Science.gov

Sample records for exchange rate dynamics

  1. Kinetic model of mass exchange with dynamic Arrhenius transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Muradova, Aliki

    2016-02-01

    We study a nonlinear kinetic model of mass exchange between interacting grains. The transition rates follow the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy that depends dynamically on the grain mass. We show that the activation parameter can be absorbed in the initial conditions for the grain masses, and that the total mass is conserved. We obtain numerical solutions of the coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations of mass exchange for the two-grain system, and we compare them with approximate theoretical solutions in specific neighborhoods of the phase space. Using phase plane methods, we determine that the system exhibits regimes of diffusive and growth-decay (reverse diffusion) kinetics. The equilibrium states are determined by the mass equipartition and separation nullcline curves. If the transfer rates are perturbed by white noise, numerical simulations show that the system maintains the diffusive and growth-decay regimes; however, the noise can reverse the sign of equilibrium mass difference. Finally, we present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of a system with many interacting grains. Diffusive and growth-decay regimes are established as well, but the approach to equilibrium is considerably slower. Potential applications of the mass exchange model involve coarse-graining during sintering and wealth exchange in econophysics.

  2. Investigating existence of chaos in short and long term dynamics of Moroccan exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology to investigate presence of chaos in exchange rate time series by combining wavelet transform and Lyapunov exponent estimation. In particular, stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is applied to exchange rate original time series for decomposition purpose. As a result, approximation and details coefficients are extracted. They are used to represent long and short term dynamics of the original exchange rate time series. Then, largest Lyapunov exponent is estimated for each type of dynamics to check for presence of chaos. Our methodology is applied to several Moroccan exchange rate time series. The empirical results show that, in general, the hypothesis of chaotic structure is accepted for currency levels but it is rejected for currency returns on both long and short dynamics. In addition, long and short dynamics exhibit different chaotic patterns in some exchange rate time series. Our approach may be useful to understand chaotic behaviour in original exchange rate time series.

  3. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-01

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics—a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  4. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berg, Mark A; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-07

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics-a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  5. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual…

  6. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  7. The long-run dynamic relationship between exchange rate and its attention index: Based on DCCA and TOP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Guo, Kun; Lu, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The behavior information of financial market plays a more and more important role in modern economic system. The behavior information reflected in INTERNET search data has already been used in short-term prediction for exchange rate, stock market return, house price and so on. However, the long-run relationship between behavior information and financial market fluctuation has not been studied systematically. Further, most traditional statistic methods and econometric models could not catch the dynamic and non-linear relationship. An attention index of CNY/USD exchange rate is constructed based on search data from 360 search engine of China in this paper. Then the DCCA and Thermal Optimal Path methods are used to explore the long-run dynamic relationship between CNY/USD exchange rate and the corresponding attention index. The results show that the significant interdependency exists and the change of exchange rate is 1-2 days lag behind the attention index.

  8. Limitations of heterogeneous models of liquid dynamics: very slow rate exchange in the excess wing.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subarna; Richert, Ranko

    2014-02-07

    For several molecular glass formers, the nonlinear dielectric effects (NDE's) are investigated for the so-called excess wing regime, i.e., for the relatively high frequencies between 10(2) and 10(7) times the peak loss frequency. It is found that significant nonlinear behavior persists across the entire frequency window of this study, and that its magnitude traces the temperature dependence of the activation energy. A time resolved measurement of the dielectric loss at fields up to 480 kV/cm across tens of thousands of periods reveals that it takes an unexpectedly long time for the steady state NDE to develop. For various materials and at different temperatures and frequencies, it is found that the average structural relaxation with time scale τα governs the equilibration of these fast modes that are associated with time constants τ which are up to 10(7) times shorter than τα. It is argued that true indicators of structural relaxation (such as rate exchange and aging) of these fast modes are slaved to macroscopic softening on the time scale of τα, and thus many orders of magnitude slower than the time constant of the mode itself.

  9. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  10. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Exchange rate rebounds after foreign exchange market interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the rebounds in the exchange rate after foreign exchange intervention. When intervention is strongly effective, the exchange rate rebounds at next day. The effect of intervention is reduced slightly by the rebound after the intervention. The exchange rate might have been 67.12-77.47 yen to a US dollar without yen-selling/dollar-purchasing intervention of 74,691,100 million yen implemented by the Japanese government since 1991, in comparison to the actual exchange rate was 103.19 yen to the US dollar at the end of March 2014.

  12. 2 CFR 200.440 - Exchange rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exchange rates. 200.440 Section 200.440 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF... Exchange rates. (a) Cost increases for fluctuations in exchange rates are allowable costs subject to...

  13. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  14. Sparseness and Roughness of Foreign Exchange Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Ausloos, M.

    An accurate multiaffine analysis of 23 foreign currency exchange rates has been performed. The roughness exponent H1 which characterizes the excursion of the exchange rate has been numerically measured. The degree of intermittency C1 has been also estimated. In the (H1,C1) phase diagram, the currency exchange rates are dispersed in a wide region around the Brownian motion value (H1=0.5,C1=0) and have a significantly intermittent component (C1≠0).

  15. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  16. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O2 exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O2 isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O3 potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged "reef" structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  17. Apparent exchange rate mapping with diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Water exchange through the cell membranes is an important feature of cells and tissues. The rate of exchange is determined by factors such as membrane lipid composition and organization, as well as the type and activity of aquaporins. A method for noninvasively estimating the rate of water exchange would be useful for characterizing pathological conditions, e.g., tumors, multiple sclerosis, and ischemic stroke, expected to be associated with a change of the membrane barrier properties. This study describes the filter exchange imaging method for determining the rate of water exchange between sites having different apparent diffusion coefficients. The method is based on the filter-exchange pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy experiment, which is here modified to be compatible with the constraints of clinical MR scanners. The data is analyzed using a model-free approach yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate, here being introduced in analogy with the concept of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on microimaging and whole-body clinical scanners using yeast suspension phantoms. The limitations and appropriate experimental conditions are examined. The results demonstrate that filter exchange imaging is a fast and reliable method for characterizing exchange, and that it has the potential to become a powerful diagnostic tool.

  18. Rate theory on water exchange in aqueous uranyl ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Vo, Quynh N.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a classical rate theory approach to predict the exchange mechanism that occurs between water and aqueous uranyl ion. Using our water and ion-water polarizable force field and molecular dynamics techniques, we computed the potentials of mean force for the uranyl ion-water pair as a function of different pressures at ambient temperature. These potentials of mean force were used to calculate rate constants using transition rate theory; the transmission coefficients also were examined using the reactive flux method and Grote-Hynes approach. The computed activation volumes are positive; thus, the mechanism of this particular water-exchange is a dissociative process.

  19. World currency exchange rate cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droå¼dż, S.; Górski, A. Z.; Kwapień, J.

    2007-08-01

    World currency network constitutes one of the most complex structures that is associated with the contemporary civilization. On a way towards quantifying its characteristics we study the cross correlations in changes of the daily foreign exchange rates within the basket of 60 currencies in the period December 1998 May 2005. Such a dynamics turns out to predominantly involve one outstanding eigenvalue of the correlation matrix. The magnitude of this eigenvalue depends however crucially on which currency is used as a base currency for the remaining ones. Most prominent it looks from the perspective of a peripheral currency. This largest eigenvalue is seen to systematically decrease and thus the structure of correlations becomes more heterogeneous, when more significant currencies are used as reference. An extreme case in this later respect is the USD in the period considered. Besides providing further insight into subtle nature of complexity, these observations point to a formal procedure that in general can be used for practical purposes of measuring the relative currencies significance on various time horizons.

  20. Apparent exchange rate for breast cancer characterization.

    PubMed

    Lasič, Samo; Oredsson, Stina; Partridge, Savannah C; Saal, Lao H; Topgaard, Daniel; Nilsson, Markus; Bryskhe, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments on several breast epithelial cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we performed the first in vivo FEXI measurement of water exchange in human breast. In cell suspensions, pulsed gradient spin-echo experiments with large b values and variable pulse duration allow the characterization of the intracellular compartment, whereas FEXSY provides a quantification of AXR. These experiments are very sensitive to the physiological state of cells and can be used to establish reliable protocols for the culture and harvesting of cells. Our results suggest that different breast cancer subtypes can be distinguished on the basis of their AXR values in cell suspensions. Time-resolved measurements allow the monitoring of the physiological state of cells in suspensions over the time-scale of hours, and reveal an abrupt disintegration of the intracellular compartment. In vivo, exchange can be detected in a tumor, whereas, in normal tissue, the exchange rate is outside the range experimentally accessible for FEXI. At present, low signal-to-noise ratio and limited scan time allows the quantification of AXR only in a region of interest of relatively large tumors.

  1. A theory of exchange rate modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    The article examines exchange rate modeling for two cases: (a) when the trading partners have mutual interests and (b) when the trading partners have antogonistic interests. Exchange rates in world markets are determined by supply and demand for the currency of each state, and states may control the exchange rate of their currency by changing the interest rate, the volume of credit, and product prices in both domestic and export markets. Abstracting from issues of production and technology in different countries and also ignoring various trade, institutional, and other barriers, we consider in this article only the effect of export and import prices on the exchange rate, we propose a new criterion of external trade activity: each trading partner earns a profit which is proportional to the volume of benefits enjoyed by the other partner. We consider a trading cycle that consists of four stages: (a) purchase of goods in the domestic market with the object of selling them abroad; (b) sale of the goods in foreign markets; (c) purchase of goods abroad with the object of selling them in the domestic market; (d) sale of the goods domestically.

  2. Water Exchange Rates and Molecular Mechanism around Aqueous Halide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-07-17

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to systematically study the water-exchange mechanism around aqueous chloride, bromide, and iodide ions. Transition state theory, Grote-Hynes theory, and the reactive flux method were employed to compute water exchange rates. We computed the pressure dependence of rate constants and the corresponding activation volumes to investigate the mechanism of the solvent exchange event. The activation volumes obtained using the transition state theory rate constants are negative for all the three anions, thus indicating an associative mechanism. Contrary to the transition state theory results, activation volumes obtained using rate constants from Grote-Hynes theory and the reactive flux method are positive, thus indicating a dissociative mechanism. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  3. Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Ariel; Eichenbaum, Martin; Rebelo, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the primary force behind the large drop in real exchange rates that occurs after large devaluations is the slow adjustment in the prices of nontradable goods and services. Our empirical analysis uses data from five large devaluation episodes: Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Korea (1997), Mexico (1994), and Thailand…

  4. Solvent exchange in liquid methanol and rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for methanol exchange. The essential features of the dynamics as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (<0.1 ps) and long time response (>5 ps). An effective characterization of the process is obtained from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory, resulting in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions.

  5. RMB Exchange Rate Forecast Approach Based on BP Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sun

    RMB exchange rate system has reformed since July, 2005. This article chose RMB exchange rate data during a period from July, 2005 to September 2010 to establish BP neural network model to forecast RMB exchange rate in the future by using MATLAB software. The result showed that BP neural network is effective to forecast RMB exchange rate and also indicated that RMB exchange rate will continue to appreciate in the future.

  6. Foreign exchange rate entropy evolution during financial crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Darko; Stosic, Dusan; Ludermir, Teresa; de Oliveira, Wilson; Stosic, Tatijana

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the effects of financial crises on foreign exchange (FX) markets, where entropy evolution is measured for different exchange rates, using the time-dependent block entropy method. Empirical results suggest that financial crises are associated with significant increase of exchange rate entropy, reflecting instability in FX market dynamics. In accordance with phenomenological expectations, it is found that FX markets with large liquidity and large trading volume are more inert - they recover quicker from a crisis than markets with small liquidity and small trading volume. Moreover, our numerical analysis shows that periods of economic uncertainty are preceded by periods of low entropy values, which may serve as a tool for anticipating the onset of financial crises.

  7. Marriage exchanges, seed exchanges, and the dynamics of manioc diversity

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; McKey, Doyle B.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2011-01-01

    The conservation of crop genetic resources requires understanding the different variables—cultural, social, and economic—that impinge on crop diversity. In small-scale farming systems, seed exchanges represent a key mechanism in the dynamics of crop genetic diversity, and analyzing the rules that structure social networks of seed exchange between farmer communities can help decipher patterns of crop genetic diversity. Using a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches, we investigated the relationships between regional patterns of manioc genetic diversity in Gabon and local networks of seed exchange. Spatially explicit Bayesian clustering methods showed that geographical discontinuities of manioc genetic diversity mirror major ethnolinguistic boundaries, with a southern matrilineal domain characterized by high levels of varietal diversity and a northern patrilineal domain characterized by low varietal diversity. Borrowing concepts from anthropology—kinship, bridewealth, and filiation—we analyzed the relationships between marriage exchanges and seed exchange networks in patrilineal and matrilineal societies. We demonstrate that, by defining marriage prohibitions, kinship systems structure social networks of exchange between farmer communities and influence the movement of seeds in metapopulations, shaping crop diversity at local and regional levels. PMID:22042843

  8. Dynamic Response of Exchange Bias in Graphene Nanoribbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    1 Dynamic response of exchange bias in graphene nanoribbons S. Narayana Jammalamadaka a, b* , S. S. Rao c, d, e* , J. Vanacken a , V. V...investigated in exchange-coupled potassium split graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). We find that, at low field sweep rate, the pronounced absolute training... graphene nanoribbons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT

  9. Solvent Exchange in Liquid Methanol and Rate Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study of this process using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for the methanol exchange process. The essential features of the dynamics of the system as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the dynamics and response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (< 0.1 ps) and long time response (> 5 ps). An effective characterization of the process results from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory. This results in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Berg, Mark A; Darvin, Jason R

    2016-08-07

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  11. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  13. Exchange of Standardized Flight Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Berry, David; Flores-Amaya, Felipe; Folliard, J.; Kiehling, R.; Ogawa, M.; Pallaschke, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft operations require the knowledge of the vehicle trajectory and attitude and also that of other spacecraft or natural bodies. This knowledge is normally provided by the Flight Dynamics teams of the different space organizations and, as very often spacecraft operations involve more than one organization, this information needs to be exchanged between Agencies. This is why the Navigation Working Group within the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems), has been instituted with the task of establishing standards for the exchange of Flight Dynamics data. This exchange encompasses trajectory data, attitude data, and tracking data. The Navigation Working Group includes regular members and observers representing the participating Space Agencies. Currently the group includes representatives from CNES, DLR, ESA, NASA and JAXA. This Working Group meets twice per year in order to devise standardized language, methods, and formats for the description and exchange of Navigation data. Early versions of some of these standards have been used to support mutual tracking of ESA and NASA interplanetary spacecraft, especially during the arrival of the 2003 missions to Mars. This paper provides a summary of the activities carried out by the group, briefly outlines the current and envisioned standards, describes the tests and operational activities that have been performed using the standards, and lists and discusses the lessons learned from these activities.

  14. Statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Wen; Suo, Yuan-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    We choice the yuan exchange rate index based on a basket of currencies as the effective exchange rate of the yuan and investigate the statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index after China's exchange rate system reform on the 21st July 2005. After dividing the time series into two parts according to the change in the yuan exchange rate regime in July 2008, we compare the statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index during these two periods. We find that the distribution of the two return series has the exponential form. We also perform the detrending moving average analysis (DMA) and the multifractal detrending moving average analysis (MFDMA). The two periods possess different degrees of long-range correlations, and the multifractal nature is also unveiled in these two time series. Significant difference is found in the scaling exponents τ(q) and singularity spectra f(α) of the two periods obtained from the MFDMA analysis. Besides, in order to detect the sources of multifractality, shuffling and phase randomization procedures are applied to destroy the long-range temporal correlation and fat-tailed distribution of the yuan exchange rate index respectively. We find that the fat-tailedness plays a critical role in the sources of multifractality in the first period, while the long memory is the major cause in the second period. The results suggest that the change in China's exchange rate regime in July 2008 gives rise to the different multifractal properties of the yuan exchange rate index in these two periods, and thus has an effect on the effective exchange rate of the yuan after the exchange rate reform on the 21st July 2005.

  15. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. Measurement of amide hydrogen exchange rates with the use of radiation damping.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing-Song; Lim, Jackwee; Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2011-09-01

    A simple method for measuring amide hydrogen exchange rates is presented, which is based on the selective inversion of water magnetization with the use of radiation damping. Simulations show that accurate exchange rates can be measured despite the complications of radiation damping and cross relaxation to the exchange process between amide and water protons. This method cannot eliminate the contributions of the exchange-relayed NOE and direct NOE to the measured exchange rates, but minimize the direct NOE contribution. In addition, the amides with a significant amount of such indirect contributions are possible to be identified from the shape of the exchange peak intensity profiles or/and from the apparent relaxation rates of amide protons which are extracted from fitting the intensity profiles to an equation established here for our experiment. The method was tested on ubiquitin and also applied to an acyl carrier protein. The amide exchange rates for the acyl carrier protein at two pHs indicate that the entire protein is highly dynamic on the second timescale. Low protection factors for the residues in the regular secondary structural elements also suggest the presence of invisible unfolded species. The highly dynamic nature of the acyl carrier protein may be crucial for its interactions with its substrate and enzymes.

  17. Rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masanori; Poulson, Simon R

    2012-04-17

    The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water was investigated at conditions of 10 to 80 °C and pH -0.6 to 4.4. Oxygen isotope exchange proceeds as a first-order reaction, and the exchange rate is strongly affected by reaction temperature and pH, with increased rates of isotope exchange at higher temperature and lower pH. Selenate speciation (HSeO(4)(-) vs SeO(4)(2-)) also has a significant effect on the rate of isotope exchange. The half-life for isotope exchange at example natural conditions (25 °C and pH 7) is estimated to be significantly in excess of 10(6) years. The very slow rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water under most environmental conditions demonstrates that selenate-δ(18)O signatures produced by biogeochemical processes will be preserved and hence that it will be possible to use the value of selenate-δ(18)O to investigate the biogeochemical behavior of selenate, in an analogous fashion to the use of sulfate-δ(18)O to study the biogeochemical behavior of sulfate.

  18. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Canet, Estel; Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-04-21

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse (15)N magnetization in D-(15)N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D-D exchange rates kD and compared them with fast H-H exchange rates kH in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature.

  19. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  20. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate.

  1. Modeling of the Bosphorus exchange flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sözer, Adil; Özsoy, Emin

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental hydrodynamic behavior of the Bosphorus Strait is investigated through a numerical modeling study using alternative configurations of idealized or realistic geometry. Strait geometry and basin stratification conditions allow for hydraulic controls and are ideally suited to support the maximal-exchange regime, which determines the rate of exchange of waters originating from the adjacent Black and Mediterranean Seas for a given net transport. Steady-state hydraulic controls are demonstrated by densimetric Froude number calculations under layered flow approximations when corrections are applied to account for high velocity shears typically observed in the Bosphorus. Analyses of the model results reveal many observed features of the strait, including critical transitions at hydraulic controls and dissipation by turbulence and hydraulic jumps. It is found that the solution depends on initialization, especially with respect to the basin initial conditions. Significant differences between the controlled maximal-exchange and drowned solutions suggest that a detailed modeling implementation involving coupling with adjacent basins needs to take full account of the Bosphorus Strait in terms of the physical processes to be resolved.

  2. Exchange Rate Volatility and Trade Equation in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasasa, Linus; Fechter, Nadine; Bustaman, Yosman

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines the characteristics of short-term and long-term fluctuations/volatility of Indonesia exchange rate and investigates whether this volatility has affected Indonesia's exports flows. In particular the paper investigates the impact of exchange rate volatility on aggregate Indonesia exports flows to the United State and also on imports. The Augmented Dickey-Fuller Test was employed on quarterly data for the period January 2000 to December 2008 to test for stationarity on the variables of interest. Estimates of the long-term influence of exchange rate volatility on the trade flows are obtained using the Johansen Cointegration Test. The results suggest that a significant long-term relationship linking exchange rate volatility and the trade volume between Indonesia and the United States exists. A negative long-term relationship between exchange rate fluctuations and the export volume sent from Indonesia to the US is obtained. On the other hand, exchange rate volatility exerts a positive long-term effect upon the import volume.

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  4. Modeling inflation rates and exchange rates in Ghana: application of multivariate GARCH models.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel Nn; Ngoh, Delali D; Doku-Amponsah, Kwabena; Ofori-Boateng, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed at investigating the volatility and conditional relationship among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates as well as to construct a model using multivariate GARCH DCC and BEKK models using Ghana data from January 1990 to December 2013. The study revealed that the cumulative depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar from 1990 to 2013 is 7,010.2% and the yearly weighted depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar for the period is 20.4%. There was evidence that, the fact that inflation rate was stable, does not mean that exchange rates and interest rates are expected to be stable. Rather, when the cedi performs well on the forex, inflation rates and interest rates react positively and become stable in the long run. The BEKK model is robust to modelling and forecasting volatility of inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The DCC model is robust to model the conditional and unconditional correlation among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The BEKK model, which forecasted high exchange rate volatility for the year 2014, is very robust for modelling the exchange rates in Ghana. The mean equation of the DCC model is also robust to forecast inflation rates in Ghana.

  5. Analysis of proton exchange kinetics with time-dependent exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to probe the kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in lysozyme in pH 5, 6 and 7.4. An analysis based on a Verhulst growth model is proposed and effectively applied to the kinetics of the hydrogen exchange. The data are described by a power-like function which is based on a time-dependence of the exchange rate. Experimental data ranging over many time scales is considered and accurate fits of a power-like function are obtained. Results of fittings show correlation between faster hydrogen-deuterium exchange and increase of pH. Furthermore a model is presented that discriminates between easily exchangeable hydrogens (located in close proximity to the protein surface) and those protected from the exchange (located in the protein interior). A possible interpretation of the model and its biological significance are discussed.

  6. Football and exchange rates: empirical support for behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Eker, Gulin; Berument, Hakan; Dogan, Burak

    2007-10-01

    Recently, economic theory has been expanded to incorporate emotions, which have been assumed to play an important role in financial decisions. The present study illustrates this by showing a connection between the sports performance of popular national football teams (Besiktas, Fenerbahce, and Galatasaray) and performance of the Turkish economy. Specifically, a significant positive association was found between the success of three major professional Turkish football teams and the exchange rate of the Turkish lira against the U.S. dollar. The effect of the football success of several Turkish football teams on the exchange rate of the Turkish lira was examined using the simultaneous multiple regression model with predictor measures of wins, losses, and ties for different combinations of teams to predict the depreciation rate of the Turkish lira between the years 1987 and 2003. Wins by Turkish football teams against foreign (non-Turkish) rivals increased with exchange rate depreciation of the Turkish lira against the U.S. dollar.

  7. Forecasting Foreign Currency Exchange Rates for Air Force Budgeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    Department of Systems Engineering and Management Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...this thesis: the Federal Reserve Foreign Exchange Rate – H.10, the Global Insight forecasts, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) as taken through...foreign currency units per U.S. dollar for each day of the previous week (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System , 2015). Table 3 is a

  8. A Role Play on Export Decisions and the Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotterell, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Explains that the goal of this exercise is to encourage an understanding of the effects of exchange rate changes and the use of forward rates. Provides a role play that involves students working in groups to decide whether to export a consignment of golf trollies to Italy and shortbread to Canada. (BSR)

  9. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  10. Modeling and predicting historical volatility in exchange rate markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Volatility modeling and forecasting of currency exchange rate is an important task in several business risk management tasks; including treasury risk management, derivatives pricing, and portfolio risk evaluation. The purpose of this study is to present a simple and effective approach for predicting historical volatility of currency exchange rate. The approach is based on a limited set of technical indicators as inputs to the artificial neural networks (ANN). To show the effectiveness of the proposed approach, it was applied to forecast US/Canada and US/Euro exchange rates volatilities. The forecasting results show that our simple approach outperformed the conventional GARCH and EGARCH with different distribution assumptions, and also the hybrid GARCH and EGARCH with ANN in terms of mean absolute error, mean of squared errors, and Theil's inequality coefficient. Because of the simplicity and effectiveness of the approach, it is promising for US currency volatility prediction tasks.

  11. Extreme-value dependence: An application to exchange rate markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Viviana

    2007-04-01

    Extreme value theory (EVT) focuses on modeling the tail behavior of a loss distribution using only extreme values rather than the whole data set. For a sample of 10 countries with dirty/free float regimes, we investigate whether paired currencies exhibit a pattern of asymptotic dependence. That is, whether an extremely large appreciation or depreciation in the nominal exchange rate of one country might transmit to another. In general, after controlling for volatility clustering and inertia in returns, we do not find evidence of extreme-value dependence between paired exchange rates. However, for asymptotic-independent paired returns, we find that tail dependency of exchange rates is stronger under large appreciations than under large depreciations.

  12. The American Foreign Exchange Option in Time-Dependent One-Dimensional Diffusion Model for Exchange Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Nasir Shashiashvili, Malkhaz

    2009-06-15

    The classical Garman-Kohlhagen model for the currency exchange assumes that the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates are constant and the exchange rate follows a log-normal diffusion process.In this paper we consider the general case, when exchange rate evolves according to arbitrary one-dimensional diffusion process with local volatility that is the function of time and the current exchange rate and where the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates may be arbitrary continuous functions of time. First non-trivial problem we encounter in time-dependent case is the continuity in time argument of the value function of the American put option and the regularity properties of the optimal exercise boundary. We establish these properties based on systematic use of the monotonicity in volatility for the value functions of the American as well as European options with convex payoffs together with the Dynamic Programming Principle and we obtain certain type of comparison result for the value functions and corresponding exercise boundaries for the American puts with different strikes, maturities and volatilities.Starting from the latter fact that the optimal exercise boundary curve is left continuous with right-hand limits we give a mathematically rigorous and transparent derivation of the significant early exercise premium representation for the value function of the American foreign exchange put option as the sum of the European put option value function and the early exercise premium.The proof essentially relies on the particular property of the stochastic integral with respect to arbitrary continuous semimartingale over the predictable subsets of its zeros. We derive from the latter the nonlinear integral equation for the optimal exercise boundary which can be studied by numerical methods.

  13. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  14. 14 CFR 65.43 - Rating privileges and exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators... tower. However, if he does not do so before August 31, 1971, he may not thereafter exercise the privileges of his senior rating at the control tower concerned until he makes the exchange. (b) The holder...

  15. 14 CFR 65.43 - Rating privileges and exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators... tower. However, if he does not do so before August 31, 1971, he may not thereafter exercise the privileges of his senior rating at the control tower concerned until he makes the exchange. (b) The holder...

  16. 14 CFR 65.43 - Rating privileges and exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators... tower. However, if he does not do so before August 31, 1971, he may not thereafter exercise the privileges of his senior rating at the control tower concerned until he makes the exchange. (b) The holder...

  17. 14 CFR 65.43 - Rating privileges and exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators... tower. However, if he does not do so before August 31, 1971, he may not thereafter exercise the privileges of his senior rating at the control tower concerned until he makes the exchange. (b) The holder...

  18. 14 CFR 65.43 - Rating privileges and exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators... tower. However, if he does not do so before August 31, 1971, he may not thereafter exercise the privileges of his senior rating at the control tower concerned until he makes the exchange. (b) The holder...

  19. Height-resolved energy exchange rates in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A.; Nygren, T.; Kuula, R.

    2012-04-01

    The electromagnetic energy exchange between the high-latitude ionosphere and magnetosphere can be described in terms of electromagnetic energy exchange rate qEM, which is a sum of ion-neutral frictional heating rate qJ (sometimes called Joule heating) and work done on neutrals qm. We have examined the height-resolved energy exchange rates in the ionosphere by using a one-month database obtained by EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements in Tromso. The CP2 scan mode of the EISCAT radar makes it possible to deduce conductivities, electric fields and neutral winds in the E region and hence estimate the different energy exchange rates. We will show characteristic examples for different situations, like a quiet ionosphere dominated by altitude-dependent neutral wind structures (probably caused by atmospheric gravity waves), or active conditions dominated by strong electric fields and intense electromagnetic energy input into the ionosphere. In general, the ion-neutral frictional heating altitude profiles are affected by vertical structuring in horizontal winds. Also, the ionosphere can be at some altitudes a sink of EM energy and at other altitudes a source of EM energy. On rare occasions, the net effect of the ionosphere is to act as an EM dynamo (source of energy).

  20. Extensions to the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoffrey J.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) is a syntactical language for exchanging flight vehicle dynamic model data. It provides a framework for encoding entire flight vehicle dynamic model data packages for exchange and/or long-term archiving. Version 2.0.1 of DAVE-ML provides much of the functionality envisioned for exchanging aerospace vehicle data; however, it is limited in only supporting scalar time-independent data. Additional functionality is required to support vector and matrix data, abstracting sub-system models, detailing dynamics system models (both discrete and continuous), and defining a dynamic data format (such as time sequenced data) for validation of dynamics system models and vehicle simulation packages. Extensions to DAVE-ML have been proposed to manage data as vectors and n-dimensional matrices, and record dynamic data in a compatible form. These capabilities will improve the clarity of data being exchanged, simplify the naming of parameters, and permit static and dynamic data to be stored using a common syntax within a single file; thereby enhancing the framework provided by DAVE-ML for exchanging entire flight vehicle dynamic simulation models.

  1. SirX: a selective inversion recovery experiment on X-nuclei for the determination of the exchange rate of slow chemical exchanges between two sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiulan; Bönisch, Friedrich

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has proven to be powerful for the study of dynamic processes. A new pulse sequence, SirX, is designed to provide boundary conditions that simplify the McConnell equations. Both an initial rate approximation and a whole curve fitting to the time course of magnetization can be used to calculate the exchange rate. These methods were used to study the exchange kinetics of N,N-dimethylacetamide. As compared with the well-established exchange spectroscopy suitable to studies of slow exchange, SirX has the advantage of being less time consuming and capable of providing more reliable kinetic data. Furthermore, by setting the observation on X-nuclei with larger chemical shift dispersion as compared with an observation on (1)H resonance, SirX extends the upper limit of a reliable determination of exchange rates.

  2. Does implied volatility of currency futures option imply volatility of exchange rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alan T.

    2007-02-01

    By investigating currency futures options, this paper provides an alternative economic implication for the result reported by Stein [Overreactions in the options market, Journal of Finance 44 (1989) 1011-1023] that long-maturity options tend to overreact to changes in the implied volatility of short-maturity options. When a GARCH process is assumed for exchange rates, a continuous-time relationship is developed. We provide evidence that implied volatilities may not be the simple average of future expected volatilities. By comparing the term-structure relationship of implied volatilities with the process of the underlying exchange rates, we find that long-maturity options are more consistent with the exchange rates process. In sum, short-maturity options overreact to the dynamics of underlying assets rather than long-maturity options overreacting to short-maturity options.

  3. Hybrid empirical mode decomposition- ARIMA for forecasting exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadan, Siti Sarah; Shabri, Ani; Ismail, Shuhaida

    2015-02-01

    This paper studied the forecasting of monthly Malaysian Ringgit (MYR)/ United State Dollar (USD) exchange rates using the hybrid of two methods which are the empirical model decomposition (EMD) and the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA). MYR is pegged to USD during the Asian financial crisis causing the exchange rates are fixed to 3.800 from 2nd of September 1998 until 21st of July 2005. Thus, the chosen data in this paper is the post-July 2005 data, starting from August 2005 to July 2010. The comparative study using root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) showed that the EMD-ARIMA outperformed the single-ARIMA and the random walk benchmark model.

  4. Oxygen-isotope exchange rates for three isostructural polyoxometalate ions.

    PubMed

    Villa, Eric M; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H

    2010-04-14

    We compare oxygen-isotope exchange rates for all structural oxygens in three polyoxoniobate ions that differ by systematic metal substitutions of Ti(IV) --> Nb(V). The [H(x)Nb(10)O(28)]((6-x)-), [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-), and [H(x)Ti(2)Nb(8)O(28)]((8-x)-) ions are all isostructural yet have different Brønsted properties. Rates for sites within a particular molecule in the series differ by at least approximately 10(4), but the relative reactivities of the oxygen sites rank in nearly the same relative order for all ions in the series. Within a single ion, most structural oxygens exhibit rates of isotopic exchange that vary similarly with pH, indicating that each structure responds as a whole to changes in pH. Across the series of molecules, however, the pH dependencies for isotope exchanges and dissociation are distinctly different, reflecting different contributions from proton- or base-enhanced pathways. The proton-enhanced pathway for isotope exchange dominates at most pH conditions for the [H(x)Ti(2)Nb(8)O(28)]((8-x)-) ion, but the base-enhanced pathways are increasingly important for the [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-) and [H(x)Nb(10)O(28)]((6-x)-) structures at higher pH. The local effect of Ti(IV) substitution could be assessed by comparing rates for structurally similar oxygens on each side of the [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-) ion and is surprisingly small. Interestingly, these nanometer-size structures seem to manifest the same general averaged amphoteric chemistry that is familiar for other reactions affecting oxides in water, including interface dissolution by proton- and hydroxyl-enhanced pathways.

  5. Selection, Evaluation, And Rating of Compact Heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Matt

    2014-10-07

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NUST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of the process flows.

  6. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... of weighted average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to...

  7. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... of weighted average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to...

  8. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to a qualified source...

  9. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... of weighted average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to...

  10. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... of weighted average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to...

  11. Oil Prices and Interest Rates: Do They Determine the Exchange Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, I. A.; Old, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the relationship between the British pound sterling, interest rates, and oil prices has been overemphasized by economic commentators because they ignored a basic economic theory about the determination of the exchange rate. Provides an example and suggestions for follow up instruction. (Author/JDH)

  12. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    PubMed

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  13. Dynamics of water and salt exchange at Maryland Coastal Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xinyi; Xia, Meng; Pitula, Joseph S.; Chigbu, Paulinus

    2017-04-01

    The exchange processes between the Maryland Coastal Bays system (MCBs) and their adjacent coastal ocean were simulated using a three-dimensional unstructured-grid based hydrodynamic model, which was validated by observed data including water level, current velocity and salinity. Idealized experiments were then carried out to investigate the impact of wind forcing on water exchange and salt flux. Through these experiments, the exchanges between the MCBs and coastal ocean were investigated at two inlets (Ocean City Inlet and Chincoteague Inlet). Given that winds and tides are two key external forces known to impact estuarine dynamics, the effect of each individual force on the exchange processes was studied to evaluate the corresponding influence on the inlet dynamics. It was found that wind forcing significantly impacts the inlet dynamics: the effect of wind directions on exchange processes under strong wind speeds is substantial; for example, northwesterly winds push flux to the southern part of the bays, while southwesterly winds pile up flux towards northern Chincoteague Bay. The effect of wind forcing on the exchange dynamics becomes stronger with the augmentation of its speed. Meanwhile, tidal forcing is the major driver of exchange dynamics at weak wind speeds (e.g., 3 m/s), and its effect on exchange process gradually weakens with stronger wind speeds (e.g., 7 m/s, 15 m/s). In addition, sensitivity tests elucidated that closing either inlet results in a significant impact on the water elevation, current velocity and salinity nearby the relevant cut-off inlet areas.

  14. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  15. The groundwater exchange rate of the southern Baltic coastal lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzyński, K.; Sadurski, A.

    1990-11-01

    The groundwater of the southern Baltic lowlands usually occurs in particular hydrogeological conditions. The lowland is mostly covered by peats several metres in thickness. Peatbog water is isolated from deeper aquifers and has different chemical composition. Salty, relic groundwater of marine origin from the Atlantic period of the Holocene (Littorina transgression) may have survived in the deeper coastal aquifers in places of sluggish flow. The results of mathematical modelling of groundwater circulation show that the flow rate and local directions of groundwater change during the year, depending on the rate of groundwater recharge by precipitation. We present here an unsteady flow model, which makes it possible to predict the water table fluctuations during a year at any point of the area studied. The calculation of the groundwater exchange rate did not confirm the presence of any places of very sluggish groundwater flow, where salty, young relic water might have survived.

  16. Air exchange rates in new energy-efficient manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, D.; Bailey, S.

    1990-10-01

    During the 1989--1990 heating season, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for the Bonneville Power Administration, measured the ventilation characteristics of 139 newly constructed energy-efficient manufactured homes and a control sample of 35 newer manufactured homes. A standard door fan pressurization technique was used to estimate shell leakiness, and a passive perfluorocarbon tracer technique was used to estimate overall air exchange rates. A measurement of the designated whole-house exhaust system flow rate was taken as well as an occupant and structure survey. The energy-efficient manufactured homes have very low air exchange rates, significantly lower than either existing manufactured homes or site-built homes. The standard deviation of the effective leakage area for this sample of homes is small (25% to 30% of the mean), indicating that the leakiness of manufactured housing stock can be confidently characterized by the mean value. There is some indication of increased ventilation due to the energy-efficient whole-house ventilation specification, but not directly related to the operation of the whole-house system. The mechanical systems as installed and operated do not provide the intended ventilation; consequently indoor air quality could possibly be adversely impacted and moisture/condensation in the living space is a potential problem. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Investigation of chemical exchange at intermediate exchange rates using a combination of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking methods (CESTrho).

    PubMed

    Kogan, Feliks; Singh, Anup; Cai, Keija; Haris, Mohammad; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2012-07-01

    Proton exchange imaging is important as it allows for visualization and quantification of the distribution of specific metabolites with conventional MRI. Current exchange mediated MRI methods suffer from poor contrast as well as confounding factors that influence exchange rates. In this study we developed a new method to measure proton exchange which combines chemical exchange saturation transfer and T(1)(ρ) magnetization preparation methods (CESTrho). We demonstrated that this new CESTrho sequence can detect proton exchange in the slow to intermediate exchange regimes. It has a linear dependence on proton concentration which allows it to be used to quantitatively measure changes in metabolite concentration. Additionally, the magnetization scheme of this new method can be customized to make it insensitive to changes in exchange rate while retaining its dependency on solute concentration. Finally, we showed the feasibility of using CESTrho in vivo. This sequence is able to detect proton exchange at intermediate exchange rates and is unaffected by the confounding factors that influence proton exchange rates thus making it ideal for the measurement of metabolites with exchangeable protons in this exchange regime.

  18. Phase transitions and relaxation dynamics of Ising models exchanging particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Segun; Fortin, Jean-Yves; Choi, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of systems in nature and in society are open and subject to exchanging their constituents with other systems (e.g., environments). For instance, in biological systems, cells collect necessary energy and material by exchange of molecules or ions. Similarly, countries, cities or research institutes evolve as their constituents move in or out. To probe the corresponding particle exchange dynamics in such systems, we consider two Ising models exchanging particles and establish a master equation describing the equilibrium phases as well as the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system. It is found that an additional stable phase emerges as a consequence of the particle exchange process. Furthermore, we formulate the Ginzburg-Landau theory which allows to probe correlation effects. Accordingly, critical slowing down is manifested and the associated dynamic exponent is computed in the linear relaxation regime. In particular, this approach is relevant for investigating the grand canonical description of the system plus environment, with particle exchange and state transitions taken into account explicitly.

  19. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained.

  20. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  1. Glycan OH Exchange Rate Determination in Aqueous Solution: Seeking Evidence for Transient Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Battistel, Marcos D; Azurmendi, Hugo F; Freedberg, Darón I

    2017-02-02

    Hydrogen bonds (Hbonds) are important stabilizing forces in biomolecules. However, for glycans in aqueous solution, direct NMR detection of Hbonds is elusive because of their transient nature. Here, we present Isotope-based Natural-abundance TOtal correlation eXchange SpectroscopY (INTOXSY), a new (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy based method, to extract OH groups' exchange rate constants (kex) for molecules in natural (13)C abundance and show that OH Hbonds can be inferred from "slower" H/D kex. We evaluate kex measured with INTOXSY in light of those extracted with line-shape analysis. Subsequently, we use a set of common glycans to establish a kex reference basis set and to infer the existence of transient Hbonds involving OH donor groups. Then, we report kex values for a series of mono- and disaccharides, as well as for oligosaccharides sialyl Lewis X and β-cyclodextrin, and compare the results with those from the reference set to extract Hbond information. Finally, we utilize NMR experimental data in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to establish donor and acceptor Hbond pairs. Our exchange rate measurements indicate that OH/OD exchange rates, kHD, values <10 s(-1) are consistent with transient Hbond OH groups and potential acceptor groups can be uncovered through MD simulations.

  2. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  6. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  7. Dependence and risk assessment for oil prices and exchange rate portfolios: A wavelet based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Chaker; Jammazi, Rania

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we propose a wavelet-based approach to accommodate the stylized facts and complex structure of financial data, caused by frequent and abrupt changes of markets and noises. Specifically, we show how the combination of both continuous and discrete wavelet transforms with traditional financial models helps improve portfolio's market risk assessment. In the empirical stage, three wavelet-based models (wavelet-EGARCH with dynamic conditional correlations, wavelet-copula, and wavelet-extreme value) are considered and applied to crude oil price and US dollar exchange rate data. Our findings show that the wavelet-based approach provides an effective and powerful tool for detecting extreme moments and improving the accuracy of VaR and Expected Shortfall estimates of oil-exchange rate portfolios after noise is removed from the original data.

  8. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Riccardo Esposito, Massimiliano; Lacoste, David

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  9. The Dynamics of Social Interaction in Telecollaborative Tandem Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen Sanchez, Brianna

    2015-01-01

    Using both quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, this dissertation study undertakes an exploration of the dynamics of the social interaction in discourse co-constructed by pairs of college students in telecollaborative tandem exchanges. Two groups of participants, Mexican learners of English as a foreign language and American learners…

  10. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  11. Dithioacetal Exchange: A New Reversible Reaction for Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2016-05-10

    Reversibility of dithioacetal bond formation is reported under acidic mild conditions. Its utility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry was explored by combining it with orthogonal disulfide exchange. In such a setup, thiols are positioned at the intersection of both chemistries, constituting a connecting node between temporally separated networks.

  12. Inhomogeneous scaling behaviors in Malaysian foreign currency exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Lim, S. C.; Murugan, R.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fractal scaling behaviors of foreign currency exchange rates with respect to Malaysian currency, Ringgit Malaysia. These time series are examined piecewise before and after the currency control imposed in 1st September 1998 using the monofractal model based on fractional Brownian motion. The global Hurst exponents are determined using the R/ S analysis, the detrended fluctuation analysis and the method of second moment using the correlation coefficients. The limitation of these monofractal analyses is discussed. The usual multifractal analysis reveals that there exists a wide range of Hurst exponents in each of the time series. A new method of modelling the multifractal time series based on multifractional Brownian motion with time-varying Hurst exponents is studied.

  13. Computational Studies of Water-Exchange Rates around Aqueous Mg2+ and Be2+

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.

    2014-12-18

    The water-exchange mechanisms occurring around aqueous divalent Mg2+ and Be2+ ions were studied using molecular dynamics simulations and rate theory methods. Properties associated with the water-exchange process, such as ion-water potentials of mean force, time-dependent transmission coefficients, and rate constants, were examined along with transition rate theory and the reactive flux method, which includes the role of solvent friction. The effects of pressure on water-exchange rates and activation volumes also were studied. The simulated activation volume values and mechanism were different for Mg2+ and Be2+ because of the nature of their solvation shells. We found the agreement with experiments was improved up on solvent effects were taken into account. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  14. Flight Dynamic Model Exchange using XML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    The AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee has worked for several years to develop a standard by which the information needed to develop physics-based models of aircraft can be specified. The purpose of this standard is to provide a well-defined set of information, definitions, data tables and axis systems so that cooperating organizations can transfer a model from one simulation facility to another with maximum efficiency. This paper proposes using an application of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to implement the AIAA simulation standard. The motivation and justification for using a standard such as XML is discussed. Necessary data elements to be supported are outlined. An example of an aerodynamic model as an XML file is given. This example includes definition of independent and dependent variables for function tables, definition of key variables used to define the model, and axis systems used. The final steps necessary for implementation of the standard are presented. Software to take an XML-defined model and import/export it to/from a given simulation facility is discussed, but not demonstrated. That would be the next step in final implementation of standards for physics-based aircraft dynamic models.

  15. Diffusive and Arrestedlike Dynamics in Currency Exchange Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clara-Rahola, J.; Puertas, A. M.; Sánchez-Granero, M. A.; Trinidad-Segovia, J. E.; de las Nieves, F. J.

