin-binding protein ezrin and with clathrin. After NHERF1 dissociates from the PTHR, ezrin then directly interacts with the PTHR to stabilize the PTHR at the cell membrane. Recruitment of β-arrestins to the PTHR is delayed until NHERF1 dissociates from the receptor, which is then trafficked to clathrin for internalization. The ability of NHERF to interact dynamically with the PTHR and cognate adapter proteins regulates receptor trafficking and signaling in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner.

  10. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jeffrey M.; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP. PMID:25877869

  11. Overexpression of GEFT, a Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, predicts poor prognosis in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Shugang; Li, Hongan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yuwen; Li, Bingcheng; Cui, Xiaobin; Chen, Yunzhao; Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents with poor prognosis. Yet, there is lack of effective prognostic biomarkers for RMS. The present study, therefore, aimed to explore potential biomarkers for RMS based on our previous findings using array comparative genomic hybridization. We investigated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEFT, at expression level in 45 RMS patients and 36 normal striated muscle controls using immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. The expression rate of GEFT in RMS samples (42/45, 93.33%) was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in normal controls (5/36, 13.89%). Moreover, the overexpression rate of GEFT in RMS (31/45, 68.89%) was also significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in normal controls (0/36, 0.00%). Increased expression of GEFT correlated significantly with advanced disease stages (stages III/IV) (P=0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.019), and distant metastasis (P=0.004), respectively, in RMS patients. In addition, RMS patients having overexpressed GEFT experienced worse overall survival (OS) than those having low levels of GEFT (P=0.001). GEFT overexpression was determined to be an independent prognostic factor for poor OS in RMS patients (hazard ratio: 3.491, 95% confidence interval: 1.121-10.871, P=0.004). In conclusion, these observations provide the first evidence of GEFT overexpression in RMS and its correlations with disease aggressiveness and metastasis. These findings suggest that GEFT may serve as a promising biomarker predicting poor prognosis in RMS patients, thus implying its potential as a therapeutic target.

  12. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders.

  13. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders. PMID:25485589

  14. Variation in Factors Regulating Net Greenhouse Gas Exchange Across Different Vegetation Types at Cape Bounty, Melville Island, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, N. A.; Blaser, A.; Buckley, E.; Humphreys, E.; Treitz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale climate simulations predict significant changes both in temperature and moisture regimes in the high Arctic. This could lead to changes in vegetation community distribution, as vegetation communities are distributed along moisture gradients often determined by snowfall patterns across the landscape. Furthermore, changes in soil moisture and temperature could alter fluxes of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and the impacts of changes in these controlling factors could vary by vegetation type.We measured both spatial and temporal variation in CO2 fluxes using combinations of eddy covariance, auto-chamber, and static chamber techniques at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO). Measurements were performed in three major plant community types: polar semi-desert (PSD), mid-moisture tundra (MM) and wet sedge meadow (WS). Based on our auto-chamber data collected in all vegetation types, ecosystem respiration (ER) related positively to air temperature, and correlated more strongly with air temperature than soil temperature. Modeled ER based on eddy covariance data and air temperature over MM agreed well with measured ER in the same vegetation type. In the WS community, average net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in 2014 measured by static chambers differed in spectrally separable 'wet' and 'dry' sedge areas (-0.33 and 0.01 µmol m-2 s-1, respectively; p<0.001). Rates of ER also varied across this moisture gradient (p<0.05). Over the entire growing season and multiple years, NEE correlated poorly with air and soil temperature, suggesting that ER is not the dominant processes driving NEE. This can vary, however, over the growing season. In PSD communities measured in 2013, air temperature related positively to NEE early in the growing season, but not during the latter part of the season, when PAR (photosynthesis) became the key factor controlling NEE. Not surprisingly, NEE related strongly (0.93) to

  15. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  16. Growing Season Length as a Key Factor of Cumulative Net Ecosystem Exchange Over the Pine Forest Ecosystems in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielewska, Alina; Urbaniak, Marek; Olejnik, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The Scots pine is one of the most important species in European and Asian forests. Due to a widespread occurrence of pine forests, their significance in the energy and mass exchange between the Earth surface and the atmosphere is also important, particularly in the context of climate change and greenhouse gases balance. The aim of this work is to present the relationship between the average annual net ecosystem productivity and growing season length, latitude and air temperature (tay) over Europe. Therefore, CO2 flux measurement data from eight European pine dominated forests were used. The observations suggest that there is a correlation between the intensity of CO2 uptake or emission by a forest stand and the above mentioned parameters. Based on the obtained results, all of the selected pine forest stands were CO2 sinks, except a site in northern Finland. The carbon dioxide uptake increased proportionally with the increase of growing season length (9.212 g C m-2 y-1 per day of growing season, R2 = 0.53, p = 0.0399). This dependency showed stronger correlation and higher statistical significance than both relationships between annual net ecosystem productivity and air temperature (R2 = 0.39, p = 0.096) and annual net ecosystem productivity and latitude (R2 = 0.47, p = 0.058). The CO2 emission surpassed assimilation in winter, early spring and late autumn. Moreover, the appearance of late, cold spring and early winter, reduced annual net ecosystem productivity. Therefore, the growing season length can be considered as one of the main factor affecting the annual carbon budget of pine forests.

  17. The ect2 rho Guanine nucleotide exchange factor is essential for early mouse development and normal cell cytokinesis and migration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Danielle R; Solski, Patricia A; Bultman, Scott J; Kauselmann, Gunther; Schoor, Michael; Kuehn, Ralf; Friedman, Lori S; Cowley, Dale O; Van Dyke, Terry; Yeh, Jen Jen; Johnson, Leisa; Der, Channing J

    2011-10-01

    Ect2 is a member of the human Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) that serve as activators of Rho family small GTPases. Although Ect2 is one of at least 25 RhoGEFs that can activate the RhoA small GTPase, cell culture studies using established cell lines determined that Ect2 is essential for mammalian cell cytokinesis and proliferation. To address the function of Ect2 in normal mammalian development, we performed gene targeting to generate Ect2 knockout mice. The heterozygous Ect2(+/-) mice showed normal development and life span, indicating that Ect2 haplodeficiency was not deleterious for development or growth. In contrast, Ect2(-/-) embryos were not found at birth or postimplantation stages. Ect2(-/-) blastocysts were recovered at embryonic day 3.5 but did not give rise to viable outgrowths in culture, indicating that Ect2 is required for peri-implantation development. To further assess the importance of Ect2 in normal cell physiology, we isolated primary fibroblasts from Ect2(fl/fl) embryos (MEFs) and ablated Ect2 using adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase. We observed a significant increase in multinucleated cells and accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, consistent with a role for Ect2 in cytokinesis. Ect2 deficiency also caused enlargement of the cytoplasm and impaired cell migration. Finally, although Ect2-dependent activation of RhoA has been implicated in cytokinesis, Ect2 can also activate Rac1 and Cdc42 to cause growth transformation. Surprisingly, ectopic expression of constitutively activated RhoA, Rac1, or Cdc42, known substrates of Ect2, failed to phenocopy Ect2 and did not rescue the defect in cytokinesis caused by loss of Ect2. In summary, our results establish the unique role of Ect2 in development and normal cell proliferation.

  18. Postnatal developmental expression of the PDZ scaffolds Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factors 1 and 2 in the rat cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kanjhan, Refik; Hryciw, Deanne H.; Bellingham, Mark C.; Poronnik, Philip; Yun, C. Chris

    2006-01-01

    Sensory transduction in the mammalian cochlea requires the maintenance of specialized fluid compartments with distinct ionic compositions. This is achieved by the concerted action of diverse ion channels and transporters, some of which can interact with the PDZ scaffolds, Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factors 1 and 2 (NHERF-1, NHERF-2). Here, we report that NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 are widely expressed in the rat cochlea, and that their expression is developmentally regulated. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting initially confirmed the RNA and protein expression of NHERFs. We then performed immunohistochemistry on cochlea during various stages of postnatal development. Prior to the onset of hearing (P8), NHERF-1 immunolabeling was prominently polarized to the apical membrane of cells lining the endolymphatic compartment, including the stereocilia and cuticular plates of the inner and outer hair cells, marginal cells of the stria vascularis, Reissner’s epithelia, and tectorial membrane. With maturation (P21, P70), NHERF-1 immunolabeling was reduced in the above structures, whereas labeling increased in the apical membrane of the interdental cells of the spiral limbus and the inner and outer sulcus cells, Hensen’s cells, the inner and outer pillar cells, Deiters cells, the inner border cells, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and spiral ganglion neurons (particularly type II). NHERF-1 expression in strial basal and intermediate cells was persistent. NHERF-2 immunolabeling was similar to that for NHERF-1 during postnatal development, with the exception of expression in the synaptic regions beneath the outer hair cells. NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin in glia. The cochlear localization of NHERF scaffolds suggests that they play important roles in the developmental regulation of ion transport, homeostasis, and auditory neurotransmission. PMID:16160858

  19. The putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor RicA mediates upstream signaling for growth and development in Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Nak-Jung; Park, Hee-Soo; Jung, Seunho; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins) govern growth, development, and secondary metabolism in various fungi. Here, we characterized ricA, which encodes a putative GDP/GTP exchange factor for G proteins in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans and the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both species, ricA mRNA accumulates during vegetative growth and early developmental phases, but it is not present in spores. The deletion of ricA results in severely impaired colony growth and the total (for A. nidulans) or near (for A. fumigatus) absence of asexual sporulation (conidiation). The overexpression (OE) of the A. fumigatus ricA gene (AfricA) restores growth and conidiation in the ΔAnricA mutant to some extent, indicating partial conservation of RicA function in Aspergillus. A series of double mutant analyses revealed that the removal of RgsA (an RGS protein of the GanB Gα subunit), but not sfgA, flbA, rgsB, or rgsC, restored vegetative growth and conidiation in ΔAnricA. Furthermore, we found that RicA can physically interact with GanB in yeast and in vitro. Moreover, the presence of two copies or OE of pkaA suppresses the profound defects caused by ΔAnricA, indicating that RicA-mediated growth and developmental signaling is primarily through GanB and PkaA in A. nidulans. Despite the lack of conidiation, brlA and vosA mRNAs accumulated to normal levels in the ΔricA mutant. In addition, mutants overexpressing fluG or brlA (OEfluG or OEbrlA) failed to restore development in the ΔAnricA mutant. These findings suggest that the commencement of asexual development requires unknown RicA-mediated signaling input in A. nidulans.

  20. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  1. Fractionation factors and activation energies for exchange of the low barrier hydrogen bonding proton in peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketone complexes of chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Westler, W M; Cleland, W W; Markley, J L; Frey, P A

    1998-12-08

    NMR investigations have been carried out of complexes between bovine chymotrypsin Aalpha and a series of four peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones, listed here in order of increasing affinity for chymotrypsin: N-Acetyl-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-Gly-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-L-Val-L-Phe-CF3, and N-Acetyl-L-Leu-L-Phe-CF3. The D/H fractionation factors (phi) for the hydrogen in the H-bond between His 57 and Asp 102 (His 57-Hdelta1) in these four complexes at 5 degreesC were in the range phi = 0.32-0.43, expected for a low-barrier hydrogen bond. For this series of complexes, measurements also were made of the chemical shifts of His 57-Hepsilon1 (delta2,2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 8.97-9. 18), the exchange rate of the His 57-Hdelta1 proton with bulk water protons (284-12.4 s-1), and the activation enthalpies for this hydrogen exchange (14.7-19.4 kcal.mol-1). It was found that the previously noted correlations between the inhibition constants (Ki 170-1.2 microM) and the chemical shifts of His 57-Hdelta1 (delta2, 2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 18.61-18.95) for this series of peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones with chymotrypsin [Lin, J., Cassidy, C. S. & Frey, P. A. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 11940-11948] could be extended to include the fractionation factors, hydrogen exchange rates, and hydrogen exchange activation enthalpies. The results support the proposal of low barrier hydrogen bond-facilitated general base catalysis in the addition of Ser 195 to the peptidyl carbonyl group of substrates in the mechanism of chymotrypsin-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis. Trends in the enthalpies for hydrogen exchange and the fractionation factors are consistent with a strong, double-minimum or single-well potential hydrogen bond in the strongest complexes. The lifetimes of His 57-Hdelta1, which is solvent shielded in these complexes, track the strength of the hydrogen bond. Because these lifetimes are orders of magnitude shorter than those of the complexes themselves, the enzyme must have a

  2. Intracellular pH regulation by Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger-1 (NHE1) is required for growth factor-induced mammary branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Edmund C; Debnath, Shawon; Gundry, Stephen; Gundry, Sajini; Uyar, Umit; Fata, Jimmie E

    2012-05-01

    Regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and protection against cytosolic acidification is primarily a function of the ubiquitous plasma membrane Na+/H+exchanger-1 (NHE1), which uses a highly conserved process to transfer cytosolic hydrogen ions (H+) across plasma membranes in exchange for extracellular sodium ions (Na+). Growth factors, which are essential regulators of morphogenesis, have also been found to be key activators of NHE1 exchanger activity; however, the crosstalk between both has not been fully evaluated during organ development. Here we report that mammary branching morphogenesis induced by transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFα) requires PI3K-dependent NHE1-activation and subsequent pHi alkalization. Inhibiting NHE1 activity after TGFα stimulation with 10 μM of the NHE1-specific inhibitor N-Methyl-N-isobutyl Amiloride (MIA) dramatically disrupted branching morphogenesis, induced extensive proliferation, ectopic expression of the epithelial hyper-proliferative marker Keratin-6 and sustained activation of MAPK. Together these findings indicate a novel developmental signaling cascade involving TGFα>PI3K>NHE1>pHi alkalization, which leads to a permissible environment for MAPK negative feedback inhibition and thus regulated mammary branching morphogenesis.

  3. Probing the rate-limiting step for intramolecular transfer of a transcription factor between specific sites on the same DNA molecule by (15)Nz-exchange NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Tugarinov, Vitali; Clore, G Marius

    2014-10-15

    The kinetics of translocation of the homeodomain transcription factor HoxD9 between specific sites of the same or opposite polarities on the same DNA molecule have been studied by (15)Nz-exchange NMR spectroscopy. We show that exchange occurs by two facilitated diffusion mechanisms: a second-order intermolecular exchange reaction between specific sites located on different DNA molecules without the protein dissociating into free solution that predominates at high concentrations of free DNA, and a first-order intramolecular process involving direct transfer between specific sites located on the same DNA molecule. Control experiments using a mixture of two DNA molecules, each possessing only a single specific site, indicate that transfer between specific sites by full dissociation of HoxD9 into solution followed by reassociation is too slow to measure by z-exchange spectroscopy. Intramolecular transfer with comparable rate constants occurs between sites of the same and opposing polarity, indicating that both rotation-coupled sliding and hopping/flipping (analogous to geminate recombination) occur. The half-life for intramolecular transfer (0.5-1 s) is many orders of magnitude larger than the calculated transfer time (1-100 μs) by sliding, leading us to conclude that the intramolecular transfer rates measured by z-exchange spectroscopy represent the rate-limiting step for a one-base-pair shift from the specific site to the immediately adjacent nonspecific site. At zero concentration of added salt, the intramolecular transfer rate constants between sites of opposing polarity are smaller than those between sites of the same polarity, suggesting that hopping/flipping may become rate-limiting at very low salt concentrations.

  4. Determination of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Kilner, J. A.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2012-10-08

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He{sup +} scattered by {sup 18}O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for E{sub i} < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for E{sub i} > 2 keV. The ion fractions P{sup +} were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  5. Factors influencing the separation of oligonucleotides using reversed-phase/ion-exchange mixed-mode high performance liquid chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Biba, Mirlinda; Jiang, Eileen; Mao, Bing; Zewge, Daniel; Foley, Joe P; Welch, Christopher J

    2013-08-23

    New mixed-mode columns consisting of reversed-phase and ion-exchange separation modes were evaluated for the analysis of short RNA oligonucleotides (∼20mers). Conventional analysis for these samples typically involves using two complementary methods: strong anion-exchange liquid chromatography (SAX-LC) for separation based on charge, and ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (IP-RPLC) for separation based on hydrophobicity. Recently introduced mixed-mode high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns combine both reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes, potentially offering a simpler analysis by combining the benefits of both separation modes into a single method. Analysis of a variety of RNA oligonucleotide samples using three different mixed-mode stationary phases showed some distinct benefits for oligonucleotide separation and analysis. When using these mixed-mode columns with typical IP-RPLC mobile phase conditions, such as ammonium acetate or triethylammonium acetate as the primary ion-pair reagent, the separation was mainly based on the IP-RPLC mode. However, when changing the mobile phase conditions to those more typical for SAX-LC, such as salt gradients with NaCl or NaBr, very different separation patterns were observed due to mixed-mode interactions. In addition, the Scherzo SW-C18 and SM-C18 columns with sodium chloride or sodium bromide salt gradients also showed significant improvements in peak shape.

  6. A glutamic finger in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO displaces Mg2+ and the beta-phosphate to destabilize GDP on ARF1.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Dufour, S; Robineau, S; Chardin, P; Paris, S; Chabre, M; Cherfils, J; Antonny, B

    1998-01-01

    The Sec7 domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO (ARNO-Sec7) is responsible for the exchange activity on the small GTP-binding protein ARF1. ARNO-Sec7 forms a stable complex with the nucleotide-free form of [Delta17]ARF1, a soluble truncated form of ARF1. The crystal structure of ARNO-Sec7 has been solved recently, and a site-directed mutagenesis approach identified a hydrophobic groove and an adjacent hydrophilic loop as the ARF1-binding site. We show that Glu156 in the hydrophilic loop of ARNO-Sec7 is involved in the destabilization of Mg2+ and GDP from ARF1. The conservative mutation E156D and the charge reversal mutation E156K reduce the exchange activity of ARNO-Sec7 by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, [E156K]ARNO-Sec7 forms a complex with the Mg2+-free form of [Delta17]ARF1-GDP without inducing the release of GDP. Other mutations in ARNO-Sec7 and in [Delta17]ARF1 suggest that prominent hydrophobic residues of the switch I region of ARF1 insert into the groove of the Sec7 domain, and that Lys73 of the switch II region of ARF1 forms an ion pair with Asp183 of ARNO-Sec7. PMID:9649435

  7. Effective Landé factor in a GaMnAs quantum dot; with the effects of sp-d exchange on a bound polaron

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, D. Peter, A. John

    2014-04-24

    The effective g-factor of conduction (valence) band electron (hole) is obtained in the GaMnAs quantum dot. Magneto bound polaron in a GaMnAs/Ga{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4}As quantum dot is investigated with the inclusion of exchange interaction effects due to Mn alloy content and the geometrical confinement. The spin polaronic energy of the heavy hole exciton is studied with the spatial confinement using a mean field theory in the presence of magnetic field strength.

  8. Neighborhood History as a Factor Shaping Syringe Distribution Networks Among Drug Users at a U.S. Syringe Exchange1

    PubMed Central

    Braine, Naomi; Acker, Caroline; Goldblatt, Cullen; Yi, Huso; Friedman, Samuel; DesJarlais, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the US, high-visibility drug markets are concentrated in neighborhoods with few economic opportunities, while drug buyers/users are widely dispersed. A study of Pittsburgh Syringe Exchange participants provides data on travel between and network linkages across neighborhoods with different levels of drug activity. There are distinct racial patterns to syringe distribution activity within networks and across neighborhoods. Pittsburgh’s history suggests these patterns emerge from historical patterns of social and economic development. Study data demonstrate the ability of IDUs to form long term social ties across racial and geographic boundaries and use them to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. PMID:19578475

  9. The auto-inhibitory state of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5/TIM can be relieved by targeting its SH3 domain with rationally designed peptide aptamers.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Tan, De-Li; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lv, Feng-Lin; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The short isoform of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 is known as TIM, which plays diverse roles in, for example, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and Src-induced podosome formation through the activation of its substrates, the Rho family of GTPases. The activation is auto-inhibited by a putative helix N-terminal to the DH domain of TIM, which is stabilized by the intramolecular interaction of C-terminal SH3 domain with a poly-proline sequence between the putative helix and the DH domain. In this study, we systematically investigated the structural basis, energetic landscape and biological implication underlying TIM auto-inhibition by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. The computational study revealed that the binding of SH3 domain to poly-proline sequence is the prerequisite for the stabilization of TIM auto-inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that targeting SH3 domain with competitors of the poly-proline sequence would be a promising strategy to relieve the auto-inhibitory state of TIM. In this consideration, we rationally designed a number of peptide aptamers for competitively inhibiting the SH3 domain based on modeled TIM structure and computationally generated data. Peptide binding test and guanine nucleotide exchange analysis solidified that these designed peptides can both bind to the SH3 domain potently and activate TIM-catalyzed RhoA exchange reaction effectively. Interestingly, a positive correlation between the peptide affinity and induced exchange activity was observed. In addition, separate mutation of three conserved residues Pro49, Pro52 and Lys54 - they are required for peptide recognition by SH3 domain -- in a designed peptide to Ala would completely abolish the capability of this peptide activating TIM. All these come together to suggest an intrinsic relationship between peptide binding to SH3 domain and the activation of TIM.

  10. Exchange of Sex for Drugs or Money in Adolescents and Young Adults: An Examination of Sociodemographic Factors, HIV-Related Risk, and Community Context.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Cherrie B; Greenberg, Lauren; Chutuape, Kate; Walker, Bendu; Monte, Dina; Kirk, Jennifer; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this research was to examine associations among sociodemographic factors, HIV risk, and community context (e.g., economic insecurity, job training, housing instability, crime victimization, and perceived community norms) in adolescents and young adults who ever exchanged sex for drugs or money. Anonymous survey data were collected using ACASIs at community venues where adolescents and young adults congregate in resource-challenged, STI prevalent, urban, US neighborhoods. Conventional descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact tests, and generalized estimating equations approaches were used to examine associations. Participants (1818, 95.5 % of those screened eligible) were, on average, aged 21.0 years; 42.2 % were males, and 4.6 % were transgender. Almost one-third (32.1 %) identified as gay or lesbian, 18.1 % identified as bisexual; 66.2 % were Black and 21.0 % were Hispanic; 1.3 % was 'living on the street'. A sizeable proportion reported HIV-related risk: 16.3 % exchanged sex, 12.6 % had sex with someone they knew to be HIV-infected, 7.8 % had sex with someone who injected drugs, and 1.3 % injected drugs. Multivariate comparisons identified a number of variables (e.g., being male or transgender, homelessness, sex with a partner who has HIV, STI history, unemployment, job training access, housing instability, crime victimization, perceived community norms) that were significantly associated with exchange of sex (p < 0.05). This research contributes to the knowledge-base regarding exchange of sex among adolescents and young adults, particularly as it relates to community context. Longitudinal studies to describe the trajectory of social, health, and physical risks and consequences are needed for development of effective evidence-based prevention strategies.

  11. Growth factor activation of an amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchange system in quiescent fibroblasts: coupling to ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Pouysségur, J; Chambard, J C; Franchi, A; Paris, S; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1982-01-01

    Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (CCl39) enter the G0/G1 nonproliferative state after serum deprivation. In this report, we show that reinitiation of DNA synthesis by serum or the combination of purified human thrombin and insulin (1-10 microgram/ml) is preceded by very early stimulation of ionic fluxes (Na+/Rb+) and protein phosphorylation (27,000 daltons, 62,000 daltons, and the ribosomal S6 proteins). The potentiating action of insulin on thrombin-stimulated DNA synthesis is also observed on thrombin-stimulated Na+ influx, Rb+ influx, and protein S6 phosphorylation. Moreover, we demonstrate that CCl39 cells possess a Na+/H+ exchange system sensitive to amiloride. Half-maximal inhibition of growth factor-activated Na+ influx and Na+-dependent H+ efflux is obtained with 3-10 microM amiloride. Two lines of evidence indicate that the extrusion of H+ via the activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger is coupled to protein S6 phosphorylation: serum-stimulated phosphorylation is blocked by (i) amiloride at a concentration that abolishes serum-stimulated Na+ influx and (ii) protonophores that acidify the cell interior. The present data support the idea that the regulation of intracellular pH is a key event in the mechanism of growth factor action. Images PMID:6287453

  12. The sugar beet gene encoding the sodium/proton exchanger 1 (BvNHX1) is regulated by a MYB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Adler, Guy; Blumwald, Eduardo; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2010-06-01

    Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX) are key players in the plant response to salinity and have a central role in establishing ion homeostasis. NHXs can be localized in the tonoplast or plasma membranes, where they exchange sodium ions for protons, resulting in sodium ions being removed from the cytosol into the vacuole or extracellular space. The expression of most plant NHX genes is modulated by exposure of the organisms to salt stress or water stress. We explored the regulation of the vacuolar NHX1 gene from the salt-tolerant sugar beet plant (BvNHX1) using Arabidopsis plants transformed with an array of constructs of BvHNX1::GUS, and the expression patterns were characterized using histological and quantitative assays. The 5 UTR of BvNHX1, including its intron, does not modulate the activity of the promoter. Serial deletions show that a 337 bp promoter fragment sufficed for driving activity that indistinguishable from that of the full-length (2,464 bp) promoter. Mutating four putative cis-acting elements within the 337 bp promoter fragment revealed that MYB transcription factor(s) are involved in the activation of the expression of BvNHX1 upon exposure to salt and water stresses. Gel mobility shift assay confirmed that the WT but not the mutated MYB binding site is bound by nuclear protein extracted from salt-stressed Beta vulgaris leaves.

  13. Arf6 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cytohesin-2 Binds to CCDC120 and Is Transported Along Neurites to Mediate Neurite Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tago, Kenji; Sango, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of neurite growth is complicated, involving continuous cytoskeletal rearrangement and vesicular trafficking. Cytohesin-2 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6, an Arf family molecular switch protein, controlling cell morphological changes such as neuritogenesis. Here, we show that cytohesin-2 binds to a protein with a previously unknown function, CCDC120, which contains three coiled-coil domains, and is transported along neurites in differentiating N1E-115 cells. Transfection of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for CCDC120 into cells inhibits neurite growth and Arf6 activation. When neurites start to extend, vesicles containing CCDC120 and cytohesin-2 are transported in an anterograde manner rather than a retrograde one. As neurites continue extension, anterograde vesicle transport decreases. CCDC120 knockdown inhibits cytohesin-2 localization into vesicles containing CCDC120 and diffuses cytohesin-2 in cytoplasmic regions, illustrating that CCDC120 determines cytohesin-2 localization in growing neurites. Reintroduction of the wild type CCDC120 construct into cells transfected with CCDC120 siRNA reverses blunted neurite growth and Arf6 activity, whereas the cytohesin-2-binding CC1 region-deficient CCDC120 construct does not. Thus, cytohesin-2 is transported along neurites by vesicles containing CCDC120, and it mediates neurite growth. These results suggest a mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6 is transported to mediate neurite growth. PMID:25326380

  14. Configuration Factors for Exchange of Radiant Energy Between Axisymmetrical Sections of Cylinders, Cones, and Hemispheres and Their Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschman, Albert J., Jr.; Pittman, Claud M.

    1961-01-01

    Radiation-interchange configuration factors are derived for axisymmetrical sections of cylinders, cones, and hemispheres radiating internally to annular and circular sections of their bases and to other axisymmetrical sections. The general procedure of obtaining configuration factors is outlined and the results are presented in the form of equations, tables, and figures.

  15. Defective Guanine Nucleotide Exchange in the Elongation Factor-like 1 (EFL1) GTPase by Mutations in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Protein*

    PubMed Central

    García-Márquez, Adrián; Gijsbers, Abril; de la Mora, Eugenio; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is orchestrated by the action of several accessory factors that provide time and directionality to the process. One such accessory factor is the GTPase EFL1 involved in the cytoplasmic maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. EFL1 and SBDS, the protein mutated in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), release the anti-association factor eIF6 from the surface of the ribosomal subunit 60S. Here we report a kinetic analysis of fluorescent guanine nucleotides binding to EFL1 alone and in the presence of SBDS using fluorescence stopped-flow spectroscopy. Binding kinetics of EFL1 to both GDP and GTP suggests a two-step mechanism with an initial binding event followed by a conformational change of the complex. Furthermore, the same behavior was observed in the presence of the SBDS protein irrespective of the guanine nucleotide evaluated. The affinity of EFL1 for GTP is 10-fold lower than that calculated for GDP. Association of EFL1 to SBDS did not modify the affinity for GTP but dramatically decreased that for GDP by increasing the dissociation rate of the nucleotide. Thus, SBDS acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for EFL1 promoting its activation by the release of GDP. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that the S143L mutation present in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome altered a surface epitope for EFL1 and largely decreased the affinity for it. These results suggest that loss of interaction between these proteins due to mutations in the disease consequently prevents the nucleotide exchange regulation the SBDS exerts on EFL1. PMID:25991726

  16. Effects of sp-d exchange on a bound polaron and the g-factor of the exciton in a GaMnAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, D.; John Peter, A.; Yoo, Chang Kyoo

    2013-08-01

    Magneto bound polaron in a GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot is investigated with the inclusion of exchange interaction effects due to Mn alloy content and the geometrical confinement. The exciton binding energy and the optical transition energy are computed as functions of dot radius and the magnetic field strength for a fixed Mn alloy content (x = 0.02) in a GaMnAs quantum dot. Numerical calculations are performed using variational method within a single band effective mass approximation. The spin polaronic energy of the heavy hole exciton is studied with the spatial confinement using a mean field theory in the presence of magnetic field strength. The magnetization as a function of dot radius is investigated in a GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot. The magnetic field induced size dependence of g-factor is studied. The effective g-factor of conduction (valence) band electron (hole) is obtained in the GaMnAs quantum dot. The results bring out that (i) the geometrical dependence on sp-d exchange interaction in the GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot has great influence with the magnetic field strength, (ii) the Landé factor is more sensitive if the geometrical confinement effect is included and (iii) the value of g-factor increases when the magnetic field strength is enhanced for all the dot radii. Our results are in good agreement with the other investigators.

  17. Direct binding of translation initiation factor eIF2gamma-G domain to its GTPase-activating and GDP-GTP exchange factors eIF5 and eIF2B epsilon.

    PubMed

    Alone, Pankaj V; Dever, Thomas E

    2006-05-05

    The GTP-binding eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2 delivers initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40 S ribosomal subunit. The factor eIF5 stimulates hydrolysis of GTP by eIF2 upon AUG codon recognition, whereas the factor eIF2B promotes guanine nucleotide exchange on eIF2 to recycle the factor for additional rounds of translation initiation. The GTP-binding (G) domain resides in the gamma subunit of the heterotrimeric eIF2; however, only eIF2beta, and not eIF2gamma, has been reported to directly bind to eIF5 or eIF2B. Using proteins expressed in yeast or recombinant systems we show that full-length yeast eIF2gamma, as well as its isolated G domain, binds directly to eIF5 and the epsilon subunit of eIF2B, and we map the interaction sites to the catalytically important regions of these factors. Consistently, an internal deletion of residues 50-100 of yeast eIF5 impairs the interaction with recombinant eIF2gamma-G domain and abolishes the ability of eIF5 to stimulate eIF2 GTPase activity in translation initiation complexes in vitro. Thus, rather than allosterically regulating eIF2gamma-G domain function via eIF2beta, our data support a model in which the GTPase-activating factor eIF5 and the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B modulate eIF2 function through direct interactions with the eIF2gamma-G domain.

  18. A novel oncogene, ost, encodes a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that potentially links Rho and Rac signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Y; Beeler, J F; Sakaguchi, K; Tachibana, M; Miki, T

    1994-01-01

    Transfection of NIH3T3 cells with an osteosarcoma expression cDNA library led to the appearance of foci of morphologically transformed cells which were found to harbor a novel oncogene, ost. The ost product was activated by truncation of the N-terminal domain of the ost proto-oncogene and was highly tumorigenic in nude mouse assays. The proto-ost cDNA, isolated subsequently, encodes a predicted protein of 100 kDa containing DH (Db1 homology) and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. Ost is mainly phosphorylated on serine and localized in the cytoplasm. Purified Ost protein catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and Cdc42 among the Rho and Ras family members tested, indicating that Ost can activate these small GTP-binding proteins. Ost did not detectably associate with RhoA or Cdc42, but interacted specifically with the GTP-bound form of Rac1, suggesting that Ost can function as an effector of Rac1. These results suggest that Ost is a critical regulatory component which links pathways that signal through Rac1, RhoA and Cdc42. Of the tissues examined, expression of ost was the highest in brain and could be localized to neurons and alpha-tanycytes, suggesting that Ost may participate in axonal transport in these specialized cells. Images PMID:7957046

  19. Energy and CO2 exchanges and influencing factors in spring wheat ecosystem along the Heihe River, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuchen; Shao, Ming'an; Gao, Hongbei

    2016-12-01

    Spring wheat ( Triticum aestivum Linn.) is an important crop for food security in the desert-oasis farmland in the middle reaches of the Heihe River in northwestern China. We measured fluxes using eddy covariance and meteorological parameters to explore the energy fluxes and the relationship between CO2 flux and climate change in this region during the wheat growing seasons in 2013 and 2014. The energy balance closures were 70.5% and 72.7% in the 2013 and 2014 growing season, respectively. The wheat ecosystem had distinct seasonal and diurnal dynamics of CO2 fluxes with U-shaped curves. The accumulated net ecosystemic CO2 exchanges (NEE) were -111.6 and -142.2 g C/m2 in 2013 and 2014 growing season, respectively. The ecosystem generally acted as a CO2 sink during the growing season but became a CO2 source after the wheat harvest. A correlation analysis indicated that night-time CO2 fluxes were exponentially dependent on air temperature and soil temperature at a depth of 5 cm but were not correlated with soil-water content, water-vapour pressure, or vapour-pressure deficit. CO2 flux was not correlated with the meteorological parameters during daytime. However, irrigation and precipitation, may complicate the response of CO2 fluxes to other meteorological parameters.

  20. [Net carbon exchange and its environmental affecting factors in a forest plantation in Badaling, Beijing of China].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang; Chen, Wen-Jing; Li, Chun-Yi; Zha, Tian-Shan; Wu, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin

    2013-11-01

    By using eddy covariance technique, a year-round (November, 2011-October, 2012) continuous measurement of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE) was conducted in a 4-year old mixed forest plantation in Badaling of Beijing. The forest plantation ecosystem was a net carbon sink in July and August, but a carbon source in the rest months. The monthly net carbon loss and uptake were the largest in April and July, respectively. The annual net ecosystem productivity was (-256 +/- 21) g C x m(-2) x a(-1), in which, the ecosystem respiration was (950 +/- 36) g C x m(-2) x a(-1), and the gross ecosystem productivity was (694 +/- 17) g C x m(-2) x a(-1). The nighttime NEE increased exponentially with the soil temperature at 10 cm depth, with the estimated temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Q10 ) being 2.2. During the growth season (May-September), the daytime NEE increased with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) as described by the Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola. The ecosystem quantum yield varied seasonally, ranging from 0.0219 micromol CO2 x micromol(-1) in May to 0.0506 micromol CO2 x micromol(-1) in July. The maximum carbon assimilation rate and the average daytime respiration followed the seasonal trends of PAR and air temperature. In July and August, vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture played a significant role in determining daytime NEE.

  1. One-step refolding and purification of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α (rhTNF-α) using ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ren, Wenxuan; Gao, Dong; Wang, Lili; Yang, Ying; Bai, Quan

    2015-02-01

    Protein refolding is a key step for the production of recombinant proteins, especially at large scales, and usually their yields are very low. Chromatographic-based protein refolding techniques have proven to be superior to conventional dilution refolding methods. High refolding yield can be achieved using these methods compared with dilution refolding of proteins. In this work, recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α (rhTNF-α) from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli was renatured with simultaneous purification by ion exchange chromatography with a DEAE Sepharose FF column. Several chromatographic parameters influencing the refolding yield of the denatured/reduced rhTNF-α, such as the urea concentration, pH value and concentration ratio of glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the mobile phase, were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, rhTNF-α can be renatured and purified simultaneously within 30 min by one step. Specific bioactivity of 2.18 × 10(8) IU/mg, purity of 95.2% and mass recovery of 76.8% of refolded rhTNF-α were achieved. Compared with the usual dilution method, the ion exchange chromatography method developed here is simple and more effective for rhTNF-α refolding in terms of specific bioactivity and mass recovery.

  2. EFA6, exchange factor for ARF6, regulates the actin cytoskeleton and associated tight junction in response to E-cadherin engagement.

    PubMed

    Luton, Frédéric; Klein, Stéphanie; Chauvin, Jean-Paul; Le Bivic, André; Bourgoin, Sylvain; Franco, Michel; Chardin, Pierre

    2004-03-01

    We addressed the role of EFA6, exchange factor for ARF6, during the development of epithelial cell polarity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. EFA6 is located primarily at the apical pole of polarized cells, including the plasma membrane. After calcium-triggered E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, EFA6 is recruited to a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction and its protein level is increased concomitantly to the accelerated formation of a functional tight junction (TJ). The expression of EFA6 results in the selective retention at the cell surface of the TJ protein occludin. This effect is due to EFA6 capacities to promote selectively the stability of the apical actin ring onto which the TJ is anchored, resulting in the exclusion of TJ proteins from endocytosis. Finally, our data suggest that EFA6 effects are achieved by the coordinate action of both its exchange activity and its actin remodeling C-terminal domain. We conclude that EFA6 is a signaling molecule that responds to E-cadherin engagement and is involved in TJ formation and stability.

  3. Level crossing, spin structure factor and quantum phases of the frustrated spin-1/2 chain with first and second neighbor exchange.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Parvej, Aslam; Soos, Zoltán G

    2015-08-12

    The spin-1/2 chain with isotropic Heisenberg exchange J1, J2  >  0 between first and second neighbors is frustrated for either sign of J1. Its quantum phase diagram has critical points at fixed J1/J2 between gapless phases with nondegenerate ground state (GS) and quasi-long-range order (QLRO) and gapped phases with doubly degenerate GS and spin correlation functions of finite range. In finite chains, exact diagonalization (ED) estimates critical points as level crossing of excited states. GS spin correlations enter in the spin structure factor S(q) that diverges at wave vector qm in QLRO(q(m)) phases with periodicity 2π/q(m) but remains finite in gapped phases. S(q(m)) is evaluated using ED and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. Level crossing and the magnitude of S(q(m)) are independent and complementary probes of quantum phases, based respectively on excited and ground states. Both indicate a gapless QLRO(π/2) phase between  -1.2  <  J1/|J2|  <  0.45. Numerical results and field theory agree well for quantum critical points at small frustration J2 but disagree in the sector of weak exchange J1 between Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains on sublattices of odd and even-numbered sites.

  4. Architecture and mechanism of the late endosomal Rab7-like Ypt7 guanine nucleotide exchange factor complex Mon1–Ccz1

    PubMed Central

    Kiontke, Stephan; Langemeyer, Lars; Kuhlee, Anne; Schuback, Saskia; Raunser, Stefan; Ungermann, Christian; Kümmel, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Mon1–Ccz1 complex (MC1) is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Rab GTPase Ypt7/Rab7 and is required for endosomal maturation and fusion at the vacuole/lysosome. Here we present the overall architecture of MC1 from Chaetomium thermophilum, and in combining biochemical studies and mutational analysis in yeast, we identify the domains required for catalytic activity, complex assembly and localization of MC1. The crystal structure of a catalytic MC1 core complex bound to Ypt7 provides mechanistic insight into its function. We pinpoint the determinants that allow for a discrimination of the Rab7-like Ypt7 over the Rab5-like Vps21, which are both located on the same membrane. MC1 shares structural similarities with the TRAPP complex, but employs a novel mechanism to promote nucleotide exchange that utilizes a conserved lysine residue of Ypt7, which is inserted upon MC1 binding into the nucleotide-binding pocket of Ypt7 and contributes to specificity. PMID:28051187

  5. Distinct roles for the two Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor domains of kalirin in regulation of neurite growth and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Penzes, P; Johnson, R C; Kambampati, V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, essential for neuronal development, is regulated in part by small GTP binding proteins of the Rho subfamily. Kalirin-9, with two Rho subfamily-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) domains, localizes to neurites and growth cones of primary cortical neurons. Kalirin-9 overexpression in cultured cortical neurons induces longer neurites and altered neuronal morphology. Expression of the first GEF domain alone results in drastically shortened axons and excessive growth cones, mediated by Rac1. Expression of the second GEF domain alone induces axonal over-elongation and abundant filopodial neurites, mediated by RhoA. Coordination of the actions of the individual GEF domains through their presence in Kalirin-9, with its Sec14p, spectrin, and Src homology domain 3 motifs, is essential for regulating neurite extension and neuronal morphology.

  6. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometric analysis of a protein containing multiple disulfide bonds: Solution structure of recombinant macrophage colony stimulating factor-beta (rhM-CSFbeta).

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuguang; Zhang, Heidi; Watson, Jeffrey; Schimerlik, Michael I; Deinzer, Max L

    2002-09-01

    Studies with the homodimeric recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor beta (rhM-CSFbeta), show for the first time that a large number (9) of disulfide linkages can be reduced after amide hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, and the protein digested and analyzed successfully for the isotopic composition by electrospray mass spectrometry. Analysis of amide H/D after exchange-in shows that in solution the conserved four-helix bundle of (rhM-CSFbeta) has fast and moderately fast exchangeable sections of amide hydrogens in the alphaA helix, and mostly slow exchanging sections of amide hydrogens in the alphaB, alphaC, and alphaD helices. Most of the amide hydrogens in the loop between the beta1 and beta4 sheets exhibited fast or moderately fast exchange, whereas in the amino acid 63-67 loop, located at the interface of the two subunits, the exchange was slow. Solvent accessibility as measured by H/D exchange showed a better correlation with the average depth of amide residues calculated from reported X-ray crystallographic data for rhM-CSFalpha than with the average B-factor. The rates of H/D exchange in rhM-CSFbeta appear to correlate well with the exposed surface calculated for each amino acid residue in the crystal structure except for the alphaD helix. Fast hydrogen isotope exchange throughout the segment amino acids 150-221 present in rhM-CSFbeta, but not rhM-CSFalpha, provides evidence that the carboxy-terminal region is unstructured. It is, therefore, proposed that the anomalous behavior of the alphaD helix is due to interaction of the carboxy-terminal tail with this helical segment.

  7. Cloning and characterization of mouse UBPy, a deubiquitinating enzyme that interacts with the ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor CDC25(Mm)/Ras-GRF1.

    PubMed

    Gnesutta, N; Ceriani, M; Innocenti, M; Mauri, I; Zippel, R; Sturani, E; Borgonovo, B; Berruti, G; Martegani, E

    2001-10-19

    We used yeast "two-hybrid" screening to isolate cDNA-encoding proteins interacting with the N-terminal domain of the Ras nucleotide exchange factor CDC25(Mm). Three independent overlapping clones were isolated from a mouse embryo cDNA library. The full-length cDNA was cloned by RACE-polymerase chain reaction. It encodes a large protein (1080 amino acids) highly homologous to the human deubiquitinating enzyme hUBPy and contains a well conserved domain typical of ubiquitin isopeptidases. Therefore we called this new protein mouse UBPy (mUBPy). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4-kilobase mRNA present in several mouse tissues and highly expressed in testis; a good level of expression was also found in brain, where CDC25(Mm) is exclusively expressed. Using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein, we demonstrated an "in vitro" interaction between mUBPy and the N-terminal half (amino acids 1-625) of CDC25(Mm). In addition "in vivo" interaction was demonstrated after cotransfection in mammalian cells. We also showed that CDC25(Mm), expressed in HEK293 cells, is ubiquitinated and that the coexpression of mUBPy decreases its ubiquitination. In addition the half-life of CDC25Mm protein was considerably increased in the presence of mUBPy. The specific function of the human homolog hUBPy is not defined, although its expression was correlated with cell proliferation. Our results suggest that mUBPy may play a role in controlling degradation of CDC25(Mm), thus regulating the level of this Ras-guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

  8. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.

  9. Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor, the c-met tyrosine kinase, can mediate a signal exchange between mesenchyme and epithelia during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (SF/HGF) has potent motogenic, mitogenic, and morphogenetic activities on epithelial cells in vitro. The cell surface receptor for this factor was recently identified: it is the product of the c-met protooncogene, a receptor-type tyrosine kinase. We report here the novel and distinct expression patterns of SF/HGF and its receptor during mouse development, which was determined by a combination of in situ hybridization and RNase protection experiments. Predominantly, we detect transcripts of c-met in epithelial cells of various developing organs, whereas the ligand is expressed in distinct mesenchymal cells in close vicinity. In addition, transient SF/HGF and c-met expression is found at certain sites of muscle formation; transient expression of the c-met gene is also detected in developing motoneurons. SF/HGF and the c-met receptor might thus play multiple developmental roles, most notably, mediate a signal given by mesenchyme and received by epithelial. Mesenchymal signals are known to govern differentiation and morphogenesis of many epithelia, but the molecular nature of the signals has remained poorly understood. Therefore, the known biological activities of SF/HGF in vitro and the embryonal expression pattern reported here indicate that this mesenchymal factor can transmit morphogenetic signals in epithelial development and suggest a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal epithelial interactions. PMID:8408200

  10. Regulated Localization Is Sufficient for Hormonal Control of Regulator of G Protein Signaling Homology Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RH-RhoGEFs)*

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Angela M.; Gutowski, Stephen; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling homology (RH) Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) (p115RhoGEF, leukemia-associated RhoGEF, and PDZ-RhoGEF) contain an RH domain and are specific GEFs for the monomeric GTPase RhoA. The RH domains interact specifically with the α subunits of G12 heterotrimeric GTPases. Activated Gα13 modestly stimulates the exchange activity of both p115RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF but not PDZ-RhoGEF. Because all three RH-RhoGEFs can localize to the plasma membrane upon expression of activated Gα13, cellular localization of these RhoGEFs has been proposed as a mechanism for controlling their activity. We use a small molecule-regulated heterodimerization system to rapidly control the localization of RH-RhoGEFs. Acute localization of the proteins to the plasma membrane activates RhoA within minutes and to levels that are comparable with activation of RhoA by hormonal stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors. The catalytic activity of membrane-localized RhoGEFs is not dependent on activated Gα13. We further show that the conserved RH domains can rewire two different RacGEFs to activate Rac1 in response to a traditional activator of RhoA. Thus, RH domains act as independent detectors for activated Gα13 and are sufficient to modulate the activity of RhoGEFs by hormones via mediating their localization to substrate, membrane-associated RhoA. PMID:24855647

  11. MtbHLH1, a bHLH transcription factor involved in Medicago truncatula nodule vascular patterning and nodule to plant metabolic exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Godiard, Laurence; Lepage, Agnès; Moreau, Sandra; Laporte, Damien; Verdenaud, Marion; Timmers, Ton; Gamas, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at defining the role of a basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factor gene from Medicago truncatula, MtbHLH1, whose expression is upregulated during the development of root nodules produced upon infection by rhizobia bacteria. We used MtbHLH1 promoter::GUS fusions and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses to finely characterize the MtbHLH1 expression pattern. We altered MtbHLH1 function by expressing a dominantly repressed construct (CRES-T approach) and looked for possible MtbHLH1 target genes by transcriptomics. We found that MtbHLH1 is expressed in nodule primordia cells derived from pericycle divisions, in nodule vascular bundles (VBs) and in uninfected cells of the nitrogen (N) fixation zone. MtbHLH1 is also expressed in root tips, lateral root primordia cells and root VBs, and induced upon auxin treatment. Altering MtbHLH1 function led to an unusual phenotype, with a modified patterning of nodule VB development and a reduced growth of aerial parts of the plant, even though the nodules were able to fix atmospheric N. Several putative MtbHLH1 regulated genes were identified, including an asparagine synthase and a LOB (lateral organ boundary) transcription factor. Our results suggest that the MtbHLH1 gene is involved in the control of nodule vasculature patterning and nutrient exchanges between nodules and roots. PMID:21679315

  12. Non-homologous end joining: Common interaction sites and exchange of multiple factors in the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Rulten, Stuart L; Grundy, Gabrielle J

    2017-03-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the dominant means of repairing chromosomal DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and is essential in human cells. Fifteen or more proteins can be involved in the detection, signalling, synapsis, end-processing and ligation events required to repair a DSB, and must be assembled in the confined space around the DNA ends. We review here a number of interaction points between the core NHEJ components (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV) and accessory factors such as kinases, phosphatases, polymerases and structural proteins. Conserved protein-protein interaction sites such as Ku-binding motifs (KBMs), XLF-like motifs (XLMs), FHA and BRCT domains illustrate that different proteins compete for the same binding sites on the core machinery, and must be spatially and temporally regulated. We discuss how post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, ADP-ribosylation and ubiquitinylation may regulate sequential steps in the NHEJ pathway or control repair at different types of DNA breaks.

  13. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  14. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  15. A European epidemiological survey of Vibrio splendidus clade shows unexplored diversity and massive exchange of virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Nasfi, H; Travers, M A; de Lorgeril, J; Habib, C; Sannie, T; Sorieul, L; Gerard, J; Avarre, J C; Haffner, P; Tourbiez, D; Renault, T; Furones, D; Roque, A; Pruzzo, C; Cheslett, D; Gdoura, R; Vallaeys, T

    2015-03-01

    virulence factors vsm and ompU that were detected among strains isolated during as well as outside mortality events. These results, combined with incongruence observed between the ompU and vsm phylogenetic trees, suggested both large diffusion of strains and massive lateral gene transfer within the V. splendidus clade.

  16. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  17. The cytohesin guanosine exchange factors (GEFs) are required to promote HGF-mediated renal recovery after acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice.