    2017-02-01

    This work studies the symmetry between colloidal dynamics and the dynamics of the Euro-U.S. dollar currency exchange market (EURUSD). We consider the EURUSD price in the time range between 2001 and 2015, where we find significant qualitative symmetry between fluctuation distributions from this market and the ones belonging to colloidal particles in supercooled or arrested states. In particular, we find that models used for arrested physical systems are suitable for describing the EURUSD fluctuation distributions. Whereas the corresponding mean-squared price displacement (MSPD) to the EURUSD is diffusive for all years, when focusing in selected time frames within a day, we find a two-step MSPD when the New York Stock Exchange market closes, comparable to the dynamics in supercooled systems. This is corroborated by looking at the price correlation functions and non-Gaussian parameters and can be described by the theoretical model. We discuss the origin and implications of this analogy.

  16. Understanding the rates and molecular mechanism of water-exchange around aqueous ions using molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Annapureddy, Harsha V R; Dang, Liem X

    2014-07-31

    Solvation processes occurring around aqueous ions are of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry, and biology. Over the past few decades, several experimental and theoretical studies were devoted to understanding ion solvation and the processes involved in it. In this article, we present a summary of our recent efforts that, through computer simulations, focused on providing a comprehensive understanding of solvent-exchange processes around aqueous ions. To accomplish these activities, we have looked at the mechanistic properties associated with the water-exchange process, such as potentials of mean force, time-dependent transmission coefficients, and the corresponding rate constants using transition state theory, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes treatments of the dynamic response of the solvent.

  17. Effect of experimental wood addition on hyporheic exchange and thermal dynamics in a losing meadow stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2012-10-01

    Stream restoration structures such as large wood can enhance shallow river-groundwater exchange, or hyporheic exchange, and alter temperature dynamics in restored reaches. We added and then removed channel-spanning logs in a second-order mountain meadow stream to test short-term impacts on hyporheic exchange, streambed temperatures, and surface water temperatures. Based on vertical seepage measurements and numerical simulations of hyporheic fluid and heat flow, large wood addition increased hyporheic exchange and altered streambed temperatures. In this losing stream, meter-scale hyporheic exchange cells formed beneath large wood. Upwelling pore water downstream of logs stabilized diel temperature cycles across <8% of the streambed, creating localized but potentially valuable thermal refuge. Exchange rates were <0.1% of channel discharge—too small to impact the range of diel temperature signals in surface water. However, the lag between downstream and upstream diel temperature signals was slightly greater with large wood, which may indicate that surface storage zones rather than hyporheic storage zones increased thermal retardation. Losing conditions limited the spatial extent and rates of hyporheic exchange near large wood. Impacts of large wood reintroduction on hyporheic exchange depend on ambient groundwater discharge or recharge, streambed permeability, channel Froude number, large wood blockage ratio, and large wood spacing. In many streams, large wood reintroduction may increase hyporheic habitat volume and complexity but may not increase exchange rates enough to alter surface water temperature or chemistry. Surface storage zones such as eddies and pools can still influence heat and solute retention in the channel.

  18. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  19. Probabilistic estimation of residential air exchange rates for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are a key determinant in the infiltration of ambient air pollution indoors. Population-based human exposure models using probabilistic approaches to estimate personal exposure to air pollutants have relied on input distributions from AER measurements. An algorithm for probabilistically estimating AER was developed based on the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory Infiltration model utilizing housing characteristics and meteorological data with adjustment for window opening behavior. The algorithm was evaluated by comparing modeled and measured AERs in four US cities (Los Angeles, CA; Detroit, MI; Elizabeth, NJ; and Houston, TX) inputting study-specific data. The impact on the modeled AER of using publically available housing data representative of the region for each city was also assessed. Finally, modeled AER based on region-specific inputs was compared with those estimated using literature-based distributions. While modeled AERs were similar in magnitude to the measured AER they were consistently lower for all cities except Houston. AERs estimated using region-specific inputs were lower than those using study-specific inputs due to differences in window opening probabilities. The algorithm produced more spatially and temporally variable AERs compared with literature-based distributions reflecting within- and between-city differences, helping reduce error in estimates of air pollutant exposure. Published in the Journal of

  20. Multifractality and value-at-risk forecasting of exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, Jonathan A.; Kinateder, Harald; Wagner, Niklas

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses market risk prediction for high frequency foreign exchange rates under nonlinear risk scaling behaviour. We use a modified version of the multifractal model of asset returns (MMAR) where trading time is represented by the series of volume ticks. Our dataset consists of 138,418 5-min round-the-clock observations of EUR/USD spot quotes and trading ticks during the period January 5, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Considering fat-tails, long-range dependence as well as scale inconsistency with the MMAR, we derive out-of-sample value-at-risk (VaR) forecasts and compare our approach to historical simulation as well as a benchmark GARCH(1,1) location-scale VaR model. Our findings underline that the multifractal properties in EUR/USD returns in fact have notable risk management implications. The MMAR approach is a parsimonious model which produces admissible VaR forecasts at the 12-h forecast horizon. For the daily horizon, the MMAR outperforms both alternatives based on conditional as well as unconditional coverage statistics.

  1. Correlation between calculated local stability and hydrogen exchange rates in proteins.

    PubMed

    Rashin, A A

    1987-11-20

    The attempt is made to find new correlations between local structural characteristics of proteins and the hydrogen exchange rates of their individual main-chain amides, and to relate such correlations to possible mechanisms of hydrogen exchange. It is found that in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) the surface area buried by a particular residue and its neighbors correlates with the exchange rate of the main-chain amide of that residue. As the area buried by a particular fragment can be associated with the stabilization of the protein structure by this fragment, the correlation suggests a role for the energetics of the local unfolding in the mechanism of hydrogen exchange. Calculations based on the assumption that the exchange mechanism involves local unfolding lead to quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured exchange rates for 80% of the amides of BPTI that are buried or hydrogen bonded to the main-chain or to internal water molecules. The same degree of correlation is found between the calculated exchange rates and partial exchange data for ribonuclease S, hen lysozyme and cytochrome c. A similarly strong correlation is found between calculated exchange rates and the exchange rates of ribonuclease A determined by neutron diffraction in the crystal. The criteria of correlation are, however, less stringent in this case because of the experimental errors, which are larger than for solution data. It is suggested that the observed correlation be used for predictions of hydrogen exchange rates in proteins.

  2. Ultrasensitive anion detection by NMR spectroscopy: a supramolecular strategy based on modulation of chemical exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Loïse H; Hadzovic, Alen; Zhang, Xiao-An

    2015-06-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for monitoring molecular interactions and is widely used to characterize supramolecular systems at the atomic level. NMR is limited for sensing purposes, however, due to low sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as conformational changes or binding events can induce drastic effects on NMR spectra in response to variations in chemical exchange (CE) rate, which can lead to new strategies in the design of supramolecular sensors through the control and monitoring of CE rate. Here, we present an indirect NMR anion sensing technique in which increased CE rate, due to anion-induced conformational flexibility of a relatively rigid structure of a novel sensor, allows ultrasensitive anion detection as low as 120 nM.

  3. Rate of Asparagine Deamidation in a Monoclonal Antibody Correlating with Hydrogen Exchange Rate at Adjacent Downstream Residues.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jonathan J; Buchanan, Andrew; Andrews, John; Chodorge, Matthieu; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Mitchell, Laura; Burmeister, Nicole; Kippen, Alistair D; Vaughan, Tristan J; Higazi, Daniel R; Lowe, David

    2017-02-21

    Antibodies are an important class of drugs, comprising more than half of all new FDA approvals. Therapeutic antibodies must be chemically stable both in storage and in vivo, following administration to patients. Deamidation is a major degradation pathway for all natural and therapeutic proteins circulating in blood. Here, the linkage between deamidation propensity and structural dynamics is investigated by examining two antibodies with differing specificities. While both antibodies share a canonical asparagine-glycine (NG) motif in a structural loop, this is prone to deamidation in one of the antibodies but not the other. We found that the hydrogen-exchange rate at the adjacent two amides, often the autocatalytic nucleophiles in deamidation, correlated with the rate of degradation. This previously unreported observation was confirmed upon mutation to stabilize the deamidation lability via a generally applicable orthogonal engineering strategy presented here. We anticipate that the structural insight into chemical degradation in full-length monoclonal antibodies and the high-resolution hydrogen-exchange methodology used will have broad application across biochemical study and drug discovery and development.

  4. 76 FR 6128 - Energy Exchange International, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...-000] Energy Exchange International, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing... the above-referenced proceeding Energy Exchange International, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an accompanying rate tariff, noting that such application includes a request for...

  5. Sampling of Protein Folding Transitions: Multicanonical Versus Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We compare the efficiency of multicanonical and replica exchange molecular dynamics for the sampling of folding/unfolding events in simulations of proteins with end-to-end β-sheet. In Go-model simulations of the 75-residue MNK6, we observe improvement factors of 30 in the number of folding/unfolding events of multicanonical molecular dynamics over replica exchange molecular dynamics. As an application, we use this enhanced sampling to study the folding landscape of the 36-residue DS119 with an all-atom physical force field and implicit solvent. Here, we find that the rate-limiting step is the formation of the central helix that then provides a scaffold for the parallel β-sheet formed by the two chain ends. PMID:24198735

  6. Dynamic Line Rating: Research and Policy Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Michael R. West

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative rating based on worst case scenarios. We demonstrate that observing the conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. This paper provides a report of a pioneering scheme in the United States of America in which DLR has been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Secondly, we discuss limitations involved. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future DLR projects. Third, we provide a policy background and discussion to clarify the technology’s potential and identifies barriers to the imminent adoption of dynamic line rating systems. We provide suggestions for regulatory bodies about possible improvements in policy to encourage adoption of this beneficial technology.

  7. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  8. G-register exchange dynamics in guanine quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Robert W.; Mittermaier, Anthony K.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are 4-stranded DNA structures formed by tracts of stacked, Hoogsteen-hydrogen bonded guanosines. GQs are found in gene promoters and telomeres where they regulate gene transcription and telomere elongation. Though GQ structures are well-characterized, many aspects of their conformational dynamics are poorly understood. For example, when there are surplus guanosines in some of the tracts, they can slide with respect to one another, a process we term G-register (GR) exchange. These motions could in principle entropically stabilize the folded state, crucially benefitting GQs as their stabilities are closely tied to biological function. We have developed a method for characterizing GR exchange where each isomer in the wild-type conformational ensemble is trapped by mutation and thermal denaturation data for the set of trapped mutants and wild-type are analyzed simultaneously. This yields GR isomer populations as a function of temperature, quantifies conformational entropy and sheds light on correlated sliding motions of the G-tracts. We measured entropic stabilizations from GR exchange up to 14.3 ± 1.6 J mol−1 K−1, with melting temperature increases up to 7.3 ± 1.6°C. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis suggests a majority of putative human GQ sequences are capable of GR exchange, pointing to the generality of this phenomenon. PMID:27060139

  9. Particle creation rate for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Ellis, George F. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the particle creation probability rate around a general black hole as an outcome of quantum fluctuations. Using the uncertainty principle for these fluctuation, we derive a new ultraviolet frequency cutoff for the radiation spectrum of a dynamical black hole. Using this frequency cutoff, we define the probability creation rate function for such black holes. We consider a dynamical Vaidya model and calculate the probability creation rate for this case when its horizon is in a slowly evolving phase. Our results show that one can expect the usual Hawking radiation emission process in the case of a dynamical black hole when it has a slowly evolving horizon. Moreover, calculating the probability rate for a dynamical black hole gives a measure of when Hawking radiation can be killed off by an incoming flux of matter or radiation. Our result strictly suggests that we have to revise the Hawking radiation expectation for primordial black holes that have grown substantially since they were created in the early universe. We also infer that this frequency cut off can be a parameter that shows the primordial black hole growth at the emission moment.

  10. DYNACLIPS (DYNAmic CLIPS): A dynamic knowledge exchange tool for intelligent agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cengeloglu, Yilmaz; Khajenoori, Soheil; Linton, Darrell

    1994-01-01

    In a dynamic environment, intelligent agents must be responsive to unanticipated conditions. When such conditions occur, an intelligent agent may have to stop a previously planned and scheduled course of actions and replan, reschedule, start new activities and initiate a new problem solving process to successfully respond to the new conditions. Problems occur when an intelligent agent does not have enough knowledge to properly respond to the new situation. DYNACLIPS is an implementation of a framework for dynamic knowledge exchange among intelligent agents. Each intelligent agent is a CLIPS shell and runs a separate process under SunOS operating system. Intelligent agents can exchange facts, rules, and CLIPS commands at run time. Knowledge exchange among intelligent agents at run times does not effect execution of either sender and receiver intelligent agent. Intelligent agents can keep the knowledge temporarily or permanently. In other words, knowledge exchange among intelligent agents would allow for a form of learning to be accomplished.

  11. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: an application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Daniel J; Porter, Mason A; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F; Jones, Nick S

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis.

  12. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: An application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, Daniel J.; Porter, Mason A.; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F.; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis.

  13. Water exchange dynamics around H₃O⁺ and OH⁻ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    Proton transfer in water and other solvents is a complicated process and an active research area. Conformational changes of water hydrating a proton can have a significant influence on proton dynamics. A hydrated proton leads to H₃O⁺ that forms three hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H₃O⁺. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH⁻ and find that the corresponding time scale (~50 picoseconds [ps]) is much smaller than that for H₃O⁺ (~100 ps). Results from all the rate theories are computed and compared. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  14. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei (qHyper-CEST): Sensing xenon-host exchange dynamics and binding affinities by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kunth, M. Witte, C.; Schröder, L.

    2014-11-21

    The reversible binding of xenon to host molecules has found numerous applications in nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Quantitative characterization of the Xe exchange dynamics is important to understand and optimize the physico-chemical behavior of such Xe hosts, but is often challenging to achieve at low host concentrations. We have investigated a sensitive quantification technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei, qHyper-CEST. Using simulated signals we demonstrated that qHyper-CEST yielded accurate and precise results and was robust in the presence of large amounts of noise (10%). This is of particular importance for samples with completely unknown exchange rates. Using these findings we experimentally determined the following exchange parameters for the Xe host cryptophane-A monoacid in dimethyl sulfoxide in one type of experiment: the ratio of bound and free Xe, the Xe exchange rate, the resonance frequencies of free and bound Xe, the Xe host occupancy, and the Xe binding constant. Taken together, qHyper-CEST facilitates sensitive quantification of the Xe exchange dynamics and binding to hydrophobic cavities and has the potential to analyze many different host systems or binding sites. This makes qHyper-CEST an indispensable tool for the efficient design of highly specific biosensors.

  15. The effect of an exchanger phase, carbon dioxide, and mineralogy on the rate of geochemical weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution (weathering) of soil minerals can have an appreciable effect on soil water chemistry. The rate at which mineral dissolution in water approaches equilibrium is dependent upon the type of minerals present, the surface area/solution volume ratio, the ionic composition of the solution, the nature of the exchanger phase of the soil, the temperature and the local partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Geochemical weathering has an important effect on the processes relating to sodic soil reclamation, nutrient availability, soil genesis, management of overburden materials from mining activities, and salt loading to surface and ground waters. Research was conducted to determine, quantitatively, the effects of CO{sub 2} and exchanger phase composition on the kinetics of calcium mineral dissolution. It was found that the presence of exchangeable sodium greatly increased the initial rate of mineral dissolution by acting to keep the soil solution low in Ca{sup 2+} ions. The kinetics of calcite dissolution were controlled by the gas transfer reaction, CO{sub 2}(gas) {yields} CO{sub 2}(ag), at CO{sub 2} levels below .03 atmospheres. A mechanistic kinetic model was proposed that included the CO{sub 2} reaction kinetics and an adsorption/hydration reaction with the calcite surface. In general, mineral weathering was found to rarely obey a diffusion controlled model and was better described by mechanistic kinetics invoking elementary chemical reactions. In addition, it was found that the weathering rate of anorthite (a calcium silicate) was too slow to contribute significant amounts of Ca{sup 2+} ions to the soil solution and the phenomenon of calcite supersaturation commonly found in soil solutions is attributed to carbon dioxide dynamics.

  16. Predicting Offender-Generated Exchange Rates: Implications for a Theory of Sentence Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.; Mooney, Jennifer L.; Minor, Kevin I.

    2005-01-01

    We solicited offender-generated exchange rates between prison and several noncustodial sanctions from a sample of 588 offenders currently serving community-based punishments. We then regressed these exchange rates on demographic, attitudinal, and correctional experience indicators. Males, Blacks, older offenders, offenders with prison experience,…

  17. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  18. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  19. Theoretical rate constants of super-exchange hole transfer and thermally induced hopping in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Asai, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Koichi

    2005-01-27

    Recently, the electronic properties of DNA have been extensively studied, because its conductivity is important not only to the study of fundamental biological problems, but also in the development of molecular-sized electronics and biosensors. We have studied theoretically the reorganization energies, the activation energies, the electronic coupling matrix elements, and the rate constants of hole transfer in B-form double-helix DNA in water. To accommodate the effects of DNA nuclear motions, a subset of reaction coordinates for hole transfer was extracted from classical molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of DNA in water and then used for ab initio quantum chemical calculations of electron coupling constants based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush model. A molecular mechanics (MM) method was used to determine the nuclear Franck-Condon factor. The rate constants for two types of mechanisms of hole transfer-the thermally induced hopping (TIH) and the super-exchange mechanisms-were determined based on Marcus theory. We found that the calculated matrix elements are strongly dependent on the conformations of the nucleobase pairs of hole-transferable DNA and extend over a wide range of values for the "rise" base-step parameter but cluster around a particular value for the "twist" parameter. The calculated activation energies are in good agreement with experimental results. Whereas the rate constant for the TIH mechanism is not dependent on the number of A-T nucleobase pairs that act as a bridge, the rate constant for the super-exchange process rapidly decreases when the length of the bridge increases. These characteristic trends in the calculated rate constants effectively reproduce those in the experimental data of Giese et al. [Nature 2001, 412, 318]. The calculated rate constants were also compared with the experimental results of Lewis et al. [Nature 2000, 406, 51].

  20. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers.

  1. The Importance of Water Exchange Rates in the Design of Responsive Agents for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A. Dean; Wu, Yunkou

    2013-01-01

    The rate of water exchange in lanthanide complexes is often overlooked as an important parameter in the design of responsive MR imaging agents. Most often, the number of inner-sphere water coordination sites or the rotational mobility of the complex are considered as the central theme while water exchange is either assumed to be “fast enough” or entirely ignored. On the other hand, relaxation and shift theories predict that water exchange rates may indeed be the key parameter one should consider in any new molecular design. In this short review, the impact of water exchange rates on three classes of lanthanide-based MRI contrast agents, T1-based relaxation agents, T2 exchange line-broadening agents and chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents, is illustrated and discussed. PMID:23333571

  2. Understanding the Rates and Molecular Mechanism of Water-Exchange around Aqueous Ions Using Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-07-31

    Solvation processes occurring around aqueous ions are of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry, and biology. Over the past few decades, several experimental and theoretical studies were devoted to understanding ion solvation and the processes involved in it. In this article, we present a summary of our recent efforts that, through computer simulations, focused on providing a comprehensive understanding of solvent-exchange processes around aqueous ions. To accomplish these activities, we have looked at the mechanistic properties associated with the water-exchange process, such as potentials of mean force, time-dependent transmission coefficients, and the corresponding rate constants using transition rate theory, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes treatments of the dynamic response of the solvent. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  3. East Asia’s Foreign Exchange Rate Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-16

    At the other extreme, Japan, the Philippines, and South Korea have usually allowed their currencies to float freely in foreign exchange ( forex ...China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam allow their currency to adjust in value in forex markets so long as the...There were also reports that Korea sold more dollars for won in early April 2008.7 At the time, some forex analysts claimed that the new South Korean

  4. Dynamic pupillary exchange engages brain regions encoding social salience.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Neil A; Gray, Marcus A; Critchley, Hugo D

    2009-01-01

    Covert exchange of autonomic responses may shape social affective behavior, as observed in mirroring of pupillary responses during sadness processing. We examined how, independent of facial emotional expression, dynamic coherence between one's own and another's pupil size modulates regional brain activity. Fourteen subjects viewed pairs of eye stimuli while undergoing fMRI. Using continuous pupillometry biofeedback, the size of the observed pupils was varied, correlating positively or negatively with changes in participants' own pupils. Viewing both static and dynamic stimuli activated right fusiform gyrus. Observing dynamically changing pupils activated STS and amygdala, regions engaged by non-static and salient facial features. Discordance between observed and observer's pupillary changes enhanced activity within bilateral anterior insula, left amygdala and anterior cingulate. In contrast, processing positively correlated pupils enhanced activity within left frontal operculum. Our findings suggest pupillary signals are monitored continuously during social interactions and that incongruent changes activate brain regions involved in tracking motivational salience and attentionally meaningful information. Naturalistically, dynamic coherence in pupillary change follows fluctuations in ambient light. Correspondingly, in social contexts discordant pupil response is likely to reflect divergence of dispositional state. Our data provide empirical evidence for an autonomically mediated extension of forward models of motor control into social interaction.

  5. Driven Nonlinear Dynamics of Two Coupled Exchange-Only Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Arijeet; Rashba, Emmanuel I.; Halperin, Bertrand I.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the creation of a fast exchange-only qubit [Medford et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 050501 (2013)], we develop a theory describing the nonlinear dynamics of two such qubits that are capacitively coupled, when one of them is driven resonantly at a frequency equal to its level splitting. We include conditions of strong driving, where the Rabi frequency is a significant fraction of the level splitting, and we consider situations where the splitting for the second qubit may be the same as or different than the first. We demonstrate that coupling between qubits can be detected by reading the response of the second qubit, even when the coupling between them is only of about 1% of their level splittings, and we calculate entanglement between qubits. Patterns of nonlinear dynamics of coupled qubits and their entanglement are strongly dependent on the geometry of the system, and the specific mechanism of interqubit coupling deeply influences dynamics of both qubits. In particular, we describe the development of irregular dynamics in a two-qubit system, explore approaches for inhibiting it, and demonstrate the existence of an optimal range of coupling strength maintaining stability during the operational time.

  6. A study on the influence of fast amide exchange on the accuracy of (15)N relaxation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Jurt, Simon; Zerbe, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    (15)N relaxation rates of amide moieties provide insight both into global as well as local backbone dynamics of peptides and proteins. As the differences in the relaxation rates in general are small, their accurate determination is of prime importance. One potential source of error is fast amide exchange. It is well known that in its presence the effects of saturation transfer and H/D exchange may result in erroneous apparent relaxation rates R (1) and R (2). Here, the extent of these errors is rigorously examined. Theoretical considerations reveal that even when saturation effects are absent, H/D exchange will easily result in significant deviations from the true values. In particular overestimations of up to 10 % in R (1) and up to 5 % in R (2) are observed. An alternative scheme for fitting the relaxation data to the corresponding exponentials is presented that in the best cases not only delivers more accurate relaxation rates but also allows extracting estimates for the exchange rates. The theoretical computations were tested and verified for the case of ubiquitin.

  7. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  8. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble.

  9. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-02-14

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model.

  10. Use of H/D isotope effects to gather information about hydrogen bonding and hydrogen exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Miyanoiri, Yohei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Yang, Chun-Jiun; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2014-04-01

    Polar side-chains in proteins play important roles in forming and maintaining three-dimensional structures, and thus participate in various biological functions. Until recently, most protein NMR studies have focused on the non-exchangeable protons of amino acid residues. The exchangeable protons attached to polar groups, such as hydroxyl (OH), sulfhydryl (SH), and amino (NH2) groups, have mostly been ignored, because in many cases these hydrogen atoms exchange too quickly with water protons, making NMR observations impractical. However, in certain environments, such as deep within the hydrophobic interior of a protein, or in a strong hydrogen bond to other polar groups or interacting ligands, the protons attached to polar groups may exhibit slow hydrogen exchange rates and thus become NMR accessible. To explore the structural and biological implications of the interactions involving polar side-chains, we have developed versatile NMR methods to detect such cases by observing the line shapes of (13)C NMR signals near the polar groups, which are affected by deuterium-proton isotope shifts in a mixture of H2O and D2O. These methods allow the detection of polar side-chains with slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates, and therefore provide opportunities to retrieve information about the polar side-chains, which might otherwise be overlooked by conventional NMR experiments. Future prospects of applications using deuterium-proton isotope shifts to retrieve missing structural and dynamic information of proteins are discussed.

  11. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  12. Gas exchange rates for three closed-basin lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.; Broecker, W.

    1980-09-01

    Long term monitoring of the /sup 14/C:/sup 12/C ratio in three closed-basin lakes in the western United States has resulted in reliable estimates of the mean CO/sub 2/ invasion rates. When normalized to sea level pressure the results are 6 mol m/sup -/2 yr/sup -/1 for Pyramid Lake, 17 for Walker Lake, and 38 for Mono Lake. Except for Mono Lake, these bomb /sup 14/C-derived invasion rates are consistent with those derived from the distribution of natural radiocarbon. The big difference in the invasion rates estimated for Mono Lake by the two methods is attributed to the influx of /sup 14/C-free spring waters to the lake. Possible causes for the difference in CO/sub 2/ invasion rates among the three lakes are wind velocity, salinity, and pH.

  13. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  14. The evolutionary synchronization of the exchange rate system in ASEAN+6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Hu, Haibo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2010-12-01

    Although there are extensive researches on the behavior of the world currency network, the complexity of the Asian regional currency system is not well understood regardless of its importance. Using daily exchange rates this paper examines exchange rate co-movements in the region before and after the China exchange rate reform. It was found that the correlation between Asian currencies and the US Dollar, the previous regional key currency has become weaker and intra-Asia interactions have increased. Cross sample entropy and cross entropy approaches are also applied to examine the synchrony behavior among the Asian currencies. The study also shows that the Asian exchange rate markets featured are neither stochastic nor efficient. These findings may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of collective behaviors in a regional currency network; they will also lay a theoretical foundation for further policy formulation in Asian currency integration.

  15. Mixed Multifractal Analysis of Crude Oil, Gold and Exchange Rate Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Meifeng; Shao, Shuxiang; Gao, Jianyu; Sun, Yu; Su, Weiyi

    2016-11-01

    The multifractal analysis of one time series, e.g. crude oil, gold and exchange rate series, is often referred. In this paper, we apply the classical multifractal and mixed multifractal spectrum to study multifractal properties of crude oil, gold and exchange rate series and their inner relationships. The obtained results show that in general, the fractal dimension of gold and crude oil is larger than that of exchange rate (RMB against the US dollar), reflecting a fact that the price series in gold and crude oil are more heterogeneous. Their mixed multifractal spectra have a drift and the plot is not symmetric, so there is a low level of mixed multifractal between each pair of crude oil, gold and exchange rate series.

  16. PEE-PEO block copolymer exchange rate between micelles is detergent and temperature activated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantz, Allen; Saboe, Patrick; Lee, Hee-Young; Sines, Ian; Butler, Paul; Bishop, Kyle; Maranas, Janna; Kumar, Manish

    We examine the kinetics of polymer chain exchange between polymer/detergent micelles, a system relevant to the synthesis of protein-containing biomimetic membranes. Although chain exchange between polymer aggregates in water is too slow to observe, adding detergent allows us to determine chain exchange rates using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). We examine a membrane-protein-relevant, vesicle-forming ultra-short polymer, Poly(ethyl ethylene)20-Poly(ethylene oxide)18 (PEE20-PEO18). PEE20-PEO18 is solubilized in mixed micelles with the membrane-protein-compatible non-ionic detergent octyl- β -D-glucoside (OG). We show that OG activates block copolymer exchange, and obtain rate constants at two detergent concentrations above the CMC (critical micellar concentration) of OG. We find that chain exchange increases two orders of magnitude when temperature increases from 308 to 338 K, and that even a 1 mg/mL increase in OG concentration leads to a noticeable increase in exchange rate. We also calculate the activation energy for chain exchange and find that it is much higher than for lipid exchange. These findings explain the need for high detergent concentration and/or temperature to synthesize densely packed polymer/protein membranes.

  17. Trade balance instability and the optimal exchange rate regime: The case of OPEC countries

    SciTech Connect

    Aljerrah, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The OPEC members have experienced wide fluctuations in their trade balances. This can be attributed to several factors: (1) heavy dependence of national income and export earnings on a single primary export-oil; (2) instability of price and world demand for oil; and (3) the exchange rate regime practiced in recent years. An exchange rate policy can be used to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance, given the changes in exchange rates of major international currencies. The purpose of this study is two fold; first, examine the effects of fluctuations in trade balance on the OPEC economies, and second, propose appropriate exchange rate regime for selected OPEC members. The study is divided into two parts. The first part demonstrates the impact of trade balance changes on national income and other macroeconomic variables using a Keynesian framework. The second part involves using conventional trade models to search for the appropriate exchange rate regime to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance of each selective country. The study's findings are: first, fluctuations in trade balances had negative effects on the economics of Algeria, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Second, the current exchange rate regime of no sample country is optimal in minimizing trade balance fluctuations. Third, in contrast to expectations, U.S. dollar peg did not stabilize the trade balance of any OPEC member. Finally, the results show that the sample OPEC economies could have enjoyed faster - though with different degree - economic growth if they had pegged their currencies to the derived optimal exchange rate regime. These optimal exchange rate regimes are: the SDR for Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, the purchasing power parity for Libya and Saudi Arabia, and the real Yen for Kuwait.

  18. Gas exchange rates of potato stands for bioregenerative life support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Stutte, Gary W.; Mackowiak, Cheryl L.; Yorio, Neil C.; Sager, John C.; Knott, William M.

    Plants can provide a means for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) while generating oxygen (O2) and clean water for life support systems in space. To study this, 20 m2 stands of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants were grown in a large (113 m3 vol.), atmospherically closed chamber. Photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the stands was detected about 10 DAP (days after planting), after which photosynthetic rates rose rapidly as stand ground cover and total light interception increased. Photosynthetic rates peaked ca. 50 DAP near 45 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 865 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF (average photosynthetic photon flux), and near 35 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 655 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Short term changes in PPF caused a linear response in stand photosynthetic rates up to 1100 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF, with a light compensation point of 185 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Comparisons of stand photosynthetic rates at different CO2 concentrations showed a classic C3 response, with saturation occurring near 1200 μmol mol-1 CO2 and compensation near 100 μmol mol-1 CO2. In one study, the photoperiod was changed from 12 h light/12 h dark to continuous light at 58 DAP. This caused a decrease in net photosynthetic rates within 48 h and eventual damage (scorching) of upper canopy leaves, suggesting the abrupt change stressed the plants and/or caused feedback effects on photosynthesis. Dark period (night) respiration rates increased during early growth as standing biomass increased and peaked near 9 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 ca. 50 DAP, after which rates declined gradually with age. Stand transpiration showed a rapid rise with canopy ground cover and peaked ca. 50 DAP near 8.9 L m-2 d-1 under 860 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF and near 6.3 L m-2 d-1 under 650 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Based on the best photosynthetic rates from these studies, approximately 25 m2 of potato plants under continuous cultivation would be required to support the CO2 removal and O2 requirements for one person.

  19. Oil price and exchange rate co-movements in Asian countries: Detrended cross-correlation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Muntazir; Zebende, Gilney Figueira; Bashir, Usman; Donghong, Ding

    2017-01-01

    Most empirical literature investigates the relation between oil prices and exchange rate through different models. These models measure this relationship on two time scales (long and short terms), and often fail to observe the co-movement of these variables at different time scales. We apply a detrended cross-correlation approach (DCCA) to investigate the co-movements of the oil price and exchange rate in 12 Asian countries. This model determines the co-movements of oil price and exchange rate at different time scale. The exchange rate and oil price time series indicate unit root problem. Their correlation and cross-correlation are very difficult to measure. The result becomes spurious when periodic trend or unit root problem occurs in these time series. This approach measures the possible cross-correlation at different time scale and controlling the unit root problem. Our empirical results support the co-movements of oil prices and exchange rate. Our results support a weak negative cross-correlation between oil price and exchange rate for most Asian countries included in our sample. The results have important monetary, fiscal, inflationary, and trade policy implications for these countries.

  20. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ - BF4-/PF6- ion pairs in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li+ and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li+ in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li+. We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  1. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-07

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  2. Forecasting of magnitude and duration of currency crises based on the analysis of distortions of fractal scaling in exchange rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritskaya, Olga Y.

    2005-05-01

    Results of fractal stability analysis of daily exchange rate fluctuations of more than 30 floating currencies for a 10-year period are presented. It is shown for the first time that small- and large-scale dynamical instabilities of national monetary systems correlate with deviations of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent from the value 1.5 predicted by the efficient market hypothesis. The observed dependence is used for classification of long-term stability of floating exchange rates as well as for revealing various forms of distortion of stable currency dynamics prior to large-scale crises. A normal range of DFA exponents consistent with crisis-free long-term exchange rate fluctuations is determined, and several typical scenarios of unstable currency dynamics with DFA exponents fluctuating beyond the normal range are identified. It is shown that monetary crashes are usually preceded by prolonged periods of abnormal (decreased or increased) DFA exponent, with the after-crash exponent tending to the value 1.5 indicating a more reliable exchange rate dynamics. Statistically significant regression relations (R=0.99, p<0.01) between duration and magnitude of currency crises and the degree of distortion of monofractal patterns of exchange rate dynamics are found. It is demonstrated that the parameters of these relations characterizing small- and large-scale crises are nearly equal, which implies a common instability mechanism underlying these events. The obtained dependences have been used as a basic ingredient of a forecasting technique which provided correct in-sample predictions of monetary crisis magnitude and duration over various time scales. The developed technique can be recommended for real-time monitoring of dynamical stability of floating exchange rate systems and creating advanced early-warning-system models for currency crisis prevention.

  3. FtsZ Filament Dynamics at Steady State: Subunit Exchange with and without Nucleotide Hydrolysis†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaodong; Erickson, Harold P.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured three aspects of FtsZ filament dynamics at steady state: rates of GTP hydrolysis, subunit exchange between protofilaments, and disassembly induced by dilution or excess GDP. All three reactions were slowed with an increase in the potassium concentration from 100 to 500 mM, via replacement of potassium with rubidium, or with an increase in the magnesium concentration from 5 to 20 mM. Electron microscopy showed that the polymers assembled under the conditions of fastest assembly were predominantly short, one-stranded protofilaments, whereas under conditions of slower dynamics, the protofilaments tended to associate into long, thin bundles. We suggest that exchange of subunits between protofilaments at steady state involves two separate mechanisms: (1) fragmentation or dissociation of subunits from protofilament ends following GTP hydrolysis and (2) reversible association and dissociation of subunits from protofilament ends independent of hydrolysis. Exchange of nucleotides on these recycling subunits could give the appearance of exchange directly into the polymer. Several of our observations suggest that exchange of nucleotide can take place on these recycling subunits, but not directly into the FtsZ polymer. Annealing of protofilaments was demonstrated for the L68W mutant in EDTA buffer but not in Mg buffer, where rapid cycling of subunits may obscure the effect of annealing. We also reinvestigated the nucleotide composition of FtsZ polymers at steady state. We found that the GDP:GTP ratio was 50:50 for concentrations of GTP > 100 μM, significantly higher than the 20:80 ratio previously reported at 20 μM GTP. PMID:19527070

  4. Hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry measures stapled peptide conformational dynamics and predicts pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo Eric; Wales, Thomas E; Elkin, Carl; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Engen, John R; Annis, D Allen

    2013-12-03

    Peptide drugs have traditionally suffered from poor pharmacokinetic properties due to their conformational flexibility and the interaction of proteases with backbone amide bonds. "Stapled Peptides" are cyclized using an all-hydrocarbon cross-linking strategy to reinforce their α-helical conformation, yielding improved protease resistance and drug-like properties. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) effectively probes the conformational dynamics of Stapled Peptides derived from the survivin-borealin protein-protein interface and predicts their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. In Stapled Peptides, amide exchange was reduced by over five orders-of-magnitude versus the native peptide sequence depending on staple placement. Furthermore, deuteration kinetics correlated directly with rates of proteolysis to reveal the optimal staple placement for improved drug properties.

  5. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  6. Multifractal analysis of managed and independent float exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stošić, Darko; Stošić, Dusan; Stošić, Tatijana; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-06-01

    We investigate multifractal properties of daily price changes in currency rates using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We analyze managed and independent floating currency rates in eight countries, and determine the changes in multifractal spectrum when transitioning between the two regimes. We find that after the transition from managed to independent float regime the changes in multifractal spectrum (position of maximum and width) indicate an increase in market efficiency. The observed changes are more pronounced for developed countries that have a well established trading market. After shuffling the series, we find that the multifractality is due to both probability density function and long term correlations for managed float regime, while for independent float regime multifractality is in most cases caused by broad probability density function.

  7. Dynamical exchange-correlation potentials beyond the local density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Vignale, Giovanni

    2006-03-01

    Approximations for the static exchange-correlation (xc) potential of density functional theory (DFT) have reached a high level of sophistication. By contrast, time-dependent xc potentials are still being treated in a local (although velocity-dependent) approximation [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich and S. Conti, PRL 79, 4879 (1997)]. Unfortunately, one of the assumptions upon which the dynamical local approximation is based appears to break down in the important case of d.c. transport. Here we propose a new approximation scheme, which should allow a more accurate treatment of molecular transport problems. As a first step, we separate the exact adiabatic xc potential, which has the same form as in the static theory and can be treated by a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or a meta-GGA. In the second step, we express the high-frequency limit of the xc stress tensor (whose divergence gives the xc force density) in terms of the exact static xc energy functional. Finally, we develop a perturbative scheme for the calculation of the frequency dependence of the xc stress tensor in terms of the ground-state Kohn-Sham orbitals and eigenvalues.

  8. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  9. Chaoticity in the time evolution of foreign currency exchange rates in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakar, O.; Aybar, O. O.; Hacinliyan, A. S.; Kusbeyzi, I.

    Tools from chaos theory that have found recent use in analysing financial markets have been applied to the US Dollar and Euro buying and selling rates against the Turkish currency. The reason for choosing the foreign exchange rate in this analysis is the fact that foreign currency is an indicator of not only the globalization of economy but also savings and investment. In order to test the globality assumption and to ascertain the degree of involvement of local conditions in Turkey, the Euro and US dollar exchange rates have been subjected to the same analysis.

  10. Effects of flow rate and temperature on cyclic gas exchange in tsetse flies (Diptera, Glossinidae).

    PubMed

    Terblanche, John S; Chown, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Air flow rates may confound the investigation and classification of insect gas exchange patterns. Here we report the effects of flow rates (50, 100, 200, 400 ml min(-1)) on gas exchange patterns in wild-caught Glossina morsitans morsitans from Zambia. At rest, G. m. morsitans generally showed continuous or cyclic gas exchange (CGE) but no evidence of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE). Flow rates had little influence on the ability to detect CGE in tsetse, at least in the present experimental setup and under these laboratory conditions. Importantly, faster flow rates resulted in similar gas exchange patterns to those identified at lower flower rates suggesting that G. m. morsitans did not show DGE which had been incorrectly identified as CGE at lower flow rates. While CGE cycle frequency was significantly different among the four flow rates (p<0.05), the direction of effects was inconsistent. Indeed, inter-individual variation in CGE cycle frequency exceeded flow rate treatment variation. Using a laboratory colony of closely related, similar-sized G. morsitans centralis we subsequently investigated the effects of temperature, gender and feeding status on CGE pattern variation since these factors can influence insect metabolic rates. At 100 ml min(-1) CGE was typical of G. m. centralis at rest, although it was significantly more common in females than in males (57% vs. 43% of 14 individuals tested per gender). In either sex, temperature (20, 24, 28 and 32 degrees C) had little influence on the number of individuals showing CGE. However, increases in metabolic rate with temperature were modulated largely by increases in burst volume and cycle frequency. This is unusual among insects showing CGE or DGE patterns because increases in metabolic rate are usually modulated by increases in frequency, but either no change or a decline in burst volume.

  11. The study of RMB exchange rate complex networks based on fluctuation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Can-Zhong; Lin, Ji-Nan; Zheng, Xu-Zhou; Liu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-10-01

    In the paper, we research on the characteristics of RMB exchange rate time series fluctuation with methods of symbolization and coarse gaining. First, based on fluctuation features of RMB exchange rate, we define the first type of fluctuation mode as one specific foreign currency against RMB in four days' fluctuating situations, and the second type as four different foreign currencies against RMB in one day's fluctuating situation. With the transforming method, we construct the unique-currency and multi-currency complex networks. Further, through analyzing the topological features including out-degree, betweenness centrality and clustering coefficient of fluctuation-mode complex networks, we find that the out-degree distribution of both types of fluctuation mode basically follows power-law distributions with exponents between 1 and 2. The further analysis reveals that the out-degree and the clustering coefficient generally obey the approximated negative correlation. With this result, we confirm previous observations showing that the RMB exchange rate exhibits a characteristic of long-range memory. Finally, we analyze the most probable transmission route of fluctuation modes, and provide probability prediction matrix. The transmission route for RMB exchange rate fluctuation modes exhibits the characteristics of partially closed loop, repeat and reversibility, which lays a solid foundation for predicting RMB exchange rate fluctuation patterns with large volume of data.

  12. Temporal Dynamics of Social Exchange and the Development of Solidarity: "Testing the Waters" versus "Taking a Leap of Faith"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwabara, Ko; Sheldon, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In their concerted efforts to unpack the microprocesses that transform repeated exchanges into an exchange relation, exchange theorists have paid little attention to how actors perceive changes and dynamics in exchanges over time. We help fill this gap by studying how temporal patterns of exchange affect the development of cohesion. Some exchange…

  13. Effects of respiratory rate and tidal volume on gas exchange in total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L; Tredici, Stefano; Fujioka, Hideki; Komori, Eisaku; Grotberg, James B; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2009-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of total liquid ventilation (TLV), and in a corresponding theoretical model, we compared nine tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations to identify a ventilator strategy to maximize gas exchange, while avoiding choked flow, during TLV. Nine different ventilation strategies were tested in each animal (n = 12): low [LR = 2.5 breath/min (bpm)], medium (MR = 5 bpm), or high (HR = 7.5 bpm) respiratory rates were combined with a low (LV = 10 ml/kg), medium (MV = 15 ml/kg), or high (HV = 20 ml/kg) tidal volumes. Blood gases and partial pressures, perfluorocarbon gas content, and airway pressures were measured for each combination. Choked flow occurred in all high respiratory rate-high volume animals, 71% of high respiratory rate-medium volume (HRMV) animals, and 50% of medium respiratory rate-high volume (MRHV) animals but in no other combinations. Medium respiratory rate-medium volume (MRMV) resulted in the highest gas exchange of the combinations that did not induce choke. The HRMV and MRHV animals that did not choke had similar or higher gas exchange than MRMV. The theory predicted this behavior, along with spatial and temporal variations in alveolar gas partial pressures. Of the combinations that did not induce choked flow, MRMV provided the highest gas exchange. Alveolar gas transport is diffusion dominated and rapid during gas ventilation but is convection dominated and slow during TLV. Consequently, the usual alveolar gas equation is not applicable for TLV.

  14. Mass spectrometric measurement of protein amide hydrogen exchange rates of apo- and holo-myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R. S.; Walsh, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates can provide detailed information concerning protein structure, dynamics, and interactions. Although nuclear magnetic resonance is typically used to provide these data, its use is restricted to lower molecular weight proteins that are soluble at millimolar concentrations. Not subject to these limitations is a mass spectrometric approach for measuring deuterium incorporation into proteins that are subsequently proteolyzed by pepsin; the resulting peptide masses are measured using a flowing-fast atom bombardment ionization source (Zhang Z, Smith DL, 1993, Protein Sci 2:522-531). In the current study, amide deuterium incorporation for intact apo- and holo-myoglobin was measured using liquid chromatography coupled directly to an electrospray ionization (LC/MS) source. Electrospray ionization provided a more complete coverage of the protein sequence and permitted the measurement of deuterium incorporation into intact proteins. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to rapidly identify the peptic peptides. It was found that within 30 s, the amides in apo-myoglobin were 47% deuterated, whereas holo-myoglobin was 12% deuterated. Peptic digestion and LC/MS demonstrated that regions represented by peptic peptides encompassing positions 1-7, 12-29, and 110-134 were not significantly altered by removal of the heme. Likewise, destabilized regions were identified within positions 33-106 and 138-153. PMID:7756994

  15. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  16. Exchange rate regimes, saving glut and the Feldstein Horioka puzzle: The East Asian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya-Bahçe, Seçil; Özmen, Erdal

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates whether the recent experience of the emerging East Asian countries with current account surpluses is consistent with the “saving glut” hypothesis and the Feldstein and Horioka puzzle. The evidence suggests that the saving retention coefficients declined substantially in most of the countries after an endogenous break date coinciding with a major exchange rate regime change with the 1997-1998 crisis. Exchange rate flexibility appears to be enhancing financial integration. The results are consistent with an “investment slump” explanation rather than the “saving glut” postulation.