    PubMed

    Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta M; Santy, Lorraine C

    2015-06-01

    The lack of current treatment and preventable measures for acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients results in an increased mortality rate of up to 80% and elevated health costs. Additionally, if not properly repaired, those who survive AKI may develop fibrosis and long-term kidney damage. The molecular aspects of kidney injury and repair are still uncertain. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes recovery of the injured kidney by inducing survival and migration of tubular epithelial cells to repopulate bare tubule areas. HGF-stimulated kidney epithelial cell migration requires the activation of ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) and Rac1 via the cytohesin family of Arf-guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), in vitro. We used an ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) mouse model to analyze the effects of modulating this signaling pathway on kidney recovery. We treated IRI mice with either HGF, the cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3, or a combination of both. As previously reported, HGF treatment promoted rapid improvement of kidney function as evidenced by creatinine (Cre) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. In contrast, simultaneous treatment with SecinH3 and HGF blocks the ability of HGF to promote kidney recovery. Immunohistochemistry showed that HGF treatment promoted recovery of tubule structure, and had enhanced levels of active, GTP-bound Arf6 and GTP-Rac1. SecinH3 treatment, however, caused a dramatic decrease in GTP-Arf6 and GTP-Rac1 levels when compared to kidney sections from HGF-treated IRI mice. Additionally, SecinH3 counteracted the renal reparative effects of HGF. Our results support the conclusion that cytohesin function is required for HGF-stimulated renal IRI repair.

  18. Drosophila RhoGEF4 encodes a novel RhoA-specific guanine exchange factor that is highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Mihye; Baek, Seung-Hak; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Seungbok

    2006-12-15

    Rho family small GTPases act as molecular switches that regulate neuronal morphogenesis, including axon growth and guidance, dendritic spine formation, and synapse formation. These proteins are positively regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of the Dbl family. This study describes the identification and characterization of Drosophila RhoGEF4 (DRhoGEF4), a novel Dbl family protein that is specifically expressed in the central nervous system during Drosophila embryogenesis. The predicted amino acid sequence of DRhoGEF4 contains a Dbl homology (DH) domain and an adjacent C-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, which are most closely related to those of mammalian frabins. In this study, the DH-PH motif is shown to enhance the dissociation of GDP from either RhoA or Rac1 but not from Cdc42 in vitro. In addition, p21-binding domain pull-down assays demonstrate that DRhoGEF4 activates RhoA, but neither Rac1 nor Cdc42 in HEK293 cells. Finally, overexpression of DRhoGEF4 is able to induce assembly of stress fibers in cultured NIH3T3 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that DRhoGEF4 may participate in cytoskeleton-related cellular events by specifically activating RhoA in neuronal morphogenesis.

  19. Role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor in Akt2-mediated plasma membrane translocation of GLUT4 in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Naoto; Nihata, Yuma; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Aiba, Atsu; Satoh, Takaya

    2014-11-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays a key role in insulin-promoted glucose uptake mediated by the GLUT4 glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. Our recent studies have demonstrated that the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt2 is critically involved in insulin-dependent Rac1 activation. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation in mouse skeletal muscle and cultured myocytes. Constitutively activated FLJ00068 induced GLUT4 translocation in a Rac1-dependent and Akt2-independent manner in L6 myocytes. On the other hand, knockdown of FLJ00068 significantly reduced constitutively activated Akt2-triggered GLUT4 translocation. Furthermore, Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation induced by constitutively activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase were inhibited by knockdown of FLJ00068. In mouse gastrocnemius muscle, constitutively activated FLJ00068 actually induced GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma. GLUT4 translocation by constitutively activated FLJ00068 was totally abolished in rac1 knockout mouse gastrocnemius muscle. Additionally, we were successful in detecting the activation of Rac1 following the expression of constitutively activated FLJ00068 in gastrocnemius muscle by immunofluorescence microscopy using an activation-specific probe. Collectively, these results strongly support the notion that FLJ00068 regulates Rac1 downstream of Akt2, leading to the stimulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

  20. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock–ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis. PMID:25908317

  1. Structural analysis of the Sil1-Bip complex reveals the mechanism for Sil1 to function as a nucleotide-exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ming; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2013-01-16

    Sil1 functions as a NEF (nucleotide-exchange factor) for the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) Hsp70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) Bip in eukaryotic cells. Sil1 may catalyse the ADP release from Bip by interacting directly with the ATPase domain of Bip. In the present study we show the complex crystal structure of the yeast Bip and the NEF Sil1 at the resolution of 2.3 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm). In the Sil1-Bip complex structure, the Sil1 molecule acts as a 'clamp' which binds lobe IIb of the Bip ATPase domain. The binding of Sil1 causes the rotation of lobe IIb {approx} 13.5{sup o} away from the ADP-binding pocket. The complex formation also induces lobe Ib to swing in the opposite direction by {approx} 3.7{sup o}. These conformational changes open up the nucleotide-binding pocket in the Bip ATPase domain and disrupt the hydrogen bonds between Bip and bound ADP, which may catalyse ADP release. Mutation of the Sil1 residues involved in binding the Bip ATPase domain compromise the binding affinity of Sil1 to Bip, and these Sil1 mutants also abolish the ability to stimulate the ATPase activity of Bip.

  2. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  3. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge.

    PubMed

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2015-06-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock-ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis.

  4. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it's functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila.

  5. BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor, is required for GABA-gated Cl⁻ influx through regulation of GABAA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuixian; Chen, Shaorui; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Chun; Wang, Ying; Le, Kang; Li, Dong; Shao, Weiwei; Lu, Liang; You, Yan; Peng, Jin; Huang, Heqing; Liu, Peiqing; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2014-04-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate the majority of fast synaptic inhibition. Trafficking regulation and protein-protein interactions that maintain the appropriate number of GABAARs at the cell surface are considered to be important mechanisms for controlling the strength of synaptic inhibition. Here, we report that BIG1, a brefeldin A (BFA)-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) which has a known role in vesicle trafficking, is a new binding partner of GABAARs. Treatment of neurons with BFA, an uncompetitive inhibitor of BIG1 GEF activity, or depletion of BIG1 by small RNA interference (siRNA) significantly decreased GABAARs at the neuronal surface and suppressed GABA-gated influx of chloride ions. Over-expression of HA-tagged BIG1-E793K, a dominant-negative mutant, also significantly decreased GABAARs at the neuronal surface, but had no effect on the total amount of GABAARs. Inhibition of GABAAR endocytosis by muscimol increased both GABAARs and BIG1 at the neuronal surface in a time-dependent fashion, and this increase could be abolished by bicuculline. Finally, depletion of BIG1 by siRNA inhibited the muscimol-stimulated increase of GABAARs. Those data suggest an important function of BIG1 in trafficking of GABAARs to the cell surface through its GEF activity. Thus, we identify an important role of BIG1 in modulating GABA-gated Cl(-) influx through the regulation of cell surface expression of GABAARs.

  6. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it’s functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila. PMID:27015411

  7. The Salmonella Typhimurium effector SteC inhibits Cdc42-mediated signaling through binding to the exchange factor Cdc24 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Piñar, Pablo; Alemán, Ainel; Sondek, John; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Molina, María; Martín, Humberto

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular survival of Salmonella relies on the activity of proteins translocated into the host cell by type III secretion systems (T3SS). The protein kinase activity of the T3SS effector SteC is required for F-actin remodeling in host cells, although no SteC target has been identified so far. Here we show that expression of the N-terminal non-kinase domain of SteC down-regulates the mating and HOG pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Epistasis analyses using constitutively active components of these pathways indicate that SteC inhibits signaling at the level of the GTPase Cdc42. We demonstrate that SteC interacts through its N-terminal domain with the catalytic domain of Cdc24, the sole S. cerevisiae Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). SteC also binds to the human Cdc24-like GEF protein Vav1. Moreover, expression of human Cdc42 suppresses growth inhibition caused by SteC. Of interest, the N-terminal SteC domain alters Cdc24 cellular localization, preventing its nuclear accumulation. These data reveal a novel functional domain within SteC, raising the possibility that this effector could also target GTPase function in mammalian cells. Our results also highlight the key role of the Cdc42 switch in yeast mating and HOG pathways and provide a new tool to study the functional consequences of Cdc24 localization. PMID:23015760

  8. The RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor, LARG, mediates ICAM-1-dependent mechanotransduction in endothelial cells to stimulate transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C; Osborne, Lukas D; Monaghan-Benson, Elizabeth; Guilluy, Christophe; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, Richard; Burridge, Keith

    2014-04-01

    RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements in endothelial cells (ECs) play an active role in leukocyte transendothelial cell migration (TEM), a normal physiological process in which leukocytes cross the endothelium to enter the underlying tissue. Although much has been learned about RhoA signaling pathways downstream from ICAM-1 in ECs, little is known about the consequences of the tractional forces that leukocytes generate on ECs as they migrate over the surface before TEM. We have found that after applying mechanical forces to ICAM-1 clusters, there is an increase in cellular stiffening and enhanced RhoA signaling compared with ICAM-1 clustering alone. We have identified that leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG), also known as Rho GEF 12 (ARHGEF12) acts downstream of clustered ICAM-1 to increase RhoA activity, and that this pathway is further enhanced by mechanical force on ICAM-1. Depletion of LARG decreases leukocyte crawling and inhibits TEM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of endothelial LARG regulating leukocyte behavior and EC stiffening in response to tractional forces generated by leukocytes.

  9. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP

    PubMed Central

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-01-01

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor – Sil1 – can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24141.001 PMID:28257000

  10. The Putative Exchange Factor Gef3p Interacts with Rho3p GTPase and the Septin Ring during Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family and its regulatory proteins play a central role in cytokinetic actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we show that the fission yeast guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef3p interacts with Rho3p at the division site. Gef3p contains a putative DH homology domain and a BAR/IMD-like domain. The protein localized to the division site late in mitosis, where it formed a ring that did not constrict with actomyosin ring (cytokinetic actomyosin ring) invagination; instead, it split into a double ring that resembled the septin ring. Gef3p co-localized with septins and Mid2p and required septins and Mid2p for its localization. Gef3p interacts physically with the GTP-bound form of Rho3p. Although Gef3p is not essential for cell separation, the simultaneous disruption of gef3+ and Rho3p-interacting proteins, such as Sec8p, an exocyst component, Apm1p, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor complex or For3p, an actin-polymerizing protein, yielded cells with strong defects in septation and polarity respectively. Our results suggest that interactions between septins and Rho-GEFs provide a new targeting mechanism for GTPases in cytokinesis, in this case probably contributing to Rho3p function in vesicle tethering and vesicle trafficking in the later steps of cell separation. PMID:24947517

  11. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness.

  12. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with conventional'' microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  13. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Healey, John F.; Deng, Wei; Spiegel, P. Clint; Meeks, Shannon L.; Li, Renhao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The development of anti-factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of anti-fVIII monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to different epitopes on fVIII, we recently have shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics, and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting response to fVIII and the combination of fVIII and recombinant factor VIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high dose fVIII, which would not be predicted based on their inhibitor titer alone. Thus the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma using a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. Objectives To map the epitopes of anti-fVIII MAbs, of which 3 are classical inhibitors and one non-classical, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Methods Binding epitopes of 4 MAbs targeting fVIII C2 domain were mapped using HDX-MS. Results The epitopes determined by HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition classical and non-classical inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished using a limited subset of C2-derived peptic fragments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of fVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24152306

  14. PKR and GCN2 kinases and guanine nucleotide exchange factor eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) recognize overlapping surfaces on eIF2alpha.

    PubMed

    Dey, Madhusudan; Trieselmann, Bruce; Locke, Emily G; Lu, Jingfang; Cao, Chune; Dar, Arvin C; Krishnamoorthy, Thanuja; Dong, Jinsheng; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2005-04-01

    Four stress-responsive protein kinases, including GCN2 and PKR, phosphorylate eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) on Ser51 to regulate general and gene-specific protein synthesis. Phosphorylated eIF2 is an inhibitor of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eIF2B. Mutations that block translational regulation were isolated throughout the N-terminal OB-fold domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF2alpha, including those at residues flanking Ser51 and around 20 A away in the conserved motif K79GYID83. Any mutation at Glu49 or Asp83 blocked translational regulation; however, only a subset of these mutations impaired Ser51 phosphorylation. Substitution of Ala for Asp83 eliminated phosphorylation by GCN2 and PKR both in vivo and in vitro, establishing the critical contributions of remote residues to kinase-substrate recognition. In contrast, mutations that blocked translational regulation but not Ser51 phosphorylation impaired the binding of eIF2B to phosphorylated eIF2alpha. Thus, two structurally distinct effectors of eIF2 function, eIF2alpha kinases and eIF2B, have evolved to recognize the same surface and overlapping determinants on eIF2alpha.

  15. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  16. The N-terminal pleckstrin, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of the exchange factor Ras-GRF act cooperatively to facilitate activation by calcium.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, R; Telliez, J B; Goonesekera, S; Feig, L A

    1996-09-01

    We have recently shown that the neuronal exchange factor p140 Ras-GRF becomes activated in vivo in response to elevated calcium levels [C. L. Farnsworth, N. W. Freshney, L. B. Rosen, A. Ghosh, M. E. Greenberg, and L. A. Feig, Nature (London) 376:524-527, 1995]. Activation is mediated by calcium-induced calmodulin binding to an IQ domain near the N terminus of Ras-GRF. Here we show that the adjacent N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH), coiled-coil, and IQ domains function cooperatively to allow Ras-GRF activation. Deletion of the N-terminal PH domain redistributes a large percentage of Ras-GRF from the particulate to the cytosolic fraction of cells and renders the protein insensitive to calcium stimulation. A similar cellular distribution and biological activity are observed when only the core catalytic domain is expressed. Although the PH domain is necessary for particulate association of Ras-GRF, it is not sufficient for targeting the core catalytic domain to this cellular location. This requires the PH domain and the adjacent coiled-coil and IQ sequences. Remarkably, this form of Ras-GRF is constitutively activated. The PH and coiled-coil domains must also perform an additional function, since targeting to the particulate fraction of cells is not sufficient to allow Ras-GRF activation by calcium. A Ras-GRF mutant containing the PH domain from Ras-GTPase-activating protein in place of its own N-terminal PH domain localizes to the particulate fraction of cells but does not respond to calcium. Similar phenotypes are seen with mutant Ras-GRFs containing point mutations in either the PH or coiled-coil domain. These findings argue that the N-terminal PH, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of Ras-GRF function together to connect Ras-GRF to multiple components in the particulate fractions of cells that are required for responsiveness of the protein to calcium signaling.

  17. Release of GTP Exchange Factor Mediated Down-Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction through ABA-Induced Rapid Degradation of RopGEFs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixing; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-05-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical to plant development and stress responses. Abiotic stress triggers an ABA signal transduction cascade, which is comprised of the core components PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, PP2C-type protein phosphatases, and protein kinases. Small GTPases of the ROP/RAC family act as negative regulators of ABA signal transduction. However, the mechanisms by which ABA controls the behavior of ROP/RACs have remained unclear. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein RopGEF1 is rapidly sequestered to intracellular particles in response to ABA. GFP-RopGEF1 is sequestered via the endosome-prevacuolar compartment pathway and is degraded. RopGEF1 directly interacts with several clade A PP2C protein phosphatases, including ABI1. Interestingly, RopGEF1 undergoes constitutive degradation in pp2c quadruple abi1/abi2/hab1/pp2ca mutant plants, revealing that active PP2C protein phosphatases protect and stabilize RopGEF1 from ABA-mediated degradation. Interestingly, ABA-mediated degradation of RopGEF1 also plays an important role in ABA-mediated inhibition of lateral root growth. The presented findings point to a PP2C-RopGEF-ROP/RAC control loop model that is proposed to aid in shutting off ABA signal transduction, to counteract leaky ABA signal transduction caused by "monomeric" PYL/RCAR ABA receptors in the absence of stress, and facilitate signaling in response to ABA.

  18. Protein kinase C phosphorylation disrupts Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 autoinhibition and promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator macromolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianquan; Poulikakos, Poulikos I; Dai, Zhongping; Testa, Joseph R; Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2007-09-14

    An emerging theme in cell signaling is that membrane-bound channels and receptors are organized into supramolecular signaling complexes for optimum function and cross-talk. In this study, we determined how protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation influences the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF) to assemble protein complexes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride ion channel that controls fluid and electrolyte transport across cell membranes. NHERF directs polarized expression of receptors and ion transport proteins in epithelial cells, as well as organizes the homo- and hetero-association of these cell surface proteins. NHERF contains two modular PDZ domains that are modular protein-protein interaction motifs, and a C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that NHERF is a phosphoprotein, but how phosphorylation affects NHERF to assemble macromolecular complexes is unknown. We show that PKC phosphorylates two amino acid residues Ser-339 and Ser-340 in the C-terminal domain of NHERF, but a serine 162 of PDZ2 is specifically protected from being phosphorylated by the intact C-terminal domain. PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant S339D/S340D of NHERF has increased affinity and stoichiometry when binding to C-CFTR. Moreover, solution small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the PDZ2 and C-terminal domains contact each other in NHERF, but such intramolecular domain-domain interactions are released in the PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant indicating that PKC phosphorylation disrupts the autoinhibition interactions in NHERF. The results demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of NHERF functions as an intramolecular switch that regulates the binding capability of PDZ2, and thus controls the stoichiometry of NHERF to assemble protein complexes.

  19. The casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p act in the secretory pathway, in part, by regulating the Rab exchange factor Sec2p

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Danièle; Novick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Sec2p is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Sec4p, the final Rab GTPase of the yeast secretory pathway. Sec2p is recruited to secretory vesicles by the upstream Rab Ypt32p acting in concert with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI(4)P). Sec2p also binds to the Sec4p effector Sec15p, yet Ypt32p and Sec15p compete against each other for binding to Sec2p. We report here that the redundant casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p phosphorylate sites within the Ypt32p/Sec15p binding region and in doing so promote binding to Sec15p and inhibit binding to Ypt32p. We show that Yck2p binds to the autoinhibitory domain of Sec2p, adjacent to the PI(4)P binding site, and that addition of PI(4)P inhibits Sec2p phosphorylation by Yck2p. Loss of Yck1p and Yck2p function leads to accumulation of an intracellular pool of the secreted glucanase Bgl2p, as well as to accumulation of Golgi-related structures in the cytoplasm. We propose that Sec2p is phosphorylated after it has been recruited to secretory vesicles and the level of PI(4)P has been reduced. This promotes Sec2p function by stimulating its interaction with Sec15p. Finally, Sec2p is dephosphorylated very late in the exocytic reaction to facilitate recycling. PMID:26700316

  20. Epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation of collecting duct cells from Oak Ridge polycystic kidney mice involves activation of Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Coaxum, Sonya D; Blanton, Mary G; Joyner, Alisha; Akter, Tanjina; Bell, P Darwin; Luttrell, Louis M; Raymond, John R; Lee, Mi-Hye; Blichmann, Paul A; Garnovskaya, Maria N; Saigusa, Takamitsu

    2014-09-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). We explored signaling pathways activated by EGF in orpk cilia (-) collecting duct cell line derived from a mouse model of PKD (hypomorph of the Tg737/Ift88 gene) with severely stunted cilia, and in a control orpk cilia (+) cell line with normal cilia. RT-PCR demonstrated mRNAs for EGF receptor subunits ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3, ErbB4, and mRNAs for Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE), NHE-1, NHE-2, NHE-3, NHE-4, and NHE-5 in both cell lines. EGF stimulated proton efflux in both cell lines. This effect was significantly attenuated by MIA, 5-(n-methyl-N-isobutyl) amiloride, a selective inhibitor of NHE-1 and NHE-2, and orpk cilia (-) cells were more sensitive to MIA than control cells (P < 0.01). EGF significantly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in both cilia (+) and cilia (-) cells (63.3 and 123.6%, respectively), but the effect was more pronounced in orpk cilia (-) cells (P < 0.01). MIA significantly attenuated EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation only in orpk cilia (-) cells (P < 0.01). EGF increased proliferation of orpk cilia (+) cells and orpk cilia (-) cells, respectively, and MIA at 1-5 μM attenuated EGF-induced proliferation in orpk cilia (-) cells without affecting proliferation of orpk cilia (+) cells. EGF-induced proliferation of both cell lines was significantly decreased by the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 and MEK inhibitor PD98059. These results suggest that EGF exerts mitogenic effects in the orpk cilia (-) cells via activation of growth-associated amiloride-sensitive NHEs and ERK.

  1. Regulation of expression and function of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) by Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs).

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhigang; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Shen, Wen-Jun; Yun, C Chris; Berlot, Catherine H; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2013-04-19

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) binds HDL and mediates selective delivery of cholesteryl esters (CEs) to the liver, adrenals, and gonads for product formation (bile acids and steroids). Because relatively little is known about SR-BI posttranslational regulation in steroidogenic cells, we examined the roles of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs) in regulating SR-BI expression, SR-BI-mediated selective CE uptake, and steroidogenesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA and protein are expressed at varying levels in model steroidogenic cell lines and the adrenal, with only low expression of PDZK1 (NHERF3) and NHERF4. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP decreased NHERF1 and NHERF2 and increased SR-BI mRNA expression in primary rat granulosa cells and MLTC-1 cells, whereas ACTH had no effect on NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA levels but decreased their protein levels in rat adrenals. Co-immunoprecipitation, colocalization, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and mutational analysis indicated that SR-BI associates with NHERF1 and NHERF2. NHERF1 and NHERF2 down-regulated SR-BI protein expression through inhibition of its de novo synthesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 also inhibited SR-BI-mediated selective CE transport and steroidogenesis, which were markedly attenuated by partial deletions of the PDZ1 or PDZ2 domain of NHERF1, the PDZ2 domain of NHERF2, or the MERM domains of NHERF1/2 or by gene silencing of NHERF1/2. Moreover, an intact COOH-terminal PDZ recognition motif (EAKL) in SR-BI is needed. Transient transfection of hepatic cell lines with NHERF1 or NHERF2 caused a significant reduction in endogenous protein levels of SR-BI. Collectively, these data establish NHERF1 and NHERF2 as SR-BI protein binding partners that play a negative role in the regulation of SR-BI expression, selective CE transport, and steroidogenesis.

  2. Dual drug load and release behavior on ion-exchange fiber: influencing factors and prediction method for precise control of the loading amount.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Liu, Tiaotiao; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Li, Sanming

    2015-01-01

    Ion-exchange fiber undergoes a stoichiometric exchange reaction and has large exchange capability, which makes it a promising candidate as a multiple drug carrier. Because combinatorial effects can act synergistically, additively or antagonistically depending on the ratio of the agents being combined, the objective of this study was to learn the dual drug loading of ion-exchange fiber and develop a mathematical method for precisely control of the loading amount. Atenolol and Gatifloxacin, with different loading behaviors into strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1, were used to build a representative of dual loading. Not suitable pH value of drug solutions could make simultaneous loading fail, while the change of drug solution volume hardly affected the equilibrium. Ion-exchange groups occupied by the drug which owned lower affinity to fiber could be grabbed by the higher affinity drug, indicating the existence of competition between drugs. Thermodynamic model was introduced to guide the loading prediction and a favorable relevance had been shown between determined and predicted data. The release behaviors of each drug from dual drug-fiber complex were similar to those from single drug-fiber complexes.

  3. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  4. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (SosCat) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of SosCat, while SosCat also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  5. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 for Rab5 proteins coordinated with GLUP6/GEF regulates the intracellular transport of the proglutelin from the Golgi apparatus to the protein storage vacuole in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liuying; Fukuda, Masako; Sunada, Mariko; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Okita, Thomas W; Ogawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Takashi; Kumamaru, Toshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Rice glutelin polypeptides are initially synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as a proglutelin, which are then transported to the protein storage vacuole (PSV) via the Golgi apparatus. Rab5 and its cognate activator guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) are essential for the intracellular transport of proglutelin from the Golgi apparatus to the PSV. Results from previous studies showed that the double recessive type of glup4/rab5a and glup6/gef mutant accumulated much higher amounts of proglutelin than either parent line. The present study demonstrates that the double recessive type of glup4/rab5a and glup6/gef mutant showed not only elevated proglutelin levels and much larger paramural bodies but also reduced the number and size of PSVs, indicating a synergistic mutation effect. These observations led us to the hypothesis that other isoforms of Rab5 and GEF also participate in the intracellular transport of rice glutelin. A database search identified a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Rab5-GEF2. Like GLUP6/GEF, Rab5-GEF2 was capable of activating Rab5a and two other Rab5 isoforms in in vitro GTP/GDP exchange assays. GEF proteins consist of the helical bundle (HB) domain at the N-terminus, Vps9 domain, and a C-terminal region. By the deletion analysis of GEFs, the HB domain was found essential for the activation of Rab5 proteins.