  17. pH and urea dependence of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin.

    PubMed

    Houliston, R Scott; Liu, Chengsong; Singh, Laila M R; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-29

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates were measured as a function of pH and urea for 37 slowly exchanging amides in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin. The rank order of exchange rates is generally maintained under different solution conditions, and trends in the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates are correlated with the rank order of exchange rates. The observed trends are consistent with the expected behavior for exchange of different amides via global and/or local unfolding. Analysis of the pH dependence of exchange in terms of rate constants for structural opening and closing reveals a wide range of rates in different parts of the hisactophilin structure. The slowest exchanging amides have the slowest opening and closing rates. Many of the slowest exchanging amides are located in trefoil 2, but there are also some slow exchanging amides in trefoils 1 and 3. Slow exchangers tend to be near the interface between the beta-barrel and the beta-hairpin triplet portions of this single-domain structure. The pattern of exchange behaviour in hisactophilin is similar to that observed previously in interleukin-1 beta, indicating that exchange properties may be conserved among beta-trefoil proteins. Comparisons of opening and closing rates in hisactophilin with rates obtained for other proteins reveal clear trends for opening rates; however, trends in closing rates are less apparent, perhaps due to inaccuracies in the values used for intrinsic exchange rates in the data fitting. On the basis of the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates and optical measurements of stability and folding, EX2 is the main exchange mechanism in hisactophilin, but there is also evidence for varying levels of EX1 exchange at low and high pH and high urea concentrations. Equilibrium intermediates in which subglobal portions of structure are cooperatively disrupted are not apparent from analysis of the urea dependence of exchange rates. There is, however, a strong correlation between

  18. Optimal experimental design for filter exchange imaging: Apparent exchange rate measurements in the healthy brain and in intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Englund, Elisabet; C Sundgren, Pia; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Nilsson, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Filter exchange imaging (FEXI) is sensitive to the rate of diffusional water exchange, which depends, eg, on the cell membrane permeability. The aim was to optimize and analyze the ability of FEXI to infer differences in the apparent exchange rate (AXR) in the brain between two populations. Methods A FEXI protocol was optimized for minimal measurement variance in the AXR. The AXR variance was investigated by test‐retest acquisitions in six brain regions in 18 healthy volunteers. Preoperative FEXI data and postoperative microphotos were obtained in six meningiomas and five astrocytomas. Results Protocol optimization reduced the coefficient of variation of AXR by approximately 40%. Test‐retest AXR values were heterogeneous across normal brain regions, from 0.3 ± 0.2 s−1 in the corpus callosum to 1.8 ± 0.3 s−1 in the frontal white matter. According to analysis of statistical power, in all brain regions except one, group differences of 0.3–0.5 s−1 in the AXR can be inferred using 5 to 10 subjects per group. An AXR difference of this magnitude was observed between meningiomas (0.6 ± 0.1 s−1) and astrocytomas (1.0 ± 0.3 s−1). Conclusions With the optimized protocol, FEXI has the ability to infer relevant differences in the AXR between two populations for small group sizes. Magn Reson Med 77:1104–1114, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26968557

  19. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  20. Care Transitions in Long-term Care and Acute Care: Health Information Exchange and Readmission Rates.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Brian; Ko, Kelly J; Alvarez del Castillo, Rodolfo

    2015-09-30

    Care transitions between settings are a well-known cause of medical errors. A key component of transition is information exchange, especially in long-term care (LTC). However, LTC is behind other settings in adoption of health information technologies (HIT). In this article, we provide some brief background information about care transitions in LTC and concerns related to technology. We describe a pilot project using HIT and secure messaging in LTC to facilitate electronic information exchange during care transitions. Five LTC facilities were included, all located within Oklahoma and serviced by the same regional health system. The study duration was 20 months. Both inpatient readmission and return emergency department (ED) visit rates were lower than baseline following implementation. We provide discussion of positive outcomes, lessons learned, and limitations. Finally, we offer implications for practice and research for implementation of HIT and information exchange across care settings that may contribute to reduction in readmission rates in acute care and ED settings.

  1. Characterization of atmosphere-water exchange processes of CO 2 in estuaries using dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Luque, E.; Forja, J. M.; Gómez-Parra, A.

    2005-12-01

    CO 2 is one of the so-called "greenhouse effect" gases; therefore, its rates of water-atmosphere exchange are very relevant for studies of climate change. Coastal zones (which include estuarine systems) are of special interest in relation to the global carbon cycle. Thus, an estuary simulator, which operates in a dynamic mixing regime, is specifically applied in an initial study of the estuarine dynamic of inorganic carbon, focusing basically on the influence of salinity and pH on the water-atmosphere fluxes of CO 2 in these zones. The simulation has been performed under two assumptions: (i) considering that the system is subjected to a stationary gradient of salinity and (ii) taking into account the effect of the tides, owing to the daily oscillations introduced by this phenomenon in the process of CO 2 transfer between the water and the atmosphere. After analysing the results, it has been observed that a potential source of error exists when choosing the coefficients of gas exchange ( k) for CO 2 studies. Nevertheless, the evolution of CO 2 fluxes along the salinity and pH gradients achieved shows the same trends with those observed in a wide variety of real estuaries described in the related literature.

  2. Energy exchange rates between the ionosphere-thermosphere system and the magnetosphere at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A.; Cai, L.; Nygren, T.; Kuula, R.

    2012-04-01

    The magnetosphere and the ionosphere-thermosphere system exchange energy in the form of electromagnetic energy flux, accompanied by electric fields and field-aligned currents, as well as in the form of precipitating particle fluxes. In this study, we examine the first form of energy exchange by using a one-month database obtained by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements in Tromso. The electromagnetic energy exchange rate can be further divided into ion-neutral frictional heating rate (sometimes called Joule heating) and work done on neutrals. The ion-neutral frictional heating rate depends on Pedersen conductivity and on ionospheric electric fields, measured in the frame of reference moving with the neutrals. The role of neutral winds has been an open question, since it is difficult to measure them. The CP2 scan mode of the EISCAT radar makes it possible to deduce neutral winds in the E region and hence to estimate the role of neutral air motion (e.g. tidal winds and atmospheric gravity waves) in the energy exchange rates. In this talk, we will present the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of height-integrated quantities: electromagnetic energy exchange rates (QEM), ion-neutral frictional heating rate (QJ) and work done on neutrals (Qm) for different magnetic activity levels categorized by the Kp index. We will show that the role of winds is different in different MLT sectors (e.g. dusk vs. dawn) and at different activity levels. We will also show that on rare occasions the ionosphere can act as a dynamo generating electromagnetic energy that may propagate to the magnetosphere.

  3. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 KExchange rates up to 8.5×10(4) s(-1) could be determined (i.e., lifetimes as short as 12 μs). The three chemical shifts δH(i) of the invisible exchanging protons H(i) and the three one-bond scalar coupling constants (1)J(N,H(i)) could also be determined accurately.

  4. Probabilistic estimation of residential air exchange rates for population-based human exposure modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are a key determinant in the infiltration of ambient air pollution indoors. Population-based human exposure models using probabilistic approaches to estimate personal exposure to air pollutants have relied on input distributions from AER meas...

  5. Improving NO(x) cap-and-trade system with adjoint-based emission exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2012-11-06

    Cap-and-trade programs have proven to be effective instruments for achieving environmental goals while incurring minimum cost. The nature of the pollutant, however, affects the design of these programs. NO(x), an ozone precursor, is a nonuniformly mixed pollutant with a short atmospheric lifetime. NO(x) cap-and-trade programs in the U.S. are successful in reducing total NO(x) emissions but may result in suboptimal environmental performance because location-specific ozone formation potentials are neglected. In this paper, the current NO(x) cap-and-trade system is contrasted to a hypothetical NO(x) trading policy with sensitivity-based exchange rates. Location-specific exchange rates, calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis, are combined with constrained optimization for prediction of NO(x) emissions trading behavior and post-trade ozone concentrations. The current and proposed policies are examined in a case study for 218 coal-fired power plants that participated in the NO(x) Budget Trading Program in 2007. We find that better environmental performance at negligibly higher system-wide abatement cost can be achieved through inclusion of emission exchange rates. Exposure-based exchange rates result in better environmental performance than those based on concentrations.

  6. A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, David T.; Rebelein, Robert P.; Schneider, Patricia H.; Simpson, Nicole B.; Fisher, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a classroom experiment on exchange rate determination appropriate for undergraduate courses in macroeconomics and international economics. In the experiment, students represent citizens from different countries and need to obtain currency to purchase goods. By participating in an auction to buy currency, students gain a…

  7. Probing exchange kinetics and atomic resolution dynamics in high-molecular-weight complexes using dark-state exchange saturation transfer NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fawzi, Nicolas L; Ying, Jinfa; Torchia, Dennis A; Clore, G Marius

    2012-07-19

    We present the protocol for the measurement and analysis of dark-state exchange saturation transfer (DEST), a novel solution NMR method for characterizing, at atomic resolution, the interaction between an NMR-'visible' free species and an NMR-'invisible' species transiently bound to a very high-molecular-weight (>1 MDa) macromolecular entity. The reduced rate of reorientational motion in the bound state that precludes characterization by traditional NMR methods permits the observation of DEST. (15)N-DEST profiles are measured on a sample comprising the dark state in exchange with an NMR-visible species; in addition, the difference (ΔR(2)) in (15)N transverse relaxation rates between this sample and a control sample comprising only the NMR-visible species is also obtained. The (15)N-DEST and ΔR(2) data for all residues are then fitted simultaneously to the McConnell equations for various exchange models describing the residue-specific dynamics in the bound state(s) and the interconversion rate constants. Although the length of the experiments depends strongly on sample conditions, approximately 1 week of NMR spectrometer time was sufficient for full characterization of samples of amyloid-β (Aβ) at concentrations of ~100 μM.

  8. Solution dynamics of the trp repressor: a study of amide proton exchange by T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gryk, M R; Finucane, M D; Zheng, Z; Jardetzky, O

    1995-03-10

    The amide proton exchange rates of Escherichia coli trp repressor have been measured through their effects on the longitudinal relaxation rates of the amide protons. Three types of exchange regimes have been observed: (1) slow exchange (on a minute/hour time-scale), measurable by isotope exchange, but not by relaxation techniques in the core of the molecule; (2) relatively rapid exchange, with the rates on a T1 relaxation time-scale (seconds) in the DNA-binding region and (3) very fast exchange at the N and C termini. The results have been analyzed in terms of the two-site exchange model originally proposed by Linderstrøm-Lang, and of a three-site extension of the model. The values of the intrinsic exchange rates calculated using the two-state model agree with the values expected from the studies of Englander and co-workers for the very fast case of the chain terminals, but disagree with the literature values by two orders of magnitude in the intermediate case found in the DNA-binding region. The implication of these findings is that the "open" state of the two-state model in the DNA-binding region is not completely open and has an intrinsic exchange rate different from that of a random coil peptide. Alternatively, if the literature values of the intrinsic exchange rates are assumed to apply to the open states in all parts of the repressor molecule, two "closed" helical states have to be postulated, in slow exchange with each other, with only one of them in rapid exchange with the open state and hence with the solvent. Kinetically, the two models are indistinguishable.

  9. Twin plane decoration of silver nanorods with palladium by galvanic exchange at a controlled rate.

    PubMed

    Sławiński, Grzegorz W; Ivanova, Olga S; Zamborini, Francis P

    2011-11-01

    Here we describe the galvanic exchange of surface-grown Ag nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs) with PdCl(4)(2-) as a function of the PdCl(4)(2-) concentration. The morphology of the resulting AgPd alloy nanostructures depends on the galvanic exchange rate, which increases with increasing PdCl(4)(2-) concentration over a specific concentration range. When the concentration of PdCl(4)(2-) exceeds 7.5 × 10(-5) M (or ratio of moles of PdCl(4)(2-) in solution to moles of Ag on the surface > 542), rapid galvanic exchange results in Pd deposition over the entire Ag nanostructure in the early stages of exchange. When the concentration of PdCl(4)(2-) is in the range of 1.0 × 10(-5) to 5.0 × 10(-5) M (moles of PdCl(4)(2-) in solution to moles of Ag on the surface = 13-54), Pd deposition occurs preferentially at high energy twin plane defects in the form of well-spaced nanoparticles during the early stages of exchange. In later stages, the Pd deposits grow and coalescence into a rough shell, and etching of the Ag leads to a presumably hollow nanostructure. Composition analysis by linear sweep voltammetry as a function of time shows that the galvanic exchange rate is much slower than the diffusion-limited rate and, when correlated with UV-vis spectroscopy, shows that less than 10% Pd in the nanostructure completely dampens the Ag-localized surface plasmon band.

  10. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  11. A macro-physics model of depreciation rate in economic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmont Lobo, Rui F.; de Sousa, Miguel Rocha

    2014-02-01

    This article aims at a new approach for a known fundamental result: barter or trade increases economic value. It successfully bridges the gap between the theory of value and the exchange process attached to the transition from endowments to the equilibrium in the core and contract curve. First, we summarise the theory of value; in Section 2, we present the Edgeworth (1881) box and an axiomatic approach and in Section 3, we apply our pure exchange model. Finally (in Section 4), using our open econo-physics pure barter (EPB) model, we derive an improvement in value, which means that pure barter leads to a decline in depreciation rate.

  12. A Kinetic Assay of Mitochondrial ATP-ADP Exchange Rate in Permeabilized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A; Manfredi, Giovanni; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    We have previously described a method to measure ADP-ATP exchange rates in isolated mitochondria by recording the changes in free extramitochondrial [Mg2+] reported by a Mg2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP to Mg2+. In this manuscript we describe a modification of this method suited for following ADP-ATP exchange rates in environments with competing reactions that interconvert adenine nucleotides, such as in permeabilized cells that harbor phosphorylases and kinases, ion pumps exhibiting substantial ATPase activity and myosin ATPase activity. Here we report that addition of BeF3− and Na3VO4 to media containing digitonin-permeabilized cells inhibit all ATP-ADP utilizing reactions, except the ANT-mediated mitochondrial ATP-ADP exchange. An advantage of this assay is that mitochondria that may have been also permeabilized by digitonin do not contribute to ATP consumption by the exposed F1Fo-ATPase, due to its sensitivity to BeF3− and Na3VO4. With this assay, ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in permeabilized cells is measured for the entire range of mitochondrial membrane potential titrated by stepwise additions of an uncoupler, and expressed as a function of citrate synthase activity per total amount of protein. PMID:20691655

  13. A kinetic assay of mitochondrial ADP-ATP exchange rate in permeabilized cells.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A; Manfredi, Giovanni; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2010-12-01

    We previously described a method to measure ADP-ATP exchange rates in isolated mitochondria by recording the changes in free extramitochondrial [Mg(2+)] reported by an Mg(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicator, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP to Mg(2+). In the current article, we describe a modification of this method suited for following ADP-ATP exchange rates in environments with competing reactions that interconvert adenine nucleotides such as in permeabilized cells that harbor phosphorylases and kinases, ion pumps exhibiting substantial ATPase activity, and myosin ATPase activity. Here we report that the addition of BeF(3)(-) and sodium orthovanadate (Na(3)VO(4)) to medium containing digitonin-permeabilized cells inhibits all ADP-ATP-using reactions except the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-mediated mitochondrial ADP-ATP exchange. An advantage of this assay is that mitochondria that may have been also permeabilized by digitonin do not contribute to ATP consumption by the exposed F(1)F(o)-ATPase due to its sensitivity to BeF(3)(-) and Na(3)VO(4). With this assay, ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in permeabilized cells is measured for the entire range of mitochondrial membrane potential titrated by stepwise additions of an uncoupler and expressed as a function of citrate synthase activity per total amount of protein.

  14. HTO washout model: on the relationship between exchange rate and washout coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Balashov, Y.; Mavrin, S.; Golubeva, V.; Galeriu, D.

    2015-03-15

    Washout coefficient Λ is widely used as a parameter in washout models. These models describes overall HTO washout with rain by a first-order kinetic equation, while washout coefficient Λ depends on the type of rain event and rain intensity and empirical parameters a, b. The washout coefficient is a macroscopic parameter and we have considered in this paper its relationship with a microscopic rate K of HTO isotopic exchange in atmospheric humidity and drops of rainwater. We have shown that the empirical parameters a, b can be represented through the rain event characteristics using the relationships of molecular impact rate, rain intensity and specific rain water content while washout coefficient Λ can be represented through the exchange rate K, rain intensity, raindrop diameter and terminal raindrop velocity.

  15. A Novel Kinetic Assay of Mitochondrial ATP-ADP Exchange Rate Mediated by the ANT

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Vajda, Szilvia; Csanády, László; Mándi, Miklós; Mathe, Katalin; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2009-01-01

    A novel method exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP to Mg2+ was developed to measure mitochondrial ADP-ATP exchange rate. The rate of ATP appearing in the medium after addition of ADP to energized mitochondria, is calculated from the measured rate of change in free extramitochondrial [Mg2+] reported by the membrane-impermeable 5K+ salt of the Mg2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator, Magnesium Green, using standard binding equations. The assay is designed such that the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is the sole mediator of changes in [Mg2+] in the extramitochondrial volume, as a result of ADP-ATP exchange. We also provide data on the dependence of ATP efflux rate within the 6.8–7.8 matrix pH range as a function of membrane potential. Finally, by comparing the ATP-ADP steady-state exchange rate to the amount of the ANT in rat brain synaptic, brain nonsynaptic, heart and liver mitochondria, we provide molecular turnover numbers for the known ANT isotypes. PMID:19289073

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for l > 1 spins in dynamically heterogeneous systems with chemical exchange among environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Bryant, R G

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for nuclei with spin l > 1 are considered in cases in which the observed nucleus may sample a rotationally immobilized and an isotropic environment that are coupled by a chemical exchange process. Spectra are simulated for the central (1/2, -1/2) transition for a 3/2 nucleus as a function of the concentrations of the two environments and as a function of the exchange rate between them. It is shown that a crucial feature determining the shape of the observable spectra is the spatial extent or the local order in the immobilized phase. In the case for which all rotationally immobilized sites sampled by the exchanging nucleus are identically oriented but where there is a distribution of these microdomain orientations with respect to the magnetic field direction, a powder pattern for the central transition is observed that carries whatever dynamic information may be derived from it. In the fast exchange limit, the width of the powder pattern scales inversely with the concentration of the isotropic environment as usual. In the intermediate exchange regimes, a complex line shape results that may mask the anisotropic character of the spectrum. In the slow exchange limit, superposition of the spectral contributions results; however, if the isotropic environment concentration is significantly larger than the anisotropic environment concentration, the anisotropic contribution is very difficult to detect because of the dynamic range problem and the possibly large difference in the effective line widths. In the case for which the exchanging nucleus samples a considerable distribution of rotationally immobilized site orientations, the anisotropic character of the spectrum is lost and a super-Lorentzian line shape results. These effects are demonstrated experimentally by 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained on a lamellar liquid crystal that is modified with the addition of a thiolmercurate to provide a site of large quadrupole

  17. Water-air and soil-air exchange rate of total gaseous mercury measured at background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Laurier; Casimir, Alain

    In order to evaluate and understand the processes of water-air and soil-air exchanges involved at background sites, an intensive field measurement campaign has been achieved during the summer of 1995 using high-time resolution techniques (10 min) at two sites (land and water) in southern Québec (Canada). Mercury flux was measured using a dynamic flux chamber technique coupled with an automatic mercury vapour-phase analyser (namely, Tekran®). The flux chamber shows that the rural grassy site acted primarily as a source of atmospheric mercury, its flux mimicked the solar radiation, with a maximum daytime value of ˜ 8.3 ng m -2 h -1 of TGM. The water surface location (St. Lawrence River site located about 3 km from the land site) shows deposition and evasion fluxes almost in the same order of magnitude (-0.5 vs 1.0 ng m -2 h -1).The latter is influenced to some extent by solar radiation but primarily by the formation of a layer of stable air over the water surface in which some redox reactions might promote evasion processes over the water surface. This process does not appear over the soil surface. As a whole, soil-air exchange rate is about 6-8 fold greater than the water-air exchange.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Heat transfer rate of Nano fluids using a Shell and Tube Heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SIVA ESWARA RAO, M.; SREERAMULU, DOWLURU; ASIRI NAIDU, D.

    2016-09-01

    Nano fluids are used for increasing thermal properties in heat transfer equipment like heat exchangers, radiators etc. This paper investigates the heat transfer rate of Nano fluids using a shell and tube heat exchanger in single and multi tubes under turbulent flow condition by a forced convection mode. Alumina Nanoparticles are prepared by using Sol-Gel method. Heat transfer rate increases with decreasing particle size. In this experiment Alumina Nano particles of about 22 nm diameter used. Alumina Nano fluids are prepared with different concentrations of Alumina particles (0.13%, 0.27%, 0.4%, and 0.53%) with water as a base fluid using ultra-sonicator. Experiment have been conducted on shell and tube heat exchanger for the above concentrations on parallel and counter flow conditions by keeping constant inlet temperatures and mass flow rate. The result shows that the heat transfer rate is good compared to conventional fluids. The properties of Nano fluids and non-dimensional numbers have been calculated.

  19. Dynamic Patterns, Parameters, and Climatic Response of CO2 Exchange of Agricultural Crops: Monocotyledons VS. Dicotyledons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Net CO2 exchange data from long-term flux tower measurements in monocotyledonous (wheat, maize) and dicotyledonous (soybeans, alfalfa, peas, peanuts) crops were partitioned into photosynthesis (P) and respiration (R) using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. Analysis of the resulting time series of P and R revealed patterns of temporal and phenological dynamics in these plant groups. We established differences in ranges and dynamic patterns of P and R as well as CO2 exchange parameters (quantum yield, photosynthetic capacity, respiration rate, light-use efficiency, curvature of the VPD response). Weekly P and R data combined with remotely sensed 7-day eMODIS NDVI allow identification of the quasi-linear relationships between P, R, and NDVI, as well as estimation of parameters of NDVI response (start of the growing season, duration of the linearity period, slope of NDVI response). While the linear-like patterns occur early in the season, later the flux response to NDVI becomes less pronounced, and for the whole season the flux-NDVI relationship assumes a hysteresis-like pattern. Introduction of VPD and soil moisture limitation as well as phenological controls (growing degree days) leads to more flexible models for P and R in relation to NDVI and on-site drivers. These models allow mapping of the cropland CO2 exchange at regional and larger scales (e.g., the Great Plains). Significant relationships of the crop GPP to the seasonally integrated NDVI were also established, providing an opportunity for mapping of crop productivity using geographically distributed historic NDVI data. On the other hand, long time series (6 to 12 years and longer) of weekly P and R data lead to models of annual photosynthesis and respiration in response to climatic factors that may be used for prognostic purposes. We developed a model of maize GPP on the Great Plains in relation to the sum of temperatures above 5 °C and the hydrologic year precipitation. The model describes 75

  20. Dynamic nonlinear vago-sympathetic interaction in regulating heart rate.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, K; Kawada, T; Nakahara, T

    1998-01-01

    Although the characteristics of the static interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in regulating heart rate have been well established, how the dynamic interaction modulates the heart rate response remains unknown. Thus, we investigated the dynamic interaction by estimating the transfer function from nerve stimulation to heart rate, using band-limited Gaussian white noise, in anesthetized rabbits. Concomitant tonic vagal stimulation at 5 and 10 Hz increased the gain of the transfer function relating dynamic sympathetic stimulation to heart rate by 55.0%+/-40.1% and 80.7%+/-50.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Concomitant tonic sympathetic stimulation at 5 and 10 Hz increased the gain of the transfer function relating dynamic vagal stimulation to heart rate by 18.2%+/-17.9% and 24.1%+/-18.0%, respectively (P < 0.05). Such bidirectional augmentation was also observed during simultaneous dynamic stimulation of the sympathetic and vagal nerves independent of their stimulation patterns. Because of these characteristics, changes in sympathetic or vagal tone alone can alter the dynamic heart rate response to stimulation of the other nerve. We explained this phenomenon by assuming a sigmoidal static relationship between autonomic nerve activity and heart rate. To confirm this assumption, we identified the static and dynamic characteristics of heart rate regulation by a neural network analysis, using large-amplitude Gaussian white noise input. To examine the mechanism involved in the bidirectional augmentation, we increased cytosolic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) at the postjunctional effector site by applying pharmacological interventions. The cAMP accumulation increased the gain of the transfer function relating dynamic vagal stimulation to heart rate. Thus, accumulation of cAMP contributes, at least in part, to the sympathetic augmentation of the dynamic vagal control of heart rate.

  1. Effects of oil prices and exchange rates on world oil consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.P.A.; Phillips, K.R.

    1984-07-01

    From 1980 to 1983, oil consumption in most industrial countries declined, even though the real dollar price of oil fell and world economic activity increased. A common explanation for this decline is that consumers continued to adjust to the sharp oil price increase occurring in 1979. A more-complete analysis reveals that exchange-rate movements have also reduced oil consumption. Because world oil prices are denominated in US dollars, movements in exchange rates can alter the price of oil faced by countries other than the United States. In fact, increases in the value of the dollar raised the effective price of oil for some major industrial countries to levels that were higher in 1983 than in 1980. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  2. Historical changes in US dollar exchange rate and real value of oil

    SciTech Connect

    DeMis, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Oil prices relative to world currencies are now at unprecedented lows, as shown by a price analysis that incorporates the effect of US dollar exchange rates on the value of oil. A commodity-based analysis corroborates this exchange-rate analysis. The value of oil today on world markets is even below its 1969 level (the nadir of the previous oil bust). The inflation-corrected price of oil (using the producer price index) in the US has increased 130% since 1969. However, the US dollar has lost over 40% of its value relative to G-7 currencies since abandonment of the Bretton Woods agreement in 1971. Therefore, the real value of oil an international markets is 20% below its 1969 level. Since 1988 alone, the dollar has lost 16% relative to the G-7 currencies. Oil producing countries are taking extreme revenue cuts caused by the eroding US dollar.

  3. Historical changes in US dollar exchange rate and real value of oil

    SciTech Connect

    DeMis, W.D. )

    1996-01-01

    Oil prices relative to world currencies are now at unprecedented lows, as shown by a price analysis that incorporates the effect of US dollar exchange rates on the value of oil. A commodity-based analysis corroborates this exchange-rate analysis. The value of oil today on world markets is even below its 1969 level (the nadir of the previous oil bust). The inflation-corrected price of oil (using the producer price index) in the US has increased 130% since 1969. However, the US dollar has lost over 40% of its value relative to G-7 currencies since abandonment of the Bretton Woods agreement in 1971. Therefore, the real value of oil an international markets is 20% below its 1969 level. Since 1988 alone, the dollar has lost 16% relative to the G-7 currencies. Oil producing countries are taking extreme revenue cuts caused by the eroding US dollar.

  4. Selection, Evaluation, and Rating of Compact Heat Exchangers v. 1.006

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-09

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NIST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of the process flows.

  5. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  6. Simulations of the water exchange dynamics of lanthanide ions in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate ([EMIm][EtSO4]) and water.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yi-Jung; Allen, Matthew J; Cisneros, G Andrés

    2016-11-09

    The dynamics of ligand exchange on lanthanide ions is important for catalysis and organic reactions. Recent (17)O-NMR experiments have shown that water-exchange rates of lanthanide ions in water/1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate (water/[EMIm][EtSO4]) increase as a function of increasing charge density. The trend of water-exchange rates in this solvent is opposite to that observed in water. Since the lanthanide ions and ionic liquids investigated in that work were highly charged, an advanced polarizable potential is desirable for accurate simulations. To this end, we have developed atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) parameters for all lanthanides and [EMIm][EtSO4], and molecular dynamics simulations with the optimized parameters have been carried out to provide possible explanations for these observed behaviors from the experiments. In water, the association of a water molecule with the first hydration shell can lead to water exchange. Smaller lanthanide ions exhibit slower water-exchange rates than larger ones because they form smaller aqua complexes, preventing the binding of incoming water molecules from the outer hydration shells. By contrast, smaller lanthanide ions undergo faster water exchange in water/[EMIm][EtSO4] because the dissociation of a water molecule is a key step for water-exchange events in this solvent. The first shell [EtSO4](-) anions bind closer to the smaller lanthanide ions, resulting in more steric crowding effects on the surrounding water and facilitating the release of water molecules.

  7. A comprehensive molecular dynamics approach to protein retention modeling in ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Dürr, Cathrin; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-02-13

    In downstream processing, the underlying adsorption mechanism of biomolecules to adsorbent material are still subject of extensive research. One approach to more mechanistic understanding is simulating this adsorption process and hereby the possibility to identify the parameters with strongest impact. So far this method was applied with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two model proteins on one cation exchanger. In this work we developed a molecular dynamics tool to simulate protein-adsorber interaction for various proteins on an anion exchanger and ran gradient elution experiments to relate the simulation results to experimental data. We were able to show that simulation results yield similar results as experimental data regarding retention behavior as well as binding orientation. We could identify arginines in case of cation exchangers and aspartic acids in case of anion exchangers as major contributors to binding.

  8. Water and ions in clays: Unraveling the interlayer/micropore exchange using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Benjamin; Marry, Virginie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Malikova, Natalie; Simon, Christian; Turq, Pierre

    2007-11-01

    We present the first microscopic description of the exchange of water and ions between clay interlayers and microporosity. A force field based on ab-initio calculations is developed and used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. The latter allow to compute the potential of mean force for the interlayer/micropore exchange for water, Na + and Cs + cations and Cl - anions. For the simulated water content (water bilayer, with interlayer spacing 15.4 Å) and salt concentration in the micropore (0.52 mol dm -3) the exchange is found to be almost not activated for water and cations, whereas the entrance of an anion into the interlayer is strongly unfavorable ( ΔF˜9kT). Calculations of the diffusion tensor in the interlayer and in the micropore complete the study of the exchange dynamics.

  9. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate.

  10. Dynamic Characteristics of Ventilatory and Gas Exchange during Sinusoidal Walking in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Iihoshi, Masaaki; Nazunin, Juhelee Tuba; Abe, Daijiro; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Our present study investigated whether the ventilatory and gas exchange responses show different dynamics in response to sinusoidal change in cycle work rate or walking speed even if the metabolic demand was equivalent in both types of exercise. Locomotive parameters (stride length and step frequency), breath-by-breath ventilation (V̇E) and gas exchange (CO2 output (V̇CO2) and O2 uptake (V̇O2)) responses were measured in 10 healthy young participants. The speed of the treadmill was sinusoidally changed between 3 km·h-1 and 6 km·h-1 with various periods (from 10 to 1 min). The amplitude of locomotive parameters against sinusoidal variation showed a constant gain with a small phase shift, being independent of the oscillation periods. In marked contrast, when the periods of the speed oscillations were shortened, the amplitude of V̇E decreased sharply whereas the phase shift of V̇E increased. In comparing walking and cycling at the equivalent metabolic demand, the amplitude of V̇E during sinusoidal walking (SW) was significantly greater than that during sinusoidal cycling (SC), and the phase shift became smaller. The steeper slope of linear regression for the V̇E amplitude ratio to V̇CO2 amplitude ratio was observed during SW than SC. These findings suggested that the greater amplitude and smaller phase shift of ventilatory dynamics were not equivalent between SW and SC even if the metabolic demand was equivalent between both exercises. Such phenomenon would be derived from central command in proportion to locomotor muscle recruitment (feedforward) and muscle afferent feedback. PMID:28076413

  11. Evaluation and comparison of diffusion MR methods for measuring apparent transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong

    2017-02-01

    Two diffusion-based approaches, CG (constant gradient) and FEXI (filtered exchange imaging) methods, have been previously proposed for measuring transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, but their accuracy and feasibility have not been comprehensively evaluated and compared. In this work, both computer simulations and cell experiments in vitro were performed to evaluate these two methods. Simulations were done with different cell diameters (5, 10, 20 μm), a broad range of kin values (0.02-30 s-1) and different SNR's, and simulated kin's were directly compared with the ground truth values. Human leukemia K562 cells were cultured and treated with saponin to selectively change cell transmembrane permeability. The agreement between measured kin's of both methods was also evaluated. The results suggest that, without noise, the CG method provides reasonably accurate estimation of kin especially when it is smaller than 10 s-1, which is in the typical physiological range of many biological tissues. However, although the FEXI method overestimates kin even with corrections for the effects of extracellular water fraction, it provides reasonable estimates with practical SNR's and more importantly, the fitted apparent exchange rate AXR showed approximately linear dependence on the ground truth kin. In conclusion, either CG or FEXI method provides a sensitive means to characterize the variations in transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, although the accuracy and specificity is usually compromised. The non-imaging CG method provides more accurate estimation of kin, but limited to large volume-of-interest. Although the accuracy of FEXI is compromised with extracellular volume fraction, it is capable of spatially mapping kin in practice.

  12. Interactions between heart rate variability and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Sin, Peter Y W; Webber, Matthew R; Galletly, Duncan C; Ainslie, Philip N; Brown, Stephen J; Willie, Chris K; Sasse, Alexander; Larsen, Peter D; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2010-07-01

    The respiratory component of heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) has been associated with improved pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans via the apparent clustering and scattering of heart beats in time with the inspiratory and expiratory phases of alveolar ventilation, respectively. However, since human RSA causes only marginal redistribution of heart beats to inspiration, we tested the hypothesis that any association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be indirect. In 11 patients with fixed-rate cardiac pacemakers and 10 healthy control subjects, we recorded R-R intervals, respiratory flow, end-tidal gas tension and the ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide and oxygen during 'fast' (0.25 Hz) and 'slow' paced breathing (0.10 Hz). Mean heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure fluctuations, tidal volume, end-tidal CO(2), and were similar between pacemaker and control groups in both the fast and slow breathing conditions. Although pacemaker patients had no RSA and slow breathing was associated with a 2.5-fold RSA amplitude increase in control subjects (39 +/- 21 versus 97 +/- 45 ms, P < 0.001), comparable (main effect for breathing frequency, F(1,19) = 76.54, P < 0.001) and reductions (main effect for breathing frequency, F(1,19) = 23.90, P < 0.001) were observed for both cohorts during slow breathing. In addition, the degree of (r = 0.36, P = 0.32) and reductions (r = 0.29, P = 0.43) from fast to slow breathing were not correlated to the degree of associated RSA amplitude enhancements in control subjects. These findings suggest that the association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency during variable-frequency paced breathing observed in prior human work is not contingent on RSA being present. Therefore, whether RSA serves an intrinsic physiological function in optimizing pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans requires further experimental validation.

  13. Evaluation and comparison of diffusion MR methods for measuring apparent transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Gore, John C; Xu, Junzhong

    2017-02-01

    Two diffusion-based approaches, CG (constant gradient) and FEXI (filtered exchange imaging) methods, have been previously proposed for measuring transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, but their accuracy and feasibility have not been comprehensively evaluated and compared. In this work, both computer simulations and cell experiments in vitro were performed to evaluate these two methods. Simulations were done with different cell diameters (5, 10, 20μm), a broad range of kin values (0.02-30s(-1)) and different SNR's, and simulated kin's were directly compared with the ground truth values. Human leukemia K562 cells were cultured and treated with saponin to selectively change cell transmembrane permeability. The agreement between measured kin's of both methods was also evaluated. The results suggest that, without noise, the CG method provides reasonably accurate estimation of kin especially when it is smaller than 10s(-1), which is in the typical physiological range of many biological tissues. However, although the FEXI method overestimates kin even with corrections for the effects of extracellular water fraction, it provides reasonable estimates with practical SNR's and more importantly, the fitted apparent exchange rate AXR showed approximately linear dependence on the ground truth kin. In conclusion, either CG or FEXI method provides a sensitive means to characterize the variations in transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, although the accuracy and specificity is usually compromised. The non-imaging CG method provides more accurate estimation of kin, but limited to large volume-of-interest. Although the accuracy of FEXI is compromised with extracellular volume fraction, it is capable of spatially mapping kin in practice.

  14. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for development of quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that the omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST (PARACEST) MRI. However, the use of omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct RF saturation (spillover) effects owing to their relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the RF spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot are in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increases linearly with creatine concentration (P< 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (P=0.32). In summary, our study extended the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. PMID:24706610

  15. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  16. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics formalism for Marcus theory of heterogeneous and self-exchange electron-transfer rate constants.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Richa; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2008-05-08

    The cross-exchange electron-transfer rate constant expression of Marcus is derived from the Flux-force formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The relationship governing the Onsager's phenomenological coefficients for cross-exchange and self-exchange electron-transfer processes is deduced. Onsager's phenomenological coefficient pertaining to the Butler-Volmer equation is derived and estimated from the experimental exchange current densities. The correlation between the heterogeneous and the homogeneous electron-transfer rate constants derived by Marcus is analyzed in terms of the corresponding phenomenological coefficients.

  17. Influence of a wick lining on the evaporation rate of lithium from a charge exchange canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, N. S.; Berger, S.; Dworschak, F.

    1992-02-01

    A wick lining is used with a lithium charge exchange canal for reducing the consumption of lithium. The wick helps to condense the lithium vapour more effectively and to make it flow back to the main oven. For its efficient functioning, the temperature gradient along the wick has to be properly maintained. The present studies were carried out to assess the extent of reduction in lithium loss when using the wick and to determine the optimum temperature settings. The evaporation rate of lithium vapour from a charge exchange canal (General Ionex Model-712) has been investigated in the temperature range from 470 to 575° C. The measurements were carried out with and without a stainless steel wire mesh wick lining, inside the canal. A quartz crystal oscillator type rate meter was used for monitoring the evaporation rate. The results indicate that, when the wick lining is inserted, the reduction in evaporation rate of lithium is only 20%. This differs much from the result of Greenway [Report 85/11, Oxford University, Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1985)] who reported a reduction by a factor of 8. The evaporation rate is also found to depend on the canal end heater temperature, maintained high enough to keep the condensing vapour in liquid state. The optimum temperature settings for the end heaters have been found to be 300 ° C. The experimental arrangements and results are presented in this paper.

  18. Dynamical exchange-correlation potentials for the electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zhixin; Vignale, Giovanni

    2002-03-01

    The imaginary parts of the exchange-correlation kernels f_xc^L,T(q=0, ω) in the linear density-density and transverse current-current response functions of a homogeneous electron liquid are calculated exactly at low frequency, to leading order in the Coulomb interaction. Combining these new results with the previously known high-frequency behaviors of Im f_xc^L,T(q=0, ω) and with the compressibility and the third frequency moment sum rules, we construct simple interpolation for Im f_xc^L,T(q=0, ω) in 3- and 2- dimensions. A novel feature of our interpolation formulas is that they explicitly take into account the two-plasmon component of the excitation spectrum: our longitudinal spectrum Im f_xc^L(q=0, ω) is thus intermediate between the Gross-Kohn interpolation, which ignores the two-plasmon contribution, and a recent approximate calculation by Nifosi, Conti, and Tosi, which probably overestimates it. Numerical results for both the real and imaginary parts of the exchange-correlation kernels at typical electron densities are presented, and compared with those obtained from previous approximations.

  19. Cluster fusion-fission dynamics in the Singapore stock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the cross-correlations between stocks in the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) evolve over 2008 and 2009 within overlapping one-month time windows. In particular, we examine how these cross-correlations change before, during, and after the Sep-Oct 2008 Lehman Brothers Crisis. To do this, we extend the complete-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm, to obtain robust clusters of stocks with stronger intracluster correlations, and weaker intercluster correlations. After we identify the robust clusters in all time windows, we visualize how these change in the form of a fusion-fission diagram. Such a diagram depicts graphically how the cluster sizes evolve, the exchange of stocks between clusters, as well as how strongly the clusters mix. From the fusion-fission diagram, we see a giant cluster growing and disintegrating in the SGX, up till the Lehman Brothers Crisis in September 2008 and the market crashes of October 2008. After the Lehman Brothers Crisis, clusters in the SGX remain small for few months before giant clusters emerge once again. In the aftermath of the crisis, we also find strong mixing of component stocks between clusters. As a result, the correlation between initially strongly-correlated pairs of stocks decay exponentially with average life time of about a month. These observations impact strongly how portfolios and trading strategies should be formulated.

  20. Ultrafast 2D-IR and simulation investigations of preferential solvation and cosolvent exchange dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Josef A; Arthur, Evan J; White, Aaron M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2015-05-21

    Using a derivative of the vitamin biotin labeled with a transition-metal carbonyl vibrational probe in a series of aqueous N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions, we observe a striking slowdown in spectral diffusion dynamics with decreased DMF concentration. Equilibrium solvation dynamics, measured with the rapidly acquired spectral diffusion (RASD) technique, a variant of heterodyne-detected photon-echo peak shift experiments, range from 1 ps in neat DMF to ∼3 ps in 0.07 mole fraction DMF/water solution. Molecular dynamics simulations of the biotin-metal carbonyl solute in explicit aqueous DMF solutions show marked preferential solvation by DMF, which becomes more pronounced at lower DMF concentrations. The simulations and the experimental data are consistent with an interpretation where the slowdown in spectral diffusion is due to solvent exchange involving distinct cosolvent species. A simple two-component model reproduces the observed spectral dynamics as well as the DMF concentration dependence, enabling the extraction of the solvent exchange time scale of 8 ps. This time scale corresponds to the diffusive motion of a few Å, consistent with a solvent-exchange mechanism. Unlike most previous studies of solvation dynamics in binary mixtures of polar solvents, our work highlights the ability of vibrational probes to sense solvent exchange as a new, slow component in the spectral diffusion dynamics.

  1. Reversible Control of Nanoparticle Functionalization and Physicochemical Properties by Dynamic Covalent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Flavio; Kay, Euan R

    2015-03-27

    Existing methods for the covalent functionalization of nanoparticles rely on kinetically controlled reactions, and largely lack the sophistication of the preeminent oligonucleotide-based noncovalent strategies. Here we report the application of dynamic covalent chemistry for the reversible modification of nanoparticle (NP) surface functionality, combining the benefits of non-biomolecular covalent chemistry with the favorable features of equilibrium processes. A homogeneous monolayer of nanoparticle-bound hydrazones can undergo quantitative dynamic covalent exchange. The pseudomolecular nature of the NP system allows for the in situ characterization of surface-bound species, and real-time tracking of the exchange reactions. Furthermore, dynamic covalent exchange offers a simple approach for reversibly switching-and subtly tuning-NP properties such as solvophilicity.

  2. Repeatability of standard metabolic rate and gas exchange characteristics in a highly variable cockroach, Perisphaeria sp.

    PubMed

    Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L

    2003-12-01

    For natural selection to take place several conditions must be met, including consistent variation among individuals. Although this assumption is increasingly being explored in vertebrates, it has rarely been investigated for insect physiological traits, although variation in these traits is usually assumed to be adaptive. We investigated repeatability (r) of metabolic rate and gas exchange characteristics in a highly variable Perisphaeria cockroach species. Although this species shows four distinct gas exchange patterns at rest, metabolic rate (r=0.51) and the bulk of the gas exchange characteristics (r=0.08-0.91, median=0.42) showed high and significant repeatabilities. Repeatabilities were generally lower in those cases where the effects of body size were removed prior to estimation of r. However, we argue that because selection is likely to act on the trait of an animal of a given size, rather than on the residual variation of that trait once size has been accounted for, size correction is inappropriate. Our results provide support for consistency of variation among individuals, which is one of the prerequisites of natural selection that is infrequently tested in insects.

  3. Reduction of Large Dynamical Systems by Minimization of Evolution Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of a large system of equations to a lower-dimensional system of similar dynamics is investigated. For dynamical systems with disparate timescales, a criterion for determining redundant dimensions and a general reduction method based on the minimization of evolution rate are proposed.

  4. Quantum dynamics of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Guillon, G.; Honvault, P.

    2015-05-07

    We present quantum dynamical investigations of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions using a time-independent quantum mechanical method and an accurate global potential energy surface of ozone [Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)]. Initial state-selected integral cross sections, rate constants, and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are obtained and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical results. The computed thermal rate constants for the oxygen exchange reactions exhibit a negative temperature dependence, as found experimentally. They are in better agreement with the experiments than the previous studies on the same reactions.

  5. Implementation of Dynamic Extensible Adaptive Locally Exchangeable Measures (IDEALEM) v 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Alex; Lee, Dongeun; Wu, K. John

    2016-03-04

    Handling large streaming data is essential for various applications such as network traffic analysis, social networks, energy cost trends, and environment modeling. However, it is in general intractable to store, compute, search, and retrieve large streaming data. This software addresses a fundamental issue, which is to reduce the size of large streaming data and still obtain accurate statistical analysis. As an example, when a high-speed network such as 100 Gbps network is monitored, the collected measurement data rapidly grows so that polynomial time algorithms (e.g., Gaussian processes) become intractable. One possible solution to reduce the storage of vast amounts of measured data is to store a random sample, such as one out of 1000 network packets. However, such static sampling methods (linear sampling) have drawbacks: (1) it is not scalable for high-rate streaming data, and (2) there is no guarantee of reflecting the underlying distribution. In this software, we implemented a dynamic sampling algorithm, based on the recent technology from the relational dynamic bayesian online locally exchangeable measures, that reduces the storage of data records in a large scale, and still provides accurate analysis of large streaming data. The software can be used for both online and offline data records.

  6. Dynamics of the force exchanged between membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-03-28

    We study the dynamical response of a fluid membrane to the sudden conformation change of active inclusions linearly coupled to the membrane curvature. The mutual force between two inclusions triggered simultaneously is shown to exhibit a transient maximum much larger than the equilibrium force. Even in the presence of tension, this dynamical interaction is long range over distances much larger than the correlation length. We derive the scaling laws describing these phenomena analytically, and we stress the importance of the damping due to intermonolayer friction.

  7. Dynamics of metal-humate complexation equilibria as revealed by isotope exchange studies - a matter of concentration and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, Holger; Eidner, Sascha; Kumke, Michael U.; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Complexation with dissolved humic matter can be crucial in controlling the mobility of toxic or radioactive contaminant metals. For speciation and transport modelling, a dynamic equilibrium process is commonly assumed, where association and dissociation run permanently. This is, however, questionable in view of reported observations of a growing resistance to dissociation over time. In this study, the isotope exchange principle was employed to gain direct insight into the dynamics of the complexation equilibrium, including kinetic inertisation phenomena. Terbium(III), an analogue of trivalent actinides, was used as a representative of higher-valent metals. Isotherms of binding to (flocculated) humic acid, determined by means of 160Tb as a radiotracer, were found to be identical regardless of whether the radioisotope was introduced together with the bulk of stable 159Tb or subsequently after pre-equilibration for up to 3 months. Consequently, there is a permanent exchange of free and humic-bound Tb since all available binding sites are occupied in the plateau region of the isotherm. The existence of a dynamic equilibrium was thus evidenced. There was no indication of an inertisation under these experimental conditions. If the small amount of 160Tb was introduced prior to saturation with 159Tb, the expected partial desorption of 160Tb occurred at much lower rates than observed for the equilibration process in the reverse procedure. In addition, the rates decreased with time of pre-equilibration. Inertisation phenomena are thus confined to the stronger sites of humic molecules (occupied at low metal concentrations). Analysing the time-dependent course of isotope exchange according to first-order kinetics indicated that up to 3 years are needed to attain equilibrium. Since, however, metal-humic interaction remains reversible, exchange of metals between humic carriers and mineral surfaces cannot be neglected on the long time scale to be considered in predictive

  8. Modified perfluorocarbon tracer method for measuring effective multizone air exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Butsugan, Michio; Nishijima, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    A modified procedure was developed for the measurement of the effective air exchange rate, which represents the relationship between the pollutants emitted from indoor sources and the residents' level of exposure, by placing the dosers of tracer gas at locations that resemble indoor emission sources. To measure the 24-h-average effective air exchange rates in future surveys based on this procedure, a low-cost, easy-to-use perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) doser with a stable dosing rate was developed by using double glass vials, a needle, a polyethylene-sintered filter, and a diffusion tube. Carbon molecular sieve cartridges and carbon disulfide (CS₂) were used for passive sampling and extraction of the tracer gas, respectively. Recovery efficiencies, sampling rates, and lower detection limits for 24-h sampling of hexafluorobenzene, octafluorotoluene, and perfluoroallylbenzene were 40% ± 3%, 72% ± 5%, and 84% ± 6%; 10.5 ± 1.1, 14.4 ± 1.4, and 12.2 ± 0.49 mL min⁻¹; and 0.20, 0.17, and 0.26 μg m⁻³, respectively.

  9. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction.

  10. Replica exchange simulations of the three-dimensional Ising spin glass: static and dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2012-02-01

    We present the results of a large-scale numerical study of the equilibrium three-dimensional Ising spin glass with Gaussian disorder. Using replica exchange (parallel tempering) Monte Carlo, we measure various static, as well as dynamical quantities, such as the autocorrelation times and round-trip times for the replica exchange Monte Carlo method. The correlation between static and dynamic observables for 5000 disorder realizations (N <=10^3 spins) down to very low temperatures (T 0.2Tc) is examined. Our results show that autocorrelation times are directly correlated with the roughness of the free energy landscape. We also discuss the size dependence of several static quantities.

  11. The Effects of Heat Exchange and Thermal Advection on the Rate of Change of Temperature at Ocean Weather Station NOVEMBER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The effects of heat exchange across the sea surface and heat advection on the observed rate of change of temperature were examined using a physical...NOVEMBER during 1954 through 1970 were used. A three-dimensional plot of the annual variations of the monthly means of observed rate of change of...temperature produced three distinct trends. Heat exchange primarily contributed to the modification of the observed rate of change of temperature during the

  12. Jealousy and Trust: Unexplored Dimensions of Social Exchange Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gerald W.; Osmond, Marie Withers

    Little effort has been made to systematically assess the determinants and consequences of marital jealousy which affect marital, familial and extra-familial expectations, interactions and behavior. A preliminary attempt to rectify this omission provides a conceptual/theoretical perspective on jealousy dynamics in marriage. Marital jealousy, a…

  13. Probing dynamics and mechanism of exchange process of quaternary ammonium dimeric surfactants, 14-s-14, in the presence of conventional surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Shi Zhen; Du, You Ru; Liu, Mai Li

    2012-12-27

    In this Article, we investigated effects of different types of conventional surfactants on exchange dynamics of quaternary ammonium dimeric surfactants, with chemical formula C(14)H(29)N(+)(CH(3))(2)- (CH(2))(s)-N(+)(CH(3))(2)C(14)H(29)·2Br(-), or 14-s-14 for short. Two nonionic surfactants, TritonX-100 (TX-100) and polyethylene glycol (23) laurylether (Brij-35), and one cationic surfactant, n-tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and one ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were chosen as typical conventional surfactants. Exchange rates of 14-s-14 (s = 2, 3, and 4) between the micelle form and monomer in solution were detected by two NMR methods: one-dimensional (1D) line shape analysis and two-dimensional (2D) exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Results show that the nonionic surfactants (TX-100 and Brij-35), the cationic surfactant (TTAB), and the ionic surfactant (SDS) respectively accelerated, barely influenced, and slowed the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The effect mechanism was investigated by the self-diffusion experiment, relaxation time measurements (T(2)/T(1)), the fluorescence experiment (I(1)/I(3)) and observed chemical shift variations. Results reveal that, nonionic conventional surfactants (TX-100 and Brij-35) loosened the molecule arrangement and decreased hydrophobic interactions in the micelle, and thus accelerated the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The cationic conventional surfactant (TTAB) barely changed the molecule arrangement and thus barely influenced the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The ionic conventional surfactant (SDS) introduced the electrostatic attraction effect, tightened the molecule arrangement, and increased hydrophobic interactions in the micelle, and thus slowed down the exchange rate of 14-s-14. Additionally, the two-step exchange mechanism of 14-s-14 in the mixed solution was revealed through interesting variation tendencies of exchange rates of 14-s-14.

  14. Energy Exchange Dynamics across L-H transitions in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, A.; Banerjee, S.; Zweben, S.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.

    2016-10-01

    This work is motivated by the need to test L-H transition paradigms (e.g., predator-prey, and ExB flow suppression) and explore possible new L-H transition dynamics. We present analysis of the L-H transition on three sets (NBI, RF, and Ohmic) of NSTX discharges using the gas-puff-imaging diagnostics for high temporal and spatial resolutions. The analysis studies the edge velocities and energy dynamics across the L-H transition using an implementation of the orthogonal decomposition programming for high temporal resolution velocity fields. In the database NSTX discharges, the production term (computed 1 cm inside the separatrix) is negative, pointing to transfer from the DC flows to the fluctuations, even immediately before the L-H transition. This suggests that depletion of turbulent fluctuation energy via transfer to the mean flow may not play a key role in the L-H transition. The thermal free energy is consistently much larger than the kinetic energy produced by the mean poloidal flow across the L-H transitions. These observations are inconsistent with the predator-prey model. The paper will describe the analysis including error estimations. Furthermore, analysis of the radial correlation dynamics across the L-H transition will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. DoE contract #DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. The CH + CO reaction: Rate coefficient for carbon atom exchange at 294 K

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; McCurdy, K.E.; Kolb, C.E. )

    1989-02-09

    A fast-flow reactor equipped with isotope-specific laser-excited fluorescence detection of CH radicals has been used to study carbon atom exchange in the reaction between CH and CO at 294 K and 2 Torr of total pressure. The rate coefficient for exchange, k{sub 3} = (2.1 {times} 0.3) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}, is about an order of magnitude larger than the bimolecular rate for the addition reaction, k{sub 2} = (2.7 {plus minus} 0.4) {times} 10{sup {minus}13}. High-pressure limiting bimolecular and low-pressure termolecular recombination rate coefficients of 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} and 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}30} cm{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} are derived. The results are discussed in the context of previous work on the title reaction and on the chemistry of singlet CH{sub 2}.

  16. Microbial desalination cells packed with ion-exchange resin to enhance water desalination rate.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Zuo, Kuichang; Xia, Xue; Wei, Jincheng; Luo, Xi; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    A novel configuration of microbial desalination cell (MDC) packed with ion-exchange resin (R-MDC) was proposed to enhance water desalination rate. Compared with classic MDC (C-MDC), an obvious increase in desalination rate (DR) was obtained by R-MDC. With relatively low concentration (10-2 g/L NaCl) influents, the DR values of R-MDC were about 1.5-8 times those of C-MDC. Ion-exchange resins packed in the desalination chamber worked as conductor and thus counteracted the increase in ohmic resistance during treatment of low concentration salt water. Ohmic resistances of R-MDC stabilized at 3.0-4.7 Ω. By contrast, the ohmic resistances of C-MDC ranged from 5.5 to 12.7 Ω, which were 55-272% higher than those of R-MDC. Remarkable improvement in desalination rate helped improve charge efficiency for desalination in R-MDC. The results first showed the potential of R-MDC in the desalination of water with low salinity.

  17. Rate-dependent extensional "dynamic ligaments" using shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-04-01

    A novel "dynamic ligament" smart material that exhibits a strongly rate-dependent response in extension is developed and characterized. The devices, based on elastomeric polymers and shear thickening fluids, exhibit low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm/s, but when stretched at 100 mm/s or higher resist with up to 7 × higher force. A link between the shear thickening fluid's rheology and the dynamic ligament's tensile performance is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Future recommendations for improving device performance are presented, along with a host of different potential application areas including safety equipment, adaptive braces, sporting goods, and military equipment.

  18. Time Dependency of Psychotherapeutic Exchanges: The Contribution of the Theory of Dynamic Systems in Analyzing Process

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Sergio; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a general framework for the use of Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS) in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS. PMID:22848205

  19. The data of GDP and exchange rate used in the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiguo; Xue, Jing; Du, Chonghua

    2016-12-01

    This article introduces the data of the log real GDP per capita ratio and the log real exchange rate which are used to revisit the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis. We acquired the data from IMF and World Bank database, and provide the name and source of the data. All data are openly accessible. Besides, we describe the value of data as well as the method to process the data which can also be found in "The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis in the developed and developing countries revisited" (Weiguo Wang, Jing Xue, Chonghua Du, 2016) [1].

  20. Influence of flow rate and heating power in effective thermal conductivity applied in borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, T.; Sapińska-Śliwa, A.; Wiśniowski, R.; Piechówka, Z.; Krzemień, M.; Pycha, D.; Jaszczur, M.

    2016-09-01

    In borehole heat exchanging systems one of the most important parameters necessary to estimate its efficiency is the effective thermal conductivity. One of the methods for determining it is thermal response test. Such a test may be performed with respect to various parameters. The most important ones include flow rate and heating power. The article summarizes the results of TRT research in Palecznica village, Poland which was performed in boreholes located there in the already operating installation. It presents the established methodology. Also, there is an attempt to determine the relation between the mentioned parameters and the effective thermal conductivity. The research indicates the dependence of the conductivity with the test parameters.

  1. On Value at Risk for Foreign Exchange Rates --- the Copula Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, P.

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the Value at Risk (VaR) of the portfolio consisting of long positions in foreign currencies on an emerging market. Basing on empirical data we restrict ourselves to the case when the tail parts of distributions of logarithmic returns of these assets follow the power laws and the lower tail of associated copula C follows the power law of degree 1. We will illustrate the practical usefulness of this approach by the analysis of the exchange rates of EUR and CHF at the Polish forex market.

  2. Determination of self-exchange rate of alkanethiolates in self-assembled monolayers on gold using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunook; Kim, Yongbin; Choi, Inseong; Chang, Rakwoo; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2014-09-16

    In this paper, we describe a new method for determining the exchange rates of alkanethiolates in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to analyze the compositions of the alkanethiolate in SAMs rapidly and directly. In particular, to investigate the self-exchange of alkanethiols, we prepared a deuterated alkanethiol that has the same molecular properties as the non-deuterated alkanethiol but a different molecular weight. SAMs consisting of deuterated alkanethiolates were immersed in a solution of the non-deuterated alkanethiol, and the influences of the immersion time, temperature, concentration, and solvent on the self-exchange rates were investigated. Furthermore, we assessed the exchange rates among alkanethiols with different carbon chain lengths and different size of ethylene glycol units. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using a model SAM system in order to understand the molecular mechanism of the exchange process.

  3. Analysis of the radiative budget of the Venusian atmosphere based on infrared Net Exchange Rate formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, Sébastien; Eymet, Vincent; Lee, Christopher; Vatant d'Ollone, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A detailed one-dimensional analysis of the energy balance in Venus atmosphere is proposed in this work, based on the Net Exchange Rate formalism that allows the identification in each altitude region of the dominant energy exchanges controlling the temperature. Well-known parameters that control the temperature profile are the solar flux deposition and the cloud particle distribution. Balance between solar heating and infrared energy exchanges is analyzed for each region: upper atmosphere (from cloud top to 100 km), upper cloud, middle cloud, cloud base, and deep atmosphere (cloud base to surface). The energy accumulated below the clouds is transferred to the cloud base through infrared windows, mostly at 3-4 μm and 5-7 μm. The continuum opacity in these spectral regions is not well known for the hot temperatures and large pressures of Venus's deep atmosphere but strongly affects the temperature profile from cloud base to surface. From cloud base, upward transport of energy goes through convection and short-range radiative exchanges up to the middle cloud where the atmosphere is thin enough in the 20-30 μm window to cool directly to space. Total opacity in this spectral window between the 15 μm CO2 band and the CO2 collision-induced absorption has a strong impact on the temperature in the cloud convective layer. Improving our knowledge of the gas opacities in these different windows through new laboratory measurements or ab initio computations, as well as improving the constraints on cloud opacities would help to separate gas and cloud contributions and secure a better understanding of Venus's atmosphere energy balance.

  4. NASA geometry data exchange specification for computational fluid dynamics (NASA IGES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew W.; Kerr, Patricia A.; Thorp, Scott A.; Jou, Jin J.

    1994-01-01

    This document specifies a subset of an existing product data exchange specification that is widely used in industry and government. The existing document is called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification. This document, a subset of IGES, is intended for engineers analyzing product performance using tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This document specifies how to define mathematically and exchange the geometric model of an object. The geometry is represented utilizing nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Only surface models are represented; no solid model representation is included. This specification does not include most of the other types of product information available in IGES (e.g., no material properties or surface finish properties) and does not provide all the specific file format details of IGES. The data exchange protocol specified in this document is fully conforming to the American National Standard (ANSI) IGES 5.2.

  5. The dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by weakly basic polyacrylic anion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamchenko, A. V.; Kushnir, T. V.

    2009-05-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by free base forms of Amberlite IRA-67 and Lewatite VP.OC.1072 weakly basic anion exchangers is studied. It is established that, in hydrodynamic regimes of filtration, which are typical of OH filters of the first stage of water-desalting plants, the limiting stage of sorption kinetics is inside diffusion. It is concluded that the process is correctly described by an asymptotic solution to the inside-diffusion model of sorption dynamics.

  6. Effect of Taiwan mutation (D7H) on structures of amyloid-β peptides: replica exchange molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phan Minh; Viet, Man Hoang; Nguyen, Phuong H; Hu, Chin-Kun; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-07-31

    Recent experiments have shown that the Taiwan mutation (D7H) slows the fibril formation of amyloid peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42. Motivated by this finding, we have studied the influence of D7H mutation on structures of Aβ peptide monomers using the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS force field and implicit water model. Our study reveals that the mechanism behind modulation of aggregation rates is associated with decrease of β-content and dynamics of the salt bridge D23-K28. Estimating the bending free energy of this salt bridge, we have found that, in agreement with the experiments, the fibril formation rate of both peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 is reduced about two times by mutation.

  7. Theoretical investigation on the mechanism and dynamics of oxo exchange of neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Dongqi

    2015-03-21

    Four types of reaction mechanisms for the oxo ligand exchange of monomeric and dimeric neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution were explored computationally using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio classical molecular dynamics. The obtained results were compared with previous studies on the oxo exchange of uranyl hydroxide, as well as with experiments. It is found that the stable T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) intermediate is a key species for oxo exchange in the proton transfer in mononuclear Path I and binuclear Path IV, similar to the case of uranyl(VI) hydroxide. Path I is thought to be the preferred oxo exchange mechanism for neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in our calculations, due to the lower activation energy (22.7 and 13.1 kcal mol(-1) for ΔG(‡) and ΔH(‡), respectively) of the overall reaction. Path II via a cis-neptunyl structure assisted by a water molecule might be a competitive channel against Path I with a mononuclear mechanism, owing to a rapid dynamical process occurring in Path II. In Path IV with the binuclear mechanism, oxo exchange is accomplished via the interaction between [NpO2(OH)4](2-) and T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) with a low activation energy for the rate-determining step, however, the overall energy required to fulfill the reaction is slightly higher than that in mononuclear Path I, suggesting a possible binuclear process in the higher energy region. The chemical bonding evolution along the reaction pathways was discussed by using topological methodologies of the electron localization function (ELF).

  8. Exchange anisotropy and the dynamic phase transition in thin ferromagnetic Heisenberg films.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunbum; Grimson, Malcolm J; Hall, Carol K

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to investigate the dependence of the dynamic phase behavior on the bilinear exchange anisotropy of a classical Heisenberg spin system. The system under consideration is a planar thin ferromagnetic film with competing surface fields subject to a pulsed oscillatory external field. The results show that the films exhibit a single discontinuous dynamic phase transition (DPT) as a function of the anisotropy of the bilinear exchange interaction in the Hamiltonian. Furthermore, there is no evidence of stochastic resonance associated with the DPT. These results are in marked contrast to the continuous DPT observed in the same system as a function of temperature and applied field strength for a fixed bilinear exchange anisotropy.

  9. Dynamic Cyclic Thiodepsipeptide Libraries from Thiol-Thioester Exchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    use in a variety of dynamic combinatorial chemistry assays. The kinetic determinants of macrocycle formation and the role of amino acid structure on...were then made in AA1, AA3, and AA4 (Table 1); by design, AA2-AA3-AA4 forms the macrocycle, and AA1 remains exocyclic. Charged amino acids (Lys, Arg...was initially included in AA3 as a turn residue that favors macrocycles. 9 Various amino acids were incorporated into AA4 to study their effect on

  10. Dynamic exchanges between DOM and POM pools in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems: A review.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Chen, Meilian; Schlautman, Mark A; Hur, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic exchanges between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) plays a critical role in organic carbon cycling in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems, interactions with aquatic organisms, mobility and bioavailability of pollutants, among many other ecological and geochemical phenomena. Although DOM-POM exchange processes have been widely studied from different aspects, little to no effort has been made to date to provide a comprehensive, mechanistic, and micro-spatial schema for understanding various exchange processes occurring in different aquatic ecosystems in a unified way. The phenomena occurring between DOM and POM were explained here with the homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms. In the homogeneous mechanism, the participating components are only organic matter (OM) constituents themselves with aggregation and dissolution involved, whereas OM is associated with other components such as minerals and particulate colloids in the heterogeneous counterpart. Besides the generally concerned processes of aggregation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption, other ecological factors such as sunlight and organisms can also participate in DOM-POM exchanges through altering the chemical nature of OM. Despite the limitation of current analytical technologies, many unknown and/or unquantified processes need to be identified to unravel the complicated exchanges of OM between its dissolved and particulate states. Based on the review of several previous mathematical models, we proposed a unified conceptual model to describe all major dynamic exchange mechanisms on the basis of exergy theory. More knowledge of dynamic DOM-POM exchanges is warranted to overcome the potential problems arising from a simple division of OM into dissolved versus particulate states and to further develop more sophisticated mathematic models.

  11. Dynamic Models of Learning That Characterize Parent-Child Exchanges Predict Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative vocabulary models for infants and toddlers were developed from models of learning that predict trajectories associated with low, average, and high vocabulary growth rates (14 to 46 months). It was hypothesized that models derived from rates of learning mirror the type of exchanges provided to infants and toddlers by parents and…

  12. An analytical model for estimating water exchange rate in white matter using diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Chopp, Michael; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Wang, Shiyang; Ding, Guangliang; Jiang, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort is being expended on using micro-structural modeling of the white matter, with the goal of relating diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) to the underlying structure of the tissue, such as axonal density. However, one of the important parameters affecting diffusion is the water exchange rate between the intra- and extra-axonal space, which has not been fully investigated and is a crucial marker of brain injury such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, there is no diffusion analytical model which includes the Water eXchange Rate (WXR) without the requirement of short gradient pulse (SGP) approximation. We therefore propose a new analytical model by deriving the diffusion signal for a permeable cylinder, assuming a clinically feasible pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence. Simulations based on Markov Random Walk confirm that the exchange parameter included in our model has a linear correlation (R2>0.88) with the actual WXR. Moreover, increasing WXR causes the estimated values of diameter and volume fraction of the cylinders to increase and decrease, respectively, which is consistent with our findings from histology measurements in tissues near TBI regions. This model was also applied to the diffusion signal acquired from ex vivo brains of 14 male (10 TBI and 4 normal) rats using hybrid diffusion imaging. The estimated values of axon diameter and axonal volume fraction are in agreement with their corresponding histological measurements in normal brains, with 0.96 intra-class correlation coefficient value resulting from consistency analysis. Moreover, a significant increase (p = 0.001) in WXR and diameter and decrease in axonal volume fraction in the TBI boundary were detected in the TBI rats compared with the normal rats.

  13. Maximizing T2-exchange in Dy3+DOTA-(amide)X chelates: Fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate for enhanced T2 contrast in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Soesbe, Todd C.; Ratnakar, S. James; Milne, Mark; Zhang, Shanrong; Do, Quyen N.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A. Dean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The water molecule exchange rates in a series of DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates were fine-tuned to maximize the effects of T2-exchange line broadening and improve T2 contrast. Methods Four DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates having a variable number of glycinate side-arms were prepared and characterized as T2-exchange agents. The non-exchanging DyTETA chelate was also used to measure the bulk water T2 reduction due solely to T2*. The total transverse relaxivity (r2tot) at 22, 37, and 52 °C for each chelate was measured in vitro at 9.4 T (400 MHz) by fitting plots of total T2−1 versus concentration. The water molecule exchange rates for each complex were measured by fitting 17O line-width versus temperature data taken at 9.4 T (54.3 MHz). Results The measured transverse relaxivities due to water molecule exchange (r2ex) and bound water lifetimes (τM) were in excellent agreement with Swift-Connick theory, with DyDOTA-(gly)3 giving the largest r2ex = 11.8 s−1 mM−1 at 37 °C. Conclusion By fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate at 37 °C, the transverse relaxivity has been increased by 2 to 30 times compared to previously studied Dy3+-based chelates. Polymerization or dendrimerization of the optimal chelate could yield a highly sensitive, molecule-sized T2 contrast agent for improved molecular imaging applications. PMID:24390729

  14. A review of air exchange rate models for air pollution exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Schultz, Bradley D; Sohn, Michael D; Long, Thomas; Langstaff, John; Williams, Ronald; Isaacs, Kristin; Meng, Qing Yu; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther

    2014-11-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings where people spend their time. The AER, which is the rate of exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pollutants and for removal of indoor-emitted air pollutants. This paper presents an overview and critical analysis of the scientific literature on empirical and physically based AER models for residential and commercial buildings; the models highlighted here are feasible for exposure assessments as extensive inputs are not required. Models are included for the three types of airflows that can occur across building envelopes: leakage, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation. Guidance is provided to select the preferable AER model based on available data, desired temporal resolution, types of airflows, and types of buildings included in the exposure assessment. For exposure assessments with some limited building leakage or AER measurements, strategies are described to reduce AER model uncertainty. This review will facilitate the selection of AER models in support of air pollution exposure assessments.

  15. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures.

  16. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures. PMID:28090133

  17. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  18. Impact of nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung rates beyond one-pion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, A.; Bollig, R.; Janka, H.-T.; Schwenk, A.

    2016-10-01

    Neutrino-pair production and annihilation through nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung is included in current supernova simulations by rates that are based on the one-pion-exchange approximation. Here we explore the consequences of bremsstrahlung rates based on modern nuclear interactions for proto-neutron star cooling and the corresponding neutrino emission. We find that despite a reduction of the bremsstrahlung emission by a factor of 2-5 in the neutrinospheric region, models with the improved treatment exhibit only ≲5 % changes of the neutrino luminosities and an increase of ≲0.7 MeV of the average energies of the radiated neutrino spectra, with the largest effects for the antineutrinos of all flavors and at late times. Overall, the proto-neutron star cooling evolution is slowed down modestly by ≲0.5 - 1 s .

  19. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  20. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates ⩾ 30 s-1) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5 s-1) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  1. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S.; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  2. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  3. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  4. Dynamic metabolic exchange governs a marine algal-bacterial interaction

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Einat; Wyche, Thomas P; Kim, Ki Hyun; Petersen, Jörn; Ellebrandt, Claire; Vlamakis, Hera; Barteneva, Natasha; Paulson, Joseph N; Chai, Liraz; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a model coccolithophore micro-alga that generates vast blooms in the ocean. Bacteria are not considered among the major factors influencing coccolithophore physiology. Here we show through a laboratory model system that the bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens, a well-studied member of the Roseobacter group, intimately interacts with E. huxleyi. While attached to the algal cell, bacteria initially promote algal growth but ultimately kill their algal host. Both algal growth enhancement and algal death are driven by the bacterially-produced phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Bacterial production of indole-3-acetic acid and attachment to algae are significantly increased by tryptophan, which is exuded from the algal cell. Algal death triggered by bacteria involves activation of pathways unique to oxidative stress response and programmed cell death. Our observations suggest that bacteria greatly influence the physiology and metabolism of E. huxleyi. Coccolithophore-bacteria interactions should be further studied in the environment to determine whether they impact micro-algal population dynamics on a global scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17473.001 PMID:27855786

  5. Direct Observation of Nanosecond Water Exchange Dynamics at a Protein Metal Site

    PubMed Central

    Stachura, Monika; Chakraborty, Saumen; Gottberg, Alexander; Ruckthong, Leela; Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Nanosecond ligand exchange dynamics at metal sites within proteins is essential in catalysis, metal ion transport, and regulatory metallobiochemistry. Herein we present direct observation of the exchange dynamics of water at a Cd2+ binding site within two de novo designed metalloprotein constructs using 111mCd perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of γ-rays and 113Cd NMR spectroscopy. The residence time of the Cd2+-bound water molecule is tens of nanoseconds at 20 °C in both proteins. This constitutes the first direct experimental observation of the residence time of Cd2+ coordinated water in any system, including the simple aqua ion. A Leu to Ala amino acid substitution ~10 Å from the Cd2+ site affects both the equilibrium constant and the residence time of water, while, surprisingly, the metal site structure, as probed by PAC spectroscopy, remains essentially unaltered. This implies that remote mutations may affect metal site dynamics, even when structure is conserved. PMID:27973778

  6. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden-Popper phases?

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C; Tamimi, Mazin A; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)O(3n+1), A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)X(3n+1); LaSrCo(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(4-δ) (n = 1), La(0.3)Sr(2.7)CoFeO(7-δ) (n = 2) and LaSr3Co(1.5)Fe(1.5)O(10-δ) (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. This is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. We conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  7. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of threemore » Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.« less

  8. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  9. On the use of a weak-coupling thermostat in replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2015-07-21

    In a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, various thermostat algorithms, including Langevin dynamics (LD), Nosé-Hoover (NH), and weak-coupling (WC) thermostats, can be used to keep the simulation temperature constant. A canonical ensemble is generated by the use of LD and NH, while the nature of the ensemble produced by WC has not yet been identified. A few years ago, it was shown that when using a WC thermostat with particular values of the temperature coupling time for liquid water at ambient temperature and pressure, the distribution of the potential energy is less wide than the canonical one. This led to an artifact in temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) simulations in which the potential energy distributions appear not to be equal to the ones of standard MD simulations. In this paper, we re-investigate this problem. We show that this artifact is probably due to the ensemble generated by WC being incompatible with the T-REMD replica-exchange criterion, which assumes a canonical configurational ensemble. We also show, however, that this artifact can be reduced or even eliminated by particular choices of the temperature coupling time of WC and the replica-exchange time period of T-REMD, i.e., when the temperature coupling time is chosen very close to the MD time step or when the exchange time period is chosen large enough. An attempt to develop a T-REMD replica-exchange criterion which is likely to be more compatible with the WC configurational ensemble is reported. Furthermore, an exchange criterion which is compatible with a microcanonical ensemble is used in total energy REMD simulations.

  10. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  11. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  12. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  13. The evolutionary rate dynamically tracks changes in HIV-1 epidemics

    SciTech Connect

    Maljkovic-berry, Irina; Athreya, Gayathri; Daniels, Marcus; Bruno, William; Korber, Bette; Kuiken, Carla; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2009-01-01

    Large-sequence datasets provide an opportunity to investigate the dynamics of pathogen epidemics. Thus, a fast method to estimate the evolutionary rate from large and numerous phylogenetic trees becomes necessary. Based on minimizing tip height variances, we optimize the root in a given phylogenetic tree to estimate the most homogenous evolutionary rate between samples from at least two different time points. Simulations showed that the method had no bias in the estimation of evolutionary rates and that it was robust to tree rooting and topological errors. We show that the evolutionary rates of HIV-1 subtype B and C epidemics have changed over time, with the rate of evolution inversely correlated to the rate of virus spread. For subtype B, the evolutionary rate slowed down and tracked the start of the HAART era in 1996. Subtype C in Ethiopia showed an increase in the evolutionary rate when the prevalence increase markedly slowed down in 1995. Thus, we show that the evolutionary rate of HIV-1 on the population level dynamically tracks epidemic events.

  14. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction.

  15. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  16. Efficient Conformational Sampling in Explicit Solvent Using a Hybrid Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    radius of gyration (Rg) distributions.17,22 Zhou and Berne showed significant dif- ferences in the free energy landscape of the C-terminal β-hairpin...exchange molecular dynamics simulation method employing the Poisson Boltzmann model. J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 127, 084119–17. (23) Zhou, R.; Berne , B. J...31) Gallicchio, E.; Andrec, M.; Felts, A. K.; Levy , R. M. Tempera- ture weighted histogram analysis method, replica exchange, and transi- tion paths. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 6722–6731.

  17. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST).

    PubMed

    Friedman, Joshua I; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates⩾30s(-1)) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5s(-1)) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  18. Amide proton exchange rates of oxidized and reduced Saccharomyces cerevisiae iso-1-cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Marmorino, J. L.; Auld, D. S.; Betz, S. F.; Doyle, D. F.; Young, G. B.; Pielak, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the rate constant, kobs, for exchange of labile protons in both oxidized (Fe(III)) and reduced (Fe(II)) iso-1-cytochrome c. We find that slowly exchanging backbone amide protons tend to lack solvent-accessible surface area, possess backbone hydrogen bonds, and are present in regions of regular secondary structure as well as in omega-loops. Furthermore, there is no correlation between kobs and the distance from a backbone amide nitrogen to the nearest solvent-accessible atom. These observations are consistent with the local unfolding model. Comparisons of the free energy change for denaturation, delta Gd, at 298 K to the free energy change for local unfolding, delta Gop, at 298 K for the oxidized protein suggest that certain conformations possessing higher free energy than the denatured state are detected at equilibrium. Reduction of the protein results in a general increase in delta Gop. Comparisons of delta Gd to delta Gop for the reduced protein show that the most open states of the reduced protein possess more structure than its chemically denatured form. This persistent structure in high-energy conformations of the reduced form appears to involve the axially coordinated heme. PMID:8268806

  19. Effects of flooding on ion exchange rates in an Upper Mississippi River floodplain forest impacted by herbivory, invasion, and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreiling, Rebecca; DeJager, Nathan R.; Whitney Swanson,; Eric A. Strauss,; Meredith Thomsen,

    2015-01-01

    We examined effects of flooding on supply rates of 14 nutrients in floodplain areas invaded by Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass), areas restored to young successional forests (browsed by white-tailed deer and unbrowsed), and remnant mature forests in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain. Plant Root Simulator ion-exchange probes were deployed for four separate 28-day periods. The first deployment occurred during flooded conditions, while the three subsequent deployments were conducted during progressively drier periods. Time after flooding corresponded with increases in NO3 −-N, K+ and Zn+2, decreases in H2PO4 −-P, Fe+3, Mn+2, and B(OH)4-B, a decrease followed by an increase in NH4 +-N, Ca+2, Mg+2 and Al+3, and an increase followed by a decrease for SO4 −2-S. Plant community type had weak to no effects on nutrient supply rates compared to the stronger effects of flooding duration. Our results suggest that seasonal dynamics in floodplain nutrient availability are similarly driven by flood pulses in different community types. However, reed canarygrass invasion has potential to increase availability of some nutrients, while restoration of forest cover may promote recovery of nutrient availability to that observed in reference mature forests.

  20. Corrections to charge exchange spectroscopic measurements in TFTR due to energy-dependent excitation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.B.; Fonck, R.J.; Knize, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    The use of charge exchange spectrocopy to determine plasma rotation speeds and ion temperature is complicated by the energy dependence of the excitation cross sections. The Doppler-broadened spectral line shape is distorted by the relative velocity between the neutral hydrogen atoms of the injected beam and impurity ions. The asymmetric nature of the energy dependence of this cross section causes a non-motional shift of the line center and a non-thermal change in the line width. These effects vary with the angles between the beam direction, rotation velocity direction, and direction of the viewing sightline. When viewing two neutral beams at different angles on TFTR, the two measurements of v/sub phi/(r) show discrepancies about 20 to 30% with each other. The calculation of the spectral intensity profiles, using the excitation rates available, overcorrects these discrepancies and indicates the need for better excitation coefficients. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Two-component mixture model: Application to palm oil and exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Palm oil is a seed crop which is widely adopt for food and non-food products such as cookie, vegetable oil, cosmetics, household products and others. Palm oil is majority growth in Malaysia and Indonesia. However, the demand for palm oil is getting growth and rapidly running out over the years. This phenomenal cause illegal logging of trees and destroy the natural habitat. Hence, the present paper investigates the relationship between exchange rate and palm oil price in Malaysia by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation via Newton-Raphson algorithm to fit a two components mixture model. Besides, this paper proposes a mixture of normal distribution to accommodate with asymmetry characteristics and platykurtic time series data.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of human IgG4 antibodies by dynamic Fab arm exchange.

    PubMed

    van der Neut Kolfschoten, Marijn; Schuurman, Janine; Losen, Mario; Bleeker, Wim K; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Vermeulen, Ellen; den Bleker, Tamara H; Wiegman, Luus; Vink, Tom; Aarden, Lucien A; De Baets, Marc H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Aalberse, Rob C; Parren, Paul W H I

    2007-09-14

    Antibodies play a central role in immunity by forming an interface with the innate immune system and, typically, mediate proinflammatory activity. We describe a novel posttranslational modification that leads to anti-inflammatory activity of antibodies of immunoglobulin G, isotype 4 (IgG4). IgG4 antibodies are dynamic molecules that exchange Fab arms by swapping a heavy chain and attached light chain (half-molecule) with a heavy-light chain pair from another molecule, which results in bispecific antibodies. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the third constant domain is critical for this activity. The impact of IgG4 Fab arm exchange was confirmed in vivo in a rhesus monkey model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. IgG4 Fab arm exchange is suggested to be an important biological mechanism that provides the basis for the anti-inflammatory activity attributed to IgG4 antibodies.

  3. Digestive state influences the heart rate hysteresis and rates of heat exchange in the varanid lizard Varanus rosenbergi.

    PubMed

    Clark, T D; Butler, P J; Frappell, P B

    2005-06-01

    To maximize the period where body temperature (Tb) exceeds ambient temperature (Ta), many reptiles have been reported to regulate heart rate (fH) and peripheral blood flow so that the rate of heat gain in a warming environment occurs more rapidly than the rate of heat loss in a cooling environment. It may be hypothesized that the rate of cooling, particularly at relatively cool Tbs, would be further reduced during postprandial periods when specific dynamic action (SDA) increases endogenous heat production (i.e. the heat increment of feeding). Furthermore, it may also be hypothesized that the increased perfusion of the gastrointestinal organs that occurs during digestion may limit peripheral blood flow and thus compromise the rate of heating. Finally, if the changes in fh are solely for the purpose of thermoregulation, there should be no associated changes in energy demand and, consequently, no hysteresis in the rate of oxygen consumption (V(O2)). To test these hypotheses, seven individual Varanus rosenbergi were heated and cooled between 19 degrees C and 35 degrees C following at least 8 days fasting and then approximately 25 h after consumption of a meal (mean 10% of fasted body mass). For a given Tb between the range of 19-35 degrees C, fh of fasting lizards was higher during heating than during cooling. Postprandial lizards also displayed a hysteresis in fh, although the magnitude was reduced in comparison with that of fasting lizards as a result of a higher fh during cooling in postprandial animals. Both for fasting and postprandial lizards, there was no hysteresis in V(O2) at any Tb throughout the range although, as a result of SDA, postprandial animals displayed a significantly higher V(O2) than fasting animals both during heating and during cooling at Tbs above 24 degrees C. The values of fh during heating at a given Tb were the same for fasting and postprandial animals, which, in combination with a slower rate of heating in postprandial animals, suggests

  4. Removal Dynamics of Immunoglobulin and Fibrinogen by Conventional Plasma Exchange, Selective Plasma Exchange, and a Combination of the Two.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Satoko; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Seshima, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takuma; Itagaki, Ayako; Kurashima, Naoki; Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi; Okado, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    While plasma exchange (PE) can eliminate plasma proteins, including all immunoglobulin (Ig) and coagulation factors, selective plasma exchange (SePE) can retain fibrinogen (Fbg). Here, we investigated the removal dynamics of Ig and Fbg in 53 patients with immunological disorders by PE, SePE, and a combination of the two. When the mean processed plasma volume (PPV) was 0.9 plasma volume (PV), the mean percent reductions of Ig and Fbg by PE were both approximately 62%-65%. When the mean PPV was 1.1 PV, the mean percent reductions by SePE were 53.1% for IgG, 30.1% for IgA, 3.6% for IgM, and 19.0% for Fbg, respectively. In the three plasmapheresis sessions performed on alternate days, we classified treatments into three categories: PE group (PE-PE-PE, N = 2), SePE group (SePE-SePE-SePE, N = 14), and PE/SePE group (PE-SePE-SePE, N = 4). The mean percent reductions of IgG, IgA, IgM, and Fbg were 82.0%, 80.4%, 87.3%, and 80.9%, respectively, for the PE group; 76.4%, 57.7%, 43.3%, and 35.9%, respectively, for the PE/SePE group; and 75.4%, 50.6%, 3.2%, and 29.3%, respectively, for the SePE group. Plasmapheresis modalities can be combined according to clinical conditions, for instance, to achieve both the unspecific removal of pathogens by PE and retention of coagulation factors, such as Fbg, by SePE.

  5. Bronchodilator effect on ventilatory, pulmonary gas exchange, and heart rate kinetics during high-intensity exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Palange, Paolo; Ora, Josuel; Martolini, Dario; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2009-12-01

    Respiratory mechanical abnormalities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may impair cardiodynamic responses and convective oxygen delivery during exercise, resulting in slower ventilatory, pulmonary gas exchange (PGE), and heart rate (HR) kinetics compared with normal. We reasoned that bronchodilators and the attendant reduction of operating lung volumes should accelerate ventilatory, PGE, and HR kinetics in the transition from rest to high-intensity exercise. Twelve clinically stable COPD patients undertook constant-work rate cycle testing at 75% of each individual's maximum work capacity after receiving either combined nebulized bronchodilators (BD) or placebo (PL), randomly. Mean response time (MRT) and amplitude of slow component for oxygen uptake (V'O(2)), carbon dioxide production (V'CO(2)), ventilation (V'(E)), and HR together with operating dynamic end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were measured. Resting and exercise EELV decreased significantly by 0.38 L after BD compared with PL. After BD, V'O(2), V'CO(2), V'(E), and HR MRT accelerated (p < 0.05) by an average of 12, 22, 27, and 22 s, respectively (i.e., 15, 18, 22 and 27%, respectively). The slow component for V'O(2) declined by an average of 55 ml/min compared with PL. Speeded MRT for V'O(2) correlated with indices of reduced lung hyperinflation, such as resting EELV (r = -0.64, p = 0.025) and EELV at isotime (r = -0.77, p = 0.0032). The results confirm an important interaction between abnormal dynamic respiratory mechanics and indices of cardio-circulatory function in the rest-to-exercise transition in COPD patients.

  6. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-03-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP.

  7. Ion exchange in alginate gels--dynamic behaviour revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Gabriela; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Smith, David K; Chechik, Victor

    2015-12-14

    The formation of alginate gel from low molecular weight alginate and very low molecular weight alginate in the presence of divalent cations was investigated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The transition from sol to gel in the presence of divalent cations was monitored by the changes in the dynamics of spin labelled alginate. The immobilisation of the spin labelled alginate in the gel reflects the strength of interaction between the cation and alginate chain. Diffusion experiments showed that both the cation and alginate polyanion in the gel fibres can exchange with molecules in solution. In particular, we showed that dissolved alginate polyanions can replace alginates in the gel fibres, which can hence diffuse through the bulk of the gel. This illustrates the surprisingly highly dynamic nature of these gels and opens up the possibility of preparing multicomponent alginate gels via polyanion exchange process.

  8. Heat transfer enhancement by dynamic corrugated heat exchanger wall: Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Schmidmayer, K.; Topin, F.; Miscevic, M.

    2016-09-01

    A new concept of heat exchanger at sub-millimeter scale is proposed for applications in cooling on-board electronics devices, in which the quality of the exchanges between fluid and wall is very critical. In the proposed system, the upper wall of the channel is deformed dynamically to obtain a sinusoidal wave on this surface. The lower wall is exposed to constant heat flux simulating the imprint of an electronic component. A systematic 3-D numerical study in transient regime on the different deformation parameters allowed obtaining both the pumping characteristics and the heat transfer characteristics of the system. It was observed that the dynamic deformation of the wall induces a significant pumping effect. The intensification of the heat transfer is very important even for highly degraded waveforms, although the pumping efficiency is reduced in this case.