  6. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  7. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  8. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  9. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  10. Small-GTPase-Associated Signaling by the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors CpDock180 and CpCdc24, the GTPase Effector CpSte20, and the Scaffold Protein CpBem1 in Claviceps purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andrea; Tillmann, Britta A. M.; Schürmann, Janine; Bölker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily are important mediators of polar growth and NADPH (Nox) signaling in a variety of organisms. These pathways influence the ability of Claviceps purpurea to infect host plants. GTPase regulators contribute to the nucleotide loading cycle that is essential for proper functionality of the GTPases. Scaffold proteins gather GTPase complexes to facilitate proper function. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) CpCdc24 and CpDock180 activate GTPase signaling by triggering nucleotide exchange of the GTPases. Here we show that CpCdc24 harbors nucleotide exchange activity for both Rac and Cdc42 homologues. The GEFs partly share the cellular distribution of the GTPases and interact with the putative upstream GTPase CpRas1. Interaction studies show the formation of higher-order protein complexes, mediated by the scaffold protein CpBem1. Besides the GTPases and GEFs, these complexes also contain the GTPase effectors CpSte20 and CpCla4, as well as the regulatory protein CpNoxR. Functional characterizations suggest a role of CpCdc24 mainly in polarity, whereas CpDock180 is involved in stress tolerance mechanisms. These findings indicate the dynamic formation of small GTPase complexes and improve the model for GTPase-associated signaling in C. purpurea. PMID:24489041

  11. ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION

    DOEpatents

    White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

  12. Optimizing exchanger design early

    SciTech Connect

    Lacunza, M.; Vaschetti, G.; Campana, H.

    1987-08-01

    It is not practical for process engineers and designers to make a rigorous economic evaluation for each component of a process due to the loss of time and money. But, it's very helpful and useful to have a method for a quick design evaluation of heat exchangers, considering their important contribution to the total fixed investment in a process plant. This article is devoted to this subject, and the authors present a method that has been proved in some design cases. Linking rigorous design procedures with a quick cost-estimation method provides a good technique for obtaining the right heat exchanger. The cost will be appropriate, sometimes not the lowest because of design restrictions, but a good approach to the optimum in an earlier process design stage. The authors intend to show the influence of the design variables in a shell and tube heat exchanger on capital investment, or conversely, taking into account the general limiting factors of the process such as thermodynamics, operability, corrosion, etc., and/or from the mechanical design of the calculated unit. The last is a special consideration for countries with no access to industrial technology or with difficulties in obtaining certain construction materials or equipment.

  13. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  14. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  15. Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) attenuates leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of p115Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor-RhoA/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Moey, Melissa; Rajapurohitam, Venkatesh; Zeidan, Asad; Karmazyn, Morris

    2011-12-01

    Leptin is a 16-kDa peptide primarily derived from white adipocytes and is typically elevated in plasma of obese individuals. Although leptin plays a critical role in appetite regulation, leptin receptors have been identified in numerous tissues including the heart and have been shown to directly mediate cardiac hypertrophy through RhoA/ROCK (Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase)-dependent p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation; however, the basis for RhoA stimulation is unknown. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in Rho activation and may be the potential upstream factors mediating leptin-induced RhoA activation and therefore a potential target for inhibition. We investigated the effects of North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), reported to reduce cardiac hypertrophy, on RhoA/ROCK and MAPK activation in ventricular cardiomyocytes exposed to leptin (50 ng/ml) and the possible role of p115RhoGEF and p63RhoGEF in these responses. Leptin produced a robust hypertrophic response that was associated with RhoA/ROCK activation resulting in a significant increase in cofilin-2 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, the latter evidenced by a reduction in the G/F actin ratio. These effects were prevented by ginseng (10 μg/ml). The stimulation of RhoA/ROCK by leptin was associated with significantly increased p115RhoGEF gene and protein expression and exchange activity, all of which were completely prevented by ginseng. The ability of ginseng to prevent leptin-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK was further associated with diminished p38 MAPK activation and nuclear translocation. These results demonstrate a potent inhibitory effect of ginseng against leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy, an effect associated with prevention of p115RhoGEF-RhoA/ROCK-dependent p38 MAPK activation.

  16. 75 FR 25899 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... Applied Scaling Factor of 1 May 3, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of... scaling factor of 1. The Exchange is not proposing any rule text changes. The rule proposal is available... Exchange would apply a scaling factor of 10 to the underlying index. The Exchange proposed the use of...

  17. Rituximab and intermediate-purity plasma-derived factor VIII concentrate (Koate®) as adjuncts to therapeutic plasma exchange for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in patients with an ADAMTS13 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Soumya; Nakagawa, Mayumi; Rosenbaum, Eric R; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Hutchins, Laura F; Makhoul, Issam; Milojkovic, Natasha; Cottler-Fox, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) results from a congenital or acquired deficiency of the von Willebrand factor (vWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. The disease can be fatal and hence treatment should be initiated promptly. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) remains the standard treatment along with adjunct therapies including steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. Addition of rituximab to TPE has been shown to be beneficial in refractory/relapsing TTP; however, TPE results in removal of rituximab from the circulation requiring more frequent dosing of rituximab to achieve a favorable outcome. The intermediate-purity plasma-derived Factor VIII concentrate (FVIII) Koate® contains the highest amount of ADAMTS13 activity yet reported and has been used successfully in treating congenital TTP. Here we report our experience with addition of this FVIII concentrate to rituximab, corticosteroids and TPE in three TTP patients with an ADAMTS13 inhibitor to permit withholding TPE for 48 h after rituximab infusion.

  18. Expressions for Form Factors for Inelastic Scattering and Charge Exchange in Plane-Wave, Distorted-Wave, and Coupled-Channels Reaction Formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2006-09-25

    This document is intended to facilitate calculation of inelastic scattering and charge-exchange cross sections in a variety of reaction models, including the plane-wave and distorted-wave approximations and the full coupled-channels treatments. Expressions are given for the coupling potentials between the relevant channels in both coordinate and momentum space. In particular, it is expected that the plane-wave calculations should be useful as a check on the correctness of coupled-channels calculations. The Fourier transform methods used to calculate the plane-wave approximation cross sections are also intended to be used to generate the transition potentials for coupled-channels codes, using a folding model with local effective interactions. Specific expressions are given for calculating transition densities for the folding model in the random phase approximation (RPA).

  19. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e., the electron density, its gradient, and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for the exchange of any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredient in exchange-correlation functional development, opening the way to an additional rung in the Jacob's ladder classification of non-empirical density functionals.

  20. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  1. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  2. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  3. [Effect of space flight factors simulated in ground-based experiments on the behavior, discriminant learning, and exchange of monoamines in different brain structures of rats].

    PubMed

    Shtemberg, A S; Lebedeva-Georgievskaia, K V; Matveeva, M I; Kudrin, V S; Narkevich, V B; Klodt, P M; Bazian, A S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental treatment (long-term fractionated γ-irradiation, antiorthostatic hypodynamia, and the combination of these factors) simulating the effect of space flight in ground-based experiments rapidly restored the motor and orienting-investigative activity of animals (rats) in "open-field" tests. The study of the dynamics of discriminant learning of rats of experimental groups did not show significant differences from the control animals. It was found that the minor effect of these factors on the cognitive performance of animals correlated with slight changes in the concentration ofmonoamines in the brain structures responsible for the cognitive, emotional, and motivational functions.

  4. Effects of lung surfactant factor (LSF) treatment on gas exchange and histopathological changes in an animal model of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): comparison of recombinant LSF with bovine LSF.

    PubMed

    Häfner, D; Germann, P G; Hauschke, D

    1994-10-01

    Repetitive lung lavage of adult rats leads to lung injury similar to ARDS resulting in poor gas exchange, protein leakage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) into the alveolar spaces (J Appl Physiol 1983; 55: 131-138). In a previous dose response comparison we have demonstrated that poor gas exchange could be improved by lung surfactant factor (LSF) instillation soon after lavage. Since Surfacten (Tokyo Tanabe Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was described in vitro to inhibit PMN activity, we compared this preparation with a Recombinant LSF preparation (Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany; phospholipids plus human identical surfactant protein C) at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight. Their efficacy was compared with an untreated control group with respect to improving gas exchange, inhibition of hyaline membrane formation and inhibition of the inflammatory response after multiple lavage. Tracheotomized rats were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C, Sweden) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths/min, inspiration:expiration ratio of 1:2, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 28 cmH2O at positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Two hours after LSF administration PEEP was reduced from 8 to 6 cmH2O (first PEEP-reduction), from 6 to 3 (second reduction) and from 3 to 0 cmH2O (third reduction) and finally raised to 8 cmH2O. Results for the averaged partial arterial oxygen pressure [PaO2 (mmHg)] of the 2 h period [PaO2(5'-120')] and for the PaO2 during the second PEEP reduction [PaO2(PEEP23/3] were calculated. Both LSF preparations caused a dose-dependent increase of the PaO2 (5'-120') and the PaO2(PEEP23/3). Similarly, the formation of hyaline membranes was inhibited by both LSF preparations in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the inflammatory response (infiltration of PMN) was not effected by either of the LSF preparations at any dose level. The described variations in ventilator settings are useful to

  5. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  6. Investigation of chemical exchange at intermediate exchange rates using a combination of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking methods (CESTrho).

    PubMed

    Kogan, Feliks; Singh, Anup; Cai, Keija; Haris, Mohammad; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2012-07-01

    Proton exchange imaging is important as it allows for visualization and quantification of the distribution of specific metabolites with conventional MRI. Current exchange mediated MRI methods suffer from poor contrast as well as confounding factors that influence exchange rates. In this study we developed a new method to measure proton exchange which combines chemical exchange saturation transfer and T(1)(ρ) magnetization preparation methods (CESTrho). We demonstrated that this new CESTrho sequence can detect proton exchange in the slow to intermediate exchange regimes. It has a linear dependence on proton concentration which allows it to be used to quantitatively measure changes in metabolite concentration. Additionally, the magnetization scheme of this new method can be customized to make it insensitive to changes in exchange rate while retaining its dependency on solute concentration. Finally, we showed the feasibility of using CESTrho in vivo. This sequence is able to detect proton exchange at intermediate exchange rates and is unaffected by the confounding factors that influence proton exchange rates thus making it ideal for the measurement of metabolites with exchangeable protons in this exchange regime.

  7. Optimizing In Vitro Pre-mRNA 3' Cleavage Efficiency: Reconstitution from Anion-Exchange Separated HeLa Cleavage Factors and from Adherent HeLa Cell Nuclear Extract.

    PubMed

    Na, Mihwa; Valente, Susana T; Ryan, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA processing steps during mRNA maturation present the cell with opportunities for gene expression regulation. One such step is the pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction, which defines the downstream end of the 3' untranslated region and, in nearly all mRNA, prepares the message for addition of the poly(A) tail. The in vitro reconstitution of 3' cleavage provides an experimental means to investigate the roles of the various multi-subunit cleavage factors. Anion-exchange chromatography is the simplest procedure for separating the core mammalian cleavage factors. Here we describe a method for optimizing the in vitro reconstitution of 3' cleavage activity from the DEAE-sepharose separated HeLa cleavage factors and show how to ensure, or avoid, dependence on creatine phosphate. Important reaction components needed for optimal processing are discussed. We also provide an optimized procedure for preparing small-scale HeLa nuclear extracts from adherent cells for use in 3' cleavage in vitro.

  8. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  9. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  10. Apparent exchange rate mapping with diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Water exchange through the cell membranes is an important feature of cells and tissues. The rate of exchange is determined by factors such as membrane lipid composition and organization, as well as the type and activity of aquaporins. A method for noninvasively estimating the rate of water exchange would be useful for characterizing pathological conditions, e.g., tumors, multiple sclerosis, and ischemic stroke, expected to be associated with a change of the membrane barrier properties. This study describes the filter exchange imaging method for determining the rate of water exchange between sites having different apparent diffusion coefficients. The method is based on the filter-exchange pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy experiment, which is here modified to be compatible with the constraints of clinical MR scanners. The data is analyzed using a model-free approach yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate, here being introduced in analogy with the concept of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on microimaging and whole-body clinical scanners using yeast suspension phantoms. The limitations and appropriate experimental conditions are examined. The results demonstrate that filter exchange imaging is a fast and reliable method for characterizing exchange, and that it has the potential to become a powerful diagnostic tool.

  11. The Tumor-suppressive Small GTPase DiRas1 Binds the Noncanonical Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SmgGDS and Antagonizes SmgGDS Interactions with Oncogenic Small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Hauser, Andrew D; Rymaszewski, Amy; Gonyo, Patrick; Prokop, Jeremy W; Jennings, Benjamin C; Lawton, Alexis J; Frei, Anne; Lorimer, Ellen L; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Noon, Kathleen; Fierke, Carol A; Williams, Carol L

    2016-03-18

    The small GTPase DiRas1 has tumor-suppressive activities, unlike the oncogenic properties more common to small GTPases such as K-Ras and RhoA. Although DiRas1 has been found to be a tumor suppressor in gliomas and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the mechanisms by which it inhibits malignant phenotypes have not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS, a protein that promotes the activation of several oncogenic GTPases. In silico docking studies predict that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS in a manner similar to other small GTPases. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA, but we report here that SmgGDS does not mediate GDP/GTP exchange on DiRas1. Intriguingly, DiRas1 acts similarly to a dominant-negative small GTPase, binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting SmgGDS binding to other small GTPases, including K-Ras4B, RhoA, and Rap1A. DiRas1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, but its expression is decreased in most breast cancers, similar to its family member DiRas3 (ARHI). DiRas1 inhibits RhoA- and SmgGDS-mediated NF-κB transcriptional activity in HEK293T cells. We also report that DiRas1 suppresses basal NF-κB activation in breast cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Taken together, our data support a model in which DiRas1 expression inhibits malignant features of cancers in part by nonproductively binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting the binding of other small GTPases to SmgGDS.

  12. The adaptor protein 3BP2 associates with VAV guanine nucleotide exchange factors to regulate NFAT activation by the B-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Isabelle; Le Bras, Séverine; Charvet, Céline; Moon, Chéol; Altman, Amnon; Deckert, Marcel

    2005-02-01

    Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) activates kinases of the Src and Syk families and signaling complexes assembled by adaptor proteins, which dictate B-cell fate and function. The adaptor 3BP2/SH3BP2, an Abl Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-binding and Syk-kinases interacting protein, exhibits positive regulatory roles in T, natural killer (NK), and basophilic cells. However, its involvement in BCR signaling is completely unknown. Here we show that 3BP2 is tyrosine phosphorylated following BCR aggregation on B lymphoma cells, and that 3BP2 is a substrate for Syk and Fyn, but not Btk. To further explore the function of 3BP2 in B cells, we screened a yeast 2-hybrid B-lymphocyte library and found 3BP2 as a binding partner of Vav proteins. The interaction between 3BP2 and Vav proteins involved both constitutive and inducible mechanisms. 3BP2 also interacted with other components of the BCR signaling pathway, including Syk and phospholipase C gamma (PLC-gamma). Furthermore, overexpression and RNAi blocking experiments showed that 3BP2 regulated BCR-mediated activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs). Finally, evidence was provided that 3BP2 functionally cooperates with Vav proteins and Rho GTPases to activate NFATs. Our results show that 3BP2 may regulate BCR-mediated gene activation through Vav proteins.

  13. [Regulation of the Na/Ca exchanger].

    PubMed

    DiPolo, R; Rojas, H; Beaugé, L

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of the squid giant axon preparation to studies on Ca homeostasis has proven very useful in laying the foundations in the study of Ca regulation. In particular the Na/Ca exchange mechanism has been characterized in terms of its regulatory processes using the well define technique of intracellular dialysis and membrane potential control. The Na/Ca exchange countertransport system plays a critical role in physiological processes including cardiac contractility and photoreception. It has also been implicate in the etiology of essential hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias and cell death. The ability of the Na/Ca exchanger to regulate the intracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca2+i]) under physiological conditions, is determined by the direction (net Ca efflux or Ca influx), and magnitude of transport. The direction of Ca transport is decided by the chemical gradient of sodium and calcium. The magnitude of the exchange is regulated by kinetic factors. This kinetic factors are critical since they decide whether the exchanger will mediate a net Ca movement under certain conditions. Recently, a large effort has been put together to characterize the secondary modulation of the Na/Ca exchanger. In particular modulation by MgATP and intracellular Ca2+. In nerve cells we have discover that MgATP regulates the exchanger through as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation processes most probably relate to the action of a kinase-phosphatase system. The other important ligand that regulates the exchange activity is the level of [Ca2+i]. We have found the presence of a regulatory site in the cytoplasmic face of the exchanger different from the transport site and probably responsible for turning the carrier "on" or "off". In this article we will depict some of the processes involved in the metabolic and ionic regulation of the Na/Ca exchanger.

  14. The Efficiency of the Transmission Function of National Exchange Centres for the International Exchange of Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genzel, Peter

    1976-01-01

    Depending on various factors prevailing in different countries, central transmission in collective consignments is not always the most economic method of dispatch of exchange materials, and particularly in the case of periodicals, not always satisfactory. (Author)

  15. Involvement of alpha-PAK-interacting exchange factor in the PAK1-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 activation and apoptosis induced by benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, S; Tanaka, M; Otsuki, Y; Fujiyama, T; Kataoka, H; Arai, H; Hanai, H; Sugimura, H

    2001-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P], a potent procarcinogen found in combustion products such as diesel exhaust and cigarette smoke, has been recently shown to activate the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and induce caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in Hepa1c1c7 cells. However, the molecules of the signaling pathway that control the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades induced by B(a)P and the interaction between those and apoptosis by B(a)P have not been well defined. We report here that B(a)P promoted Cdc42/Rac1, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), and JNK1 activities in 293T and HeLa cells. Moreover, alpha-PAK-interacting exchange factor (alpha PIX) mRNA and its protein expression were upregulated by B(a)P. While overexpression of an active mutant of alpha PIX (DeltaCH) facilitated B(a)P-induced activation of Cdc42/Rac1, PAK1, and JNK1, overexpression of mutated alphaPIX (L383R, L384S), which lacks guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, SH3 domain-deleted alphaPIX (Delta SH3), which lacks the ability to bind PAK, kinase-negative PAK1 (K299R), and kinase-negative SEK1 (K220A, K224L) inhibited B(a)P-triggered JNK1 activation. Interestingly, overexpression of alphaPIX (Delta CH) and a catalytically active mutant PAK1 (T423E) accelerated B(a)P-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, whereas alphaPIX (Delta SH3), PAK1 (K299R), and SEK 1 (K220A, K224L) inhibited B(a)P-initiated apoptosis. Finally, a preferential caspase inhibitor, Z-Asp-CH2-DCB, strongly blocked the alphaPIX (Delta CH)-enhanced apoptosis in cells treated with B(a)P but did not block PAK1/JNK1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that alphaPIX plays a crucial role in B(a)P-induced apoptosis through activation of the JNK1 pathway kinases.

  16. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  17. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  18. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  20. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  1. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  2. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  3. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  4. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  5. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  6. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  7. Handicapping Social Exchange Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishler, Barbara

    The economic theory of social exchange has some serious shortcomings when applied to minorities--especially the disabled. First, it assumes dyads comprise the basic unit where exchange occurs and that rewards and costs must occur at that level. Second, the model standardizes the experience of white, Western European and American males. The model…

  8. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  9. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  10. Cryptographic Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    While transparency in financial markets should enhance liquidity, its exploitation by unethical and parasitic traders discourages others from fully embracing disclosure of their own information. Traders exploit both the private information in upstairs markets used to trade large orders outside traditional exchanges and the public information present in exchanges' quoted limit order books. Using homomorphic cryptographic protocols, market designers can create "partially transparent" markets in which every matched trade is provably correct and only beneficial information is revealed. In a cryptographic securities exchange, market operators can hide information to prevent its exploitation, and still prove facts about the hidden information such as bid/ask spread or market depth.

  11. Voltage-gated ion channel Kv4.3 is associated with Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors and regulates angiotensin receptor type 1 signaling to small G-protein Rap.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Irina A; Cohen, Ira S; Doronin, Sergey V

    2007-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.3 was coexpressed with its beta-subunit Kv channel-interacting protein 2 and the angiotensin type 1 receptor in HEK-293 cells. Proteomic analysis of proteins coimmunoprecipitated with Kv4.3 revealed that Kv4.3 is associated with Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors MR-GEF and EPAC-1. Previously, we demonstrated that Kv4.3 interacts with the angiotensin type 1 receptor in HE293 cells and cardiac myocytes. On the basis of this, we investigated the angiotensin type 1 receptor signaling to small G-proteins Ras and Rap-1 in the presence and absence of the Kv4.3-Kv channel-interacting protein 2 macromolecular complex. Ras activation was not significantly affected by coexpression of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2. Ras exhibited a rapid activation-inactivation pattern with maximum activity at 2.5 min after addition of angiotensin II. In contrast, activation of Rap-1 was affected dramatically by coexpression of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2 with the angiotensin type 1 receptor. In the absence of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2, stimulation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor resulted in steady activation of Rap-1 that reached a plateau 25 min after addition of angiotensin II. In the presence of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2, Rap-1 reaches a maximum activity 2.5 min after addition of angiotensin II and then deactivates rapidly, demonstrating a pattern of activation similar to that of Ras. Our findings show that Kv4.3 regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor signaling to the small G-protein Rap-1.

  12. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  13. The Chromobacterium violaceum type III effector CopE, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1 and Cdc42, is involved in bacterial invasion of epithelial cells and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuyoshi; Akiba, Kinari; Iguchi, Mirei; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by Chromobacterium pathogenicity islands 1 and 1a (Cpi-1/-1a) is critical for Chromobacterium violaceum pathogenesis. T3SS-dependent virulence is commonly characterized by type III effector virulence function, but the full repertoire of the effector proteins of Cpi-1/-1a T3SS is unknown. In this study, we showed that expression of Cpi-1/-1a T3SS is controlled by the master regulator CilA. We used transcriptional profiling with DNA microarrays to define CilA regulon and identified genes encoding T3SS effectors whose translocation into host cells was dependent on Cpi-1/-1a T3SS. From these effectors, we found that CopE (CV0296) has similarities to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases in its C-terminal portion. The N-terminal portions (1-81 amino acids) of CopE and a CivB as a putative chaperone were required for its translocation. CopE specifically activates Rac1 and Cdc42 followed by the induction of actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. Interestingly, C. violaceum invades human epithelial HeLa cells in a Cpi-1/-1a-encoded T3SS- and CopE-dependent manner. Finally, C. violaceum strains lacking copE and expressing a CopE-G168V deficient in GEF activity were attenuated for virulence in mice, suggesting that CopE contributes to the virulence of this pathogen.

  14. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  15. Compact, super heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  16. Hibernation and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Jackson, Donald C

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation in endotherms and ectotherms is characterized by an energy-conserving metabolic depression due to low body temperatures and poorly understood temperature-independent mechanisms. Rates of gas exchange are correspondly reduced. In hibernating mammals, ventilation falls even more than metabolic rate leading to a relative respiratory acidosis that may contribute to metabolic depression. Breathing in some mammals becomes episodic and in some small mammals significant apneic gas exchange may occur by passive diffusion via airways or skin. In ectothermic vertebrates, extrapulmonary gas exchange predominates and in reptiles and amphibians hibernating underwater accounts for all gas exchange. In aerated water diffusive exchange permits amphibians and many species of turtles to remain fully aerobic, but hypoxic conditions can challenge many of these animals. Oxygen uptake into blood in both endotherms and ectotherms is enhanced by increased affinity of hemoglobin for O₂ at low temperature. Regulation of gas exchange in hibernating mammals is predominately linked to CO₂/pH, and in episodic breathers, control is principally directed at the duration of the apneic period. Control in submerged hibernating ectotherms is poorly understood, although skin-diffusing capacity may increase under hypoxic conditions. In aerated water blood pH of frogs and turtles either adheres to alphastat regulation (pH ∼8.0) or may even exhibit respiratory alkalosis. Arousal in hibernating mammals leads to restoration of euthermic temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange and occurs periodically even as ambient temperatures remain low, whereas body temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange of hibernating ectotherms are tightly linked to ambient temperature.

  17. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  18. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  19. Ion exchange chromatography of proteins and clearance of aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yigzaw, Y; Hinckley, P; Hewig, A; Vedantham, G

    2009-06-01

    Clearance of product related aggregates in therapeutic proteins is a major focus of purification process development. A typical purification process will have one or two chromatographic steps that remove these product related aggregates to an acceptable level. Both cation exchange and anion exchange chromatography can provide robust clearance of aggregates. The primary factors that are critical for aggregate clearance are: resin chemistry, binding and elution condition, peak collection and column load factor. This review covers how these factors can be optimized to increase the effectiveness of ion exchange chromatography in removing aggregates.

  20. Microtube strip heat exchanger. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with ``conventional`` microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  1. The Ras-specific exchange factors mouse Sos1 (mSos1) and mSos2 are regulated differently: mSos2 contains ubiquitination signals absent in mSos1.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, K H; Papageorge, A G; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M; Lowy, D R

    1997-01-01

    We have compared aspects of the mouse sos1 (msos1) and msos2 genes, which encode widely expressed, closely related Ras-specific exchange factors. Although an msos1 plasmid did not induce phenotypic changes in NIH 3T3 cells, addition of a 15-codon myristoylation signal to its 5' end enabled the resulting plasmid, myr-sos1, to induce approximately one-half as many foci of transformed cells as a v-H-ras control. By contrast, an isogenic myr-sos2 plasmid, which was made by fusing the first 102 codons from myr-sos1 at homologous sequences to an intact msos2 cDNA, did not induce focal transformation directly, although it could form foci in cooperation with c-H-ras. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the half-life of Sos¿1 in NIH 3T3 cells was greater than 18 h, while that of Sos2 was less than 3 h. While in vitro-translated Sos1 was stable in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate, Sos2 was degraded in the lysate, as were each of two reciprocal chimeric Sos1-Sos2 proteins, albeit at a slower rate. In the lysate, Sos2 and the two chimeric proteins could be stabilized by ATPgammaS. Unlike Sos1, Sos2 was specifically immunoprecipitated by antiubiquitin antibodies. In a myristoylated version, the chimeric gene encoding Sos2 at its C terminus made a stable protein in NIH 3T3 cells and induced focal transformation almost as efficiently as myr-msos1, while the myristoylated protein encoded by the other chimera was unstable and defective in the transformation assay. We conclude that mSos2 is much less stable than mSos1 and is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent process. A second mSos2 degradation signal, mapped to the C terminus in the reticulocyte lysate, does not seem to function under the growth conditions of the NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:9372945

  2. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  3. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  4. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  5. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  6. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  7. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS.

  8. Chromosomal localization of two genes encoding human ras exchange factors: SOS1 maps to the 2p22-->p16 region and SOS2 to the 14q21-->q22 region of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Mattei, M G

    1994-01-01

    The human SOS1 and SOS2 genes encode proteins that control GDP-->GTP exchange on ras proteins and are involved in signal transduction by tyrosine kinase receptors. In situ hybridization shows that SOS1 maps to 2p22-->p16 and SOS2 to 14q21-->q22 in the human genome.

  9. Environment-dependent guest exchange in supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Li, Longyu; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-10-21

    Dynamic exchange of guest molecules, encapsulated in host assemblies, is a phenomenon in supramolecular chemistry that has important implications in several applications. While the mechanism of exchange in micellar assemblies has been previously investigated, the effect of host and guest environment upon the guest-exchange dynamics has received little attention, if any. In this paper, we study the guest-exchange mechanism in pH-sensitive nanogels along with pH-insensitive nanogels as a control. By systematically comparing the behavior of these nanogels, we show that size, concentration, and hydrophobicity can all play a critical role in guest-exchange dynamics. More importantly, these studies reveal that the dominant mechanism of guest exchange can intimately depend on environmental factors.

  10. Environment-Dependent Guest Exchange in Supramolecular Hosts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic exchange of guest molecules, encapsulated in host assemblies, is a phenomenon in supramolecular chemistry that has important implications in several applications. While the mechanism of exchange in micellar assemblies has been previously investigated, the effect of host and guest environment upon the guest-exchange dynamics has received little attention, if any. In this paper, we study the guest-exchange mechanism in pH-sensitive nanogels along with pH-insensitive nanogels as a control. By systematically comparing the behavior of these nanogels, we show that size, concentration, and hydrophobicity can all play a critical role in guest-exchange dynamics. More importantly, these studies reveal that the dominant mechanism of guest exchange can intimately depend on environmental factors. PMID:25244305

  11. Suppressing exchange effects in diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan A; Adams, Ralph W; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A

    2014-01-01

    In diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) the aim is to separate signals from different molecular species according to their different diffusion coefficients. Each species has its individual diffusion coefficient (that may accidentally coincide with that of another species, e.g. if they are of very similar size). In exchanging systems, however, there is a serious complication in that the apparent diffusion coefficient of an exchanging signal will be a compromise that depends, among other factors, on the diffusion coefficients of the exchange partners and the rate of exchange between them. The DOSY spectrum will be much harder to interpret and can often give the appearance of extra (spurious) components in the mixture. Here a new and surprisingly simple experiment is described that suppresses the effects of exchange on apparent diffusion coefficients, restoring the simplicity of interpretation enjoyed by non-exchanging systems.

  12. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual…

  13. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  15. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  16. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  17. Research Exchange, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These three issues of the "Research Exchange" focus on how better to conduct disability research and disseminate research results. The first issue examines the topic of human subject/human research participant protection, with a focus on research funded through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). It…

  18. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  19. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge…

  20. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. D.

    1991-04-01

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchangers. The team has begun a heat exchanger stress analysis; however, they have been concentrating the bulk of their analytical energies on a computational fluid dynmaics (CFD) model to determine the location and magnitude of shell-side flow maldistribution which decreases heat exchanger effectiveness. DSI received 120 fineblanked tubestrips from Southern Fineblanking (SFB) for manufacturing process development. Both SFB and NIST provided inspection reports of the tubestrips. DSI completed the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips on the array. Pressing the tubestrips on tube arrays showed design deficiencies both in the tubestrip design and the tooling design. DSI has a number of revisions in process to correct these deficiencies. The research effort has identified a more economical fusible alloy for encapsulating the tube array, and determined the parameters required to successfully encapsulate the tube array with the new alloy. A more compact MTS heat exchanger bank was designed.

  1. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge,…

  2. Minimizing back exchange in the hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry experiment.

    PubMed

    Walters, Benjamin T; Ricciuti, Alec; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S Walter

    2012-12-01

    The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to the hydrogen exchange (HX) proteolytic fragmentation experiment extends powerful HX methodology to the study of large biologically important proteins. A persistent problem is the degradation of HX information due to back exchange of deuterium label during the fragmentation-separation process needed to prepare samples for MS measurement. This paper reports a systematic analysis of the factors that influence back exchange (solution pH, ionic strength, desolvation temperature, LC column interaction, flow rates, system volume). The many peptides exhibit a range of back exchange due to intrinsic amino acid HX rate differences. Accordingly, large back exchange leads to large variability in D-recovery from one residue to another as well as one peptide to another that cannot be corrected for by reference to any single peptide-level measurement. The usual effort to limit back exchange by limiting LC time provides little gain. Shortening the LC elution gradient by 3-fold only reduced back exchange by ~2%, while sacrificing S/N and peptide count. An unexpected dependence of back exchange on ionic strength as well as pH suggests a strategy in which solution conditions are changed during sample preparation. Higher salt should be used in the first stage of sample preparation (proteolysis and trapping) and lower salt (<20 mM) and pH in the second stage before electrospray injection. Adjustment of these and other factors together with recent advances in peptide fragment detection yields hundreds of peptide fragments with D-label recovery of 90% ± 5%.

  3. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  4. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  5. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Extratropical Stratosphere-Troposphere Mass Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the exchange of gases between the stratosphere and the troposphere is important for determining how pollutants enter the stratosphere and how they leave. This study does a global analysis of that the exchange of mass between the stratosphere and the troposphere. While the exchange of mass is not the same as the exchange of constituents, you can t get the constituent exchange right if you have the mass exchange wrong. Thus this kind of calculation is an important test for models which also compute trace gas transport. In this study I computed the mass exchange for two assimilated data sets and a GCM. The models all agree that amount of mass descending from the stratosphere to the troposphere in the Northern Hemisphere extra tropics is approx. 10(exp 10) kg/s averaged over a year. The value for the Southern Hemisphere by about a factor of two. ( 10(exp 10) kg of air is the amount of air in 100 km x 100 km area with a depth of 100 m - roughly the size of the D.C. metro area to a depth of 300 feet.) Most people have the idea that most of the mass enters the stratosphere through the tropics. But this study shows that almost 5 times more mass enters the stratosphere through the extra-tropics. This mass, however, is quickly recycled out again. Thus the lower most stratosphere is a mixture of upper stratospheric air and tropospheric air. This is an important result for understanding the chemistry of the lower stratosphere.

  7. Highly tritiated water processing by isotopic exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W.M.; Willms, R.S.; Glugla, M.; Cristescu, I.; Michling, R.; Demange, D.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) is produced in fusion machines and one of the promising technologies to process it is isotopic exchange. 3 kinds of Pt-catalyzed zeolite (13X-APG, CBV-100-CY and HiSiv-1000) were tested as candidates for isotopic exchange of highly tritiated water (HTW), and CBV-100-CY (Na-Y type with a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio of ∼ 5.0) shows the best performance. Small-scale tritium testing indicates that this method is efficient for reaching an exchange factor (EF) of 100. Full-scale non-tritium testing implies that an EF of 300 can be achieved in 24 hours of operation if a temperature gradient is applied along the column. For the isotopic exchange, deuterium recycled from the Isotope Separation System (deuterium with 1% T and/or 200 ppm T) should be employed, and the tritiated water regenerated from the Pt-catalyzed zeolite bed after isotopic exchange should be transferred to Water Detritiation System (WDS) for further processing.

  8. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  9. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  10. Exchange rate rebounds after foreign exchange market interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the rebounds in the exchange rate after foreign exchange intervention. When intervention is strongly effective, the exchange rate rebounds at next day. The effect of intervention is reduced slightly by the rebound after the intervention. The exchange rate might have been 67.12-77.47 yen to a US dollar without yen-selling/dollar-purchasing intervention of 74,691,100 million yen implemented by the Japanese government since 1991, in comparison to the actual exchange rate was 103.19 yen to the US dollar at the end of March 2014.

  11. Intergranular exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M. W.; Indeck, R. S.

    1994-02-01

    We evaluate the exchange interaction between neighboring grains of a polycrystalline magnetic material with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, based on the energy of the domain wall formed at the portion of the interface in atomic contact. The analysis suggests that previous work [J.-G. Zhu and H. N. Bertram, in Solid State Physics Vol. 46, edited by H. Ehrenreich and T. Turnbull (Academic, San Diego, 1992)] may underestimate the interaction, and it predicts a different dependence on grain size.

  12. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  13. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  14. Exchange-dependent relaxation in the rotating frame for slow and intermediate exchange -- modeling off-resonant spin-lock and chemical exchange saturation transfer.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Moritz; Bachert, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Chemical exchange observed by NMR saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-lock (SL) experiments provide an MRI contrast by indirect detection of exchanging protons. The determination of the relative concentrations and exchange rates is commonly achieved by numerical integration of the Bloch-McConnell equations. We derive an analytical solution of the Bloch-McConnell equations that describes the magnetization of coupled spin populations under radiofrequency irradiation. As CEST and off-resonant SL are equivalent, their steady-state magnetization and dynamics can be predicted by the same single eigenvalue: the longitudinal relaxation rate in the rotating frame R1ρ . For the case of slowly exchanging systems, e.g. amide protons, the saturation of the small proton pool is affected by transverse relaxation (R2b ). It turns out, that R2b is also significant for intermediate exchange, such as amine- or hydroxyl-exchange or paramagnetic CEST agents, if pools are only partially saturated. We propose a solution for R1ρ that includes R2 of the exchanging pool by extending existing approaches, and verify it by numerical simulations. With the appropriate projection factors, we obtain an analytical solution for CEST and SL for nonzero R2 of the exchanging pool, exchange rates in the range 1-10(4) Hz, B1 from 0.1 to 20 μT and arbitrary chemical shift differences between the exchanging pools, whilst considering the dilution by direct water saturation across the entire Z-spectra. This allows the optimization of irradiation parameters and the quantification of pH-dependent exchange rates and metabolite concentrations. In addition, we propose evaluation methods that correct for concomitant direct saturation effects. It is shown that existing theoretical treatments for CEST are special cases of this approach.

  15. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  16. Exchange-driven growth.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2003-09-01

    We study a class of growth processes in which clusters evolve via exchange of particles. We show that depending on the rate of exchange there are three possibilities: (I) Growth-clusters grow indefinitely, (II) gelation-all mass is transformed into an infinite gel in a finite time, and (III) instant gelation. In regimes I and II, the cluster size distribution attains a self-similar form. The large size tail of the scaling distribution is Phi(x) approximately exp(-x(2-nu)), where nu is a homogeneity degree of the rate of exchange. At the borderline case nu=2, the distribution exhibits a generic algebraic tail, Phi(x) approximately x(-5). In regime III, the gel nucleates immediately and consumes the entire system. For finite systems, the gelation time vanishes logarithmically, T approximately [lnN](-(nu-2)), in the large system size limit N--> infinity. The theory is applied to coarsening in the infinite range Ising-Kawasaki model and in electrostatically driven granular layers.

  17. Anion exchangers with branched functional ion exchange layers of different hydrophilicity for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shchukina, O I; Zatirakha, A V; Smolenkov, A D; Nesterenko, P N; Shpigun, O A

    2015-08-21

    Novel polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based anion exchangers differing from each other in the structure of the branched functional ion exchange layer are prepared to investigate the role of linker and functional site on ion exchange selectivity. The proposed method of synthesis includes the obtaining of aminated PS-DVB particles by means of their acylation with following reductive amination with methylamine. Further modification of the obtained secondary aminogroups is provided by the alkylation with either 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE) or resorcinol diglycidyl ether (RDGE), which form the linkers of different hydrophobicity, and amination of terminal epoxide rings with trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) or triethanolamine (TEA). The variation of the structure and hydrophobicity of the linker and terminal quaternary ammonium sites in the functional layer allows the alteration of selectivity and separation efficiency of the obtained adsorbents. The ion exchange selectivity and separation efficiency of the anion exchangers are evaluated using the model mixtures of anions (F(-), HCOO(-), Cl(-), NO2(-), Br(-), NO3(-), HPO4(2-) and SO4(2-)) in potassium hydroxide eluents. The adsorbents show the decrease of selectivity with increasing the hydrophilicity of the terminal functional site. The anion exchangers having more flexible and hydrophilic 1,4-BDDGE linker provide smaller separation factors for most of the analytes as compared with RDGE-containing adsorbents with the same terminal ion exchange sites, but are characterized with higher column efficiencies and better peak symmetry for polarizable anions. In case of 1,4-BDDGE-modified anion exchangers of the particle size of 3.3μm functionalized with DMEA and MDEA the calculated values of column efficiencies for polarizable NO3(-) and Br(-) are up to 49,000 and 53,000N/m, respectively, which is almost twice higher than the values obtained for the RDGE

  18. High Performance Woven Mesh Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Richard A.; Li, Chen; Park, Ji-Wook; Xu, Jun

    2002-07-01

    Simple-to-fabricate woven mesh structures, consisting of bonded laminates of two-dimensional plain-weave conductive screens, or three-dimensional orthogonal weaves are described. Geometric equations show that these porous matrices can be fabricated to have a wide range of porosity and a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity vector. A mathematical model of the thermal performance of such a mesh, deployed as a heat exchange surface, is developed. Measurements of pressure drop and overall heat transfer rate are reported and used with the performance model to develop correlation equations of mesh friction factor and Colburn j-factor as a function of coolant properties, mesh characteristics and flow rate through the mesh. A heat exchanger performance analysis delineates conditions where the two mesh technologies offer superior performance.

  19. Lightweight Long Life Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    A shuttle orbiter flight configuration aluminum heat exchanger was designed, fabricated, and tested. The heat exchanger utilized aluminum clad titanium composite parting sheets for protection against parting sheet pin hole corrosion. The heat exchanger, which is fully interchangeable with the shuttle condensing heat exchanger, includes slurpers (a means for removing condensed water from the downstream face of the heat exchanger), and both the core air passes and slurpers were hydrophilic coated to enhance wettability. The test program included performance tests which demonstrated the adequacy of the design and confirmed the predicted weight savings.

  20. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  1. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  2. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1967-01-01

    The oxygen production of a photosynthetic gas exchanger containing Chlorella pyrenoidosa (1% packed cell volume) was measured when various concentrations of carbon dioxide were present within the culture unit. The internal carbon dioxide concentrations were obtained by manipulating the entrance gas concentration and the flow rate. Carbon dioxide percentages were monitored by means of electrodes placed directly in the nutrient medium. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the nutrient medium which produced maximal photosynthesis was in the range of 1.5 to 2.5% by volume. Results were unaffected by either the level of carbon dioxide in the entrance gas or the rate of gas flow. Entrance gases containing 2% carbon dioxide flowing at 320 ml/min, 3% carbon dioxide at 135 ml/min, and 4% carbon dioxide at 55 ml/min yielded optimal carbon dioxide concentrations in the particular unit studied. By using carbon dioxide electrodes implanted directly in the gas exchanger to optimize the carbon dioxide concentration throughout the culture medium, it should be possible to design more efficient large-scale units. PMID:4382391

  3. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  4. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  5. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  6. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  7. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  8. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  9. Contextual determinants of condom use among female sex exchangers in East Harlem, NYC: an event analysis.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James M; Tortu, Stephanie; Pouget, Enrique R; Hamid, Rahul; Neaigus, Alan

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of contexts involving HIV risk behaviors among women who exchange sex for money or drugs. Event analysis was used to identify the individual, relationship, and contextual factors that contribute to these high-risk sex exchange practices. Analyses were conducted on data obtained from 155 drug-using women who reported details of their most recent sex exchange event with male clients. The majority of sex exchange encounters (78%) involved consistent condom use. In multivariable analysis, protective behavior was associated primarily with situational and relationship variables, such as exchange location, substance use, sexual practices, and respondent/client discussion and control. In order to inform HIV prevention programs targeted to women sex exchangers, further research is needed on the contextual determinants of risk, especially with regard to condom-use negotiation and factors involving substance use that adversely affect women's ability to manage protective behavior in the context of sex exchange.

  10. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  11. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  12. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  13. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  14. International Cell Exchange, 1994.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1994-01-01

    1. We summarize typings of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 20 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange in 1994. Serologic Class II typings were compared with DNA typings for the same 20 cells. Two hundred eighty-one laboratories participated in the monthly Class I Serum Exchange. One hundred nineteen serology laboratories and 74 DNA laboratories reported Class II specificities on a monthly basis. 2. The average detection levels, as well as the high detection levels, were determined for 16 A-locus and 27 B-locus antigens. Mean detection rates of 95% or greater average detection were obtained for 12 A-locus and 10 B-locus antigens. Lower than 80% agreement was calculated for one A-locus antigen (A74) and 7 B-locus (B46, B48, B61, B67, B73, B75, B77) antigens. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 10 A-locus and 7 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The false-negative discrepancy rates, i.e. how often the antigen was missed, were greater for more of the B-locus specificities than for the A-locus antigens. B62, having the highest false-positive rate, tended to be overassigned. The discrepancy rates, especially the false-negative rate, for B70 were shown to decrease over a 7-year period. 4. In 1994, 8 laboratories attained records of total no misses for all analyzed antigens. Twelve laboratories had final records of only one discrepancy, and 5 laboratories had impressive perfect records (zero false negatives and false positives) for their yearly antigen reports. 5. Retyping of 12 Class I and 8 Class II reference cells showed improved detection of antigens. Results of a donor typed 4 times over 11 years demonstrated marked improvement, nearly doubling for A33, B38, and B75. Two cells first typed in 1991, then retyped in 1994, showed improved detection for Class II splits by serology and DNA typing. 6. We updated the list of sequenced Class I Exchange cells. Seven new cells were added as well as confirmatory sequence data for A

  15. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  16. The NESACS Exchange with Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Morton Z.; Tanner, Ruth; Strem, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS) is going to host visit to the representatives of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) at their annual exchange program this year. The delegation is expected to spotlight the ACS international effects, in addition to the advantages of the exchange between the two organizations.

  17. Macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, R F; E Gancher, R; Russo, F R

    1970-06-01

    Two macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers have been prepared and characterized. One contains the iminodiacetate group and the second contains the arsonate group as the ion-exchanging site. The macroreticular resins show selectivities among metal ions similar to those of the commercially available naicroreticular chelating resins. Chromatographie separations on the new resins are rapid and sharp.

  18. EXCHANGE. Volume 9-92

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  19. Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

  20. The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gisevius, Annette; Weber, Robin A.

    2009-01-01

    The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange/Multiplikatorenschulung im transatlan-tischen Austausch is a collaboration between volunteers and staff in both the US and German AFS organizations. The goal of the project is to increase the level of intercultural learning of German and US secondary education exchange participants and their host families.…

  1. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  2. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  3. The bacterial chemical repertoire mediates metabolic exchange within gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Rath, Christopher M; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2012-04-01

    Microbial communities in the gut have been hypothesized to play key roles in the health of the host organism. Exploring the relationship between these populations and disease states has been a focus of the human microbiome project. However, the biological roles of the compounds produced by the gut bacteria are largely unknown. We hypothesize that these compounds act as metabolic exchange factors-mediating inter-species and intra-species interactions in the microbiome. This view is supported through this review of known bacterial metabolic exchange factors and evidence for uncharacterized metabolic exchange factors in the gut. The impact of model systems and technological developments in exploring this hypothesis are also discussed. Together, these investigations are revolutionizing our understanding of the gut microbiome-presenting the possibility of identifying new strategies for treating disease in the host.

  4. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  5. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, A.R.

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

  6. Energy-Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  7. Aluminum heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Koisuka, M.; Aoki, H.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes a heat exchanger comprising a flat metal tube for conducting fluid having opposite first and second ends, of metal fins fixed onto outer surfaces of the flat metal tube, first and second header pipes fixedly mounted on the opposite ends of the flat metal tube, respectively, so that the flat metal tube communicates with the interior of the header pipes. Each of the header pipes has a first end that is open and a second end that is closed. An inlet tube is connected to the first end of the first header pipe, and an outlet tube is connected to the first end of the second header pipe. The improvement described here comprises one of the inlet and outlet tubes having an end portion inserted into the first end of the corresponding interconnected header pipe. The end portion has a cut-away portion in the form of a first axial slit extending axially inwardly from an open end at the adjacent end of the one tube. The first axial slit has an axial intermediate portion slightly smaller than the thickness of the flat metal tube, and a tapered portion diverging towards the open end of the first axial slit, and the first end of the flat metal tube extends into the corresponding interconnected header pipe and is closely fitted into the first axial slit.

  8. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  9. Starrett City energy exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Starrett City/26th Ward Energy Project is a joint effort of Starrett City (a privately owned and operated 5881-unit high rise housing complex located in Brooklyn, NY) and the city of New York Department of Environmental Protection to develop the means to utilize waste-derived energy produced as by-products of municipal waste water treatment. Starrett City, a development of over 20,000 residents with its own schools, shopping and community centers, and power plant, is located directly across the street from the City of New York's 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant. Out of five energy exchange options, a cooperative project team recommended three: (1) transmitting all digester gas from the 26th Ward wastewater sewage-treatment facility to Starrett's cogeneration-type total energy plant (TEP), (2) piping hot water from the Starrett TEP to provide space and process heat to the 26th Ward, and (3) pumping treated effluent from the 26th Ward to the TEP to eliminate the need for Starrett's cooling tower. Starrett City assumed all installation and maintenance costs, both on city property and the TEP. Starrett projects a 53$ million saving in fuel costs over the next 20 years. The project will serve as a model for similar energy resource development efforts and offer the rationale for the private sector and municipalities to build together for the future.

  10. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, Angelo R. [Marple Township, Delaware County, PA

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

  11. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Fink, D; Rose, J; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability - a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases - of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl2) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg(-1). Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E=1.68×AlKCl, r(2)=0.66, n=25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl2 extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial 'organic-rich' CLASS having E values<1000 mg·kg(-1). It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here.

  12. Modeling ecosystem CO[sub 2] exchange in Harvard Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Amthor, J.S.; Goulden, M.L. Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA )

    1993-06-01

    A new model of forest ecosystem CO[sub 2] and energy exchange (FORPHYS) was tested (i.e., validated) with eddy-correlation measurements of net atmosphere/biosphere CO[sub 2] exchange at Harvard Forest. FORPHYS predictions were comparable to measured whole-ecosystem CO[sub 2] exchange rates. The leaf physiology component of FORPHYS combines a radiation transfer model; a modified Farquhar model of photosynthesis and photorespiration; a physically based model of leaf energy exchange, transpiration, and temperature; a leaf respiration model; and a dynamic model of stomatal conductance. Maintenance respiration of all tree organs is based on temperature and nitrogen content. Growth and growth respiration are modeled according to the quantitative biosynthesis model of Penning de Vries. Soil CO[sub 2] exchange is modeled empirically, based on environmental factors. FORPHYS is used to identify, in a quantitative manner, the processes underlying net ecosystem exchange of carbon and energy. The ultimate goal of the model is to predict effects of environmental change, in particular increasing atmospheric CO[sub 2] and temperature, on forest ecosystem carbon exchange and storage.

  13. 77 FR 51602 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of a Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... one year in the U.S. over-the-counter market, on another national securities exchange, or on a regulated foreign exchange following the consummation of the Reverse Merger and (i) in the case of a... issuers and market participants with respect to the factors considered by the Exchange in...

  14. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  15. DNA Strand Exchange and RecA Homologs in Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. Scott; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Homology search and DNA strand–exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand–exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand–exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved. PMID:25475089

  16. DNA strand exchange and RecA homologs in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Scott; Bishop, Douglas K

    2014-12-04

    Homology search and DNA strand-exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand-exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved.