  9. Provably authenticated group Diffie-Hellman key exchange - The dynamic case (Extended abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2001-09-20

    Dynamic group Diffie-Hellman protocols for Authenticated Key Exchange(AKE) are designed to work in scenario in which the group membership is not known in advance but where parties may join and may also leave the multicast group at any given time. While several schemes have been proposed to deal with this scenario no formal treatment for this cryptographic problem has ever been suggested. In this paper, we define a security model for this problem and use it to precisely define Authenticated Key Exchange (AKE) with ''implicit'' authentication as the fundamental goal, and the entity-authentication goal as well. We then define in this model the execution of a protocol modified from a dynamic group Diffie-Hellman scheme offered in the literature and prove its security.

  10. On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient calculations obtained in indirect whole room calorimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper analyzes the accuracy of metabolic rate calculations performed in the whole room indirect calorimeter using the molar balance equations. The equations are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes need to b...

  11. Simultaneous determination of labile proton concentration and exchange rate utilizing optimal RF power: radio frequency power (RFP) dependence of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2009-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is increasingly used to probe mobile proteins and microenvironment properties, and shows great promise for tumor and stroke diagnosis. However, CEST MRI contrast mechanism is complex, depending not only on the CEST agent concentration, exchange and relaxation properties, but also varying with experimental conditions such as magnetic field strength and RF power. Hence, it remains somewhat difficult to quantify apparent CEST MRI contrast for properties such as pH, temperature and protein content. In particular, CEST MRI is susceptible to RF spillover effects in that RF irradiation may directly saturate the bulk water MR signal, leading to an optimal RF power at which the CEST contrast is maximal. Whereas RF spillover is generally considered an adverse effect, it is noted here that the optimal RF power strongly varies with exchange rate, although with negligible dependence on labile proton concentration. An empirical solution suggested that optimal RF power may serve as a sensitive parameter for simultaneously determining the labile proton content and exchange rate, hence, allowing improved characterization of the CEST system. The empirical solution was confirmed by numerical simulation, and experimental validation is needed to further evaluate the proposed technique. PMID:19926319

  12. Simultaneous determination of labile proton concentration and exchange rate utilizing optimal RF power: Radio frequency power (RFP) dependence of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2010-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is increasingly used to probe mobile proteins and microenvironment properties, and shows great promise for tumor and stroke diagnosis. However, CEST MRI contrast mechanism is complex, depending not only on the CEST agent concentration, exchange and relaxation properties, but also varying with experimental conditions such as magnetic field strength and RF power. Hence, it remains somewhat difficult to quantify apparent CEST MRI contrast for properties such as pH, temperature and protein content. In particular, CEST MRI is susceptible to RF spillover effects in that RF irradiation may directly saturate the bulk water MR signal, leading to an optimal RF power at which the CEST contrast is maximal. Whereas RF spillover is generally considered an adverse effect, it is noted here that the optimal RF power strongly varies with exchange rate, although with negligible dependence on labile proton concentration. An empirical solution suggested that optimal RF power may serve as a sensitive parameter for simultaneously determining the labile proton content and exchange rate, hence, allowing improved characterization of the CEST system. The empirical solution was confirmed by numerical simulation, and experimental validation is needed to further evaluate the proposed technique.

  13. Dynamic energy release rate in couple-stress elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, L.; Piccolroaz, A.; Mishuris, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is concerned with energy release rate for dynamic steady state crack problems in elastic materials with microstructures. A Mode III semi-infinite crack subject to loading applied on the crack surfaces is considered. The micropolar behaviour of the material is described by the theory of couple-stress elasticity developed by Koiter. A general expression for the dynamic J-integral including both traslational and micro-rotational inertial contributions is derived, and the conservation of this integral on a path surrounding the crack tip is demonstrated.

  14. Infinite swapping replica exchange molecular dynamics leads to a simple simulation patch using mixture potentials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2013-02-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) becomes more efficient as the frequency of swap between the temperatures is increased. Recently Plattner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] proposed a method to implement infinite swapping REMD in practice. Here we introduce a natural modification of this method that involves molecular dynamics simulations over a mixture potential. This modification is both simple to implement in practice and provides a better, energy based understanding of how to choose the temperatures in REMD to optimize efficiency. It also has implications for generalizations of REMD in which the swaps involve other parameters than the temperature.

  15. Exchange interaction-driven dynamic nuclear polarization in Mn-doped InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, O.; Baudin, E.; Lemaître, A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigated optical spin orientation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) doped by a single Mn atom, a magnetic impurity providing a neutral acceptor A0 with an effective spin J =1 . We find that the spin of an electron photocreated in such a quantum dot can be efficiently oriented by a quasiresonant circularly polarized excitation. For the electron spin levels which are made quasidegenerate by a magnetic field compensating the exchange interaction Δe with A0, there is however a full depolarization due the anisotropic part of the exchange. Still, in most studied QDs, the spin polarized photoelectrons give rise to a pronounced DNP which grows with a longitudinal magnetic field until a critical field where it abruptly vanishes. For some QDs, several replica of such DNP sequence are observed at different magnetic fields. This striking behavior is qualitatively discussed as a consequence of different exchange interactions experienced by the electron, driving the DNP rate via the energy cost of electron-nucleus spin flip-flops.

  16. Influence of magnesium sulfate on HCO3/Cl transmembrane exchange rate in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Zaikina, Yulia S; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Serebrennikova, Elena S; Volkov, Leonid; Maltsev, Valeri P; Chernyshev, Andrei V

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is widely used in medicine but molecular mechanisms of its protection through influence on erythrocytes are not fully understood and are considerably controversial. Using scanning flow cytometry, in this work for the first time we observed experimentally (both in situ and in vitro) a significant increase of HCO3(-)/Cl(-) transmembrane exchange rate of human erythrocytes in the presence of MgSO4 in blood. For a quantitative analysis of the obtained experimental data, we introduced and verified a molecular kinetic model, which describes activation of major anion exchanger Band 3 (or AE1) by its complexation with free intracellular Mg(2+) (taking into account Mg(2+) membrane transport and intracellular buffering). Fitting the model to our in vitro experimental data, we observed a good correspondence between theoretical and experimental kinetic curves that allowed us to evaluate the model parameters and to estimate for the first time the association constant of Mg(2+) with Band 3 as KB~0.07mM, which is in agreement with known values of the apparent Mg(2+) dissociation constant (from 0.01 to 0.1mM) that reflects experiments on enrichment of Mg(2+) at the inner erythrocyte membrane (Gunther, 2007). Results of this work partly clarify the molecular mechanisms of MgSO4 action in human erythrocytes. The method developed allows one to estimate quantitatively a perspective of MgSO4 treatment for a patient. It should be particularly helpful in prenatal medicine for early detection of pathologies associated with the risk of fetal hypoxia.

  17. A high rate of telomeric sister chromatid exchange occurs in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B-cells.

    PubMed

    Medves, Sandrine; Auchter, Morgan; Chambeau, Laetitia; Gazzo, Sophie; Poncet, Delphine; Grangier, Blandine; Verney, Aurélie; Moussay, Etienne; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brisou, Gabriel; Morjani, Hamid; Géli, Vincent; Palissot, Valérie; Berchem, Guy; Salles, Gilles; Wenner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells protect their telomere ends from erosion through reactivation of telomerase or by using the Alternative Lengthening of Telomere (ALT) mechanism that depends on homologous recombination. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) B cells are characterized by almost no telomerase activity, shelterin deregulation and telomere fusions. To characterize telomeric maintenance mechanisms in B-CLL patients, we measured their telomere length, telomerase expression and the main hallmarks of the ALT activity i.e. C-circle concentration, an extra-chromosomal telomere repeat (ECTR), and the level of telomeric sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) rate. Patients showed relative homogenous telomere length although almost no TERT transcript and nearly no C-circle were evidenced. Nevertheless, compared with normal B cells, B-CLL cells showed an increase in T-SCE rate that was correlated with a strong down-regulation of the topoisomerase III alpha (TOP3A) expression, involved in the dissolution of Holliday Junctions (HJ), together with an increased expression of SLX1A, SLX4, MUS81 and GEN1, involved in the resolution of HJ. Altogether, our results suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism of B-CLL cells do not preferentially use telomerase or ALT. Rather, the rupture of the dissolvasome/resolvasome balance may increase telomere shuffling that could homogenize telomere length, slowing telomere erosion in this disease.

  18. Transported Substrate Determines Exchange Rate in the Multidrug Resistance Transporter EmrE*

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport. PMID:24448799

  19. Transported substrate determines exchange rate in the multidrug resistance transporter EmrE.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Emma A; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A

    2014-03-07

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport.

  20. Can Heart Rate Variability be used to Estimate Gas Exchange Threshold in Obese Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, F; Seabra, A; Montenegro, R; Cunha, F; Bouskela, E; Farinatti, P

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the agreement and reliability of oxygen uptake (V̇O2), V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2 R), heart rate (HR) and power output at intensities corresponding to the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in obese and eutrophic adolescents. A further aim was to establish whether the HRVT was able to detect changes in cardio-respiratory fitness in obese adolescents after 3 months of recreational soccer practice. First, 25 obese and 10 eutrophic adolescents (ages 12-17) visited the laboratory twice to perform cycling CPET to test the reliability of CPET outcomes at GET and HRVT. Furthermore, the level of agreement between GET and HRVT was determined for a subgroup of 10 obese adolescents after performing a 3-month recreational soccer program. No significant difference was found for V̇O2, %V̇O2 R, HR and power output at the GET and HRVT (P>0.05), which were equally able to detect improvements in aerobic fitness after the soccer intervention. Correlations between GET and HRVT for V̇O2 and %V̇O2 R ranged from 0.89 to 0.95 (P<0.001) and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 (P<0.006). Overall, HRVT seems to be a reliable alternative for prescribing aerobic exercise intensity in obese adolescents.

  1. Homeochaos: dynamics stability of a symbiotic network with population dynamics and evolving mutation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Ikegami, Takashi

    1992-06-01

    Evolution of mutation rates is studied, in a population model with mutation of species coded by bit sequences and mutation rates. Even without interaction among species, the mutation rate is initially enhanced to search for fitted species and then is lowered towards zero. This enhancement opens a possibility of automatic simulated annealing. With the interaction among species (hosts versus parasites), high mutation rates are sustained. The rates go up with the interaction strength abruptly if the fitness landscape is rugged. A large cluster of species, connected by mutation, is formed by a sustained high mutation rate. With the formation of this symbiotic network resolved is the paradox of mutation rates; paradox on the stability of a rule to change itself. Population dynamics of each species shows high-dimensional chaos with small positive Lyapunov exponents. Stability of our symbiotic network is dynamically sustained through this weak high-dimensional chaos, termed “homeochaos”.

  2. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  3. Optimal mutation rates in dynamic environments: The eigen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2011-03-01

    We consider the Eigen quasispecies model with a dynamic environment. For an environment with sharp-peak fitness in which the most-fit sequence moves by k spin-flips each period T we find an asymptotic stationary state in which the quasispecies population changes regularly according to the regular environmental change. From this stationary state we estimate the maximum and the minimum mutation rates for a quasispecies to survive under the changing environment and calculate the optimum mutation rate that maximizes the population growth. Interestingly we find that the optimum mutation rate in the Eigen model is lower than that in the Crow-Kimura model, and at their optimum mutation rates the corresponding mean fitness in the Eigen model is lower than that in the Crow-Kimura model, suggesting that the mutation process which occurs in parallel to the replication process as in the Crow-Kimura model gives an adaptive advantage under changing environment.

  4. Optimal mutation rates in dynamic environments: The Eigen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2010-08-01

    We consider the Eigen quasispecies model with a dynamic environment. For an environment with sharp-peak fitness in which the most-fit sequence moves by k spin-flips each period T we find an asymptotic stationary state in which the quasispecies population changes regularly according to the regular environmental change. From this stationary state we estimate the maximum and the minimum mutation rates for a quasispecies to survive under the changing environment and calculate the optimum mutation rate that maximizes the population growth. Interestingly we find that the optimum mutation rate in the Eigen model is lower than that in the Crow-Kimura model, and at their optimum mutation rates the corresponding mean fitness in the eigenmodel is lower than that in the Crow-Kimura model, suggesting that the mutation process which occurs in parallel to the replication process as in the Crow-Kimura model gives an adaptive advantage under changing environment.

  5. New model describing the dynamical behaviour of penetration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Tohru; Minagawa, Hiroe; Chiba, Michiko

    2013-02-01

    We propose a hierarchical logistic equation as a model to describe the dynamical behaviour of a penetration rate of a prevalent stuff. In this model, a memory, how many people who already possess it a person who does not process it yet met, is considered, which does not exist in the logistic model. As an application, we apply this model to iPod sales data, and find that this model can approximate the data much better than the logistic equation.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of bond exchange reactions in covalent adaptable networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Yu, Kai; Mu, Xiaoming; Shi, Xinghua; Wei, Yujie; Guo, Yafang; Qi, H Jerry

    2015-08-21

    Covalent adaptable networks are polymers that can alter the arrangement of network connections by bond exchange reactions where an active unit attaches to an existing bond then kicks off its pre-existing peer to form a new bond. When the polymer is stretched, bond exchange reactions lead to stress relaxation and plastic deformation, or the so-called reforming. In addition, two pieces of polymers can be rejoined together without introducing additional monomers or chemicals on the interface, enabling welding and reprocessing. Although covalent adaptable networks have been researched extensively in the past, knowledge about the macromolecular level network alternations is limited. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the macromolecular details of bond exchange reactions in a recently reported epoxy system. An algorithm for bond exchange reactions is first developed and applied to study a crosslinking network formed by epoxy resin DGEBA with the crosslinking agent tricarballylic acid. The trace of the active units is tracked to show the migration of these units within the network. Network properties, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites, the chain angle, and the initial modulus, are examined after each iteration of the bond exchange reactions to provide detailed information about how material behaviors and macromolecular structure evolve. Stress relaxation simulations are also conducted. It is found that even though bond exchange reactions change the macroscopic shape of the network, microscopic network characteristic features, such as the distance between two neighboring crosslink sites and the chain angle, relax back to the unstretched isotropic state. Comparison with a recent scaling theory also shows good agreement.

  7. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F A; Montenegro, R A; Midgley, A W; Vasconcellos, F; Soares, P P; Farinatti, P

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%VO2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and VO2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P<0.001) and 5.2 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) (P=0.001) higher in running than cycling, but no significant differences were observed between running and walking, or cycling and walking (P>0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise.

  8. Central metal ion exchange in a coordination polymer based on lanthanide ions and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid: exchange rate and tunable affinity.

    PubMed

    Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Ooi, Kenta; Tanaka, Mikiya; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the exchange of lanthanide(III) ions (Ln(3+)) between a solution and a coordination polymer (CP) of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (Hdehp), [Ln(dehp)3], is studied. Kinetic and selectivity studies suggest that a polymeric network of [Ln(dehp)3] has different characteristics than the corresponding monomeric complex. The reaction rate is remarkably slow and requires over 600 h to reach in nearly equilibrium, and this can be explained by the polymeric crystalline structure and high valency of Ln(3+). The affinity of the exchange reaction reaches a maximum with the Ln(3+) possessing an ionic radius 7% smaller than that of the central Ln(3+), therefore, the affinity of the [Ln(dehp)3] is tunable based on the choice of the central metal ion. Such unique affinity, which differs from the monomeric complex, can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The latter likely becomes predominant for Ln(3+) exchange when the ionic radius of the ion in solution is smaller than the original Ln(3+) by more than 7%. Structural studies suggest that the incoming Ln(3+) forms a new phase though an exchange reaction, and this could plausibly cause the structural strain.

  9. Spin dynamics of polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle in multiple spin systems.

    PubMed

    Gan, Z

    2000-03-01

    Polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) [J. Magn. Reson. A 109, 270 (1994)] is an important experiment in NMR structural characterization of membrane proteins in oriented lipid bilayers. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the spin dynamics in PISEMA to investigate the line-narrowing mechanism. The study focuses on the effect of neighboring protons on the spin exchange of a strongly coupled spin pair. The spin exchange is solved analytically for simple spin systems and is numerically simulated for many-spin systems. The results show that the dipolar couplings from the neighboring protons of a strongly coupled spin pair perturb the spin exchange only in the second order, therefore it has little contribution to the linewidth of PISEMA spectra in comparison to the separated-local-field spectra. The effects from proton resonance offset and the mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn condition are also discussed along with experimental results using model single-crystal samples.

  10. Dynamics of nitrate limitation on gaseous nitrogen exchanges from pristine peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobroeck, D.; Brüggemann, N.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Boeckx, P.

    2009-04-01

    The cycling of gaseous nitrogen species in peatland ecosystems and the functioning of driving forces on microbial denitrification rates are poorly accounted. Physico-chemical soil conditions and biotic interactions1 control the availability of nitrate for respiratory denitrification resulting in high spatial variability of gaseous nitrogen exchange rates in nutrient poor peat soils and complicating impact assessment of eutrophication. The responses of nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) fluxes to nitrate addition were compared between distinct contrasts in plant growth at a pristine, hummocky peatland. Allowing to determine the dynamics of nitrate limitation on gaseous nitrogen exchanges in accordance to covariance in soil anaerobiosis and resource competition. Two quantification techniques were applied parallel to soil core incubations in order to determine N2O and N2 fluxes. Helium atmosphere incubation was used for direct quantification of net N2O and N2 fluxes. Reducing the background N2 concentration in the soil atmosphere to approx. 20 ppm enabled highly sensitive measurement of N2 fluxes. On the other hand a 15N-N2O tracer technique was explored as a tool to demonstrate and quantify gross consumption rates of atmospheric N2O to N2 and recycling of gaseous N-losses by microbial fixation. The headspace N2O pool was increased with 0.03 ppm 15•15N-N2O rendering an enrichment of ± 9.8 atom% 15•15N-N2O. Triplicate soil core samples were taken from two contrasting soil habitat in a hummocky, Carex dominated fen located in the Biebrza National Park, NE Poland (53 °07′N; 23 °10′E). The hummocks had a gravimetric soil water content of 76.6 ± 2.2% and high root abundance, dissimilar to 83.4 ± 1.0% and little root prevalence in the hollows. Singular nitrate addition, comparable to the atmospheric NOY -deposition, was applied two days in advance of flux measurement. Actual net gaseous nitrogen fluxes and responses to nitrate addition were apparently

  11. General Formalism of Mass Scaling Approach for Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) has demonstrated its efficiency by combining trajectories of a wide range of temperatures. As an extension of the method, the author formalizes the mass-manipulating replica-exchange molecular dynamics (MMREMD) method that allows for arbitrary mass scaling with respect to temperature and individual particles. The formalism enables the versatile application of mass-scaling approaches to the REMD method. The key change introduced in the novel formalism is the generalized rules for the velocity and momentum scaling after accepted replica-exchange attempts. As an application of this general formalism, the refinement of the viscosity-REMD (V-REMD) method [P. H. Nguyen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 144109 (2010)] is presented. Numerical results are provided using a pilot system, demonstrating easier and more optimized applicability of the new version of V-REMD as well as the importance of adherence to the generalized velocity scaling rules. With the new formalism, more sound and efficient simulations will be performed.

  12. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  13. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  14. Maximum, minimum, and optimal mutation rates in dynamic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the parallel mutation-selection quasispecies model with a changing environment. For an environment with the sharp-peak fitness function in which the most fit sequence changes by k spin flips every period T , we find analytical expressions for the minimum and maximum mutation rates for which a quasispecies can survive, valid in the limit of large sequence size. We find an asymptotic solution in which the quasispecies population changes periodically according to the periodic environmental change. In this state we compute the mutation rate that gives the optimal mean fitness over a period. We find that the optimal mutation rate per genome, k/T , is independent of genome size, a relationship which is observed across broad groups of real organisms.

  15. Plasma extraction rate and collection efficiency during therapeutic plasma exchange with Spectra Optia in comparison with Haemonetics MCS+.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Catherine; Gericke, Marion; Smith, Richard; Hermans, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    For therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), continuous and intermittent flow separators are known to be efficient. This study was undertaken to compare the performances of the Spectra Optia, a continuous flow centrifugal apheresis system recently developed by CaridianBCT, with the Haemonetics Multicomponents System (MCS)+ apheresis system based on intermittent flow centrifugation. The primary objective of the study was to compare the time required to exchange one total plasma volume with both separators. The secondary objectives were to determine the plasma exchange efficiency, the plasma extraction rate, the percentage of target exchange volume achieved, and the loss of cellular components. The study involved prospectively paired comparison of 16 TPE on each device performed in patients with chronic diseases treated with TPE. The time required to exchange 1 total plasma volume was 182 ± 36 minutes for MCS+ procedures and 100 ± 20 minutes for the Spectra Optia procedures (P < 0.05, all results presented as mean ± standard deviation). A significantly higher plasma extraction rate was achieved (30.2 ± 4.3 vs 16.8 ± 3.4 mL/min, respectively, P < 0.05), and the plasma exchange efficiency was slightly better with the Spectra Optia compared with the MCS+ procedures (83.4 ± 7.0 vs 80.0 ± 8.5%, P < 0.05). The platelet loss was significantly lower with the Spectra Optia compared with the MCS+ procedures (1.6 ± 2.3 vs 7.5 ± 4.2%, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas the red blood cells loss was comparable. In conclusion, the Spectra Optia has significantly higher extraction rate and exchange efficiency than the MCS+ allowing to remove the same amount of plasma in less time, by processing less blood. It also removes significantly less platelets than the MCS+ separator.

  16. Predicting Residential Air Exchange Rates from Questionnaires and Meteorology: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure models is the estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) of individual homes, where people spend most of their time. The AER, which is the airflow into and out of a building, is a primary mechanism for entry of outdoor air pollutants and removal of indoor source emissions. The mechanistic Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) AER model was linked to a leakage area model to predict AER from questionnaires and meteorology. The LBL model was also extended to include natural ventilation (LBLX). Using literature-reported parameter values, AER predictions from LBL and LBLX models were compared to data from 642 daily AER measurements across 31 detached homes in central North Carolina, with corresponding questionnaires and meteorological observations. Data was collected on seven consecutive days during each of four consecutive seasons. For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 43% (0.17 h−1) and 40% (0.17 h−1) for the LBL and LBLX models, respectively. Additionally, a literature-reported empirical scale factor (SF) AER model was evaluated, which showed a median absolute difference of 50% (0.25 h−1). The capability of the LBL, LBLX, and SF models could help reduce the AER uncertainty in air pollution exposure models used to develop exposure metrics for health studies. PMID:21069949

  17. Air exchange rates and migration of VOCs in basements and residences

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liuliu; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Rowe, Zachary; Chin, Jo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Basements can influence indoor air quality by affecting air exchange rates (AERs) and by the presence of emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other pollutants. We characterized VOC levels, AERs and interzonal flows between basements and occupied spaces in 74 residences in Detroit, Michigan. Flows were measured using a steady-state multi-tracer system, and 7-day VOC measurements were collected using passive samplers in both living areas and basements. A walkthrough survey/inspection was conducted in each residence. AERs in residences and basements averaged 0.51 and 1.52 h−1, respectively, and had strong and opposite seasonal trends, e.g., AERs were highest in residences during the summer, and highest in basements during the winter. Air flows from basements to occupied spaces also varied seasonally. VOC concentration distributions were right-skewed, e.g., 90th percentile benzene, toluene, naphthalene and limonene concentrations were 4.0, 19.1, 20.3 and 51.0 μg m−3, respectively; maximum concentrations were 54, 888, 1117 and 134 μg m−3. Identified VOC sources in basements included solvents, household cleaners, air fresheners, smoking, and gasoline-powered equipment. The number and type of potential VOC sources found in basements are significant and problematic, and may warrant advisories regarding the storage and use of potentially strong VOCs sources in basements. PMID:25601281

  18. Intelligent Soft Computing on Forex: Exchange Rates Forecasting with Hybrid Radial Basis Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Marcek, Dusan; Durisova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with application of quantitative soft computing prediction models into financial area as reliable and accurate prediction models can be very helpful in management decision-making process. The authors suggest a new hybrid neural network which is a combination of the standard RBF neural network, a genetic algorithm, and a moving average. The moving average is supposed to enhance the outputs of the network using the error part of the original neural network. Authors test the suggested model on high-frequency time series data of USD/CAD and examine the ability to forecast exchange rate values for the horizon of one day. To determine the forecasting efficiency, they perform a comparative statistical out-of-sample analysis of the tested model with autoregressive models and the standard neural network. They also incorporate genetic algorithm as an optimizing technique for adapting parameters of ANN which is then compared with standard backpropagation and backpropagation combined with K-means clustering algorithm. Finally, the authors find out that their suggested hybrid neural network is able to produce more accurate forecasts than the standard models and can be helpful in eliminating the risk of making the bad decision in decision-making process. PMID:26977450

  19. US residential building air exchange rates: new perspectives to improve decision making at vapor intrusion sites.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Shirazi, Elham; Colliver, Donald G; Pennell, Kelly G

    2017-02-22

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is well-known to be difficult to characterize because indoor air (IA) concentrations exhibit considerable temporal and spatial variability in homes throughout impacted communities. To overcome this and other limitations, most VI science has focused on subsurface processes; however there is a need to understand the role of aboveground processes, especially building operation, in the context of VI exposure risks. This tutorial review focuses on building air exchange rates (AERs) and provides a review of literature related building AERs to inform decision making at VI sites. Commonly referenced AER values used by VI regulators and practitioners do not account for the variability in AER values that have been published in indoor air quality studies. The information presented herein highlights that seasonal differences, short-term weather conditions, home age and air conditioning status, which are well known to influence AERs, are also likely to influence IA concentrations at VI sites. Results of a 3D VI model in combination with relevant AER values reveal that IA concentrations can vary more than one order of magnitude due to air conditioning status and one order of magnitude due to house age. Collectively, the data presented strongly support the need to consider AERs when making decisions at VI sites.

  20. Air exchange rates and alternative vapor entry pathways to inform vapor intrusion exposure risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Willett, Evan J; Shirazi, Elham; Pennell, Kelly G

    2016-11-12

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is a term used to describe indoor air (IA) contamination that occurs due to the migration of chemical vapors in the soil and groundwater. The overall vapor transport process depends on several factors such as contaminant source characteristics, subsurface conditions, building characteristics, and general site conditions. However, the classic VI conceptual model does not adequately account for the physics of airflow around and inside a building and does not account for chemical emissions from alternative "preferential" pathways (e.g. sewers and other utility connections) into IA spaces. This mini-review provides information about recent research related to building air exchange rates (AERs) and alternative pathways to improve the accuracy of VI exposure risk assessment practices. First, results from a recently published AER study for residential homes across the United States (US) are presented and compared to AERs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The comparison shows considerable differences in AERs when season, location, building age, and other factors are considered. These differences could directly impact VI assessments by influencing IA concentration measurements. Second, a conceptual model for sewer gas entry into buildings is presented and a summary of published field studies is reported. The results of the field studies suggest that alternative pathways for vapors to enter indoor spaces warrant consideration. Ultimately, the information presented in this mini-review can be incorporated into a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach for assessing site-specific VI exposure risks.

  1. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  2. Efficacy of a heat and moisture exchanger in inhalation anesthesia at two different flow rates.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koichi; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Abe, Hidehiro; Nishiyama, Tomoki; Manabe, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    In general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, a circle system with a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) and a low total flow is often used to prevent hypothermia and to maintain inspired gas humidity. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inspired gas humidity and body temperature, in general anesthesia with or without an HME at two different total flow rates. Eighty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] I or II) scheduled to undergo either orthopedic or head and neck surgery were studied. They were divided into four groups, of 20 patients each: total flow of 2 lxmin(-1) with (group HME2L) or without (group 2L) HME, and a total flow of 4 lxmin(-1) with (group HME4L) or without (group 4L) HME. The relative and absolute humidity and pharyngeal and inspired gas temperatures were measured for 2 h after endotracheal intubation. The relative humidity was not significantly different among groups 2L, HME2L, and HME4L. Group 4L had significantly lower absolute humidity than group 2L. The pharyngeal temperature did not decrease significantly for 2 h in any of the groups. During general anesthesia with a total flow of 2 lxmin(-1) in 2 h, HME might not be necessary, while with a total flow of 4 lxmin(-1), HME could be useful to maintain inspired gas humidity.

  3. Intelligent Soft Computing on Forex: Exchange Rates Forecasting with Hybrid Radial Basis Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Falat, Lukas; Marcek, Dusan; Durisova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with application of quantitative soft computing prediction models into financial area as reliable and accurate prediction models can be very helpful in management decision-making process. The authors suggest a new hybrid neural network which is a combination of the standard RBF neural network, a genetic algorithm, and a moving average. The moving average is supposed to enhance the outputs of the network using the error part of the original neural network. Authors test the suggested model on high-frequency time series data of USD/CAD and examine the ability to forecast exchange rate values for the horizon of one day. To determine the forecasting efficiency, they perform a comparative statistical out-of-sample analysis of the tested model with autoregressive models and the standard neural network. They also incorporate genetic algorithm as an optimizing technique for adapting parameters of ANN which is then compared with standard backpropagation and backpropagation combined with K-means clustering algorithm. Finally, the authors find out that their suggested hybrid neural network is able to produce more accurate forecasts than the standard models and can be helpful in eliminating the risk of making the bad decision in decision-making process.

  4. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  5. Predicting residential air exchange rates from questionnaires and meteorology: model evaluation in central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Breen, Miyuki; Williams, Ronald W; Schultz, Bradley D

    2010-12-15

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure models is the estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) of individual homes, where people spend most of their time. The AER, which is the airflow into and out of a building, is a primary mechanism for entry of outdoor air pollutants and removal of indoor source emissions. The mechanistic Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) AER model was linked to a leakage area model to predict AER from questionnaires and meteorology. The LBL model was also extended to include natural ventilation (LBLX). Using literature-reported parameter values, AER predictions from LBL and LBLX models were compared to data from 642 daily AER measurements across 31 detached homes in central North Carolina, with corresponding questionnaires and meteorological observations. Data was collected on seven consecutive days during each of four consecutive seasons. For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 43% (0.17 h(-1)) and 40% (0.17 h(-1)) for the LBL and LBLX models, respectively. Additionally, a literature-reported empirical scale factor (SF) AER model was evaluated, which showed a median absolute difference of 50% (0.25 h(-1)). The capability of the LBL, LBLX, and SF models could help reduce the AER uncertainty in air pollution exposure models used to develop exposure metrics for health studies.

  6. Folding of SAM-II riboswitch explored by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Wang; Zhihong, Li

    2015-01-21

    Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA fragments that function via a conformational transition mechanism when a specific target molecule binds to its binding pocket, representing an inviting new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics. To understand the folding mechanism of SAM-II riboswitch, occurring predominantly in proteobacteria, a 100ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent is performed. Our results show that this RNA pseudoknot has multiple folding pathways, and various intermediate structures. The resultant riboswitch conformational transition map is well consistent with the recent fluorescence measurement, which confirms the dynamical properties of this pseudoknot. Moreover, a novel transition pathway is predicted. The global folding dynamics is mainly coupled with the helix rather than the loop region. The potential folding pathways of the riboswitch presented here should lead to a deeper understanding of the folding mechanism of the riboswitch, as well as the conformational change of RNA pseudoknot.

  7. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA laboratory in Athens, Georgia i spursuing the goal of developing a model for describing toxicant vapor phase air/water exchange under all relevant environmental conditions. To date, the two-layer exchange model (suitable for low wind speed conditions) has been modif...

  8. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  9. Determinants of Protein Elution Rates from Preparative Ion-Exchange Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, James M.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2016-01-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their uptake and elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and L-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents. PMID:26948763

  10. Determinants of protein elution rates from preparative ion-exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-04-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and l-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents.

  11. Dynamic behaviour of birch and sequoia at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatoly, Bragov; Andrey, Lomunov; Ivan, Sergeichev; Gray, George, III

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents results of experimental analysis for structural woods, i.e. birch and sequoia at high strain rates. Monotonic and cyclic compression testing at room temperature of these materials was performed by experimental Kolsky method, using the 20-mm diameter split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The cut out specimens were loaded along and across fibers of woods, as well as, in others angles of cutting out from wooden materials. There were obtained dynamic deformation diagrams in various above conditions for these materials. Directions of specimens' cutting out, as well as, confined conditions effect on mechanical dynamic properties of the woods tested. Loading and unloading branches of stress-strain diagrams obtained are nonlinear and strain rates sensitive. Post-failure behavior of woods' specimens tested results from various forms of their fracture, such cracking and spalling. Experimental stress-strain curves showed significant influence of cutting out angles of specimens on fracture stresses' values. Dynamic deformation diagrams at cyclic loading, obtained by original modification of SPHB, are also presented for tested materials. Alongside with the SHPB tests, plane-wave experiments were conducted and the shock adiabates for the wood samples were obtained.

  12. High-resolution determination of 147Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elchuk, S; Lucy, C A; Burns, K I

    1992-10-15

    A procedure has been developed for measuring 147Pm in bioassay samples, based on the separation and preconcentration of 147Pm from the urine matrix by adsorption onto a conventional cation-exchange column with final separation and purification by HPLC using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography. The concentration of 147Pm is determined by collecting the appropriate HPLC fraction and measuring the 147Pm by liquid scintillation counting. The limit of detection is 0.1 Bq (3 fg) 147Pm based on a 500-mL sample of urine and a counting time of 30 min with a background of 100 cpm. Ten samples can be processed in 1.5-2 days.

  13. Ion exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies: effect of resin ligand density on dynamic binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Ann Marie; Harinarayan, Chithkala; Malmquist, Gunnar; Axén, Andreas; van Reis, Robert

    2009-05-15

    Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of a monoclonal antibody on agarose based strong cation exchange resins is determined as a function of resin ligand density, apparent pore size of the base matrix, and protein charge. The maximum DBC is found to be unaffected by resin ligand density, apparent pore size, or protein charge within the tested range. The critical conductivity (conductivity at maximum DBC) is seen to vary with ligand density. It is hypothesized that the maximum DBC is determined by the effective size of the proteins and the proximity to which they can approach one another. Once a certain minimum resin ligand density is supplied, additional ligand is not beneficial in terms of resin capacity. Additional ligand can provide flexibility in designing ion exchange resins for a particular application as the critical conductivity could be matched to the feedstock conductivity and it may also affect the selectivity.

  14. Simulating the frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents with dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Wang, Heping; Zhuang, Xin; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents is numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) at the mesoscopic particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the “color” repulsion model is adopted to describe binary fluids according to Rothman-Keller method. The present DPD simulation can reproduce the flow phenomena of lock-exchange density currents, including the lobe-and-cleft instability that appears at the head, as well as the formation of coherent billow structures at the interface behind the head due to the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Furthermore, through the DPD simulation, some small-scale characteristics can be observed, which are difficult to be captured in macroscopic simulation and experiment.

  15. Dynamic Behaviour of Birch and Sequoia at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragov, A. M.; Lomunov, A. K.; Sergeichev, I. V.; Gray, G. T.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents results of the dynamic mechanical response of for two structural woods, i.e. birch and sequoia. Monotonic and cyclic compression testing at room temperature of these materials was performed using a modified Kolsky method; a 20-mm diameter split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The birch and sequoia specimens were loaded parallel and orthogonal to the grain of the wood, as well as, at other angles relative to the wood grain. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the two woods was measured as a function of loading orientation under a uniaxial stress state as well as under circumferential confinement using a collar surrounding the sample to quantify the effect of lateral confinement on mechanical behavior. The loading and unloading responses of both woods were found to exhibit nonlinear behavior and a strong dependency on the strain rate of loading. The dynamic stress-strain responses of the birch and sequoia showed a strong influence of grain orientation of the flow stress and fracture behavior. Examination of the damage evolution and fracture responses of the birch and sequoia displayed a strong dependence on grain orientation. Cyclic dynamic loading data, obtained using a modification of the original SHPB testing method, is also presented for the two structural woods studied. In addition to the SHPB tests, plane-wave Shockwave loading experiments were conducted and the shock adiabates for birch was obtained.

  16. Ion-exchange of monovalent and bivalent cations with NaA zeolite membranes : a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, S.; Jia, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular simulations using the method of molecular dynamics have been carried out to study the dynamics and energetics of ion exchanges between monovalent and bivalent cations in supercritical and subcritical (liquid) electrolyte solutions (here Li+, and Ca++ in aqueous solutions of LiCl and CaCl2) and an ion exchange membrane (NaA zeolite) using direct simulations of up to a nanosecond or more. NaA zeolites are widely used in many commercial ion-exchange processes including detergents. Results show that with appropriate driving forces, such ion exchange processes can be clearly witnessed and investigated using molecular simulations at these timescales, especially for supercritical solutions. An attempt is made to understand the phenomenon of ion exchange at the molecular level. Results have shown that the ion-exchange process is primarily energetically driven and entropic forces do not appear to be playing a significant role in the exchanges observed. For supercritical LiCl solutions, small differences were found between the energy of the Li+ inside and outside the membrane. In contrast, for Na+ there was a considerable energetic advantage in being outside the membrane, making the overall exchange process energetically favourable. In subcritical (liquid) LiCl solutions an exchange was found to be more favourable energetically than supercritical solutions. For Ca++ similar trends were observed, except the differences in the energies were much larger (compared to the corresponding Li+ exchanges), making them more energetically efficient, as has also been observed experimentally. In addition to clarifying the molecular basis for these exchanges, simulations can also potentially be very useful to determine the behaviour (e.g. state dependence, etc.) of hydrodynamic parameters commonly used to characterize ion-exchange processes at a fundamental molecular level, and to determine if the hydrodynamic equations used for ion-exchange processes are applicable to nano

  17. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  18. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Malone, Sparkle L; Staudhammer, Christina L; Oberbauer, Steven F; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G; Schedlbauer, Jessica L; Loescher, Henry W; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades.

  19. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Enhances CO2 Exchange Rates in Freshwater Marsh Ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Sparkle L.; Staudhammer, Christina L.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G.; Schedlbauer, Jessica L.; Loescher, Henry W.; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009–2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (−11 to −110 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (−5 to −43.5 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (−16 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades. PMID:25521299

  20. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for charge exchange of metastable O/+//2D/ with N2. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using a data base of aeronomical parameters measured on board the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient is deduced for the charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2. The results indicate the Explorer values determined over the temperature range from 700 to 1900 K are not in conflict with laboratory measurements made at higher temperatures.

  1. The impact of water exchange rate on the health and performance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish mortality in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) has been observed by the authors to increase when RAS are managed at low makeup water exchange rates with relatively high feed loading. The precise etiology of this elevated mortality was unknown, all typical water quality parameters were wit...

  2. On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient calculations obtained in indirect whole room calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molar balance equations of indirect calorimetry are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes heed to be inferred from a known noisy effect – gaseous concentrations. Two methods of such inversion are analyzed. Th...

  3. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model is a population exposure model that uses a pro...

  4. Characterization of exchange rate regimes based on scaling and correlation properties of volatility for ASEAN-5 countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniandy, Sithi V.; Uning, Rosemary

    2006-11-01

    Foreign currency exchange rate policies of ASEAN member countries have undergone tremendous changes following the 1997 Asian financial crisis. In this paper, we study the fractal and long-memory characteristics in the volatility of five ASEAN founding members’ exchange rates with respect to US dollar. The impact of exchange rate policies implemented by the ASEAN-5 countries on the currency fluctuations during pre-, mid- and post-crisis are briefly discussed. The time series considered are daily price returns, absolute returns and aggregated absolute returns, each partitioned into three segments based on the crisis regimes. These time series are then modeled using fractional Gaussian noise, fractionally integrated ARFIMA (0,d,0) and generalized Cauchy process. The first two stationary models provide the description of long-range dependence through Hurst and fractional differencing parameter, respectively. Meanwhile, the generalized Cauchy process offers independent estimation of fractal dimension and long memory exponent. In comparison, among the three models we found that the generalized Cauchy process showed greater sensitivity to transition of exchange rate regimes that were implemented by ASEAN-5 countries.

  5. Feedbacks between Exchange-Rate Movements and Domestic Inflation: Vicious and Not So Virtuous Cycles, Old and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaventa, Luigi

    1983-01-01

    Theories and models dealing with the vicious cycle between exchange rates and domestic inflation and the way in which this relationship has influenced the economic policies of European nations are reviewed. Attempts of European nations to avoid the cycle of depreciation and inflation are covered. New theories may be necessary. (IS)

  6. Assembly and exchange of intermediate filament proteins of neurons: neurofilaments are dynamic structures

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have explored the dynamics of intermediate filament assembly and subunit exchange using fluorescently labeled neurofilament proteins and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Neurofilaments (NFs) are assembled from three highly phosphorylated proteins with molecular masses of 180 (NF-H), 130 (NF-M), and 66 kD (NF-L) of which NF-L forms the structural core. The core component, NF-L, was stoichiometrically labeled at cysteine 321 with fluorescein, coumarin, or biotin-maleimide to produce assembly-competent fluorescent or biotinylated derivatives, respectively. Using coumarin-labeled NF-L as fluorescence donor and fluorescein-labeled NF-L as the fluorescence acceptor, assembly of NF filaments was induced by rapidly raising the NaCl concentration to 170 mM, and the kinetics was followed by the decrease in the donor fluorescence. Assembly of NF-L subunits into filaments does not require nucleotide binding or hydrolysis but is strongly dependent on ionic strength, pH, and temperature. The critical concentration of NF-L, that concentration that remains unassembled at equilibrium with fully formed filaments, is 38 micrograms/ml or 0.6 microM. Under physiological salt conditions NF-L filaments also undergo extensive subunit exchange. Kinetic analysis and evaluation of several possible mechanisms indicate that subunit exchange is preceded by dissociation of subunits from the filament and generation of a kinetically active pool of soluble subunits. Given the concentration of NF-L found in nerve cells and the possibility of regulating this pool, these results provide the first information that intermediate filaments are dynamic structures and that NF-L within the NF complex is in dynamic equilibrium with a small but kinetically active pool of unassembled NF-L units. PMID:2925792

  7. Exchange bias in (FeNi/IrMn)n multilayer films evaluated by static and dynamic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Shankar; Diaconu, Andrei; Vargas, Jose M.; Lenormand, Denny R.; Garcia, Carlos; Ross, C. A.; Spinu, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Exchange bias properties of [FeNi/IrMn]n multilayer films with variable thickness of the ferromagnetic layers and different repetitions n were determined by using static and dynamic measurement techniques. The static magnetic properties were revealed through magnetometry measurements at room temperature following major hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves protocols. Room temperature x-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and vector network analyser (VNA)-FMR experiments were used to determine dynamically the exchange anisotropy in the FeNi/IrMn multilayers. From the static measurements the exchange anisotropy was determined while dynamic measurements allowed the determination of additional parameters including anisotropy field, saturation magnetization and rotatable anisotropy. The differences between the values of the exchange biased obtained from each technique are discussed.

  8. Dynamic XML-based exchange of relational data: application to the Human Brain Project.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhengming; Kadiyska, Yana; Li, Hao; Suciu, Dan; Brinkley, James F

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to exporting relational data in XML format for data exchange over the web. We describe the first real-world application of SilkRoute, a middleware program that dynamically converts existing relational data to a user-defined XML DTD. The application, called XBrain, wraps SilkRoute in a Java Server Pages framework, thus permitting a web-based XQuery interface to a legacy relational database. The application is demonstrated as a query interface to the University of Washington Brain Project's Language Map Experiment Management System, which is used to manage data about language organization in the brain.

  9. Seasonal Variations of Indoor Microbial Exposures and Their Relation to Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Air Exchange Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael; Gustavsen, Sine; Hansen, Erik Wind

    2012-01-01

    Indoor microbial exposure has been related to adverse pulmonary health effects. Exposure assessment is not standardized, and various factors may affect the measured exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of selected microbial exposures and their associations with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m3) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m3). Indoor bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m3) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m3). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass of inhalable dust and number of particles. Temperature and air exchange rates were positively associated with fungi and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and negatively with bacteria and the total inflammatory potential. Although temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates were significantly associated with several indoor microbial exposures, they could not fully explain the observed seasonal variations when tested in a mixed statistical model. In conclusion, the season significantly affects indoor microbial exposures, which are influenced by temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. PMID:23001651

  10. Seasonal variations of indoor microbial exposures and their relation to temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mika; Bekö, Gabriel; Timm, Michael; Gustavsen, Sine; Hansen, Erik Wind; Madsen, Anne Mette

    2012-12-01

    Indoor microbial exposure has been related to adverse pulmonary health effects. Exposure assessment is not standardized, and various factors may affect the measured exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal variation of selected microbial exposures and their associations with temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates in Danish homes. Airborne inhalable dust was sampled in five Danish homes throughout the four seasons of 1 year (indoors, n = 127; outdoors, n = 37). Measurements included culturable fungi and bacteria, endotoxin, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, total inflammatory potential, particles (0.75 to 15 μm), temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates. Significant seasonal variation was found for all indoor microbial exposures, excluding endotoxin. Indoor fungi peaked in summer (median, 235 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in winter (median, 26 CFU/m(3)). Indoor bacteria peaked in spring (median, 2,165 CFU/m(3)) and were lowest in summer (median, 240 CFU/m(3)). Concentrations of fungi were predominately higher outdoors than indoors, whereas bacteria, endotoxin, and inhalable dust concentrations were highest indoors. Bacteria and endotoxin correlated with the mass of inhalable dust and number of particles. Temperature and air exchange rates were positively associated with fungi and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and negatively with bacteria and the total inflammatory potential. Although temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates were significantly associated with several indoor microbial exposures, they could not fully explain the observed seasonal variations when tested in a mixed statistical model. In conclusion, the season significantly affects indoor microbial exposures, which are influenced by temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rates.