  17. Custom, contract, and kidney exchange.

    PubMed

    Healy, Kieran; Krawiec, Kimberly D

    2012-01-01

    In this Essay, we examine a case in which the organizational and logistical demands of a novel form of organ exchange (the nonsimultaneous, extended, altruistic donor (NEAD) chain) do not map cleanly onto standard cultural schemas for either market or gift exchange, resulting in sociological ambiguity and legal uncertainty. In some ways, a NEAD chain resembles a form of generalized exchange, an ancient and widespread instance of the norm of reciprocity that can be thought of simply as the obligation to “pay it forward” rather than the obligation to reciprocate directly with the original giver. At the same time, a NEAD chain resembles a string of promises and commitments to deliver something in exchange for some valuable consideration--that is, a series of contracts. Neither of these salient "social imaginaries" of exchange--gift giving or formal contract--perfectly meets the practical demands of the NEAD system. As a result, neither contract nor generalized exchange drives the practice of NEAD chains. Rather, the majority of actual exchanges still resemble a simpler form of exchange: direct, simultaneous exchange between parties with no time delay or opportunity to back out. If NEAD chains are to reach their full promise for large-scale, nonsimultaneous organ transfer, legal uncertainties and sociological ambiguities must be finessed, both in the practices of the coordinating agencies and in the minds of NEAD-chain participants. This might happen either through the further elaboration of gift-like language and practices, or through a creative use of the cultural form and motivational vocabulary, but not necessarily the legal and institutional machinery, of contract.

  18. Effect of polyamine reagents on exchange capacity in ion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, T. I.; Dyachenko, F. V.; Bogatyreva, Yu. V.; Borodastov, A. K.; Ershova, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of compounds involved in complex reagents is described using Helamin 906H reagent as an example. The working exchange capacity of KU-2-8chs cation exchanger in hydrogen form and Amberlite IRA 900Cl anion exchanger in OH form remained almost unchanged when they were used repeatedly to purify water that contained Helamin 906H reagent; in addition, this capacity was the same upon filtration of water that did not contain this reagent. Leakage of total organic carbon was observed earlier than that of calcium ions upon filtration of the solution through the cation exchanger layer. The test results obtained in industrial conditions indicated that using H-OH filters to purify turbine condensate enables the decrease of the concentration of organic and other impurities therein.

  19. Post-quantum key exchange protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong; Leung, Lin; Kwan, Andis Chi-Tung; Zhang, Xiaowen; Kahanda, Dammika; Anshel, Michael

    2006-05-01

    If an eavesdropper Eve is equipped with quantum computers, she can easily break the public key exchange protocols used today. In this paper we will discuss the post-quantum Diffie-Hellman key exchange and private key exchange protocols.

  20. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  1. Heat exchange assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2004-06-08

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  2. Hear Exchange Assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2003-05-27

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  3. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  4. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOEpatents

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  5. 75 FR 51138 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; EDGA... Securities Exchange LLC; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE Amex LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Designation of Longer Period...

  6. 75 FR 52558 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ...; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; EDGA... Securities Exchange LLC; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE Amex LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Correction August 19, 2010. The Securities...

  7. Marriage exchanges, seed exchanges, and the dynamics of manioc diversity

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; McKey, Doyle B.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2011-01-01

    The conservation of crop genetic resources requires understanding the different variables—cultural, social, and economic—that impinge on crop diversity. In small-scale farming systems, seed exchanges represent a key mechanism in the dynamics of crop genetic diversity, and analyzing the rules that structure social networks of seed exchange between farmer communities can help decipher patterns of crop genetic diversity. Using a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches, we investigated the relationships between regional patterns of manioc genetic diversity in Gabon and local networks of seed exchange. Spatially explicit Bayesian clustering methods showed that geographical discontinuities of manioc genetic diversity mirror major ethnolinguistic boundaries, with a southern matrilineal domain characterized by high levels of varietal diversity and a northern patrilineal domain characterized by low varietal diversity. Borrowing concepts from anthropology—kinship, bridewealth, and filiation—we analyzed the relationships between marriage exchanges and seed exchange networks in patrilineal and matrilineal societies. We demonstrate that, by defining marriage prohibitions, kinship systems structure social networks of exchange between farmer communities and influence the movement of seeds in metapopulations, shaping crop diversity at local and regional levels. PMID:22042843

  8. Steric effects in peptide and protein exchange with activated disulfides.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L; Griffin, Donald R; Wong, Darice Y; Kasko, Andrea M

    2013-08-12

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da to 10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa - 10 kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size, and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role.

  9. Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Game Changing Development is taking on a technologydevelopment and demonstration effort to design, build, and test the next generation of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HXs) on ...

  10. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  11. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  12. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  13. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  14. Mass exchange processes with input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a system of interacting clusters evolving through mass exchange and supplemented by input of small clusters. Three possibilities depending on the rate of exchange generically occur when input is homogeneous: continuous growth, gelation, and instantaneous gelation. We mostly study the growth regime using scaling methods. An exchange process with reaction rates equal to the product of reactant masses admits an exact solution which allows us to justify the validity of scaling approaches in this special case. We also investigate exchange processes with a localized input. We show that if the diffusion coefficients are mass-independent, the cluster mass distribution becomes stationary and develops an algebraic tail far away from the source.

  15. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  16. Ion exchange - Simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Finn, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for simulating multicomponent adsorption by ion-exchange resins was adapted for use as both an ASPEN-callable module and as a free-standing simulator of the ion-exchange bed. Four polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonic acid resins have been characterized for three principal ions. It is concluded that a chelating resin appears appropriate as a heavy-metal trap. The same ASPEN-callable module is used to model this resin when Wilson parameters can be obtained.

  17. Isotopic exchange of uranium. II. Exchange kinetics in solution-organic-ion exchanger systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhinskii, M.V.; Bronzov, P.A.; Vitinskii, M.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The results of a study of the sorption of uranium and the kinetics of isotopic exchange between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) in systems consisting of a hydrochloric acid solution and the KU-2-8P and AV-17-10P ion-exchange resins have been studied. It has been shown that the sorption of uranium is limited by diffusion in the sorbent grains and that isotopic exchange is limited by the reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI).

  18. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Warming and Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Alter Plant Production and Ecosystem gas Exchange in a Semi-Arid Grassland Through Direct Responses to Global Change Factors and Indirect Effects on Water Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. A.; Pendall, E.; Williams, D. G.; Bachman, S.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lecain, D. R.; Follett, R.

    2007-12-01

    were highly species specific. Ecosystem-level gas exchange measurements indicated that interactions between watering and CO2 enrichment increased C cycling over a range of soil moisture conditions, although watering had a greater relative impact on C fluxes than CO2 enrichment. Results from the combined warming and CO2 enrichment experiment in 2007 indicate soil fluxes of CO2 increased with elevated CO2 and warming, but decreased with warming later in the year compared to un-heated controls. Soil CH4 uptake was enhanced by elevated CO2 but reduced by warming, particularly later in the year. Soil fluxes of N2O were unaffected by treatment. These preliminary results indicate potentially strong feedbacks between carbon cycling and warming are mediated by ecosystem processes in this semiarid rangeland.

  20. Knowledge Exchange: Capacity Building in a Small University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sally Fowler

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine an early articulation of some of the key factors in building capacity and the potential for knowledge exchange (KE) within a small, learning and teaching-oriented organization. Design/methodology/approach: An action research study is planned as a practical enquiry. In common with other action research,…

  1. Radiation Studies with Argentine Ion Exchange Material

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    2002-06-28

    A recent technology exchange between Argentina Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEA) and the US Department of Energy involved vitrification studies of ion exchange resins. Details of the spent ion exchange resins currently stored at two Argentine nuclear power plants, Atucha I and Embalse, have been presented in earlier reports. The present study examines irradiation of simulant samples of ion exchange resins.

  2. 36 CFR 254.14 - Exchange agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.14 Exchange agreement. (a) The parties to a proposed exchange may enter into... outstanding interests, stipulation of any necessary cash equalization, and all other terms and conditions necessary to complete an exchange; (2) Inclusion of the terms regarding responsibility for...

  3. 36 CFR 254.14 - Exchange agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.14 Exchange agreement. (a) The parties to a proposed exchange may enter into... outstanding interests, stipulation of any necessary cash equalization, and all other terms and conditions necessary to complete an exchange; (2) Inclusion of the terms regarding responsibility for...

  4. 36 CFR 254.14 - Exchange agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.14 Exchange agreement. (a) The parties to a proposed exchange may enter into... outstanding interests, stipulation of any necessary cash equalization, and all other terms and conditions necessary to complete an exchange; (2) Inclusion of the terms regarding responsibility for...

  5. 36 CFR 254.14 - Exchange agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.14 Exchange agreement. (a) The parties to a proposed exchange may enter into... outstanding interests, stipulation of any necessary cash equalization, and all other terms and conditions necessary to complete an exchange; (2) Inclusion of the terms regarding responsibility for...

  6. 36 CFR 254.14 - Exchange agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.14 Exchange agreement. (a) The parties to a proposed exchange may enter into... outstanding interests, stipulation of any necessary cash equalization, and all other terms and conditions necessary to complete an exchange; (2) Inclusion of the terms regarding responsibility for...

  7. Exchanging ideas. Adapting materials.

    PubMed

    Savage, A

    1998-01-01

    A training manual on reproductive health is a key tool in an HIV/AIDS youth peer education program of the Asian Red Cross and the Red Crescent AIDS Task Force. Young people worked with project staff to develop a common outline for the manual that included sexual health and reproduction, personal development, support from friends, gender relations, HIV/AIDS, other youth health issues, and factors affecting risk behaviors. However, the basic text and its illustrations were modified according to the situation in individual regions and countries. In both Viet Nam and Cambodia, statements correcting local myths about HIV transmission have been included in exercises presented in the manual. Involvement of young people in all phases of program development and sensitivity to gender differences have been key to the success of this project.

  8. Social Exchange and Sexual Behavior in Young Women's Premarital Relationships in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Nancy; Goldberg, Rachel E.; Mberu, Blessing U.; Zulu, Eliya M.

    2011-01-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of money and gifts for sexual activities within nonmarital relationships, has been widely considered a contributing factor to the disproportionate prevalence of HIV/AIDS among young women in sub-Saharan Africa. This study applied social exchange theory to premarital relationships in order to investigate the…

  9. Daily Social Exchanges and Affect in Middle and Later Adulthood: The Impact of Loneliness and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Alissa; Bergeman, C. S.; Scott, Stacey B.

    2012-01-01

    Although daily social exchanges are important for well-being, it is unclear how different types of exchanges affect daily well-being, as well as which factors influence the way in which individuals react to their daily social encounters. The present study included a sample of 705 adults aged 31 to 91, and using Multilevel Modeling analyses…

  10. Influence of pine bark particle size and pH on cation exchange capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) describes the maximum quantity of cations a soil or substrate can hold while being exchangeable with the soil solution. While CEC has been studied for peat-based substrates, relatively little work has documented factors that affect CEC of pine bark substrates. The ob...

  11. The liquid droplet heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, A. P.

    Direct contact heat exchange between a gas and a molten metal dispersed into droplets offers an attractive new approach to increasing the efficiency and decreasing the specific weight of thermal power cycles for space applications. The ability of a droplet heat exchanger to transfer heat directly from a liquid metal to a working gas over a wide temperature range circumvents many of the material limitations of conventional tube type heat exchangers and does away with complicated plumbing systems and their tendency toward simple point failure. Droplet heat exchangers offer large surface to volume ratios in a compact geometry, very low pressure drop and high effectiveness. In the simplest configuration the molten material is sprayed axially through a counterflowing, high pressure inert working gas in an insulated cylindrical chamber. The droplets transfer heat directly to the gas by convection as they traverse the heat exchanger and are subsequently collected for recycling through the heat source. A number of suitable liquid metals and eutectic alloys having negligibly low vapor pressures in the temperature range of 350-1300 K were identified. Experimental studies of droplet formation with mercury demonstrated that near perfect control of droplet size can be easily achieved.

  12. Electrically Switched Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    JPH Sukamto; ML Lilga; RK Orth

    1998-10-23

    This report discusses the results of work to develop Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) for separations of ions from waste streams relevant to DOE site clean-up. ESIX combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for radionuclide separation that lowers costs and minimizes secondary waste generation typically associated with conventional ion exchange. In the ESIX process, an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto. a high surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. As a result, the production of secondary waste is minimized, since the large volumes of solution associated with elution, wash, and regeneration cycles typical of standard ion exchange are not needed for the ESIX process. The document is presented in two parts: Part I, the Summary Report, discusses the objectives of the project, describes the ESIX concept and the approach taken, and summarizes the major results; Part II, the Technology Description, provides a technical description of the experimental procedures and in-depth discussions on modeling, case studies, and cost comparisons between ESIX and currently used technologies.

  13. Exchange-biased magnetic vortices.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.; Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Nogues, J.; Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2008-07-01

    This paper reviews our work on the interplay between exchange bias due to the coupling of a ferromagnet to an antiferromagnet and the formation of magnetic vortices, which occur due to the patterning of a ferromagnet. Depending on the thermal and magnetic history, a variety of different effects can be observed. Thermal annealing in a saturating magnetic field establishes a spatially homogeneous exchange bias with a uniform unidirectional anisotropy. This results in an angular dependence of the magnetization reversal mode, which can be either via magnetization rotation or vortex nucleation and annihilation. In contrast, thermal annealing in a field smaller than the vortex annihilation field imprints the ferromagnetic vortex configuration in the antiferromagnet with high fidelity resulting in unusual asymmetric hysteresis loops. Furthermore, we discuss how the interfacial nature of the exchange bias can modify the vortex magnetization along the thickness of the ferromagnet.

  14. Atmosphere-surface exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabberdt, W F; Lenschow, D H; Horst, T W; Zimmerman, P R; Oncley, S P; Delany, A C

    1993-06-04

    The exchange of various trace species and energy at the earth's surface plays an important role in climate, ecology, and human health and welfare. Surface exchange measurements can be difficult to obtain yet are important to understand physical processes, assess environmental and global change impacts, and develop robust parameterizations of atmospheric processes. The physics and turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed as they contribute to dry surface exchange rates (fluxes). Micrometeorological, budget, and enclosure techniques used to measure or estimate surface fluxes are described, along with their respective advantages and limitations. Various measurement issues (such as site characteristics, sampling considerations, sensor attributes, and flow distortion) impact on the ability to obtain representative surface-based and airborne flux data.

  15. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  16. Making Virtual Exchange/Telecollaboration Mainstream--Large Scale Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagley, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Language educators' goals include promoting cultural understanding and improving the language skills of their students. Virtual Exchange (VE) is a powerful means to do this. Students in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms often have few opportunities to communicate with other users of English. VE gives them virtual mobility, enabling…

  17. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  18. The Electrically Controlled Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jacob

    Controlling magnetism via voltage in the virtual absence of electric current is the key to reduce power consumption while enhancing processing speed, integration density and functionality in comparison with present-day information technology. Almost all spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is therefore a key challenge to better spintronics. However, there is no direct interaction between magnetization and electric fields, thus making voltage control of magnetism in general a scientific challenge. The significance of controlled interface magnetism started with the exchange-bias effect. Exchange bias is a coupling phenomenon at magnetic interfaces that manifests itself prominently in the shift of the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop along the magnetic-field axis. Various attempts on controlling exchange bias via voltage utilizing different scientific principles have been intensively studied recently. The majority of present research is emphasizing on various complex oxides. Our approach can be considered as a paradigm shift away from complex oxides. We focus on a magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic simple oxide Cr2O3. From a combination of experimental and theoretical efforts, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This is a significant scientific breakthrough providing a new route towards potentially revolutionizing information technology. In addition, a second path of electrically controlled exchange bias is introduced by exploiting the piezoelectric property of BaTiO3. An exchange-bias Co

  19. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  20. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  1. Statistical equilibrium in simple exchange games II. The redistribution game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, U.; Scalas, E.; Viarengo, P.

    2007-11-01

    We propose a simple stochastic exchange game mimicking taxation and redistribution. There are g agents and n coins; taxation is modeled by randomly extracting some coins; then, these coins are redistributed to agents following Polya's scheme. The individual wealth equilibrium distribution for the resulting Markov chain is the multivariate symmetric Polya distribution. In the continuum limit, the wealth distribution converges to a Gamma distribution, whose form factor is just the initial redistribution weight. The relationship between this taxation-and-redistribution scheme and other simple conservative stochastic exchange games (such as the BDY game) is discussed.

  2. Dimensional Analysis of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    8217thIJt4IiTY CLASSIFICATION OF TWI4S PAG(E ona Dola t ern.r) 20. (continued) c-a• of factors having significance in OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...heat exchangers. Certain of these groups are then evaluated for a model and prototype OTEC -Type heat exchanger using the same working fluid and ex...Development Administration, and the U. S. Navy are brought out. Chapter II investigates the scaling problems of heat ex- changers in OTEC (Ocean Thermal

  3. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  4. Characterising the exchangeability of phenanthrene associated with naturally occurring soil colloids using an isotopic dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Juhasz, Albert; Donner, Erica; Lombi, Enzo

    2015-04-01

    The association of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with inorganic and organic colloids is an important factor influencing their bioavailability, mobility and degradation in the environment. Despite this, our understanding of the exchangeability and potential bioavailability of PAHs associated with colloids is limited. The objective of this study was to use phenanthrene as a model PAH compound and develop a technique using (14)C phenanthrene to quantify the isotopically exchangeable and non-exchangeable forms of phenanthrene in filtered soil water or sodium tetraborate extracts. The study was also designed to investigate the exchangeability of colloidal phenanthrene as a function of particle size. Our findings suggest that the exchangeability of phenanthrene in sodium tetraborate is controlled by both inorganic and organic colloids, while in aqueous solutions inorganic colloids play the dominant role (even though coating of these by organic matter cannot be excluded). Filter pore size did not have a significant effect on phenanthrene exchangeability.

  5. Using a health information exchange system for imaging information: patterns and predictors.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Grinspan, Zachary M; Kern, Lisa M; Campion, Thomas R; Kaushal, Rainu

    2013-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) systems may address the challenges that prevent easy access to patients' existing radiological information at the point of care. However, little is known about the factors associated with usage of HIE for radiology reports, nor about how reports are shared with an exchange network. We analyzed the system log files from a regional health information organization in upstate New York matched with insurance claims files using network analysis and regression modeling. The exchange network was dominated by a few key information sources. Outpatient users overall accessed 17 times more radiology reports than inpatient and ED users combined. Additionally, as the number of exchange partners increased per organization, the average number of reports exchanged by that organization also increased. Radiology reports were most likely to be accessed by physicians and other clinical users. These findings have implications for those operating and fostering exchange activity.

  6. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. The Structure of Social Exchange in Self-Help Support Groups: Development of a Measure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L.

    2014-01-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics. PMID:24398622

  8. Our International Art Exchange Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocciolone, Kathy R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses an international art exchange project designed to teach fifth-grade students that the culture of a country is reflected in its art and that art is a universal language. Describes the contributions from Scotland, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Japan, and India. Points out ways to use materials in schools. (KO)

  9. Identifiability, exchangeability and confounding revisited

    PubMed Central

    Greenland, Sander; Robins, James M

    2009-01-01

    In 1986 the International Journal of Epidemiology published "Identifiability, Exchangeability and Epidemiological Confounding". We review the article from the perspective of a quarter century after it was first drafted and relate it to subsequent developments on confounding, ignorability, and collapsibility. PMID:19732410

  10. "Bottle-Brush" Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Heat exchanger consists of a metal tube with wires extending inward from wall. Conduction of heat along wires improves heat transfer to gas or other filling. Fluid is heated throughout the cross section of tube. Suggested applications are refrigerators, heat engines, thermal instrumentation, and heat switches.

  11. Fock exchange in FLAPW method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2008-03-01

    Fock exchange potential has distinct features which cannnot be seen in the LDA exchange potential. (i) It is self-interaction free potential and (ii) nonlocal potential and thus state-dependent potential. With appropriate correlation effects added, these two features may produce significantly improved results over the conventional LDA results, as one can witness in the GW calculations. Massidda et al. (1993) proposed a way to calculate Fock exchange potential of extended solids within the FLAPW method. Their idea was to apply Weinert's Poisson solver to infinite lattice summation as is done for the Hartree potential calculation. Due to the long range nature of Coulomb interaction, one encounters singularity problem in this process. They handled it by simply extending Gygi's prescription (1986), which was originally developed for the norm-conserving pseudopotential framework. In this paper, we present our formula in calculating Fock exchange matrix of solids based on the FLAPW method. Following Massidda's idea, we use Weinert's Poisson solver. However, in treating the Coulomb singularity, we have developed more accurate way: the occupied eigenfunctions in Fock operator are expanded upto the second order in terms of q vector based on the k.p perturbation theory, whearas Gygi's way corresponds to the zeroth order expansion. With this higher order expansion, one can achieve faster convergence for the Brillouin zone integration appearing in the Fock operator.

  12. Knowledge Exchange with Sistema Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie; Moran, Nikki; Duffy, Celia; Loening, Gica

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a knowledge exchange project, funded by the Scottish Funding Council and undertaken by a group of researchers from three higher education institutions in Scotland and the project partner, Sistema Scotland. This newly established charity is attempting to implement a major programme of social change, developed in Venezuela,…

  13. Educational Telecomputing Projects: Interpersonal Exchanges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Judi

    1995-01-01

    Six different types of interpersonal exchanges, or educational telecomputing activities that incorporate the use of interpersonal skills are presented: (1) "keypals"; (2) global classrooms; (3) electronic "appearances"; (4) electronic monitoring; (5) question-and-answer services; and (6) impersonations. From this presentation,…

  14. Lightweight long life heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of a full scale shuttle-type condensing heat exchanger constructed of aluminum and utilizing aluminum clad titanium parting sheets is described. A long term salt spray test of candidate parting sheet specimens is described. The results of an investigation into an alternate method of making composite sheet material are discussed.

  15. Legal Exchange: Necessity and Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    The International Legal Exchange Program (ILEP) arranges for lawyers from the U.S. or foreign countries to have several months of training in countries different from their own. The program offers an opportunity to strengthen world order under law through better understanding. (Author/PG)

  16. Calculations of Shipboard Heat Exchangers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-18

    Constrained moticn is created by the external exciting forces - pumps, compresors , fars, agitators. During the heat exchange distinguish the phenomena...cast tcttozs. (5). fcr fla*/plane covers/caps. FOOTNOTE 1. Is taken stall value. !NDFOCINOIE. Additional requirements fox the dished bcttcss. -w j DOC

  17. Homans on Exchange: Hedonism Revived

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamsson, Bengt

    1970-01-01

    George C. Homan's theory on social exchange is critically examined and found to have serious shortcomings with regard to its deductive and inductive aspects. An expecially prominent shortcoming concerns the tautological character of his concept of reward," which makes his theory deductively unclear and empirically untestable. Homan's critique…

  18. Primer on nuclear exchange models

    SciTech Connect

    Hafemeister, David

    2014-05-09

    Basic physics is applied to nuclear force exchange models between two nations. Ultimately, this scenario approach can be used to try and answer the age old question of 'how much is enough?' This work is based on Chapter 2 of Physics of Societal Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007 and 2014)

  19. Equal division of estates and the exchange motive.

    PubMed

    Norton, Edward C; Taylor, Donald H

    2005-01-01

    Although the bequest motive is one of the most important theoretical extensions of the life-cycle hypothesis, few empirical studies have measured determinants of unequal estate division. We estimated whether several proxies that are consistent with exchange and altruism lead to unequal estate division using data from a longitudinal survey of deceased elderly persons linked to probate court records. Equal division was the rule-between 70 and 83% of estates were divided equally, depending on the strictness of the definition of equal division. Several measures of exchange were not significant predictors of unequal division. Two factors that are consistent with both exchange and altruism- writing the last will and testament within five years of death and having more children-predict unequal estate division. The models control for selection, because many decedents do not file a record in probate court.