  11. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  12. Authentic Assessment in the Geometry Classroom: Calculating the Classroom Air-Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erich, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a room air-exchange activity designed to assess student understanding of the concept of volume. Lists materials for the activity and its procedures. Includes the lesson plan and a student worksheet. (KHR)

  13. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  14. Determination of mu-oxo exchange rates in di-mu-oxo dimanganese complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tagore, Ranitendranath; Chen, Hongyu; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary W

    2006-07-26

    A time-resolved mass spectrometric technique has been used for the determination of rates of exchange of mu-O atoms with water for the complexes [(mes-terpy)2Mn2(III/IV)(mu-O)2(H2O)2](NO3)3 (1, mes-terpy = 4'-mesityl-2,2':6',2' '-terpyridine), [(bpy)4Mn2(III/IV)(mu-O)2](ClO4)3 (2, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), [(phen)4Mn2(III/IV)(mu-O)2](ClO4)3 (3, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), [(bpea)2Mn2(III/IV)(mu-O)2(mu-OAc)](ClO4)2 (4, bpea = bis(2-pyridyl)ethylamine), [(bpea)2Mn2(IV/IV)(mu-O)2(mu-OAc)](ClO4)3 (4ox), [(terpy)4Mn4(IV/IV/IV/IV)(mu-O)5(H2O)2](ClO4)6 (5, terpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), and [(tacn)4Mn4(IV/IV/IV/IV)(mu-O)6]Br(3.5)(OH)0.5.6H2O (6, tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane). The rate of exchange of mu-OAc bridges with free acetate in solution has been measured for complexes 4 and 4ox. These are the first measurements of rates of ligand exchange on biologically relevant high-valent Mn complexes. The data analysis method developed here is of general utility in the quantitation of isotope exchange processes by mass spectrometry. We find that the presence of labile coordination sites on Mn increases mu-O exchange rates, and that all-Mn(IV) states are more inert toward exchange than mixed Mn(III)-Mn(IV) states. The rates of mu-O exchange obtained in this work for a di-mu-oxo Mn2(III/IV) dimer with labile coordination sites are compared with the oxygen isotope incorporation rates from substrate water to evolved dioxygen measured in different S states of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). On the basis of this comparison, we propose that both substrate waters are not bound as mu-O bridges between Mn atoms in the S2 and S3 states of the OEC.

  15. Influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting.

    PubMed

    de Guardia, A; Petiot, C; Rogeau, D; Druilhe, C

    2008-01-01

    The paper aimed to study the influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting of wastewater sludge with wood chips. Wastewater sludge was sampled at a pig slaughterhouse 24h before each composting experiment, and mixtures were made at the same mass ratio. Six composting experiments were performed in a lab reactor (300 L) under forced aeration. Aeration flow was constant throughout the experiment and aeration rates applied ranged between 1.69 and 16.63 L/h/kg DM of mixture. Material temperature and oxygen consumption were monitored continuously. Nitrogen losses in leachates as organic and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate, and losses in exhaust gases as ammonia were measured daily. Concentrations of total carbon and nitrogen i.e., organic nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, and nitrite and nitrate were measured in the initial substrates and in the composted materials. The results showed that organic nitrogen, which was released as NH4+/NH3 by ammonification, was closely correlated to the ratio of carbon removed from the material to TC/N(org) of the initial substrates. The increase of aeration was responsible for the increase in ammonia emissions and for the decrease in nitrogen losses through leaching. At high aeration rates, losses of nitrogen in leachates and as ammonia in exhaust gases accounted for 90-99% of the nitrogen removed from the material. At low aeration rates, those accounted for 47-85% of the nitrogen removed from the material. The highest concentrations of total ammoniacal nitrogen in composts occurred at the lowest aeration rate. Due to the correlation of ammonification with biodegradation and to the measurements of losses in leachates and in exhaust gases, the pool NH4+/NH3 in the composting material was calculated as a function of time. The nitrification rate was found to be proportional to the mean content of NH4+/NH3 in the material, i.e., initial NH4+/NH3 plus NH4+/NH3 released by ammonification minus losses in

  16. Hepatitis B virus direct repeat sequence: imino proton exchange rates and distance and torsion angle restraints from NMR.

    PubMed

    Bishop, K D; Blocker, F J; Egan, W; James, T L

    1994-01-18

    Structural features of a trisdecamer duplex, [d(GGCAGAGGTGAAA).d(TTTCACCTCTGCC)], in solution are being investigated by proton one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. This DNA sequence is comprised of the 11-base-pair direct repeat sequence found in the hepatitis B viral genome with an additional base pair from the genome included on each end to minimize end effects on the 11-bp sequence of interest. The direct repeat sequence occurs twice in the viral genome; both are essential for initiation of DNA synthesis. The critical nature of this sequence suggests it may be a target to control replication of the virus. Elucidation of the structure of the direct repeat sequence could prove to be beneficial in targeting efforts. Structural determination via restrained molecular dynamics requires experimentally derived distance restraints. The ability to determine solution structures of biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy is limited by the quality and quantity of distance and torsion angle restraints that can be extracted from the NMR data. Techniques used to establish these restraints are constantly evolving and improving. Modifications in procedure are applied to the trisdecamer duplex to yield improvements in the determination of sugar conformations from COSY data and a substantial increase in the number of distance restraints typically garnered from 2D NOE intensity data. This increase in the number of distance restraints normally obtained from 2D NOE intensities was accomplished by utilizing a new version of the iterative complete relaxation matrix program MARDIGRAS with intensities extracted from a 2D NOE data set acquired in 90% H2O. The exchange rate of the imino and amino protons with the solvent water protons can now be included in the relaxation matrix calculations, thereby providing more accurate distances when utilizing the 2D NOE cross-peaks involving at least one exchangeable proton. In this lab, analysis of two-quantum-filtered correlation

  17. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  18. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  19. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Derocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here-which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole-circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100K which shows 30 Hz linewidths.

  20. σ and κ mesons as broad dynamical resonances in one-meson-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong Xiem, Ngo Thi; Shinmura, Shoji

    2014-09-01

    The existences of broad scalar σ (600) and κ (700) mesons have been discussed intensively in the experimental and theoretical studies on ππ and πK scatterings. By using chiral perturbation model, J. Oller, A. Gómez and J. R. Peláez confirmed the existence of these mesons as dynamical resonances. In meson-exchange models, their existence has not been established yet. In this talk, using the quasi-potential of meson-exchange model and Lippmann-Schwinger equation, we determine the T and S-matrices, from which we could find the positions of poles in physical amplitudes in the complex E-plane. With the full treatment of meson-meson interactions (ππ - πK - πη - ηη and πK - ηK) , for the first time, the existence of the scalar σ (600) and κ (700) mesons are confirmed in one-meson-exchange model. There are two kinds of form factors in our model: the monopole and the Gaussian. Our recent results show that the poles σ and κ appear at around 410 - i 540 MeV and 650 - i 20 MeV for monopole form factors, respectively. For Gaussian form factors, the poles σ and κ, respectively, are at 360 - i 510 MeV and 649 - i 190 MeV.

  1. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  2. Dynamics of Exchange at Gas-Zeolite Interfaces 1: Pure Component n-Butane and Isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    CHANDROSS,MICHAEL E.; WEBB III,EDMUND B.; GREST,GARY S.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.; ROTH,M.W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of n-butane and isobutane in silicalite. They begin with a comparison of the bulk adsorption and diffusion properties for two different parameterizations of the interaction potential between the hydrocarbon species, both of which have been shown to reproduce experimental gas-liquid coexistence curves. They examine diffusion as a function of the loading of the zeolite, as well as the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant at loading and for infinite dilution. They continue with simulations in which interfaces are formed between single component gases and the zeolite. After reaching equilibrium, they examine the dynamics of exchange between the bulk gas and the zeolite. Finally, they calculate the permeability of the zeolite for n-butane and isobutane as a function of pressure. Their simulations are performed for a number of different gas temperatures and pressures, covering a wide range of state points.

  3. Combining coarse-grained protein models with replica-exchange all-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wabik, Jacek; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Koliński, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  4. Search for Length Dependent Stable Structures of Polyglutamaine Proteins with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, Robert; Cox, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the need to find beta-structure aggregation nuclei for the polyQ diseases such as Huntington's, we have undertaken a search for length dependent structure in model polyglutamine proteins. We use the Onufriev-Bashford-Case (OBC) generalized Born implicit solvent GPU based AMBER11 molecular dynamics with the parm96 force field coupled with a replica exchange method to characterize monomeric strands of polyglutamine as a function of chain length and temperature. This force field and solvation method has been shown among other methods to accurately reproduce folded metastability in certain small peptides, and to yield accurately de novo folded structures in a millisecond time-scale protein. Using GPU molecular dynamics we can sample out into the microsecond range. Additionally, explicit solvent runs will be used to verify results from the implicit solvent runs. We will assess order using measures of secondary structure and hydrogen bond content.

  5. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-03-01

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion...carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contract all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimental quantities.

  7. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contact all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimetnal quantities.

  8. Robust Biased Brownian Dynamics for Rate Constant Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Gang; Skeel, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A reaction probability is required to calculate the rate constant of a diffusion-dominated reaction. Due to the complicated geometry and potentially high dimension of the reaction probability problem, it is usually solved by a Brownian dynamics simulation, also known as a random walk or path integral method, instead of solving the equivalent partial differential equation by a discretization method. Building on earlier work, this article completes the development of a robust importance sampling algorithm for Brownian dynamics—i.e., biased Brownian dynamics with weight control—to overcome the high energy and entropy barriers in biomolecular association reactions. The biased Brownian dynamics steers sampling by a bias force, and the weight control algorithm controls sampling by a target weight. This algorithm is optimal if the bias force and the target weight are constructed from the solution of the reaction probability problem. In reality, an approximate reaction probability has to be used to construct the bias force and the target weight. Thus, the performance of the algorithm depends on the quality of the approximation. Given here is a method to calculate a good approximation, which is based on the selection of a reaction coordinate and the variational formulation of the reaction probability problem. The numerically approximated reaction probability is shown by computer experiments to give a factor-of-two speedup over the use of a purely heuristic approximation. Also, the fully developed method is compared to unbiased Brownian dynamics. The tests for human superoxide dismutase, Escherichia coli superoxide dismutase, and antisweetener antibody NC6.8, show speedups of 17, 35, and 39, respectively. The test for reactions between two model proteins with orientations shows speedups of 2578 for one set of configurations and 3341 for another set of configurations. PMID:14507681

  9. Dynamic Line Rating Oncor Electric Delivery Smart Grid Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Justin; Smith, Cale; Young, Mike; Donohoo, Ken; Owen, Ross; Clark, Eddit; Espejo, Raul; Aivaliotis, Sandy; Stelmak, Ron; Mohr, Ron; Barba, Cristian; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Malkin, Stuart; Dimitrova, Vessela; Ragsdale, Gary; Mitchem, Sean; Jeirath, Nakul; Loomis, Joe; Trevino, Gerardo; Syracuse, Steve; Hurst, Neil; Mereness, Matt; Johnson, Chad; Bivens, Carrie

    2013-05-04

    Electric transmission lines are the lifeline of the electric utility industry, delivering its product from source to consumer. This critical infrastructure is often constrained such that there is inadequate capacity on existing transmission lines to efficiently deliver the power to meet demand in certain areas or to transport energy from high-generation areas to high-consumption regions. When this happens, the cost of the energy rises; more costly sources of power are used to meet the demand or the system operates less reliably. These economic impacts are known as congestion, and they can amount to substantial dollars for any time frame of reference: hour, day or year. There are several solutions to the transmission constraint problem, including: construction of new generation, construction of new transmission facilities, rebuilding and reconductoring of existing transmission assets, and Dynamic Line Rating (DLR). All of these options except DLR are capital intensive, have long lead times and often experience strong public and regulatory opposition. The Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) project co-funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oncor Electric Delivery Company developed and deployed the most extensive and advanced DLR installation to demonstrate that DLR technology is capable of resolving many transmission capacity constraint problems with a system that is reliable, safe and very cost competitive. The SGDP DLR deployment is the first application of DLR technology to feed transmission line real-time dynamic ratings directly into the system operation’s State Estimator and load dispatch program, which optimizes the matching of generation with load demand on a security, reliability and economic basis. The integrated Dynamic Line Rating (iDLR)1 collects transmission line parameters at remote locations on the lines, calculates the real-time line rating based on the equivalent conductor temperature, ambient temperature and influence of wind and solar

  10. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  11. Numerical studies on sizing/ rating of plate fin heat exchangers for a modified Claude cycle based helium liquefier/ refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, M.; Chakravarty, A.; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Performance of modern helium refrigeration/ liquefaction systems depends significantly on the effectiveness of heat exchangers. Generally, compact plate fin heat exchangers (PFHE) having very high effectiveness (>0.95) are used in such systems. Apart from basic fluid film resistances, various secondary parameters influence the sizing/ rating of these heat exchangers. In the present paper, sizing calculations are performed, using in-house developed numerical models/ codes, for a set of high effectiveness PFHE for a modified Claude cycle based helium liquefier/ refrigerator operating in the refrigeration mode without liquid nitrogen (LN2) pre-cooling. The combined effects of secondary parameters like axial heat conduction through the heat exchanger metal matrix, parasitic heat in-leak from surroundings and variation in the fluid/ metal properties are taken care of in the sizing calculation. Numerical studies are carried out to predict the off-design performance of the PFHEs in the refrigeration mode with LN2 pre-cooling. Iterative process cycle calculations are also carried out to obtain the inlet/ exit state points of the heat exchangers.

  12. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media

    PubMed Central

    Suess, D.; Fuger, M.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Vogler, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media. PMID:27245287

  13. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Suess, D; Fuger, M; Abert, C; Bruckner, F; Vogler, C

    2016-06-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media.

  14. Dynamics of suspended sediment exchange and transport in a degraded mangrove creek in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kitheka, Johnson U; Ongwenyi, George S; Mavuti, Kenneth M

    2002-12-01

    This study focuses on sediment exchange dynamics in Mwache Creek, a shallow tidal mangrove wetland in Kenya. The surface area of the creek is 17 km2 at high water spring. The creek experiences semidiurnal tides with tidal ranges of 3.2 m and 1.4 m during spring and neap tides, respectively. The creek is ebb dominant in the frontwater zone main channel and is flood dominant in the backwater zone main channel. During rainy season, the creek receives freshwater and terrigenous sediments from the seasonal Mwache River. Heavy supply of terrigenous sediments during the El Niño of 1997-1998 led to the huge deposition of sediments (10(60 tonnes) in the wetland that caused massive destruction of the mangrove forest in the upper region. In this study, sea level, tidal discharges, tidal current velocities, salinity, total suspended sediment concentrations (TSSC) and particulate organic sediment concentrations (POSC) measured in stations established within the main channel and also within the mangrove forests, were used to determine the dynamics of sediment exchange between the frontwater and backwater zones of the main channel including also the exchange with mangrove forests. The results showed that during wet seasons, the high suspended sediment concentration associated with river discharge and tidal resuspension of fine channel-bed sediment accounts for the inflow of highly turbid water into the degraded mangrove forest. Despite the degradation of the mangrove forest, sediment outflow from the mangrove forest was considerably less than the inflow. This caused a net trapping of sediment in the wetland. The net import of the sediment dominated in spring tide during both wet and dry season and during neap tide in the wet season. However, as compared to heavily vegetated mangrove wetlands, the generally degraded Mwache Creek mangrove wetland sediment trapping efficiency is low as the average is about 30% for the highly degraded backwater zone mangrove forest and 65% in the

  15. Detrended cross-correlation analysis on RMB exchange rate and Hang Seng China Enterprises Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qingsong; Yang, Bingchan; Ma, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cross-correlations between the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets on the basis of a cross-correlation statistic test and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA). MF-DCCA has, at best, serious limitations for most of the signals describing complex natural processes and often indicates multifractal cross-correlations when there are none. In order to prevent these false multifractal cross-correlations, we apply MFCCA to verify the cross-correlations. Qualitatively, we find that the return series of the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets were, overall, significantly cross-correlated based on the statistical analysis. Quantitatively, we find that the cross-correlations between the stock index and RMB exchange markets were strongly multifractal, and the multifractal degree of the onshore RMB exchange markets was somewhat larger than the offshore RMB exchange markets. Moreover, we use the absolute return series to investigate and confirm the fact of multifractality. The results from the rolling windows show that the short-term cross-correlations between volatility series remain high.

  16. Structural dynamics of soluble chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 examined by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Stoyan H; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L; Dirr, Heini W

    2009-09-08

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1, but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2, and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilizing domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix alpha1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand beta2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer.

  17. Super-Resolution of Dynamic Scenes Using Sampling Rate Diversity.

    PubMed

    Salem, Faisal; Yagle, Andrew E

    2016-08-01

    In earlier work, we proposed a super-resolution (SR) method that required the availability of two low resolution (LR) sequences corresponding to two different sampling rates, where images from one sequence were used as a basis to represent the polyphase components (PPCs) of the high resolution (HR) image, while the other LR sequences provided the reference LR image (to be super-resolved). The (simple) algorithm implemented by Salem and Yagle is only applicable when the scene is static. In this paper, we recast our approach to SR as a two-stage example-based algorithm to process dynamic scenes. We employ feature selection to create, from the LR frames, local LR dictionaries to represent PPCs of HR patches. To enforce sparsity, we implement Gaussian generative models as an efficient alternative to L1-norm minimization. Estimation errors are further reduced using what we refer to as the anchors, which are based on the relationship between PPCs corresponding to different sampling rates. In the second stage, we revert to simple single frame SR (applied to each frame), using HR dictionaries extracted from the super-resolved sequence of the previous stage. The second stage is thus a reiteration of the sparsity coding scheme, using only one LR sequence, and without involving PPCs. The ability of the modified algorithm to super-resolve challenging LR sequences reintroduces sampling rate diversity as a prerequisite of robust multiframe SR.

  18. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  19. Measurement of air exchange rate of stationary vehicles and estimation of in-vehicle exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Spengler, J D; Yoon, D W; Dumyahn, T; Lee, K; Ozkaynak, H

    1998-01-01

    The air exchange rates or air changes per hour (ACH) were measured under 4 conditions in 3 stationary automobiles. The ACH ranged between 1.0 and 3.0 h-1 with windows closed and no mechanical ventilation, between 1.8 and 3.7 h-1 for windows closed with fan set on recirculation, between 13.3 and 26.1 h-1 for window open with no mechanical ventilation, and between 36.2 and 47.5 h-1 for window closed with the fan set on fresh air. ACHs for windows closed with no ventilation were higher for the older automobile than for the newer automobiles. With the windows closed and fan turned off, ACH was not influenced by wind speed (p > 0.05). When the window was open, ACH appeared to be greatly affected by wind speed (R2 = 0.86). These measurements are relevant to understanding exposures inside automobiles to sources such as dry-cleaned clothes, cigarettes and airbags. Therefore, to understand the in-vehicle exposure to these internal sources, perchloroethylene (PCE) emitted from dry-cleaned clothes and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) inside a vehicle were modeled for simulated driving cycles. Airbag deployment was also modeled for estimating exposure level to alkaline particulate and carbon monoxide (CO). Average exposure to PCE inside a vehicle for 30 minutes period was high (approximately 780 micrograms/m3); however, this is only 6% of the two-week exposure that is influenced by the storage of dry cleaned clothing at home. On the other hand, the exposure levels of respirable suspended particulate (RSP) and formaldehyde due to ETS could reach 2.1 mg/m3 and 0.11 ppm, respectively, when a person smokes inside a driving car even with the window open. In modeling the in-vehicle concentrations following airbag deployment, the average CO level over 20 minutes would not appear to present problem (less than 28 ppm). The peak concentration of respirable particulate would have exceeded 140 mg/m3. Since most of the particle mass is composed of alkaline material, these high levels

  20. Ionization dynamics of small water clusters: Proton transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Takada, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The surfaces of icy planets and comets are composed of frozen water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). These surfaces are irradiated by solar wind and cosmic rays from the interstellar space and they cause ionization of surface molecules. In this report, the effects of ionization of cold water clusters have been investigated using a direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method to elucidate the rate of proton transfer (PT) in cations of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 2-7). After ionization of the water clusters, PT occurred in all the cluster cations, and dissociation of the OH radical occurred for n = 4-7. The time of PT decreased with increasing the cluster size at n = 2-5 and reached a limiting value at n = 6 and 7. The mechanism of the PT process in ionized water clusters was discussed based on the theoretical results.

  1. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  2. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; ...

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  3. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  4. Dynamic Strength of Metals at High Pressure and Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to materials science at very high pressures and strain rates has been developed on the Omega laser, using a ramped plasma piston drive. A laser drives an ablative shock through a solid plastic reservoir where it unloads at the rear free surface, expands across a vacuum gap, and stagnates on the metal sample under study. This produces a gently increasing ram pressure, compressing the sample nearly isentropically. The peak pressure on the sample, diagnosed with VISAR measurements, can be varied by adjusting the laser energy and pulse length, gap size, and reservoir density, and obeys a simple scaling relation.^1 This has been demonstrated at OMEGA at pressures to 200 GPa in Al foils. In an important application, using in-flight x-ray radiography, the material strength of solid-state samples at high pressure can be inferred by measuring the reductions in the growth rates (stabilization) of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interfaces. RT instability measurements of solid of Al-6061-T6 ^2 and vanadium, at pressures of 20-100 GPa, and strain rates of 10^6 to 10^8 s-1, show clear material strength effects. Modelling results for two constitutive strength models -- Steinberg-Guinan and Preston-Tonks-Wallace, show enhanced dynamic strength that may be correlated with a high-strain-rate, phono-drag mechanism. Data, modeling details and future prospects for this project using the National Ignition Facility laser, will be presented. [1] J. Edwards et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 075002 (2004). [2] K. T. Lorenz et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056309 (2005). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Nucleation rate analysis of methane hydrate from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C; Beckham, Gregg T; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates calculated by MFPT and SP methods are within 5%, and the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  6. Rates of water exchange for two cobalt(II) heteropoly-oxotungstate compounds in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlin, C. Andre; Harley, Stephen J.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Johnson, Rene L.; Villa, Eric M.; Fidler, Mary Kate; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Spiccia, Leone; Britt, R. David; Casey, William H.

    2011-03-17

    Polyoxometalate ions are used as ligands in water-oxidation processes related to solar energy production. An important step in these reactions is the association and dissociation of water from the catalytic sites, the rates of which are unknown. Here we report the exchange rates of water ligated to CoII atoms in two polyoxotungstate sandwich molecules using the 17O-NMR-based Swift–Connick method. The compounds were the [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-W9O34)2]-10 and the larger αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16 ions, each with two water molecules bound trans to one another in a CoII sandwich between the tungstate ligands. The clusters, in both solid and solution state, were characterized by a range of methods, including NMR, EPR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, and EXAFS spectroscopy, ESI-MS, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and potentiometry. For [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-PW9O34)2]-10 at pH 5.4, we estimate: k 298=1.5(5)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=39.8±0.4 kJ mol-1, ΔS=+7.1±1.2 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=5.6 ±1.6 cm3 mol-1. For the Wells–Dawson sandwich cluster (αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16) at pH 5.54, we find: k298=1.6(2)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=27.6±0.4 kJ mol-1 ΔS=-33±1.3 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=2.2±1.4 cm3mol-1 at pH 5.2. The molecules are clearly stable and monospecific in slightly acidic solutions, but dissociate in strongly acidic solutions. This dissociation is detectable by EPR

  7. Computing H/D-Exchange rates of single residues from data of proteolytic fragments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein conformation and protein/protein interaction can be elucidated by solution-phase Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (sHDX) coupled to high-resolution mass analysis of the digested protein or protein complex. In sHDX experiments mutant proteins are compared to wild-type proteins or a ligand is added to the protein and compared to the wild-type protein (or mutant). The number of deuteriums incorporated into the polypeptides generated from the protease digest of the protein is related to the solvent accessibility of amide protons within the original protein construct. Results In this work, sHDX data was collected on a 14.5 T FT-ICR MS. An algorithm was developed based on combinatorial optimization that predicts deuterium exchange with high spatial resolution based on the sHDX data of overlapping proteolytic fragments. Often the algorithm assigns deuterium exchange with single residue resolution. Conclusions With our new method it is possible to automatically determine deuterium exchange with higher spatial resolution than the level of digested fragments. PMID:20701784

  8. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  9. Completion Rates and Accuracy of Performance Under Fixed and Variable Token Exchange Periods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, T. F.; Malaby, J. E.

    This research investigated the effects of employing fixed, variable, and extended token exchange periods for back-ups on the completion and accuracy of daily assignments for a total fifth and sixth-grade class. The results indicated that, in general, a higher percentage of assignments was completed when the number of days between point exchanges…

  10. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  11. Recent advancements on modelling the exchange flow dynamics through the Turkish Strait System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannino, Gianmaria; Sözer, Adil; Özsoy, Emin

    2014-05-01

    The system composed by the two narrow Straits, Dardanelles and Bosphorus, and the Marmara Sea is known as the Turkish Straits System (TSS). The scientific questions on the role of the TSS in coupling the adjacent basins of the Mediterranean and Black Seas with highly contrasting properties, in a region of high climatic variability and materials transport depending critically on the cycle of water can only be answered by model predictions of the processes that determine the integral properties of the coupled sub-systems. This can only be achieved if the entire TSS is modeled as a finely resolved integral system that appropriately accounts for the high contrasts in seawater properties, steep topography, hydraulic controls, fine and meso-scale turbulence, nonlinear and non-hydrostatic effects, thermodynamic states and an active free-surface in the fullest extent, based on well represented fluid dynamical principles. In this study the MITgcm is used at very high resolution to study this extreme environment that needs to be represented as a whole and with the full details of its highly contrasting properties. The model domain chosen extends over the entire TSS, including also part of the north-east Aegean Sea at south, and the Black Sea at north of the domain. A non-uniform curvilinear orthogonal grid covers the domain at variable resolution: from less than 50 m in the two Straits up to about 1 Km in the Marmara Sea. To adequately resolve the complex hydraulic dynamics of the TSS, the model grid is made by 100 vertical z-levels. The model is initialized with three different water masses filling the western part of the domain, the Marmara Sea and the eastern side of the domain respectively, with vertical profiles selected from CTD casts obtained during the cruise of the R/V BİLİM of the Institute of Marine Sciences in June-July 2013. With the initial condition specified as lock-exchanges at the two straits, the model is left free to adjust to the expected two

  12. The relationships between Shanghai stock market and CNY/USD exchange rate: New evidence based on cross-correlation analysis, structural cointegration and nonlinear causality test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Wan, Jieqiu

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the co-movement of Shanghai stock market and China Yuan (CNY) exchange rates. First, we find that stock price and exchange rate are significantly cross-correlated. Second, employing a cointegration test allowing for a structural break, we find that the Shanghai Composite Index (SCI) is not cointegrated with the exchange rate of CNY/USD. The so-called “cointegration” found in previous studies is just caused by the shock of the recent financial crisis. Third, using linear and nonlinear Granger causality tests, we find no causality between stock prices and exchange rates during the period before the recent financial crisis. After the financial crisis, a unidirectional causality behavior running from exchange rates to stock index is present.

  13. The loss rates of O{sup +} in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.; Shen, C.

    2014-03-15

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O{sup +} (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O{sup +} to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O{sup +} are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  14. Assessing the Dynamics of Bittorrent Swarms Topologies Using the Peer Exchange Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzie, Mohamad Dikshie; Thamrin, Achmad Husni; van Meter, Rodney; Murai, Jun

    Bittorrent is one of the most popular and successful applications in the current Internet. However, we still have little knowledge about the topology of real Bittorrent swarms, how dynamic the topology is, and how it affects overall behavior. This paper describes an experimental study of the overlay topologies of real-world Bittorrent networks, focusing on the activity of the nodes of its P2P topology and especially their dynamic relationships. Peer Exchange Protocol (PEX) messages are analyzed to infer topologies and their properties, capturing the variations of their behavior. Our measurements, verified using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness of fit test and the likelihood ratio test and confirmed via simulation, show that a power-law with exponential cutoff is a more plausible model than a pure power-law distribution. We also found that the average clustering coefficient is very low, supporting this observation. Bittorrent swarms are far more dynamic than has been recognized previously, potentially impacting attempts to optimize the performance of the system as well as the accuracy of simulations and analyses.

  15. Plasticity of 150-Loop in Influenza Neuraminidase Explored by Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Nanyu; Mu, Yuguang

    2013-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza is a key target for antiviral inhibitors, and the 150-cavity in group-1 NA provides new insight in treating this disease. However, NA of 2009 pandemic influenza (09N1) was found lacking this cavity in a crystal structure. To address the issue of flexibility of the 150-loop, Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were performed on different groups of NAs. Free energy landscape calculated based on the volume of 150-cavity indicates that 09N1 prefers open forms of 150-loop. The turn A (residues 147–150) of the 150-loop is discovered as the most dynamical motif which induces the inter-conversion of this loop among different conformations. In the turn A, the backbone dynamic of residue 149 is highly related with the shape of 150-loop, thus can function as a marker for the conformation of 150-loop. As a contrast, the closed conformation of 150-loop is more energetically favorable in N2, one of group-2 NAs. The D147-H150 salt bridge is found having no correlation with the conformation of 150-loop. Instead the intimate salt bridge interaction between the 150 and 430 loops in N2 variant contributes the stabilizing factor for the closed form of 150-loop. The clustering analysis elaborates the structural plasticity of the loop. This enhanced sampling simulation provides more information in further structural-based drug discovery on influenza virus. PMID:23593372

  16. Analysis of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rate within the scope of econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa; Balcılar, Mehmet; Özdemir, Zeynel Abidin; Ersoy, Ersan

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the Turkish Lira/US Dollar (TRY/USD), Turkish Lira/Euro (TRY/EUR), Turkish Lira/Japanese Yen (TRY/JPY) and Turkish Lira/Swiss Franc (TRY/CHF) exchange rates in the global financial crisis period to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY by using a mathematical methodology developed by Watanabe et al. (2007). The methodology defines the bubbles and crashes in financial market price fluctuations by considering an exponential fitting of the associated data. This methodology is applied to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rates from January, 1, 2005 to December, 20, 2013. In this mathematical methodology, the whole period of bubbles and crashes can be determined purely from past data, and the start of bubbles and crashes can be identified even before its bursts. In this way, the periods of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF are determined, and the beginning and end points of these periods are detected. The results show that the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate are commonly finished earlier than in the other exchange rates; hence it is probable that the crashes in the other exchange rates would be finished soon when the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate ended. We also find that the periods of crashes in the TRY/EUR exchange rate take longer time than in the other exchange rates. This information can be used in risk management and/or speculative gain. The crashes' periods in the TRY/EUR and TRY/USD exchange rates are observed to be relatively longer than in the other exchange rates.

  17. Beryllium fluoride exchange rate accelerated by Mg²⁺ as discovered by ¹⁹F NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili; Jiang, Ling

    2015-01-08

    Beryllium fluoride is widely used as a phosphoryl analogue in macromolecular studies, which are not only fluoride-sensitive but also magnesium-dependent. The beryllium fluorides are a mixture of different species including BeF3(-) and BeF4(2-) exchanging under thermodynamic equilibrium in neutral aqueous solutions. In the cases of mimicking phosphate group transfer, both beryllium fluoride and the magnesium ion are generally needed. However, the impact of magnesium on the bioactivity of beryllium fluoride is not clear. We have found by (19)F NMR spectroscopy that Mg(2+) can severely affect the chemical exchange kinetics between BeF3(-) and BeF4(2-). When the F(-) concentration is relatively low, the presence of 10.0 mM Mg(2+) can accelerate the exchange rate 3-4 fold. However, when the F(-) concentration is relatively high, the Mg(2+) effect on the chemical exchange vanishes. On the basis of these findings, we proposed a possible mechanism that BeF4(2-) and Mg(2+) form an ion pair that affects the distribution of beryllium fluoride species and thus the activity in the solution.

  18. Importance of ventricular rate after mode switching during low intensity exercise as assessed by clinical symptoms and ventilatory gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Brunner-La Rocca, H P; Rickli, H; Weilenmann, D; Duru, F; Candinas, R

    2000-01-01

    Automatic mode switching from DDD(R) to DDI(R) or VVI(R) pacing modes has improved dual chamber pacing in patients at high risk for supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. However, little is known about the effect of ventricular pacing rate adaptation after mode switching. We conducted a single-blinded, crossover study in 15 patients (58 +/- 21 years) with a DDD pacemaker who had AV block and normal sinus node function to investigate the influence of pacing rate adaptation to intrinsic heart rate during low intensity exercise. Patients performed two tests (A/B) of low intensity treadmill exercise (0.5 W/kg) in randomized order. They initially walked for 6 minutes while paced in DDD mode. The pacing mode was then switched to VVI with a pacing rate of either 70 beats/min (test A) or matched to the intrinsic heart rate (95 +/- 11 beats/min test B). Respiratory gas exchange variables were determined and patients classified the effort before and after mode switching on a Borg scale from 6 to 20. Percentage changes of respiratory gas exchange measurements were significantly larger (O2 consumption: -8.2 +/- 5.0% vs. -0.6 +/- 7.2%; ventilatory equivalent of CO2 exhalation: 5.3 +/- 4.9% vs. 1.5 +/- 4.3%; respiratory exchange ratio: 7.0 +/- 2.2% vs. 3.5 +/- 3.0%; end-tidal CO2: -5.7 +/- 2.9% vs. -1.8 +/- 2.7%; all P < 0.01) and the increase in subjective assessment of the effort tended to be higher (mean increase on Borg scale: 1.6 +/- 1.9 vs. 1.1 +/- 1.8, P = 0.07) after heart rate unadjusted than after adjusted mode switching. Mode switching from DDD to VVI pacing is better tolerated and gas exchange measurements are less influenced if ventricular pacing rate is adjusted to the level of physical activity. Thus, pacing rate adjustment should be considered as part of automatic mode switch algorithms.

  19. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4, 5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias.

  20. Hydrated fractions of cellulosics probed by infrared spectroscopy coupled with dynamics of deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Driemeier, Carlos; Mendes, Fernanda M; Ling, Liu Yi

    2015-08-20

    This article presents a novel method to selectively probe the non-crystalline, hydrated fractions of cellulosic biomass. The method is based on time-resolved infrared spectra analyzed to provide information on spectral and dynamical features of deuterium exchange (OH → OD) in D2O atmosphere. We assign deuterium exchange spectral regions (700-3800 cm(-1)) and explore changes due to relative humidity, different cellulosic samples, and infrared polarization. Here, two results are highlighted. First, a wide range of celluloses isolated from plants show remarkable spectral similarities whatever the relative amounts of cellulose and xylan. This result supports an inherent type of hydrated disorder which is mostly insensitive to the molecular identities of the associated polysaccharides. Second, polarized infrared analysis of cotton reveals hydrated cellulose having chains preferentially aligned with those of crystals, while the hydroxyls of hydrated cellulose present much more randomized orientation. Our results provide new insights on molecular and group orientation and on hydrogen bonding in hydrated fractions of cellulosic biomass.

  1. Walking freely in the energy and temperature space by the modified replica exchange molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao

    2016-06-30

    Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) method is a powerful sampling tool in molecular simulations. Recently, we made a modification to the standard REMD method. It places some inactive replicas at different temperatures as well as the active replicas. The method completely decouples the number of the active replicas and the number of the temperature levels. In this article, we make a further modification to our previous method. It uses the inactive replicas in a different way. The inactive replicas first sample in their own knowledge-based energy databases and then participate in the replica exchange operations in the REMD simulation. In fact, this method is a hybrid between the standard REMD method and the simulated tempering method. Using different active replicas, one can freely control the calculation quantity and the convergence speed of the simulation. To illustrate the performance of the method, we apply it to some small models. The distribution functions of the replicas in the energy space and temperature space show that the modified REMD method in this work can let the replicas walk freely in both of the two spaces. With the same number of the active replicas, the free energy surface in the simulation converges faster than the standard REMD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. On the mesoscale dynamics of the Indian/Atlantic interocean exchange.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matano, R. P.; Beier, E. J.

    2002-12-01

    In this presentation we analyze the Indian/Atlantic interocean exchanges in an eddy-permitting numerical simulation of the global ocean circulation. Our analysis focuses in the Cape Basin, a region of the southeastern Atlantic limited to the northwest by the Walvis Ridge and to the south by the subtropical convergence. To quantify the relative importance of the different dynamical mechanisms involved in the interocean exchange we separated the climatological mean circulation from the transients. The analysis indicates that Agulhas eddies not only influence the transient fluxes but also to those associated with the mean circulation (eddy fluxes, for example, supply most of the energy of the Benguela Current). A distinct characteristic of the eddy variability within the Cape Basin is the co-existence of cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices in dipole structures that resemble the heton model of Hogg and Stommel (Deep Sea Research,1985). Anticyclones are surface intensified vortices that, in spite of their baroclinic structure, reach to deep layers. Cyclones, are bottom-intensified vortices with dominant barotropic structure that projects into the upper layer. The propagation of cyclones and anticyclones is strongly affected by the bottom topography. Our analysis shows that the Walvis Ridge and the Vema Seamount block the passage of bottom-intensified cyclones and rectifies the trajectories of the upper-intensified anticyclones. Although most anticyclones are able to escape the basin the deep compensation generated by the ridge generates an energy loss of approximately 30%, and a rectification of the eddy trajectory to a more westward direction.

  3. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4,  5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias.

  4. Intensification of heat exchange in a device for gas-dynamic energy separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, A. I.; Burtsev, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The operating efficiency of a gas-dynamic energy-separation device is analyzed, and it is shown that it can be improved if we deposit a regular relief on the wall separating the supersonic and subsonic channels. To decrease the total pressure losses on the side of the supersonic channel, shallow spherical dimples (stampings) are deposited, creating spherical ledges in the subsonic channel because of the small thickness of the wall. The calculation technique is modernized, and modeling is carried out, which shows that by introducing intensified heat exchange, it is possible to improve the efficiency of this device by 1.2-1.4 times in air and in natural gas with a simultaneous decrease in the device size by 20-25%.

  5. Issues associated with modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Tomasz; Tsotridis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the current study is to highlight possible limitations and difficulties associated with Computational Fluid Dynamics in PEM single fuel cell modelling. It is shown that an appropriate convergence methodology should be applied for steady-state solutions, due to inherent numerical instabilities. A single channel fuel cell model has been taken as numerical example. Results are evaluated for quantitative as well qualitative points of view. The contribution to the polarization curve of the different fuel cell components such as bi-polar plates, gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers and membrane was investigated via their effects on the overpotentials. Furthermore, the potential losses corresponding to reaction kinetics, due to ohmic and mas transport limitations and the effect of the exchange current density and open circuit voltage, were also investigated. It is highlighted that the lack of reliable and robust input data is one of the issues for obtaining accurate results.

  6. Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amyloid Precursor Protein Dimer in Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is the primary element in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the membrane due to the cleavages by β- and γ-secretases. Here, we predict the transmembrane structures of the wild-type and mutant APP in the biological membrane by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations illustrate large conformational differences between the wild type and mutant APP fragments in the membrane. Dimerization of the wild type occurs due to the Cα-H⋯O hydrogen bonds at the Gly-XXX-Gly motifs between two APP fragments, whereas the mutant dimer is stabilized by the interactions between hydrophobic side chains. We also observe the downward shift of γ-cleavage site in the mutant APP, which may cause the prohibition of Aβ production.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study on Energy Exchange Between Vibration Modes of a Square Graphene Nanoflake Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunae; Kang, Jeong Won; Kim, Ki-Sub; Kwon, Oh-Kuen

    2016-02-01

    Superlubricity in nanoscale graphene structures has been of interest for developing graphene-based nanoelectromechanical systems, as well as for the study of basic mechanical properties. Here, we investigated the translational and rotational motions of a square graphene nanoflake with retracting motions by performing classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the kinetic energy of the translational motion was exchanged into the kinetic energy of the rotational motion. Thus, square graphene nanoflake oscillators have very low quality factors in translational motions. We discuss that square graphene nanoflakes have great potential to be a core component in nanoelectromechanical systems by detecting their motions with ultrahigh sensitivity to facilitate the development of sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  8. Saturation-recovery metabolic-exchange rate imaging with hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate using spectral-spatial excitation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Rolf F; Sperl, Jonathan I; Weidl, Eliane; Menzel, Marion I; Janich, Martin A; Khegai, Oleksandr; Durst, Markus; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Glaser, Steffen J; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian

    2013-05-01

    Within the last decade hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate chemical-shift imaging has demonstrated impressive potential for metabolic MR imaging for a wide range of applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. In this work, a highly efficient pulse sequence is described for time-resolved, multislice chemical shift imaging of the injected substrate and obtained downstream metabolites. Using spectral-spatial excitation in combination with single-shot spiral data acquisition, the overall encoding is evenly distributed between excitation and signal reception, allowing the encoding of one full two-dimensional metabolite image per excitation. The signal-to-noise ratio can be flexibly adjusted and optimized using lower flip angles for the pyruvate substrate and larger ones for the downstream metabolites. Selectively adjusting the excitation of the down-stream metabolites to 90° leads to a so-called "saturation-recovery" scheme with the detected signal content being determined by forward conversion of the available pyruvate. In case of repetitive excitations, the polarization is preserved using smaller flip angles for pyruvate. Metabolic exchange rates are determined spatially resolved from the metabolite images using a simplified two-site exchange model. This novel contrast is an important step toward more quantitative metabolic imaging. Goal of this work was to derive, analyze, and implement this "saturation-recovery metabolic exchange rate imaging" and demonstrate its capabilities in four rats bearing subcutaneous tumors.

  9. Calculation of the Helfferich number to identify the rate-controlling step of ion exchange for a batch process

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, K.

    1995-08-01

    The Helfferich number He is used frequently as a valuable criterion to decide whether for an ion exchange process film diffusion or particle diffusion of the ions is the rate-determining step. The corresponding equation given by Helfferich is restricted, however, for the boundary condition of an infinite solution volume. In the present paper, the Helfferich number is calculated also for a finite solution volume, i.e., for a typical batch process. Because the resulting equation can be solved only numerically, the results are presented in graphical form. It is also examined for which batch processes the conventional Helfferich number already yields a conservative and thus a very simple and useful estimate of the rate-determining step. Information on the kinetics of ion exchange reactions is required not only for the economic employment of synthetic ion exchangers in the industry and the laboratory but also for a better understanding of these processes in natural systems, as, e.g., the sorption of nutrient and toxic ions by the soil.

  10. Transient computation fluid dynamics modeling of a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell with serpentine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guilin; Fan, Jianren

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has become a promising candidate for the power source of electrical vehicles because of its low pollution, low noise and especially fast startup and transient responses at low temperatures. A transient, three-dimensional, non-isothermal and single-phase mathematical model based on computation fluid dynamics has been developed to describe the transient process and the dynamic characteristics of a PEMFC with a serpentine fluid channel. The effects of water phase change and heat transfer, as well as electrochemical kinetics and multicomponent transport on the cell performance are taken into account simultaneously in this comprehensive model. The developed model was employed to simulate a single laboratory-scale PEMFC with an electrode area about 20 cm 2. The dynamic behavior of the characteristic parameters such as reactant concentration, pressure loss, temperature on the membrane surface of cathode side and current density during start-up process were computed and are discussed in detail. Furthermore, transient responses of the fuel cell characteristics during step changes and sinusoidal changes in the stoichiometric flow ratio of the cathode inlet stream, cathode inlet stream humidity and cell voltage are also studied and analyzed and interesting undershoot/overshoot behavior of some variables was found. It was also found that the startup and transient response time of a PEM fuel cell is of the order of a second, which is similar to the simulation results predicted by most models. The result is an important guide for the optimization of PEMFC designs and dynamic operation.

  11. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  12. Interest rate change and Omori dynamics in the Stock Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-03-01

    I present the behavior of U.S. markets on the day of U.S. Federal Open Market Commission (FOMC) meetings from the perspective of Statistical Physics. The announcement of key U.S. Federal Reserve rate changes causes a small financial shock, where the dynamics before and after the announcement can be described by an Omori law. We find that markets respond sharply to the news in a complex way reminiscent of physical earthquakes described by the Omori law, which describes the power-law relaxation of aftershocks following a singular perturbation. We find Omori laws in both the volatility of the price (also known as the absolute returns) and the volume traded, using 1-minute resolution financial time series. These results suggest that the perturbative response of the stock market is the same for both financial news and financial crises. The intraday response can be measured by the Omori power-law exponent φ, which has opposite sign before and after the announcement. We estimate the magnitude of news by relating φ to the behavior of the U. S. Treasury Bill before and after FOMC announcements.

  13. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-03-08

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion···carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level.

  14. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  15. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-01-01

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion···carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level. PMID:28272396

  16. The dynamics of stock exchange based on the formalism of weak continuous quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, S.; Tuluzov, I.

    2010-07-01

    The problem of measurement in economic models and the possibility of their quantum-mechanical description are considered. It is revealed that the apparent paradox of such a description is associated with a priori requirement of conformity of the model to all the alternatives of free choice of the observer. The measurement of the state of a trader on a stock exchange is formally defined as his responses to the proposals of sale at a fixed price. It is shown that an analogue of Bell's inequalities for this measurement model is violated at the most general assumptions related to the strategy of the trader and requires a quantum-mechanical description of the dynamics of his condition. In the framework of the theory of weak continuous quantum measurements, the equation of stock price dynamics and the quantum-mechanical generalization of the F. Black and M. Scholes model for pricing options are obtained. The fundamental distinctions between the obtained model and the classical one are discussed.

  17. Size-dependent Melting Behavior of Iron Nanoparticles by Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Qiang; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Yingteng; Sun, Deyan; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao

    2013-03-01

    Due to the finite size effect, nanoparticles own unique physical, chemical, and magnetic properties. Comparing with the bulk materials, the large surface/volume ratio of nanoparticles could lead to more complicate atomic and electronic behavior, thus the thermodynamical properties can be also very rich. In the last a few decades, as one of the fundamental problems in the nano science, the melting behavior of nanoparticles had been widely investigated by numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Using replica-exchange molecular dynamics method (REMD), we have investigated the size dependence of the melting behavior of iron nanoparticles. Comparing to the conventional molecular dynamics (MD), the REMD method is found to be very efficient to determine the melting point, by avoiding the superheating and undercooling phenomena. With accurate determination of the melting point, we find that the melting temperature does not follow linearly with the inverse of size. By incorporating the size dependent thickness of surface liquid layer which is observed in our simulation, we propose a revised liquid skin melting model to describe the size dependent melting temperature. Special Funds for Major State Basic Research, NSFC, MOE, Shanghai Municipality

  18. Water exchange for screening colonoscopy increases adenoma detection rate: a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cadoni, Sergio; Falt, Přemysl; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Radaelli, Franco; Fojtik, Petr; Gallittu, Paolo; Liggi, Mauro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Smajstrla, Vit; Urban, Ondřej; Erriu, Matteo; Koo, Malcolm; Leung, Felix W

    2017-03-10

    Background and study aims Single-center studies, which were retrospective and/or involved unblinded colonoscopists, have suggested that water exchange, but not water immersion, compared with air insufflation significantly increases the adenoma detection rate (ADR), particularly in the proximal and right colon. Head-to-head comparison of the three techniques with ADR as primary outcome and blinded colonoscopists has not been reported to date. In a randomized controlled trial with blinded colonoscopists, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the three insertion techniques on ADR. Patients and methods A total of 1224 patients aged 50 - 70 years (672 males) and undergoing screening colonoscopy were randomized 1:1:1 to water exchange, water immersion, or air insufflation. Split-dose bowel preparation was adopted to optimize colon cleansing. After the cecum had been reached, a second colonoscopist who was blinded to the insertion technique performed the withdrawal. The primary outcome was overall ADR according to the three insertion techniques (water exchange, water immersion, and air insufflation). Secondary outcomes were other pertinent overall and right colon procedure-related measures. Results Baseline characteristics of the three groups were comparable. Compared with air insufflation, water exchange achieved a significantly higher overall ADR (49.3 %, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 44.3 % - 54.2 % vs. 40.4 % 95 %CI 35.6 % - 45.3 %; P  = 0.03); water exchange showed comparable overall ADR vs. water immersion (43.4 %, 95 %CI 38.5 % - 48.3 %; P  = 0.28). In the right colon, water exchange achieved a higher ADR than air insufflation (24.0 %, 95 %CI 20.0 % - 28.5 % vs. 16.9 %, 95 %CI 13.4 % - 20.9 %; P  = 0.04) and a higher advanced ADR (6.1 %, 95 %CI 4.0 % - 9.0 % vs. 2.5 %, 95 %CI 1.2 % - 4.6 %; P = 0.03). Compared with air insufflation, the mean number of adenomas

  19. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using Rn-222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the emission of Rn-222 from Amazon forest rocks and soils and used as a tracer of ventilation of the forest canopy layer at night. It was determined that the greatest resistance to transfer of trace gases from the soil to the atmosphere lies in the soil air space. Profiles of Rn-222 and CO2 showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from Rn-222 and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s/cm, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. The resistance to exchange with air from the entire 41 m layer below the canopy averaged 4.8 s/cm during 13 nights of CO2 profiles. The calculated average time to flush the layer below 41 m is 5.5 hr, and it is concluded that this indicates that significant exchange occurs despite nocturnal stratification.

  20. Dynamic behavior of chemical exchange column in a water detritiation system for a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, T.; Iwai, Y.

    2008-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a CECE column used for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) plant has been studied. In the case where the column was filled with natural water, the time required to achieve steady state was almost the same as that for the column operated under the total reflux mode. The manipulated variables were flow rate of the bottom stream for the control of the bottom tritium concentration, and flow rate of the hydrogen stream for the control of the top tritium concentration. For both the variables, the response curve was expressed by the first-order lag system, and a PID controller could be applied. (authors)

  1. Catalysis in a Cage: Condition-Dependent Speciation and Dynamics of Exchanged Cu Cations in SSZ-13 Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Christopher; Parekh, Atish A; Khurana, Ishant; Di Iorio, John R; Li, Hui; Albarracin Caballero, Jonatan D; Shih, Arthur J; Anggara, Trunojoyo; Delgass, W Nicholas; Miller, Jeffrey T; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Gounder, Rajamani; Schneider, William F

    2016-05-11

    The relationships among the macroscopic compositional parameters of a Cu-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite catalyst, the types and numbers of Cu active sites, and activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 are established through experimental interrogation and computational analysis of materials across the catalyst composition space. Density functional theory, stochastic models, and experimental characterizations demonstrate that within the synthesis protocols applied here and across Si:Al ratios, the volumetric density of six-membered-rings (6MR) containing two Al (2Al sites) is consistent with a random Al siting in the SSZ-13 lattice subject to Löwenstein's rule. Further, exchanged Cu(II) ions first populate these 2Al sites before populating remaining unpaired, or 1Al, sites as Cu(II)OH. These sites are distinguished and enumerated ex situ through vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS) and chemical titrations. In situ and operando XAS follow Cu oxidation state and coordination environment as a function of environmental conditions including low-temperature (473 K) SCR catalysis and are rationalized through first-principles thermodynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Experiment and theory together reveal that the Cu sites respond sensitively to exposure conditions, and in particular that Cu species are solvated and mobilized by NH3 under SCR conditions. While Cu sites are spectroscopically and chemically distinct away from these conditions, they exhibit similar turnover rates, apparent activation energies and apparent reaction orders at the SCR conditions, even on zeolite frameworks other than SSZ13.

  2. Heart rate variability and nonlinear analysis of heart rate dynamics following single and multiple Wingate bouts.

    PubMed

    Millar, Philip J; Rakobowchuk, Mark; McCartney, Neil; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2009-10-01

    Sprint interval training involves short bouts of high-intensity exercise and has produced training responses similar to those of endurance training. The effects of multiple supramaximal exercise bouts on neurocardiac modulation have not been examined. Therefore, we investigated the recovery of heart rate (HR) variability and nonlinear HR dynamics in 10 young (20.1 +/- 1.2 years) healthy males following single (1) and multiple (4) Wingate tests. HR variability was assessed with time and frequency domain measures, whereas nonlinear HR dynamics were determined by assessing the complexity (sample entropy) and fractal nature (detrended fluctuation analysis) of the HR time series. Responses were determined at pre-exercise baseline and at 3 time points during recovery from exercise: Post1 (5-20 min), Post2 (45-60 min), and Post3 (105-120 min). Following a single Wingate test, all temporal and spectral HR measures had returned to baseline by 1 h of recovery. In contrast, these measures were different from baseline at 2 h following multiple Wingate tests. Fractal HR properties were altered (p < 0.05) at Post1 following a single Wingate test and at Post1 and Post2 following multiple Wingate tests. HR complexity was reduced (p < 0.001) throughout the 2-h recovery following both exercise conditions. In conclusion, Wingate tests result in alterations in cardiac autonomic control, with multiple Wingate tests resulting in larger, more prolonged alterations. Based on the results of the single Wingate test, nonlinear measures, such as HR complexity, may be more sensitive in detecting subtle alterations in neurocardiac behaviour, compared with traditional measures of HR variability.

  3. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS.

  4. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  5. Dynamics of Human Telomerase Holoenzyme Assembly and Subunit Exchange across the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Vogan, Jacob M; Collins, Kathleen

    2015-08-28

    Human telomerase acts on telomeres during the genome synthesis phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by its concentration in Cajal bodies and transient colocalization with telomeres. Whether the regulation of human telomerase holoenzyme assembly contributes to the cell cycle restriction of telomerase function is unknown. We investigated the steady-state levels, assembly, and exchange dynamics of human telomerase subunits with quantitative in vivo cross-linking and other methods. We determined the physical association of telomerase subunits in cells blocked or progressing through the cell cycle as synchronized by multiple protocols. The total level of human telomerase RNA (hTR) was invariant across the cell cycle. In vivo snapshots of telomerase holoenzyme composition established that hTR remains bound to human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) throughout all phases of the cell cycle, and subunit competition assays suggested that hTERT-hTR interaction is not readily exchangeable. In contrast, the telomerase holoenzyme Cajal body-associated protein, TCAB1, was released from hTR in mitotic cells coincident with TCAB1 delocalization from Cajal bodies. This telomerase holoenzyme disassembly was reversible with cell cycle progression without any change in total TCAB1 protein level. Consistent with differential cell cycle regulation of hTERT-hTR and TCAB1-hTR protein-RNA interactions, overexpression of hTERT or TCAB1 had limited if any influence on hTR assembly of the other subunit. Overall, these findings revealed a cell cycle regulation that disables human telomerase association with telomeres while preserving the co-folded hTERT-hTR ribonucleoprotein catalytic core. Studies here, integrated with previous work, led to a unifying model for telomerase subunit assembly and trafficking in human cells.

  6. Dynamic Information Management and Exchange for Command and Control Applications, Modelling and Enforcing Category-Based Access Control via Term Rewriting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0026 Dynamic Information Management and Exchange for Command and Control Applications Maribel...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 24 August 2010 – 28 February 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamic Information Management and Exchange for...specified by individual members of the federation). 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Information Management , Distributed

  7. Time variations of 222Rn concentration and air exchange rates in a Hungarian cave.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Hedvig Éva; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordán, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Akos; Kiss, Attila

    2012-09-01

    A long-term radon concentration monitoring was carried out in the Pál-völgy cave, Budapest, Hungary, for 1.5 years. Our major goal was to determine the time dependence of the radon concentration in the cave to characterise the air exchange and define the most important environmental parameters that influence the radon concentration inside the cave. The radon concentration in the cave air was measured continuously by an AlphaGuard radon monitor, and meteorological parameters outside the cave were collected simultaneously. The air's radon concentration in the cave varied between 104 and 7776 Bq m(-3), the annual average value was 1884±85 Bq m(-3). The summer to winter radon concentration ratio was as high as 21.8. The outside air temperature showed the strongest correlation with the radon concentration in the cave, the correlation coefficient (R) was 0.76.

  8. Dynamics of carbon dioxide exchange of a wheat community grown in a semi-closed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1989-01-01

    A wheat (Triticum aestivum Yecora Rojo) community was grown in the semi-closed conditions of the NASA/KSC Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Experiments were conducted to determine whole community carbon dioxide exchange rates as influenced by growth and development, carbon dioxide concentration, time within the photoperiod, irradiance, and temperature. Plants were grown at a population of about 1500 per sq meter using a 20 hour light/4 hour dark daily regime. Light was supplied by HPS vapor lamps and irradiance was maintained in the range of 590 to 675 mu mol per sq meter. The temperature regime was 20 C light/16 C dark and nutrients were supplied hydroponically as a thin film. Fractional interception of PPF by the community increased rapidly during growth reaching a maximum of 0.96, 24 days after planting. This time corresponded to canopy closure and maximum rates of net photosynthesis (NP). Net daily CO2 utilization rates were calculated to day 48 and a 4th order regression equation integrated to obtain total moles of CO2 fixed by the community. This procedure may be useful for monitoring and prediction of biomass yields in a closed ecology life support system (CELSS).

  9. Maximal sum of metabolic exchange fluxes outperforms biomass yield as a predictor of growth rate of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Yizhak, Keren; Wagner, Allon; Shtifman Segal, Ella; Freilich, Shiri; Henry, Christopher S; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Growth rate has long been considered one of the most valuable phenotypes that can be measured in cells. Aside from being highly accessible and informative in laboratory cultures, maximal growth rate is often a prime determinant of cellular fitness, and predicting phenotypes that underlie fitness is key to both understanding and manipulating life. Despite this, current methods for predicting microbial fitness typically focus on yields [e.g., predictions of biomass yield using GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs)] or notably require many empirical kinetic constants or substrate uptake rates, which render these methods ineffective in cases where fitness derives most directly from growth rate. Here we present a new method for predicting cellular growth rate, termed SUMEX, which does not require any empirical variables apart from a metabolic network (i.e., a GEM) and the growth medium. SUMEX is calculated by maximizing the SUM of molar EXchange fluxes (hence SUMEX) in a genome-scale metabolic model. SUMEX successfully predicts relative microbial growth rates across species, environments, and genetic conditions, outperforming traditional cellular objectives (most notably, the convention assuming biomass maximization). The success of SUMEX suggests that the ability of a cell to catabolize substrates and produce a strong proton gradient enables fast cell growth. Easily applicable heuristics for predicting growth rate, such as what we demonstrate with SUMEX, may contribute to numerous medical and biotechnological goals, ranging from the engineering of faster-growing industrial strains, modeling of mixed ecological communities, and the inhibition of cancer growth.

  10. Hysteresis of heart rate and heat exchange of fasting and postprandial savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus).

    PubMed

    Zaar, Morten; Larsen, Einer; Wang, Tobias

    2004-04-01

    Reptiles are ectothermic, but regulate body temperatures (T(b)) by behavioural and physiological means. Body temperature has profound effects on virtually all physiological functions. It is well known that heating occurs faster than cooling, which seems to correlate with changes in cutaneous perfusion. Increased cutaneous perfusion, and hence elevated cardiac output, during heating is reflected in an increased heart rate (f(H)), and f(H), at a given T(b), is normally higher during heating compared to cooling ('hysteresis of heart rate'). Digestion is associated with an increased metabolic rate. This is associated with an elevated f(H) and many species of reptiles also exhibited a behavioural selection of higher T(b) during digestion. Here, we examine whether digestion affects the rate of heating and cooling as well as the hysteresis of heart rate in savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus). Fasting lizards were studied after 5 days of food deprivation while digesting lizards were studied approximately 24 h after ingesting dead mice that equalled 10% of their body mass. Heart rate was measured while T(b) increased from 28 to 38 degrees C under a heat lamp and while T(b) decreased during a subsequent cooling phase. The lizards exhibited hysteresis of heart rate, and heating occurred faster than cooling. Feeding led to an increased f(H) (approximately 20 min(-1) irrespective of T(b)), but did not affect the rate of temperature change during heating or cooling. Therefore, it is likely that the increased blood flows during digestion are distributed exclusively to visceral organs and that the thermal conductance remains unaffected by the elevated metabolic rate during digestion.

  11. Dynamic analysis of heart rate may predict subsequent ventricular tachycardia after myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Seppanen, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Koistinen, J.; Tulppo, M. P.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics analysis of RR interval behavior and traditional measures of heart rate variability were compared between postinfarction patients with and without vulnerability to ventricular tachyarrhythmias in a case-control study. Short-term fractal correlation of heart rate dynamics was better than traditional measures of heart rate variability in differentiating patients with and without life-threatening arrhythmias.

  12. Human recombinant [C22A] FK506-binding protein amide hydrogen exchange rates from mass spectrometry match and extend those from NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.; Li, W.; Logan, T. M.; Li, M.; Marshall, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of human recombinant [C22A] FK506 binding protein (C22A FKBP) has been determined by protein fragmentation, combined with electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MS). After a specified period of H/D exchange in solution, C22A FKBP was digested by pepsin under slow exchange conditions (pH 2.4, 0 degree C), and then subjected to on-line HPLC/MS for deuterium analysis of each proteolytic peptide. The hydrogen exchange rate of each individual amide hydrogen was then determined independently by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR on 15N-enriched C22A FKBP. A maximum entropy method (MEM) algorithm makes it possible to derive the distributions of hydrogen exchange rate constants from the MS-determined deuterium exchange-in curves in either the holoprotein or its proteolytic segments. The MEM-derived rate constant distributions of C22A FKBP and different segments of C22A FKBP are compared to the rate constants determined by NMR for individual amide protons. The rate constant distributions determined by both methods are consistent and complementary, thereby validating protein fragmentation/mass spectrometry as a reliable measure of hydrogen exchange in proteins. PMID:9336843

  13. Low air exchange rate causes high indoor radon concentration in energy-efficient buildings.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, A V; Yarmoshenko, I V; Zhukovsky, M V

    2015-06-01

    Since 1995, requirements on energy-efficient building construction were established in Russian Building Codes. In the course of time, utilisation of such technologies became prevailing, especially in multi-storey building construction. According to the results of radon survey in buildings constructed meeting new requirements on energy efficiency, radon concentration exceeds the average level in early-constructed buildings. Preponderance of the diffusion mechanism of radon entry in modern multi-storey buildings has been experimentally established. The experimental technique of the assessment of ventilation rate in dwellings under real conditions was developed. Based on estimates of average ventilation rate, it was approved that measures to increase energy efficiency lead to reduction in ventilation rate and accumulation of higher radon concentrations indoors. Obtained ventilation rate values have to be considered as extremely low.

  14. Effect of low /sup 60/Co dose rates on sister chromatid exchange incidence in the benthic worm. Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr.

    1981-10-13

    The usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as a measure of low-level radiation effect was examined in a benthic marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. Larvae were exposed to /sup 60/Co radiation for 12 to 24 h at total doses ranging from 0.5 to 309 R and at dose rates from 0.04 to 13 R/h. Animals exposed at intermediate dose rates (0.5, 0.6, 1.25, 2.0, and 2.5 R/h) had SCE frequencies per chromosome about twice that of those receiving no radiation (controls), whereas those exposed at the higher dose rates (7.0 and 13 R/h) had SCE frequencies lower than the controls. Animals exposed at the lower dose rates (0.04 and 0.1 R/h) had lower SCE frequencies than those exposed at intermediate dose rates (and higher SCE frequencies than controls). The length of chromosome pair number one differed among metaphase spreads and was used as an index of chromosome condensation in a given metaphase. Because there is a possibility that chromosome morphology may affect the ability to resolve SCEs, morphology will be monitored in future studies. A preliminary experiment was performed to assess the effects of 2.2 and 11.5 R/h for 24 h on growth and development. Larvae observed at 6 and 17 d after irradiation did not have significantly different numbers of abnormal larvae or survival rates.

  15. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics in crystalline ferromagnets and exchange-biased systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David Michael

    Time-resolved ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements are performed using a pump-probe technique with a non-optical pump to observe precession and relaxation of the magnetization in epitaxial magnetic thin films at temperatures down to 5 K. Spatial localization achieved through use of an optical probe allows a direct measurement of spin relaxation, reducing the effects of inhomogeneous dephasing relative to probes of larger areas, while the use of low fields allows a study of dynamics throughout the entire magnetization reversal process. The reversal mechanism of FexCo1-x is probed as a function of cubic and uniaxial anisotropy strengths, using FMR as a direct probe of the free energy surface. A coherent rotation model describes the reversal for fields up through 700 Oe, failing only for fields near 105 Oe applied along the GaAs [01 1¯] direction where nucleation of nearly perpendicular domains is observed. Measurements of the Gilbert damping parameter alpha indicate that it is smaller for fields applied along the [01 1¯] direction than for fields along [011] or [010]. Dynamic interactions between local moments and itinerant carriers are examined in the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMn xAs. Holes and local moments are found to precess together on timescales greater than 50 ps. Although previous experiments by other groups have observed a change in the magnetization due to introduction of photoexcited carriers, our measurements indicate no dynamical change in magnetization due to additional optically pumped carriers. The Gilbert damping parameter alpha is observed to increase more than twofold as temperature is raised from 20 K to the Curie temperature, although the decay time remains nearly independent of temperature over this range. Exchange-biased Fe/FeF2 is found to exhibit temperature-dependent anisotropy above its Neel temperature (78 K), while the anisotropy of structurally similar Fe/MnF2 remains independent of temperature above TN = 67 K. Dynamic

  16. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (ISES Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous exposure assessment panel studies have observed considerable seasonal, between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure ...

  17. Spatiotemporally‐Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution‐Related Morbidity in AtlantaMorbidity in Atlanta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies frequently use central site concentrations as surrogates of exposure to air pollutants. Variability in air pollutant infiltration due to differential air exchange rates (AERs) is potentially a major factor affecting the relationship between central site c...

  18. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P < 0.01) while the pH-dependent exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P < 0.01). In summary, our study verified that a simplified qCEST analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system.

  19. Modeling variations in the cedi/dollar exchange rate in Ghana: an autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (ARCH) models.

    PubMed

    Techie Quaicoe, Michael; Twenefour, Frank B K; Baah, Emmanuel M; Nortey, Ezekiel N N

    2015-01-01

    This research article aimed at modeling the variations in the dollar/cedi exchange rate. It examines the applicability of a range of ARCH/GARCH specifications for modeling volatility of the series. The variants considered include the ARMA, GARCH, IGARCH, EGARCH and M-GARCH specifications. The results show that the series was non stationary which resulted from the presence of a unit root in it. The ARMA (1, 1) was found to be the most suitable model for the conditional mean. From the Box-Ljung test statistics x-squared of 1476.338 with p value 0.00217 for squared returns and 16.918 with 0.0153 p values for squared residuals, the null hypothesis of no ARCH effect was rejected at 5% significance level indicating the presence of an ARCH effect in the series. ARMA (1, 1) + GARCH (1, 1) which has all parameters significant was found to be the most suitable model for the conditional mean with conditional variance, thus showing adequacy in describing the conditional mean with variance of the return series at 5% significant level. A 24 months forecast for the mean actual exchange rates and mean returns from January, 2013 to December, 2014 made also showed that the fitted model is appropriate for the data and a depreciating trend of the cedi against the dollar for forecasted period respectively.

  20. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  1. The study of mercury exchange rate between air and soil surface in Hongfeng reservoir region, Guizhou, PR China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Feng, X.; Qiu, G.

    2003-05-01

    In summer of 2002, we measured the exchange flux of mercury between air and soil surface using the method of Dynamic Flux Chamber (DFC) in Hongfeng lake region. At the same time, we recorded meteorological parameters such as air temperature, soil temperature, wind speed and solar radiation using a multi-function mini-weather station (global water III). Soil, moss and fertilizer samples in study area were also collected. The Hg fluxes of air/soil surface rangeed from -11.0ng m^{-2} h^{-1} to 219.0ng m^{-2}h^{-1}, averaged at 29.2 ng m^{-2} h^{-1} (n = 508). The data show that the exchange of mercury is bi-direction between air and soit surface: namely both emission and deposition of mercury occurs, but Hg emission is much more frequent than deposition process (n_{deposition} =3,n_{emission}= 505). The average mercury content in soil, moss, fertilizer sample are 249.9± 24.1ng/g (n=3), 450.4 ± 64.6ng/g (n=2), 53.4ng/g (n= 1) respectively.

  2. River temperature processes under contrasting riparian land cover: linking microclimate, heat exchange and water thermal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kantola, K.; Malcolm, I.

    2012-12-01

    River temperature influences strongly growth and survival in salmonid fish, which are often the target of river management strategies. Temperature is controlled by transfers of heat and water to/ from the river system, with land and water management modifying exchanges and consequently thermal regime. In the UK, fisheries managers are promoting riparian forest planting as a climate change adaption measure to reduce water temperature extremes. However, scientific understanding lags behind management and policy needs. Specifically, there is an urgent requirement to determine planting strategies that maximise expected benefits of riparian forest in terms of reduction in maximum water temperature. Scientific knowledge is necessary to underpin conceptual and deterministic models to inform management. To address this research gap, this paper analyses high resolution (15 minute) hydrometeorological data collected over a calendar year in the western Scottish Highlands (Loch Ard) to understand the controls and processes determining river temperature dynamics under open moorland (control), semi-natural woodland and commercial forest. The research programme aims: (1) to characterise spatial and temporal variability in riparian microclimate and stream water temperature regime across forest treatments; (2) to identify the hydrological, climatological and site-specific factors affecting stream temperature; (3) to estimate the energy balance at sites representative of each forest treatment and, thus, yield physical process understanding about dominant heat exchanges driving thermal variability; and (4) to use 1-3 to predict stream temperature sensitivity under different forestry and hydroclimatological scenarios. Results indicated that inter-treatment differences in mean and maximum daily water column temperature were ordered open > semi-natural > commercial during summer, but semi-natural > commercial > open during winter. Minimum water temperature was ordered commercial > semi

  3. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained proteins in implicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Dong, Xiao; Laghaei, Rozita; Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2009-01-08

    Current approaches aimed at determining the free energy surface of all-atom medium-size proteins in explicit solvent are slow and are not sufficient to converge to equilibrium properties. To ensure a proper sampling of the configurational space, it is preferable to use reduced representations such as implicit solvent and/or coarse-grained protein models, which are much lighter computationally. Each model must be verified, however, to ensure that it can recover experimental structures and thermodynamics. Here we test the coarse-grained implicit solvent OPEP model with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) on six peptides ranging in length from 10 to 28 residues: two alanine-based peptides, the second beta-hairpin from protein G, the Trp-cage and zinc-finger motif, and a dimer of a coiled coil peptide. We show that REMD-OPEP recovers the proper thermodynamics of the systems studied, with accurate structural description of the beta-hairpin and Trp-cage peptides (within 1-2 A from experiments). The light computational burden of REMD-OPEP, which enables us to generate many hundred nanoseconds at each temperature and fully assess convergence to equilibrium ensemble, opens the door to the determination of the free energy surface of larger proteins and assemblies.

  4. Replica exchange molecular dynamics study of the truncated amyloid beta (11-40) trimer in solution.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Truong, Duc Toan; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-01-18

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers are neurotoxic compounds that destroy the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. Recent studies indicated that the trimer is one of the most cytotoxic forms of low molecular weight Aβ oligomers. As there was limited information about the structure of the Aβ trimer, either by experiment or by computation, we determined in this work the structure of the 3Aβ11-40 oligomer for the first time using the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of an explicit solvent. More than 20.0 μs of MD simulations were performed. The probability of the β-content and random coil structure of the solvated trimer amounts to 42 ± 6 and 49 ± 7% which is in good agreement with experiments. Intermolecular interactions in central hydrophobic cores play a key role in stabilizing the oligomer. Intermolecular polar contacts between D23 and residues 24-29 replace the salt bridge D23-K28 to secure the loop region. The hydrophilic region of the N-terminus is maintained by the intermolecular polar crossing contacts H13A-Q15B and H13B-Q15C. The difference in the free energy of binding between the constituting monomers and the others amounts to -36 ± 8 kcal mol(-1). The collision cross section of the representative structures of the trimer was computed to be 1330 ± 47 Å(2), which is in good agreement with previous experiments.

  5. Custom-tailored adsorbers: A molecular dynamics study on optimal design of ion exchange chromatography material.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Pilgram, Florian; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-09-25

    The performance of functionalized materials, e.g., ion exchange resins, depends on multiple resin characteristics, such as type of ligand, ligand density, the pore accessibility for a molecule, and backbone characteristics. Therefore, the screening and identification process for optimal resin characteristics for separation is very time and material consuming. Previous studies on the influence of resin characteristics have focused on an experimental approach and to a lesser extent on the mechanistic understanding of the adsorption mechanism. In this in silico study, a previously developed molecular dynamics (MD) tool is used, which simulates any given biomolecule on resins with varying ligand densities. We describe a set of simulations and experiments with four proteins and six resins varying in ligand density, and show that simulations and experiments correlate well in a wide range of ligand density. With this new approach simulations can be used as pre-experimental screening for optimal adsorber characteristics, reducing the actual number of screening experiments, which results in a faster and more knowledge-based development of custom-tailored adsorbers.

  6. Efficient Determination of Relative Entropy Using Combined Temperature and Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Chipot, Christophe; Roux, Benoît

    2015-05-12

    The performance and accuracy of different simulation schemes for estimating the entropy inferred from free energy calculations are tested. The results obtained from replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations based on a simplified toy model are compared to exact numerically derived ones to assess accuracy and convergence. It is observed that the error in entropy estimation decreases by at least an order of magnitude and the quantities of interest converge much faster when the simulations are coupled via a temperature REMD algorithm and the trajectories from different temperatures are combined. Simulations with the infinite-swapping method and its variants show some improvement over the traditional nearest-neighbor REMD algorithms, but they are more computationally expensive. To test the methodologies further, the free energy profile for the reversible association of two methane molecules in explicit water was calculated and decomposed into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Finally, a strategy based on umbrella sampling computations carried out via simultaneous temperature and Hamiltonian REMD simulations is shown to yield the most accurate entropy estimation. The entropy profile between the two methane molecules displays the characteristic signature of a hydrophobic interaction.

  7. Assessment of the Draft AIAA S-119 Flight Dynamic Model Exchange Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Murri, Daniel G.; Hill, Melissa A.; Jessick, Matthew V.; Penn, John M.; Hasan, David A.; Crues, Edwin Z.; Falck, Robert D.; McCarthy, Thomas G.; Vuong, Nghia; Zimmerman, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of a draft AIAA standard for flight dynamics model exchange, ANSI/AIAA S-119-2011, was conducted on behalf of NASA by a team from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center. The assessment included adding the capability of importing standard models into real-time simulation facilities at several NASA Centers as well as into analysis simulation tools. All participants were successful at importing two example models into their respective simulation frameworks by using existing software libraries or by writing new import tools. Deficiencies in the libraries and format documentation were identified and fixed; suggestions for improvements to the standard were provided to the AIAA. An innovative tool to generate C code directly from such a model was developed. Performance of the software libraries compared favorably with compiled code. As a result of this assessment, several NASA Centers can now import standard models directly into their simulations. NASA is considering adopting the now-published S-119 standard as an internal recommended practice.

  8. Rapid Determination of Fast Protein Dynamics from NMR Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Data.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yina; Hansen, Alexandar L; Peng, Yu; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2016-02-24

    Functional motions of (15)N-labeled proteins can be monitored by solution NMR spin relaxation experiments over a broad range of timescales. These experiments however typically take of the order of several days to a week per protein. Recently, NMR chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiments have emerged to probe slow millisecond motions complementing R1ρ and CPMG-type experiments. CEST also simultaneously reports on site-specific R1 and R2 parameters. It is shown here how CEST-derived R1 and R2 relaxation parameters can be measured within a few hours at an accuracy comparable to traditional relaxation experiments. Using a "lean" version of the model-free approach S(2) order parameters can be determined that match those from the standard model-free approach applied to (15)N R1, R2 , and {(1)H}-(15)N NOE data. The new methodology, which is demonstrated for ubiquitin and arginine kinase (42 kDa), should serve as an effective screening tool of protein dynamics from picosecond-to-millisecond timescales.

  9. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ - BF4-/PF6- ion pairs in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li+(aq) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIB). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around hydrated Li+ in acetonitrile (ACN), which is common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li+(aq). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux and Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  10. The role of dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange on streambed denitrification in a first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mina; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-12-01

    The role of temporally varying surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange on nitrate removal by streambed denitrification was examined along a reach of Leary Weber Ditch (LWD), Indiana, a small, first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed within the Upper Mississippi River basin, using data collected in 2004 and 2005. Stream stage, GW heads (H), and temperatures (T) were continuously monitored in streambed piezometers and stream bank wells for two transects across LWD accompanied by synoptic measurements of stream stage, H, T, and nitrate (NO3) concentrations along the reach. The H and T data were used to develop and calibrate vertical two-dimensional, models of streambed water flow and heat transport across and along the axis of the stream. Model-estimated SW-GW exchange varied seasonally and in response to high-streamflow events due to dynamic interactions between SW stage and GW H. Comparison of 2004 and 2005 conditions showed that small changes in precipitation amount and intensity, evapotranspiration, and/or nearby GW levels within a low-relief watershed can readily impact SW-GW interactions. The calibrated LWD flow models and observed stream and streambed NO3 concentrations were used to predict temporal variations in streambed NO3 removal in response to dynamic SW-GW exchange. NO3 removal rates underwent slow seasonal changes, but also underwent rapid changes in response to high-flow events. These findings suggest that increased temporal variability of SW-GW exchange in low-order, low-relief watersheds may be a factor contributing their more efficient removal of NO3.

  11. The role of dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange on streambed denitrification in a first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahimi Kazerooni, Mina N.; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of temporally varying surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange on nitrate removal by streambed denitrification was examined along a reach of Leary Weber Ditch (LWD), Indiana, a small, first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed within the Upper Mississippi River basin, using data collected in 2004 and 2005. Stream stage, GW heads (H), and temperatures (T) were continuously monitored in streambed piezometers and stream bank wells for two transects across LWD accompanied by synoptic measurements of stream stage, H, T, and nitrate (NO3) concentrations along the reach. The H and T data were used to develop and calibrate vertical two-dimensional, models of streambed water flow and heat transport across and along the axis of the stream. Model-estimated SW-GW exchange varied seasonally and in response to high-streamflow events due to dynamic interactions between SW stage and GW H. Comparison of 2004 and 2005 conditions showed that small changes in precipitation amount and intensity, evapotranspiration, and/or nearby GW levels within a low-relief watershed can readily impact SW-GW interactions. The calibrated LWD flow models and observed stream and streambed NO3 concentrations were used to predict temporal variations in streambed NO3 removal in response to dynamic SW-GW exchange. NO3 removal rates underwent slow seasonal changes, but also underwent rapid changes in response to high-flow events. These findings suggest that increased temporal variability of SW-GW exchange in low-order, low-relief watersheds may be a factor contributing their more efficient removal of NO3.

  12. Nanocluster dynamics in fast rate epitaxy under mesoplasma condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Shibuta, Y.; Kambara, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of Si nano-clusters during epitaxial growth has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulation using the Tersoff potential. Several nm sized Si cluster formed during rapid cooling was found to deform instantaneously upon impingement on a Si(1 0 0) substrate at the same time with the spontaneous ordering of the atomic structure to that of the substrate. Due to the increased fraction of high-energy atoms at the surface, smaller clusters (˜1 nm) are favorable for such a deformation even at lower temperatures. This is the advantage of loosely-bound cluster as growth precursor to attain epitaxy with reduced impact energies.

  13. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  14. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation.

  15. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on nitrate reductase activity, nitric oxide content and gas exchange in winter wheat leaves].

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Zhou-Ping

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of different nitrogen application rates on the nitrate reductase (NR) activity, nitric oxide (NO) content and gas exchange parameters in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves from tillering stage to heading stage and on grain yield were studied. The results showed that the photosynthetic rate (P(n)), transpiration rate (T(r)) and instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE) of leaves as well as the grain yield were increased with increasing nitrogen application rate first but decreased then, with the values of all these parameters reached the highest in treatment N180. The NR activity increased with increasing nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant linear correlation between NR activity and NO content at tillering and jointing stages (R2 > or = 0.68, n = 15). NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (G(s)) (R2 > or = 0.43, n = 15). The lower NO content produced by lower NR activity under lower nitrogen application rate promoted the stoma opened, while the higher NO content produced by higher NR activity under higher nitrogen application rate induced the stoma closed. Although the leaf NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 > or = 0.36, n = 15), no remarkable correlation was observed between NR activity and NO content at heading stage, suggesting that nitrogen fertilization could not affect leaf NO content through promoting NR activity, and further more, regulate the stomatal action. Under appropriate nitrogen application the leaf NR activity and NO content were lower, G(s), T(r) and IWUE were higher, and thus, the crop had a better drought-resistant ability, higher P(n), and higher grain yield.

  16. Fluence-dependent dynamics of the 5d6s exchange splitting in Gd metal after femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietsch, Björn; Carley, Robert; Gleich, Markus; Teichmann, Martin; Bowlan, John; Weinelt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the fluence-dependent dynamics of the exchange-split 5d6s valence bands of Gd metal after femtosecond, near-infrared (IR) laser excitation. Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulses is used to simultaneously map the transient binding energies of the minority and majority spin valence bands. The decay constant of the exchange splitting increases with fluence. This reflects the slower response of the occupied majority-spin component, which we attribute to Elliot-Yafet spin-flip scattering in accordance with the microscopic three-temperature model (M3TM). In contrast, the time constant of the partly unoccupied minority-spin band stays unaffected by a change in pump fluence. Here, we introduce as an alternative to superdiffusive spin transport exchange scattering, which is an ultrafast electronic mechanism explaining the observed dynamics. Exchange scattering can reduce the spin polarization in the partially unoccupied minority-spin band and thus its energetic position without effective demagnetization.

  17. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  18. Improve Synergy Between Health Information Exchange and Electronic Health Records to Increase Rates of Continuously Insured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Rachel; Burdick, Tim; Angier, Heather; Wallace, Lorraine; Nelson, Christine; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Sumic, Aleksandra; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Affordable Care Act increases health insurance options, yet many Americans may struggle to consistently maintain coverage. While health care providers have traditionally not been involved in providing insurance enrollment support to their patients, the ability for them to do so now exists. We propose that providers could capitalize on the expansion of electronic health records (EHRs) and the advances in health information exchanges (HIEs) to improve their patients’ insurance coverage rates and continuity. Evidence for Argument: We describe a project in which we are building strategies for linking, and thus improving synergy between, payer and EHR data. Through this effort, care teams will have access to new automated tools and increased EHR functionality designed to help them assist their patients in obtaining and maintaining health insurance coverage. Suggestion for the Future: The convergence of increasing EHR adoption, improving HIE functionality, and expanding insurance coverage options, creates new opportunities for clinics to help their patients obtain public health insurance. Harnessing this nascent ability to exchange information between payers and providers may improve synergies between HIE and EHRs, and thus support clinic-based efforts to keep patients continuously insured. PMID:26355818

  19. Measurement of the rates of detergent exchange between micelles and the aqueous phase using phosphorescent labelled detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, J.D.; Turro, N.J.

    1981-12-24

    Phosphorescence quenching is used to measure micelle-probe detergent dynamics. For phosphorescent detergent probes with varying hydrocarbon length the rate constants from escape (K-) from cationic host micelles are measured using cobalt(III) hexamine as an aqueous soluble triplet quencher. For 10-(4-bromo-1-naphthoyl) decyltrimethylammonium bromide (BND-10), K- is 3.2 x 10/sup 3/ S/sup -1/, and K+, the reentry rate constant, is 5.7 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ S/sup -1/ for hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (HDTCL) host micelles at 25 C. The log of K- is a linear function of the number of methylenes in the probe alkyl chain, in agreement with rates determined previously with relaxation methods. The apparent activation energy for escape of BND-10 from HDTCL micelles is 9 kcal/mol. Escape rates are measured for several host micelles and for micelles composed of probe detergents - self-micelles. 15 references.

  20. Catecholaminergic Regulation of Learning Rate in a Dynamic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jepma, Marieke; Nassar, Matthew R.; Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in a changing world requires flexibly adapting one’s rate of learning to the rate of environmental change. Recent studies have examined the computational mechanisms by which various environmental factors determine the impact of new outcomes on existing beliefs (i.e., the ‘learning rate’). However, the brain mechanisms, and in particular the neuromodulators, involved in this process are still largely unknown. The brain-wide neurophysiological effects of the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine on stimulus-evoked cortical responses suggest that the catecholamine systems are well positioned to regulate learning about environmental change, but more direct evidence for a role of this system is scant. Here, we report evidence from a study employing pharmacology, scalp electrophysiology and computational modeling (N = 32) that suggests an important role for catecholamines in learning rate regulation. We found that the P3 component of the EEG—an electrophysiological index of outcome-evoked phasic catecholamine release in the cortex—predicted learning rate, and formally mediated the effect of prediction-error magnitude on learning rate. P3 amplitude also mediated the effects of two computational variables—capturing the unexpectedness of an outcome and the uncertainty of a preexisting belief—on learning rate. Furthermore, a pharmacological manipulation of catecholamine activity affected learning rate following unanticipated task changes, in a way that depended on participants’ baseline learning rate. Our findings provide converging evidence for a causal role of the human catecholamine systems in learning-rate regulation as a function of environmental change. PMID:27792728

  1. Competitions hatch butterfly attractors in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu Ying

    2005-03-01

    Chaos in foreign exchange markets is a common issue of concern in the study of economic dynamics. In this work, we mainly investigate the competition effect on chaos in foreign exchange markets. As one of the main economic structures in the globalization process, competition between two target exchange rates with the same base currency forms a simple competitive exchange rate relation, where each exchange rate follows the chaotic model of De Grauwe (Exchange Rate Theory-Chaotic Models of Foreign Exchange Markets, Blackwell, Oxford, Cambridge, MA, 1993). The main discovery is, while each exchange rate is in its non-chaotic parameter regions, the effect of competition will “hatch” butterfly-like chaotic attractors in the competitive market. The positive Lyapunov exponent in the market explains the reason why chaos occurs.

  2. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, A.

    2013-01-31

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI's rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  3. The Presence of Fast-Exchanging Proton Species in Aqueous Solutions of paraCEST Agents Can Impact Rate Constants Measured for Slower Exchanging Species When Fitting CEST Spectra to the Bloch Equations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    LnDOTA-tetraamide complexes typically exist in solution as a mixture of square-antiprismatic (SAP) and twisted square-antiprismatic (TSAP) coordination isomers. In most cases, the SAP isomer, which is preferred for CEST imaging, predominates, and the presence of the minor TSAP isomer is assumed to have little influence on quantitative measures of the water-exchange rate constant for the SAP isomer. Here, we sought to confirm the validity of this assumption by mixing two chelates with different SAP and TSAP isomer populations while measuring the water-exchange rate constant of the SAP isomer. The results show that an increase in the population of the TSAP isomer in solution results in as much as a 30% overestimation of the water-exchange rate constant for the SAP isomer when CEST spectra are fit to the Bloch equations. This effect was shown to be significant only when the TSAP isomer population exceeded 50%. PMID:25210979

  4. Firing rate of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons with synaptic current dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieux, David; Monnai, Takaaki

    2009-08-15

    We derive analytical formulas for the firing rate of integrate-and-fire neurons endowed with realistic synaptic dynamics. In particular, we include the possibility of multiple synaptic inputs as well as the effect of an absolute refractory period into the description. The latter affects the firing rate through its interaction with the synaptic dynamics.