  20. Semilocal density functional obeying a strongly tightened bound for exchange

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2015-01-01

    Because of its useful accuracy and efficiency, density functional theory (DFT) is one of the most widely used electronic structure theories in physics, materials science, and chemistry. Only the exchange-correlation energy is unknown, and needs to be approximated in practice. Exact constraints provide useful information about this functional. The local spin-density approximation (LSDA) was the first constraint-based density functional. The Lieb–Oxford lower bound on the exchange-correlation energy for any density is another constraint that plays an important role in the development of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) and meta-GGAs. Recently, a strongly and optimally tightened lower bound on the exchange energy was proved for one- and two-electron densities, and conjectured for all densities. In this article, we present a realistic “meta-GGA made very simple” (MGGA-MVS) for exchange that respects this optimal bound, which no previous beyond-LSDA approximation satisfies. This constraint might have been expected to worsen predicted thermochemical properties, but in fact they are improved over those of the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof GGA, which has nearly the same correlation part. MVS exchange is however radically different from that of other GGAs and meta-GGAs. Its exchange enhancement factor has a very strong dependence upon the orbital kinetic energy density, which permits accurate energies even with the drastically tightened bound. When this nonempirical MVS meta-GGA is hybridized with 25% of exact exchange, the resulting global hybrid gives excellent predictions for atomization energies, reaction barriers, and weak interactions of molecules. PMID:25561554

  1. 25th anniversary article: Ion exchange in colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchi; Kershaw, Stephen V; Rogach, Andrey L

    2013-12-23

    We review the progress in ion exchange in a variety of nanocrystal structures from the earliest accounts dating back over two decades ago to the present day. In recent years the number of groups using this method to form otherwise difficult or inaccessible nanoparticle shapes and morphologies has increased considerably and the field has experienced a resurgence of interest. Whilst most of the early work on cation exchange centered on II-VI materials, the methodology has been expanded to cover a far broader range of semiconductor nanocrystals including low toxicity I-III-VI materials and the much less facile III-V materials. The extent of exchange can be controlled leading to lightly doped nanoparticles, alloys, core-shells, segmented rods and dots-in-rods. Progress has been driven by a better understanding of the underlying principles of the exchange process - from thermodynamic factors (differences in cation solubilities); the interactions between ions and transfer agents (solvents, ligands, anions, co-dopants); ionic in-diffusion mechanisms and kinetics. More recent availability of very detailed electron microscopy coupled with image reconstruction techniques has been a valuable tool to investigate the resulting heterostructures and internal interfaces. We start by surveying the range of synthetic approaches most often used to carry out ion exchange, mainly focusing on cation replacement strategies, and then describe the rich variety of nanostructures these techniques can bring forth. We also describe some of the principles that are used to establish the relative ease of exchange and to systematically improve the process where the basic energetics are less favorable. To help further the understanding of the underlying fundamentals we have gathered together useful data from the literature on solubilities, cation and anion hardness, ligand and solvent Lewis acid or base strengths for a wide range of chemical species generally used. We offer a perspective on the

  2. Multiphase complete exchange on Paragon, SP2 and CS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1995-01-01

    The overhead of interprocessor communication is a major factor in limiting the performance of parallel computer systems. The complete exchange is the severest communication pattern in that it requires each processor to send a distinct message to every other processor. This pattern is at the heart of many important parallel applications. On hypercubes, multiphase complete exchange has been developed and shown to provide optimal performance over varying message sizes. Most commercial multicomputer systems do not have a hypercube interconnect. However, they use special purpose hardware and dedicated communication processors to achieve very high performance communication and can be made to emulate the hypercube quite well. Multiphase complete exchange has been implemented on three contemporary parallel architectures: the Intel Paragon, IBM SP2 and Meiko CS-2. The essential features of these machines are described and their basic interprocessor communication overheads are discussed. The performance of multiphase complete exchange is evaluated on each machine. It is shown that the theoretical ideas developed for hypercubes are also applicable in practice to these machines and that multiphase complete exchange can lead to major savings in execution time over traditional solutions.

  3. Magnetic Exchange Interactions in Long Range Ordered Diluted Organometallic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Naveen; Manning, Lane; Furis, Madalina

    2015-03-01

    Exchange Interactions in diluted organometallic crystalline thin films of Phthalocyanines made of a mixture of organo-soluble derivatives of metal-free (H2Pc) molecule and MnPc is investigated. The tuning of optical and magnetic properties in organometallics is driven by their emergence in optoelectronic applications involving flexible electronics. Thin films with metal to metal-free Pc ratios ranging from 1: 1 to 1:10 were fabricated using solution processing that produces macroscopic grains. In the case of Mn-Pc, our previos measurements showed enhanced hybridization of ligand π-electronic states with the Mn d-orbitals as well as indirect exchange interaction similar to that of RKKY type exchange. The evolution of Zeeman splitting of specific MCD-active states resulted in enhanced effective π-electrons g-factors, analogous to diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) systems. Recent Variable temperature Magnetic Circular Dichroism (VTVH-MCD) measurements has now revealed that the exchange interaction is Antiferromagnetic. Recent MCD data for mixed derivatives will be presented along with their temperature dependance that further probes this exchange interaction. NSF award 1056589

  4. A piloted simulation study of data link ATC message exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1989-01-01

    Data link Air Traffic Control (ATC) and Air Traffic Service (ATS) message and data exchange offers the potential benefits of increased flight safety and efficiency by reducing communication errors and allowing more information to be transferred between aircraft and ground facilities. Digital communication also presents an opportunity to relieve the overloading of ATC radio frequencies which hampers message exchange during peak traffic hours in many busy terminal areas. A piloted simulation study to develop pilot factor guidelines and assess potential flight crew benefits and liabilities from using data link ATC message exchange was completed. The data link ATC message exchange concept, implemented on an existing navigation computer Control Display Unit (CDU) required maintaining a voice radio telephone link with an appropriate ATC facility. Flight crew comments, scanning behavior, and measurements of time spent in ATC communication activities for data link ATC message exchange were compared to similar measures for simulated conventional voice radio operations. The results show crew preference for the quieter flight deck environment and a perception of lower communication workload.

  5. Gendered Pathways: Violent Childhood Maltreatment, Sex Exchange, and Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Verona, Edelyn; Murphy, Brett; Javdani, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent work has emphasized the role of violent victimization, along with risky contexts like sex exchange, in pathways to problems of externalizing and substance use in women. Nonetheless, few studies have empirically tested gender differences involving the roles of adversity factors (e.g., childhood violent maltreatment, sex exchange) in drug use patterns. The present study tested a model of gender differences in relationships between childhood physical and sexual abuse, sex exchange, and two indicators of drug use: engagement and symptoms of disorder. Method We recruited an ethnically-diverse sample of 304 (130 women) adults with recent histories of violence and/or drug use, who completed a substance use diagnostic interview, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and a sex exchange questionnaire. Results First, structural equation modeling revealed that childhood sexual and physical abuse were related to increased drug engagement in women and men, respectively, above the influence of early childhood contextual variables (e.g., neighborhood, family) and age. Second, sexual abuse was related to sex exchange, which in turn was related to drug use symptoms in women but not men. Conclusions These data provide empirical support for distinct trauma-related pathways to drug use problems in men and women, which has implications for gendered explanations and prevention approaches. PMID:26229728

  6. Two-Photon-Exchange and {gamma}Z-Exchange Corrections to Parity-Violating Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Haiqing; Kao Chungwen; Yang Shinnan

    2007-12-31

    Leading electroweak corrections play an important role in precision measurements of the strange form factors. We calculate the two-photon-exchange (TPE) and {gamma}Z-exchange corrections to the parity-violating asymmetry of the elastic electron-proton scattering in a simple hadronic model including the finite size of the proton. We find both can reach a few percent and are comparable in size with the current experimental measurements of strange-quark effects in the proton neutral weak current. The effect of {gamma}Z exchange is in general larger than that of TPE, especially at low momentum transfer Q{sup 2}{<=}1 GeV{sup 2}. Their combined effects on the values of G{sub E}{sup s}+G{sub M}{sup s} extracted in recent experiments can be as large as -40% in certain kinematics.

  7. Health information exchange and healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    2009-06-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) makes previously inaccessible data available to clinicians, resulting in more complete information. This study tested the hypotheses that HIE information access reduced emergency room visits and inpatient hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among medically indigent adults. HIE access was quantified by how frequently system users' accessed patients' data. Encounter counts were modeled using zero inflated binomial regression. HIE was not accessed for 43% of individuals. Patient factors associated with accessed data included: prior utilization, chronic conditions, and age. Higher levels of information access were significantly associated with increased counts of all encounter types. Results indicate system users were more likely to access HIE for patients for whom the information might be considered most beneficial. Ultimately, these results imply that HIE information access did not transform care in the ways many would expect. Expectations in utilization reductions, however logical, may have to be reevaluated or postponed.

  8. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section. (1) All heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service within the heat exchange system that...., the heat exchange system does not contain any heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service as... exchange system in organic HAP service or from each heat exchanger exit line for each heat exchanger...

  9. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  10. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  11. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  12. A simple nonlocal model for exchange.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G

    2009-12-21

    This work presents a new nonlocal model for the exchange energy density. The model is obtained from the product of the Kohn-Sham one-particle density matrix used to construct exact [Hartree-Fock-like (HF)] exchange, and an approximate density matrix used to construct local spin-density approximation (LSDA) exchange. The proposed exchange energy density has useful formal properties, including correct spin and coordinate scaling and the correct uniform limit. It can readily be evaluated in finite basis sets, with a computational scaling intermediate between HF exchange and semilocal quantities such as the noninteracting kinetic energy density. Applications to representative systems indicate that its properties are typically intermediate between HF and LSDA exchange, and often similar to global hybrids of HF and LSDA exchange. The model is proposed as a novel "Rung 3.5" ingredient for constructing approximate exchange-correlation functionals.

  13. Learn about the Environmental Information Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    States, territories, and tribes can partner with EPA to exchange standardized data to improve its quality, increase its availability, and integrate it better across different sources using connecting nodes, xml schema, and a data exchange template.

  14. Multivariate Comparative Analysis of Stock Exchanges: The European Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralun-Bereźnicka, Julia

    The aim of the research is to perform a multivariate comparative analysis of 20 European stock exchanges in order to identify the main similarities between the objects. Due to the convergence process of capital markets in Europe the similarities between stock exchanges could be expected to increase over time. The research is meant to show whether and how these similarities change. Consequently, the distances between clusters of similar stock exchanges should become less significant, which the analysis also aims at verifying. The basis of comparison is a set of 48 monthly variables from the period January, 2003 to December, 2006. The variables are classified into three categories: size of the market, equity trading and bonds. The paper aims at identifying the clusters of alike stock exchanges and at finding the characteristic features of each of the distinguished groups. The obtained categorization to some extent corresponds with the division of the European Union into “new” and “old” member countries. Clustering method, performed for each quarter separately, also reveals that the classification is fairly stable in time. The factor analysis, which was carried out to reduce the number of variables, reveals three major factors behind the data, which are related with the earlier mentioned categories of variables.

  15. CFD analysis of the plate heat exchanger - Mathematical modelling of mass and heat transfer in serial connection with tubular heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, Marian; Kocich, Radim

    2016-06-01

    Application of numerical simulations based on the CFD calculation when the mass and heat transfer between the fluid flows is essential component of thermal calculation. In this article the mathematical model of the heat exchanger is defined, which is subsequently applied to the plate heat exchanger, which is connected in series with the other heat exchanger (tubular heat exchanger). The present contribution deals with the possibility to use the waste heat of the flue gas produced by small micro turbine. Inlet boundary conditions to the mathematical model of the plate heat exchanger are obtained from the results of numerical simulation of the tubular heat exchanger. Required parameters such for example inlet temperature was evaluated from temperature field, which was subsequently imported to the inlet boundary condition to the simulation of plate heat exchanger. From the results of 3D numerical simulations are evaluated basic flow variables including the evaluation of dimensionless parameters such as Colburn j-factor and friction ft factor. Numerical simulation is realized by software ANSYS Fluent15.0.

  16. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  17. Bistability in radiative heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, V. I.; Ovcharov, V. V.; Prigara, V. P.

    2008-08-01

    The possibility of a bistable regime in systems with radiative heat exchange is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. The transfer characteristics of a radiation-closed stationary system have been calculated, in which the radiator is a blackbody and the absorber is made of a material with the absorptivity sharply increasing in a certain temperature interval. The radiator and absorber are separated by a vacuum gap. The heat exchange between the system and the environment is controlled by varying the flow rate of a heat-transfer agent cooling the absorber. The output parameter of a bistable system is the absorber temperature, while the input parameter can be either the radiator temperature or the heat-transfer agent flow rate. Depending on the choice of the input parameter, the transfer characteristic of the system is either represented by a usual S-like curve or has an inverted shape.

  18. Energy exchanges in reconnection outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin V.; Newman, David L.; Markidis, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Reconnection outflows are highly energetic directed flows that interact with the ambient plasma or with flows from other reconnection regions. Under these conditions the flow becomes highly unstable and chaotic, as any flow jets interacting with a medium. We report here massively parallel simulations of the two cases of interaction between outflow jets and between a single outflow with an ambient plasma. We find in both case the development of a chaotic magnetic field, subject to secondary reconnection events that further complicate the topology of the field lines. The focus of the present analysis is on the energy balance. We compute each energy channel (electromagnetic, bulk, thermal, for each species) and find where the most energy is exchanged and in what form. The main finding is that the largest energy exchange is not at the reconnection site proper but in the regions where the outflowing jets are destabilized.

  19. Role exchange in medical interpretation.

    PubMed

    White, Kari; Laws, M Barton

    2009-12-01

    Prior research has documented that medical interpreters engage in non-conduit roles during medical visits. However, agreement on the appropriateness of these roles and their impact on the medical encounter have not yet been achieved. The purpose of this study was to identify non-conduit behavior (role exchange), elucidate the various forms it takes among different types of interpreters, and assess its potential to affect clinical encounters. Using audiotapes from 13 pediatric outpatient visits, we found that "chance" and uncertified hospital interpreters engaged in role exchange by assuming the provider's role; the patient's role; and taking other non-interpretive roles such as socializing with mothers or acting in one's alternate professional role. These behaviors occurred frequently among both types of interpreters while the provider was actively engaged in conducting the medical visit. In most instances, the interpreter did not make his or her behavior transparent to either the provider or the mother. Implications for interpreter and provider training are discussed.

  20. Heat exchanger and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2015-12-22

    Heat exchangers include a housing having an inlet and an outlet and forming a portion of a transition chamber. A heating member may form another portion of the transition chamber. The heating member includes a first end having a first opening and a second end having a second opening larger than the first opening. Methods of conveying a fluid include supplying a first fluid into a transition chamber of a heat exchanger, supplying a second fluid into the transition chamber, and altering a state of a portion of the first fluid with the second fluid. Methods of sublimating solid particles include conveying a first fluid comprising a material in a solid state into a transition chamber, heating the material to a gaseous state by directing a second fluid through a heating member and mixing the first fluid and the second fluid.

  1. SODIUM-WATER HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, W.R.; Koch, L.J.

    1962-04-17

    A heat exchanger comprising a tank for hot liquid and a plurality of concentric, double tubes for cool liquid extending vertically through the tank is described. These tubes are bonded throughout most of their length but have an unbonded portion at both ends. The inner tubes extend between headers located above and below the tanmk and the outer tubes are welded into tube sheets forming the top and bottom of the tank at locations in the unbonded portions of the tubes. (AEC)

  2. [Biofouling of heat exchange tubes].

    PubMed

    Montero, F; Pintado, J L

    1994-01-01

    We compared the biofouling behavior of different materials (admiralty brass, stainless steel, and titanium) commonly used to construct heat exchangers in thermoelectric plants. The incidence of film formation on the loss of heat during transference was assessed, and analyzed in terms of plant efficiency and corrosion, both general and localized development. Our results showed that the resistance of titanium and stainless steel to corrosion was similar, and much better than that of admiralty brass. Biofouling, however, was higher in the first two materials.

  3. On exchangeable continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Robert; Wolf, Michael M.

    2009-01-15

    We investigate permutation-invariant continuous variable quantum states and their covariance matrices. We provide a complete characterization of the latter with respect to permutation invariance and exchangeability and representing convex combinations of tensor power states. On the level of the respective density operators this leads to necessary criteria for all these properties which become necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. For these we use the derived results to provide de Finetti-type theorems for various distance measures.

  4. North Atlantic Nordic Seas exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Østerhus, S.

    2000-02-01

    The northeastern part of the North Atlantic is unique in the sense that it is much warmer in the surface than other ocean areas at similar latitudes. The main reason for this is the large northward transport of heat that extends to high latitudes and crosses the Greenland-Scotland Ridge to enter the Nordic Seas and the Arctic. There the warm Atlantic water is converted to colder water masses that return southwards over the ridge partly as surface outflows and partly as overflows through the deep passages across the ridge. In this paper, the state of knowledge on the exchanges especially across the eastern part of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge is reviewed based on results from the ICES NANSEN (North Atlantic-Norwegian Sea Exchanges) project, from the Nordic WOCE project and from other sources. The accumulated evidence allows us to describe the exchanges in fair detail; the origins of the waters, the patterns of their flow towards and over the ridge and their ultimate fate. There is also increasing information on temporal variations of the exchanges although dynamical changes are still not well understood. Quantitative estimates for the volume transport of most of the overflow branches seem reasonably well established, and transport measurements of the Atlantic inflows to the Nordic Seas are approaching acceptable levels of confidence which allows preliminary budgets to be presented. The deep overflows are driven by pressure gradients set up by the formation of deep and intermediate water. The dominance of deep overflows over surface outflows in the water budget argues that this thermohaline forcing also dominates over direct wind stress and estuarine forcing in driving the Atlantic water inflow across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, while wind stress seems to influence the characteristics and distribution of the Atlantic water north of the ridge.

  5. Electrically controlled cesium ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.

    1996-10-01

    Several sites within the DOE complex (Savannah River, Idaho, Oak Ridge and Hanford) have underground storage tanks containing high-level waste resulting from nuclear engineering activities. To facilitate final disposal of the tank waste, it is advantageous to separate and concentrate the radionuclides for final immobilization in a vitrified glass matrix. This task proposes a new approach for radionuclide separation by combining ion exchange (IX) and electrochemistry to provide a selective and economic separation method.

  6. Heat exchanger expert system logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction is described of the operation and fault diagnostics of a Deep Space Network heat exchanger to a rule base by the application of propositional calculus to a set of logic statements. The value of this approach lies in the ease of converting the logic and subsequently implementing it on a computer as an expert system. The rule base was written in Process Intelligent Control software.

  7. 2 CFR 200.440 - Exchange rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exchange rates. 200.440 Section 200.440 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF... Exchange rates. (a) Cost increases for fluctuations in exchange rates are allowable costs subject to...

  8. Trust and Transitions in Modes of Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshire, Coye; Gerbasi, Alexandra; Cook, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the relationship between uncertainty and trust in exogenous shifts in modes of social exchange (i.e., those that are not initiated by the individuals in a given exchange system). We explore how transitions from a high uncertainty environment (reciprocal exchange) to lower-uncertainty environments (nonbinding or…

  9. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  10. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Fred E. (Inventor); Howell, Harold R. (Inventor); Winkler, Roger V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  11. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  12. Power and Dependence in Intimate Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Rijt, Arnout; Macy, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    A division of labor is mediated by exchange of valued goods and services. We use social exchange theory to extend this principal to "labors of love." Sexual activity in a close personal relationship seems outside the domain of bargaining and exchange. Nevertheless, we explore the possibility that this most intimate of human relations is influenced…

  13. Neighbourhood Book Exchanges: Localising Information Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Tenny; Gollner, Kathleen; Nathan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Through this paper we report on an exploratory study into the design and use of neighbourhood book exchanges in North America. We identify dominant media framings of these book exchanges in North America, along with claims made concerning the influence of the exchanges. We compare the media claims with insights from interviews with…

  14. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  15. Exchange current corrections to neutrino-nucleus scattering. I. Nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umino, Y.; Udias, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    Relativistic exchange current corrections to the impulse approximation in low and intermediate energy neutrino-nucleus scattering are presented assuming nonvanishing strange quark form factors for constituent nucleons. Two-body exchange current operators which treat all SU(3) vector and axial currents on an equal footing are constructed by generalizing the soft-pion dominance method of Chemtob and Rho. For charged current reactions, exchange current corrections can reduce the impulse approximation results by 5 to 10 % depending on the nuclear density. A finite strange quark form factor may change the total cross section for neutral current scattering by 20% while exchange current corrections are found to be sensitive to the nuclear density. Implications on the current LSND experiment to extract the strange quark axial form factor of the nucleon are discussed.

  16. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following news headlines: ADPE acquisition process made easy with SRP; scientific reference material available; ORPS WordPerfect macro setup procedure; system managed storage is here; LIBSPOOL for MVS mainframe end-users; training center course schedule for February 1993; enjoy NJOY; scientific user services staff decreased; new release of Forwarn, a static source code analysis tool for FORTRAN programs; out of the cold with HEAT; coping cells from one table to another in word perfect; used PC equipment pool; and video training.

  17. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics on computer environments: Releasing computer software outside EG G Idaho; Ilford digital photo imager; mandatory upgrade of PC ORPS software; ORPS host computer upgrade; EROB computer users see network change; password expiration notice; big iron still has place in HPC market; handy scripts to copy and move files; more on workstation password expiration; training center course schedule for April 1993; Microsoft Word Version 5.1a- button bar; file attributes can provide you greater flexibility; constructing a personal WordPerfect dictionary; and Windows shortcuts.

  18. In Situ Investigations of Ion Exchange Processes in Microporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Parise, J. B.; Hanson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which ions exchange in microporous and layered solids, such as zeolites and clays for example, has important implications in areas as diverse as soil fertility and environmental remediation. A detailed characterization of the ion-exchange pathway, the structural consequences of ion exchange and the specific sites involved in the course of exchange, is desirable. A probe that is both time- and structure-sensitive allows resolution of which specific sites are involved, along with the effects of different cation types on the uptake and release of ions. In order to discern the mechanism of ion exchange, it is necessary not only to observe the course of the reaction, which can now be done routinely using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction at synchrotron sources, but also to collect dynamic diffraction data of sufficient quality to allow structure refinement using Rietveld structure refinement techniques. This at present requires the collection of monochromatic data. Tradeoffs between time-resolution, peak-to-background discrimination and structural resolution are often required and depend on the problem at hand. We have developed a number of strategies for in situ ion exchange techniques that probe both structural and kinetic information from dynamic solid media. Examples include investigations of the site-specific ion-exchange mechanism in zeolite LSX using a combination of ex situ and in situ time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, Iterative Target Transformation Factor Analysis (ITTFA) and Rietveld structural refinements. Measurement of competitive ion depletion curves showed that the newly synthesized gallosilicate TsG-1 is more selective for Sr than mineral clinoptilolite, and the structural pathway of Sr-exchange in TsG-1 was monitored by in situ and ex situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In those cases where full structure refinement is desirable using less than optimal powder diffraction data, we found it necessary to first

  19. 76 FR 79254 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    .... Registration of Market Makers The Exchanges propose to give Members the option to register as Market Makers... thereunder. \\6\\ 17 CFR 240.15c3-1. The Exchanges could suspend or terminate the registration of a Market Maker if the Exchange(s) determine(s) that the Market Maker: Substantially or continually fails...

  20. Heat exchangers of gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Iu. F.; Mitin, B. M.

    1991-07-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on methods for studying the thermal and hydraulic characteristics of heat exchangers used in gas turbine engines and methods for the analysis and experimental investigation of the dynamic characteristics of heat exchangers with different coolant flow schemes, including cryogenic heat exchangers. In particular, attention is given to the effect of tube bundle parameters on the dimensional and mass characteristics of high-temperature heat exchangers, a numerical method for calculating the dynamic characteristics of a fuel-air heat exchanger with a buffer cavity, and an experimental study of the air drying process in air coolers.

  1. Optimal counter-current exchange networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Robert S.; Mao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    We present a general analysis of exchange devices linking their efficiency to the geometry of the exchange surface and supply network. For certain parameter ranges, we show that the optimal exchanger consists of densely packed pipes which can span a thin sheet of large area (an "active layer"), which may be crumpled into a fractal surface and supplied with a fractal network of pipes. We derive the efficiencies of such exchangers, showing the potential for significant gains compared to regular exchangers (where the active layer is flat), using parameters relevant to biological systems.

  2. Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes

    DOEpatents

    Talmud, Fred M.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio

    1980-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

  3. Structure, function and evolution of the gas exchangers: comparative perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maina, JN

    2002-01-01

    Over the evolutionary continuum, animals have faced similar fundamental challenges of acquiring molecular oxygen for aerobic metabolism. Under limitations and constraints imposed by factors such as phylogeny, behaviour, body size and environment, they have responded differently in founding optimal respiratory structures. A quintessence of the aphorism that ‘necessity is the mother of invention’, gas exchangers have been inaugurated through stiff cost–benefit analyses that have evoked transaction of trade-offs and compromises. Cogent structural–functional correlations occur in constructions of gas exchangers: within and between taxa, morphological complexity and respiratory efficiency increase with metabolic capacities and oxygen needs. Highly active, small endotherms have relatively better-refined gas exchangers compared with large, inactive ectotherms. Respiratory structures have developed from the plain cell membrane of the primeval prokaryotic unicells to complex multifunctional ones ofthe modern Metazoa. Regarding the respiratory medium used to extract oxygen from, animal life has had only two choices – water or air – within the biological range of temperature and pressure the only naturally occurring respirable fluids. In rarer cases, certain animalshave adapted to using both media. Gills (evaginated gas exchangers) are the primordial respiratory organs: they are the archetypal water breathing organs. Lungs (invaginated gas exchangers) are the model air breathing organs. Bimodal (transitional) breathers occupy the water–air interface. Presentation and exposure of external (water/air) and internal (haemolymph/blood) respiratory media, features determined by geometric arrangement of the conduits, are important features for gas exchange efficiency: counter-current, cross-current, uniform pool and infinite pool designs have variably developed. PMID:12430953

  4. Electrodeposition of microparticles on polarized ion exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbich, S.V.; Ponomarev, M.I.; Grebenyuk, V.D.; Dukhin, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The use of ion exchange membranes to extract microparticles from an aqueous solution is considered. The efficiency of removing negatively charged aerosil particles depends substantially on the nature of the membrane located at the anode. It has been established that besides an increase in the electric field intensity the principal factor ensuring an increase in the efficiency of purifying a solution by electrodeposition of microparticles on a membrane surface is a reduction in the flowrate relative to the membrane surface.

  5. Tear exchange and contact lenses: a review.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses.

  6. Tear exchange and contact lenses: A review

    PubMed Central

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N.; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses. PMID:25575892

  7. Perceived appearance judgments moderate the biological stress effects of social exchanges.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Ashley M; Sabik, Natalie J; Lupis, Sarah B; Rene, Kirsten M; Wolf, Jutta M

    2014-12-01

    Social relationships are generally thought of as beneficial. However, the present study set out to test the hypothesis that for individuals who perceive others to judge their appearance negatively, daily social interactions can also be a source of stress. Indeed when assessing 38 young adults, we found that both more incidences of negative exchanges reported during the past month as well as perceived negative appearance judgments by others were associated with more self-reported stress. Interestingly, however, for individuals with low attribution body esteem, higher numbers of positive social exchanges during the past month were related to health-relevant changes in biological markers of chronic stress as well. The same was true for individuals with high attribution body esteem who reported to experience only very few positive exchanges. As such, these findings go beyond the initial focus on low body esteem and negative social exchanges and introduce high body esteem as well as daily positive exchanges as potential health risk factors.

  8. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, Laurie A.; Burkholder, Harvey R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity.

  9. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  10. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  11. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  12. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  13. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  14. 31 CFR 500.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National securities exchange. 500.325... Definitions § 500.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  15. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  16. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  17. Inorganic ion exchangers for nuclear waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.; Bortun, A.; Bortun, L.; Behrens, E.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a broad spectrum of inorganic ion exchangers that can be used for a range of applications and separations involving remediation of groundwater and tank wastes. The authors intend to scale-up the most promising exchangers, through partnership with AlliedSignal Inc., to provide samples for testing at various DOE sites. While much of the focus is on exchangers for removal of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} from highly alkaline tank wastes, especially at Hanford, the authors have also synthesized exchangers for acid wastes, alkaline wastes, groundwater, and mercury, cobalt, and chromium removal. These exchangers are now available for use at DOE sites. Many of the ion exchangers described here are new, and others are improved versions of previously known exchangers. They are generally one of three types: (1) layered compounds, (2) framework or tunnel compounds, and (3) amorphous exchangers in which a gel exchanger is used to bind a fine powder into a bead for column use. Most of these exchangers can be regenerated and used again.

  18. Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

  19. Spin Exchange Interaction in Substituted Copper Phthalocyanine Crystalline Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Naveen; Pan, Zhenwen; Lamarche, Cody J.; Wetherby, Anthony; Waterman, Rory; Tokumoto, Takahisa; Cherian, Judy G.; Headrick, Randall L.; McGill, Stephen A.; Furis, Madalina I.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of spin exchange in crystalline thin films of Copper Octabutoxy Phthalocyanine (Cu-OBPc) are investigated using Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy. These studies are made possible by a solution deposition technique which produces highly ordered films with macroscopic grain sizes suitable for optical studies. For temperatures lower than 2 K, the contribution of a specific state in the valence band manifold originating from the hybridized lone pair in nitrogen orbitals of the Phthalocyanine ring, bears the Brillouin-like signature of an exchange interaction with the localized d-shell Cu spins. A comprehensive MCD spectral analysis coupled with a molecular field model of a σπ − d exchange analogous to sp-d interactions in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS) renders an enhanced Zeeman splitting and a modified g-factor of −4 for the electrons that mediate the interaction. These studies define an experimental tool for identifying electronic states involved in spin-dependent exchange interactions in organic materials. PMID:26559337

  20. Spin Exchange Interaction in Substituted Copper Phthalocyanine Crystalline Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Naveen; Pan, Zhenwen; Lamarche, Cody J.; Wetherby, Anthony; Waterman, Rory; Tokumoto, Takahisa; Cherian, Judy G.; Headrick, Randall L.; McGill, Stephen A.; Furis, Madalina I.

    2015-11-01

    The origins of spin exchange in crystalline thin films of Copper Octabutoxy Phthalocyanine (Cu-OBPc) are investigated using Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy. These studies are made possible by a solution deposition technique which produces highly ordered films with macroscopic grain sizes suitable for optical studies. For temperatures lower than 2 K, the contribution of a specific state in the valence band manifold originating from the hybridized lone pair in nitrogen orbitals of the Phthalocyanine ring, bears the Brillouin-like signature of an exchange interaction with the localized d-shell Cu spins. A comprehensive MCD spectral analysis coupled with a molecular field model of a σπ - d exchange analogous to sp-d interactions in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS) renders an enhanced Zeeman splitting and a modified g-factor of -4 for the electrons that mediate the interaction. These studies define an experimental tool for identifying electronic states involved in spin-dependent exchange interactions in organic materials.

  1. Modeling of karst aquifer genesis: Influence of exchange flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Liedl, Rudolf; Sauter, Martin

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical model study simulating the early karstification of a single conduit embedded in a fissured system. A hybrid continuum-discrete pipe flow model (CAVE) is used for the modeling. The effects of coupling of the two flow systems on type and duration of early karstification are studied for different boundary conditions. Assuming fixed head boundaries at both ends of the conduit, coupling of the two flow systems via exchange flow between the conduit and the fissured system leads to an enhanced evolution of the conduit. This effect is valid over a wide range of initial conduit diameters, and karstification is accelerated by a factor of about 100 as compared to the case of no exchange flow. Parameter studies reveal the influence of the exchange coefficient and of the hydraulic conductivity of the fissured system on the development time for the conduit. In a second scenario the upstream fixed head boundary is switched to a fixed flow boundary at a specified flow rate during the evolution, limiting the amount of water draining toward the evolving conduit. Depending on the flow rate specified, conduit evolution may be slowed down or greatly impaired if exchange flow is considered.

  2. Spin Exchange Interaction in Substituted Copper Phthalocyanine Crystalline Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Naveen; Pan, Zhenwen; Lamarche, Cody J; Wetherby, Anthony; Waterman, Rory; Tokumoto, Takahisa; Cherian, Judy G; Headrick, Randall L; McGill, Stephen A; Furis, Madalina I

    2015-11-12

    The origins of spin exchange in crystalline thin films of Copper Octabutoxy Phthalocyanine (Cu-OBPc) are investigated using Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy. These studies are made possible by a solution deposition technique which produces highly ordered films with macroscopic grain sizes suitable for optical studies. For temperatures lower than 2 K, the contribution of a specific state in the valence band manifold originating from the hybridized lone pair in nitrogen orbitals of the Phthalocyanine ring, bears the Brillouin-like signature of an exchange interaction with the localized d-shell Cu spins. A comprehensive MCD spectral analysis coupled with a molecular field model of a σπ - d exchange analogous to sp-d interactions in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS) renders an enhanced Zeeman splitting and a modified g-factor of -4 for the electrons that mediate the interaction. These studies define an experimental tool for identifying electronic states involved in spin-dependent exchange interactions in organic materials.

  3. Improved ceramic heat exchange material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollister, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved corrosion resistant ceramic materials that are suitable for use as regenerative heat exchangers for vehicular gas turbines is reported. Two glass-ceramic materials, C-144 and C-145, have superior durability towards sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate compared to lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) Corning heat exchange material 9455. Material C-144 is a leached LAS material whose major crystalline phase is silica keatite plus mullite, and C-145 is a LAS keatite solid solution (S.S.) material. In comparison to material 9455, material C-144 is two orders of magnitude better in dimensional stability to sulfuric acid at 300 C, and one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate at 1000 C. Material C-145 is initially two times better in stability to sulfuric acid, and about one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate. Both C-144 and C-145 have less than 300 ppm delta L/L thermal expansion from ambient to 1000 C, and good dimensional stability of less than approximately 100 ppm delta L/L after exposure to 1000 C for 100 hours. The glass-ceramic fabrication process produced a hexagonal honeycomb matrix having an 85% open frontal area, 50 micrometer wall thickness, and less than 5% porosity.

  4. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  5. Seasonality of Arctic Mediterranean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieper, Christoph; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Mediterranean communicates through a number of passages with the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans. Most of the volume exchange happens at the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge: warm and saline Atlantic Water flows in at the surface, cold, dense Overflow Water flows back at the bottom and fresh and cold Polar Water flows out along the East Greenland coast. All surface inflows show a seasonal signal whereas only the outflow through the Faroe Bank Channel exhibits significant seasonality. Here we present a quantification of the seasonal cycle of the exchanges across the Greenland-Scotland ridge based on volume estimates of the in- and outflows within the last 20 years (ADCP and altimetry). Our approach is comparatistic: we compare different properties of the seasonal cycle like the strength or the phase between the different in- and outflows. On the seasonal time scale the in- and outflows across the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge are not balanced. The net flux thus has to be balanced by the other passages on the Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait as well as runoff from land.

  6. Exchange of astronomy teaching experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Working Group of the European Association for Astronomy Education responsible for Teacher Training organises an annual Summer School for teachers under expert guidance. For a week the teachers participating can exchange experiences, increase their knowledge and discuss different ideas and perspectives. In general, the instructors are professional astronomers, professors and teachers from different countries. The papers presented offer very practical activities, paying special attention to didactic aspects, and take the form of general lectures to all 40 participants and workshops to reduced groups of 20 participants. There are also day and night observations, without expensive equipment or complicated procedures, that are easy to set up and based on topics that it is possible to use in the classroom. The Summer Schools promote a scientific astronomical education at all levels of astronomy teaching, reinforce the link between professional astronomers and teachers with experience of teaching astronomy, allow debates among the participants on their pedagogical activities already carried out in their own classroom and help them to organise activities outside it. Astronomy teachers need special training, access to specific research, to new educational materials and methods and the opportunity to exchange experiences. All these things are provided by the Summer School.

  7. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  8. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  9. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Hung, Yi-Hsuan; Teng, Tun-Chien; Chen, Jyun-Hong

    2011-08-09

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration.

  10. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Woods, H Arthur; Smith, Jennifer N

    2010-05-04

    For terrestrial animals and plants, a fundamental cost of living is water vapor lost to the atmosphere during exchange of metabolic gases. Here, by bringing together previously developed models for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model of water loss. The model predicts that water loss scales to gas exchange with an exponent of 1 and that the amount of water lost per unit of gas exchanged depends on several factors: the surface temperature of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model predictions were largely confirmed by data on 202 species in five taxa--insects, birds, bird eggs, mammals, and plants--spanning nine orders of magnitude in rate of gas exchange. Discrepancies between model predictions and data seemed to arise from biologically interesting violations of model assumptions, which emphasizes how poorly we understand gas exchange in some taxa. The universal model provides a unified conceptual framework for analyzing exchange-associated water losses across taxa with radically different metabolic and exchange systems.

  11. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  12. Improved constraint satisfaction in a simple generalized gradient approximation exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, Alberto; Pacheco-Kato, Juan C.; Gázquez, José L.; del Campo, Jorge M.; Trickey, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Though there is fevered effort on orbital-dependent approximate exchange-correlation functionals, generalized gradient approximations, especially the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form, remain the overwhelming choice in calculations. A simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange functional [A. Vela, V. Medel, and S. B. Trickey, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 244103 (2009), 10.1063/1.3152713] was developed that improves substantially over PBE in energetics (on a typical test set) while being almost as simple in form. The improvement came from constraining the exchange enhancement factor to be below the Lieb-Oxford bound for all but one value of the exchange dimensionless gradient, s, and to go to the uniform electron gas limit at both s = 0 and s → ∞. Here we discuss the issue of asymptotic constraints for GGAs and show that imposition of the large s constraint, {lim }nolimits_{s to infty } s^{1/2} F_{xc} (n,s) < infty, where Fxc(n, s) is the enhancement factor and n is the electron density, upon the Vela-Medel-Trickey (VMT) exchange functional yields modest further improvement. The resulting exchange functional, denoted VT{8,4}, is only slightly more complicated than VMT and easy to program. Additional improvement is obtained by combining VT{8,4} or VMT exchange with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional. Extensive computational results on several datasets are provided as verification of the overall performance gains of both versions.

  13. DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1990-11-01

    The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The performance of ammonium exchanged zeolite for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in soil water.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-08-05

    Nitrogen deficiency has been identified as the main inhibiting factor for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low nutrient environments. This study examines the performance of ammonium exchanged zeolite to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in soil water within laboratory scale flow cells. Biofilm formation and biodegradation were accelerated by the exchange of cations in soil water with ammonium in the pores of the exchanged zeolite when compared with natural zeolite flow cells. These results have implications for sequenced permeable reactive barrier design and the longevity of media performance within such barriers at petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites deficient in essential soil nutrients.

  15. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  16. Separation of thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using silica based anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanliang; Wei, Yuezhou; He, Linfeng; Tang, Fangdong

    2016-09-30

    To separate thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using anion exchange process, a strong base silica-based anion exchange resin (SiPyR-N4) was synthesized. Batch experiments were conducted and the separation factor of thorium and uranium in 9M nitric acid was about 10. Ion exchange chromatography was applied to separate thorium and uranium in different ratios. Uranium could be eluted by 9M nitric acid and thorium was eluted by 0.1M nitric acid. It was proved that thorium and uranium can be separated and recovered successfully by this method.

  17. Full Electric Control of Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. M.; Cybart, Shane A.; Yi, D.; Parker, James M.; Ramesh, R.; Dynes, R. C.

    2013-02-01

    We report the creation of a multiferroic field effect device with a BiFeO3 (BFO) (antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric) gate dielectric and a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) (ferromagnetic) conducting channel that exhibits direct, bipolar electrical control of exchange bias. We show that exchange bias is reversibly switched between two stable states with opposite exchange bias polarities upon ferroelectric poling of the BFO. No field cooling, temperature cycling, or additional applied magnetic or electric field beyond the initial BFO polarization is needed for this bipolar modulation effect. Based on these results and the current understanding of exchange bias, we propose a model to explain the control of exchange bias. In this model the coupled antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric order in BFO along with the modulation of interfacial exchange interactions due to ionic displacement of Fe3+ in BFO relative to Mn3+/4+ in LSMO cause bipolar modulation.

  18. Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M.; Radermacher, R.

    2001-09-15

    significantly. However, under such conditions, air side pressure drop also increases when moisture condensation occurs. An increase in airflow rate also increases the overall heat transfer coefficient. Air side pressure drop mainly depends on airflow rate. For the gas cooler, a significant portion of the heat transfer occurred in the first heat exchanger module on the refrigerant inlet side. The temperature and pressure of CO{sub 2} significantly affect the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics due to some important properties (such as specific heat, density, and viscosity). In the transcritical region, performance of CO{sub 2} strongly depends on the operating temperature and pressure. Semi-empirical models were developed for predictions of CO{sub 2} evaporator and gas cooler system capacities. The evaporator model introduced two new factors to account for the effects of air-side moisture condensate and refrigerant outlet superheat. The model agreed with the experimental results within {+-}13%. The gas cooler model, based on non-dimensional parameters, successfully predicted the experimental results within {+-}20%. Recommendations for future work on this project include redesigning headers and/or introducing flow mixers to avoid flow mal-distribution problems, devising new defrosting techniques, and improving numerical models. These recommendations are described in more detail at the end of this report.

  19. Peturbative gluon exchange in a covariant quark model of the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hiroshi; Buck, W.W. . Dept. of Physics); Gross, F. . Dept. of Physics Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA )

    1990-01-01

    A covariant pion wave function, which reproduces the low energy data, is used to calculate the perturbative gluon exchange contributions to the pion charge form factor. It is found that the perturbative process dominates at q > 3.5 GeV/c. The dependence on the quark mass and the asymptotic behavior of the form factor are explicitly displayed.

  20. Sparseness and Roughness of Foreign Exchange Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Ausloos, M.

    An accurate multiaffine analysis of 23 foreign currency exchange rates has been performed. The roughness exponent H1 which characterizes the excursion of the exchange rate has been numerically measured. The degree of intermittency C1 has been also estimated. In the (H1,C1) phase diagram, the currency exchange rates are dispersed in a wide region around the Brownian motion value (H1=0.5,C1=0) and have a significantly intermittent component (C1≠0).

  1. Electric Control of Exchange Bias Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, W.; Binek, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr2O3, and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  2. Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-09-05

    This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

  3. 36 CFR 902.55 - Intragovernmental exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., real estate, or facilities, documents exchanged preparatory to anticipated legal proceedings; material... before a court of law, administrative board, hearing officer, or contracting officer. (b) This...

  4. Ion Exchange and Liquid Column Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Harold F.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes recent advances in principles and methodology in ion exchange and chromatography. Two tables list representative examples for inorganic ions and organic compounds. Cites 544 references. (CS)

  5. Adaptive Strategies in the Iterated Exchange Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraov, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    We argue for clear separation of the exchange problem from the exchange paradox to avoid confusion about the subject matter of these two distinct problems. The exchange problem in its current format belongs to the domain of optimal decision making—it doesn't make any sense as a game of competition. But it takes just a tiny modification in the statement of the problem to breathe new life into it and make it a practicable and meaningful game of competition. In this paper, we offer an explanation for paradoxical priors and discuss adaptive strategies for both the house and the player in the restated exchange problem.

  6. Entropy exchange for infinite-dimensional systems

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhoubo; Hou, Jinchuan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the entropy exchange for channels and states in infinite-dimensional systems are defined and studied. It is shown that, this entropy exchange depends only on the given channel and the state. An explicit expression of the entropy exchange in terms of the state and the channel is proposed. The generalized Klein’s inequality, the subadditivity and the triangle inequality about the entropy including infinite entropy for the infinite-dimensional systems are established, and then, applied to compare the entropy exchange with the entropy change. PMID:28164995

  7. Energy recovery heat exchanger installation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, N.F.

    1983-08-16

    An installation is disclosed for energy recovery heat exchangers arranged to transfer heat into or out of air exhausted from an air handling system for paint spray booths. The system includes a collection chamber about which the intakes of a series of exhaust fans are arranged to draw exhaust air into an exhaust stack. Pairs of inclined wetted surface coil sets are mounted in the walls of the enclosures, each in communication with the intake of an exhaust fan so as to receive airflow of each exhaust fan. Each of the enclosures is provided with an access door to enable cleaning and other maintenance chores to be carried out on the coil sets and pivotally mounted blocking panels may be positioned to close off air flow across the coils and bypassing of the exhaust flow through the access doors in the event excessive overspray solids are present in the exhaust flow.

  8. Educational Exchanges Across the Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, D. J.; Walker, C. E.; Smith, M.; Pompea, S. M.; Orellana, D.

    2003-12-01

    What is color? What is light? How can we use a spectrometer to help students understand the answers to these questions? Even half a world apart and between people of different languages and cultures, how to teach these ideas to students can be a lively subject for discussion. And it is! Aided by Internet 2-based videoconferencing, NOAO North and South have sponsored three teacher professional development videoconference workshops, dubbed ASTRO-Chile, linking teachers in Tucson, AZ, and La Serena, Chile. The teachers exchange methods and ideas about how to explain and demonstrate physical concepts, important to the study of astronomy, to students of various ages. The workshops are conducted in Spanish with four bilingual science teachers from the Tucson area discussing pedagogical approaches with their teaching counterparts in Chile. Demonstrations and project presentations, from both sites, are included as part of each workshop. This work is supported, in part, through funding from the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  9. Oxidizer heat exchanger component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T.; Kanic, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the RL10 Rocket Engine Product Improvement Program, Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (OHE) stages 1, 2, and 3 were designed and fabricated during late 1983 and early 1984. The purpose of the OHE is to provide gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector for stable engine operation at tank head idle and pumped idle operating modes. This report summarizes the OHE stages 1 and 3 rig testing, and includes the separation of the stage 1-and-2 assembly and the remanifolding of stage 1. The OHE performance analysis and analytical model modifications for both stages are also presented. The flow tests were accomplished during the time period from 9 October 1984 to 12 November 1984.

  10. Indian/atlantic Interocean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matano, R. P.; Beier, E. J.

    In this presentation we analyze the interocean exchanges between the Indian and the South Atlantic Oceans simulated in an global, eddy-permitting simulation. The analy- sis focuses in the Cape Basin, a region of the southeastern Atlantic limited to the north- west by the Walvis Ridge and to the south by the subtropical convergence. To quantify the relative importance of the different dynamical mechanisms involved in the intero- cean exchange we separated the climatological mean circulation from the transients. The analysis indicates that Agulhas eddies not only influence the transient fluxes but also to those associated with the mean circulation (eddy fluxes, for example, supply most of the energy of the Benguela Current). A distinct characteristic of the eddy variability within the Cape Basin is the co-existence of cyclonic and anticyclonic vor- tices in dipole structures that resemble the heton model of Hogg and Stommel (Deep Sea Research,1985). Anticyclones are surface intensified vortices that, in spite of their baroclinic structure, reach to deep layers. Cyclones, are bottom-intensified vortices with dominant barotropic structure that projects into the upper layer. The propaga- tion of cyclones and anticyclones is strongly affected by the bottom topography. Our analysis shows that the Walvis Ridge and the Vema Seamount block the passage of bottom-intensified cyclones and rectifies the trajectories of the upper-intensified anti- cyclones. Although most anticyclones are able to escape the basin the deep compen- sation generated by the ridge generates an energy loss of approximately 30%, and a rectification of the eddy trajectory to a more westward direction.

  11. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  12. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  13. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  14. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  15. Annual sea ice. An air-sea gas exchange moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, T.A.; Kelley, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Arctic annual sea ice, particularly when it is relatively warm (> -15/sup 0/C) permits significant gas exchange between the sea and air throughout the entire year. Sea ice, particularly annual sea ice, differs from freshwater ice with respect to its permeability to gases. The presence of brine allows for significant air-sea-ice exchange of CO/sub 2/ throughout the winter, which may significantly affect the global carbon dioxide balance. Other trace gases are also noted to be enriched in sea ice, but less is known about their importance to air-sea-interactions at this time. Both physical and biological factors cause and modify evolution of gases from the surface of sea ice. Quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the nature and physical behavior of sea ice with respect to brine and gases are discussed.

  16. Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping of He-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Thad

    2015-04-01

    Spin-exchange optical pumping, in which angular momentum is transferred from light to alkali atoms to He-3, is a powerful method for producing large quantities of highly polarized nuclei for electron scattering experiments and neutron spin filters/analyzers. Technical innovations (exquisite aluminosilicate glass cells with T1 >> 100 hours, > 100 Watt frequency-narrowed diode lasers) and improved understanding of the atomic physics processes involved (precision polarimetry, hybrid spin-exchange, circular dichroism), have resulted in orders of magnitude scale-up from the nascent experiments in the late 1980s. Improved understanding of effects such as the X-factor and particulate formation are needed to further advance the conversion of spin-polarized light into seminal physics results.

  17. Tritium permeation losses in HYLIFE-II heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Dolan, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium permeation through the intermediate heat exchanger of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion design concept is evaluated for routine operating conditions. The permeation process is modelled using the Lewis analogy combined with surface recombination. It is demonstrated that at very low driving potentials, permeation becomes proportional to the first power of the driving potential. The model predicts that under anticipated conditions the primary cooling loop will pass about 6% of the tritium entering it to the intermediate coolant. Possible approached to reducing tritium permeation are explored. Permeation is limited by turbulent diffusion transport through the molten salt. Hence, surface barriers with impendance factors typical of present technology can do very little to reduce permeation. Low Flibe viscosity is desirable. An efficient tritium removal system operating on the Flibe before it gets to the intermediate heat exchanger is required. Needs for further research are highlighted. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Separation of americium from curium by oxidation and ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan D; Shehee, Thomas C; Clearfield, Abraham; Hobbs, David T

    2012-08-21

    Nuclear energy has the potential to be a clean alternative to fossil fuels, but in order for it to play a major role in the US, many questions about the back end of the fuel cycle must be addressed. One of these questions is the difficult separation of americium from curium. Here, we report the oxidation of Am in two systems, perchloric acid and nitric acid and the affect of changing the acid has on the oxidation. K(d) values were observed and a direct separation factor was calculated and was seen to be as high as 20 for four metal(IV) pillared phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials. These ion exchangers are characterized by very low selectivity for cations with low charge but extremely high uptake of ions of high charge.

  19. 78 FR 46622 - Application of Topaz Exchange, LLC for Registration as a National Securities Exchange; Findings...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... type of Industry Director shall always be equal to one another.\\22\\ \\22\\ See Topaz Exchange.... Ownership Structure: Ownership and Voting Limitations As noted above in Section II.A, Topaz Exchange will be... with the governance structure of other exchanges, ISE Holdings' Board may waive the 40%...

  20. Exchange Studies as Actor-Networks: Following Korean Exchange Students in Swedish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Song-ee

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how Korean exchange students organized their studies during exchange programs in Swedish higher education. For most students, the programs became a disordered period in relation to their education. The value of exchange studies seems mainly to be extra-curricular. Drawing upon actor network theory, the article argues that the…