  5. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Bryan F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P; Pollastri, Michael P; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2010-12-15

    This paper combines two techniques--mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders--to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3(+) groups--a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its secondary or tertiary structure--resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation--that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation--is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural

  6. How Does the Electron Dynamics Affect the Global Reconnection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether the microscale controls the macroscale or vice-versa remains one of the most challenging problems in plasmas. A particular topic of interest within this context is collisionless magnetic reconnection, where both points of views are espoused by different groups of researchers. This presentation will focus on this topic. We will begin by analyzing the properties of electron diffusion region dynamics both for guide field and anti-parallel reconnection, and how they can be scaled to different inflow conditions. As a next step, we will study typical temporal variations of the microscopic dynamics with the objective of understanding the potential for secular changes to the macroscopic system. The research will be based on a combination of analytical theory and numerical modeling.

  7. Dynamic Structural Changes During Complement C3 Activation Analyzed by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Michael C.; Ricklin, Daniel; Papp, Krisztián; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Sfyroera, Georgia; Chen, Hui; Winters, Michael S.; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of component C3 to C3b is a central step in the activation of complement. Whereas C3 is largely biologically inactive, C3b is directly involved in various complement activities. While the recently described crystal structures of C3 and C3b provide a molecular basis of complement activation, they do not reflect the dynamic changes that occur in solution. In addition, the available C3b structures diverge in some important aspects. Here we have utilized hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to investigate relative changes in the solution-phase structures of C3 and C3b. By combining two forms of mass spectrometry we could maximize the primary sequence coverage of C3b and demonstrate the feasibility of this method for large plasma proteins. While the majority of the 82 peptides that could be followed over time showed only minor alterations in HDX, we observed clear changes in solvent accessibility for 16 peptides, primarily in the α-chain (α’NT, MG6-8, CUB, TED, C345C domains). Most of these peptides could be directly linked to the structural transitions visible in the crystal structures and revealed additional information about the probability of the structural variants of C3b. In addition, a discontinuous cluster of seven peptides in the MG3, MG6, LNK and α’NT domains showed a decreased accessibility after activation to C3b. Although no gross conformational changes are detected in the crystal structure, this area may reflect a structurally flexible region in solution that contributes to C3 activation and function. PMID:18456336

  8. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  9. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  10. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at μg/ √Hz and μrad/s/ √Hz levels, making thismore » a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.« less

  11. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at μg/ √Hz and μrad/s/ √Hz levels, making this a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.

  12. Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash and isotopically-labeled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Gary S.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2013-06-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in hydrous minerals and volcanic glass are routinely used as paleo-proxies to infer the isotopic values of meteoric waters and thus paleo-climatic conditions. We report a series of long-term exposure experiments of distal 7700 BP Mt. Mazama ash (-149‰ δ2H, +7‰ δ18O, 3.8 wt.% H2O) with isotopically-labeled water (+650‰ δ2H, +56‰ δ18O). Experiments were done at 70, 40 and 20 °C, and ranged in duration from 1 to 14454 h (˜20 months), to evaluate the rates of deuterium and 18O exchange, and investigate the relative role of exchange and diffusion. We also investigate the effect of drying on H2Otot and δ2H in native and reacted ash that can be used in defining the protocols for natural sample preparation. We employ Thermal Conversion Elemental Analyzer (TCEA) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis and a KBr pellet technique with infrared spectroscopy to measure the evolution of δ2H, total water, and OH water peaks in the course of exposure experiments, and in varying lengths of vacuum drying. Time series experiments aided by infrared measurements demonstrate the following new results: (i) It wasobserved that from 5 to >100‰ δ2H increases with time, with faster deuterium exchange at higher temperatures. Times at 15% of theoretical "full δ2H exchange" are: 15.8 years at 20 °C, 5.2 years at 40 °C, and 0.4 years at 70 °C. (ii) Even at extended exposure durations experiments show no net increase in water weight percent nor in δ18O in ash; water released from ash rapidly by thermal decomposition is not enriched in δ18O. This observation clearly suggests that it is hydrogen exchange, and not water addition or oxygen exchange that characterizes the process. (iii) Our time series drying, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-KBr and Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) analyses collectively suggest a simple mechanistic view that there are three kinds of "water" in ash: water (mostly H2O) that is less strongly bonded

  13. Influence of intergranular exchange coupling on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, R.; Schmidt, H.; Tibus, S.; Springer, F.; Fassbender, J.; Rohrmann, H.; Albrecht, M.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the effect of Co{sup +} irradiation on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media. Increasing irradiation levels reduce the saturation magnetization and effective anisotropy, which decrease the intrinsic magnetization precession frequency. Furthermore, increasing intergranular exchange coupling results in a qualitative change in the behavior of the magnetic material from a collection of individual grains to a homogeneous thin film, as evidenced in both the switching behavior and dynamics. The frequency change cannot be explained by single crystal macrospin modeling, and can only be reproduced by the inclusion of the dipolar effects and anisotropy distribution inherent in a granular medium.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR Characterized Using Crystallography and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, H.A.; Wang, C.; Zhao, X.; Hamuro, Y.; Conners, K.; Kearins, M.C.; Lu, F.; Sauder, J.M.; Molnar, K.S.; Coales, S.J.; Maloney, P.C.; Guggino, W.B.; Wetmore, D.R.; Weber, P.C.; Hunt, J.F.

    2012-04-30

    The {Delta}F508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and {Delta}F508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because {Delta}F508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs, and the {Delta}F508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide {sup 1}H/{sup 2}H exchange rates in matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs reveal that {Delta}F508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the {Delta}F508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-{Delta}F508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all {Delta}F508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation {Delta}F508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased

  15. Ozone dynamics and snow-atmosphere exchanges during ozone depletion events at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Boylan, Patrick; Johnson, Bryan; Oltmans, Sam; Fairall, Chris; Staebler, Ralf; Weinheimer, Andrew; Orlando, John; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Flocke, Frank; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Shepson, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of lower atmospheric ozone and ozone exchanges at the snow surface were studied using a suite of platforms during the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snow (OASIS) Spring 2009 experiment at an inland, coastal site east of Barrow, Alaska. A major objective was to investigate if and how much chemistry at the snow surface at the site contributes to springtime ozone depletion events (ODEs). Between March 8 and April 16, seven ODEs, with atmospheric ozone dropping below 1.0 ppbv, were observed. The depth of the ozone-depleted layer was variable, extending from the surface to ˜200-800 m. ODEs most commonly occurred during low wind speed conditions with flow coming from the Arctic Ocean. Two high-sensitivity ozone chemiluminescence instruments were used to accurately define the remaining sub-ppbv ozone levels during ODEs. These measurements showed variable residual ODE ozone levels ranging between 0.010 and 0.100 ppbv. During the most extended ODE, when ozone remained below 1.0 ppbv for over 78 h, these measurements showed a modest ozone recovery or production in the early afternoon hours, resulting in increases in the ozone mixing ratio of 0.100 to 0.800 ppbv. The comparison between high-sensitivity ozone measurements and BrO measured by longpath differential absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) during ODEs indicated that at low ozone levels formation of BrO is controlled by the amount of available ozone. Measurements of ozone in air drawn from below the snow surface showed depleted ozone in the snowpack, with levels consistently remaining <6 ppbv independent of above-surface ambient air concentrations. The snowpack was always a sink of ozone. Ozone deposition velocities determined from ozone surface flux measurements by eddy covariance were on the order of 0.01 cm s-1, which is of similar magnitude as ozone uptake rates found over snow at other polar sites that are not subjected to ODEs. The results from these multiple platform measurements unequivocally show that snow

  16. Dynamics of CO2-exchange and C-budgets due to soil erosion: Insights from a 4 years observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Garcia Alba, Juana; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of reduced wintertime plant cover and vigorous crop growth during summer. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore, the interdisciplinary project "CarboZALF" was established in Dedelow/Prenzlau (NE-Germany) in 2009. Within the field experiment CarboZALF-D, CO2 fluxes for the soil-plant systems were monitored, covering typical landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Automated chamber systems, each consisting of four transparent chambers (2.5 m height, basal area 2.25 m2), were placed along gradients at both measurement sites. Monitored CO2 fluxes were gap-filled on a high-temporal resolution by modelling ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Gap-filling was e.g. needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. The monitored crop rotation was corn-winter wheat (2 a), sorghum-winter triticale and alfalfa (1.5 a). In our presentation we would like to show insights from a 4 years observation period, with prounounced differences between the eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco, GPP and NEE compared to the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol. Site-specific NEE and C-balances were positively related to soil C-stocks as well as biomass production, and generated a minor C-sink in case of the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and a highly variable C-source in case of the

  17. A dynamic model to study the exchange of gas-phase persistent organic pollutants between air and a seasonal snowpack.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kaj M; Halsall, Crispin J; Christensen, Jesper H

    2006-04-15

    An arctic snow model was developed to predict the exchange of vapor-phase persistent organic pollutants between the atmosphere and the snowpack over a winter season. Using modeled meteorological data simulating conditions in the Canadian High Arctic, a single-layer snowpack was created on the basis of the precipitation rate, with the snow depth, snow specific surface area, density, and total surface area (TSA) evolving throughout the annual time series. TSA, an important parameter affecting the vapor-sorbed quantity of chemicals in snow, was within a factor of 5 of measured values. Net fluxes for fluorene, phenanthrene, PCB-28 and -52, and alpha- and gamma-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) were predicted on the basis of their wet deposition (snowfall) and vapor exchange between the snow and atmosphere. Chemical fluxes were found to be highly dynamic, whereby deposition was rapidly offset by evaporative loss due to snow settling (i.e., changes in TSA). Differences in chemical behavior over the course of the season (i.e., fluxes, snow concentrations) were largely dependent on the snow/air partition coefficients (K(sa)). Chemicals with relatively higher K(sa) values such as alpha- and gamma-HCH were efficiently retained within the snowpack until later in the season compared to fluorene, phenathrene, and PCB-28 and -52. Average snow and air concentrations predicted by the model were within a factor of 5-10 of values measured from arctic field studies, but tended to be overpredicted for those chemicals with higher K(sa) values (i.e., HCHs). Sensitivity analysis revealed that snow concentrations were more strongly influenced by K(sa) than either inclusion of wind ventilation of the snowpack or other changes in physical parameters. Importantly, the model highlighted the relevance of the arctic snowpack in influencing atmospheric concentrations. For the HCHs, evaporative fluxes from snow were more pronounced in April and May, toward the end of the winter, providing evidence that

  18. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry of bacteriorhodopsin reveals light-induced changes in the structural dynamics of a biomolecular machine.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid; Konermann, Lars

    2011-12-21

    Many proteins act as molecular machines that are fuelled by a nonthermal energy source. Examples include transmembrane pumps and stator-rotor complexes. These systems undergo cyclic motions (CMs) that are being driven along a well-defined conformational trajectory. Superimposed on these CMs are thermal fluctuations (TFs) that are coupled to stochastic motions of the solvent. Here we explore whether the TFs of a molecular machine are affected by the occurrence of CMs. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is a light-driven proton pump that serves as a model system in this study. The function of BR is based on a photocycle that involves trans/cis isomerization of a retinal chromophore, as well as motions of transmembrane helices. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry was used to monitor the TFs of BR, focusing on the monomeric form of the protein. Comparative HDX studies were conducted under illumination and in the dark. The HDX kinetics of BR are dramatically accelerated in the presence of light. The isotope exchange rates and the number of backbone amides involved in EX2 opening transitions increase roughly 2-fold upon illumination. In contrast, light/dark control experiments on retinal-free protein produced no discernible differences. It can be concluded that the extent of TFs in BR strongly depends on photon-driven CMs. The light-induced differences in HDX behavior are ascribed to protein destabilization. Specifically, the thermodynamic stability of the dark-adapted protein is estimated to be 5.5 kJ mol(-1) under the conditions of our work. This value represents the free energy difference between the folded state F and a significantly unfolded conformer U. Illumination reduces the stability of F by 2.2 kJ mol(-1). Mechanical agitation caused by isomerization of the chromophore is transferred to the surrounding protein scaffold, and subsequently, the energy dissipates into the solvent. Light-induced retinal motions therefore act analogously to an internal heat

  19. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-04-16

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain.

  20. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2013-06-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main sources of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behavior. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  1. Application of static and dynamic enclosures for determining dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide exchange in Sphagnum peatlands: Implications for the magnitude and direction of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, William Z.; Hines, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    A static enclosure method was applied to determine the exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between the surface of Sphagnum peatlands and the atmosphere. Measurements were performed concurrently with dynamic (flow through) enclosure measurements with sulfur-free air used as sweep gas. This latter technique has been used to acquire the majority of available data on the exchange of S gases between the atmosphere and the continental surfaces and has been criticized because it is thought to overestimate the true flux of gases by disrupting natural S gas gradients. DMS emission rates determined by both methods were not statistically different between 4 and greater than 400 nmol/sq m/h, indicating that previous data on emissions of at least DMS are probably valid. However, the increase in DMS in static enclosures was not linear, indicating the potential for a negative feedback of enlosure DMS concentrations on efflux. The dynamic enclosure method measured positive OCS flux rates (emission) at all sites, while data using static enclosures indicated that OCS was consumed from the atmosphere at these same sites at rates of 3.7 to 55 nmol/sq m/h. Measurements using both enclosure techniques at a site devoid of vegetation showed that peat was a source of both DMS and OCS. However, the rate of OCS efflux from decomposing peat was more than counterbalanced by OCS consumption by vegetation, including Sphagnum mosses, and net OCS uptake occurred at all sites. We propose that all wetlands are net sinks for OCS.

  2. Relaxation dynamics and coherent energy exchange in coupled vibration-cavity polaritons (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Blake S.; Fears, Kenan P.; Dressick, Walter J.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Spann, Bryan T.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2016-09-01

    Coherent coupling between an optical transition and confined optical mode have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been considered. Here, we demonstrate both static and dynamic results for vibrational bands strongly coupled to optical cavities. We experimentally and numerically describe strong coupling between a Fabry-Pérot cavity and carbonyl stretch ( 1730 cm 1) in poly-methylmethacrylate and provide evidence that the mixed-states are immune to inhomogeneous broadening. We investigate strong and weak coupling regimes through examination of cavities loaded with varying concentrations of a urethane monomer. Rabi splittings are in excellent agreement with an analytical description using no fitting parameters. Ultrafast pump-probe measurements reveal transient absorption signals over a frequency range well-separated from the vibrational band, as well as drastically modified relaxation rates. We speculate these modified kinetics are a consequence of the energy proximity between the vibration-cavity polariton modes and excited state transitions and that polaritons offer an alternative relaxation path for vibrational excitations. Varying the polariton energies by angle-tuning yields transient results consistent with this hypothesis. Furthermore, Rabi oscillations, or quantum beats, are observed at early times and we see evidence that these coherent vibration-cavity polariton excitations impact excited state population through cavity losses. Together, these results indicate that cavity coupling may be used to influence both excitation and relaxation rates of vibrations. Opening the field of polaritonic coupling to vibrational species promises to be a rich arena amenable to a wide variety of infrared-active bonds that can be studied in steady state and dynamically.

  3. Effects of river morphology, hydraulic gradients, and sediment deposition on water exchange and oxygen dynamics in salmonid redds.

    PubMed

    Schindler Wildhaber, Y; Michel, C; Epting, J; Wildhaber, R A; Huber, E; Huggenberger, P; Burkhardt-Holm, P; Alewell, C

    2014-02-01

    Fine sediment decreasing gravel permeability and oxygen supply to incubating salmonid embryos, is often considered the main contributing factor for the observed decline of salmonid populations. However, oxygen supply to salmonid embryos also depends on hydraulic conditions driving water flow through the redd. A more generalized perspective is needed to better understand the constraints on successful salmonid incubation in the many heavily modified fluvial ecosystems of the Northern Hemisphere. The effects of hydraulic gradients, riverbed and redd morphology as well as fine sediment deposition on dissolved oxygen (DO) and water exchange was studied in 18 artificial redds at three sites along a modified river. Fifty percent of the redds in the two downstream sites were lost during high flow events, while redd loss at the upstream site was substantially lower (8%). This pattern was likely related to increasing flood heights from up- to downstream. Specific water infiltration rates (q) and DO were highly dynamic and driven on multiple temporal and spatial scales. Temporally, the high permeability of the redd gravel and the typical pit-tail structure of the new built redds, leading to high DO, disappeared within a month, when fine sediment had infiltrated and the redd structure was leveled. On the scale of hours to days, DO concentrations and q increased during high flows, but decreased during the falling limb of the water level, most likely related to exfiltration of oxygen depleted groundwater or hyporheic water. DO concentrations also decreased under prolonged base flow conditions, when increased infiltration of silt and clay particles clogged the riverbed and reduced q. Spatially, artificial log steps affected fine sediment infiltration, q and interstitial DO in the redds. The results demonstrate that multiple factors have to be considered for successful river management in salmonid streams, including riverbed structure and local and regional hydrogeological

  4. Detection of the dynamic magnetic behavior of the antiferromagnet in exchange-coupled NiFe/IrMn bilayers.

    PubMed

    Spizzo, F; Tamisari, M; Bonfiglioli, E; Del Bianco, L

    2013-09-25

    The magnetothermal behavior of antiferromagnetic IrMn layers of different thickness (3, 6, 10 nm) has been studied by exploiting the exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic 5 nm-thick NiFe layer. A procedure has been devised for the measurement of the magnetization of the NiFe/IrMn bilayers as a function of temperature and time at different values of an external magnetic field, Hinv, antiparallel to the unidirectional exchange anisotropy. This analysis allows one to probe the effective distribution of anisotropy energy barriers of the antiferromagnetic phase, as sensed by the ferromagnetic layer. Two magnetic regimes have been distinguished. At temperature T < 100 K, the interfacial IrMn spins are frozen in a glassy state and are collectively involved in the exchange coupling with the NiFe spins. At T ∼ 100 K the collective state breaks up; thus, above this temperature, only the interfacial IrMn spins which are tightly polarized by the IrMn nanograins, forming the bulk of the layer, are effectively involved in the exchange coupling mechanism. Due to that, for T > 100 K the exchange coupling is ruled by the anisotropy energy barriers of the bulk IrMn nanograins, namely by the layer thickness. The thermal evolution of the exchange field and of the coercivity in the three samples is coherently explained in the framework of this description of the dynamic magnetic behavior of the IrMn phase.

  5. Invariance of firing rate and field potential dynamics to stimulus modulation rate in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Roy; Nir, Yuval; Harel, Michal; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael; Fried, Itzhak

    2011-08-01

    The effect of stimulus modulation rate on the underlying neural activity in human auditory cortex is not clear. Human studies (using both invasive and noninvasive techniques) have demonstrated that at the population level, auditory cortex follows stimulus envelope. Here we examined the effect of stimulus modulation rate by using a rare opportunity to record both spiking activity and local field potentials (LFP) in auditory cortex of patients during repeated presentations of an audio-visual movie clip presented at normal, double, and quadruple speeds. Mean firing rate during evoked activity remained the same across speeds and the temporal response profile of firing rate modulations at increased stimulus speeds was a linearly scaled version of the response during slower speeds. Additionally, stimulus induced power modulation of local field potentials in the high gamma band (64-128 Hz) exhibited similar temporal scaling as the neuronal firing rate modulations. Our data confirm and extend previous studies in humans and anesthetized animals, supporting a model in which both firing rate, and high-gamma LFP power modulations in auditory cortex follow the temporal envelope of the stimulus across different modulation rates.

  6. Dynamic NMR of Intramolecular Exchange Processes in EDTA Complexes of Sc[superscript 3+], Y[superscript 3+], and La[superscript 3+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ba, Yong; Han, Steven; Ni, Lily; Su, Tony; Garcia, Andres

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic NMR makes use of the effect of chemical exchanges on NMR spectra to study kinetics and thermodynamics. An advanced physical chemistry lab experiment was developed to study the intramolecular exchange processes of EDTA (the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) metal complexes. EDTA is an important chelating agent, used in…

  7. Predicting prey population dynamics from kill rate, predation rate and predator-prey ratios in three wolf-ungulate systems.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Hebblewhite, Mark; Smith, Douglas W; Peterson, Rolf O

    2011-11-01

    1. Predation rate (PR) and kill rate are both fundamental statistics for understanding predation. However, relatively little is known about how these statistics relate to one another and how they relate to prey population dynamics. We assess these relationships across three systems where wolf-prey dynamics have been observed for 41 years (Isle Royale), 19 years (Banff) and 12 years (Yellowstone). 2. To provide context for this empirical assessment, we developed theoretical predictions of the relationship between kill rate and PR under a broad range of predator-prey models including predator-dependent, ratio-dependent and Lotka-Volterra dynamics. 3. The theoretical predictions indicate that kill rate can be related to PR in a variety of diverse ways (e.g. positive, negative, unrelated) that depend on the nature of predator-prey dynamics (e.g. structure of the functional response). These simulations also suggested that the ratio of predator-to-prey is a good predictor of prey growth rate. That result motivated us to assess the empirical relationship between the ratio and prey growth rate for each of the three study sites. 4. The empirical relationships indicate that PR is not well predicted by kill rate, but is better predicted by the ratio of predator-to-prey. Kill rate is also a poor predictor of prey growth rate. However, PR and ratio of predator-to-prey each explained significant portions of variation in prey growth rate for two of the three study sites. 5. Our analyses offer two general insights. First, Isle Royale, Banff and Yellowstone are similar insomuch as they all include wolves preying on large ungulates. However, they also differ in species diversity of predator and prey communities, exploitation by humans and the role of dispersal. Even with the benefit of our analysis, it remains difficult to judge whether to be more impressed by the similarities or differences. This difficulty nicely illustrates a fundamental property of ecological

  8. Growth rate in the dynamical dark energy models.

    PubMed

    Avsajanishvili, Olga; Arkhipova, Natalia A; Samushia, Lado; Kahniashvili, Tina

    Dark energy models with a slowly rolling cosmological scalar field provide a popular alternative to the standard, time-independent cosmological constant model. We study the simultaneous evolution of background expansion and growth in the scalar field model with the Ratra-Peebles self-interaction potential. We use recent measurements of the linear growth rate and the baryon acoustic oscillation peak positions to constrain the model parameter [Formula: see text] that describes the steepness of the scalar field potential.

  9. An Abstract Multi-Rate Method for Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    a single macro multi-rate step from initial to final time. TODO : There are time domain multigrid approaches. This should be mentioned here with...simplified faster than real-time models such as those employed in first order design optimization tools [ TODO : citations]. Increasing in detail one...training [ TODO : citations]. Next are vehicle models of modest detail which support off-line analysis of vehicle handling, virtual kinematics and

  10. A CORBA-based object framework with patient identification translation and dynamic linking. Methods for exchanging patient data.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ohe, K

    1999-03-01

    Exchanging and integration of patient data across heterogeneous databases and institutional boundaries offers many problems. We focused on two issues: (1) how to identify identical patients between different systems and institutions while lacking universal patient identifiers; and (2) how to link patient data across heterogeneous databases and institutional boundaries. To solve these problems, we created a patient identification (ID) translation model and a dynamic linking method in the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) environment. The algorithm for the patient ID translation is based on patient attribute matching plus computer-based human checking; the method for dynamic linking is temporal mapping. By implementing these methods into computer systems with help of the distributed object computing technology, we built a prototype of a CORBA-based object framework in which the patient ID translation and dynamic linking methods were embedded. Our experiments with a Web-based user interface using the object framework and dynamic linking-through the object framework were successful. These methods are important for exchanging and integrating patient data across heterogeneous databases and institutional boundaries.

  11. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around “set points” that include a constant leaf internal [CO2], ci, a constant drawdown in CO2 (ca - ci), and a constant ci/ca. Because these set points can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange, it will be essential for the accuracy of Earth systems models that generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to ca be identified if any do exist. We hypothesized that the concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these set point strategies, would provide a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca. We analyzed studies reporting C stable isotope ratio (δ13C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆13C) from woody plant taxa that grew across ca spanning at least 100 ppm for each species investigated. From these data we calculated ci, and in combination with known or estimated ca, leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies were assessed. Overall, our analyses does not support the hypothesis that trees are canalized towards any of the proposed set points, particularly so for a constant ci. Rather, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that stomatal optimization regulates leaf gas

  12. Does Guidewire Exchange Influence Infection Rate Related to Catheters Used for Vascular Access in Children on Chronic Hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Battelino, Nina; Ponikvar, Rafael; Premru, Vladimir; Novljan, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) can either be inserted "de novo" or placed by guidewire exchange (GWE). From September 1998 to September 2015, 32 children (19 boys, 13 girls) were hemodialyzed in our unit by using a CVC. The mean age at CVC insertion was 12.6 ± 0.5 years. A total of 121 uncuffed catheters were placed, either "de novo" or by GWE in 64 (52.9%) and 57 (47.1%) cases, respectively. The most frequent cause for line revision was catheter dysfunction in 40/121 (33.1%) patients. The overall incidence of bacteremia was 1.5/1000 catheter-days. The incidence in newly inserted and GWE catheters was 1.4 and 1.7/1000 catheter-days, respectively. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.939). The infection rate correlated with patient age, and was higher in younger children (P = 0.006). GWE is an effective option of line revision, and did not influence the infection rate in our study.

  13. Screened-exchange density functional approach to Auger recombination and impact ionization rates in InGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Asahi, Ryoji; Geller, Clint; Freeman, Arthur

    2004-03-01

    We present an ab-initio modeling approach for Auger recombination and impact ionization in semiconductors directed at i) quantitative rate determinations and 2) elucidating trends with respect to alloy composition, carrier concentration and temperature. We present a fully first-principles formalism (S.Picozzi, R.Asahi, C.B. Geller and A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.Lett. 89, 197601 (2002); Phys.Rev.B 65, 113206 (2002).), based on accurate energy bands and wave functions within the screened exchange local density approximation and the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method (E.Wimmer, H.Krakauer, M.Weinert, A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.B 24, 864 (1981)). Results are presented for electron- and hole-initiated impact ionization processes and Auger recombinations for p-type and n-type InGaAs. Anisotropy and composition effects in the related rates are discussed in terms of the underlying band-structures. Calculated Auger lifetimes, in general agreement with experiments, are studied for different recombination mechanisms (i.e. CCCH, CHHL, CHHS, involving conduction electrons (C), heavy- (H) and light-hole (L), spin split-off (S) band) in order to understand the dominant mechanism.

  14. The rates of exchange of water molecules from Al(III)-methylmalonate complexes: The effect of chelate ring size

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, W.H.; Phillips, B.L.; Nordin, J.P.; Sullivan, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Rate coefficients are reported for exchange of hydration waters in the inner-coordination-sphere of Al(III)-methylmalonate complexes with bulk solution as determined via {sup 17}O-NMR. Surprisingly, water molecules in the thermodynamically less-stable complexes containing six-membered chelates are much more labile than those in five-membered oxalate-A(III) complexes. The surprising trend in reactivity is attributable either to differences in the Lewis basicities of oxygens in bidentate oxalate and methylmalonate ligands, or to rapid dissociation/reassociation of one of the acetate groups to the metal center. These results identify a useful case where trends in the apparent labilities of dissolved and presumed surface complexes deviate sharply. This deviation could be usefully exploited to probe surfaces if ligand-promoted dissolution rates could be compared at conditions where inner-sphere and outer-sphere chelate complexes could be distinguished spectroscopically. The authors expect inner-sphere oxalate to have a smaller labilizing effect than malonate or methylmalonate. A contrary result would indicate structural dissimilarity between complexes on the surface and in solution, or perhaps steric hindrance.

  15. Enhancement of specific absorption rate by exchange coupling of the core-shell structure of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadatare, M. R.; Meshram, J. V.; Gurav, K. V.; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Pawar, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia, drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this paper, an attempt has been made to increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs. To increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs, one can take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the NP and maximize the specific absorption rate, which is the gauge of conversion efficiency. In order to examine the tunability of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetic heating power, a representative magnetically hard material (CoFe2O4) has been coupled to a soft material (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized NPs show specific absorption rates that are of an order of magnitude larger than the conventional one.

  16. Structure and thermodynamics of amylin dimer studied by Hamiltonian-temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2011-03-31

    The loss of the insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, responsible for type-II diabetes, is associated with islet amyloid deposits. The main component of these deposits is the amyloid fibrils formed by the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP also known as amylin). Although the fibrils are well characterized by cross β structure, the structure of the transient oligomers formed in the early stage of aggregation remains elusive. In this study, we apply the Hamiltonian-temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics to characterize the structure and thermodynamics of a full-length hIAPP dimer in both the presence and the absence of the Cys2-Cys7 disulfide bond. We compare these results with those obtained on the monomeric and dimeric forms of rat IAPP (rIAPP) with a disulfide bridge which differ from the hIAPP by 6 amino acids in the C-terminal region, but it is unable to form fibrils. Using a coarse-grained protein force field (OPEP-the Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction) running for a total of 10-28 μs per system studied, we show that sequences sample α-helical structure in the N-terminal region but that the length of this secondary element is shorter and less stable for the chains without the disulfide bridge (residues 5-16 for hIAPP with the bridge vs 10-16 for hIAPP without the bridge). This α-helix is known to be an important transient stage in the formation of oligomers. In the C-terminal, the amyloidogenic region of hIAPP, β-strands are seen for residues 17-26 and 30-35. On the contrary, no significant β-sheet content in the C-terminal is observed for either the monomeric or the dimeric rIAPP. These numerical results are fully consistent with recent experimental findings that the N-terminal residues are not part of the fibril by forming α-helical structure but rather play a significant role in stabilizing the amyloidogenic region available for the fibrillation.

  17. Dynamic exchange via spin currents in acoustic and optical modes of ferromagnetic resonance in spin-valve structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Pogorelov, Yu. G.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.; Kakazei, G. N.; Sobolev, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    Two ferromagnetic (FM) layers magnetically decoupled by a thick, normal metal spacer layer can be dynamically coupled via spin currents emitted by the spin pump and absorbed through the spin-torque effects at the neighboring interfaces. A decrease of damping in both layers due to a partial compensation of the angular momentum leakage in each layer was previously observed at the coincidence of the two FM resonances. In the case of nonzero magnetic coupling, such a dynamic exchange will depend on the mutual precession of the magnetic moments in the layers. A difference in the linewidth of the resonance peaks is expected for the acoustic and optical regimes of precession. However, the interlayer coupling (IC) hybridizes the resonance responses of the layers and therefore can also change their linewidths. The interplay between the two mechanisms has never been considered before. In the present work, the joint influence of the hybridization and nonlocal damping on the linewidth has been studied in weakly coupled NiFe/CoFe/Cu/CoFe/MnIr spin-valve multilayers. It has been found that the dynamic exchange by spin currents is different in the optical and acoustic modes, and this difference is dependent on the IC strength. In contrast to the acoustic precession mode, the dynamic exchange in the optical mode works as an additional damping source. A simulation in the framework of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert formalism for two FM layers coupled magnetically and by spin currents has been done to separate the effects of the nonlocal damping from the resonance modes hybridization. In our samples, both mechanisms bring about linewidth changes of the same order of magnitude but lead to a distinctly different angular behavior. The obtained results are relevant for a broad class of coupled magnetic multilayers with ballistic regime of the spin transport.

  18. Tuning towards dynamic freezing using a two-rate protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyaki; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Sengupta, K.

    2016-08-01

    We study periodically driven closed quantum systems where two parameters of the system Hamiltonian are varied periodically in time with frequencies ω1 and ω2=r ω1 . We show that such drives may be used to tune towards dynamics-induced freezing where the wave function of the state of the system after a drive cycle at time T =2 π /ω1 has almost perfect overlap with the initial state. We locate regions in the (ω1,r ) plane where the freezing is near exact for a class of integrable models and a specific nonintegrable model. The integrable models that we study encompass Ising and XY models in d =1 , Kitaev model in d =2 , and Dirac fermions in graphene and atop a topological insulator surface, whereas the nonintegrable model studied involves the experimentally realized one-dimensional tilted Bose-Hubbard model in an optical lattice. In addition, we compute the relevant correlation functions of such driven systems and describe their characteristics in the region of the (ω1,r ) plane where the freezing is near exact. We supplement our numerical analysis with semianalytic results for integrable driven systems within adiabatic-impulse approximation and discuss experiments which may test our theory.

  19. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q. L. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.

    2015-11-30

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L1{sub 0}-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  20. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q. L.; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-11-01

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L10-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  1. Study of H/D exchange rates to derive the strength of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in halo substituted organic building blocks: An NMR spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Suryaprakash, N.

    2015-10-01

    Rates of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy are utilized to derive the strength of hydrogen bonds and to monitor the electronic effects in the site-specific halogen substituted benzamides and anilines. The theoretical fitting of the time dependent variation of the integral areas of 1H NMR resonances to the first order decay function permitted the determination of H/D exchange rate constants (k) and their precise half-lives (t1/2) with high degree of reproducibility. The comparative study also permitted the unambiguous determination of relative strength of hydrogen bonds and the contribution from electronic effects on the H/D exchange rate.

  2. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  3. Heart Rate Variability Dynamics for the Prognosis of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Lam-Espinosa, Eric; Ramirez-Moreno, David F.; Calvo-Echeverry, Paulo C.; Agredo-Rodriguez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    Statistical, spectral, multi-resolution and non-linear methods were applied to heart rate variability (HRV) series linked with classification schemes for the prognosis of cardiovascular risk. A total of 90 HRV records were analyzed: 45 from healthy subjects and 45 from cardiovascular risk patients. A total of 52 features from all the analysis methods were evaluated using standard two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test). The results of the statistical procedure provided input to multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks, radial basis function (RBF) neural networks and support vector machines (SVM) for data classification. These schemes showed high performances with both training and test sets and many combinations of features (with a maximum accuracy of 96.67%). Additionally, there was a strong consideration for breathing frequency as a relevant feature in the HRV analysis. PMID:21386966

  4. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  5. Analyzing the Cross-Correlation Between Onshore and Offshore RMB Exchange Rates Based on Multifractal Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (MF-DCCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chi; Zhou, Yingying; Wang, Gangjin; Yan, Xinguo

    We use the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA) method to explore the multifractal behavior of the cross-correlation between exchange rates of onshore RMB (CNY) and offshore RMB (CNH) against US dollar (USD). The empirical data are daily prices of CNY/USD and CNH/USD from May 1, 2012 to February 29, 2016. The results demonstrate that: (i) the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is persistent and its fluctuation is smaller when the order of fluctuation function is negative than that when the order is positive; (ii) the multifractal behavior of the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is significant during the sample period; (iii) the dynamic Hurst exponents obtained by the rolling windows analysis show that the cross-correlation is stable when the global economic situation is good and volatile in bad situation; and (iv) the non-normal distribution of original data has a greater effect on the multifractality of the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD than the temporary correlation.

  6. Site-specific hydration dynamics of globular proteins and the role of constrained water in solvent exchange with amphiphilic cosolvents

    PubMed Central

    King, John T.; Arthur, Evan J.; Brooks, Charles L.; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces for protein folding, association and function are often determined by protein-water interactions. With a novel covalently bound labeling approach, we have used sensitive vibrational probes, site-selectively conjugated to two lysozyme variants–in conjunction with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy–to investigate directly the protein-water interface. By probing alternatively a topologically flat, rigid domain and a flexible domain, we find direct experimental evidence for spatially heterogeneous hydration dynamics. The hydration environment around globular proteins can vary from exhibiting bulk-like hydration dynamics to dynamically constrained water, which results from stifled hydrogen bond switching dynamics near extended hydrophobic surfaces. Furthermore, we leverage preferential solvation exchange to demonstrate that the liberation of dynamically constrained water is a sufficient driving force for protein-surface association reactions. These results provide an intuitive picture of the dynamic aspects of hydrophobic hydration of proteins, illustrating an essential function of water in biological processes. PMID:22530969

  7. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws)) with experimental factor-compensated and T(1) -normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant radio frequency (RF) irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (k(ws)) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI.

  8. Investigation of mercury exchange between forest canopy vegetation and the atmosphere using a new dynamic chamber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Lindberg, S.E.; Hintelmann, H.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a dynamic chamber system that allows full transmission of PAR and UV radiation and permits enclosed intact foliage to maintain normal physiological function while Hg(0) flux rates are quantified in the field. Black spruce and jack pine foliage both emitted and absorbed Hg(0), exhibiting compensation points near atmospheric Hg(0) concentrations of ???2-3 ng m-3. Using enriched stable Hg isotope spikes, patterns of spike Hg(II) retention on foliage were investigated. Hg(0) evasion rates from foliage were simultaneously measured using the chamber to determine if the decline of foliar spike Hg(II) concentrations overtime could be explained by the photoreduction and re-emission of spike Hg to the atmosphere. This mass balance approach suggested that spike Hg(0) fluxes alone could not account for the measured decrease in spike Hg(II) on foliage following application, implying that either the chamber underestimates the true photoreduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) on foliage, or other mechanisms of Hg(II) loss from foliage, such as cuticle weathering, are in effect. The radiation spectrum responsible for the photoreduction of newly deposited Hg(II) on foliage was also investigated. Our spike experiments suggest that some of the Hg(II) in wet deposition retained by the forest canopy may be rapidly photoreduced to Hg(0) and re-emitted back to the atmosphere, while another portion may be retained by foliage at the end of the growing season, with some being deposited in litterfall. This finding has implications for the estimation of Hg dry deposition based on throughfall and litterfall fluxes. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  9. Investigation of mercury exchange between forest canopy vegetation and the atmosphere using a new dynamic chamber.

    PubMed

    Graydon, Jennifer A; St Louis, Vincent L; Lindberg, Steve E; Hintelmann, Holger; Krabbenhoft, David P

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the design of a dynamic chamber system that allows full transmission of PAR and UV radiation and permits enclosed intact foliage to maintain normal physiological function while Hg(0) flux rates are quantified in the field. Black spruce and jack pine foliage both emitted and absorbed Hg(0), exhibiting compensation points near atmospheric Hg(0) concentrations of approximately 2-3 ng m(-3). Using enriched stable Hg isotope spikes, patterns of spike Hg(ll) retention on foliage were investigated. Hg(0) evasion rates from foliage were simultaneously measured using the chamber to determine if the decline of foliar spike Hg(II) concentrations over time could be explained by the photoreduction and re-emission of spike Hg to the atmosphere. This mass balance approach suggested that spike Hg(0) fluxes alone could not account for the measured decrease in spike Hg(II) on foliage following application, implying that eitherthe chamber underestimates the true photoreduction of Hg(ll) to Hg(0) on foliage, or other mechanisms of Hg(II) loss from foliage, such as cuticle weathering, are in effect. The radiation spectrum responsible for the photoreduction of newly deposited Hg(II) on foliage was also investigated. Our spike experiments suggest that some of the Hg(ll) in wet deposition retained by the forest canopy may be rapidly photoreduced to Hg(0) and re-emitted back to the atmosphere, while another portion may be retained by foliage at the end of the growing season, with some being deposited in litterfall. This finding has implications for the estimation of Hg dry deposition based on throughfall and litterfall fluxes.

  10. Design and properties of a rate-dependent ‘dynamic ligament’ containing shear thickening fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-12-01

    A ‘dynamic ligament’ device that exhibits a discontinuous, rate-dependent tensile response is developed and characterized. The device, based on a shear thickening fluid (STF) and flexible ribbons enclosed in elastomeric tubing, exhibits low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm s-1, but when stretched at 100 mm s-1 or higher resists with more than tenfold higher force. A link between the rheology of the STF and the tensile performance of the dynamic ligament is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Visualization experiments show evidence of void formation and dilation in the STF during high rate extension.

  11. In-situ measurements of wetting rate and local temperatures with dropwise condensation in a compact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzevles, F.L.A.; Geld, C.W.M. van der

    1995-12-31

    In an air-water compact plastic heat exchanger made of PVDF water vapor is condensed dropwise from an air-stream mixture in laminar flow. Inlet vapor fractions, temperatures and velocity rates have been varied. A special window arrangement facilitated the measurements of the area of a plate that is wetted, the droplet distribution and, with the aid of an infrared camera, the temperatures of droplet interface and plate wall. About forty percent of the hemispherical condensate drops have a radius less than 0.1 mm. The wetted area fraction depends on the inlet vapor mass fraction, C{sub in}, and is characterized by a constant value of 36% for C{sub in} {ge} 0.05. This area is for 75% covered by droplets with radii larger than 0.5 mm. The maximum drop radius is 1.65 mm. These large droplets are responsible for the drainage which happens faster if the inlet gas velocity is higher. Retardation of the onset of condensation causes partial wetting on a plate for normal cooling conditions and for 0.03 < C{sub in} < 0.05. The temperature difference between the top and the rim of a droplet can be as large as 6 C. Further downstream this temperature difference is higher. It increases for increasing C{sub in}.

  12. Effect of OPEC oil pricing on output, prices, and exchange rates in the United States and other industrialized countries

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisig, H.

    1981-01-01

    Following each major oil price increase, real gross national product (GNP) has fallen, unemployment and inflation have risen, and exchange rates have moved erratically. But how do oil price increases produce these effects. This paper discusses some of the macroeconomic consequences of too high and rising oil prices, and some of the policy options that might control these effects. It finds that the high and rising price of oil imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) burdens the industrial oil-importing countries in two ways. First, because total expenditures on oil rise relative to income, the potential real standard of living in oil-importing countries falls. Together, the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), for example, may have paid as much as $150 billion more for oil in 1979 than they would have paid in a competitive oil market. Second, the rising oil price increases unemployment and inflation in ways that are difficult for policymakers in oil-importing countries to manage; on the one hand, the rising oil price produces general inflation, and on the other hand, it depresses domestic demand and employment. Policymakers attempt to control part of the inflation, at the cost of increasing unemployment. The total loss in output from the 1974 to 1975 recession, though part of it may have followed from factors unrelated to oil, was about $350 billion.

  13. Intramolecular exchange energy transfer in a bridged bimetallic transition metal complex: Calculation of rate constants using emission spectral fitting parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Baba, A.I.; Kim, W.Y.; Schmehl, R.H.; Atherton, S.J.

    1996-11-21

    The photophysical behavior of the transition metal complexes [[(bpy){sub 2}Ru]{sub 2}(bphb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4}, [[(tpy)(CN)Ru]{sub 2}(bhpb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} and [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bhpb)Ru(tpy)(CN)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4} (bpy = 2,2`-bipyridine, typ = 2,2`,6`,2{double_prime}-terpyridine, bphb = 1,4-bis(2,2`-bipyrid-4-yl)benzene) was investigated in acetonitrile solution and low-temperature glasses. Luminescence spectra, excitation spectra, and transient absorption decays of the three complexes serve to show that intermolecular electronic energy transfer from the MLCT excited state of the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore occurs in the unsymmetric bimetallic complex. Nearly complete energy transfer from the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the tpy-containing chromophore was observed even in 4:1 ethanol: methanol glasses at 20K. A semiclassical exchange energy transfer mechanism was used to treat the available data; the Franck-Condon weighted density of state (FCWD) was obtained using parameters determined from fits of luminescence spectra. Give the FCWD at room temperature and the experimental rate constant, an electronic coupling matrix element of approximately 60 cm{sup -1} was determined for this system. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Driving factors of interactions between the exchange rate market and the commodity market: A wavelet-based complex network perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shaobo; An, Haizhong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Xueyong

    2017-08-01

    In traditional econometrics, a time series must be in a stationary sequence. However, it usually shows time-varying fluctuations, and it remains a challenge to execute a multiscale analysis of the data and discover the topological characteristics of conduction in different scales. Wavelet analysis and complex networks in physical statistics have special advantages in solving these problems. We select the exchange rate variable from the Chinese market and the commodity price index variable from the world market as the time series of our study. We explore the driving factors behind the behavior of the two markets and their topological characteristics in three steps. First, we use the Kalman filter to find the optimal estimation of the relationship between the two markets. Second, wavelet analysis is used to extract the scales of the relationship that are driven by different frequency wavelets. Meanwhile, we search for the actual economic variables corresponding to different frequency wavelets. Finally, a complex network is used to search for the transfer characteristics of the combination of states driven by different frequency wavelets. The results show that statistical physics have a unique advantage over traditional econometrics. The Chinese market has time-varying impacts on the world market: it has greater influence when the world economy is stable and less influence in times of turmoil. The process of forming the state combination is random. Transitions between state combinations have a clustering feature. Based on these characteristics, we can effectively reduce the information burden on investors and correctly respond to the government's policy mix.

  15. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    DOE PAGES

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding