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Sample records for exchange transfusion het

  1. Harvesting the noncirculating pool of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in rats by hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET): yield and functional assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.H. Jr.; Moser, K.M.; Ulich, T.; Cairo, M.S.

    1987-11-01

    Isolation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) provides an opportunity to study PMN activity in vitro and to label PMN for study of in vivo kinetics. However, simple phlebotomy (SP) of a small animal frequently yields too few PMN for in vitro handling, while PMN harvested from an induced-peritonitis may not accurately reflect PMN in a less stimulated state. We report a novel method of harvesting PMN from the circulation of rats, using hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET), which is both time and animal sparing. HET harvested 8-fold more PMN than SP. In vitro cell function was examined with assays of adherence, chemotaxis, bacterial killing, and superoxide generation. No significant (p less than 0.05) difference was found between PMN obtained by HET and pooled-PMN obtained by SP. In vivo function was examined following labeling with indium 111-oxine. The kinetics pattern described suggested normal migratory activity when compared to previous reports. The data demonstrate that rats possess a relatively large, noncirculating pool of PMN which is readily accessible by HET.

  2. Effects of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Kouwaki, Masanori; Goto, Kenji; Endo, Takeshi; Ito, Koichi; Koyama, Norihisa; Togari, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    To study the effect of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in a patient with necrotizing enterocolitis, the levels of 12 cytokines and serum calprotectin were measured among exchange transfusion. A male extremely low birth weight infant was in non-compensated shock and diagnosed stage 3 necrotizing enterocolitis. Exchange transfusion was performed for critical condition, refractory hypotension and disseminated intravascular coagulation. After exchange transfusion, the patient's blood pressure increased and stabilized. Then an enterostomy was performed and revealed necrosis of the ascending colon. Of the cytokines examined, interleukin-8 and serum calprotectin were high before exchange transfusion and decreased after exchange transfusion.

  3. Improved monoclonal antibody tumor/background ratios with exchange transfusions.

    PubMed

    Henry, C A; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1991-01-01

    Blood exchange transfusions were performed in nude rats with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in an attempt to improve specific monoclonal antibody (MoAb) tumor/non-tumor uptake ratios. Animals were injected intravenously with both 131I-5G6.4 specific and 125I-UPC-10 non-specific MoAb. Twenty-four hours later 65-80% of the original blood was exchanged with normal heparinized rat blood and then these rodents were sacrificed. Exchange transfusion significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased normal tissue activities of 131I (except for muscle) by 63-85%, while tumor activity decreased only 5%. Tumor to background ratios increased from 0.1-0.8 to 2.3-6.3. Exchange transfusions substantially enhance tumor/normal tissue antibody uptake ratios and, along with plasmapheresis, may be useful in enhancing antibody localization in vivo, particularly for therapy.

  4. Exchange transfusion in complicated pediatric malaria: A critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Barman, Himesh

    2015-04-01

    Complicated falciparum malaria is a killer disease resulting in high mortality in spite of appropriate treatment. Some workers have reported improved survival when adjunct exchange blood transfusion is included in the treatment modality while others opine against it. This review is an effort to address and critically appraise current evidence for the treatment mode for severe malaria. The literature was searched with a specified search strategy to identify reports of children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe malaria. Total 23 children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria published by 9 authors were identified. Age ranged from 5 months to 16 years with a mean age of 6.4 years. The average preprocedure parasite index (PI) was 41.4% (95confidence interval [CI]; 31.2-51.4). The average blood volume exchanged was 118.6% (95% CI; 94.7-143) of the circulating blood volume. The average postexchange reduction in PI was 34.1% (95% CI; 25.4-42.8). Three out of 23 children encountered some complications. All the children survivedKeywords: Exchange blood transfusion, parasite index, pediatric Intensive Care Unit, red cell exchange, severe falciparum malaria.

  5. Exchange transfusion of a patient with fulminant Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Machin, S J

    1991-02-01

    We report a patient with fulminant Lassa fever who responded dramatically to a 2.5-litre exchange transfusion of whole blood. On admission he was semicomatose with facial oedema and oral haemorrhage; his platelets showed markedly depressed aggregation to ADP; and his plasma inhibited the aggregation responses of normal platelets in vitro. Exchange transfusion resulted in rapid clinical improvement, recovery of platelet function, and disappearance of platelet-inhibitory activity in plasma. The patient died 2 weeks later from an acute encephalopathy. His initial response was sufficiently impressive to suggest that further evaluation of this therapeutic approach is justified in selected patients with overwhelming Lassa virus infection.

  6. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis treated with exchange transfusion and Lugol's iodine.

    PubMed

    Wit, J M; Gerards, L J; Vermeulen-Meiners, C; Bruinse, H W

    1985-03-01

    An infant with neonatal thyrotoxicosis was born to a mother who had become euthyroid after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. Exchange transfusion resulted in a 50% decrease of serum thyroxine levels and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. After 10 days mild thyrotoxic signs reappeared with high serum thyroxine levels, which were treated successfully with Lugol's iodine for 4 weeks. TSI was undetectable at 7 weeks of age. TSI was present in breast milk.

  7. Is exchange transfusion a possible treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis?

    PubMed

    Timpani, Giuseppina; Foti, Francesca; Nicolò, Antonino; Nicotina, Pier Antonio; Nicastro, Emanuele; Iorio, Raffaele

    2007-11-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare congenital disorder of the liver associated to a poor prognosis. Liver transplantation is often required, since no effective medical treatment has been found. Despite mounting evidence of an alloimmune etiology of this condition, exchange transfusion has never been proposed as a specific treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis. Here we describe two siblings affected by neonatal hemochromatosis. The first, a female, died at 18 days of severe coagulopathy and acute renal failure, diagnosed as affected by neonatal hemochromatosis only when the second sibling was suspected as being affected by the same disease. The second child showed a rapidly worsening coagulopathy which was treated with two exchange transfusions, followed by rapid clinical and laboratory improvement, before reaching a definite diagnosis of neonatal hemochromatosis. He is healthy at present after a follow-up of 12 months. Although exchange transfusion has never been considered as treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis, this case suggests that it could be a feasible treatment option for children affected by this disease, as for other alloimmune conditions.

  8. Exchange transfusion in severe hyperbilirubinemia: an experience in northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour Sakha, Seddigheh; Gharehbaghi, Manizheh Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the indications for exchange transfusion (ECT) and the rates of ECT-related adverse events in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We reviewed retrospectively the medical charts of all newborns that had undergone ECT over three years from January 2006 to December 2008. Causes of jaundice, demographic data of the patients, and details of ECT and ECT-related adverse events were recorded. A total of 176 ECT procedures were performed in 150 neonates in the three-year study period. The mean total serum bilirubin before ECT was 29.59 +/- 6.88 mg/dl. Those infants requiring more than one ECT had higher total serum bilirubin than neonates with single ECT, but the difference was not significant (35.66 +/- 12.21 vs. 29.12 +/- 6.30 mg/dl, p = 0.09). The most common cause of ECT was ABO incompatibility (49.3%), Rh disease (7.3%) and idiopathic (28%). Among the adverse events related to ECT, thrombocytopenia (36.4%), hypocalcemia (25.5%), apnea (20%), and infection (10.9%) were noted commonly. No case of ECT-related mortality was observed. All of the adverse events resolved completely before discharge. ABO isoimmunization was the most common cause of ECT in this study. The majority of adverse events associated with ECT are asymptomatic and reversible.

  9. Pediatric orthotopic heart transplant requiring perioperative exchange transfusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    McNeer, Brian; Dickason, Brent; Niles, Scott; Ploessl, Jay

    2004-12-01

    An 11-month-old patient with idiopathic cardiomyopathy was scheduled for orthotopic heart transplantation. A perioperative exchange transfusion was performed because of elevated panel reactive antibody levels. This process was accomplished in the operating room prior to instituting cardiopulmonary bypass using a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. In preparation for the procedure, the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit was primed with washed leukocyte-filtered banked packed red blood cells, fresh-frozen plasma, albumin, and heparin. Pump prime laboratory values were normalized prior to beginning the exchange transfusion. The patient's blood was downloaded from the venous line just proximal to the venous reservoir while simultaneously transfusing the normalized prime at normothermia. Approximately 125% of the patients calculated blood volume was exchanged. This technique greatly reduces the likelihood of hyperacute rejection. The exchange transfusion process, in addition to the patient immature immune system, provides additional options in orthotopic heart transplantation for patients that may otherwise not be considered suitable candidates.

  10. Mortality increases after massive exchange transfusion with older stored blood in canines with experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Steven B; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Kanias, Tamir; Feng, Jing; Helms, Christine C; Solomon, Michael A; Alimchandani, Meghna; Quezado, Martha; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2013-02-28

    Two-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24) infected with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia were randomized in a blinded fashion for exchange transfusion with either 7- or 42-day-old canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Older blood increased mortality (P = .0005), the arterial alveolar oxygen gradient (24-48 hours after infection; P ≤ .01), systemic and pulmonary pressures during transfusion (4-16 hours) and pulmonary pressures for ~ 10 hours afterward (all P ≤ .02). Further, older blood caused more severe lung damage, evidenced by increased necrosis, hemorrhage, and thrombosis (P = .03) noted at the infection site postmortem. Plasma cell–free hemoglobin and nitric oxide (NO) consumption capability were elevated and haptoglobin levels were decreased with older blood during and for 32 hours after transfusion (all P ≤ .03). The low haptoglobin (r = 0.61; P = .003) and high NO consumption levels at 24 hours (r = −0.76; P < .0001) were associated with poor survival. Plasma nontransferrin-bound and labile iron were significantly elevated only during transfusion (both P = .03) and not associated with survival (P = NS). These data from canines indicate that older blood after transfusion has a propensity to hemolyze in vivo, releases vasoconstrictive cell-free hemoglobin over days, worsens pulmonary hypertension, gas exchange, and ischemic vascular damage in the infected lung, and thereby increases the risk of death from transfusion.

  11. Partial manual exchange reduces iron accumulation during chronic red cell transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J.; Reddoch, Shirley; Wolfe, Jaime; Casella, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is an inevitable consequence of chronic red cell transfusions without erythrocytapheresis or chelation therapy. The effectiveness of partial manual exchange, a technique used to slow iron loading, has not been evaluated. We evaluated all children with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving chronic transfusion to identify chelation naïve subjects who had quantitative liver iron concentration (LIC) studies. Seventeen chelation naïve children with SCD received a median of 29 transfusions prior to first LIC determination. Serum ferritin concentrations were assessed prior to each transfusion. The mean volume of blood phlebotomized prior to each transfusion was 5.1±1.8 cc/kg, which cumulatively resulted in a calculated median 35.0 mg/kg removal of iron. Using linear regression, pretransfusion phlebotomy resulted in a statistically significant reduction in ferritin (-8.8 ng/mL of ferritin for each mg/kg of iron phlebotomized, P = 0.02). A reduction in LIC from pretransfusion phlebotomy could not be established (P =0.4). Partial manual exchanges appear to be an effective strategy for slowing the pace of iron loading in the setting of chronic transfusion for SCD. PMID:23887022

  12. Exchange blood transfusion in the management of severe pertussis in young infants.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Delma; Bradley, John S; Gargas, Jessie; Mason, Wilbert H; Lehman, Deborah; Lehman, Samuel M; Murray, Erin L; Harriman, Kathleen; Cherry, James D

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed data from 10 young infants who received exchange blood transfusions for management of severe pertussis. Our data are insufficient to address efficacy of the procedure, but our data, as well as previous reports in the literature, indicate that if the procedure is to be successful, it should be done before organ failure has occurred and immediately if shock/hypotension occur.

  13. Ionized calcium in exchange transfusion with THAM-buffered ACD blood

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Z.; Hanley, W. B.; Radde, I. C.

    1972-01-01

    In 20 exchange transfusions with THAM-buffered ACD blood 5 ml. of 2% calcium gluconate (8 mg. elemental calcium) was injected after each 100 ml. of blood exchanged. Plasma ionized calcium decreased significantly during the procedure, although after each injection of calcium gluconate, levels returned briefly to normal. Ten minutes after the end of exchange ionized calcium had returned to pre-exchange levels and remained there until at least 30 mins. postexchange. Total calcium also increased significantly. Short periods of extreme hypercalcemia (between 7 and 8 mEq./l.) were noted after each injection of calcium gluconate. The amount of calcium gluconate was insufficient to counteract the calcium-chelating effect of citrate. If no heparinized blood is available we suggest adding heparin and calcium chloride to THAM-buffered ACD blood to avoid the repeated sudden fluctuations between low and high calcium ion activity. PMID:4629427

  14. Probable graft-vs-graft reaction in an infant after exchange transfusion and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lauer, B A; Githens, J H; Hayward, A R; Conrad, P D; Yanagihara, R T; Tubergen, D G

    1982-07-01

    A newborn with graft-vs-host (GVH) disease following an exchange transfusion was treated by attempting to eradicate the incompatible graft and to reconstitute the child hematologically and immunologically with a bone marrow transplant. The patient was a female term infant (blood group B, Rh+ Coombs test positive) who received a one-unit group O, Rh- exchange transfusion from an unrelated female donor for hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO incompatibility on day 2. Signs of acute GVH disease began on day 8 and the clinical diagnosis was supported by skin biopsy. With antithymocyte globulin and high dose dexamethasone, the GVH reaction improved somewhat. Cyclophosphamide, 200 mg/kg total dose, was given over four days followed by a marrow graft from a brother who was HLA-A, B identical, and probably also D locus compatible in mixed lymphocyte culture. All signs of GVH resolved with cyclophosphamide treatment and hematologic reconstitution was evident by 14 days after transplant. Two weeks later the GVH reaction and aplastic anemia recurred and Y chromatin was detected in only 6% of marrow cells. The infant died on day 80. Autopsy showed disseminated candidiasis, disseminated cytomegalovirus infection, thymic dysplasia, hypoplastic marrow, and other histopathologic changes consistent with GVH disease. The persistence of female cells in blood and bone marrow and the destruction of the reconstituted marrow suggest that the original incompatible transfusion-derived graft was not eliminated and that it ultimately rejected the histocompatible marrow graft.

  15. The Effect on Serum Ionic Magnesium of Exchange Transfusion with Citrated as Opposed to Heparinized Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Prakash C.; Denton, Ronald L.; Harpur, Eleanor; Stern, Leo; Sugden, Donald L.

    1967-01-01

    Serum Mg++ levels before, during, and after replacement transfusion were determined in 20 newborn infants. In 10 infants exchanged with acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood, the level fell from 1.75 ± 0.16 mEq./l. to 0.99 ± 0.16 mEq./l. By contrast, levels in 10 infants exchanged with two types of heparinized blood were unchanged: the pre-exchange values were 1.59 ± 0.11, and the postexchange levels were 1.59 ± 0.08 mEq./l. Mean values for donor bloods were 0.42 ± 0.07 mEq./l. with ACD blood, and 1.45 ± 0.03 mEq./l. with heparinized blood. In vitro studies involving the addition of known amounts of citrate to standard Mg++ solutions demonstrated that the citrate caused a reduction of ionic magnesium. It is proposed that the fall in serum Mg++ when ACD blood is used for exchange transfusion is the combined result of Mg++ binding by the citrate, and the dilution effect of the relatively large proportion of anticoagulant to blood (1:3) used with the ACD mixture. PMID:6066819

  16. Effect of exchange transfusions with citrated blood on plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in neonates.

    PubMed

    Markestad, T; Aksnes, L; Finne, P H; Aarskog, D

    1984-05-01

    The plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D), and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25-(OH)2D) were determined pre- and postexchange , and in donors' blood in 10 blood exchange transfusions with citrated blood for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The postexchange concentrations of 25-OHD and 24,25-(OH)2D were intermediate between the levels before exchange and in donors' blood. Before therapy, the 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations were higher in the infants' than in donors' blood, and the pre-exchange levels were re-established during the procedure. The results suggest that postexchange concentrations of 25-OHD and 24,25-(OH)2D could be explained on the basis of redistribution of the metabolites between plasma and extravascular pools, whereas de novo synthesis was the most likely cause for the restoration of 1,25-(OH)2D levels.

  17. Exchange transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease of the newborn Severe disturbances in body chemistry Severe newborn jaundice that does not respond to ... possible complications include: Blood clots Changes in blood chemistry (high or low potassium, low calcium, low glucose, ...

  18. Facility-based constraints to exchange transfusions for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Mabogunje, Cecilia A; Olaifa, Sarah M; Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical guidelines for the management of infants with severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia recommend immediate exchange transfusion (ET) when the risk or presence of acute bilirubin encephalopathy is established in order to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus. However, the literature is sparse concerning the interval between the time the decision for ET is made and the actual initiation of ET, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with significant resource constraints but high rates of ET. This paper explores the various stages and potential delays during this interval in complying with the requirement for immediate ET for the affected infants, based on the available evidence from LMICs. The vital role of intensive phototherapy, efficient laboratory and logistical support, and clinical expertise for ET are highlighted. The challenges in securing informed parental consent, especially on religious grounds, and meeting the financial burden of this emergency procedure to facilitate timely ET are examined. Secondary delays arising from post-treatment bilirubin rebound with intensive phototherapy or ET are also discussed. These potential delays can compromise the effectiveness of ET and should provide additional impetus to curtail avoidable ET in LMICs. PMID:27170928

  19. Hearing and Neurological Impairment in Children with History of Exchange Transfusion for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cruz, Carlos F.; García Alonso-Themann, Patricia; Cedillo-Rodríguez, Ileana A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine frequency of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), identified by abnormal threshold in evoked potentials, absence of otoacoustic emissions and behavioral responses, auditory neuropathy (AN) (absence of evoked potentials, with preservation of otoacoustic emissions), and neurological comorbidity in infants with hyperbilirubinemia (HB) treated with exchange-transfusion (ET). From a total of 7,219 infants, ET was performed on 336 (4.6%). Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 102; 234 children did not meet criteria (182 outside of the study period, 34 did not have complete audiological evaluation, and 18 rejected the followup). Thirty-five children (34%) were born at-term and 67 (66%) were preterm. Children had a mean age of 5.5 ± 3.9 years. Main causes of ET were Rh isoimmunization in 48 (47%), ABO incompatibility in 28 (27.5%), and multifactorial causes in 26 (25.5%). Fifteen (15%) children presented with SNHL. Preterm newborns presented more often with SNHL. Indirect bilirubin level was higher in children with SNHL (22.2 versus 18.7 mg/dL, P = 0.02). No cases of AN were documented. An increased risk of neurologic sequelae was observed in children with SNHL. In conclusion, we disclosed a high frequency of SNHL in children with neonatal HB and ET and neurological alterations. No cases of AN were observed. PMID:24678325

  20. False-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hisashi; Honda, Haruki; Egami, Shohei; Yokoyama, Tomoaki; Fujimoto, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Makiko; Sugiura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma are therapeutic options for patients with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. Passive acquisition of various clinically important antibodies through these therapies can occur, leading to false serology and negatively affecting patients' clinical care. It is recommended that dermatologists recognize the possibility of these phenomena and interpret them appropriately. Here, we report false-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. We also discuss the measure for misinterpretation and unnecessary clinical intervention.

  1. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelets White Cells Transfusion of Red Cells Iron Overload Transfusion of Platelets Transfusion of Granulocytes Transfusion of ... you may have, such as heart disease. Iron Overload. The body contains about 2,000 to 3, ...

  2. Safety, tolerability, and outcomes of regular automated red cell exchange transfusion in the management of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tsitsikas, Dimitris A; Sirigireddy, Bala; Nzouakou, Ruben; Calvey, Alexander; Quinn, Joanne; Collins, Janine; Orebayo, Funmilayo; Lewis, Natasha; Todd, Sophie; Amos, Roger J

    2016-12-01

    We report here our experience with regular automated red cell exchange transfusion for the management of chronic complications of sickle cell disease in 50 patients in our institution from June 2011 to December 2014. The mean sickle hemoglobin level was 44% and 8.5% pre- and post-transfusion, respectively. Platelets were reduced by a mean 70% during the procedure with a count of less than 50 × 10(9) /l in 6% of cases. The alloimmunization rate was 0.065/100 units of red cells with no hemolytic reactions. Patients with no iron overload at baseline showed no evidence of iron accumulation with a mean liver iron concentration of 1.6 mg/g dry tissue and 1.9 mg/g dry tissue at baseline and 36 months, respectively. All six patients with pre-existing iron overload and on chelation therapy, showed a gradual reduction of their liver iron concentration and two patients could discontinue chelation during the follow-up period. Seventy percentage of patients who were on the programme for recurrent painful crises showed a sustained reduction in the number of emergency hospital attendances; the mean number of days in hospital for emergency treatment was 103 in the year prior to commencing ARCET and reduced to 62 (40%) after the first 12 months, 51 (50%) after 24 months, and 35 days (66%) after 36 months. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:545-550, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  4. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-05-09

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06-0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock.

  5. Precision evaluation of the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino capture rate from the (3He,t ) charge-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, D.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Alanssari, M.; Brown, B. A.; Cleveland, B. T.; Ejiri, H.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Gavrin, V. N.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hatanaka, K.; Holl, M.; Iwamoto, C.; Lennarz, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, H.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.

    2015-03-01

    A precision measurement of the 71Ga(3He,t ) 71Ge charge-exchange reaction was performed. By using a rather complete set of theoretical form factors to describe the cross-section angular distributions over a large angular range, the Gamow-Teller strength distribution up to the effective neutron-separation energy in 71Ge was extracted. The data and the analysis constrain the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino rate in a neutrino nonoscillation scenario. For nonoscillating neutrinos we report a solar neutrino capture rate of 122.4 ±3.4 (stat ) ±1.1 (sys ) SNU, which is lower than the presently accepted value of 132 ±18 SNU, though not in disagreement given the quoted errors.

  6. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Neonatal jaundice is a common problem among infants immediately after birth. It is the result of the inability ... breakdown product of blood cells, from the blood. Neonatal jaundice is usually a self-limiting, mild disorder. The ...

  7. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... notice a decrease in red blood cell levels. Iron overload If you receive multiple blood transfusions, you may end up with too much iron in your blood. Iron overload (hemochromatosis) can damage ...

  8. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  9. [Blood transfusion practices: about transfusions at night].

    PubMed

    Roche, C; Théfenne, H; Hance, P; Garnotel, E

    2013-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety covers all stages from prescription of immuno-haematological examinations until the completion of the transfusion. According to the 05/11/2006 Afssaps' decision on good transfusion practices, transfusions should not be given at night unless the patient is actively bleeding or has some other urgent clinical need. A retrospective study was used to assess the proportion of transfusions at night. Through this professional practice evaluation, we analyze the reasons leading to perform transfusions at late hours, in order to reduce errors and improve safety for patients.

  10. Acquired hemoglobin variants and exposure to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient red blood cell units during exchange transfusion for sickle cell disease in a patient requiring antigen-matched blood.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Patricia M; Francis, Richard O; Spitalnik, Patrice F; Schwartz, Joseph; Jhang, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Red blood cell exchange (RBCEx) is frequently used in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and acute chest syndrome or stroke, or to maintain target hemoglobin S (HbS) levels. In these settings, RBCEx is a category I or II recommendation according to guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis published by the American Society for Apheresis. Matching donor red blood cells (RBCs) to recipient phenotypes (e.g., C, E, K-antigen negative) can decrease the risk of alloimmunization in patients with multi-transfused SCD. However, this may select for donors with a higher prevalence of RBC disorders for which screening is not performed. This report describes a patient with SCD treated with RBCEx using five units negative for C, E, K, Fya, Fyb (prospectively matched), four of which were from donors with hemoglobin variants and/or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Pre-RBCEx HbS quantification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrated 49.3% HbS and 2.8% hemoglobin C, presumably from transfusion of a hemoglobin C-containing RBC unit during a previous RBCEx. Post-RBCEx HPLC showed the appearance of hemoglobin G-Philadelphia. Two units were G6PD-deficient. The patient did well, but the consequences of transfusing RBC units that are G6PD-deficient and contain hemoglobin variants are unknown. Additional studies are needed to investigate effects on storage, in-vivo RBC recovery and survival, and physiological effects following transfusion of these units. Post-RBCEx HPLC can monitor RBCEx efficiency and detect the presence of abnormal transfused units.

  11. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  12. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  13. Blood Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Panigrahi, Anil K

    2017-03-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a balance between providing benefit for patients while avoiding risks of transfusion. Randomized, controlled trials of restrictive RBC transfusion practices have shown equivalent patient outcomes compared with liberal transfusion practices, and meta-analyses have shown improved in-hospital mortality, reduced cardiac events, and reduced bacterial infections. This body of level 1 evidence has led to substantial, improved blood utilization and reduction of inappropriate blood transfusions with implementation of clinical decision support via electronic medical records, along with accompanying educational initiatives.

  14. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines.

  15. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... or saved by collecting it with a special machine and giving it back into the patient. Giving a person back his or her own blood is called an autologous transfusion. It cuts down on the need for transfusions from other donors. But some studies have found tumor ... Information, ...

  16. [Data interchange in blood transfusion: the impact of a new standard on the evolution of health electronic data exchange in France].

    PubMed

    Ferrera, V; Staccini, P; Chiaroni, J; Quaranta, J F; Boulay, F; De Micco, P

    1998-10-01

    The sanitary and social data interchange within care establishments or networks is today the subject of many national or international considerations. Electronic data interchange in the health field has characteristics linked to ethical and deontological principles of care staff. Used daily, this tool contributes to the quality of care, to the optimization of patient treatment and to the organization of the system care. In the transfusion field, the standardization of messages related to the traceability of blood products in now required by the No. 2 instruction of French Blood Agency, which rules the using of national norms elaborated by the French Agency of Normalization. If the technicality is the greater part of these regulated and formalized messages, this standardization systematizes and justifies the nominative and ciphered data interchange in an open environment, opening a new dimension in the interoperability of data system between care establishments. This article analyzes the characteristics and the potential impact of this normalization on the evolution of the electronic data interchange in the health field.

  17. The Mechanism of Toxicity in HET-S/HET-s Prion Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Seuring, Carolin; Greenwald, Jason; Wasmer, Christian; Wepf, Roger; Saupe, Sven J.; Meier, Beat H.; Riek, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The HET-s protein from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina is a prion involved in a cell death reaction termed heterokaryon incompatibility. This reaction is observed at the point of contact between two genetically distinct strains when one harbors a HET-s prion (in the form of amyloid aggregates) and the other expresses a soluble HET-S protein (96% identical to HET-s). How the HET-s prion interaction with HET-S brings about cell death remains unknown; however, it was recently shown that this interaction leads to a relocalization of HET-S from the cytoplasm to the cell periphery and that this change is associated with cell death. Here, we present detailed insights into this mechanism in which a non-toxic HET-s prion converts a soluble HET-S protein into an integral membrane protein that destabilizes membranes. We observed liposomal membrane defects of approximately 10 up to 60 nm in size in transmission electron microscopy images of freeze-fractured proteoliposomes that were formed in mixtures of HET-S and HET-s amyloids. In liposome leakage assays, HET-S has an innate ability to associate with and disrupt lipid membranes and that this activity is greatly enhanced when HET-S is exposed to HET-s amyloids. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses revealed that HET-s induces the prion-forming domain of HET-S to adopt the β-solenoid fold (previously observed in HET-s) and this change disrupts the globular HeLo domain. These data indicate that upon interaction with a HET-s prion, the HET-S HeLo domain partially unfolds, thereby exposing a previously buried ∼34-residue N-terminal transmembrane segment. The liberation of this segment targets HET-S to the membrane where it further oligomerizes, leading to a loss of membrane integrity. HET-S thus appears to display features that are reminiscent of pore-forming toxins. PMID:23300377

  18. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  19. Transfusion practices in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  20. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  1. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  2. Transfusion-transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Bihl, Florian; Castelli, Damiano; Marincola, Francesco; Dodd, Roger Y; Brander, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens. PMID:17553144

  3. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  4. Alternatives to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2013-05-25

    The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias.

  5. Chimerism in transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Patricia AR

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion therapy is complicated by the production of alloantibodies to antigens present in the donor and lacking in the recipient through the poorly-understood but likely multi-factorial process of alloimmunization. The low prevalence of alloimmunization in transfused patients (6.1%)1 suggests that processes central to immunologic tolerance may be operating in the vast majority of transfused patients who do not produce alloantibodies. Using RhD as a prototype, evidence is reviewed that the ability to make antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens may result in part from immunologic tolerance acquired in utero. These ideas are extended to other examples of maternal microchimerism (MMc) of other non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA). An evolutionary argument is offered that multi-generational immunity supports the hypothesis that MMc may partly explain the “non-responder” phenotype in RBC alloimmunization. PMID:24196285

  6. [History of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, Raúl; de Micheli, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The idea of transfusing blood of an animal to another or from an animal to a man or from one to another man, is very ancient. When the doctrine of blood circulation was diffused, in the first third of the XVII century, this idea was give fresh impetus. On began also to inject some substance into the blood, wich will permit to introduce medicaments intravenously. It is worthy to be remembered that in the same year when the Harveyan monography De motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus was published (1628), the Paduan professor Giovanni Colle suggested a procedure for blood transfusions. Later (1645) the Tuscan physician Francesco Folli showed another procedure, in the presence of the great duke of Toscana, Ferdinando II de Medici. On his side, the surgeon Giovanni Guglielmo Riva realized blood transfusions from animals to men in 1668. Transfusions were already carried out by Richard Lower in London and by Jean-Baptiste Denis in Paris. During the XVIII century, blood transfusions were not effectuated because of some failure occurred in the formed century and of the proscription by civil and religious authorities. Nevertheless these were renewed during the first third of the XIX century in England as well as in the continental Europe. In Mexico the first blood transfusion was effectuated in 1845 by the physician Matias D. Beistegui. At the time persisted the problem of blood coagulation, which could be resolved during the XX century in North America (Crile, 1906) as well as in Latin America (Luis Agote, 1914). Moreover the blood groups were described in 1900 by the Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner, who identified later the Rh factor. It seems completely justified the inscription shining on the façade of the National Archive in Washington: "The past is only prologue".

  7. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  8. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  9. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... two tests will be done before the transfusion: Blood typing. To confirm your child's blood type, a nurse ... blood bank lab, where technicians test it for blood type. Cross-matching. Once typing is complete, a compatible donor blood is chosen. ...

  10. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  11. Hematologic Disorders: Blood Transfusion Products.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Until the 1980s, liberal blood transfusion criteria with limited evidence were used regardless of the patient's clinical condition. However, blood transfusion products are associated with several risks, such as infection, acute lung injury, circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion reactions. More restrictive transfusion criteria and patient monitoring can decrease the need for transfusions, as well as decrease morbidity and mortality rates and costs. The national supply of blood products continues to decline with more stringent blood donor criteria. Preoperative autologous blood donation has fallen out of favor in patients without antibodies to high-incidence antigens because of increased rates of transfusion, waste of predonated units, and significant costs. Instead, preoperative erythropoietin plus iron therapy in patients who are at high risk of postoperative anemia as well as intraoperative techniques, such as use of antifibrinolytics and cell salvage, can prevent the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. Artificial blood products remain problematic and are not used in the United States.

  12. New technology for transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter H

    2007-01-01

    Hemovigilance programs from around the world document that the greatest risk to recipients of blood transfusion is human error, resulting in transfusion of the incorrect blood component. Errors in transfusion care have strong parallels with errors in medication administration. Errors often result from 'lapse' or 'slip' mistakes in which details of patient identification are overlooked. Three areas of transfusion are focal points for improved care: the labelling of the patient's pre-transfusion sample, the decision to transfuse and the final bedside check designed to prevent mis-transfusion. Both barcodes and radio-frequency identification technology, each ideally suited to matching alpha-numeric identifiers, are being implemented in order to improve performance sample labelling and the bedside check. The decision to transfuse should ultimately be enhanced through the use of nanotechnology sensors, computerised order entry and decision support systems. Obstacles to the deployment of new technology include resistance to change, confusion regarding the best technology, and uncertainty regarding the return-on-investment. By focusing on overall transfusion safety, deploying validated systems appropriate for both medication and blood administration, thoughtful integration of technology into bedside practice and demonstration of improved performance, the application of new technologies will improve care for patients in need of transfusion therapy.

  13. Boltzmann Transport in Hybrid PIC HET Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    the device. Experimental measurements and computational simulations have consistently indicated that the electron transport perpendicular to the...plasma conditions experienced in HPHall. 1. Electron mobility in HET simulation The most widely used computational simulations of HETs, including HPHall...Figure 1: Cartoon schematic of anomalous electron trans- port regions in typical HET II. Computational setup As the stalwart HET simulation code in the EP

  14. Transfusion therapy in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tai-Tsung

    2008-04-01

    Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units are commonly indicated for blood transfusion due to many reasons. Children are quite different from adults during growth and development, and that should be taken into consideration. It is very difficult to establish a universal transfusion guideline for critically ill children, especially preterm neonates. Treating underlying disease and targeted replacement therapy are the most effective approaches. Red blood cells are the first choice for replacement therapy in decompensated anemic patients. The critical hemoglobin concentration may be higher in critically ill children for many reasons. Whole blood is used only in the following conditions or diseases: (1) exchange transfusion; (2) after cardiopulmonary bypass; (3) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (4) massive transfusion, especially in multiple component deficiency. The characteristics of hemorrhagic diseases are so varied that their therapy should depend on the specific needs associated with the underlying disease. In general, platelet transfusion is not needed when a patient has platelet count greater than 10,000/mm3 and is without active bleeding, platelet functional deficiency or other risk factors such as sepsis. Patients with risk factors or age less than 4 months should be taken into special consideration, and the critical thrombocyte level will be raised. Platelet transfusion is not recommended in patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenia due to acceleration of platelet destruction without active bleeding or life-threatening hemorrhage. There are many kinds of plasma-derived products, and recombinant factors are commonly used for hemorrhagic patients due to coagulation factor deficiency depending on the characteristics of the diseases. The most effective way to correct disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is to treat the underlying disease. Anticoagulant therapy is very important; heparin is the most common

  15. What is autologous blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Sansom, A

    1993-07-01

    The word autologous is Greek in origin. The definition is exact 'autos' means self and 'logus' means relation. Thus, the meaning is 'related to self'. Autologous blood transfusion, which also is referred to frequently but incorrectly and imprecisely as auto transfusion, designates the reinfusion of blood or blood components to the same individual from whom they were taken. Homologous blood is blood or blood components, from another human donor, taken and stored for later transfusion as required.

  16. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  17. Transfusion--whence and why.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John

    2014-02-01

    The past is prologue. Reviewing the history of transfusion tells us how far we have come, but also where we need to go. The past has been filled with innovation and important discoveries, but is also fraught with stumbling blocks and unintended side effects. Although much has been achieved and transfusion is safer today than ever, nonetheless we are recognizing new potential concerns with transfusion and we are undergoing a paradigm shift in our attitudes, approach and patient management in regard to blood transfusion.

  18. Qualitative research in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Arnold, E; Lane, S

    2011-10-01

    Transfusion medicine research has traditionally employed quantitative methods to answer clinical research questions. Increasingly, qualitative research methods are being used in the field to address a wide variety of research questions in areas such as blood donation, transfusion practices and policy development. This article describes the key characteristics, methodologies and methods of qualitative research and draws on examples to show how qualitative research approaches have been applied in the field of transfusion medicine. It is hoped that this overview will inform and encourage the application of qualitative research in the field of transfusion medicine.

  19. A Clinical Trial to Detect Subclinical Transfusion-induced Lung Injury during Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, John R.; Gropper, Michael A.; Toy, Pearl; Lieberman, Jeremy; Twiford, Jenifer; Weiskopf, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related acute lung injury incidence remains the leading cause of posttransfusion mortality. The etiology may be related to leukocyte antibodies or biologically active compounds in transfused plasma, injuring susceptible recipient's lungs. We have hypothesized that transfusion could have less severe effects that are not always appreciated clinically, and have shown subtly decreased pulmonary oxygen gas transfer in healthy volunteers after transfusion of fresh and 21-day stored erythrocytes. Here we tested the same hypothesis in surgical patients. Methods Ninety-one patients undergoing elective major spine surgery with anticipated need for erythrocyte transfusion were randomly allocated to receive their first transfusion of erythrocytes as cell salvage (CS), washed stored, or unwashed stored. Clinicians were not blinded to group assignment. Pulmonary gas transfer and mechanics were measured 5 min before and 30 min after erythrocyte transfusion. Results The primary outcome variable, gas transfer, as assessed by change of PaO2/FIO2, with erythrocyte transfusion was not significant in any group: (CS: 9 ± 59, mean ± SD; washed, 10 ± 26; unwashed 15 ± 1), and did not differ among groups (P = 0.92). Pulmonary dead space (VD/VT) decreased with CS transfusion (−0.01 ± 0.04; P = 0.034), but did not change with other erythrocytes; the change from before to after erythrocyte transfusion did not differ among groups (−0.01 to +0.01; P = 0.28). Conclusions We did not find impaired gas exchange as assessed by PaO2/FIO2 with transfused erythrocytes that did or did not contain nonautologous plasma. This clinical trial did not support the hypothesis of erythrocyte transfusion-induced gas-exchange deficit that had been found in healthy volunteers. PMID:25946480

  20. Reducing noninfectious risks of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, noninfectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion, respectively. These complications and others are reviewed, and several controversial methods for prevention of noninfectious complications of transfusion are discussed, including universal leukoreduction of erythrocyte units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of erythrocyte storage age.

  1. Transfusion service disaster planning.

    PubMed

    Bundy, K L; Foss, M L; Stubbs, J R

    2008-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, recently set forth a directive to develop a Mayo Emergency Incident Command System (MEICS) plan to respond to major disasters. The MEICS plan that was developed interfaces with national response plans to ensure effective communication and coordination between our institution and local, state, and federal agencies to establish a common language and communication structure. The MEICS plan addresses multiple aspects of dealing with resource needs during a crisis, including the need for blood and transfusion medicine services. The MEICS plan was developed to supplement our current local emergency preparedness procedures and provide a mechanism for responding to the escalating severity of an emergency to deal with situations of a magnitude that is outside the normal experience. A plan was developed to interface the existing Transfusion Medicine disaster plan standard operating procedures (SOP) with the institutional and Department of Laboratory Medicine (DLMP) MEICS plans. The first step in developing this interface was defining MEICS. Other major steps were defining the chain of command, developing a method for visually indicating who is "in charge," planning communication, defining the actions to be taken, assessing resource needs, developing flowcharts and updating SOPs, and developing a blood rationing team to deal with anticipated blood shortages. Several key features of the interface and updated disaster plan that were developed are calling trees for response personnel, plans for relocating leadership to alternative command centers, and action sheets to assist with resource assessment. The action sheets also provide documentation of key actions by response personnel.

  2. Blood transfusion practices in neuroanaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Hassan, Nelofar; Syed, Sumaya

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanaesthesia practice is associated with risk of significant blood loss resulting in anaemia in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The transfusion triggers in a neurologically injured brain are not clearly defined. Both a low haematocrit and a high haematocrit have not shown any improvement in the outcome. Transfusion of red blood cells may improve the cerebral oxygenation on neurophysiological monitors. However, these benefits have not been translated into clinical practice. Transfusion in subarachnoid haemorrhage leads to increased incidence of vasospasm and a poor outcome. Restrictive transfusion strategy is seen to have a lower incidence of pneumonia, urinary tract infection, bacteremia and septic shock in severe head injury. Current evidence suggests that a haemoglobin (Hb) level of <7 g/dl may be deleterious to the neurosurgical population. Target Hb of 8-9 g/dl may be desirable intraoperatively. Different transfusion triggers may hold true for different neurosurgical pathologies. PMID:25535426

  3. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  4. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws.

  5. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries.

  6. Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Wendel, S

    1998-11-01

    Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease has been recognized since 1952. Until recently, no cases were reported outside of Latin America. However, emigration during the past 20 years expanded its transfusional geographic borders to North America. Trypanosoma cruzi-infected donors usually are asymptomatic, often for a lifetime. This situation complicates donor screening, particularly in regions where blood bank personnel are not familiar with the risk factors and natural history of this transfusion-transmitted infection. This review addresses the main aspects of epidemiology, risks of infection, clinical symptoms in donors and recipients, preventive measures, and blood donor screening to prevent transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

  7. HetF and PatA control levels of HetR in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2008-12-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that differentiates heterocysts in response to deprivation of combined nitrogen. A hetF deletion strain lacked heterocysts and had aberrant cell morphology. Site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted active-site histidine and cysteine residues of this putative caspase-hemoglobinase fold protease abolished HetF function, supporting the hypothesis that HetF is a protease. Deletion of patA, which is necessary for the formation of most intercalary heterocysts, or hetF resulted in an increase in HetR protein, and extra copies of hetF on a plasmid functionally bypassed the deletion of patA. A hetR-gfp translational fusion expressed from an inducible promoter demonstrated that hetF-dependent downregulation of HetR levels occurs rapidly in vegetative cells, as well as developing heterocysts. "Mosaic" filaments in which only one cell of a filament had a copy of hetR or hetF indicated that hetF is required for differentiation only in cells that will become heterocysts. hetF was required for transcription from a hetR-dependent transcription start point of the hetR promoter and induction of transcription from the patS promoter. The inverse correlation between the level of HetR protein and transcription from hetR-dependent promoters suggests that the transcriptional activity of HetR is regulated by HetF and PatA.

  8. Transfusion medicine as of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion of blood components is one of the most common medical treatments, and in spite of the time that has evolved since we started to transfuse blood routinely in the 1930s, there are issues associated with its use that we are still trying to improve. Issues such as when to transfuse and adverse effects associated with the transfusion are fields where new evidence is being generated that ideally should help us to indicate when and what to transfuse to the patients. The recognition that the evidence generated in randomized control trials was not widely applied to guide the indication of the transfusion of blood components has provoked the development of initiatives that try to reduce its unnecessary usage. Those initiatives, grouped under the name of patient blood management, have represented a significant paradigm change, and a growing number of activities in this field are performed in health-care facilities around the world. This article tries to summarize the latest publications in those fields. PMID:25580259

  9. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal.

  10. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  11. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (β)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  12. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001595.htm Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a rare condition ...

  13. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  14. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... its parts) or, more often, as individual parts. Blood Types Every person has one of the following blood types: A, B, AB, or O. Also, every person's ... used in a transfusion must work with your blood type. If it doesn't, antibodies (proteins) in your ...

  15. Truth about Transfusions (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stick together and plug up the cut blood vessel so that no more blood will flow out. Red blood cells, plasma, and platelets are commonly used in transfusions. Red blood cells help people who have lost a lot of blood or are anemic. Doctors ...

  16. Successful use of rituximab in platelet transfusion refractoriness in a multi-transfused patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing-Hong; Shen, Yi-Ping; Ye, Bao-Dong; Zhou, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with newly diagnosed INT-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome--refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (MDS-RCMD) was not responsive to treatment, such as androgen, thalidomide, granulocyte--colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) combined with erythropoietin (EPO), interleukin-11 (IL-11) and thrombopoietin (TPO), and became transfusion dependent. Due to repeated blood transfusions, he developed platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) to platelets from cross-matched donors as well as random donors. Anti-HLA class I antibodies were positive with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; however, HLA-compatible platelet products were unavailable. PTR was unresponsive to high-dose immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. The patient was then treated with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8, and 100 mg total dose on days 15 and 22. Already after the first dose of rituximab, the patient was able to received successful platelet transfusion from all donors. Therefore rituximab may be considered as a potential therapy for PTR.

  17. The team focus on improving blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Brady, P; Foot, C; Levy, R; Thomson, A

    2011-03-01

    The current literature pertaining to associated morbidity and mortality with homologous blood transfusion in the surgical patient seems to be pointing only in one direction, which is we must start reducing our patients exposure to homologous blood and products. There appears to be ever mounting evidence of increases in infraction, stroke, transfusion related lung injury, infection, and death that authors are associating with transfusion. A number of authors are reporting success in reducing their patients' requirements for homologous transfusion simply by working as a team or what is known as a multidisciplinary approach and following set transfusion protocols and algorithms. At our institution we have taken note of these reports and have taken the first steps in the formation of a Cardiac Surgical Transfusion Management Group where all specialties involved in the decision making process of transfusion in the cardiac surgical patient can have representation and be directly involved in the establishment of protocols, transfusion algorithms, and a transfusion audit system. The main goal of this group is to implement a change in transfusion practice and to assess the impact the change has had on transfusion requirements and make appropriate recommendations to the treating specialists.

  18. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  19. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  20. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply.

  1. [Blood components and good practices in transfusion].

    PubMed

    Andreu, Georges

    2015-02-01

    Each year, more than three millions of blood components are transfused to more than five hundred thousand patients in France. The optimal use of blood components requires that physicians prescribing blood components master the clinical indications of red blood cells concentrates, platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma. In addition, physicians in charge of blood component prescription should provide adequate pre- and post-transfusion information to their patients. Compliance of blood components administration in patients with safety guidelines contributes as well to their optimal use. In addition, for each blood component transfused, a proper evaluation of its safety and its efficacy should be done. Finally, a regular evaluation of transfusion practice in hospital services were blood components are used, through audits made in cooperation with their blood component provider, either blood transfusion centre or the hospital blood bank, enables to appreciate the level of compliance with safety and clinical guidelines, and more globally how the transfusion process is mastered.

  2. Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  3. Richard Lower: the origins of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Fastag, Eduardo; Varon, Joseph; Sternbach, George

    2013-06-01

    Millions of blood transfusions are performed yearly worldwide. With respect to its historical origins, this practice began in the 17(th) century with an English physician. In 1666, Richard Lower reported the first successful transfusion between animals. The first transfusion in a human patient was performed the following year by Jean Baptiste Denis, a French physician. That same year, Lower transfused blood from a lamb into the bloodstream of a clergyman named Arthur Coga. However, the practice was subsequently abandoned for hundreds of years. Safe transfusion awaited the recognition of blood types and cross-matching, and did not occur until early in the 20(th) century. A number of other advances in transfusion therapy have followed, and more are in development.

  4. Pulmonary consequences of transfusion: TRALI and TACO.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2006-06-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload are important, life-threatening complications of transfusion. Each adversely impact hospital length of stay and cost of healthcare. TRALI is clinically indistinguishable from the adult respiratory distress syndrome but it has a more favorable prognosis. Approximately 10% of TRALI patients die from this complication. The at-risk patient for TRALI has not been identified. The most commonly cited incidence is 1:5000 plasma-containing blood component transfusions. Although several pathways may lead to TRALI, passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is currently the most important association. TACO occurs in 1-8% of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. It is precipitated by positive fluid balance and high transfusion flow rates. TACO is characterized by respiratory distress and acute pulmonary edema.

  5. Reduction of exposure to blood donors in preterm infants submitted to red blood cell transfusions using pediatric satellite packs

    PubMed Central

    Uezima, Cristina Lika; Barreto, Ariane Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Bordin, José Orlando; Barros, Melca Maria O.; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In preterm newborn infants transfused with erythrocytes stored up to 28 days, to compare the reduction of blood donor exposure in two groups of infants classified according to birth weight. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with preterm infants with birth weight <1000g (Group 1) and 1000-1499g (Group 2), born between April, 2008 and December, 2009. Neonates submitted to exchange transfusions, emergency erythrocyte transfusion, or those who died in the first 24 hours of life were excluded. Transfusions were indicated according to the local guideline using pediatric transfusion satellite bags. Demographic and clinical data, besides number of transfusions and donors were assessed. . Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with multiple transfusions. RESULTS: 30 and 48 neonates were included in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The percentage of newborns with more than one erythrocyte transfusion (90 versus 11%), the median number of transfusions (3 versus 1) and the median of blood donors (2 versus 1) were higher in Group 1 (p<0.001), compared to Group 2. Among those with multiple transfusions, 14 (82%) and one (50%) presented 50% reduction in the number of blood donors, respectively in Groups 1 and 2. Factors associated with multiple transfusions were: birth weight <1000g (OR 11.91; 95%CI 2.14-66.27) and presence of arterial umbilical catheter (OR 8.59; 95%CI 1.94-38.13), adjusted for confounders. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of pediatrics satellites bags on blood donor reduction was higher in preterm infants with birth weight <1000g. PMID:24142309

  6. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

  7. [CD36 Antigen Deficiency and Platelet Transfusion].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yan; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Wei-Dong

    2016-06-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, a multi-ligand receptor, possesses various biological functions. CD36 deficiency may stimulate the body to produce anti-CD36 alloimmune antibodies through the several pathways, such as blood transfusion, pregnancy or organ transplantation and so on, leading to the refractoriness of immune platelet transfusion and other diseases. The recent research advances of CD36 deficiency and its molecular biological basis, platelet transfusion and CD36 antibody detection are summarized briefey in this review.

  8. Perioperative blood transfusion: the role of allogenous and autologous transfusions, and pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Khan, Wasim S; Maruthainar, Nimalan

    2010-08-01

    The decision to transfuse patients perioperatively is made on an individual basis and should consider factors such as duration and severity of anaemia, symptoms, physiological parameters and comorbidities. Autologous blood transfusion has the benefit of avoiding some of the immunological and infective complications associated with allogenic blood transfusion. Pharmacological agents as well as anaesthetic and surgical techniques have a role in avoiding the need for blood transfusion.

  9. The Impact of Platelet Transfusion in Massively Transfused Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    packed red blood cells [PRBC] within 24 hours of admission). Mortality was evaluated according to 4 apheresis platelet (aPLT):PRBC ratios: Low ratio (1...a massive transfusion, as the apheresis platelet -to-red cell ratio increased, a stepwise improvement in survival was seen. Prospective evaluation of...6.6 9.9 5.5 9.6 0.001 *FFP:PRBC ratio (%) (units FFP/units PRBC) 100. aPLT, apheresis platelets ; FFP, fresh frozen plasma; PRBC, packed red

  10. Hemolysis after ABO-incompatible platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Chow, M P; Yung, C H; Hu, H Y; Tzeng, C H

    1991-08-01

    An 18 year old girl, with acute myeloid leukemia, developed progressive hemolysis after receiving multiple transfusions with ABO-incompatible platelets. It was caused by passive transfusion of anti-A and -B isoagglutinin from the donor plasma. Her hemoglobin level returned to normal after giving group compatible or pooled and reduced volume platelet concentrates. Transfusing group-incompatible platelets is not contraindicated, but donor plasma reduction should be considered for those patients who need prolonged platelet support. Testing for isoagglutinin titer in group O donors is an alternate method to reduce the incidence of plasma-induced hemolysis in group-incompatible platelet transfusions.

  11. [Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database.

  12. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  13. As a toxin dies a prion comes to life: A tentative natural history of the [Het-s] prion

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Saupe, Sven J

    2015-01-01

    A variety of signaling pathways, in particular with roles in cell fate and host defense, operate by a prion-like mechanism consisting in the formation of open-ended oligomeric signaling complexes termed signalosomes. This mechanism emerges as a novel paradigm in signal transduction. Among the proteins forming such signaling complexes are the Nod-like receptors (NLR), involved in innate immunity. It now appears that the [Het-s] fungal prion derives from such a cell-fate defining signaling system controlled by a fungal NLR. What was once considered as an isolated oddity turns out to be related to a conserved and widespread signaling mechanism. Herein, we recall the relation of the [Het-s] prion to the signal transduction pathway controlled by the NWD2 Nod-like receptor, leading to activation of the HET-S pore-forming cell death execution protein. We explicit an evolutionary scenario in which formation of the [Het-s] prion is the result of an exaptation process or how a loss-of-function mutation in a pore-forming cell death execution protein (HET-S) has given birth to a functional prion ([Het-s]). PMID:26110610

  14. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  15. Blood transfusion reactions; evaluation of 462 transfusions at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arewa, O P; Akinola, N O; Salawu, L

    2009-06-01

    The immuno-haematological safety of blood remains an important and recurring issue in blood transfusion practice. Data concerning morbidity and mortality from blood transfusion is sparse in Nigeria however and while the current efforts at reduction in the incidence of adverse consequence of blood transfusion is encapsulated in the concept of Haemovigilance, the Nigerian blood transfusion service is yet to institute the practice. A prospective study of 462 transfusions at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital was done to evaluate the incidence and pattern of transfusion reactions in the hospital. The overall incidence of transfusion reactions is 8.7% (40 cases), with febrile nonhaemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) constituting 65% of these. The incidence of adverse reaction is significantly related to a positive history of previous transfusion (p = 0.0039). Efforts must be sustained at evolving a system to minimize the incidence and consequences. The development of a haemovigilance system in which data regarding all transfusions carried out in Nigerian hospitals is collated and analyzed is necessary. The advent of the National Blood Transfusion Service (N.B.T.S) in Nigeria with Zonal centres in the six geopolitical zones of the country offers an opportunity for setting up a national haemovigilance programme.

  16. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  17. Transfusion medicine in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Santoso, J T; Lin, D W; Miller, D S

    1995-06-01

    Obstetricians and Gynecologists care for many patients with conditions potentially requiring blood transfusions. Cesarean section and hysterectomy are the two surgeries performed most frequently and both have the potential for blood loss requiring transfusion. Other examples include postpartum hemorrhage, placenta previa, and ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Obstetricians and gynecologists need to become knowledgeable about the ever-changing aspects of blood transfusion and apply it in their clinical practice. This review intends to update obstetricians and gynecologists and other health care professionals about the basic as well as the latest technologies of blood transfusion. The different types of blood components are discussed including their preparation, indications, risks, and benefits. The complications of blood transfusion and their management are reviewed, including infections, noninfectious, and immunological etiologies. HIV and hepatitis are explored, these being the most serious infectious risks of transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion, an underutilized option, is examined. Hemodilution and intraoperative blood salvage, other techniques for using the patient's own blood, are discussed. Finally, synthetic agents such as erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, factors, desmopressin acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, and new products are introduced as potential replacements to blood transfusion in the future.

  18. Transfusion-related sepsis: a silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J

    2016-01-28

    In this issue of Blood, Hong et al advocate for use of additional US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved safety measures for transfusion. Most patients transfused with contaminated platelets do not show immediate clinical signs. Active surveillance suggests patient risk 10- to 40-fold higher than passive hemovigilance.

  19. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  20. No CLL transmission through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Hjalgrim et al used the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2) database, which includes comprehensive information on donors and recipients of >20 million blood products handled by the Danish and Swedish blood banks between 1968 and 2010, to address the clinically relevant question of whether chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is transmitted through blood transfusions.

  1. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    PubMed

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety.

  2. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  3. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain.

  4. Decreased damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia by transfusion of zero-link hemoglobin polymers in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Toshiaki; Nemoto, Masaaki; Kwansa, Herman; Sampei, Kenji; Habeeb, Murtuza; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transfusion of large polymers of hemoglobin avoids the peripheral extravasation and hypertension associated with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin transfusion and may be more effective in rescuing brain from focal ischemia. Effects of transfusion of high-oxygen affinity, bovine hemoglobin polymers of different weight ranges were determined. Methods Hypervolemic exchange transfusion was performed during two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Results Compared to transfusion with a 5% albumin solution or no transfusion, infarct volume was reduced 40% by transfusion of a 6% solution containing hemoglobin polymers in the nominal range 500–14000 kDa. Infarct volume was not significantly reduced by transfusion of a lower concentration of 2–3% of this size range of polymers, 6% hemoglobin solutions without removal of polymers <500 kDa or >14000 kDa, or crosslinked hemoglobin tetramers with normal oxygen affinity. Exchange transfusion with the 6% solution of the 500–14000 kDa hemoglobin polymers did not improve the distribution of cerebral blood flow during focal ischemia and, in mice without ischemia, did not affect flow to brain or other major organs. Conclusion An intermediate size range of polymerized bovine hemoglobin possessing high oxygen affinity appears optimal for rescuing mouse brain from transient focal cerebral ischemia. A minimum concentration of a 6% solution is required, the rescue is superior to that obtained with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin possessing normal oxygen affinity, and tissue salvage is not associated with increased blood flow. This polymer solution avoids the adverse effects of severe renal and splanchnic vasoconstriction seen with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin. PMID:18988905

  5. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  6. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322 580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21 413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a ‘back to basics’ approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  7. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  8. Notification of transfusion transmitted infection.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Lincoln P; Tetali, Shailaja

    2008-01-01

    The National Blood Policy of India, 2002, advocates the disclosure of results of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI) to blood donors. However, in the absence of well-defined notification processes, and in order to avoid serious consequences resulting from unguided disclosure, blood bank personnel discard blood that is TTI-positive. We report on a survey of 105 voluntary blood donors in Kerala. Only two out of three participants had filled the donor form in the last year. Only half were aware that the blood bank was supposed to inform them if they tested positive for TTI. Fifty-seven per cent of donors wanted to be informed every time they donated blood, irrespective of a positive or negative result.

  9. The transfusion medicine we want.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics.This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

  10. Blood transfusion and infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith A; Acker, Michael A; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Gelijns, Annetine C; Michler, Robert E; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O; O'Gara, Patrick T; Moskowitz, Alan J; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. In all, 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60 ± 5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBC) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (p < 0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (p = 0.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and preoperative and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections.

  11. Highly Efficient Prion Transmission by Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbière, Fabien; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Schelcher, François; Vilette, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Lacroux, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of v-CJD by blood and blood derived products by transfusion rely on infectious titers measured in rodent models of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) using intra-cerebral (IC) inoculation of blood components. To address the biological relevance of this approach, we compared the efficiency of TSE transmission by blood and blood components when administrated either through transfusion in sheep or by intra-cerebral inoculation (IC) in transgenic mice (tg338) over-expressing ovine PrP. Transfusion of 200 µL of blood from asymptomatic infected donor sheep transmitted prion disease with 100% efficiency thereby displaying greater virulence than the transfusion of 200 mL of normal blood spiked with brain homogenate material containing 103ID50 as measured by intracerebral inoculation of tg338 mice (ID50 IC in tg338). This was consistent with a whole blood titer greater than 103.6 ID50 IC in tg338 per mL. However, when the same blood samples were assayed by IC inoculation into tg338 the infectious titers were less than 32 ID per mL. Whereas the transfusion of crude plasma to sheep transmitted the disease with limited efficacy, White Blood Cells (WBC) displayed a similar ability to whole blood to infect recipients. Strikingly, fixation of WBC with paraformaldehyde did not affect the infectivity titer as measured in tg338 but dramatically impaired disease transmission by transfusion in sheep. These results demonstrate that TSE transmission by blood transfusion can be highly efficient and that this efficiency is more dependent on the viability of transfused cells than the level of infectivity measured by IC

  12. Anemia, Apnea of Prematurity, and Blood Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Zagol, Kelley; Lake, Douglas E.; Vergales, Brooke; Moorman, Marion E.; Paget-Brown, Alix; Lee, Hoshik; Rusin, Craig G.; Delos, John B.; Clark, Matthew T.; Moorman, J. Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the frequency and severity of apneic events in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants before and after blood transfusions using continuous electronic waveform analysis. Study design We continuously collected waveform, heart rate, and oxygen saturation data from patients in all 45 neonatal intensive care unit beds at the University of Virginia for 120 weeks. Central apneas were detected using continuous computer processing of chest impedance, electrocardiographic, and oximetry signals. Apnea was defined as respiratory pauses of >10, >20, and >30 seconds when accompanied by bradycardia (<100 beats per minute) and hypoxemia (<80% oxyhemoglobin saturation as detected by pulse oximetry). Times of packed red blood cell transfusions were determined from bedside charts. Two cohorts were analyzed. In the transfusion cohort, waveforms were analyzed for 3 days before and after the transfusion for all VLBW infants who received a blood transfusion while also breathing spontaneously. Mean apnea rates for the previous 12 hours were quantified and differences for 12 hours before and after transfusion were compared. In the hematocrit cohort, 1453 hematocrit values from all VLBW infants admitted and breathing spontaneously during the time period were retrieved, and the association of hematocrit and apnea in the next 12 hours was tested using logistic regression. Results Sixty-seven infants had 110 blood transfusions during times when complete monitoring data were available. Transfusion was associated with fewer computer-detected apneic events (P < .01). Probability of future apnea occurring within 12 hours increased with decreasing hematocrit values (P < .001). Conclusions Blood transfusions are associated with decreased apnea in VLBW infants, and apneas are less frequent at higher hematocrits. PMID:22494873

  13. Origins and Evolution of the HET-s Prion-Forming Protein: Searching for Other Amyloid-Forming Solenoids

    PubMed Central

    Gendoo, Deena M. A.; Harrison, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The HET-s prion-forming domain from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina is gaining considerable interest since it yielded the first well-defined atomic structure of a functional amyloid fibril. This structure has been identified as a left-handed beta solenoid with a triangular hydrophobic core. To delineate the origins of the HET-s prion-forming protein and to discover other amyloid-forming proteins, we searched for all homologs of the HET-s protein in a database of protein domains and fungal genomes, using a combined application of HMM, psi-blast and pGenThreader techniques, and performed a comparative evolutionary analysis of the N-terminal alpha-helical domain and the C-terminal prion-forming domain of HET-s. By assessing the tandem evolution of both domains, we observed that the prion-forming domain is restricted to Sordariomycetes, with a marginal additional sequence homolog in Arthroderma otae as a likely case of horizontal transfer. This suggests innovation and rapid evolution of the solenoid fold in the Sordariomycetes clade. In contrast, the N-terminal domain evolves at a slower rate (in Sordariomycetes) and spans many diverse clades of fungi. We performed a full three-dimensional protein threading analysis on all identified HET-s homologs against the HET-s solenoid fold, and present detailed structural annotations for identified structural homologs to the prion-forming domain. An analysis of the physicochemical characteristics in our set of structural models indicates that the HET-s solenoid shape can be readily adopted in these homologs, but that they are all less optimized for fibril formation than the P. anserina HET-s sequence itself, due chiefly to the presence of fewer asparagine ladders and salt bridges. Our combined structural and evolutionary analysis suggests that the HET-s shape has “limited scope” for amyloidosis across the wider protein universe, compared to the ‘generic’ left-handed beta helix. We discuss the implications of

  14. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments.

  15. Red cell transfusion "trigger": a review.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Marian

    2003-07-01

    Despite the publication of several consensus guidelines that set forth recommendations for the transfusion of red cells, actual clinical practice continues to vary widely. Animal data and studies in human volunteers and patients support a red cell transfusion threshold of 7 to 8 g/dl in most patients. However, conflicting data, particularly in cardiac patients and in the elderly, suggest that it may be impossible to define a single red cell "trigger" for all patients. A well-designed, randomized, controlled trial is still needed to establish a safe threshold for red cell transfusion in adults with coronary artery disease.

  16. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  17. Timing and Location of Blood Product Transfusion and Outcomes in Massively Transfused Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Apheresis platelets ; resuscitation; massive transfusion; combat trauma. S ince Damage Control surgery...patient mor- tality associated with increased transfusion of apheresis pla- telets (aPLT) led the United States Army Surgeon General to mandate platelet ...4. Perkins JG, Cap AP, Spinella PC, et al. An evaluation of the impact of apheresis platelets used in the setting of massively transfused trauma

  18. The hazards of blood transfusion in historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning of the modern era of blood transfusion coincided with World War II and the resultant need for massive blood replacement. Soon thereafter, the hazards of transfusion, particularly hepatitis and hemolytic transfusion reactions, became increasingly evident. The past half century has seen the near eradication of transfusion-associated hepatitis as well as the emergence of multiple new pathogens, most notably HIV. Specific donor screening assays and other interventions have minimized, but not eliminated, infectious disease transmission. Other transfusion hazards persist, including human error resulting in the inadvertent transfusion of incompatible blood, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), and transfusion-induced immunomodulation. These infectious and noninfectious hazards are reviewed briefly in the context of their historical evolution. PMID:18809775

  19. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play.

  20. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation.

  1. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  2. Evolution in a centralized transfusion service.

    PubMed

    AuBuchon, James P; Linauts, Sandra; Vaughan, Mimi; Wagner, Jeffrey; Delaney, Meghan; Nester, Theresa

    2011-12-01

    The metropolitan Seattle area has utilized a centralized transfusion service model throughout the modern era of blood banking. This approach has used four laboratories to serve over 20 hospitals and clinics, providing greater capabilities for all at a lower consumption of resources than if each depended on its own laboratory and staff for these functions. In addition, this centralized model has facilitated wider use of the medical capabilities of the blood center's physicians, and a county-wide network of transfusion safety officers is now being developed to increase the impact of the blood center's transfusion expertise at the patient's bedside. Medical expectations and traffic have led the blood center to evolve the centralized model to include on-site laboratories at facilities with complex transfusion requirements (e.g., a children's hospital) and to implement in all the others a system of remote allocation. This new capability places a refrigerator stocked with uncrossmatched units in the hospital but retains control over the dispensing of these through the blood center's computer system; the correct unit can be electronically cross-matched and released on demand, obviating the need for transportation to the hospital and thus speeding transfusion. This centralized transfusion model has withstood the test of time and continues to evolve to meet new situations and ensure optimal patient care.

  3. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  4. Plasma exchange in the treatment of immune disease.

    PubMed

    Branda, R F; Moldow, C F; McCullough, J J; Jacob, H S

    1975-01-01

    Plasma exchange was investigated as an alternative to the use of toxic drugs to remove unwanted antibody. Studies in rabbits immunized with bovine serum albumin demonstrate that exchange transfusion after a primary immunization results in a rebound of antibody to above preexchange levels. However, exchange transfusion seven, 11, or 18 days after secondary immunization results in permanent lowering of antibody levels. Plasma exchange with the continuous flow centrifuge was used in four patients with hematologic diseases. White cell isoantibodies were removed in a septic leukopenic patient, permitting white cell transfusions. Two patients with immune thrombocytopenia were exchanges; one showed prompt and permanent elevation of platelet count, while the other did not improve. A patient with immune hemolytic anemia had stabilization of hemoglobin levels and decreased Coombs reactivity following plasma exchange.

  5. Transfusion and component characteristics are not associated with allergic transfusion reactions to apheresis platelets

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J.; Tobian, Aaron A.R.; Savage, Jessica H.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Borge, P. Dayand; Kaufman, Richard M.; Ness, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related characteristics have been hypothesized to cause allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) but they have not been thoroughly studied. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the associations of infusion rate, infusion volume, ABO mismatching, component age, and premedication with the incidence and severity of ATRs. A secondary objective is to compare the risk of these attributes relative to the previously reported risk factor for aeroallergen sensitization in transfusion recipients, as measured by an aeroallergen-specific IgE antibody screen. Study Design and Methods Clinical and transfusion-related data were collected on subjects with reported ATRs and uneventful (control) apheresis platelet transfusions over a combined 21 month period at two academic medical centers. Control transfusions were selected as the next uneventful transfusion after an ATR was reported. Logistic regression, Mann-Whitney and t tests were used to assess associations with ATRs. Previously reported aeroallergen-specific IgE screening data was incorporated into a multivariable logistic regression. Results 143 ATRs and 61 control transfusions were evaluated among 168 subjects, ages 2-86 years. Infusion rate, infusion volume, ABO mismatching, component age, and premedication showed no statistically significant association with ATRs (P>0.05). Neither infusion rate nor infusion volume increased the risk of anaphylaxis vs. mucocutaneous only ATRs. Aeroallergen sensitization has previously been associated with ATRs. After controlling for transfusion-related covariates, aeroallergen sensitization remained statistically significantly associated with ATRs (OR 2.68, 95%CI: 1.26-5.69). Conclusions Transfusion and component-specific attributes are not associated with ATRs. An allergic predisposition in transfusion recipients is associated most strongly with ATR risk. PMID:25209730

  6. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-01-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal. PMID:25535417

  7. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication.

  8. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger contributes to stool transport in mice with experimental diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    NISHIYAMA, Kazuhiro; TANIOKA, Kohta; AZUMA, Yasu-Taka; HAYASHI, Satomi; FUJIMOTO, Yasuyuki; YOSHIDA, Natsuho; KITA, Satomi; SUZUKI, Sho; NAKAJIMA, Hidemitsu; IWAMOTO, Takahiro; TAKEUCHI, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) is a bidirectional transporter that is controlled by membrane potential and transmembrane gradients of Na+ and Ca2+. To reveal the functional role of NCX on gastrointestinal motility, we have previously used NCX1 and NCX2 heterozygote knockout mice (HET). We found that NCX1 and NCX2 play important roles in the motility of the gastric fundus, ileum and distal colon. Therefore, we believed that NCX1 and NCX2 play an important role in transport of intestinal contents. Here, we investigated the role of NCX in a mouse model of drug-induced diarrhea. The fecal consistencies in NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET were assessed using a diarrhea induced by magnesium sulfate, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET, exacerbated magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea by increasing watery fecals. Likewise, 5-HT-induced diarrheas were exacerbated in NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET. However, NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET demonstrated PGE2 induced diarrhea similar to those of wild-type mice (WT). As well as the result of the distal colon shown previously, in the proximal and transverse colons of WT, the myenteric plexus layers and the longitudinal and circular muscle layers were strongly immunoreactive to NCX1 and NCX2. In this study, we demonstrate that NCX2 has important roles in development of diarrhea. PMID:27928109

  9. Transfusion Associated Microchimerism: The Hybrid Within

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Evan M; Jackman, Rachael P; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Busch, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Microchimerism, the coexistence of genetically disparate populations of cells in a receptive host, is well described in both clinical and physiological settings, including transplantation and pregnancy. Microchimerism can also occur following allogeneic blood transfusion in traumatically injured patients, where donor cells have been observed decades after transfusion. To date, transfusion-associated microchimerism (TA-MC) appears confined to this clinical subset, most likely due to the immune perturbations that occur following severe trauma that allow foreign donor cells to survive. TA-MC appears to be unaffected by leukoreduction and has been documented following transfusion with an array of blood products. The only significant predictor of TA-MC to date is the age of red cells, with fresher units associated with higher risk. Thus far, no adverse clinical effect has been observed in limited studies of TA-MC. There are, however, hypothesized links to transfusion-associated graft vs. host disease (TA-GvHD) that may be unrecognized and consequently under-reported. Microchimerism in other settings has gained increasing attention due to a plausible link to autoimmune diseases, as well as its diagnostic and therapeutic potential vis-a-vis ante-natal testing and adoptive immunotherapy, respectively. Furthermore, microchimerism provides a tool to further our understanding of immune tolerance and regulation. PMID:23102759

  10. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  11. A case study of recipient twin surviving complications of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Squires, Linda Sharee

    2013-10-01

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) has a high rate of mortality and morbidity. This article describes the clinical course of a recipient twin in a case of TTTS. The twin was on long-term respiration support and survived two resuscitations, pneumothorax, chest tube placement, blood exchange, necrotizing enterocolitis and corrective surgery. This case demonstrates that the effective use of a collaborative, multidisciplinary care approach between two hospitals can result in a newborn surviving a severe case of TTTS.

  12. [Management of massive transfusion - the role of the blood transfusion service].

    PubMed

    Sone, Shinji; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Massive transfusion (hemorrhage) is defined as blood transfusion exceeding the circulatory blood volume within 24 hours. Here, we investigated cases of massive transfusion, defined as transfusion of more than 21 units of red blood cells within 24 hours, in our institution in the period from August 2005 to March 2013. Massive transfusion accounted for approximately 1% of all blood transfusions in our institution, and the majority were cardiac surgery cases (75%), with 80% of the cases receiving blood transfusion irtfhe operating theater. Brain-dead heart and liver transplantations were started in our hospital in 2006. Due to the revision of the Organ Transplantation Law in July 2010, brain-dead organ donations increased in Japan. Massive transfusion was required in approximately 47% of heart and 41% of liver transplants, with 44% of the transplants being conducted on holidays, and 47% at night. Therefore, the implementation of a 24-hour duty system for medical technologists, including holidays, is essential for the prompt testing and supply of blood products. For improvement of the safety of blood supply, a computer network system, connecting the blood control system of the blood transfusion service, the anesthetic system of the operating theater, and the hospital general medical system, was implemented in our hospital in March 2007. In the operating theater, anesthetists can request blood products, order new blood products, cross-check the provided blood products, and register their use, using this system. At the blood transfusion service, the blood products to be provided are cross- checked against the anesthetists' requests. Through this system, the anesthetists and blood transfusion service staff can check the list of blood products available for the surgical patient as well as those already transfused, on a real-time basis. For analysis of the improvements achieved, we compared the number of non-used blood units, i.e., the number of those provided minus the

  13. The appropriateness of blood transfusion following primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Joy, PJ; Bennet, SJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant proportion of all red cell transfusions are given to patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. Concern over transfusion safety and cost, coupled with evidence showing that restrictive transfusion policies benefit patients, prompted us to audit our blood prescribing practice at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to assess the appropriateness of every transfusion episode following elective primary total hip replacement. METHODS All patients undergoing a primary total hip replacement in our department over a six-month period were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively using case note examination and transfusion service data. Standards were dictated by the British Orthopaedic Association guidelines on blood conservation in elective orthopaedic surgery. RESULTS Twenty-seven per cent of patients (39/143) were transfused. Forty-six per cent of these (18/39) were transfused inappropriately and twenty-three per cent (9/39) appropriately. Thirteen per cent (5/39) had a valid indication for transfusion but were over-transfused and in eighteen per cent (7/39) the quality of documentation did not allow an assessment to be made. Fifty-two per cent of patients who had surgical drains (29/56) were transfused. Reaudit following staff education and amendments to the local transfusion policy did not demonstrate a reduction in transfusion rates. CONCLUSIONS This audit showed that significant potential exists for reducing transfusion rates based on optimising prescribing practice alone. It also demonstrated that changing local practice based on audit data can be challenging. PMID:22507728

  14. When to consider transfusion therapy for patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Taher, A T; Radwan, A; Viprakasit, V

    2015-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) refers to all thalassaemia disease phenotypes that do not require regular blood transfusions for survival. Thalassaemia disorders were traditionally concentrated along the tropical belt stretching from sub-Saharan Africa through the Mediterranean region and the Middle East to South and South-East Asia, but global migration has led to increased incidence in North America and Northern Europe. Transfusionists may be familiar with β-thalassaemia major because of the lifelong transfusions needed by these patients. Although patients with NTDT do not require regular transfusions for survival, they may require transfusions in some instances such as pregnancy, infection or growth failure. The complications associated with NTDT can be severe if not properly managed, and many are directly related to chronic anaemia. Awareness of NTDT is important, and this review will outline the factors that should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to initiate and properly plan for transfusion therapy in these patients in terms of transfusion interval and duration of treatment.

  15. Blood transfusion in trauma patients: unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    Cushing, M; Shaz, B H

    2011-03-01

    Massive transfusion is an essential part of resuscitation efforts in acute trauma patients. The goal is to quickly correct trauma-induced coagulopathy and replace red blood cell (RBC) mass with the minimal number as well as the appropriate choice of blood components to minimize the possible adverse effects of transfusions. Early trauma induced coagulopathy (ETIC) is present in about 20% of patients upon hospital admission and predicts for decreased survival. The mechanism of ETIC is still being elucidated; however, most theories of ETIC's pathophysiology justify the early use of plasma. Most massive transfusion protocol (MTP) ratios deliver blood products in a ratio of 1:1:1 for RBCs:plasma:platelets, which is supported by the majority of the literature demonstrating improved patient survival with higher ratios (>1 plasma and platelet for every 2 RBCs transfused). Indeed, formula-driven MTPs allow trauma services to react quickly to ETIC and provide coagulation factors and platelets in these ratios without having to wait for the results of coagulation assays while the patient's coagulopathy worsens. New MTPs are being created which are adjusted according to an individual's coagulation laboratory values based on point-of-care laboratory tests, such as thromboelastography. When creating an MTP, product wastage due to inappropriate activation and improper product storage should be considered and closely monitored. Another area of discussion regarding transfusion in trauma includes the potential association of prolonged storage of RBCs and adverse outcomes, which has yet to be confirmed. Significant progress has been made in the transfusion management of trauma patients, but further studies are required to optimize patient care and outcomes.

  16. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed.

  17. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... will have a reaction after the transfusion. Iron Overload Getting many blood transfusions can cause too much iron to build up in your blood (iron overload). People who have a blood disorder like thalassemia , ...

  18. [Preventing deficiencies in the transfusion process].

    PubMed

    Hergon, E; Rouger, P; Garnerin, P

    1994-01-01

    The methods of system reliability analysis represent an interesting set of tools used to follow the so-called "transfusion process", defined as all the steps from donors sensitization to recipients follow-up. FMECA, (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis), can be used as a prevention tool, independently of any dysfunction in the process. Of course, it can equally be used following a failure, in order to analyse the causes and to apply the specific corrections. Quality insurance, system reliability analysis, epidemiologic surveillance and safety monitoring operate in synergy. These three issues pertaining to transfusion safety constitute a dynamic system.

  19. Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J; Tobian, Aaron AR; Savage, Jessica H; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T; Ness, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multi-factorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed. PMID:22998777

  20. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease: a serious residual risk of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Martha J; Blackall, Douglas P

    2005-11-01

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is well recognized as an uncommon, but frequently fatal, adverse effect of blood component therapy. In this disorder, viable donor lymphocytes transfused to a vulnerable patient orchestrate a devastating attack on the recipient's tissues. In contrast to the striking reduction in infectious risks of blood transfusion, a significant residual risk of TA-GVHD remains. This article reviews the pathogenesis and mechanism of TA-GVHD, which provide the foundation for a prevention strategy. A review of selected recent cases illustrates the challenges faced in the identification, prevention, and treatment of this frustrating disorder.

  1. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion. PMID:28127478

  2. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Puch, Irene; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B; Remy, Kenneth E; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A; Kelley, Walter E; Popovsky, Mark A; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2014-02-27

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P < .05 for interactions). Washing older units of blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes.

  3. Transfusion under triple threat: Lessons from Japan's 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Kenneth E; Komazawa, Tomoko; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011 provoked tsunami waves with inland penetration up to 5 km and run-up heights to 40 m. More than 400 km(2) were flooded, mainly along the northeast coast of Japan's largest island, Honshu. Nearly 20,000 human lives were abruptly taken by this natural disaster. Four coastal nuclear facilities went into automatic shutdown; at one, Fukushima Daiichi, cooling system failures resulted in the meltdown of three reactor cores, accompanied by explosive release of radioisotopes. Essentials of modern blood banking and transfusion medicine were lost: roads, vehicles, blood collection venues, and facilities for blood testing and processing. Normal channels of communication were interrupted, not only by physical damage but also due to circuit overload as mobile phone users sought information and tried to exchange messages about their own and others' health, welfare, and whereabouts. The Japanese Red Cross, as a monopoly supplier of allogeneic blood, responded with a nationally coordinated effort that met the transfusion demands of a disaster characterized by immediate mass fatality rather than mass injury. Japan's routine transfusion demands are also met by hospital-based autologous blood programs, which could be pressed into service for emergency allogeneic collections. Herein we report institutional and personal experience in anticipation of future disasters, in which transfusion needs might differ from routine demand.

  4. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B.; Remy, Kenneth E.; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A.; Kelley, Walter E.; Popovsky, Mark A.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Klein, Harvey G.; Natanson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P < .05 for interactions). Washing older units of blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes. PMID:24366359

  5. Bacteriological Controls at Czechoslovakia Blood Transfusion Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-07-01

    and tremor appear. 2. During the second state (30-60 minutes after the be- ginning of the transfusion) sudden chills appear, which last 10-30 minutes...by increased muscular rigidity. 4. The fourth phase is of shock, disappearance of vasomotor regulation, strong orthostatic hypotension with peripheral

  6. Transfusion-acquired AIDS in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yao, C; Wang, W W; Chung, Y M; Su, Y L; Liu, C Y; Chen, Y M

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be transmitted through blood transfusion. The first transfusion-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient in Taiwan was a 46-year-old woman who received two units of whole blood during a hysterectomy at a provincial hospital in 1985. In 1991, she experienced a herpes zoster infection. In March 1993, she had extensive herpetic gingivostomatitis and another herpes zoster attack, and was treated at the same hospital. Two months later, she had oral candidiasis and was treated at a medical center. She was not tested for HIV-1 infection until she developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in June 1993. In February 1994, and developed cytomegalovirus retinitis and died 6 months later. Donor blood given to the patients during the hysterectomy was HIV-1 positive. The donor's HIV infection was discovered in 1991 and he died of AIDS in 1993. As blood centers in Taiwan did not start screening for HIV-1 until January 1988, it is urgently recommended that any individual who received a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 in Taiwan and who currently experiences repeated episodes of opportunistic infections have an HIV-1 blood test. The receipt of a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 should be listed by the Department of Health as an indication for HIV-1 screening.

  7. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  8. Red blood cell transfusion in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G; Spahn, Donat R; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-04

    Every year, about 75 million units of blood are collected worldwide. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is one of the few treatments that adequately restore tissue oxygenation when oxygen demand exceeds supply. Although the respiratory function of blood has been studied intensively, the trigger for RBC transfusion remains controversial, and doctors rely primarily on clinical experience. Laboratory assays that indicate failing tissue oxygenation would be ideal to guide the need for transfusion, but none has proved easy, reproducible, and sensitive to regional tissue hypoxia. The clinical importance of the RBCs storage lesion (ie, the time-dependent metabolic, biochemical, and molecular changes that stored blood cells undergo) is poorly understood. RBCs can be filtered, washed, frozen, or irradiated for specific indications. Donor screening and testing have dramatically reduced infectious risks in the developed world, but infection remains a major hazard in developing countries, where 13 million units of blood are not tested for HIV or hepatitis viruses. Pathogen inactivation techniques are in clinical trials for RBCs, but none is available for use. Despite serious immunological and non-immunological complications, RBC transfusion holds a therapeutic index that exceeds that of many common medications.

  9. [Transfusion of plasma: products-indications].

    PubMed

    Djoudi, R

    2013-05-01

    The use of therapeutic plasma has increased in France by more than 40% since 2002. This growth may be explained by the improvement in transfusion safety, the diminution of the risk of transmission of pathogens and the regained confidence of the physicians in blood products. Therapeutic plasma also benefits from additional procedures to reduce infectious (securisation) or immunological risks (selection of blood donors). Its application in massive transfusions has undergone a significant evolution over the last few years. A proactive attitude favouring early and important use of plasma on the basis of pre-established protocols is advocated henceforth. The prescription of therapeutic plasma for other indications must be guided by the results of biological tests and an evaluation of the haemorrhagic risk. Despite regular updating of the guidelines for good transfusion practice, plasma is still sometimes prescribed for prophylactic purposes in situations where the biological and/or clinical criteria do not justify it. Moreover, it is not recommended to use fresh frozen plasma in cases of deficiency of coagulation factors if the specific concentrates are available as intravenous fluids. Complementary clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate, in certain indications, the real benefits of the transfusion of plasma and the interest of replacing it by concentrates of coagulant factors (fibrinogen, prothrombin complex).

  10. Utilization management in the blood transfusion service.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter Sunny

    2014-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center.

  11. [Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain.

  12. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  13. [Consent to transfusion of blood and hemoderivatives].

    PubMed

    Massaro, A L; Alba, E; Ragonesi, G; Colla, F; Barbini, V; Corvetto, L; D'Addato, F

    2002-04-01

    The transfusion of blood or hemoderivatives is a medical procedure that necessarily involves the possibility of danger or damage, given that, even with maximum prudence, diligence and expertise, it is impossible to avoid severe risks of infections, transfusional reactions, alloimmunisation, undesired immunomodulating effects, etc. Article 19 of Ministerial Decree 15/01/1991 makes it obligatory to obtain informed consent , understood as the free expression of the acceptance of treatment provided after being fully informed of the nature, possibility, risks and collateral effects of the procedure. Consent to blood transfusion can only be given by a person with full mental faculties, whereas transfusion treatment can be proposed for a minor, for a prisoner or for a person who is temporarily incapacitated by their physical conditions. The authors examine a number of problems regarding the following questions: what happens if consent is withheld? What can happen if consent is not requested or if the transfusion is performed when consent has been denied? In conclusion, it is difficult to offer operating schemes that are easy to apply: much depends on the patient's conditions, his reactions, his concerns, his trust in the doctor and the latter's communication skills.

  14. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51,440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies.

  15. Blood Transfusion Delay and Outcome in County Hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Julius; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Gachau, Susan; Makone, Boniface; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Mbevi, George; Chepkirui, Mercy; Malla, Lucas; Oliwa, Jacquie; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Severe anemia is a leading indication for blood transfusion and a major cause of hospital admission and mortality in African children. Failure to initiate blood transfusion rapidly enough contributes to anemia deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines delays in accessing blood and outcomes in transfused children in Kenyan hospitals. Children admitted with nonsurgical conditions in 10 Kenyan county hospitals participating in the Clinical Information Network who had blood transfusion ordered from September 2013 to March 2016 were studied. The delay in blood transfusion was calculated from the date when blood transfusion was prescribed to date of actual transfusion. Five percent (2,875/53,174) of admissions had blood transfusion ordered. Approximately half (45%, 1,295/2,875) of children who had blood transfusion ordered at admission had a documented hemoglobin < 5 g/dl and 36% (2,232/6,198) of all children admitted with a diagnosis of anemia were reported to have hemoglobin < 5 g/dL. Of all the ordered transfusions, 82% were administered and documented in clinical records, and three-quarters of these (75%, 1,760/2,352) were given on the same day as ordered but these proportions varied from 71% to 100% across the 10 hospitals. Children who had a transfusion ordered but did not receive the prescribed transfusion had a mortality of 20%, compared with 12% among those transfused. Malaria-associated anemia remains the leading indication for blood transfusion in acute childhood illness admissions. Delays in transfusion are common and associated with poor outcomes. Variance in delay across hospitals may be a useful indicator of health system performance. PMID:27920394

  16. Economic impact of blood transfusions: balancing cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-02-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system.

  17. Unique risks of red blood cell transfusions in very-low-birth-weight neonates: associations between early transfusion and intraventricular hemorrhage and between late transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Baer, Vickie L; Del Vecchio, Antonio; Henry, Erick

    2013-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions can be life-saving for neonates with severe anemia or active hemorrhage. However, risks of transfusions exist and should always be weighed against potential benefits. At least two transfusion risks are unique to very low birth weight neonates. The first is an association between transfusions given in the first days after birth and the subsequent occurrence of a grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage. The second is an association between "late" RBC transfusions and the subsequent occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis. Much remains to be discovered about the pathogenesis of these two outcomes. Moreover, work is needed to clearly establish whether transfusions are causatively-associated with these outcomes or are co-variables. This review will provide basic data establishing these associations and propose mechanistic explanations.

  18. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  19. Transfusion recipient epidemiology and outcomes research: possibilities for the future.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Christopher D; Blumberg, Neil; Glynn, Simone A; Ness, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) supports major research programs related to the field of transfusion medicine, which encompass blood banking, the practice of transfusion medicine itself, and cellular therapies. Specific programmatic elements have included 1) the Transfusion Medicine/Hemostasis Clinical Trials Network (TMH CTN) charged with conducting clinical trials in transfusion medicine and hemostasis; 2) the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II), which includes domestic and international efforts dedicated to blood donor safety and blood availability issues; 3) the Specialized Centers of Clinically Oriented Research (SCCOR) in Transfusion Biology and Medicine that include two major projects, the Biologic and Immunologic Aspects of Transfusion Medicine Program and the Transfusion and Lung Injury Program, and 4) the Transfusion Therapy Trial for Functional Outcomes in Cardiovascular Patients Undergoing Surgical Hip Fracture Repair (FOCUS), a Phase III clinical trial that has as its major goal to determine whether a more aggressive transfusion strategy in surgery patients with cardiovascular disease (or risk factors) is associated with improved functional recovery and decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes. Notably, none of these programs supports epidemiologic and clinical outcomes research focused on transfusion recipients. Thus, on October 31, 2007, a Working Group on Transfusion Recipient Epidemiology and Outcomes Research was convened by the NHLBI. This group was asked to discuss the current status of the field, identify critical research needs, and make recommendations to the NHLBI program staff.

  20. Buffer Loading and Chunking in Sequential Keypressing (Het Laden van de Motor Buffer Versus Het Gebruik van Motor Chunks bij Sequentieule Toetsdrukseries)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-18

    chunking in sequential keypressing (Het laden van de motor buffer versus het gebruik van motor chunks bij sequentiele toetsdrukseries) W.B. Verwey 18 maart...1994, Rapport TM 1994 B-7 TNO Technische Menskunde’, Soesterberg MANAGEMENT UITTREKSEL Dit rapport beschrijft een experiment naar de effecten van...Menakunde. Korte samenvatting van: Buffer loading and chunking in sequential keypressing (Het laden van de motor buffer versus het gebruik van motor

  1. Severe hyperkalemia following blood transfusions: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Milionis, Haralampos J; Elisaf, Moses S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding often require large volume blood transfusion. Among the various side effects of blood transfusion, the increase of potassium levels is a serious one which is often overlooked. We report a case of severe hyperkalemia in a patient with gastric bleeding after large volume transfusion of packed red blood cells. The patient had hyperkalemia at baseline associated with his receiving medication as well as acute renal failure following hypovolemia. The baseline hyperkalemia was further aggravated after massive transfusions of packed red blood cells in a short period of time. The associated pathogenetic mechanisms resulting in the increase of potassium levels are presented. A number of risk factors which increase the risk of hyperkalemia after blood transfusion are discussed. Moreover, appropriate management strategies for the prevention of blood transfusion associated hyperkalemia are also presented. Physicians should always keep in mind the possibility of hyperkalemia in cases of blood transfusion. PMID:28101452

  2. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  3. Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following whole blood transfusion from an unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Ranjan, Rajiv R; Shah, Apurva P

    2010-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

  4. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  5. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  6. [Platelet transfusion role in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Petermann, R

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal immune thrombocytopenia represent less than 5% of cases of early thrombocytopenia (early-onset<72hours post-delivery). As in adults, thrombocytopenia in neonates is defined as a platelet count less than 150G/L. They are either auto- or allo-immune. Thrombocytopenia resulting from transplacental passage of maternal antibodies directed to platelet membrane glycoproteins can be severe. The major complication of severe thrombocytopenia is bleeding and particularly intra-cranial haemorrhage and neurologic sequelea following. However, auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenia have very different characteristics including the treatment management. In fact, this treatment is based on platelet transfusion associated or not to intravenous immunoglobulin administration. The purpose of this article is to remind platelet transfusion's place in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia in terms of recently published French guidelines and international practices.

  7. Thymoma masquerading as transfusion dependent anemia

    PubMed Central

    Muzamil, Javvid; Shiekh, Aejaz Aziz; Bhat, Gull Mohammad; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Bhat, Shuaeb; Nabi, Firdousa

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a known entity in clinical medicine. Patients are often transfusion dependent for their whole life. Ascertaining its etiology is always a herculean task. We received a similar transfusion-dependent patient, who on evaluation was found to have thymoma as an etiological factor. Thymoma presenting as PRCA is seen in 2%–5% patients and evaluating PRCA for thymoma is seen in 5%–13% patient. As per the WHO histopathological classification, thymoma has six types and Type A is associated with PRCA and Type B is associated with myasthenia gravis. This correlation was not seen in our patient, who had Type B thymoma. Surgical resection of thymus improves 30% of PRCA and rest needs immunosuppression. Our patient was not the surgical candidate, and hence he was put on chemotherapy. PMID:28144099

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  9. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  10. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  11. Blood transfusion before radiation for malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, T.K. )

    1989-10-27

    This editorial discusses the situation of administering blood to patients prior to radiotherapy in an attempt to increase tissue/tumor oxygen tension. The author believes that since the rate at which tumor cells consume oxygen is highly variable, the aim of achieving high cellular oxygen tension may be met better by maintaining a high blood perfusion rate. Blood volume can be maintained without relying on transfusion, and safer alternatives are available.

  12. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes.

  13. [Methologic contribution to blood transfusion materials surveillance].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pujol-Rey, A; Arzur, C

    2001-08-01

    To reduce seriousness and frequency of iatrogenic risk implies prevention policies and efficient operational systems for vigilance. This risk management implies definition of precise organizations and procedures able to locate and to notify quickly undesirable events. This is the case about single use medical devices (SUMD) used in blood transfusion. This article is a contribution to the organisation of the implemented material vigilance in blood transfusion, collectively carried out with actors concerned (users, manufacturers, National Commission for Material Vigilance). It presents a lot of tools and methods to favour practices harmonization, as well as preventive a curative (specifications before purchase, main part of the quality contract between customer and supplier; internal control plan; index for medical device used in transfusion; illustrated glossaries for three main families of medical devices; index about symptomatic events; definitions of seriousness levels with their operational consequences; methods to manage a single use medical device judged as defective; tool for the review of incidents according to reference and batch). Then, the management of incidents about SUMD is presented within a material vigilance system integrated into the quality system of the institution, for user as for manufacturer. This is done in a chronological order with successively description of the incident, the assessment of the impact, the management of the associated risk, the periodical review of incidents and management of matters in dispute.

  14. Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction in a pediatric patient following transfusion of apheresis platelets.

    PubMed

    Sapatnekar, Suneeti; Sharma, Girish; Downes, Katharine A; Wiersma, Susan; McGrath, Claire; Yomtovían, Roslyn

    2005-12-01

    The practice of transfusing ABO-incompatible platelets, driven primarily by concerns about inventory management, has been considered generally safe because the accompanying plasma is usually diluted in the recipient's total blood volume. However, if the platelet product contains a large volume of plasma or a high concentration of incompatible isoagglutinin, there may be hemolysis of the recipient's red cells. Patients with a small blood volume, such as babies and children, are considered to be at particular risk for such a complication. We describe the case of a baby who suffered massive hemolysis of her group A red cells after transfusion of group O Apheresis Platelets containing a high-titered anti-A isoagglutinin. We also offer a review of the literature on this subject and recommendations to avoid acute hemolytic reactions as a result of platelet transfusion.

  15. Blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Shefali; Chung, Lawrance K; Lagman, Carlito; Voth, Brittany L; Barnette, Natalie E; Elhajjmoussa, Lekaa; Yang, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can be complicated by significant blood losses that have the potential to decrease tissue perfusion to critical brain tissue. Red blood cell transfusion is used in a variety of capacities both inside, and outside, of the operating room to prevent untoward neurologic damage. However, evidence-based guidelines concerning thresholds and indications for transfusion in neurosurgery remain limited. Consequently, transfusion practices in neurosurgical patients are highly variable and based on institutional experiences. Recently, a paradigm shift has occurred in neurocritical intensive care units, whereby restrictive transfusion is increasingly favored over liberal transfusion but the ideal strategy remains in clinical equipoise. The authors of this study perform a systematic review of the literature with the objective of capturing the changing landscape of blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients.

  16. Impact of Plasma Transfusion in Trauma Patients Who Do Not Require Massive Transfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    apheresis platelets and cryoprecipitate transfused during their hospital stay was 0.7 2.2 U and 1.0 4.0 U, respectively. Patients who received...different, and for the volume of packed red blood cells, platelets , and cryoprecipitate transfused. For the unmatched cohorts, p values for categorical...7.2; 4 (1–66) 2.1 4.8; 0 (0–31) 0.001 Mean units of platelets received 0.7 2.2; 0 (0–34) 0.7 1.4; 0 (0–10) 0.7 2.8; 0 (0–34) 0.99 Mean units

  17. Platelet transfusion - the new immunology of an old therapy.

    PubMed

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A; Heal, Joanna M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy.

  18. The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    outcomes in patient populations with massive bleeding. Later the discoveries that blood transfusion could transmit hepatitis B and C and HIV made a great...risks of TTD and transfusion reactions in relation with the potential benefit of transfusion. In Norway, the serocon- version rate (HIV and hepatitis B ...blood group O negative or positive and potential donors, they will then be screened for HIV and hepatitis B and C using rapid tests. RCCL medical teams

  19. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  20. Microvascular Response to Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Methods Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The proportion of perfused capillaries (PPC) pre- and post-transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Results Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD=21), mean ISS was 29 (SD=16), and mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dL (SD=0.9). No patients had MAP < 65 mm Hg (mean 89 mm Hg, SD 17) or lactate > 2.5 mmol/L (mean 1.1 mmol/L, SD 0.3). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pre-transfusion PPC (Spearman r= -0.63, p=0.0002). Conclusions Pre-transfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, while those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion. PMID:22344313

  1. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  2. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  3. [Blood is not for everyone: the usefulness of erythrocyte transfusion].

    PubMed

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Arbous, M S Sesmu; So-Osman, Cynthia; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence on the limited usefulness and the adverse consequences of erythrocyte transfusion has led to a large drop in the number of blood transfusions over the last 20 years. The results of randomised studies suggest that in most haemodynamically stable patients with acute anaemia an Hb transfusion threshold of 4.4 mmol/l for blood transfusion has the same outcomes as a higher transfusion threshold. The effect of blood transfusion in patients with anaemia is not only dependent on their Hb level, but also on other clinical factors that play a role in the balance between oxygen supply and its consumption. The Dutch '4-5-6' rule for indication for blood transfusion takes a number of important clinical factors into account, however, results of recent research suggest that the strict application of this rule will lead to unnecessary transfusions. New research in this area is focused on the quantification of the effect of blood transfusion in various combinations of relevant patient characteristics.

  4. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/.

  5. The Ratio of Blood Products Transfused Affects Mortality in Patients Receiving Massive Transfusions at a Combat Support Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    products (RBC, FFP, cryoprecipitate, recombinant FVIIa [rFVIIa], apheresis platelet [aPLT], and fresh whole blood [FWB] units) administered within 24...RBC units transfused was calculated as the number of both stored RBC and FWB units transfused and plasma as FFP plus FWB units. One apheresis platelet ...calculation of apheresis platelet units transfused, though FWB has previously been shown to be as effective as 10 units of platelet concentrate.33 The

  6. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  7. Forum for debate: Safety of allogeneic blood transfusion alternatives in the surgical/critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Gómez, M; Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M; García Erce, J A; Gómez Luque, A; Leal-Noval, S R; Colomina, M J; Comin Colet, J; Contreras Barbeta, E; Cuenca Espiérrez, J; Garcia de Lorenzo Y Mateos, A; Gomollón García, F; Izuel Ramí, M; Moral García, M V; Montoro Ronsano, J B; Páramo Fernández, J A; Pereira Saavedra, A; Quintana Diaz, M; Remacha Sevilla, Á; Salinas Argente, R; Sánchez Pérez, C; Tirado Anglés, G; Torrabadella de Reinoso, P

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, several safety alerts have questioned or restricted the use of some pharmacological alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion in established indications. In contrast, there seems to be a promotion of other alternatives, based on blood products and/or antifibrinolytic drugs, which lack a solid scientific basis. The Multidisciplinary Autotransfusion Study Group and the Anemia Working Group España convened a multidisciplinary panel of 23 experts belonging to different healthcare areas in a forum for debate to: 1) analyze the different safety alerts referred to certain transfusion alternatives; 2) study the background leading to such alternatives, the evidence supporting them, and their consequences for everyday clinical practice, and 3) issue a weighted statement on the safety of each questioned transfusion alternative, according to its clinical use. The members of the forum maintained telematics contact for the exchange of information and the distribution of tasks, and a joint meeting was held where the conclusions on each of the items examined were presented and discussed. A first version of the document was drafted, and subjected to 4 rounds of review and updating until consensus was reached (unanimously in most cases). We present the final version of the document, approved by all panel members, and hope it will be useful for our colleagues.

  8. Blood transfusion trigger in burns: a four-year retrospective analysis of blood transfusions in eleven burn centers in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Fuzaylov, G; Anderson, R; Lee, J; Slesarenko, S; Nagaychuk, V; Grigorieva, T; Kozinec, G

    2015-09-30

    One focus of improvement of burn care in Ukraine was the management of blood loss and blood transfusions in burn patients. The aim of this project was to analyze blood transfusion triggers in burn patients and outcomes at eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. This multicenter retrospective study reviewed four years of data on blood-transfused burn patients admitted to eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. Data analyzed included: demographics, characteristics of the burns, complications of burn injury, triggers for blood transfusions and outcomes. A total of 928 burn patients who received 2,693 blood transfusions from 11 major burn centers over a four-year period, were studied. Regardless of the total body surface area (TBSA) that was burned, blood transfusions were administered with a hemoglobin (Hb) trigger value of around 9 g/dL. Roughly one third (30.5%) of all transfusions were given in patients with a TBSA ≤ 10%. We demonstrated that Ukrainian doctors were using the same Hb trigger for blood transfusions for all Ukrainian burn patients, which suggested a need to change blood transfusion policy.

  9. Costs associated with blood transfusions in Sweden--the societal cost of autologous, allogeneic and perioperative RBC transfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenngård, A H; Persson, U; Söderman, C

    2005-08-01

    Anaemia is characterised by an insufficient number of red blood cells (RBCs) and might occur for different reasons, e.g. surgical procedures are often with associated blood loss. Patients who suffer from anaemia have the option of treatment with blood transfusion or medical treatment. In this study, the societal cost, for the case of Sweden, of RBC transfusion using three different techniques, i.e. allogeneic, autologous and intraoperative transfusion, was estimated. The analysis was based on information from interviews with hospital staff at large Swedish hospitals and from published data. The average cost for a 2 units transfusion was found to be Swedish kronor (SEK) 6330 (702 Euro) for filtered allogeneic RBCs and SEK 5394 (598 Euro) for autologous RBCs for surgery patients. Transfusion reactions accounted for almost 35 per cent of the costs of allogeneic RBC transfusions. The administration cost was found to be much higher for autologous transfusions compared with allogeneic transfusions. The cost of intraoperative erythrocyte salvage was calculated to be SEK 2567 (285 Euro) per transfusion (>4 units).

  10. Improving the bacteriological safety of platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Blajchman, Morris A; Goldman, Mindy; Baeza, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Despite the increased application of aseptic techniques for blood collection and the preparation of platelet concentrates, morbidity and mortality arising from the transfusion of bacterially contaminated allogeneic platelet products persist. This problem exists because stored platelet concentrates represent a nearly ideal growth medium for bacteria and because they are stored at temperatures (22 degrees +/- 2 degrees C) that facilitate bacterial growth. The presence of bacteria in blood components including platelets has been a problem for many decades and currently is the most common microbiological cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. A variety of strategies have been devised and/or proposed in an attempt to try to reduce the risk of transfusion-associated sepsis. These include pretransfusion bacterial detection, efforts to reduce the likelihood of bacterial contamination, the optimization of blood product processing and storage, reducing recipient exposure, and the introduction of pathogen inactivation methodology. With regard to doing bacterial detection, a number of automated detection systems have become available to test for contaminated platelet components, but their utility to some extent is restricted by the time they take to indicate the presence of bacteria and/or their lack of sensitivity to detect initially low bacterial loads. A variety of other approaches has been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and include filtration to remove leukocytes and bacteria, diversion of the initial aliquot of blood during donation, and improved donor skin disinfection. Platelet pathogen inactivation methods under investigation include the addition of L-carnitine, gamma-irradiation, riboflavin plus UVA irradiation, and amotosalen HCl plus UVA irradiation. The latter process is licensed for clinical use with platelets in some countries in Europe. All of these approaches, either collectively or individually, hold considerable promise

  11. A non Q/N-rich prion domain of a foreign prion, [Het-s], can propagate as a prion in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Vibha; Maddelein, Marie-Lise; Talarek, Nicolas; J. Saupe, Sven; Liebman, Susan W.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Prions are self-propagating, infectious aggregates of misfolded proteins. The mammalian prion, PrPSc, causes fatal neurodegenerative disorders. Fungi also have prions. While yeast prions depend upon glutamine/asparagine(Q/N)-rich regions, the Podospora anserina HET-s and PrP prion proteins, lack such sequences. Nonetheless, we show that the HET-s prion domain fused to GFP propagates as a prion in yeast. Analogously to native yeast prions: transient overexpression of the HET-s fusion induces ring-like aggregates that propagate in daughter cells as cytoplasmically-inherited, detergent-resistant dot aggregates. Efficient dot propagation, but not ring formation, is dependent upon the Hsp104 chaperone. The yeast prion [PIN+] enhances HET-s ring formation, suggesting that prions with and without Q/N-rich regions interact. Finally, HET-s aggregates propagated in yeast are infectious when introduced into Podospora. To our knowledge, this is the first report of prion propagation in a truly foreign host. Since yeast can host non Q/N-rich prions, such native yeast prions may exist. PMID:17612491

  12. Blood transfusion and the World Wars.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the remarkable development in the science and practice of blood transfusion during the 20 years either side of 1900, progressing through the challenges of surgical vascular access, the propensity of shed blood to clot and the more mysterious apparently arbitrary acute reactions (later revealed as due to blood group incompatibility), to describe in more detail, the developments at the Western Front, then giving a précis of the advances in the interwar years through to the mid-twentieth-century 'blood-banking'.

  13. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  14. Aging of platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    A goal of platelet storage is to maintain the quality of platelets from the point of donation to the point of transfusion - to suspend the aging process. This effort is judged by clinical and laboratory measures with varying degrees of success. Recent work gives encouragement that platelets can be maintained ex vivo beyond the current 5 -7 day shelf life whilst maintaining their quality, as measured by posttransfusion recovery and survival. However, additional measures are needed to validate the development of technologies that may further reduce the aging of stored platelets, or enhance their hemostatic properties.

  15. History of blood transfusion in sub-saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy and safety of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa is the subject of much concern, yet there have been very few studies of its history. An overview of that record finds that transfusions were first reported in Africa (sub-Saharan and excluding South Africa) in the early 1920s, and organized transfusion practices were established before the Second World War. Blood transfusion grew rapidly after 1945, along with the construction of new hospitals and expanded health services in Africa. Significant differences existed between colonial powers in the organization of transfusion services, but these converged after independence as their use continued to grow and decentralized and hospital-based practices were adopted. It was only after the oil crisis in the mid-1970s that health spending declined and the collection, testing, and transfusion of blood began to level off. Thus, when the AIDS crisis hit transfusion services, they were already struggling to meet the needs of patients. At this time, foreign assistance as well as the World Health Organization and the League of Red Cross Societies helped respond to both the immediate problem of testing blood, and for some countries, support existed for the broader reorganization of transfusion. Overall, the history shows that transfusion was adopted widely and quickly, limited mainly by the availability of knowledgeable doctors and hospital facilities. There was less resistance than expected by Africans to receive transfusions, and the record shows a remarkable flexibility in obtaining blood. The dangers of disease transmission were recognized from an early date but were balanced against the potential lifesaving benefits of transfusion.

  16. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were divided into two groups: group A (n=127) who received allogeneic transfusion only in TKA and group B (n=118) who received autologous transfusion via an autologous transfusion device and allogeneic transfusion. In both groups, the patients were transfused when the hemoglobin level was below 9 g/dL. In group B, blood collected by the autologous transfusion device was transfused only once after surgery. The total blood loss volume, total transfusion volume, and the presence of side effects were assessed based on medical records. Results Group A received 294.6 mL more allogeneic transfusion than group B (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with regard to the development of side effects between groups. Conclusions Application of an autologous transfusion device during TKA can be effective in reducing the allogeneic transfusion volume. Moreover, allogeneic transfusion was not necessary after autologous transfusion in some patients. PMID:26389070

  17. The AIDS crisis and the medical-legal implications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L J

    1991-06-01

    An increased awareness of the potential to be harmed by blood transfusions has come with the AIDS crisis. Patients and health care providers alike are concerned with the complications of a transfusion, and various alternatives to traditional transfusion therapy have emerged. They include autologous transfusions, directed donations, and outright refusals of transfusion therapy. This article examines the medical-legal considerations that accompany a decision to transfuse. Various legal theories used in cases where persons injured by transfusions have sought legal redress and the outcomes of those cases will be examined. The question of whether directed donations are a reasonable alternative to traditional transfusion therapy will also be explored.

  18. Providing a Placental Transfusion in Newborns Who Need Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Katheria, Anup C.; Brown, Melissa K.; Rich, Wade; Arnell, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been several studies and reviews on the importance of providing a placental transfusion to the newborn. Allowing a placental transfusion to occur by delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord is an extremely effective method of enhancing arterial oxygen content, increasing cardiac output, and improving oxygen delivery. However, premature and term newborns who require resuscitation have impaired transitional hemodynamics and may warrant different methods to actively provide a placental transfusion while still allowing for resuscitation. In this review, we will provide evidence for providing a placental transfusion in these circumstances and methods for implementation. Several factors including cord clamping time, uterine contractions, umbilical blood flow, respirations, and gravity play an important role in determining placental transfusion volumes. Finally, while many practitioners agree that a placental transfusion is beneficial, it is not always straightforward to implement and can be performed using different methods, making this basic procedure important to discuss. We will review three placental transfusion techniques: delayed cord clamping, intact umbilical cord milking, and cut-umbilical cord milking. We will also review resuscitation with an intact cord and the evidence in term and preterm newborns supporting this practice. We will discuss perceived risks versus benefits of these procedures. Finally, we will provide key straightforward concepts and implementation strategies to ensure that placental-to-newborn transfusion can become routine practice at any institution. PMID:28180126

  19. Preventive transfusion in Dengue shock syndrome-is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Lum, Lucy Chai See; Abdel-Latif, Mohammad El-Amin; Goh, Adrian Yu Teik; Chan, Patrick Wai Keong; Lam, Sai Kit

    2003-11-01

    We compared 53 patients with Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) who received preventive transfusions with 53 who did not. Significant differences in the development of pulmonary edema and length of hospitalization (P<.05) and none in hemorrhage (P=.136) were observed. Preventive transfusions did not produce sustained improvements in the coagulation status in DSS.

  20. Acquired haemophilia A as a blood transfusion emergency

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Roveroni, Giovanni; Tassinari, Cristina; Giuffrida, Annachiara; Gandini, Giorgio; Franchini, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acquired haemophilia is a rare autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies directed in the majority of the cases against clotting factor VIII. This disorder is characterised by the sudden onset of bleeding that not rarely may be life-threatening and need transfusion support. Most reports on this condition describe the need for blood transfusions during the acute, haemorrhagic phase, but the number of transfused red cell units is often unknown. Patients and methods In the last 5 years, 14 patients with acquired haemophilia A were identified in the transfusion and haemophilia centres of Verona and Castelfranco Veneto. The transfusion support for these 14 patients was analyzed in this retrospective survey. Results The 14 patients required a total of 183 red cell units. The average transfusion requirement was 13 red cells units/patient, with a range from 0 to 38 units. Conclusions Eleven of the 14 patients studied needed strong transfusion support to enable any further management of the haemorrhages, as well as for eradication treatment of the autoantibodies to factor VIII. A relevant part of the management of haemorrhagic symptoms as well as the first choice for any further treatment (bleeding or the cure of the underlying disease) is transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:18661918

  1. Diabetes mellitus in the context of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nilotpal

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting humans. However, knowledge of diabetes mellitus in the context of blood transfusion is lacking. In this article, the eligibility of people with diabetes as donors, issues faced during blood component transfusion to diabetics and impaired glucose tolerance among chronic blood recipients will be discussed, along with discussion of the present state of evidence.

  2. Total quality management in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smit-Sibinga, C T

    2000-01-01

    Quality management is an ongoing development resulting in consistency products and services and ever increasing customer satisfaction. The ultimum is Total Quality Management. Quality systems and quality management in transfusion medicine have gained considerable attention since the outbreak of the AIDS epidemic. Where product orientation has long been applied through quality control, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles were introduced, shifting the developments in the direction of process orientation. Globally, and particularly in the more industrialised world people and system orientation has come along with the introduction of the ISO9001 concept. Harmonisation and a degree of uniformity are needed to implement a universally applicable Quality System and related Quality Management. Where the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional organisation with the most extensive experience in quality systems in blood transfusion, the European Union and the Council of Europe now are in the process to design a quality system and management applicable to a larger variety of countries, based on a hybrid of current GMP and ISO9001 principles. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has developed a more universally to implement Quality Manual, with a pilot project in Honduras. It is recommendable to harmonise the various designs and bring the approaches under one common denominator.

  3. The aging human recipient of transfusion products.

    PubMed

    Nydegger, Urs E; Luginbühl, Martin; Risch, Martin

    2015-06-01

    In this review the different mechanisms of aging and frailty such as DNA defects due to impaired DNA repair, inflammatory processes, disturbances of oxidative phosphorylation are discussed together with mechanisms of cell repair. Components of blood plasma, such as the growth-differentiation protein GDF11, were shown to enhance neurogenesis and to improve the vasculature in the animal cortex and to rejuvenate muscle tissue. Advances in laboratory assays allow to identify plasma proteins that may affect tissue regeneration. This new knowledge from animal research might affect transfusion practice in geriatric patients in the future. Provided it can be translated and confirmed in human research, blood products might no longer be considered only as oxygen carriers or drugs to improve hemostasis. In the present time blood transfusion (RBCs, plasma or platelets) should be directed by differentiated guidelines considering not only cut-off values of hemoglobin, platelet count or coagulation but also old age-specific biologic variation, comorbidities and the clinical context e.g. of bleeding.

  4. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  5. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  6. [Aspects of blood transfusion in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Massenet, D; Bouh, A

    1997-01-01

    Blood transfusion in Djibouti is organized with reference to relevant French regulation and the recommendations of the World Health Organization. The system is basically family donor system operating on the principle of one tested unit of blood for every two untested units donated. Spontaneous donations mainly from the police and army personnel account for only 20% of the 2500 units collected each year. The principle blood products are adult whole blood, adult red cells, and fresh frozen plasma. Products are distributed after viral and microbial testing for infectious disease. Overall the percentage of blood products that are not released due to detection of infectious agents is 17.5%. This rate is well correlated with the incidence of hepatitis B (15.5%), HIV infection (3.4%), hepatitis C (1.5%) and syphilis (0.4%) in Djibouti. The greatest demand for whole blood comes from medical departments where indigent people are treated for anemia due to dietary deficiency. Contamination by HIV present at undetectable levels at the time of testing is a serious problem. Measures should be taken to prevent anemia due to dietary deficiency and develop the use of autologous transfusion.

  7. Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM): an update.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Blajchman, Morris A

    2007-11-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT)-related immunomodulation (TRIM) encompasses the laboratory immune aberrations that occur after ABT and their established or purported clinical effects. TRIM is a real biologic phenomenon resulting in at least one established beneficial clinical effect in humans, but the existence of deleterious clinical TRIM effects has not yet been confirmed. Initially, TRIM encompassed effects attributable to ABT by immunomodulatory mechanisms (e.g., cancer recurrence, postoperative infection, or virus activation). More recently, TRIM has also included effects attributable to ABT by pro-inflammatory mechanisms (e.g., multiple-organ failure or mortality). TRIM effects may be mediated by: (1) allogeneic mononuclear cells; (2) white-blood-cell (WBC)-derived soluble mediators; and/or (3) soluble HLA peptides circulating in allogeneic plasma. This review categorizes the available randomized controlled trials based on the inference(s) that they permit about possible mediator(s) of TRIM, and examines the strength of the evidence available for relying on WBC reduction or autologous transfusion to prevent TRIM effects.

  8. Transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Takata, Y; Kurokawa, H; Fukuda, J

    2003-04-01

    Transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) is a new DNA virus found in patients with post-transfusion hepatitis. The prevalence of this virus among dental patients has not been reported, therefore, the prevalence of TTV infection in consecutive dental inpatients was evaluated. TTV DNA was assayed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 441 dental inpatients with oral cancer (n=192) or oral cysts (n=249). The serum HBs antigen and HCV antibody as well as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) concentrations were also measured. Of 441 subjects, 137 were infected with TTV (31.1%). This prevalence of TTV was much higher than that of HBV or HCV (HBV 1.2%; HCV 6.0%) in these dental patients. There was no gender or age difference in the prevalence of TTV infection. Of the 192 patients with oral cancer, 57 subjects had TTV in their sera, while 80 of 249 with oral cystic disease had TTV. The prevalence of TTV was similar between the two different disease groups. Neither the serum ALT nor serum AST concentrations were different between the subjects positive and negative for TTV DNA. In hospitalized dental patients, 31.1% were infected with TTV. The prevalence of TTV was much higher than that of HBV or HCV. There was no difference in the prevalence of TTV between subjects with cancer and cysts. Dentists should maintain high standards of infection control when treating any dental patient.

  9. The increasing importance of Intellectual Property in Transfusion Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Ian D; Rooney, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    The Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) originated in Edinburgh in the 1920's by dentist Jack Copland. Since that time the scope of Transfusion Medicine has broadened significantly to accommodate advances in technologies such as cell isolation, culture and manipulation. Many transfusion services, including SNBTS, now provide expertise both in the traditional field of blood transfusion and the newer, wider field of human cell (including 'adult' and embryonic stem cells) and tissue procurement and culture - in all the new science of "regenerative medicine". This paper describes the importance of Intellectual Property in the provision of Transfusion Medicine today and provides guidance on the management of Intellectual Property so that advances in the field have the best chance of successful translation into clinical practice.

  10. Improving communication of inpatient blood transfusion events to GPs.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Patients who have had blood transfusions whilst in hospital must have this information communicated to their General Practitioner at discharge. Audit demonstrated that just 50% of patients (n=15) under medical specialties who had undergone a blood transfusion had this information included in their discharge letter. To improve this, a section was specifically designated on the e-discharge pro-forma for the documentation of blood transfusion events, and focused teaching was delivered to all new FY1 doctors at their induction. Post intervention, 80% of blood transfusions occurring in medical patients were documented on the e-discharge, with an improvement in how detailed this documentation was (n=40). This simple intervention is an easily reproducible, cost neutral method of ensuring that more blood transfusion events are communicated to patients' GPs; improving care and reducing risk.

  11. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  12. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur.

  13. Acute HIV illness following blood transfusion in three African children.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, R; Greenberg, A E; Francis, H; Kabote, N; Izaley, L; Nguyen-Dinh, P; Quinn, T C; Van der Groen, G; Curran, J W; Piot, P

    1988-04-01

    Three children are described in whom pre-transfusion samples were HIV-seronegative and post-transfusional samples, obtained within 1 week after transfusion, were HIV-seropositive. Two of them developed a transient fever within 1 week of receiving the blood transfusion, and a transient generalized skin eruption which lasted for about 2 weeks. All three developed persistent generalized lymphadenopathy. One child developed a lumbar herpes zoster 7 months after transfusion. IgM Western blots demonstrated the presence of antibodies to protein bands p17, p24 and p55 in all three children. These three case reports suggest that children who receive a seropositive blood transfusion are at high risk for developing acute manifestations of HIV infection.

  14. Mutagenesis of hetR reveals amino acids necessary for HetR function in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2007-03-01

    HetR is the master regulator of heterocyst differentiation in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Genetic selection was used to identify 33 amino acid substitutions in HetR that reduced the proportion of cells undergoing heterocyst differentiation to less than 2%. Conservative substitutions in the wild-type HetR protein revealed three mutations that dramatically reduced the amount of heterocyst differentiation when the mutant allele was present in place of the wild-type allele on a replicating plasmid in a mutant lacking hetR on the chromosome. An H69Y substitution resulted in heterocyst formation among less than 0.1% of cells, and D17E and G36A substitutions resulted in a Het- phenotype, compared to heterocyst formation among approximately 25% of cells with the wild-type hetR under the same conditions. The D17E substitution prevented DNA binding activity exhibited by wild-type HetR in mobility shift assays, whereas G36A and H69Y substitutions had no affect on DNA binding. D17E, G36A, and H69Y substitutions also resulted in higher levels of the corresponding HetR protein than of the wild-type protein when each was expressed from an inducible promoter in a hetR deletion strain, suggesting an effect on HetR protein turnover. Surprisingly, C48A and S152A substitutions, which were previously reported to result in a Het- phenotype, were found to have no effect on heterocyst differentiation or patterning when the corresponding mutations were introduced into an otherwise wild-type genetic background in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The clustering of mutations that satisfied the positive selection near the amino terminus suggests an important role for this part of the protein in HetR function.

  15. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment. PMID:27114815

  16. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-03-31

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment.

  17. Epidemiology of Transfusion-Transmitted Infections Among Multi-Transfused Patients in Seven Hospitals in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Prevalence and risk factors vary by geographic location and by the specific TTI (including HIV-1, HBV, HCV and HTLV -I) Objective To determine the prevalence... HTLV -I infection HIV infection was associated only with total number of traxlsfuslon units received Conclusions High prevalences of HBV and HCV...Multi-transfused, HIV-1, HBV, HCV, HTLV -I, Epldemmlogy 1. Introduction The worldwide dlstnbunon of hepanns C wrus (HCV) mfecnon includes 170 mflhon

  18. Fungal prion HET-s as a model for structural complexity and self-propagation in prions.

    PubMed

    Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald

    2014-04-08

    The highly ordered and reproducible structure of the fungal prion HET-s makes it an excellent model system for studying the inherent properties of prions, self-propagating infectious proteins that have been implicated in a number of fatal diseases. In particular, the HET-s prion-forming domain readily folds into a relatively complex two-rung β-solenoid amyloid. The faithful self-propagation of this fold involves a diverse array of inter- and intramolecular structural features. These features include a long flexible loop connecting the two rungs, buried polar residues, salt bridges, and asparagine ladders. We have used site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray fiber diffraction to probe the relative importance of these features for the formation of β-solenoid structure, as well as the cumulative effects of multiple mutations. Using fibrillization kinetics and chemical stability assays, we have determined the biophysical effects of our mutations on the assembly and stability of the prion-forming domain. We have found that a diversity of structural features provides a level of redundancy that allows robust folding and stability even in the face of significant sequence alterations and suboptimal environmental conditions. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the structural interactions necessary for self-propagation. Propagation of prion structure seems to require an obligatory level of complexity that may not be reproducible in short peptide models.

  19. Fungal prion HET-s as a model for structural complexity and self-propagation in prions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The highly ordered and reproducible structure of the fungal prion HET-s makes it an excellent model system for studying the inherent properties of prions, self-propagating infectious proteins that have been implicated in a number of fatal diseases. In particular, the HET-s prion-forming domain readily folds into a relatively complex two-rung β-solenoid amyloid. The faithful self-propagation of this fold involves a diverse array of inter- and intramolecular structural features. These features include a long flexible loop connecting the two rungs, buried polar residues, salt bridges, and asparagine ladders. We have used site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray fiber diffraction to probe the relative importance of these features for the formation of β-solenoid structure, as well as the cumulative effects of multiple mutations. Using fibrillization kinetics and chemical stability assays, we have determined the biophysical effects of our mutations on the assembly and stability of the prion-forming domain. We have found that a diversity of structural features provides a level of redundancy that allows robust folding and stability even in the face of significant sequence alterations and suboptimal environmental conditions. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the structural interactions necessary for self-propagation. Propagation of prion structure seems to require an obligatory level of complexity that may not be reproducible in short peptide models. PMID:24706820

  20. [Blood transfusion and ethics: new questions].

    PubMed

    Sicard, D

    2006-09-01

    Chairman to the French Institutional Review Board, Professor Didier Sicard raises blood donation issues from an ethical standpoint. The contaminated blood scandal focused on the necessity of reducing transfusion risks and regarded blood safety as an ethical mandatory requirement, a debatable subject to deal with. The author proposes to reconsider the nature of unpaid blood donations while advising not to scorn the remunerated gift when such is the case. As for the use of blood, he questions the solutions based on a zero risk perspective, in particular an excessive auto-transfusional practice or a restrictive use of blood, lately regarded as essential. Starting from the blood donation concern this article leads us to think over both our society's fears and the precautionary principle abuses.

  1. [Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI): obvious and incomprehensible].

    PubMed

    Bulanov, A Iu

    2009-01-01

    Acute transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI) is an acute lung injury associated with and develops within 6 hours after the transfusion of components and blood preparations. Today there are no uniform views on the pathogenesis of TRALI. The discussion of immune and non-immune mechanisms is relevant. The key link of the former is that the presence of anti-leukocytic antibodies in a donor or a recipient and their interaction during transfusion with the leukocytes of the recipient or the donor, respectively; that of the latter link is the accumulation of biologically active substances in the transfusion media during storage and their passive administration to the recipient during transfusion. In both cases, the total link is drastic increased pulmonary capillary permeability. The clinical presentation of TRALI is nonspecific and generally similar to that of the adult respiratory distress syndrome and lung injuries of another genesis. It is necessary to make its differential diagnosis with allergic reactions, the transfusion of bacterially contaminated media and mainly with circulatory overload. Specific treatments for transfusion-associated lung injury are unavailable. Diferent variants of respiratory therapy are effective. Prevention of TRALI is mainly based on its immune mechanism. The leading direction of its prevention is to select donors.

  2. Transfusion related adverse events in the Platelet Dose study

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Ness, Paul; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND How platelet (PLT) product characteristics such as dose, source (whole blood-derived (WBD) vs. apheresis), storage duration, and ABO matching status affect the risks of transfusion-related adverse events (TRAEs) is unclear. Similarly, more information is needed to define how recipient characteristics affect the frequency of TRAEs following PLT transfusion. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the multicenter Platelet Dose (“PLADO”) study, pediatric and adult hematology-oncology patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia were randomized to receive low-dose (LD), medium-dose (MD), or high-dose (HD) PLT prophylaxis for a pre-transfusion PLT count ≤10,000/μL. All PLT units (apheresis or WBD) were leukoreduced. Post hoc analyses of PLADO data were performed using multi-predictor models. RESULTS 5034 PLT transfusions to 1102 patients were analyzed. A TRAE occurred with 501 PLT transfusions (10.0%). The most common TRAEs were fever (6.6% of transfusions), allergic/hypersensitivity reactions (1.9%), and sinus tachycardia (1.8%). Patients assigned HD PLTs were more likely than LD or MD patients to experience any TRAE (OR for HD vs. MD 1.50, 95% CI (1.10, 2.05), three-group comparison p=0.02). PLT source and ABO matching status were not significantly related to overall TRAE risk. Compared to a patient’s first PLT transfusion, subsequent PLT transfusions were less likely to have a TRAE reported, primarily due to a lower risk of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions. CONCLUSION The most important PLT unit characteristic associated with TRAEs was PLT dose per transfusion. HD PLTs may increase the risk of TRAEs, and LD PLTs may reduce the risk. PMID:25065959

  3. Microvascular response to red blood cell transfusion in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; MacLennan, Paul A; Vandromme-Cusick, Marianne J; Angotti, Jonathan M; Magnotti, Louis J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-03-01

    Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark-field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The perfused proportion of capillaries (PPC) before and after transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD, 21) years, mean Injury Severity Score was 29 (SD, 16), and mean pretransfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 (SD, 0.9) g/dL. No patients had a mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mmHg (mean, 89 [SD, 17] mmHg) or lactate of greater than 2.5 mmol/L (mean, 1.1 [SD, 0.3] mmol/L). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pretransfusion PPC (Spearman r = -0.63, P = 0.0002). Pretransfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, whereas those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion.

  4. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  5. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rappeport, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of foreign recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. 58 refs.

  7. West Nile Virus in Europe and Safety of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Giulio; Cristiano, Karen; Pupella, Simonetta; Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) has become an increasing issue in the transfusion setting since 2002, when it was firstly shown in the USA that it can be transmitted through blood transfusion. Since then, several precautionary measures have been introduced in Europe in order to reduce the possible risk of transmission via transfusion/solid organ transplantation. In addition, the epidemiological surveillance has been tightened and the network for communication of human WNV cases strengthened. This review will focus on WNV circulation and the safety of blood in Europe. PMID:27403087

  8. Errors in transfusion medicine: have we learned our lesson?

    PubMed

    Fastman, Barbara Rabin; Kaplan, Harold S

    2011-01-01

    The phrase "patient safety" represents freedom from accidental or preventable harm due to events occurring in the healthcare setting. Practitioners aim to reduce, if not prevent, medical errors and adverse outcomes. Yet studies performed from many perspectives show that medical error constitutes a serious worldwide problem. Transfusion medicine, with its interdisciplinary intricacies and the danger of fatal outcomes, serves as an exemplar of lessons learned. Opportunity for error in complex systems is vast, and although errors are traditionally blamed on humans, they are often set up by preexisting factors. Transfusion has inherent hazards such as clinical vulnerabilities (eg, contracting an infectious agent or experiencing a transfusion reaction), but there also exists the possibility of hazards associated with process errors. Sample collection errors, or preanalytic errors, may occur when samples are drawn from donors during blood donation, as well as when drawn from patients prior to transfusion-related testing, and account for approximately one-third of events in transfusion. Errors in the analytic phase of the transfusion chain, slips and errors in the laboratory, comprise close to one-third of patient safety-related transfusion events. As many as 40% of mistransfusions are due to errors in the postanalytic phase: often failures in the final check of the right blood and the right patient at the bedside. Bar-code labels, radiofrequency identification tags, and even palm vein-scanning technology are increasingly being utilized in patient identification. The last phase of transfusion, careful monitoring of the recipient for adverse signs or symptoms, when performed diligently can help prevent or manage a potentially fatal reaction caused by an earlier process error or an unavoidable physiologic condition. Ways in which we can and do deal with potential hazards of transfusion are discussed, including a method of hazard reduction termed inherently safer design

  9. A Predictive Model for Massive Transfusion in Combat Casualty Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Transfusion. 2004; 44:809–813. 9. Malone DL, Dunne J, Tracy JK, Putnam AT, Scalea TM, Napolitano LM. Blood transfusion, independent of shock severity, is...mechanical ventilation. Crit Care Med. 2004;32:1817–1824. 15. Dunne JR, Malone DL, Tracy JK, Napolitano LM. Allogenic blood transfusion in the first...infection rates in the critically ill patient. Crit Care Med. 2002;30:2249–2254. 37. Malone D, Kuhls D, Napolitano LM, McCarter R, Scalea T. Blood

  10. [The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2014-11-01

    Hydrostatic pulmonary edema is a frequent and severe complication of blood transfusion. Recent epidemiological studies open the way for a better prevention of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload. Preventive measures rely solely on the medical and nursing staff. Mitigation strategies include a careful identification of patients and conditions at-risk, a single-unit transfusion policy in patients with chronic anemia, the use of slow infusion rates, the careful monitoring of patient vital signs (particularly systemic arterial blood pressure). Peritransfusion IV diuretics use is likely to be helpful, although optimal prescribing patterns have not been defined.

  11. [TRALI is an overlooked severe complication related to blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Haunstrup, Thure Mors; Baech, John; Varming, Kim; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Nielsen, Kaspar René

    2014-03-31

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is recognized as the most frequent cause of transfusion-related severe morbidity and mortality. TRALI is characterized by post-transfusional respiratory distress, hypoxaemia and radiographic verified lung infiltration, in the absence of sign of circulatory overload. TRALI is predominantly triggered by human leukocyte antigen or human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies from the transfused blood component. Particularly antibodies against the HNA-3a are involved in severe and fatal TRALI cases. The serological investigation is important to trace and exclude blood donors with TRALI antibodies.

  12. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) - review].

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Z; Simetka, O; Kořístka, M

    2013-04-01

    TRALI is a major cause of serious morbidity and mortality associated with a blood transfusion. It is clinically manifested by acute respiratory distress within 6 hours of completion of transfusion. Neutrophils have the key role in the pathogenesis. They are activated mostly with leukocyte antibodies (HLA and granulocyte) that are present mainly in plasma containing blood products. TRALI is a clinical diagnosis based on hypoxemia and positive finding on lung X-ray examination. The treatment is only supportive and the mortality is about 5% to 10%. The major preventive measure is transfusing blood products from donors without leukocyte antibodies.

  13. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... causing an unequal exchange of blood. The recipient twin is at risk for heart failure receiving too much blood from ... its heart to work harder, while the donor twin is at risk for loss of blood. Laser surgery may be ...

  14. Bone marrow transfusions in previously irradiated, hematologically normal syngeneic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Lawce, H.; Tjio, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    Transfusion of syngeneic marrow into normal, nonirradiated recipients results only in minimal proliferation of donor cells. However, irradiated recipients, restored to hematologic normalcy by an initial marrow transfusion, subsequently sustain proliferation which replaces approximately 10% of endogenous marrow after a single transfusion of 4 x 10/sup 7/ marrow cells of the same strain as the host. Cells from histoincompatible donors proliferate only rarely or minimally in the marrows of these irradiated, but hematologically normal recipients without reirradiation. Syngeneic male donor cells proliferate in irradiated and restored female mice, while female donor cells fail to proliferate in the marrow of syngeneic male recipients. A possible explanation is that transfused female cells respond immunologically to the abundant H-Y antigen in the male environment and are eliminated as a result.

  15. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  16. Severe thalassaemia intermedia with multiple fractures: role of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib Qayyum; Iqbal, Mudassar; Wahla, Madiha Saeed; Tarrar, Aimel Munir

    2011-11-01

    Thalassaemia intermedia includes thalassaemias with clinical severity intermediate between asymptomatic thalassaemia minor and transfusion dependent thalassaemia major. By definition patients of thalassaemia intermedia maintain a haemoglobin level of 7-10 g/dl and do not, or only occasionally, require blood transfusion. An eight-year-old girl who was a known case of thalassaemia intermedia and had been occasionally transfused presented with fever, pain and swelling over the wrists, ankles and above the right knee joint. Radiographs showed medullary widening, cortical thinning and; multiple, recent and old, partially healed fractures of metadiaphseal regions of long bones. Her fractures have been immobilized by means of back slabs. In view of her recurrent fractures and growth retardation we advised a regular transfusion-chelation regimen to our patient to suppress her ineffective dyserythropoiesis. The treatment is expected to prevent further bone fragility and fractures, as well as improve her life quality.

  17. Safety of platelet transfusion: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Katus, M C; Szczepiorkowski, Z M; Dumont, L J; Dunbar, N M

    2014-08-01

    Platelet components became routinely available to many institutions in the late 1960s and since then utilization has steadily increased. Platelets are produced by three principal methods and their manufacturing process is regulated by multiple agencies. As the field of platelet transfusion has evolved, a broad array of strategies to improve platelet safety has developed. This review will explore the evolution of modern platelet component therapy, highlight the various risks associated with platelet transfusion and describe risk reduction strategies that have been implemented to improve platelet transfusion safety. In closing, the reader will be briefly introduced to select investigational platelet and platelet-mimetic products that have the potential to enhance platelet transfusion safety in the near future.

  18. Thrombocytopenia, Platelet Transfusion, and Outcome Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jun Liong; Hisamuddin, Syafiah Hanis; O'Sullivan, Aoife; Chan, Grace; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia affects patients undergoing liver transplantation. Intraoperative platelet transfusion has been shown to independently influence survival after liver transplantation at 1 and 5 years. We examined the impact of thrombocytopenia and intraoperative platelet transfusion on short-term graft and overall survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A total of 399 patients undergoing first OLT were studied. Graft and overall survival in patients with different degrees of thrombocytopenia and with or without intraoperative platelet transfusion were described. The degree of thrombocytopenia prior to OLT did not affect graft or overall survival after transplant. However, graft survival in patients receiving platelets was significantly reduced at 1 year (P= .023) but not at 90 days (P= .093). Overall survival was significantly reduced at both 90 days (P= .040) and 1 year (P= .037) in patients receiving platelets. We conclude that a consistently lower graft and overall survival were observed in patients receiving intraoperative platelet transfusion.

  19. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens of modern trauma care are targeted to the early correction of acute traumatic coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of trauma massive transfusion based on clinical outcomes. We also examined whether the concept was useful in that early prediction of massive transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. Methods Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability of death. A logistic regression model for the prediction of massive transfusion, defined as 10 or more units of red cell transfusions, was developed. Results In total, 5,693 patient records were available for analysis. Mortality increased as transfusion requirements increased, but the model indicated no threshold effect. Mortality was 9% in patients who received none to five PRBC units, 22% in patients receiving six to nine PRBC units, and 42% in patients receiving 10 or more units. A logistic model for prediction of massive transfusion was developed and validated at multiple sites but achieved only moderate performance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.81, with specificity of only 50% at a sensitivity of 90% for the prediction of 10 or more PRBC units. Performance varied widely at different trauma centers, with specificity varying from 48% to 91%. Conclusions No threshold for definition exists at which a massive transfusion specifically results in worse outcomes. Even with a large sample size across multiple trauma datasets, it was not possible to develop a

  20. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  1. Risk of Erectile Dysfunction in Transfusion-naive Thalassemia Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Te-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Dai, Ming-Shen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on the mechanism of pathophysiology, thalassemia major or transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients may have an increased risk of developing organic erectile dysfunction resulting from hypogonadism. However, there have been few studies investigating the association between erectile dysfunction and transfusion-naive thalassemia populations. We constructed a population-based cohort study to elucidate the association between transfusion-naive thalassemia populations and organic erectile dysfunction This nationwide population-based cohort study involved analyzing data from 1998 to 2010 obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, with a follow-up period extending to the end of 2011. We identified men with transfusion-naive thalassemia and selected a comparison cohort that was frequency-matched with these according to age, and year of diagnosis thalassemia at a ratio of 1 thalassemia man to 4 control men. We analyzed the risks for transfusion-naive thalassemia men and organic erectile dysfunction by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In this study, 588 transfusion-naive thalassemia men and 2337 controls were included. Total 12 patients were identified within the thalassaemia group and 10 within the control group. The overall risks for developing organic erectile dysfunction were 4.56-fold in patients with transfusion-naive thalassemia men compared with the comparison cohort after we adjusted for age and comorbidities. Our long-term cohort study results showed that in transfusion-naive thalassemia men, there was a higher risk for the development of organic erectile dysfunction, particularly in those patients with comorbidities. PMID:25837766

  2. Impact of Policy Change on US Army Combat Transfusion Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    feared being transfusion-related acute lung injury ( TRALI ), and infectious. Infectious complications are exceedingly rare with the greatest risk being...hepatitis B virus infection at 1:63,000.33 Noninfectious complications are more common.34,35 Although TRALI remains the most feared, its incidence is...10 –15. 36. Wallis JP, Lubenko A, Wells AW, Chapman CE. Single hospital experience of TRALI . Transfusion. 2003;43:1053–1059. 37. Toy P, Lowell C

  3. Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

    1984-11-01

    To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions.

  4. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  5. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    PubMed

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products.

  6. Successful transfusion-free pancreatectomy in Jehovah's Witness patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Oh; Kim, Dong Won; Jeong, Mi Ae; Lee, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyu Nam

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Although perioperative therapies have improved greatly, pancreatectomies still often need blood transfusions. However, the morbidity from blood transfusions, the poor prognosis of blood transfused patients, high cost, and decreasing supply of blood products is accelerating transfusion-free (TF) surgery in the patients who have pacreatectomies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of TF pancreatectomies for patients who are Jehovah's Witness. Methods We investigated the possibility of TF pancreatectomies for the Jehovah's Witness patients undergoing pancreatectomies between January 2007 and Februay 2014. There were 4 cases of Whipple's operation, 4 of pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, 2 of radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy and 1 of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. All were performed by one surgeon. Results Most of the TF pancreatecomies patients received perioperative blood augmentation and intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH). They received no blood transfusions at any time during their hospitalization, and pre- and intra-operative data and outcomes were acceptably favorable. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first successful consecutive pancreatectomy program for Jehovah's Witness not involving blood transfusion. TF pancreatectomy can be performed successfully in selected Jehovah's Witness. Postoperative prognosis and outcomes should be confirmed in follow up studies. PMID:27621749

  7. Blood transfusion safety; current status and challenges in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aneke, John C.; Okocha, Chide E.

    2017-01-01

    The attainment of blood transfusion safety in Nigeria (and probably the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa) remains an uphill task due to a number of factors, ranging from shortage of blood, poor implementation of blood transfusion guidelines, infrastructural deficits to high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), particularly hepatitis and human immune deficiency viruses. We reviewed available data on blood transfusion practices and safety in Nigeria using the PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and African Index Medicus search engines, through a combination of word and phrases relevant to the subject. The World Health Organization has been in the forefront of efforts to establish safe, available, and affordable blood transfusion services in most parts of Africa through encouraging adequate blood donor recruitment, donor blood testing, and collection as well developing strategies for the rational use of blood. Even though modest improvement has been recorded, particularly with regards to donor blood screening for common TTIs, considerable efforts are needed in the form of robust public enlightenment campaigns (on blood donation) and continuous system improvement to drive the current transfusion practices in the country toward safety and self-sustenance. PMID:28316432

  8. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  9. Disseminated fusariosis and endogenous fungal endophthalmitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following platelet transfusion possibly due to transfusion-related immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To report a case of disseminated fusariosis with endogenous endophthalmitis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Transfusion-associated immune modulation secondary to platelet transfusion could play an important role in the pathophysiology of this case. Case Presentation A 9 year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pancytopenia and disseminated Intravascular coagulation was given platelet transfusion. He developed disseminated fusariosis and was referred to the ophthalmology team for right endogenous endophthalmitis. The infection was controlled with aggressive systemic and intravitreal antifungals. Conclusion Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are predisposed to endogenous fungal endophthalmitis. Transfusion-associated immune modulation may further increase host susceptibility to such opportunistic infections. PMID:22044440

  10. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion.

  11. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion. PMID:26538747

  12. A Yeast Toxic Mutant of HET-s(218-289) Prion Displays Alternative Intermediates of Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Géan, Julie; Immel, Françoise; Cullin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Amyloids are thought to be involved in various types of neurodegenerative disorders. Several kinds of intermediates, differing in morphology, size, and toxicity, have been identified in the multistep amyloidogenesis process. However, the mechanisms explaining amyloid toxicity remain unclear. We previously generated a toxic mutant of the nontoxic HET-s(218-289) amyloid in yeast. Here we report that toxic and nontoxic amyloids differ not only in their structures but also in their assembling process. We used multiple and complementary methods to investigate the intermediates formed by these two amyloids. With the methods used, no intermediates were observed for the nontoxic amyloid; however, under the same experimental conditions, the toxic mutant displayed visible oligomeric and fibrillar intermediates. PMID:20713008

  13. Repeat ABO-incompatible platelet transfusions leading to haemolytic transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Sadani, D T; Urbaniak, S J; Bruce, M; Tighe, J E

    2006-10-01

    A 65-year-old woman, blood group A RhD positive, who had completed her first course of induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia was transfused with apheresis platelets over a number of days. On three occasions she received group O RhD positive units, which had been screened and found not to contain high-titre anti-A,B isoagglutinins. Following the third unit, she developed a haemolytic transfusion reaction and died soon thereafter. This has led to change in policy of the supplying centre in testing for high-titre anti-A,B isoagglutinins. Blood group O apheresis platelets and fresh-frozen plasma units are now labelled as high titre with a cut-off of 1/50 as compared to the previous cut-off of 1/100 for anti-A,B isoagglutinins. A universal approach to testing donations for high-titre anti-A,B isoagglutinins, better compliance of guidelines and monitoring of patients is necessary.

  14. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karanbir; Gupta, Rajesh; Kamal, Haris; Silvestri, Nicholas J; Wolfe, Gil I

    2015-03-01

    The appearance of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after blood transfusion is rare and has only been reported in three patients to our knowledge. We report a fourth patient with PRES secondary to blood transfusion. A 36-year-old woman with a history of menorrhagia presented to the emergency department with severe fatigue. She had a hemoglobin of 1.7 g/dl and received four units of red blood cells over 15 hours. On day 6 post-transfusion she returned with confusion, headache and a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The MRI of her brain was consistent with PRES. The following day her confusion worsened, repeat MRI of the brain showed new T2-weighted lesions. Over next 10 days her mental status gradually improved close to her baseline. A repeat MRI of the brain showed resolution of the T2-weighted lesions. The clinical presentation, radiological findings and disease progression in our patient was consistent with PRES. Other than the blood transfusions, there were no apparent risk factors for PRES. The prior three patients with post-transfusion PRES have been reported in middle-aged women with uterine fibroids. It is suspected that these patients have a subacute to chronic anemic state due to ongoing menorrhagia. It is interesting to note that no cases of PRES post-transfusion have been reported in the setting of acute blood loss, such as from trauma. It is postulated that an abrupt increase in hemoglobin causes a rapid rise in blood viscosity and loss of hypoxic vasodilation. Subsequent endothelial damage and brain capillary leakage results in PRES. This constellation of changes may not occur after transfusion in patients with more acute blood loss.

  16. Prolonged red cell storage before transfusion increases extravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rapido, Francesca; Brittenham, Gary M.; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; La Carpia, Francesca; L’Acqua, Camilla; McMahon, Donald J.; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Netterwald, Jane; Wang, Hangli; Schwartz, Joseph; Eisenberger, Andrew; Soffing, Mark; Yeh, Randy; Divgi, Chaitanya; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Shaz, Beth H.; Sheth, Sujit; Francis, Richard O.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Hod, Eldad A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Some countries have limited the maximum allowable storage duration for red cells to 5 weeks before transfusion. In the US, red blood cells can be stored for up to 6 weeks, but randomized trials have not assessed the effects of this final week of storage on clinical outcomes. METHODS. Sixty healthy adult volunteers were randomized to a single standard, autologous, leukoreduced, packed red cell transfusion after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks of storage (n = 10 per group). 51-Chromium posttransfusion red cell recovery studies were performed and laboratory parameters measured before and at defined times after transfusion. RESULTS. Extravascular hemolysis after transfusion progressively increased with increasing storage time (P < 0.001 for linear trend in the AUC of serum indirect bilirubin and iron levels). Longer storage duration was associated with decreasing posttransfusion red cell recovery (P = 0.002), decreasing elevations in hematocrit (P = 0.02), and increasing serum ferritin (P < 0.0001). After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion was followed by increases in AUC for serum iron (P < 0.01), transferrin saturation (P < 0.001), and nontransferrin-bound iron (P < 0.001) as compared with transfusion after 1 to 5 weeks of storage. CONCLUSIONS. After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion of autologous red cells to healthy human volunteers increased extravascular hemolysis, saturated serum transferrin, and produced circulating nontransferrin-bound iron. These outcomes, associated with increased risks of harm, provide evidence that the maximal allowable red cell storage duration should be reduced to the minimum sustainable by the blood supply, with 35 days as an attainable goal. REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02087514. FUNDING. NIH grant HL115557 and UL1 TR000040. PMID:27941245

  17. Effect of transfusion therapy on cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle-cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Verlhac, Suzanne; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Ithier, Ghislaine; Sellami, Fatiha; Faid, Sonia; Missud, Florence; Ducrocq, Rolande; Alberti, Corinne; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Baruchel, Andre; Benkerrou, Malika

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the long-term effect of transfusional exchange therapy on MRA/MRI abnormalities in 24 homozygous sickle-cell anemia (HbSS) children presenting with abnormal brain MRA. The median time elapsed from baseline to last available MRA was 29 months. Follow-up MRAs showed improvement, stabilization or worsening of cerebrovascular lesions in 11, 6 and 7 patients respectively. Complete normalization of MRA was observed in 6 patients within a mean time of 1.4 years, but stenosis recurred at the same location in the 4 patients in whom transfusion therapy was discontinued. Baseline severe stenosis/occlusion of large cerebral arteries and occurrence of moyamoya syndrome were significantly associated with an absence of improvement of the cerebral vasculopathy. These data emphasize the heterogeneity of the course of cerebrovasculopathy in SS children receiving chronic transfusion. Further studies are needed to determine whether different therapeutic approaches have to be considered according to these different evolutive patterns in SS children. PMID:19059938

  18. Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahieu-Caputo, Dominique; Dommergues, Marc; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Mireille; Cai, Yi; Narcy, Françoise; Jolly, Dominique; Gonzales, Marie; Dumez, Yves; Gubler, Marie-Claire

    2000-01-01

    The twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTS) results from an unbalanced blood supply through placental anastomoses in monochorionic twins. It induces growth restriction, renal tubular dysgenesis, and oliguria in the donor and visceromegaly and polyuria in the recipient. A better understanding of its pathophysiology could contribute to improving the management of TTS, which still carries a high perinatal mortality in both twins. As well as several other candidates, the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in TTS. To evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the kidneys of 21 twin pairs who died from TTS at 19 to 30 weeks, compared with 39 individuals in a control group, using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The overexpression of the renin protein and transcript with frequent evidence of renin synthesis by mesangial cells was observed in the donor kidneys, presumably as a consequence of chronic renal hypoperfusion. This upregulation of renin synthesis might be beneficial to restore euvolemia. In severe cases of TTS, however, angiotensin-II-induced vasoconstriction acts as an additional deleterious factor by further reducing the renal blood flow in donors. In recipients, renin expression was virtually absent, possibly because it was down-regulated by hypervolemia. However, in addition to congestion and hemorrhagic infarction, there were severe glomerular and arterial lesions resembling those observed in polycythemia- or hypertension-induced microangiopathy. We speculate that fetal hypertension in the recipient might be partly mediated by the transfer of circulating renin produced by the donor, through the placental vascular shunts. PMID:10666392

  19. [Septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri in a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Tichit, R; Saumet, L; Marchandin, H; Haouy, S; Latry, P; Sirvent, N

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial transfusion risk is currently the greatest infectious risk of blood transfusion. We report the case of a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia who presented septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri. The life-threatening development could have been avoided by strict compliance with good clinical practice. The stability of mortality rates due to adverse effects of bacterial proliferation during platelet transfusions in France since 1994 calls for optimization of all preventive measures throughout the transfusion chain and perfect knowledge of transfusion rules by medical staff and care givers.

  20. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  1. Autologous versus allogeneic transfusion: patients' perceptions and experiences

    PubMed Central

    Graham, I D; Fergusson, D; Dokainish, H; Biggs, J; McAuley, L; Laupacis, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative autologous donation is one way to decrease a patient's exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion. This study was designed to determine patients' perceptions about the autologous blood donation process and their experiences with transfusion. METHODS: To assess patient perception, a questionnaire was administered a few days before surgery to patients undergoing elective cardiac and orthopedic surgery in a Canadian teaching hospital. All patients attending the preoperative autologous donation clinic during a 10-month period were eligible. A convenience sample of patients undergoing the same types of surgery who had not predonated blood were selected from preadmission clinics. Patient charts were reviewed retrospectively to assess actual transfusion practice in all cases. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients underwent cardiac surgery (40 autologous donors, 40 nondonors) and 73 underwent orthopedic surgery (38 autologous donors, 35 nondonors). Of the autologous donors, 75 (96%) attended all scheduled donation appointments, 73 (93%) said that they were "very likely" or "likely" to predonate again, and 75 (96%) said that they would recommend autologous donation to others. There was little difference in preoperative symptoms between the autologous donors and the nondonors, although the former were more likely than the latter to report that their overall health had remained the same during the month before surgery (30 [75%] v. 21 [52%] for the cardiac surgery patients and 30 [79%] v. 18 [51%] for the orthopedic surgery patients). When the autologous donors were asked what they felt their chances would have been of receiving at least one allogeneic blood transfusion had they not predonated, the median response was 80%. When they were asked what their chances were after predonating their own blood, the median response was 0%. The autologous donors were significantly less likely to receive allogeneic blood transfusions (6 [15%] for cardiac surgery and 3 [8

  2. Detection of autologous blood transfusions in athletes: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mørkeberg, Jakob

    2012-07-01

    Autologous blood transfusions (ABTs) has been used by athletes for approximately 4 decades to enhance their performance. Although the method was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee in the mid 1980s, no direct detection method has yet been developed and implemented by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Several indirect methods have been proposed with the majority relying on changes in erythropoiesis-sensitive blood markers. Compared with the first methods developed in 1987, the sensitivity of subsequent tests has not improved the detection of blood doping. Nevertheless, the use of sophisticated statistical algorithms has assured a higher level of specificity in subsequent detection models, which is a crucial aspect of antidoping testing particularly to avoid "false positives." Today, the testing markers with the best sensitivity/specificity ratio are the Hbmr model (an algorithm based on the total amount of circulating hemoglobin level [hemoglobin level mass] and percentage of reticulocytes, 4.51·ln(Hbmass)-√%ret) and the OFF-hr model (algorithm based on hemoglobin level concentration and percentage of reticulocytes, Hb(g/L)-60·√%ret). Only the OFF-hr model is currently approved by WADA. Recently, alternative indirect strategies for detecting blood doping have been proposed. One method is based upon a transfusion-induced immune-response resulting in specific changes in gene expression related to leukocytes such as T lymphocytes. Another method relies on detecting increased plasticizer metabolite levels in the urine caused by the leakage of plasticizers from the blood bags used during the blood storage. These methods need further development and validation across different types of transfusion regimes before they can be implemented. In addition, several research projects have been funded by WADA in recent years and are now under development including "Detection of Autologous Blood Transfusions Using Activated Red Blood Cells (the red blood cells

  3. Retrospective evaluation of adverse transfusion reactions following blood product transfusion from a tertiary care hospital: A preliminary step towards hemovigilance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Thapliyal, Rakesh; Coshic, Poonam; Chatterjee, Kabita

    2013-01-01

    Background: The goal of hemovigilance is to increase the safety and quality of blood transfusion. Identification of the adverse reactions will help in taking appropriate steps to reduce their incidence and make blood transfusion process as safe as possible. Aims: To determine the frequency and type of transfusion reactions (TRs) occurring in patients, reported to the blood bank at our institute. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all TRs reported to the blood bank at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, between December 2007 and April 2012 was done. All the TRs were evaluated in the blood bank and classified using standard definitions. Results: During the study period a total of 380,658 bloods and blood components were issued by our blood bank. Out of the total 196 adverse reactions reported under the hemovigilance system, the most common type of reaction observed was allergic 55.1% (n = 108), followed by febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) 35.7% (n = 70). Other less frequently observed reactions were Anaphylactoid reactions 5.1% (n = 10), Acute non-immune HTRs 2.6% (n = 5), Circulatory overload 0.5% (n = 1), Transfusion related acute lung injury 0.5% (n = 1), Delayed HTRs 0.5% (n = 1). Not a single case of bacterial contamination was observed. Conclusion: The frequency of TRs in our patients was found to be 0.05% (196 out of 380,658). This can be an underestimation of the true incidence because of under reporting. It should be the responsibility of the blood transfusion consultant to create awareness amongst their clinical counterpart about safe transfusion practices so that proper hemovigilance system can be achieved to provide better patient care. PMID:24014939

  4. Transfusion safety in developing countries and the Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Ray, V L; Chaudhary, R K; Choudhury, N

    2000-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic has brought into focus the importance of safe blood transfusion. The management of an effective transfusion service is an expensive endeavour even in the most developed countries, and is therefore a monumental challenge for developing countries with limited budgets and other priorities. HIV prevalence in the Indian population has shown a steady rise from 0.5% in 1990 to 1.2% in 1997 with the highest prevalence in cities. When the HIV infection was discovered in India in 1986, the health authorities set up the National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) with a primary focus on ensuring a safe blood supply. NACO was funded by the World Bank and technically supported by WHO. The supreme Court of India has also taken up the issue of blood safety by banning paid donations by the end of 1997 and established the autonomous National Blood Transfusion Council and the State Transfusion Councils. The Drugs Controller of India and State F.D.A. have issued licences to all blood banks to streamline them after all requirements are met. However, there are a number of blood banks which are operating without licences. While India collects three million units of blood, barely 10% is available as blood components, and only a percentage of the blood is being screened for infectious markers. Nevertheless, there is a general recognition that an improved transfusion service is required in India.

  5. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahdi; Faraoni, David

    2015-07-26

    Although red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions, anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. For these reasons, the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia, prevent excessive blood loss, and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions, several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications, dosage, and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects, some high-risk patients (e.g., symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade, a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  6. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A; Matthay, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underreported complication of transfusion therapy, and it is the third most common cause of transfusion-associated death. TRALI is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy. The diagnosis of TRALI relies on excluding other diagnoses such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Supportive diagnostic evidence includes identifying neutrophil or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in the donor or recipient plasma. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, with the majority of cases linked to whole blood, packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of TRALI may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, with the first "hit" being a predisposing inflammatory condition commonly present in the operating room or ICU. The second hit may involve the passive transfer of neutrophil or HLA antibodies from the donor or the transfusion of biologically active lipids from older, cellular blood products. Treatment is supportive, with a prognosis substantially better than most causes of clinical acute lung injury.

  8. Strategies for achieving transfusion independence in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mary Laudon

    2007-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of complex diseases of the myeloid stem cell that result in chronic cytopenias. In some instances, these disorders may progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with MDS frequently experience chronic, symptomatic anemia, and many become dependent on chronic transfusions of packed red blood cells. However, long-term transfusion dependence has clinical and economic consequences, including a potentially negative impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). Recently, studies have investigated various strategies to reduce or eliminate transfusion needs in MDS patients. Supportive measures with hematopoietic growth factors such as erythropoietin are often less effective in MDS-associated anemia than in anemia from other causes, but some patients may benefit from this approach. Treatment with other agents, such as antithymocyte globulin, azacitidine, decitabine, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, has resulted in transfusion independence in some subsets of MDS patients. Nurses who care for patients with MDS should be aware of the impact of transfusion dependence on the patient's QOL, as well as the benefits and risks of the various other treatment options available to these patients. Such knowledge will enable the nurse to provide accurate, relevant information, so that patients can make informed choices regarding treatment options for MDS.

  9. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  10. Pathology consultation on transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Adamski, Jill

    2012-10-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious condition characterized by respiratory distress, hypoxia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, which occur within 6 hours of transfusion. Several theories have been proposed to explain the underlying pathologic mechanisms of TRALI. Immune-mediated TRALI accounts for over 80% of reported cases and is mediated by donor antibodies to HLAs and/or human neutrophil antigens (HNA). Immune-mediated TRALI is most commonly associated with donor plasma transfusion or other blood products from multiparous women, which has led many countries to reduce or exclude women from donating high-volume plasma products. This policy change has resulted in a decrease in the incidence of TRALI and highlighted the importance of nonimmune-mediated TRALI, which is thought to be caused by bioreactive lipids and other biologic response modifiers that accumulate during storage of blood products. When TRALI is suspected, clinical consultation with a transfusion medicine specialist helps differentiate it from other transfusion reactions with similar characteristics.

  11. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  12. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for five days released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol’s beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  13. Bartonella henselae transmission by blood transfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marilene Neves; Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Ericson, Marna Elise; Gupta, Kalpna; Gilioli, Rovilson; de Almeida, Amanda Roberta; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; de Almeida Lins, Karina; Soares, Tania Cristina Benetti; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bartonella spp. are neglected fastidious Gram-negative bacilli. We isolated Bartonella henselae from 1.2% of 500 studied blood donors and demonstrated that the bacteria remain viable in red blood cell units after 35 days of experimental infection. Now, we aim to evaluate the possibility of B. henselae transmission by blood transfusion in a mouse model. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Eight BALB/c mice were intraperitoneal inoculated with a 30μLof suspension with 104 CFU/mL of B. henselae and a second group of eight mice were inoculated with saline solution and used as control. After 96 hours of inoculation, the animals were euthanized. We collected blood and tissue samples from skin, liver, and spleen. Thirty microliters of blood from four Bartonella-inoculated animals were transfused into a new group (n=4). Another group received blood from the control animals. B. henselae infection was investigated by conventional and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS Blood samples from all 24 mice were negative by molecular tests though half of the tissue samples were positive by nested PCR in the intraperitoneal Bartonella-investigated animals. Tissues from two of the four mice that received blood transfusions from Bartonella-inoculated animals were also nested PCR positives. CONCLUSIONS Transmission of B. henselae by transfusion is possible in mice even when donor animals have undetectable bloodstream infection. The impact of human Bartonella sp. transmission through blood transfusion recipients must be evaluated. PMID:26968530

  14. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  15. 40 CFR 721.4100 - Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle. 721.4100 Section 721.4100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4100 Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle. (a) Chemical...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4100 - Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle. 721.4100 Section 721.4100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4100 Tris(disubstituted alkyl) het-er-o-cy-cle. (a) Chemical...

  17. LRS2: A New Integral Field Spectrograph for the HET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Hill, Gary J.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Tonnesen, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Here we present LRS2 (Low Resolution Spectrograph) and highlight early science opportunities with the newly upgraded Hobby Eberly telescope (HET). LRS2 is a four-channel optical wavelength (370nm - 1micron) spectrograph based on two VIRUS unit spectrographs. This fiber-fed integral field spectrograph covers a 12" x 6" field of view, switched between the two units (one blue, and one red) at R~2000. We highlight design elements, including the fundamental modification to grisms (from VPH gratings in VIRUS) to access the higher resolution. We discuss early science opportunities, including investigating nearby "blue-bulge" spiral galaxies and their anomalous star formation distribution.

  18. Fiber Diffraction of the Prion-Forming Domain HET-s(218-289) Shows Dehydration-Induced Deformation of a Complex Amyloid Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    Amyloids are filamentous protein aggregates that can be formed by many different proteins and are associated with both disease and biological functions. The pathogenicities or biological functions of amyloids are determined by their particular molecular structures, making accurate structural models a requirement for understanding their biological effects. One potential factor that can affect amyloid structures is hydration. Previous studies of simple stacked β-sheet amyloids have suggested that dehydration does not impact structure, but other studies indicated dehydration-related structural changes of a putative water-filled nanotube. Our results show that dehydration significantly affects the molecular structure of the fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289), which forms a β-solenoid with no internal solvent-accessible regions. The dehydration-related structural deformation of HET-s(218–289) indicates that water can play a significant role in complex amyloid structures, even when no obvious water-accessible cavities are present.

  19. Fiber Diffraction of the Prion-Forming Domain HET-s(218–289) Shows Dehydration-Induced Deformation of a Complex Amyloid Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are filamentous protein aggregates that can be formed by many different proteins and are associated with both disease and biological functions. The pathogenicities or biological functions of amyloids are determined by their particular molecular structures, making accurate structural models a requirement for understanding their biological effects. One potential factor that can affect amyloid structures is hydration. Previous studies of simple stacked β-sheet amyloids have suggested that dehydration does not impact structure, but other studies indicated dehydration-related structural changes of a putative water-filled nanotube. Our results show that dehydration significantly affects the molecular structure of the fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289), which forms a β-solenoid with no internal solvent-accessible regions. The dehydration-related structural deformation of HET-s(218–289) indicates that water can play a significant role in complex amyloid structures, even when no obvious water-accessible cavities are present. PMID:24670041

  20. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society.

  1. Transfusion as an Inflammation Hit: Knowns and Unknowns

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Tariket, S.; Sut, C.; Haddad, A.; Aloui, C.; Chakroun, T.; Laradi, S.; Cognasse, F.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion of blood cell components is frequent in the therapeutic arsenal; it is globally safe or even very safe. At present, residual clinical manifestations are principally inflammatory in nature. If some rare clinical hazards manifest as acute inflammation symptoms of various origin, most of them linked with conflicting and undesirable biological material accompanying the therapeutic component (infectious pathogen, pathogenic antibody, unwanted antigen, or allergen), the general feature is subtler and less visible, and essentially consists of alloimmunization or febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction. The present essay aims to present updates in hematology and immunology that help understand how, when, and why subclinical inflammation underlies alloimmunization and circumstances characteristic of red blood cells and – even more frequently – platelets that contribute inflammatory mediators. Modern transfusion medicine makes sustained efforts to limit such inflammatory hazards; efforts can be successful only if one has a clear view of each element’s role. PMID:27965664

  2. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  3. Pulmonary insults due to transfusions, radiation, and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, P.

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary insults caused by transfusion, radiation, and hyperoxia share many clinical features with insults caused by serious pulmonary infections. The major objective in evaluating these patients is to establish the diagnosis with as much certainty as possible. Unfortunately, there are no clinical aspects or laboratory tests that are pathognomonic for these diseases; therefore, it is often necessary to rely on a knowledge of those features which help to distinguish these disorders from infectious etiologies. For example, patients suffering from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) experience onset of insult within 6 hours of a transfusion and have the presence of leukoagglutinins in their serum. Patients with radiation injuries frequently have roentgenographic infiltrates that conform to the ports of radiation. Despite extensive animal and human studies, factors distinguishing hyperoxic injury from infectious disorders remain poorly defined. These clinical features and others are reviewed to identify the essential components in the diagnosis of TRALI, acute radiation pneumonitis, and hyperoxic pneumonitis. 84 references.

  4. Blood transfusion in peace and war, 1900-1918.

    PubMed

    Schneider, W H

    1997-04-01

    The practice of blood transfusion became commonplace in the first half of the twentieth century, a time that coincided with the practice of war on a hitherto unprecedented scale. A close examination of the process reveals that it was not a simple one of war acting as a stimulus to scientific and medical discovery. Most innovations had their origins in the United States before the war, whose main effect was to diffuse and perfect transfusion through greatly increased use of the technique. The result was that in less than twenty years blood transfusion changed from being a medical curiosity and procedure of last resort to a practical and relatively simple treatment that demonstrated its value in saving thousands of lives.

  5. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (<1:1) subgroups. Coagulation was detected before and after 24 h of massive blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P < 0.05) in the low plasma subgroup of coagulation normal group after massive blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the ratio of plasma to erythrocyte should be adjusted according to the patient's coagulation function during massive blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  6. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  7. [Transfusion medicine in the 2000s, on a reform].

    PubMed

    Hervé, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The creation of the Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) was mentioned in the Law of July 1, 1998, pertaining to sanitary safety. The EFS is the sole operator of blood transfusion. With a unique legal status, supervised by the Ministry in charge of Health, the EFS organizes the activities involved in the transfusion chain over the whole territory, it promotes research activities and take part in international scientific cooperation. Its activities include medical biology as well as cell and gene therapy. As part of the new 2000-2004 territorial transfusion scheme, the EFS network comprises 18 centers (versus 43 in the previous plan), 14 of which are located in the French territory and the other 4 overseas. The network includes 18 technical platforms for the biological qualification of blood products, while 27 are dedicated to their preparation, transformation and storage. The activities of collection and distribution, which comply with the principle of proximity to both donors and patients, are ensured by 220 sites spread over the whole territory. For the future, the EFS wants to focus its efforts on reducing residual infectious risks (using molecular biology tools), preventing immunological risks, drawing up an education program aiming at teaching transfusion medicine differently. Despite the advances achieved in biotechnologies, the development of substitution products to replace blood transfusion will still require a lot of time. The EFS wishes to focus its action following three different axes: transfusion medicine, medical biology and cell engineering. With its 18 centers and its 8,200 persons, the EFS must face the challengers of the 2000s, relying on the advances in biotechnologies.

  8. A Computerized Prediction Model of Hazardous Inflammatory Platelet Transfusion Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Sebban, Marc; Fromont, Elisa; Chavarin, Patricia; Absi, Lena; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet component (PC) transfusion leads occasionally to inflammatory hazards. Certain BRMs that are secreted by the platelets themselves during storage may have some responsibility. Methodology/Principal Findings First, we identified non-stochastic arrangements of platelet-secreted BRMs in platelet components that led to acute transfusion reactions (ATRs). These data provide formal clinical evidence that platelets generate secretion profiles under both sterile activation and pathological conditions. We next aimed to predict the risk of hazardous outcomes by establishing statistical models based on the associations of BRMs within the incriminated platelet components and using decision trees. We investigated a large (n = 65) series of ATRs after platelet component transfusions reported through a very homogenous system at one university hospital. Herein, we used a combination of clinical observations, ex vivo and in vitro investigations, and mathematical modeling systems. We calculated the statistical association of a large variety (n = 17) of cytokines, chemokines, and physiologically likely factors with acute inflammatory potential in patients presenting with severe hazards. We then generated an accident prediction model that proved to be dependent on the level (amount) of a given cytokine-like platelet product within the indicated component, e.g., soluble CD40-ligand (>289.5 pg/109 platelets), or the presence of another secreted factor (IL-13, >0). We further modeled the risk of the patient presenting either a febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction or an atypical allergic transfusion reaction, depending on the amount of the chemokine MIP-1α (<20.4 or >20.4 pg/109 platelets, respectively). Conclusions/Significance This allows the modeling of a policy of risk prevention for severe inflammatory outcomes in PC transfusion. PMID:24830754

  9. Mass analysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction validate predictions of stacked beta-solenoid model of HET-s prion fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anindito; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Wall, Joseph S; Sabate, Raimon; Saupe, Sven J; Steven, Alasdair C

    2007-02-23

    Fungal prions are infectious filamentous polymers of proteins that are soluble in uninfected cells. In its prion form, the HET-s protein of Podospora anserina participates in a fungal self/non-self recognition phenomenon called heterokaryon incompatibility. Like other prion proteins, HET-s has a so-called "prion domain" (its C-terminal region, HET-s-(218-289)) that is responsible for induction and propagation of the prion in vivo and for fibril formation in vitro. Prion fibrils are thought to have amyloid backbones of polymerized prion domains. A relatively detailed model has been proposed for prion domain fibrils of HET-s based on a variety of experimental constraints (Ritter, C., Maddelein, M. L., Siemer, A. B., Luhrs, T., Ernst, M., Meier, B. H., Saupe, S. J., and Riek, R. (2005) Nature 435, 844-848). To test specific predictions of this model, which envisages axial stacking of beta-solenoids with two coils per subunit, we examined fibrils by electron microscopy. Electron diffraction gave a prominent meridional reflection at (0.47 nm)(-1), indicative of cross-beta structure, as predicted. STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) mass-per-unit-length measurements yielded 1.02 +/- 0.16 subunits per 0.94 nm, in agreement with the model prediction (1 subunit per 0.94 nm). This is half the packing density of approximately 1 subunit per 0.47 nm previously obtained for fibrils of the yeast prion proteins, Ure2p and Sup35p, whence it follows that the respective amyloid architectures are basically different.

  10. Structure of transcription factor HetR required for heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Joachimiak, G.; Ye, Z.; Binkowski, T; Zhang, R.; Gornicki, P.; Callahan, S.; Hess, W.; Haselkorn, R.; Joachimiak, A.

    2011-06-21

    HetR is an essential regulator of heterocyst development in cyanobacteria. HetR binds to a DNA palindrome upstream of the hetP gene. We report the crystal structure of HetR from Fischerella at 3.0 {angstrom}. The protein is a dimer comprised of a central DNA-binding unit containing the N-terminal regions of the two subunits organized with two helix-turn-helix motifs; two globular flaps extending in opposite directions; and a hood over the central core formed from the C-terminal subdomains. The flaps and hood have no structural precedent in the protein database, therefore representing new folds. The structural assignments are supported by site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-binding studies. We suggest that HetR serves as a scaffold for assembly of transcription components critical for heterocyst development.

  11. Blood transfusions in critical care: improving safety through technology & process analysis.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, Rebecca K; Brient, Kathy; Clark, Marie; Custard, Kristi; Davis, Carolyn; Gecomo, Jonathan; Ho, Judy Ong

    2010-06-01

    A multidisciplinary safety initiative transformed blood transfusion practices at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas. An intense analysis of a mistransfusion using the principles of a Just Culture and the process of Cause Mapping identified system and human performance factors that led to the transfusion error. Multiple initiatives were implemented including technology, education and human behaviour change. The wireless technology of Pyxis Transfusion Verification by CareFusion is effective with the rapid infusion module efficient for use in critical care. Improvements in blood transfusion safety were accomplished by thoroughly evaluating the process of transfusions and by implementing wireless electronic transfusion verification technology. During the 27 months following implementation of the CareFusion Transfusion Verification there have been zero cases of transfusing mismatched blood.

  12. Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets.

    PubMed

    Tang, David H; Olesnicky, Bohdan T; Eby, Michael W; Heiskell, Lawrence E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear(®), a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear(®) as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings.

  13. Microparticles in Stored RBC as Potential Mediators of Transfusion Complications

    PubMed Central

    Jy, Wenche; Ricci, Marco; Shariatmadar, Sherry; Gomez-Marin, Orlando; Horstman, Lawrence H; Ahn, Yeon S

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews evidence for the involvement of cell-derived microparticles (MP) in transfusion-related adverse events. The controversy concerning possible added risk of older vs. fresher stored blood is also reviewed, and is consistent with the hypothesis that MP are involved with adverse events. Although all types of circulating MP are discussed, the emphasis is on red cell-derived MP (RMP). The evidence is particularly strong for involvement of RMP in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), but also for post-operative thrombosis. However, this evidence is largely circumstantial. Work in progress to directly test the hypothesis is also briefly reviewed. PMID:21496051

  14. [Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV) and renal failure].

    PubMed

    Tarrass, Faissal; Koenig, Jean Louis; Leroy, Fanny; Mackaya, Léandre; Colomb, Henri

    2006-09-01

    In 1997, a new DNA virus, designated TTV "Transfusion Transmitted Virus", was isolated and seemed to be associated with non A-G post-transfusion hepatitis. The virus infects mainly patients at risk for parenteral exposure and hence, prone to develop chronic liver disease, as well as healthy populations worldwide. Few reports, however, have been published on the epidemiology and potential significance of TTV infection in patients with renal disease. This paper reviews, characterization of the virus, the history of its discovery, taxonomy and identification. Current status of TTV infection in patients with renal diseases are also summarised.

  15. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  16. [Preventive measures against transfusion-associated complications and side effects].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miho; Ikebuchi, Kenji

    2008-09-01

    The current efforts and strategies have greatly helped reduce transfusion-associated risks. Indeed, the risk of being infected by a contaminated blood unit today is lower than that thirty years ago. This improvement is due to the introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT). Compatibility testing is designed to ensure that the patient receives the intended units of red cell concentrate (RCC) and that transfusion will be effective with minimum risk of adverse reactions. The process includes ABO and Rh typing of patients, testing recipient serum for clinically important alloantibodies, and crossmatching donor red cells with recipient serum by a technique that detects serological incompatibility.

  17. Wild type and mutants of the HET-s(218-289) prion show different flexibility at fibrillar ends: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ran; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2014-03-01

    The C-terminal segment (residues 218-289) of the HET-s protein of the filamentous fungus Podosporina anserina is a prion-forming domain. The structural model of the HET-s(218-289) amyloid fibril based on solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints shows a β solenoid topology which is comprised of a β-sheet core and interconnecting loops. For the single-point mutants Phe286Ala and Trp287Ala, slower aggregation rates in vitro and loss of prionic infectivity have been reported recently. Here we have used molecular dynamics to compare the flexibility of the mutants and wild type. The simulations, initiated from a trimeric aggregate extracted from the NMR structural model, show structural stability on a 100-ns time scale for wild type and mutants. Analysis of the fluctuations along the simulations reveals that the mutants are less flexible than the wild type in the C-terminal segment at only one of the two external monomers. Analysis of interaction energy and buried accessible surface indicates that residue Phe286 in particular is stabilized in the Trp287Ala mutant. The simulation results provide an atomistic explanation of the suggestion (based on indirect experimental evidence) that flexibility at the protofibril end(s) is required for fibril elongation. Moreover, they provide further evidence that the growth of the HET-s amyloid fibril is directional.

  18. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  19. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218–289)*

    PubMed Central

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation. PMID:23986444

  20. From blood transfusion to patient blood management: a new paradigm for patient care and cost assessment of blood transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Leahy, M F; Mukhtar, S A

    2012-03-01

    The ageing population in developed countries, including Australia, is putting increasing demands on blood transfusion services. With a falling donor pool there is likely to be a shortage of blood and blood products in the next 20 to 30 years unless there are significant changes in medical practice. The National Health and Medical Research Council/Australasian Society of Blood Transfusion Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Blood Components from 2001 are being redeveloped by the National Health and Medical Research Council/Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion as evidence-based patient-focused Patient Blood Management guidelines with the aim of improving patient outcomes by reducing inappropriate blood and blood product use and targeting therapies for improving the management of anaemia and coagulopathies.

  1. [Chagas' disease in patients in chronic hemodialysis. Prevalence and risk of transmission by blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Lorca, M; Lorca, E; Atías, A; Plubins, L

    1989-06-01

    A serologic study of Chagas disease was performed in 110 patients submitted to chronic hemodialisis and blood transfusions. Immunofluorescence antibody testing (IgG and IgM) was positive in 6 out of 62 patients receiving multiple blood transfusions (9.7%), but negative in all 48 subjects without transfusions. Thus, repeated blood transfusion is a significant risk for T cruzi infection in chronic hemodialized patients.

  2. Risk factors for intraoperative massive transfusion in pediatric liver transplantation: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seok-Joon; Kim, Sun-Key; Choi, Seong-Soo; Kang, Keum Nae; Rhyu, Chang Joon; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Young-Kug

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pediatric liver transplantation (LT) is strongly associated with increased intraoperative blood transfusion requirement and postoperative morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we aimed to assess the risk factors associated with massive transfusion in pediatric LT, and examined the effect of massive transfusion on the postoperative outcomes. Methods: We enrolled pediatric patients who underwent LT between December 1994 and June 2015. Massive transfusion was defined as the administration of red blood cells ≥100% of the total blood volume during LT. The cases of pediatric LT were assigned to the massive transfusion or no-massive transfusion (administration of red blood cells <100% of the total blood volume during LT) group. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the risk factors associated with massive transfusion in pediatric LT. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, with the log rank test, was used to compare graft and patient survival within 6 months after pediatric LT between the 2 groups. Results: The total number of LT was 112 (45.0%) and 137 (55.0%) in the no-massive transfusion and massive transfusion groups, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that high white blood cell (WBC) count, low platelet count, and cadaveric donors were significant predictive factors of massive transfusion during pediatric LT. The graft failure rate within 6 months in the massive transfusion group tended to be higher than that in the no-massive transfusion group (6.6% vs. 1.8%, P = 0.068). However, the patient mortality rate within 6 months did not differ significantly between the massive transfusion and no-massive transfusion groups (7.3% vs. 7.1%, P = 0.964). Conclusion: Massive transfusion during pediatric LT is significantly associated with a high WBC count, low platelet count, and cadaveric donor. This finding can provide a better understanding of perioperative blood transfusion management

  3. Prevalence of HLA antibodies in remotely transfused or alloexposed volunteer blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kakaiya, Ram M.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Wright, David J.; Steele, Whitney R.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Rios, Jorge A.; Carey, Patricia; Glynn, Simone A.

    2010-01-01

    Background HLA antibody testing of previously transfused or pregnant donors may help reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the prevalence of HLA antibodies in transfused donors has not been well characterized. Methods Transfusion and pregnancy history was obtained from consenting donors. HLA Class I & II antibody testing was performed by multi-antigen bead Luminex platform. Cut off values for class I & II antibodies used normalized background ratio of 10.8 and 6.9 respectively. Linear probability models were used to evaluate potential associations between HLA alloimmunization and donor characteristics. Results 7,920 donors (2,086 males and 5,834 females) were tested. HLA antibody prevalence did not significantly differ between 895 transfused (1.7%) and 1138 non-transfused males (1.0%), [odds ratio (OR) 1.75; 95% CI 0.80, 3.82]. Prevalence in 45 transfused nulliparous females (4.4%, 95% CI 0.1%, 11.8%) was not statistically different from the 1.6% prevalence in 1732 non-transfused nulliparous females (odds ratio 2.94, 95% CI 0.68, 12.74). Transfused parous females had higher prevalence than non-transfused counterparts (p=0.004), odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 1.07, 1.80). In a linear probability model, the estimated additive risk of transfusion-induced alloimmunization was only 0.8% (95% CI -0.2%, 1.8%), (p=0.10). Donor transfusion history showed that 58% of transfusions occurred >10 years previously. Conclusion Transfused volunteer blood donors do not appear to have a significantly higher prevalence of HLA antibodies than their non-transfused counterparts. Thus, in an effort to reduce TRALI risk, ascertaining past history of transfusion and testing these donors for HLA antibodies is not necessary. PMID:20070615

  4. Effects of Storage-Aged RBC Transfusions on Endothelial Function in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Robert; Hayek, Salim; Rahman, Ayaz; Poole, Joseph C.; Menon, Vivek; Sher, Salman; Newman, James L.; Karatela, Sulaiman; Polhemus, David; Lefer, David J.; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Roback, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical and animal studies indicate that transfusions of older stored RBCs impair clinical outcomes as compared to fresh RBC transfusions. It has been suggested that this effect is due to inhibition of NO-mediated vasodilation following transfusion of older RBC units. However, to date this effect has not been identified in human transfusion recipients. Study Design and Methods Forty-three hospitalized patients with transfusion orders were randomized to receive either fresh (< 14 days) or older stored (> 21 days) RBC units. Prior to transfusion, and at selected time points after the start of transfusion, endothelial function was assessed using non-invasive flow-mediated dilation assays. Results Following transfusion of older RBC units, there was a significant reduction in NO-mediated vasodilation at 24 hours after transfusion (p=0.045), while fresh RBC transfusions had no effect (p=0.231). Conclusions The present study suggests for the first time a significant inhibitory effect of transfused RBC units stored > 21 days on NO-mediated vasodilation in anemic hospitalized patients. This finding lends further support to the hypothesis that deranged NO signaling mediates adverse clinical effects of older RBC transfusions. Future investigations will be necessary to address possible confounding factors and confirm these results. PMID:25393772

  5. ABO compatibility can influence the results of platelet transfusion. Results of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, E J; Schiffer, C A

    1989-06-01

    Sixty consecutive patients with untreated acute leukemia alternately received either ABO-matched or ABO-mismatched random-donor platelet transfusions prepared from pooled platelet concentrate stored for 1 to 3 days. Patients were assigned randomly to receive matched or mismatched platelets as their first transfusion, and the first four transfusions were analyzed. In 40 evaluable patients, there was no significant difference (paired t test) between the 10-minute posttransfusion corrected count increments (CCI) of the initial transfusions of matched and mismatched platelets. In contrast, the second matched transfusion was significantly better than the second mismatched transfusion. This effect of ABO compatibility was particularly pronounced in a subset of patients. Six patients in whom mismatched transfusions were consistently inferior to matched transfusions had either a significant increase in anti-A or -B isoagglutinin titers following the first transfusion or elevated titers before or at the conclusion of the study. Conversely, in five patients in whom there was no apparent effect of ABO mismatching, only one had an increase in isoagglutinin titer. Platelet survival was not altered as the ratio of 18-hour to 10-minute posttransfusion CCl was 0.6 for both matched and mismatched platelet transfusions. These data demonstrate that ABO compatibility can affect the results of random-donor platelet transfusions and that patients who experience poor increments from ABO-mismatched platelets may benefit from a trial of ABO-compatible platelets before the initiation of HLA-matched platelet transfusion.

  6. A Teenage Girl with Acute Dyspnea and Hypoxemia during Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tanpowpong, P.; Thongpo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) can cause morbidity and mortality. We present the case of teenager who developed dyspnea and hypoxemia few hours after red cell transfusion. After being admitted for close monitoring and oxygen therapy, her symptoms spontaneously resolved. Message: dyspnea during red cell transfusion should raise the suspicion of TRALI. PMID:27891282

  7. Comparison of Platelet Transfusion as Fresh Whole Blood Versus Apheresis Platelets for Massively Transfused Combat Trauma patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    T R A N S F U S I O N P R A C T I C E Comparison of platelet transfusion as fresh whole blood versus apheresis platelets for massively transfused...J. Rentas, Charles E . Wade, John B. Holcomb, and the 31st Combat Support Hospital Research Group BACKGROUND: At major combat hospitals, the military...Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue, NW, Washing- ton, DC 20307; e -mail: Jeremy.perkins1@us.army.mil. The opinions or assertions

  8. Effects of a CME Program on Physicians' Transfusion Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The hospital charts of 44 patients who were autologous blood donors undergoing elective orthopedic surgery and a matched group of 44 patients who were not autologous blood donors were analyzed to determine their physicians' transfusion practices. A continuing medical education program was developed. (Author/MLW)

  9. [Blood transfusion and inflammation as of yesterday, today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Garraud, O; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Laradi, S; Pozzetto, B; Cognasse, F

    2015-08-01

    Blood transfusion is made possible principally by use of donated homologous components that - in turn - can be perceived as sources of danger by recipients. This may create an innate immune response dominated by inflammation, especially when transfusion is repeated. Residual leukocytes in blood components can source inflammatory lesions but considerably less than used to be prior to systematic, early and stringent - in process - leukoreduction. Every blood component can cause inflammation, though barely in the case of therapeutic plasma (in such a case, this is mainly restricted to allergy). Iron that may be freed by red blood cells but also processing and storage lesions such as the emission of microparticles can reveal themselves as pro-inflammatory. Platelets in platelet components represent the main source of inflammatory and/or allergic hazards in transfusion; this is linked with processing and storage lesions but also with the platelet physiology itself. It is of utmost importance to avoid inflammatory adverse events in patients that are fragile because of their primary condition and/or treatment; this stands for their safety, as inflammation can be extremely severe and even lethal, and also for their comfort; this increases efficacy of transfusion programs while reducing the overall costs.

  10. Antigen Density Dictates Immune Responsiveness following Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Connie M; Patel, Seema R; Smith, Nicole H; Bennett, Ashley; Kamili, Nourine A; Mener, Amanda; Gerner-Smidt, Christian; Sullivan, Harold C; Hale, J Scott; Wieland, Andreas; Youngblood, Benjamin; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R

    2017-04-01

    Although RBC transfusion can result in the development of anti-RBC alloantibodies that increase the probability of life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reactions, not all patients generate anti-RBC alloantibodies. However, the factors that regulate immune responsiveness to RBC transfusion remain incompletely understood. One variable that may influence alloantibody formation is RBC alloantigen density. RBC alloantigens exist at different densities on the RBC surface and likewise exhibit distinct propensities to induce RBC alloantibody formation. However, although distinct alloantigens reside on the RBC surface at different levels, most alloantigens also represent completely different structures, making it difficult to separate the potential impact of differences in Ag density from other alloantigen features that may also influence RBC alloimmunization. To address this, we generated RBCs that stably express the same Ag at different levels. Although exposure to RBCs with higher Ag levels induces a robust Ab response, RBCs bearing low Ag levels fail to induce RBC alloantibodies. However, exposure to low Ag-density RBCs is not without consequence, because recipients subsequently develop Ag-specific tolerance. Low Ag-density RBC-induced tolerance protects higher Ag-density RBCs from immune-mediated clearance, is Ag specific, and occurs through the induction of B cell unresponsiveness. These results demonstrate that Ag density can potently impact immune outcomes following RBC transfusion and suggest that RBCs with altered Ag levels may provide a unique tool to induce Ag-specific tolerance.

  11. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goubran, Hadi A.; Elemary, Mohamed; Radosevich, Miryana; Seghatchian, Jerard; El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient’s immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure. PMID:27006592

  12. Fetofetal transfusion syndrome: do the neonatal criteria apply in utero?

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, N M; Borrell, A; Hubinont, C; Tannirandorn, Y; Nicolini, U; Rodeck, C H

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen fetuses (five twin, one triplet) were compromised by fetofetal transfusion syndrome in six pregnancies, five in the mid trimester, and one in the third trimester. This diagnosis, which was suspected because of ultrasound findings of discordant growth, discordant amniotic fluid volumes, concordant external genitalia, and monochorial placentation, was confirmed postnatally in each. Nine fetuses underwent blood sampling to aid diagnosis and assessment of fetal wellbeing. In contrast to fetofetal transfusion syndrome investigated postnatally, a difference in haemoglobin concentration of 50 g/l or more in utero was found in only one pregnancy, which was near term, although all had fetal erythroblastaemia and a difference in weight of 20% or more. In vivo confirmation of shared circulation was achieved in two pregnancies by transfusing adult Rh negative red cells into the smaller fetus and then detecting them by Kleihauer testing in blood aspirated from the larger. Invasive procedures also yielded information on fetal blood gas measurements (acidaemia in four and hypoxaemia in six) and amniotic pressure (raised in two). We suggest that comparison of haemoglobin concentrations is inaccurate in fetofetal transfusion syndrome in utero, the diagnosis of which may necessitate detection of a shared circulation using a marker such as adult red cells. PMID:1696801

  13. The use of big data in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Pendry, K

    2015-06-01

    'Big data' refers to the huge quantities of digital information now available that describe much of human activity. The science of data management and analysis is rapidly developing to enable organisations to convert data into useful information and knowledge. Electronic health records and new developments in Pathology Informatics now support the collection of 'big laboratory and clinical data', and these digital innovations are now being applied to transfusion medicine. To use big data effectively, we must address concerns about confidentiality and the need for a change in culture and practice, remove barriers to adopting common operating systems and data standards and ensure the safe and secure storage of sensitive personal information. In the UK, the aim is to formulate a single set of data and standards for communicating test results and so enable pathology data to contribute to national datasets. In transfusion, big data has been used for benchmarking, detection of transfusion-related complications, determining patterns of blood use and definition of blood order schedules for surgery. More generally, rapidly available information can monitor compliance with key performance indicators for patient blood management and inventory management leading to better patient care and reduced use of blood. The challenges of enabling reliable systems and analysis of big data and securing funding in the restrictive financial climate are formidable, but not insurmountable. The promise is that digital information will soon improve the implementation of best practice in transfusion medicine and patient blood management globally.

  14. Economic considerations on transfusion medicine and patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Axel; Ozawa, Sherri; Farrugia, Albert; Farmer, Shannon L; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-03-01

    In times of escalating health-care cost, it is of great importance to carefully assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of the most resource-consuming health interventions. A long-standing and common clinical practice that has been underestimated in cost and overestimated in effectiveness is the transfusion of allogeneic blood products. Studies show that this intervention comes with largely underestimated service cost and unacceptably high utilisation variability for matched patients, thus adding billions of unnecessary dollars to the health-care expenditure each year. Moreover, a large and increasing body of literature points to a dose-dependent increase of morbidity and mortality and adverse long-term outcomes associated with transfusion whereas published evidence for benefit is extremely limited. This means that transfusion may be a generator for increased hospital stay and possible re-admissions, resulting in additional billions in unnecessary expenditure for the health system. In contrast to this, there are evidence-based and cost-effective treatment options available to pre-empt and reduce allogeneic transfusions. The patient-specific rather than a product-centred application of these multiple modalities is termed patient blood management (PBM). From a health-economic perspective, the expeditious implementation of PBM programmes is clearly indicated. Both patients and payers could benefit from this concept that has recently been endorsed through the World Health Assembly resolution WHA63.12.

  15. [Possibility of using DST-30 thermoelastoplast in blood transfusion systems].

    PubMed

    Il'iakov, E V; El'tsefon, B S; Polezhaev, V V; Zotkina, I V; Krivonosov, A I

    1979-01-01

    Investigating possible application of the DCT-30 thermoelastoplastic shows advantages of some physico-technical properties of this product based on natural caoutchouc and latex by comparison with base-rubber onene. It justifies recommending the former for making injection tubes in the blood transfusion systems.

  16. Massive blood transfusion in the elective surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Erber, Wendy N

    2002-08-01

    Massive haemorrhage in elective surgery can be either anticipated (e.g. organ transplantation) or unexpected. Management requires early recognition, securing haemostasis and maintenance of normovolaemia. Transfusion management involves the transfusion of packed red cells, platelet concentrates and plasma (fresh frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate). Blood product support should be based on clinical judgment and be guided by repeated laboratory tests of coagulation. Although coagulation tests may not provide a true representation of in vivo haemostasis, they do assist in management of haemostatic factors. Below critical levels (prothrombin time or activated partial thromboplastin time >1.8; fibrinogen <1.0 g/l; platelet count < 80 x 10(9) 1(-1)) it is difficult to achieve haemostasis. Despite seemingly adequate blood component therapy there remain situations where haemorrhage is uncontrollable. In this setting, alternative approaches must be considered. These include the use of other blood products (e.g. prothrombin complex concentrates; fresh whole blood; fibrin glue) and pharmacological agents (e.g. aprotinin). Complications of massive transfusion result in significant morbidity and mortality. These may be secondary to the storage lesion of the transfused blood products, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hypothermia or hypovolaemic shock. The use of fresh blood products and leucocyte-reduced packed red cells and platelets, may minimise some of the adverse clinical sequelae.

  17. [Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Aybey, Bekir; Coşkun, Diler; Aytaç, Jale

    2006-01-01

    In this report, a case of transfusion-associated graft versus host disease that developed following coronary arter bypass grafting and mitral annuloplasty operations, has been presented. The diagnosis of 62 year-old male patient was based on the presence of typical findings as fever, liver function disorders, skin rash and hypoplastic bone marrow findings that began ten days after the operation; with the exclusion of other pathologies (e.g. drug eruptions, viral infections, septicemia, scalded skin syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis) and histopathological findings of skin biopsy. There was a history of five units of blood transfusion of which one was from a close relative. The blood from the relative was thought to be responsible for the disease. With this case, we wanted to emphasize once more that transfusion of the blood of a relative must be avoided in patients who have undergone major operations such as cardiovascular surgery. The irradiation of these bloods before transfusion may be effective to prevent graft versus host disease.

  18. Blood group antibodies and their significance in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Poole, Joyce; Daniels, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of almost universally present naturally occurring antibodies in blood plasma led to the discovery of the ABO blood group system which remains, more than 100 years later, the most important and clinically significant of all blood groups. Blood group antibodies play an important role in transfusion medicine, both in relation to the practice of blood transfusion and in pregnancy, but not all are clinically significant. Clinically significant antibodies are capable of causing adverse events following transfusion, ranging from mild to severe, and of causing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn following placental transfer from mother to fetus. Assessing the clinical significance of antibodies relies heavily on mode of reactivity and historical data relating to specificity; functional assays are sometimes employed. The principals of methodology for blood typing and antibody identification have changed little over the years, relying mainly on serological methods involving red cell agglutination. The recent advent of blood typing using DNA technology, although still in relative infancy, will surely eventually supersede serology. However, deciding on the clinical significance of an antibody when compatible blood is not immediately available is likely to remain as one of the most common dilemmas facing transfusion practitioners.

  19. [Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): an unrecognised pathology].

    PubMed

    Moalic, V; Vaillant, C; Ferec, C

    2005-03-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but potentially severe complication of blood transfusion, manifested by pulmonary oedema, fever and hypotension. The signs and symptoms are often attributed to other clinical aspects of a patient's condition, and therefore, TRALI may go unrecognised. It has been estimated to be the third cause of transfusion related mortality, so it should be better diagnosed. Cases are related to multiple blood units, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets or intravenous immunoglobulins. Physiopathology of TRALI is poorly understood, and still controversial. It is often due to an immunological conflict between transfused plasma antibodies and recipients' blood cells. These antibodies are either HLA (class I or II) or granulocyte-specific. They appear to act as mediators, which result in granulocytes aggregation, activation and micro vascular pulmonary injury. Lipids or cytokines in blood units are also involved as TRALI priming agents. Diagnosis is based on antibody screening in blood components and on specific-antigen detection in the recipient. The screening of anti-HLA or anti-granulocytes is recommended as part of prevention for female donors who had been pregnant. Preventative measures should also include leucoreduction and measures to decrease the amount of priming agents in blood components. In this article, we summarise what is known about TRALI, and we focus attention on unanswered questions and controversial issues related to TRALI.

  20. Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria in Iran: A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    MARDANI, Ahmad; KESHAVARZ, Hossein; POURFATHOLLAH, Ali Akbar; MAGHSUDLU, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malaria is the most important transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) in worldwide after viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The main objective of the present study was to review and evaluate the transmission of malaria via blood transfusion in Iran. Methods: A literature search was done without time limitation in the electronic databases as follows: PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Science Direct, scientific information database (SID), Magiran, IranMedex and Irandoc. The searches were limited to the published papers to English and Persian languages. Results: Six papers were eligible. From 1963 to 1983, 344 cases of Transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM) had been reported from different provinces of Iran. The most prevalent species of involved Plasmodium in investigated cases of TTM was Plasmodium malariae (79.24%). The screening results of 1,135 blood donors for malaria were negative by microscopic examination of peripheral blood smears and rapid diagnostic test (RDT) methods. Conclusion: Lack of TTM report from Iran in the last three decades indicates that the screening of blood donors through interviewing (donor selection) may be effective in the prevention of the occurrence of transfusion-transmitted malaria. PMID:28096847

  1. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05) and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index. PMID:25207187

  2. Red blood cell transfusion practices in very low birth weight infants in 1990s postsurfactant era.

    PubMed Central

    Beeram, M. R.; Krauss, D. R.; Riggs, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study are (1) to evaluate the practice of red blood cell transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (between 501 to 1500 g) during the postsurfactant era of the 1990s; and (2) to evaluate if there is a decreasing trend in red cell transfusions in the 1990s. Database and medical records of VLBW infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) between January 1990 and December 1995 at Scott & White Clinic, Temple, Texas, were reviewed. Five hundred twenty-seven infants were admitted to the NICU, excluding 5 infants that were transferred out for possible cardiac surgery or for other reasons. Fifty one (9.7%) of these infants died prior to discharge. Hence, data from 476 survivors were reviewed for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Transfusions were given at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. None of the infants received erythropoietin. Of the 476 infants, 289 (61%) received RBC transfusions during the hospital stay, with 2.7+/-3.6 transfusions per infant with a volume of 40.5+/-50.4 mL/kg. Smaller infants required significantly more transfusions compared to larger infants when divided into 250-g subgroups. No statistically significant difference was noted in the number of RBC transfusions per infant or number of infants transfused during the 6-year period from year to year. We conclude that VLBW infants in the 1990s postsurfactant era required 2.7 RBC transfusions per infant, on average, with the smallest infants requiring the most transfusions. These data will be helpful to counsel mothers in preterm labor regarding the need of transfusions for each birth weight category. Red cell transfusion practice has not changed over this 6-year period in the 1990s. Additional measures such as erythropoietin or even stricter transfusion criteria may be necessary to decrease transfusions further. However, safety of such measures should be carefully evaluated. PMID:11688921

  3. Evaluation of Preoperative and Intraoperative RBC Transfusion Practices at Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Zachary; Chen, James; Conceicao, Celson; Hoffman, Risa; Miller, Lee; Taela, Atanasio; DeUgarte, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative and intraoperative blood transfusion practices in Hospital Central (Maputo, Mozambique) and estimate the number of potentially avoidable transfusions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study was performed. Age, comorbidities, hemoglobin, the potential for blood loss, and units of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were recorded. Preoperative transfusions were evaluated to determine whether they met criteria established by the Mozambican Ministry of Health as well as proposed guidelines based on more restrictive protocols. Avoidable blood transfusions were defined as those preoperative transfusions that were not indicated based on these guidelines. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors that predicted transfusion. RESULTS Two-hundred and five patients (age range: 0.1 - 86 years) underwent surgery in the main operating room during the two-week study period. Overall, thirty-five (17%) patients received sixty-eight transfusions. Of these, thirty-six transfusions were given preoperatively and thirty-two were given intraoperatively. Thirty-six percent of preoperative transfusions were avoidable according to national guidelines. Ninety-two percent were avoidable using more restrictive guidelines. The primary predictors of preoperative blood transfusion were lower hemoglobin (odd's ratio 0.390 / 1 g/dl; p<0.0001) and the potential for blood loss (odd's ratio 3.73; p=0.0410). CONCLUSIONS Adherence to existing hemoglobin thresholds recommended by national blood transfusion guidelines could significantly reduce the number of transfusions and the association risk of transfusion-transmissible infections. Adoption of more restrictive guidelines is recommended to further improve blood transfusion utilization and further reduce the transmission risk of HIV and hepatitis. PMID:23692441

  4. Vestibular responses to linear acceleration are absent in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi-het mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Erway, L. C.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Schimenti, J. C.; Jones, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were measured in normal mice and in mice homozygous for the head tilt mutation (het/het, abbr. het). The het mice lack otoconia, the inertial mass critical for natural stimulation of inner ear gravity receptors. Our findings demonstrate that vestibular neural responses to pulsed linear acceleration are absent in het mice. The results: (1) confirm that adequate sensory stimuli fail to activate gravity receptors in the het model; and (2) serve as definitive evidence that far-field vestibular responses to pulsed linear acceleration depend critically on otolith end organs. The C57BL/6JEi-het mouse may be an excellent model of gravity receptor sensory deprivation.

  5. ABO incompatible renal transplant: Transfusion medicine perspective

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Nayak, Sweta; Chowdhry, Mohit; Jasuja, Sanjiv; Sagar, Gaurav; Rosamma, N. L.; Thakur, Uday Kumar

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our study presents an analysis of the trends of ABO antibody titers and the TPE (Therapeutic Plasma Exchange) procedures required pre and post ABO incompatible renal transplant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty nine patients underwent ABO incompatible renal transplant during the study period. The ABO antibody titers were done using the tube technique and titer reported was the dilution at which 1+ reaction was observed. The baseline titers of anti-A and anti-B antibodies were determined. The titer targeted was ≤8. Patients were subjected to 1 plasma volume exchange with 5% albumin and 2 units of AB group FFP (Fresh Frozen Plasma) in each sitting. TPE procedures post-transplant were decided on the basis of rising antibody titer with/ without graft dysfunction. RESULTS: The average number of TPE procedures required was 4-5 procedures/patient in the pretransplant and 2-3/patient in the post-transplant period. An average titer reduction of 1 serial dilution/procedure was noted for Anti-A and 1.1/procedure for Anti-B. Number of procedures required to reach the target titer was not significantly different for Anti-A and Anti-B (P = 0.98). Outcome of the transplant did not differ significantly by reducing titers to a level less than 8 (P = 0.32). The difference in the Anti-A and Anti-B titers at 14th day post-transplant was found to be clinically significant (P = 0.042). CONCLUSION: With an average of 4-5 TPE procedures pretransplant and 2-3 TPE procedures post transplants, ABO incompatible renal transplantations can be successfully accomplished. PMID:28316440

  6. Iron overload in patients with transfusion dependent myelodisplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Genadieva-Stavrik, S; Georgievski, B; Stojanoski, Z; Krstveska-Balkanov, S; Pivkova, A; Trajkova, M; Genadieva-Dimitrova, M; Serafimoski, V

    2011-01-01

    The myelodisplastic syndrome is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterised by ineffective and dysplastic haematopoesis and pancytopenia in the peripheral blood, followed by progressive disturbance of differentiation of the haematopoetic stem cell, resulting in evolution of the disease towards acute leukaemia. According to the latest WHO classification, the term myelodisplastic syndrome includes diseases with an indolent course, as well as diseases with a fast evolution towards acute leukaemia. Because of this diversity, haematologists base their therapeutic decisions on prognostic scoring systems which incorporate all the significant factors with an influence on survival in this group of patients with myelodisplastic syndrome. Bearing in mind that anaemia is the most frequent form of cytopenia in patients with myelodisplastic syndrome, it is common that at some point of the disease almost every patient with myelodisplastic syndrome is transfusion-dependent. Frequently applied transfusions secure the correction of anaemia in these patients, giving them a good quality of life, but at the same time endangering them with the potential threat of iron overload, when the physiological mechanisms of iron excretion from the organism become insufficient. There is a clear correlation between transfusion dependence and the overall survival in patients with myelodisplastic syndrome. Chelators secure the lowering of the iron surfeit and are indicated in transfusion-dependant patients with myelodisplastic syndrome ( need for two blood units monthly, during one year ), when the ferritin level increases over 1000, in patients who are candidates for transplantation as well as in patients from good prognostic groups with median survival over one year. The therapy with chelators lasts as long as the patient is transfusion-dependant.

  7. Guidance on platelet transfusion for patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nahirniak, Susan; Slichter, Sherrill J; Tanael, Susano; Rebulla, Paolo; Pavenski, Katerina; Vassallo, Ralph; Fung, Mark; Duquesnoy, Rene; Saw, Chee-Loong; Stanworth, Simon; Tinmouth, Alan; Hume, Heather; Ponnampalam, Arjuna; Moltzan, Catherine; Berry, Brian; Shehata, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia are at an increased risk for hemorrhage and alloimmunization to platelets. Updated guidance for optimizing platelet transfusion therapy is needed as data from recent pivotal trials have the potential to change practice. This guideline, developed by a large international panel using a systematic search strategy and standardized methods to develop recommendations, incorporates recent trials not available when previous guidelines were developed. We found that prophylactic platelet transfusion for platelet counts less than or equal to 10 × 10(9)/L is the optimal approach to decrease the risk of hemorrhage for patients requiring chemotherapy or undergoing allogeneic or autologous transplantation. A low dose of platelets (1.41 × 10(11)/m2) is hemostatically as effective as higher dose of platelets but requires more frequent platelet transfusions suggesting that low-dose platelets may be used in hospitalized patients. For outpatients, a median dose (2.4 × 10(11)/m2) may be more cost-effective to prevent clinic visits only to receive a transfusion. In terms of platelet products, whole blood-derived platelet concentrates can be used interchangeably with apheresis platelets, and ABO-compatible platelet should be given to improve platelet increments and decrease the rate of refractoriness to platelet transfusion. For RhD-negative female children or women of child-bearing potential who have received RhD-positive platelets, Rh immunoglobulin should probably be given to prevent immunization to the RhD antigen. Providing platelet support for the alloimmunized refractory patients with ABO-matched and HLA-selected or crossmatched products is of some benefit, yet the degree of benefit needs to be assessed in the era of leukoreduction.

  8. Fulminant transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease in a premature infant

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.S.; Dixon, S.L.

    1989-05-01

    A fatal case of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease developed in a premature infant after receiving several blood products, including nonirradiated white blood cells. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease can be prevented. Irradiation of blood products is the least controversial and most effective method. Treatment was unsuccessful in most reported cases of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Therefore irradiation of blood products before transfusing to patients susceptible to transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease is strongly recommended.

  9. An audit on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ozgönenel, Bülent; Kanhere, Rujuta; O'Malley, Barbara; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Eisenbrey, A Bradley

    2007-08-01

    This audit encompassing a six-month period on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary total hip arthroplasty showed that the rate of allogeneic blood avoidance was 84.8% for preoperative autologous blood donors and 47.8% for non-donors (p<0.001). Lower preoperative hemoglobin level was associated with an increased allogeneic unit transfusion (p<0.001). The intraoperative use of autologous blood collection and transfusion systems did not reduce the transfusion risk, and the use of the colloid volume expander was associated with a 1.8-fold increased risk of transfusion (p=0.022).

  10. Regular long-term red blood cell transfusions for managing chronic chest complications in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Hambleton, Ian R; Cho, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is a genetic haemoglobin disorder, which can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Sickle cell disease is one of the most common severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. The two most common chronic chest complications due to sickle cell disease are pulmonary hypertension and chronic sickle lung disease. These complications can lead to morbidity (such as reduced exercise tolerance) and increased mortality. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011 and updated in 2014. Objectives We wanted to determine whether trials involving people with sickle cell disease that compare regular long-term blood transfusion regimens with standard care, hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea) any other drug treatment show differences in the following: mortality associated with chronic chest complications; severity of established chronic chest complications; development and progression of chronic chest complications; serious adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register. Date of the last search: 25 April 2016. We also searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 26 January 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 26 January 2016. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of people of any age with one of four common sickle cell disease genotypes, i.e. Hb SS, Sß0, SC, or Sß+ that compared regular red blood cell transfusion regimens (either simple or exchange transfusions) to hydroxycarbamide, any other drug treatment, or to standard care that were aimed at reducing the development or progression of chronic chest

  11. Reengineering transfusion and cellular therapy processes hospitalwide: ensuring the safe utilization of blood products.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jay P

    2005-10-01

    Efforts to make blood transfusion as safe as possible have focused on making the blood in the bag as disease-free as possible. The results have been dramatic, and the costs have been correspondingly high. Although blood services will have to continue to deal with emerging pathogens, efforts to reduce the transfusion of infectious agents presently posing a risk will require high incremental costs and result in only improvements of a small magnitude. The other aspect of safe blood transfusion, the actual transfusion process performed primarily in hospitals, has been accorded considerably less interest. We should turn our attention to enhancing overall blood safety by focusing on improving the process of blood transfusion. Errors involving patient, specimen, and blood product identification put transfused patients at risk, increasing the mortality risk for some. Solutions that could improve the transfusion process are discussed as a focus of this article.

  12. [Blood transfusion via the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit: the anesthesiologist point of view].

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Rossi-Blancher, M; Poquet, C

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac surgery frequently requires blood transfusion. The use of transfusion should be restricted due to side effects. Blood transfusion via the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit is easy and allows a fast transfusion. The administration of packed red cells is relatively frequent because of the CPB-induced hemodilution and of the higher rate of postoperative complications when the haematocrit during CPB decreases below 20%. This transfusion of packed red cells does not seem to be associated with complications during CPB. Platelet transfusion during bypass is illogical because of the destruction of platelets during CPB and must be avoided. Fresh frozen plasma transfusion during CPB is seldom indicated but is possible. It could reverse heparin resistance.

  13. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  14. [Risk of Chagas disease through transfusions in the Americans].

    PubMed

    Schmuñis, G A

    1999-01-01

    The safety of blood transfusion depends on a country's laws, decrees and/or regulations concerning the collection, production and use of blood and blood derivatives. It also needs governmental enforcement of those instruments, as well as trained health professionals to obtain blood and produce blood derivatives, following total quality control procedures both at collection and production, and use. By 1998, all Latin American countries had laws, decrees and/or regulations that governed the production and use of blood, with the exception of El Salvador and Nicaragua. During the past six decades, economic need in Latin America has promoted migration to urban areas. Consequently, at present time, more than 60% of the population live in cities, which increases the probability of finding blood infected by Trypanosoma cruzi among donors. Unless all the blood from infected donors is discarded, the possibility of transmitting infection by transfusion remains. Moreover, infection by T. cruzi through transfusion is a potential problem in developed countries, now that tens of thousands of individuals from Latin America have migrated to the United States, Canada, western Europe, Australia and Japan. When donors are not screened for T. cruzi, the risk of transfusing infected blood is greater at higher prevalence rates of infection in the donor population; it also increases with the number of transfusions received by the recipient. In 1993, Bolivia presented the highest risk of receiving infected blood and becoming infected with T. cruzi; this country was followed by Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. As the coverage of HIV screening became almost universal, the probability of receiving blood infected by HIV and becoming infected was low in all countries. In the case of hepatitis B (HVB), the highest probability of infection was in Bolivia, Nicaragua and Guatemala. This probability was even greater for Hepatitis C (HVC), given the low coverage of donor screening in all countries

  15. Blood transfusion and alloimmunization in patients with thalassemia: multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Azarkeivan, Azita; Ansari, Shahla; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajibeigy, Bashir; Maghsudlu, Mahtab; Nasizadeh, Soheila; Shaigan, Mojgan; Toolabi, Abdolmajid; Salahmand, Mitra

    2011-09-01

    One of transfusion's side effects is alloimmunization against red blood cell (RBC) antigens. Early diagnosis by antibody screening is an important step in the detection of these alloantibodies. The authors studied the frequency of alloimmunization in thalassemic patients of 4 centers (2 adult and 2 pediatric centers) and compared the rates in children (up to 15 years) and adults. Antibody screening tests were performed by gel method according to its standard pattern and respective program. In positive cases, antibody identification test by gel method was performed. Eight hundred thirty-five patients were studied; 548 (65.6%) were adults (mean age = 24.5), and 287 (34.4%) cases were pediatrics (mean age = 10.05). Of these patients, 74.1% had no history of transfusion reaction, whereas 21 (2.5%) had hemolytic complications. Seventy-eight (9.3%) exhibited allergic symptoms, and 117 (14%) cases experienced febrile reactions during transfusion. Antibody screening showed positive results in 22 pediatric cases (7.7%) and 79 adults (14.4%); 72 (71.3%), 19 (18.8%), 3 (3%), and 1 (1%) cases exhibited single, double, triple, and autoantibodies, respectively. Anti-Kell antibody was seen in 34 (33.7%) cases, anti-D was seen in 11 (10.9%) cases, and anti-E in was seen in 10 (9.9%) cases. The authors observed 8 anti-D+C (7.9%) cases, 1 anti-D+E (1%), 3 anti-Kell+E, 3 anti-Kell+Kpa (3%), and 1 anti-Kell+D double antibodies. These antibodies were also a combination of Rh subgroups or Rh and Kell subgroups. The authors observed meaningful relations between history of transfusion reactions and age with antibody screening results (P = .005). Based on alloantibodies types, more than two thirds of them were Rh subgroups and Kell groups. Phenotype determination of RBCs before beginning chronic blood transfusion and careful cross-matching with Kell and Rh subgroups in addition to ABO may help reduce alloimmunization in chronic transfusion patients.

  16. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  17. [Diagnosis and transfusion algorithm for the management of perioperative coagulopathy].

    PubMed

    Azma, Toshiharu; Yamasaki, Kyoko; Mimasu, Masashi; Nakao, Masakazu; Kikuchi, Hirosato

    2008-09-01

    The present article reviewed the management of coagulopathy in the perioperative setting, following the Japanese practical guidelines for the blood component therapy, edited by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan in 2005. The threshold concentrations of platelets, prothrombin time international normalized ratio (PT-INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were optimized for the perioperative critical care under active and/or microvascular bleeding, based on currently available randomized controlled trials. Discontinuation or modification of anticoagulants as well as antiplatelets is essential for the safe perioperative care. Several factors, including normothermia, normovolemia, as well as the maintenance of plasma calcium levels within normal range, are important for the management of coagulopathy. Platelet counts, PT, APTT, and if possible, other point-of-care testing including thromboelastography and its modified techniques should be performed following visual inspection of abnormal bleeding. The transfusion algorithms based on causal diagnosis of coagulopathy optimize the risk/ benefit ratio of perioperative transfusion therapy.

  18. The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Koen; Zaaijer, Hans L; Verweij, Marcel F

    2017-03-01

    Tolerance for blood transfusion risks is very low, as evidenced by the implementation of expensive blood tests and the rejection of gay men as blood donors. Is this low risk tolerance supported by the precautionary principle, as defenders of such policies claim? We discuss three constraints on applying (any version of) the precautionary principle and show that respecting these implies tolerating certain risks. Consistency means that the precautionary principle cannot prescribe precautions that it must simultaneously forbid taking, considering the harms they might cause. Avoiding counterproductivity requires rejecting precautions that cause more harm than they prevent. Proportionality forbids taking precautions that are more harmful than adequate alternatives. When applying these constraints, we argue, attention should not be restricted to harms that are human caused or that affect human health or the environment. Tolerating transfusion risks can be justified if available precautions have serious side effects, such as high social or economic costs.

  19. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  20. The Case for a Conservative Approach to Blood Transfusion Management in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Tyler; Paone, Gaetano; Emery, Robert W; Ferraris, Victor A

    2016-01-01

    Limiting blood transfusion in cardiac operations is a well-meaning goal of perioperative care. Potential benefits include decreasing morbidity and limiting procedural costs. It is difficult to identify transfusion as the cause of adverse outcomes. The need for transfusion may identify a sicker patient population at greater risk for a worse outcome that may or may not be related to the transfusion. We reviewed the indications for and adverse effects of blood transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac procedures to provide a balanced approach to management of blood resources in this population. We reviewed current literature, including systematic reviews and practice guidelines, to synthesize a practice management plan in patients having cardiac operations. Several prospective randomized studies and large population cohort studies compared a postoperative restrictive transfusion policy to a more liberal policy and found very little difference in outcomes but decreased costs with a restrictive policy. Evidence-based practice guidelines and implementation standards provide robust intervention plans that can limit harmful effects of transfusion and provide safe and effective procedure outcomes. A restrictive transfusion policy seems to be safe and effective but does not necessarily provide better outcome in most patient cohorts. The implications of these findings suggest that many discretionary transfusions could be avoided. A subset of high-risk patients could undoubtedly benefit from a more liberal transfusion policy, but the definition of high risk is ill defined.

  1. Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumiya

    2013-02-01

    Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

  2. An evidence-based approach to red blood cell transfusions in asymptomatically anaemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, AW; de Gara, CJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgeons and physicians encounter blood transfusions on a daily basis but a robust evidence-based strategy on indications and timing of transfusion in asymptomatic anaemic patients is yet to be determined. For judicious use of blood products, the risks inherent to packed red blood cells, the patient’s co-morbidities and haemoglobin (Hb)/haematocrit levels should be considered. This review critiques and summarises the latest available evidence on the indications for transfusions in healthy and cardiac disease patients as well as the timing of transfusions relative to surgery. Methods An electronic literature search of the MEDLINE®, Google Scholar™ and Trip databases was conducted for articles published in English between January 2006 and January 2015. Studies discussing timing and indications of transfusion in medical and surgical patients were retrieved. Bibliographies of studies were checked for other pertinent articles that were missed by the initial search. Findings Six level 1 studies (randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews) and six professional society guidelines were included in this review. In healthy patients without cardiac disease, a restrictive transfusion trigger of Hb 70–80g/l is safe and appropriate whereas in cardiac patients, the trigger is Hb 80–100g/l. The literature on timing of transfusions relative to surgery is limited. For the studies available, preoperative transfusions were associated with a decreased incidence of subsequent transfusions and timing of transfusions did not affect the rates of colorectal cancer recurrence. PMID:26492900

  3. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  4. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Risks in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanhehco, Yvette C.; Berns, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were frequently required when iron and anabolic steroids failed to improve the clinical symptoms of anemia associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels that were commonly less than 7 g/dL. After the approval of EPO in the US in 1989, the Hb levels of patients on hemodialysis dramatically improved and the need for RBC transfusions decreased significantly. The need for RBC transfusion remains for patients who require an immediate increase in their RBC mass due to symptomatic anemia and is likely to increase due to changes in the management of anemia in dialysis patients resulting from clinical trials data, regulatory changes, and new reimbursement policies for EPO. The safety of the blood supply has greatly improved over the last few decades and the risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases has now been dramatically reduced. Non-infectious complications of transfusion currently cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the US. Transfusion also brings a risk of alloimmunization, a particular concern for dialysis patients waiting for kidney transplantation. Knowledge of the risks of RBC transfusions will help clinicians better assess the risks and benefits of transfusing patients with ESRD. This article reviews the modern day infectious and non-infectious risks of allogeneic RBC transfusions. PMID:22686519

  5. Transfusion in transplant patients: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Klein, H G

    1993-01-01

    Several transfusion-related complications have particular relevance to the transplant setting. Transfusions reportedly improve solid organ graft survival, especially when the donor and recipient share at least one HLA-DR antigen. Whereas the mechanism for this effect is unclear, less favorable "immunomodulating" effects of transfusion may increase postoperative infections and shorten survival time and disease-free intervals in patients with a variety of malignancies who are undergoing surgery. The contribution of the different components of the blood transfusion to these outcomes remains speculative. Directed donations, especially from relatives and in the setting of a recipient who is immunosuppressed, may give rise to a severe but under-appreciated immunologic consequence of transfusion: graft-versus-host disease. Although still rarely reported, transfusional graft-versus-host disease is almost invariably fatal. This complication is entirely avoidable if the transfused blood product is appropriately gamma-irradiated. Infectious complications remain the most feared consequence of transfusion; the cytomegalovirus, the human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C may run a more fulminant course in transplant patients who are immunosuppressed. Red cell substitutes, hematopoietic growth factors, and autologous transfusion are among the strategies for preventing complications of blood transfusion. With the advent of cyclosporine and more potent and specific immunosuppressive therapies, the desirability of preoperative transfusion for organ grafts warrants reevaluation.

  6. Blood transfusion practices in a tertiary care center in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sonam

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion plays vital roles in the medical and surgical practice. To achieve optimum use of blood, transfusion has to be appropriate and judicious consuming minimal resources and manpower. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pattern of blood transfusion requests and utilization with the aim of determining transfusion practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood request forms and cross-match worksheets at the blood bank were analyzed over a 6-month period. Numbers of requisitions, blood units cross-matched, issued out, transfused, and nontransfused were calculated. Nonusage probability (NUP) and the cross-match to transfusion ratio (CTR) for each clinical unit were computed. RESULTS: Two thousand two hundred and sixty-eight units of blood were cross-matched for 1487 patient's transfusion requests, out of which only 1455 (64.2%) were transfused giving a total CTR of 1.6 for the hospital. The CTR for the various clinical units were: Obstetrics and gynecology (O and G) 2.7, surgery 2.1, orthopedics 1.9, medicine 1.1, pediatrics 1, and oncology 1. CONCLUSIONS: The overall CTR (1.6) of the hospital was within the optimal range except for the O and G and surgery department which were having very high NUP and CTR indicating their suboptimal transfusion practices. Introducing revised transfusion guidelines, maximum surgical blood ordering schedule and type, screen, save, and abbreviated cross-match method can help toward adequate requisition and utilization of blood thereby reducing wastage of resources, time, and manpower. PMID:28367018

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin transfusion in colostrum-deprived dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, A; Belloli, A; Biffani, S; Locatelli, V; Dall'Ara, P; Filipe, J; Restelli, I; Proverbio, D; Pravettoni, D

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin transfusion is employed in the management of the failure of passive transfer (FPT). The aim of this study was to investigate the dose of immunoglobulin G (IgG) needed to reach a protective concentration (>10 g/L) in colostrum-deprived dairy calves. Twenty-eight Holstein Friesian newborn male calves were randomly assigned to either a control group (CG) or a treatment group (PG). Calves in the CG received 4 L of high quality colostrum within 12 h of birth. Calves in the PG received 62.7 ± 3.1 g of IgG IV in 2.6 ± 0.3 L of plasma within 6 h after birth. Serum immunoglobulin G (sIgG) and serum total protein (sTP) concentrations were assayed before and after (24 h, 72 h and 1 week after birth) plasma transfusion or colostrum ingestion. Serum (s) IgG and sTP concentrations increased in both groups throughout the period of observation. Mean sIgG and sTP concentrations after colostrum ingestion or plasma transfusion were higher in the CG than in the PG (P <0.01). Nine treated calves developed diarrhoea during the study and four were humanely euthanased due to progressive clinical deterioration. None of the calves in the CG showed signs of disease or died during the study. The dose of IgG used in this trial effectively provided an adequate sIgG concentration in colostrum-deprived calves (>10 g/L). Calves in the CG had significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates compared to those in the PG, suggesting that plasma transfusion alone is ineffective in providing complete protection against neonatal disease.

  8. Blood transfusion in the para-Bombay phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lin-Chu, M; Broadberry, R E

    1990-08-01

    The H-deficient phenotypes found in Chinese so far, have all been secretors of soluble blood group substances in saliva. The corresponding isoagglutinin activity (e.g. anti-B in OB(Hm) persons) has been found to be weak in all cases. To determine the clinical significance of these weak isoagglutinins 51Cr red cell survival tests were performed on three OB(Hm) individuals transfused with small volumes (4 ml) of groups B and O RBC. Rapid destruction of most of the RBC occurred whether or not the isoagglutinins of the OB(Hm) individuals were indirect antiglobulin test (IAGT) reactive. When a larger volume (54 ml packed RBC) of group B cells (weakly incompatible by IAGT) was transfused to another OB(Hm) individual with IAGT active anti-HI, the survival of the transfused RBC was 93% at 24 h, with 30% of the RBC remaining in the circulation at 28 d in contrast to 76% as would be expected if the survival was normal. Therefore when whole units of blood of normal ABO blood groups, compatible by IAGT, are transfused, the survival is expected to be almost normal. These weak isoagglutinins may not be very clinically significant and we suggest that when para-Bombay blood is not available, the compatibility testing for OA(Hm) persons should be performed with group A and group O packed RBC; OB(Hm) with group B and group O packed RBC: OAB(Hm) with groups A, B, AB and O packed RBC. For cross matching, the indirect antiglobulin test by a prewarmed technique should be used.

  9. Transfusion Support for ABO-Incompatible Progenitor Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kopko, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary ABO-incompatible transplants comprise up to 50% of allogeneic progenitor cell transplants. Major, minor and bidirectional ABO-incompatible transplants each have unique complications that can occur, including hemolysis at the time of progenitor cell infusion, hemolysis during donor engraftment, passenger lymphocyte syndrome, delayed red blood cell engraftment, and pure red cell aplasia. Appropriate transfusion support during the different phases of the allogeneic progenitor cell transplant process is an important part of ABO-incompatible transplantation. PMID:27022318

  10. Hyperkalemia After Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    both adults and children, hypokalemia has been reported more frequently than hyperkalemia. The largest reported series of which we are aware...retrospective in nature, reported an incidence of hypokalemia of 72% in children undergoing liver transplantation; hyperkalemia occurred in less than 5% of...patients.1 Others have likewise observed hypokalemia to be more common after transfusion.2–4 In the few, small studies describing hyperkalemia after

  11. Structural insights into HetR−PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  12. Blood transfusions and local tumor recurrence in colorectal cancer. Evidence of a noncausal relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, O R; Hop, W C; Marquet, R L; Jeekel, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors analyzed the effect of blood transfusions on the pattern of colorectal cancer recurrence. BACKGROUND. Retrospective studies suggest that blood transfusions are associated with a poor prognosis in patients who undergo operations for colorectal malignancies. In a previously published, randomized trial, it was investigated whether autologous blood transfusions could overcome this putative detrimental effect. However, this did not appear to be the case. METHODS. In the current study, the authors analyzed the patterns of recurrence in 420 patients who underwent curative operations for colorectal cancer. RESULTS. Patients who did not require transfusions (N = 143) had significantly better disease-free survival than those who did need transfusions (N = 277); percentages at 4 years were 73% and 59%, respectively (p = 0.001). No difference was found between both groups in comparing cumulative percentages of patients having metastases; percentages at 4 years were 25% in the group that did not undergo transfusion and 27% in the transfused group. The percentage of cases having local recurrence, however, was significantly increased (p = 0.0006) in the transfused group as compared with the group that did not undergo transfusion; percentages at 4 years were 20% and 3%, respectively. The groups of patients receiving only allogeneic, only autologous, or both types of transfusions all had a significantly higher incidence of local recurrence than the patients who did not receive transfusions, but no differences were found between these three groups. CONCLUSIONS. These findings suggest that the association between blood transfusions and prognosis in colorectal cancer is a result of the circumstances that necessitate transfusions, leading to the development of local recurrences, but not of distant metastases. PMID:7986147

  13. Blood still kills: six strategies to further reduce allogeneic blood transfusion-related mortality.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Blajchman, Morris A

    2010-04-01

    After reviewing the relative frequency of the causes of allogeneic blood transfusion-related mortality in the United States today, we present 6 possible strategies for further reducing such transfusion-related mortality. These are (1) avoidance of unnecessary transfusions through the use of evidence-based transfusion guidelines, to reduce potentially fatal (infectious as well as noninfectious) transfusion complications; (2) reduction in the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury in recipients of platelet transfusions through the use of single-donor platelets collected from male donors, or female donors without a history of pregnancy or who have been shown not to have white blood cell (WBC) antibodies; (3) prevention of hemolytic transfusion reactions through the augmentation of patient identification procedures by the addition of information technologies, as well as through the prevention of additional red blood cell alloantibody formation in patients who are likely to need multiple transfusions in the future; (4) avoidance of pooled blood products (such as pooled whole blood-derived platelets) to reduce the risk of transmission of emerging transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) and the residual risk from known TTIs (especially transfusion-associated sepsis [TAS]); (5) WBC reduction of cellular blood components administered in cardiac surgery to prevent the poorly understood increased mortality seen in cardiac surgery patients in association with the receipt of non-WBC-reduced (compared with WBC-reduced) transfusion; and (6) pathogen reduction of platelet and plasma components to prevent the transfusion transmission of most emerging, potentially fatal TTIs and the residual risk of known TTIs (especially TAS).

  14. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  15. Reasons for moving toward a patient-centric paradigm of clinical transfusion medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C

    2013-04-01

    The combination of patient blood management (PBM) modalities and multicomponent apheresis permits us to administer even safer transfusions than those using the "safer-than-ever" blood components distributed in the beginning of the 21st century. PBM identifies a patient at risk of transfusion and formulates a multidisciplinary and multimodal-yet individualized-plan for reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion. Multicomponent apheresis can collect any combination of red blood cells, platelets, and plasma from the same donor during the same donation, and it should eventually reserve all components harvested from the same donation for transfusion to the same recipient. Together, PBM and multicomponent apheresis represent a new paradigm-the patient-centric paradigm-of transfusion medicine whose purpose is to reduce the transfusion risk for each individual patient to the level of the ALARA (as-low-as-reasonably-achievable) risk. PBM and multicomponent apheresis can meet a patient's transfusion needs with at least twofold fewer allogeneic donor exposures, thereby reducing the risk of infectious and immunologic complications of transfusion by at least twofold. The reduction in risk includes the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality (transfusion-related acute lung injury) and the cardinal threat to transfusion safety (the next "HIV-like" pathogen to emerge in the future). Once it is determined that PBM and multicomponent apheresis can replace the current blood-procurement system at a "reasonable" cost and without jeopardizing the supply of blood and components, the patient-centric paradigm should replace the current, component-centric paradigm of transfusion medicine to reduce the transfusion risk to the level of the ALARA risk.

  16. Outpatient red blood cell transfusion payments among patients on chronic dialysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Payments for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are separate from US Medicare bundled payments for dialysis-related services and medications. Our objective was to examine the economic burden for payers when chronic dialysis patients receive outpatient RBC transfusions. Methods Using Truven Health MarketScan® data (1/1/02-10/31/10) in this retrospective micro-costing economic analysis, we analyzed data from chronic dialysis patients who underwent at least 1 outpatient RBC transfusion who had at least 6 months of continuous enrollment prior to initial dialysis claim and at least 30 days post-transfusion follow-up. A conceptual model of transfusion-associated resource use based on current literature was employed to estimate outpatient RBC transfusion payments. Total payments per RBC transfusion episode included screening/monitoring (within 3 days), blood acquisition/administration (within 2 days), and associated complications (within 3 days for acute events; up to 45 days for chronic events). Results A total of 3283 patient transfusion episodes were included; 56.4% were men and 40.9% had Medicare supplemental insurance. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) age was 60.9 (15.0) years, and mean Charlson comorbidity index was 4.3 (2.5). During a mean (SD) follow-up of 495 (474) days, patients had a mean of 2.2 (3.8) outpatient RBC transfusion episodes. Mean/median (SD) total payment per RBC transfusion episode was $854/$427 ($2,060) with 72.1% attributable to blood acquisition and administration payments. Complication payments ranged from mean (SD) $213 ($168) for delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction to $19,466 ($15,424) for congestive heart failure. Conclusions Payments for outpatient RBC transfusion episodes were driven by blood acquisition and administration payments. While infrequent, transfusion complications increased payments substantially when they occurred. PMID:23121762

  17. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. Aims This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%). The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9%) and fever (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3%) of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. Conclusions Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety. PMID:23049336

  18. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  19. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  20. Thromboelastography-guided transfusion Therapy in the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Brazzel, Charice

    2013-04-01

    This article presents thromboelastography (TEG) as an important assay to incorporate into anesthesia practice for development of evidence-based therapy of trauma patients receiving blood transfusions. The leading cause of death worldwide results from trauma. Hemorrhage is responsible for 30% to 40% of trauma mortality and accounts for almost 50% of the deaths occurring in the initial 24 hours following the traumatic incident. On admission, 25% to 35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a sevenfold increase in morbidity and mortality. The literature supports that routine plasma-based routine coagulation tests, such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio, are inadequate for monitoring coagulopathy and guided transfusion therapy in trauma patients. A potential solution is incorporating the use of the TEG assay into the care of trauma patients to render evidence-based therapy for patients requiring massive blood transfusions. Analysis with TEG provides a complete picture of hemostasis, which is far superior to isolated, static conventional tests. The result is a fast, well-designed, and precise diagnosis enabling more cost-effective treatment, improved clinical outcome, accurate use of blood products, and pharmaceutical therapies at the point of care.

  1. Proteomics applied to transfusion plasma: the beginning of the story.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A; Richa, L; Defer, C; Dernis, D; Huart, J-J; Tokarski, C; Rolando, C

    2013-05-01

    'Safe blood' is and has always been the major concern in transfusion medicine. Plasma can undergo virus inactivation treatments based on physicochemical, photochemical or thermal methodologies for pathogen inactivation. The validation of these treatments is essentially based on clottability assays and clotting factors' titration; however, their impact on plasma proteins at the molecular level has not yet been evaluated. Proteomics appears as particularly adapted to identify, to localize and, consequently, to correlate these modifications to the biological activity change. At the crossroads of biology and analytical sciences, proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins in tissues, physiological fluids or cells at a given moment and in a precise environment. The proteomic strategy is based on a set of methodologies involving separative techniques like mono- and bidimensional gel electrophoresis and chromatography, analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics. Even if plasma has been extensively studied since the very beginning of proteomics, its application to transfusion medicine has just begun. In the first part of this review, we present the principles of proteomics analysis. Then, we propose a state of the art of proteomics applied to plasma analysis. Finally, the use of proteomics for the evaluation of the impact of storage conditions and pathogen inactivation treatments applied to transfusion plasma and for the evaluation of therapeutic protein fractionated is discussed.

  2. Transfusion-Dependent Anaemia: An Overlooked Complication of Paraoesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garett S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. A paraoesophageal hernia (PH) may be one reason for iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) but is often overlooked as a cause. We aimed to assess the incidence and resolution of transfusion-dependent IDA in patients presenting for hiatal hernia surgery. Methods. We analysed a prospective database of patients undergoing laparoscopic hiatal repair in order to identify patients with severe IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion. Results. Of 138 patients with PH managed over a 4-year period, 7 patients (5.1%; M : F 2 : 5; median age 62 yrs (range 57–82)) with IDA requiring red cell/iron transfusion were identified. Preoperatively, 3/7 patients underwent repetitive and unnecessary diagnostic endoscopic investigations prior to surgery. Only 2/7 ever demonstrated gastric mucosal erosions (Cameron ulcers). All patients were cured from anaemia postoperatively. Discussion. PH is an important differential diagnosis in patients with IDA, even those with marked anaemia and no endoscopically identifiable mucosal lesions. Early recognition can avoid unnecessary additional diagnostic endoscopies. Laparoscopic repair is associated with low morbidity and results in resolution of anaemia. PMID:27379280

  3. Efficacy of fresh packed red blood transfusion in organophosphate poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hang-xing; Tong, Pei-jian; Li, Cai-xia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bing-yu; Huang, Zhi-hui; Wang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate caused by organophosphate (OP) poisoning is still high, even the standard treatment such as atropine and oxime improves a lot. To search for alternative therapies, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in acute OP poisoning, and compare the therapeutic effects of RBCs at different storage times. Patients diagnosed with OP poisoning were included in this prospective study. Fresh RBCs (packed RBCs stored less than 10 days) and longer-storage RBCs (stored more than 10 days but less than 35 days) were randomly transfused or not into OP poisoning patients. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in blood, atropine usage and durations, pralidoxime durations were measured. We found that both fresh and longer-storage RBCs (200–400 mL) significantly increased blood ChE levels 6 hours after transfusion, shortened the duration for ChE recovery and length of hospital stay, and reduced the usage of atropine and pralidoxime. In addition, fresh RBCs demonstrated stronger therapeutic effects than longer-storage RBCs. Packed RBCs might be an alternative approach in patients with OP poisoning, especially during early stages. PMID:28296779

  4. [Post-transfusion hepatitis C. From screening to compensation].

    PubMed

    Ferrant, O; Bazin, A; Girard, A; Le Coutour, X; Leporrier, M; Papin, F

    2010-04-01

    In France, during the last decades preceding the 1990s, 100,000 to 400,000 blood recipients may have been infected by hepatitis C. Since 1990, thanks to advances in transfusion safety, the risk of hepatitis C contamination has become extremely low. Given the natural history of the disease, it can be a long time unnoticed. Thus, even today, a significant part of infected individuals do not know their serological status. Through several periods and several campaigns, we present the various means used for the detection of post-transfusion hepatitis C at the Caen University Hospital. These methods have been introduced as a result of legislation or through arrangements made by the institution. They were made possible through the action of haemovigilance system, monitoring adverse reactions related to blood products and of blood products traceability which helps to realise special researches in case of suspected transfused blood products. In addition to posttransfusion hepatitis C detection, we are discussing available victim ways to be indemnified for the injury suffered by contamination by hepatitis C.

  5. Quality Assessment of Established and Emerging Blood Components for Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Acker, Jason P; Marks, Denese C; Sheffield, William P

    2016-01-01

    Blood is donated either as whole blood, with subsequent component processing, or through the use of apheresis devices that extract one or more components and return the rest of the donation to the donor. Blood component therapy supplanted whole blood transfusion in industrialized countries in the middle of the twentieth century and remains the standard of care for the majority of patients receiving a transfusion. Traditionally, blood has been processed into three main blood products: red blood cell concentrates; platelet concentrates; and transfusable plasma. Ensuring that these products are of high quality and that they deliver their intended benefits to patients throughout their shelf-life is a complex task. Further complexity has been added with the development of products stored under nonstandard conditions or subjected to additional manufacturing steps (e.g., cryopreserved platelets, irradiated red cells, and lyophilized plasma). Here we review established and emerging methodologies for assessing blood product quality and address controversies and uncertainties in this thriving and active field of investigation.

  6. Quality Assessment of Established and Emerging Blood Components for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Denese C.

    2016-01-01

    Blood is donated either as whole blood, with subsequent component processing, or through the use of apheresis devices that extract one or more components and return the rest of the donation to the donor. Blood component therapy supplanted whole blood transfusion in industrialized countries in the middle of the twentieth century and remains the standard of care for the majority of patients receiving a transfusion. Traditionally, blood has been processed into three main blood products: red blood cell concentrates; platelet concentrates; and transfusable plasma. Ensuring that these products are of high quality and that they deliver their intended benefits to patients throughout their shelf-life is a complex task. Further complexity has been added with the development of products stored under nonstandard conditions or subjected to additional manufacturing steps (e.g., cryopreserved platelets, irradiated red cells, and lyophilized plasma). Here we review established and emerging methodologies for assessing blood product quality and address controversies and uncertainties in this thriving and active field of investigation. PMID:28070448

  7. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  8. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  9. Hepcidin as a new biomarker for detecting autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Barras, Laura; Nicoli, Raul; Robinson, Neil; Baume, Norbert; Lion, Niels; Barelli, Stefano; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is an efficient way to increase sport performance. It is also the most challenging doping method to detect. At present, individual follow-up of haematological variables via the athlete biological passport (ABP) is used to detect it. Quantification of a novel hepatic peptide called hepcidin may be a new alternative to detect ABT. In this prospective clinical trial, healthy subjects received a saline injection for the control phase, after which they donated blood that was stored and then transfused 36 days later. The impact of ABT on hepcidin as well as haematological parameters, iron metabolism, and inflammation markers was investigated. Blood transfusion had a particularly marked effect on hepcidin concentrations compared to the other biomarkers, which included haematological variables. Hepcidin concentrations increased significantly: 12 hr and 1 day after blood reinfusion, these concentrations rose by seven- and fourfold, respectively. No significant change was observed in the control phase. Hepcidin quantification is a cost-effective strategy that could be used in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT.

  10. [Acute adverse effects in transfusion. Proposals for the hemosurveillance system].

    PubMed

    Baptista González, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    The management model based on risk prevention has become a major influence in shaping policies for transfusion safety. There are approximately sixty interactions between the health worker and the patient during the transfusion process,representing the number of times where you have the opportunity to make a mistake.We present an analysis of the weaknesses of the National Blood System, with particular attention to the haemovigilance donor and patient. The proposals include the implementation of the National Blood containing the need to establish from the National Blood Safety, significant changes in the regulatory framework and the internal regulations of the Ministry of Health, the CNTS and COFEPRIS. Is required to promote and coordinate the collection of accurate information from the committees of transfusion medicine, which will be accompanied by an initial diagnosis from the National Survey of Blood. Requires notice to other forms of funding to ensure the viability of the projects operating blood bank. Finally, as a strategic resource, the blood is of public, so access should not be restricted.

  11. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported.

  12. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  13. Consequences of Transfusing Blood Components in Patients With Trauma: A Conceptual Model.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Transfusion of blood components is often required in resuscitation of patients with major trauma. Packed red blood cells and platelets break down and undergo chemical changes during storage (known as the storage lesion) that lead to an inflammatory response once the blood components are transfused to patients. Although some evidence supports a detrimental association between transfusion and a patient's outcome, the mechanisms connecting transfusion of stored components to outcomes remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide critical care nurses with a conceptual model to facilitate understanding of the relationship between the storage lesion and patients' outcomes after trauma; outcomes related to trauma, hemorrhage, and blood component transfusion are grouped according to those occurring in the short-term (≤30 days) and the long-term (>30 days). Complete understanding of these clinical implications is critical for practitioners in evaluating and treating patients given transfusions after traumatic injury.

  14. Predictors and complications of blood transfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael A; Yu, Stephen; Jeffries, James J; Silverton, Craig D

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative patient optimization can minimize the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine predictors and complications of transfusions. This retrospective review analyzed 1795 patients who underwent primary THA and TKA at our institution between January 2011 and December 2012. Of the 1573 patients ultimately included the rates of transfusion were 9.27% in TKA and 26.6% in THA. Significant predictors for transfusion include: preoperative hemoglobin, age, female gender, body mass index, creatinine, TKA, operating room time, operative blood loss, and intra-operative fluids. The DVT rate was comparable, but deep surgical site infection rate among transfused patients was 2.4% compared to 0.5% in non-transfused patients (P = 0.0065).

  15. Hyperkalemia caused by rapid red cell transfusion and the potassium absorption filter

    PubMed Central

    Imashuku, Yasuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Mizuno, Takayoshi; Fukushima, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of transient hyperkalemia during hysterectomy after cesarean section, due to preoperatively undiagnosed placenta accreta that caused unforeseen massive hemorrhage and required rapid red cell transfusion. Hyperkalemia-induced by rapid red cell transfusion is a well-known severe complication of transfusion; however, in patients with sudden massive hemorrhage, rapid red cell transfusion is necessary to save their life. In such cases, it is extremely important to monitor serum potassium levels. For an emergency situation, a system should be developed to ensure sufficient preparation for immediate transfusion and laboratory tests. Furthermore, sufficient stock of preparations to treat hyperkalemia, such as calcium preparations, diuretics, glucose, and insulin is required. Moreover, a transfusion filter that absorbs potassium has been developed and is now available for clinical use in Japan. The filter is easy to use and beneficial, and should be prepared when it is available. PMID:28217070

  16. Role of blood transfusion in organ system failure following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Maetani, S; Nishikawa, T; Tobe, T; Hirakawa, A

    1986-01-01

    Using multivariate probit analysis, the data of 565 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery were retrospectively analyzed, and the etiologic role of blood transfusion in organ system failure (OSF), which includes respiratory failure, gastrointestinal stress bleeding, renal failure, nonobstructive, nonhepatitic jaundice, and coagulopathy, was studied. Apart from the amount of blood transfusion, the following factors were included in the analysis as possible contributors to OSF: age, preoperative hematocrit, organ failure risk (diffuse peritonitis, obstructive cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, terminal cancer, and hemorrhagic shock), operative time, blood loss, and postoperative highest hematocrit. The results showed that, except for preoperative hematocrit, all the factors are statistically significant contributors, blood transfusion being the most significant. There was no statistically significant interaction between blood transfusion and organ failure risk. It is concluded that blood transfusion is an important, independent factor contributing to OSF, and its contribution cannot be attributed to the underlying conditions that require blood transfusion. PMID:3485412

  17. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a clinical review with emphasis on the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alexander B; Moss, Marc; Silliman, Christopher C

    2009-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality world-wide. Although first described in 1983, it took two decades to develop consensus definitions, which remain controversial. The pathogenesis of TRALI is related to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host or the infusion of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. TRALI appears to be the result of at least two sequential events and treatment is supportive. This review demonstrates that critically ill patients are more susceptible to TRALI and require special attention by critical care specialists, haematologists and transfusion medicine experts. Further research is required into TRALI and its pathogenesis so that transfusions are safer and administered appropriately. Avoidance including male-only transfusion practises, the use of leucoreduced components, fresher blood/blood components and solvent detergent plasma are also discussed.

  18. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  19. Real-time blood cross-matching sensor for intelligent management of transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, M K; Anthony, Steven R

    2004-01-01

    Blood transfusion errors are not uncommon. In some cases the error is fatal. This is primarily due to lack of an automated system at the point of application and over-reliance on bar-coding and paperwork to catch these critical errors. In emergency situations, human errors contribute to transfusion and transplantation of incompatible blood types and organs resulting in rejection and possible fatality. We present a sensing concept that will monitor blood compatibility between the patient and the transfusion bag before allowing the valve to open for transfusion to take place. This will eliminate all transfusion errors and provide 100% safe transfusions automatically. The operating principle of the sensor is based on the light scattering characteristics of dilute blood and the effect of agglutination on scattering. The device proposed is an optical system based on spectrophotometric methods. The device configuration, and results from several tests with combinations of known blood samples will be presented.

  20. Gender disparities in red blood cell transfusion in elective surgery: a post hoc multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gombotz, Hans; Schreier, Günter; Neubauer, Sandra; Kastner, Peter; Hofmann, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A post hoc gender comparison of transfusion-related modifiable risk factors among patients undergoing elective surgery. Settings 23 Austrian centres randomly selected and stratified by region and level of care. Participants We consecutively enrolled in total 6530 patients (3465 women and 3065 men); 1491 underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, 2570 primary unilateral total hip replacement (THR) and 2469 primary unilateral total knee replacement (TKR). Main outcome measures Primary outcome measures were the number of allogeneic and autologous red blood cell (RBC) units transfused (postoperative day 5 included) and differences in intraoperative and postoperative transfusion rate between men and women. Secondary outcomes included perioperative blood loss in transfused and non-transfused patients, volume of RBCs transfused, perioperative haemoglobin values and circulating red blood volume on postoperative day 5. Results In all surgical groups, the transfusion rate was significantly higher in women than in men (CABG 81 vs 49%, THR 46 vs 24% and TKR 37 vs 23%). In transfused patients, the absolute blood loss was higher among men in all surgical categories while the relative blood loss was higher among women in the CABG group (52.8 vs 47.8%) but comparable in orthopaedic surgery. The relative RBC volume transfused was significantly higher among women in all categories (CABG 40.0 vs 22.3; TKR 25.2 vs 20.2; THR 26.4 vs 20.8%). On postoperative day 5, the relative haemoglobin values and the relative circulating RBC volume were higher in women in all surgical categories. Conclusions The higher transfusion rate and volume in women when compared with men in elective surgery can be explained by clinicians applying the same absolute transfusion thresholds irrespective of a patient's gender. This, together with the common use of a liberal transfusion strategy, leads to further overtransfusion in women. PMID:27965248

  1. [Data processing and blood transfusion activities: fact and future in 2013].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y; Daurat, G

    2013-05-01

    It is now hard to think of blood transfusion activities without data processing. Blood transfusion centers are unable to work without it since a long time. Its necessity in hospital blood banks is following the same pattern. Electronic data interchange between them is growing because of their high interdependence. A lot has already been done and works routinely. But a lot remains to be done, due to continuous evolution of computer science and blood transfusion itself.

  2. Blood Transfusion Requirements for Patients With Sarcomas Undergoing Combined Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Helena M.; Whitehead, Lynne; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Burnet, Neil G.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with bony and soft tissue sarcomas may require intensive treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which often leads to a fall in haemoglobin levels, requiring blood transfusion. There may be advantages in predicting which patients will require transfusion, partly because anaemia and hypoxia may worsen the response of tumours to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between 1997 and 2003, a total of 26 patients who received intensive treatment with curative intent were identified. Transfusions were given to maintain the haemoglobin at 10g/dl or above during chemotherapy, and at 12 g/dl or above during radiotherapy. Eighteen (69%) required a transfusion, the majority as a result of both the chemotherapy and RT criteria. There were 78 transfusion episodes, and 181 units of blood given. In the 18 patients who required transfusion, the average number of units was 10.1, but seven patients required more blood than this. The most significant factor influencing blood transfusion was choice of intensive chemotherapy. Intensive chemotherapy and presenting Hb less than 11.6 g/dl identified 13 out of 18 patients who needed transfusion. Adding a drop in haemoglobin of greater than 1.7 g/dl after one cycle of chemotherapy identified 16 out of 18 patients who required transfusion. The seven patients who had heavy transfusion requirements were identified by age 32 or less, intensive chemotherapy and a presenting Hb of 12 g/dl or less. Erythropoietin might be a useful alternative to transfusion in selected patient groups, especially those with heavy transfusion requirements. PMID:18521418

  3. EFFECT OF TRANSFUSION THERAPY ON TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER ULTRASONOGRAPHY VELOCITIES IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Yim, Eunsil; Miller, Scott; Adams, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Children with sickle cell disease and abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography have a high risk of stroke, but this risk is greatly reduced when chronic transfusion therapy is administered. The change in TCD velocities during chronic transfusion therapy and rate and frequency of normalization of TCD findings have not been studied extensively. Procedures Using data from children with sickle cell disease enrolled as potential subjects in the Optimizing Primary Stroke Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP 2) trial, we characterized the change in TCD velocities on transfusion therapy and identified predictors of developing a normal TCD. Results Among 88 children with serial TCD data after starting transfusions for abnormal TCD 46 (52%) converted to normal TCD after a mean of 4.3 months (median 3.0; range 0.85-14.3 months) of transfusions. TCD studies remained abnormal in 19/88 (21.6%) after a mean of 2.4 years of transfusion. The median TCD velocity was lowered by 38 cm/s within three months of initiating transfusions, followed by a more gradual decline then stabilization of velocities, although with significant individual variation. Factors associated with conversion to normal TCD included lower initial TCD velocity, younger age, and higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin level during transfusion therapy. Conclusion Younger children with higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels and lower abnormal TCD velocities are most likely to have rapid normalization of TCD on transfusions. Long-term follow-up of children with persistently abnormal exams or worsening velocities on transfusion is needed to determine if these children are at higher risk of stroke. PMID:21370410

  4. Reporting adverse transfusion reactions: A retrospective study from tertiary care hospital from New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Sangeeta; Puri, Vandana; Mahajan, Gunjan; Gupta, Prajwala; Jain, Manjula

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Blood transfusion services have achieved newer heights in the last decade, with developments in cellular techniques, component separation, and integration of molecular methods. However, the system of recording and reporting of the adverse events related to blood transfusion is developing countries like India is grossly inadequate and voluntary in nature. AIMS: This study was undertaken to analyze the retrospective data on adverse events related to blood transfusions in our hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study was done to examine all the transfusion related adverse events reported in a Regional Blood Bank Transfusion Centre of North India over a period of 9 years. Adverse transfusion events related to whole blood, red cell concentrates (RCCs), and all other components were analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Average rate of transfusion reactions with the components was also assessed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Categorical variables were analyzed using the Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was taken to indicate a significant difference. RESULTS: During this period, a total of 1,60,973 blood/blood component units were issued by our blood bank to various departments of the hospital and 314 immediate transfusion events were reported. The rate of immediate transfusion reactions during the study was 0.19%. Average transfusion reaction rate with RCC was 0.25% with febrile nonhemolytic reactions being the most common type of adverse event (37.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Awareness should be increased among clinicians to correctly prevent, identify, and report transfusion-related adverse events. These measures should be implemented to increase blood transfusion quality and safety. PMID:28316433

  5. [A structured ePortfolio to handle a programme of professional competences assessment in the area of transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Staccini, P; Hergon, E; Bordonado, C; Jullien, S; Quaranta, J-F

    2007-08-01

    In order to organize a nationwide program for the evaluation of professional practices in the area of blood transfusion, the French National Blood Transfusion Institute and the Nice-Sophia Antipolis University designed and implemented a web based service aimed at following-up and guiding the physicians involved in such an assessment program. The core component is a structured electronic portfolio (ePortfolio), the implementation of which was based on an object-oriented environment combined with a content management system. The modelling of the global evaluation system makes it possible to describe this type of portfolio according to six axes: an axis "objectives" (competencies accreditation); an axis "target" (heath care professionals); an axis "content" (numerical documents); an axis "structure" (matrix of answer defined in space and time); an axis "source" (single source peer-reviewed); an axis "level of evidence" (validation of the proof after its deposit by an identified and authenticated peer user, whole tracking of the exchanges and interactions between users and device).

  6. Is there a "magic" hemoglobin number? Clinical decision support promoting restrictive blood transfusion practices.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Shah, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Blood transfusion has been identified as one of the most frequently performed therapeutic procedures, with a significant percentage of transfusions identified to be inappropriate. Recent key clinical trials in adults have provided Level 1 evidence to support restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices. However, some advocates have attempted to identify a "correct" Hb threshold for RBC transfusion; whereas others assert that management of anemia, including transfusion decisions, must take into account clinical patient variables, rather than simply one diagnostic laboratory test. The heterogeneity of guidelines for blood transfusion by a number of medical societies reflects this controversy. Clinical decision support (CDS) uses a Hb threshold number in a smart Best Practices Alert (BPA) upon physician order, to trigger a concurrent utilization self-review for whether blood transfusion therapy is appropriate. This review summarizes Level 1 evidence in seven key clinical trials in adults that support restrictive transfusion practices, along strategies made possible by CDS that have demonstrated value in improving blood utilization by promoting restrictive transfusion practices.

  7. [The European network of transfusion medicine societies (EuroNet-TMS): The White Book 2005].

    PubMed

    Rouger, P

    2005-06-01

    Europe is building up. It develops in a quite complex environment, in which health care represents an important field of activities. As for blood transfusion, it plays a major role especially in the development of medical activities as well as for the patients treatments. Today, blood components are still of human origin and there are no substitutes for them. As a medical discipline, Blood Transfusion represents a broad field in medicine which requests the involvement of numerous actors. It is up to professional medical/scientific societies to promote the discipline. This is why it has been considered necessary and relevant to build up a federation of transfusion medicine societies throughout the European Union (EU) ; it is called EuroNet-TMS, the European Network of Transfusion Medicine Societies. This network groups more than 7500 professionals of involved in blood transfusion activities. It has six major objectives: 1) To find coherent responses to issues at stake in transfusion; 2) To promote medical and scientific developments of blood transfusion in Europe; 3) To ensure the highest and most up-to-date scientific level to meet safety and quality standards; 4) To offer similar services to all EU citizens in the field of blood transfusion; 5) To share knowledge and date within Europe; 6) To develop interfaces with decision-makers among the diverse European countries. The first step is the writing of the "White Book 2005" which reports the state of the art of blood transfusion in Europe; a prospective plan is proposed to be discussed.

  8. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion.

  9. [Identitovigilance and its impact on the results ensuring the transfusion security].

    PubMed

    Flourié, F; Duboeuf, S; Oriol, P; Benamara, A; Rigal, E; Garraud, O

    2008-01-01

    Errors on identity of patients during their registration may lead to non-compliance with a transfusion procedure, a non-issue adjusted blood and thus a transfusion risk. The main mistake is the misknowledge of an antibody, secondarily a loss of transfusion information and a redundancy of examinations. The creation of a working group "identitovigilance" helped sensitize the staff of health establishments and clinical chemistry laboratories. In this area of computerization of medical and transfusion records, shared folders and networking, identification of patients is a real issue of risk management hospital.

  10. Evidence Base for Restrictive Transfusion Triggers in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R.; Spahn, Gabriela H.; Stein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Liberal versus restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion triggers have been debated for years. This review illustrates the human body's physiologic response to acute anemia and summarizes the evidence from prospective randomized trials (RCTs) for restrictive use of RBC transfusions in high-risk patients. During progressive anemia, the human body maintains the oxygen delivery to the tissues by an increase in cardiac output and peripheral oxygen extraction. Seven RCTs with a total of 5,566 high-risk patients compared a restrictive hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger (Hb < 70 or < 80 g/l) with a liberal Hb transfusion trigger (Hb < 90 or < 100 g/l). Unanimously these studies show non-inferiority, safety, and a significant reduction in RBC transfusions in the restrictive groups. In one RCT mortality was higher in the liberal Hb transfusion group, and in two additional RCTs mortality of subgroups or after risk adjustment was significantly higher in the liberal Hb transfusion trigger groups. Conclusion Strong RCT evidence suggests the safety of restrictive transfusion triggers. As a consequence, an Hb transfusion trigger of <70 g/l is recommended for high risk patients. PMID:26019706

  11. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  12. Malaysian child infected with Plasmodium vivax via blood transfusion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria may be a serious complication of blood transfusion due to the asymptomatic persistence of parasites in some donors. This case report highlights the transfusion-transmitted malaria of Plasmodium vivax in a child diagnosed with germ cell tumour. This child had received blood transfusion from three donors and a week later started developing malaria like symptoms. Nested PCR and sequencing confirmed that one of the three donors was infected with P. vivax and this was transmitted to the 12-year-old child. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported transfusion-transmitted malaria case in Malaysia. PMID:24007496

  13. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant).

  14. Transfusion Medicine Problems and Solutions for the Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Luban, Naomi L.C.; McBride, Eileen; Ford, Jason C.; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an integral part of the care of children with oncologic and hematologic conditions. The complexity of transfusion medicine may however lead to challenges for pediatric hematologists/oncologists. In this review, three commonly encountered areas of transfusion medicine are explored. The approach to the investigation and management of suspected platelet refractoriness is reviewed. The unique transfusion related challenges encountered by children undergoing stem cell transplantation are also discussed. Finally, issues arising out of the care of children with hemoglobinopathies are explored, with an emphasis on the incidence of allo- and autoimmunization. PMID:22238206

  15. Transmission of HIV by transfusion of HIV-screened blood: the value of a national register. The 'Recipients' Study Group of the French Society of Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Courtois, F; Jullien, A M; Chenais, F; Noel, L; Pinon, F

    1992-03-01

    A National Register of transfusion-transmitted infections was opened by the French Society of Blood Transfusion on 1 October, 1986. Out of 54 initially reported cases of HIV-infection, allegedly transmitted by blood components, further investigation could be completed in 33 cases. The transfusional origin of contamination was considered as established or probable in 28/33 cases, either because a potentially infectious unit was identified among those transfused to the recipient (23/28), or because the recipient was known to be seronegative before transfusion (5/28), or both (10/28). In 5/33 cases transfusion was considered as presumably responsible for contamination because no other risk factor was found in the recipient. Among the 33 documented cases of HIV-transmission by screened blood, 29 (88%) occurred between 1985 and 1987, and four (12%) during 1988. Out of 19 implicated donors later found seropositive, 16 belonged to a high-risk group for HIV-infection. The majority of HIV-infections occurred as a consequence of blood donation in the window period between contamination and the appearance of detectable antibodies in the donor's serum (11/19). In three instances, however, human and operational errors led to the release of seropositive units. We conclude that the main value of this Register is to provide a potential trend-indicator of transfusion-related infectious risks, to allow objective documentation of reported cases and to contribute to the improvement of blood transfusion practice.

  16. Relationships between the ABC-exporter HetC and peptides that regulate the spatiotemporal pattern of heterocyst distribution in Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    In the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, cells called heterocysts that are specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen differentiate from vegetative cells of the filament in the absence of combined nitrogen. Heterocysts follow a specific distribution pattern along the filament, and a number of regulators have been identified that influence the heterocyst pattern. PatS and HetN, expressed in the differentiating cells, inhibit the differentiation of neighboring cells. At least PatS appears to be processed and transferred from cell to cell. HetC is similar to ABC exporters and is required for differentiation. We present an epistasis analysis of these regulatory genes and of genes, hetP and asr2819, successively downstream from hetC, and we have studied the localization of HetC and HetP by use of GFP fusions. Inactivation of patS, but not of hetN, allowed differentiation to proceed in a hetC background, whereas inactivation of hetC in patS or patS hetN backgrounds decreased the frequency of contiguous proheterocysts. A HetC-GFP protein is localized to the heterocysts and especially near their cell poles, and a putative HetC peptidase domain was required for heterocyst differentiation but not for HetC-GFP localization. hetP is also required for heterocyst differentiation. A HetP-GFP protein localized mostly near the heterocyst poles. ORF asr2819, which we denote patC, encodes an 84-residue peptide and is induced upon nitrogen step-down. Inactivation of patC led to a late spreading of the heterocyst pattern. Whereas HetC and HetP appear to have linked functions that allow heterocyst differentiation to progress, PatC may have a role in selecting sites of differentiation, suggesting that these closely positioned genes may be functionally related.

  17. Spatial fluctuations in expression of the heterocyst differentiation regulatory gene hetR in Anabaena filaments.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-04-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  18. Ocular abnormalities in multi-transfused beta-thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Reza; Heydarian, Samira; Karami, Hosein; Shektaei, Mohammad Momeni; Dailami, Kiumars Noruzpour; Amiri, Ahmad Ahmadzadeh; Rezaee, Majid Reza Sheikh; Far, Asad Allah Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess ocular changes in thalassemia patients who have received multiple transfusions and chelate binding therapy in order to avoid iron accumulation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 54 thalassemia major patients were selected as case group, and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were regarded as a control group. Ocular examination included visual acuity, refraction testing, slit lamp examination, funduscopy, tonometry, perimetry, tear break-up time test, and color vision testing were performed for all the participants. We computed the frequency and duration of blood transfusion, the mean serum ferritin level, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and type, duration, and daily dose of chelation therapy for thalassemia patients based on their records. Statistical Analysis Used: All data analysis was performed using SPSS, version 19. Results: All the thalassemic patients were asymptomatic, but abnormal ocular findings (dry eye (33.3%), cataract (10.2%), retinal pigment epithelium degeneration (16.7%), color vision deficiency (3.7%), and visual field defects (33.7%)) were seen in 68.5% of thalassemic group. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities in normal group was 19.4%, which was significantly lower than that in thalassemia patients (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was found between ocular abnormalities and mean serum ferritin level (P = 0.627) and mean hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.143). Correlation of number of blood transfusion with the presence of ocular abnormalities was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). Conclusions: As life expectancy for beta-thalassemia patients extends, regular ophthalmological evaluation to detect early changes in their ocular system is recommended. PMID:26632126

  19. Allogeneic versus autologous blood transfusion and survival after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chalfin, Heather J.; Frank, Steven M.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Trock, Bruce J.; Drake, Charles G.; Partin, Alan W.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Ness, Paul M.; Jeong, Byong C.; Lee, Seung B.; Han, Misop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Potential adverse effects of blood transfusion (BT) remain controversial, especially for clinical outcomes after curative cancer surgery. Some postulate that immune modulation after allogeneic BT predisposes to recurrence and death, but autologous superiority is not established. This study assessed whether BT is associated with long-term prostate cancer recurrence and survival a large single-institutional radical prostatectomy (RP) database. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Between 1994 and 2012, a total of 11,680 patients had RP with available outcome and transfusion data. A total of 7443 (64%) had complete covariate data. Clinical variables associated with biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were identified with Cox proportional hazards models for three groups: no BT (reference, 27.7%, n = 2061), autologous BT only (68.8%, n = 5124), and any allogeneic BT (with or without autologous, 3.5%, n = 258). RESULTS Median (range) follow-up was 6 (1–18) years. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly decreased OS (but not BRFS or PCSS) in the allogeneic group versus autologous and no BT groups (p = 0.006). With univariate analysis, any allogeneic BT had a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.29 (range, 1.52–3.46; p < 0.0001) for OS, whereas autologous BT was not significant (HR, 1.04 [range, 0.82–1.32], p = 0.752). In multivariable models, neither autologous nor allogeneic BT was independently associated with BRFS, CSS, or OS, and a dose response was not observed for allogeneic units and BRFS. CONCLUSION Although allogeneic but not autologous BT was associated with decreased long-term OS, after adjustment for confounding clinical variables, BT was not independently associated with OS, BRFS, or CSS regardless of transfusion type. Notably, no association was observed between allogeneic BT and cancer recurrence. Observed differences in OS may reflect confounding. PMID:24601996

  20. Clinical Gestalt and the Prediction of Massive Transfusion after Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pommerening, Matthew J.; Goodman, Michael D.; Holcomb, John B.; Wade, Charles E.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Cohen, Mitch J.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Myers, John G.; Phelan, Herb A.; Muskat, Peter; Rahbar, Mohammad; Cotton, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early recognition and treatment of trauma patients requiring massive transfusion (MT) has been shown to reduce mortality. While many risk factors predicting MT have been demonstrated, there is no universally accepted method or algorithm to identify these patients. We hypothesized that even among experienced trauma surgeons, the clinical gestalt of identifying patients who will require MT is unreliable. Methods Transfusion and mortality outcomes after trauma were observed at 10 U.S. Level-1 trauma centers in patients who survived ≥30 minutes after admission and received ≥1 unit of RBC within 6 hours of arrival. Subjects who received ≥ 10 units within 24 hours of admission were classified as MT patients. Trauma surgeons were asked the clinical gestalt question “Is the patient likely to be massively transfused?” ten minutes after the patients arrival. The performance of clinical gestalt to predict MT was assessed using chi-square tests and ROC analysis to compare gestalt to previously described scoring systems. Results Of the 1,245 patients enrolled, 966 met inclusion criteria and 221 (23%) patients received MT. 415 (43%) were predicted to have a MT and 551(57%) were predicted to not have MT. Patients predicted to have MT were younger, more often sustained penetrating trauma, had higher ISS scores, higher heart rates, and lower systolic blood pressures (all p < 0.05). Gestalt sensitivity was 65.6% and specificity was 63.8%. PPV and NPV were 34.9% and 86.2% respectively. Conclusion Data from this large multicenter trial demonstrates that predicting the need for MT continues to be a challenge. Because of the increased mortality associated with delayed therapy, a more reliable algorithm is needed to identify and treat these severely injured patients earlier. Level of Evidence II; Diagnostic study - Development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients (with universally applied reference standard) PMID:25682314

  1. [History of autologous blood transfusion in neurosurgical operations].

    PubMed

    Nagai, M

    1998-12-01

    The first report on predeposit autologous blood transfusion was made in 1921 by F.C. Grant, neurosurgeon in the University Hospital of Pennsylvania. The patient was a 42-year-old man with cerebellar tumor, having a rare blood type for which no donor had been listed up. 500 ml of autologous blood was obtained, kept in 0.2% sodium citrate solution in a refrigerator and retransfused following a suboccipital exploration. Clinically, no reaction was noted and there was a favorable postoperative course, and 'autotransfusion' was evaluated as a life-saving procedure. In 1925, L.E. Davis and H. Cushing reported the first case of intraoperative autotransfusion (intraoperative blood salvage). The patient was a 42-year-old man with left occipital meningioma which, due to massive bleeding, could not be removed even by two-stage operations. In a 3rd stage operation, they could remove the tumor of 120 g totally by the aid of intraoperative replacement using 600 ml autologous blood collected with a home-made suction apparatus. No adverse side-effect was noted. This procedure was performed for 23 cases and it revealed beneficial effects except in one case. In ten of the cases, the procedure was estimated as a life-saving treatment. At the present time, the appropriate use of the patients' blood for transfusion therapy is recommended due to a shortage of donors. The use of autologous blood could play a key role, not only in saving the homologous blood supply, but also in avoiding complications encountered in conventional transfusion treatments. The methods of 'Autotransfusion' originated from operations in the neurosurgical area. On that account, it is desirable that neurosurgeons should be concerned with this subject even now.

  2. The evolution of perioperative transfusion testing and blood ordering.

    PubMed

    White, Marissa J; Hazard, Sprague W; Frank, Steven M; Boyd, Joan S; Wick, Elizabeth C; Ness, Paul M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of modern anesthesia and surgical practices has been accompanied by enhanced supportive procedures in blood banking and transfusion medicine. There is increased focus on the preparation and the use of blood components including, but not limited to, preventing unnecessary type and screen/crossmatch orders, decreasing the time required to provide compatible red blood cells (RBCs), and reducing the waste of limited blood and personnel resources. The aim of this review is to help the anesthesiologist and surgical staff identify patients at highest risk for surgical bleeding. In addition, this review examines how anesthesia and transfusion medicine can efficiently and safely allocate blood components for surgical patients who require transfusions. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 through March 2014. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles were also assessed. Several innovations have drastically changed the procedures by which blood is ordered, inventoried, and the speed in which blood is delivered for patient care. Before entering an operating room, patient blood management provides guidance to clinicians about when and how to treat preoperative anemia and intra- and postoperative strategies to limit the patient's exposure to blood components. Timely updates of the recommendations for blood orders (maximum surgical blood ordering schedule) have enhanced preoperative decision making regarding the appropriateness of the type and screen versus the type and crossmatch order. The updated maximum surgical blood ordering schedule reflects modern practices, such as laparoscopy, improved surgical techniques, and use of hemostatic agents resulting in a more streamlined process for ordering and obtaining RBCs. The electronic (computer) crossmatch and electronic remote blood issue have also dramatically reduced the amount of time required to obtain crossmatch-compatible RBCs

  3. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  4. Does blood transfusion affect pituitary gonadal axis and sperm parameters in young males with sickle cell disease?

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Yasin, Mohamed; El-Awwa, Ahmed; Abdelrahman, Mohamed O.; De Sanctis, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effect of packed red cell transfusion (PCTx) on serum concentrations of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (LH and FSH) and testosterone (T) levels and measured sperm parameters in young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) on top-up transfusion (TTx) and those on exchange transfusion (ETx) regimen. Materials and Methods: Basal serum concentrations of FSH, LH, and T and semen parameters were evaluated before and 7 days after PCTx in 18 young adults with transfusion-dependent SCD, aged 20.7 ± 2.88 years. They had full pubertal development (Tanner's stage 5), and capacity to ejaculate. They were regularly transfused since early childhood. Chelation therapy was started early during the first 2 years of life using desferrioxamine and was replaced by deferasirox for the last 4-5 years. Ten patients were on TTx and eight were on ETx regimen. Results: PCTx significantly increased hemoglobin (Hb) from 8.5 ± 1.17 g/dl to 10.5 ± 0.4 g/dl, T from 12.3 ± 1.24 nmol/L to 14.23 ± 1.22 nmol/L and gonadotropins’ concentrations. Sperm parameters improved significantly after PCTx including: total sperm count from 87.4 ± 24.6 million/ml to 146.2 ± 51.25 million/ml, total progressive sperm motility (TPM) from 40.8 ± 11.1 million/ml to 93.4 ± 38.3 million/ml, rapid progressive sperm motility (RPM) progressive motility from 29.26 ± 8.75 million/ml to 67.4 ± 29 million/ml. After PCTx the total sperm count, TPM and RPM were significantly better in the ETx group versus the TTx group. Before and after PCTx, T concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm total count, volume, TPM and RPM (r = 0.53, 0.55, 0.42, and 0.38, respectively, P < 0.01). Hb concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm count, TPM, RPM, and % of sperms with normal morphology (r = 0.60, 0.69, 0.66, and 0.86, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggests that in males with SCD blood transfusion is associated with

  5. Anti-fibrinolytic use for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David A; Carless, Paul A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Stokes, Barrie J; Fergusson, Dean A; Ker, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have led to the development of a range of interventions to minimise blood loss during major surgery. Anti-fibrinolytic drugs are widely used, particularly in cardiac surgery, and previous reviews have found them to be effective in reducing blood loss, the need for transfusion, and the need for re-operation due to continued or recurrent bleeding. In the last few years questions have been raised regarding the comparative performance of the drugs. The safety of the most popular agent, aprotinin, has been challenged, and it was withdrawn from world markets in May 2008 because of concerns that it increased the risk of cardiovascular complications and death. Objectives To assess the comparative effects of the anti-fibrinolytic drugs aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA), and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) on blood loss during surgery, the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and adverse events, particularly vascular occlusion, renal dysfunction, and death. Search methods We searched: the Cochrane Injuries Group’s Specialised Register (July 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) 1950 to July 2010, EMBASE (Ovid SP) 1980 to July 2010. References in identified trials and review articles were checked and trial authors were contacted to identify any additional studies. The searches were last updated in July 2010. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of anti-fibrinolytic drugs in adults scheduled for non-urgent surgery. Eligible trials compared anti-fibrinolytic drugs with placebo (or no treatment), or with each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. This version of the review includes a sensitivity analysis excluding trials authored by Prof. Joachim Boldt. Main results This review summarises data from 252 RCTs that recruited over 25,000 participants. Data from

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of a transfusion-transmitted hepatitis A outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Andrea; Juhász, Gabriella; Dencs, Ágnes; Tresó, Bálint; Rusvai, Erzsébet; Barabás, Éva; Takács, Mária

    2017-02-01

    A transfusion-associated hepatitis A outbreak was found in the first time in Hungary. The outbreak involved five cases. Parenteral transmission of hepatitis A is rare, but may occur during viraemia. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products was performed, and all the examined samples were identical in the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus genome. HAV sequences found in recent years were compared and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strain which caused these cases is the same as that had spread in Hungary recently causing several hepatitis A outbreaks throughout the country.

  7. [Serological characteristics and transfusion efficacy evaluation in 61 cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Chun-Ya; Guan, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lin-Fen; Wang, Ke; Luo, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yi; Li, Ming-Wei; Feng, Yan-Nan; Tong, Shan; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Lu; Wu, Yue-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan; Pan, Ji-Chun; Fen, Qian; Zhang, Ting; Wang, De-Qing

    2013-10-01

    This study was aimed to analyze the serological characteristics, efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patients with idiopathic or secondary AIHA were analyzed retrospectively, then the serological characteristics and the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions were investigated, and the efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion were evaluated according to the different autoantibody type and infused different RBC components. The results showed that out of 61 cases of AIHA, 21 cases were idiopathic, and 40 cases were secondary. 8 cases (13.1%) had IgM cold autoantibody, 50 cases (82.0%) had IgG warm autoantibody, and 3 cases (4.9%) had IgM and IgG autoantibodies simultaneously. There were 18 cases (29.5%) combined with alloantibodies. After the exclusion of alloantibodies interference, 113 incompatible RBC transfusions were performed for 36 patients with AIHA, total efficiency rate, total partial efficiency rate and total inefficiency rate were 56.6%, 15.1% and 28.3%, respectively. Incompatible RBC transfusions were divided into non-washed RBC group and washed RBC group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in non-washed RBC group were 57.6%, 13.0% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in washed RBC group were 53.6%, 21.4% and 25.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05) in two groups. Incompatible RBC transfusions were also divided into IgM cold autoantibody group and IgG warm autoantibody group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgM cold autoantibody group were 46.2%, 30.8% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgG warm autoantibody group were 56.7%, 13.4% and 29.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05 ) in two

  8. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties

  9. Intrauterine blood transfusion in immune hydrops fetalis, corrects middle cerebral artery Doppler velocimetry very quickly

    PubMed Central

    Yalinkaya, Ahmet; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Celik, Yusuf; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Taner, Mehmet Zeki

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the middle cerebral artery velocimetry before and after intrauterine blood transfusion in immune hydrops fetalis. The current study was conducted in a tertiary research hospital, from February 2009 to January 2011. Nineteen intrauterine blood transfusions performed during the study period. The factors recorded were age of the mothers, gestational weeks, pre-transfusion fetal hematocrit and post-transfusion fetal hematocrit, and also middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocimetry (MCA-PSV) was detected and recorded before and after intrauterine transfusion. A control group of twenty two cases for normal MCA doppler velocimetry was also included to the study. During the study, a total of eleven rhesus isoimmunized pregnancies underwent intrauterine blood transfusions at our perinatal diagnose unit. Before transfusion seventeen severe and two moderate anemias were detected and mean MoM of MCA-PSV was 1.76±0.38 MoM. Post transfusion mean MoM of MCA-PSV in the patient group and control group were 1.08±0.22 MoM and 0.96±0.21 MoM, respectively. The mean MCA-PSV values were higher in RI fetuses than post transfusion and control group. In current study, we found that MCA-PSV is a valuable parameter in detecting fetal anemia requiring intrauterine transfusion and mean MCA-PSV values is higher than 1.5 MoM in fetuses with anemia. And also decrease in MCA-PSV just after transfusion in anemic fetuses showed the quick response of the fetus to correction of anemia. PMID:22364302

  10. Transfusion in critical care - a UK regional audit of current practice.

    PubMed

    Plumb, J O M; Taylor, M G; Clissold, E; Grocott, M P W; Gill, R

    2017-02-18

    A consistent message within critical care publications has been that a restrictive transfusion strategy is non-inferior, and possibly superior, to a liberal strategy for stable, non-bleeding critically ill patients. Translation into clinical practice has, however, been slow. Here, we describe the degree of adherence to UK best practice guidelines in a regional network of nine intensive care units within Wessex. All transfusions given during a 2-month period were included (n = 444). Those given for active bleeding or within 24 h of major surgery, trauma or gastrointestinal bleeding were excluded (n = 148). The median (IQR [range]) haemoglobin concentration before transfusion was 73 (68-77 [53-106]) g.l(-1) , with only 34% of transfusion episodes using a transfusion threshold of < 70 g.l(-1) . In a subgroup analysis that did not study patients with a history of cardiac disease (n = 42), haemoglobin concentration before transfusion was 72 (68-77 [50-98]) g.l(-1) , with only 36% of transfusion episodes using a threshold of < 70 g.l(-1) (see Fig. 3). Most blood transfusions given to critically ill patients who were not bleeding in this audit used a haemoglobin threshold > 70 g.l(-1) . The reason why recommendations on transfusion triggers have not translated into clinical practice is unclear. With a clear national drive to decrease usage of blood products and clear evidence that a threshold of 70 g.l(-1) is non-inferior, it is surprising that a scarce and potentially dangerous resource is still being overused within critical care. Simple solutions such as electronic patient records that force pause for thought before blood transfusion, or prescriptions that only allow administration of a single unit in non-emergency circumstances may help to reduce the incidence of unnecessary blood transfusions.

  11. ABO Antibody Titers are not Predictive of Hemolytic Reactions Due to Plasma Incompatible Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Karafin, Matthew S.; Blagg, Lorraine; Tobian, Aaron A. R.; King, Karen E.; Ness, Paul M.; Savage, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The overall risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions from plasma (minor) incompatible platelet transfusions and the role of a critical anti-A or anti-B titer in predicting/preventing these reactions has not been clearly established. Methods We evaluated all apheresis platelet (AP) transfusions for three months. Using the gel titer method, we determined the anti-A and/or the anti-B IgG titer for all incompatible APs. Reported febrile transfusion reactions and hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) were recorded; transfusions were not prospectively evaluated by the study team. A post-transfusion DAT and eluate were performed after a reported febrile or hemolytic reaction for patients who received plasma incompatible APs. Results 647of 4,288 AP transfusions (15.1%) were plasma incompatible. Group O APs (N = 278) had significantly higher anti-A and anti-B titers than group A or B APs (p<0.0001). No group A or B APs had a titer >128 (0/342). For group O APs, 73 had titers ≥256 (26.3%), and 27 had titers ≥512 (9.7%). No HTRs were reported to any plasma incompatible AP transfusion during the study period. Two plasma incompatible AP transfusions were associated with fever/chills and positive DATs, of which one had a positive eluate. The incidence of a DAT and eluate positive febrile transfusion reaction in the plasma incompatible AP population is 0.15% (95% CI 0.0–0.86%). Conclusion A critical anti-A or B titer is not sufficient to predict the risk of hemolysis in patients receiving plasma incompatible APs, although underreporting of reactions to the blood bank may limit the generalizability of this study. PMID:22339320

  12. Red cell exchange, erythrocytapheresis, in the treatment of malaria with high parasitaemia in returning travellers.

    PubMed

    Macallan, D C; Pocock, M; Robinson, G T; Parker-Williams, J; Bevan, D H

    2000-01-01

    In severe falciparum malaria with high parasitaemia, removal of parasitized erythrocytes is generally considered to be of value as adjunctive therapy in addition to standard chemotherapy. Such removal is commonly achieved by exchange transfusion but this procedure is time-consuming and may be associated with haemodynamic disturbance. Current-generation automated cell-separator hardware and software allows prompt red cell exchange, erythrocytapheresis, in a single continuous-flow isovolaemic procedure. We describe the application of this procedure to 5 cases of severe falciparum malaria in travellers returning to the UK from the tropics. All patients also received quinine and conventional supportive therapy. In all cases, dramatic reduction in parasitaemia was achieved within 2 h with subsequent complete clinical recovery. Erythrocytapheresis has significant advantages over exchange transfusion in terms of speed, efficiency, haemodynamic stability and retention of plasma components such as clotting factors and may thus represent an improvement in adjunctive therapy for severe malaria.

  13. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  14. Does tranexamic acid reduce blood transfusion cost for primary total hip arthroplasty? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ryan N; Moskal, Joseph T; Capps, Susan G

    2015-02-01

    Peri-operative tranexamic acid (TXA) significantly reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and thus hospital costs are reduced. Before employing TXA in primary THA at our institution, facility costs were $286.90/THA for blood transfusion and required 0.45 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 19.87%). After incorporating TXA, the cost for intravenous application was $123.38/THA for blood transfusion and TXA medication and 0.07 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 4.39%) and the cost for topical application was $132.41/THA for blood transfusion and TXA and 0.14 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 12.86%). TXA has the potential to reduce the facility cost per THA and the man-hours/THA from blood transfusions.

  15. Targeting Continuing Medical Education on Decision Makers: Who Decides to Transfuse Blood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnough, Lawrence T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Staff communication patterns were observed during 13 open-heart surgeries to identify the transfusion decision makers. It was determined that targeting decision makers for continuing medical education would improve the quality of transfusion practice and increase the efficiency of continuing education. (SK)

  16. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  17. Lessons from the response to the threat of transfusion-transmitted vCJD in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Murphy, W G

    2013-09-01

    By the time vCJD was first described in 1996, it was already far too late to offset further disaster from transmission of the disease by blood transfusion: almost all the humans who would be infected and infectious were already diseased. Nothing done by the blood transfusion services around that time, with the exception of excluding transfusion recipients as blood donors, would have made any useful contribution to containing the extent of the epidemic. The ability to spread emerging diseases before the problem is manifest or understood is a fixed and unavoidable feature of blood transfusion as it is practiced today. A second fixed property of blood transfusion is that the root cause of disaster is not within the control of the blood transfusion universe. Strategies that have emerged to cope with similar threat in other enterprises that also contain these properties comprise the components of robust design: surveillance, preparedness for action, engagement, herding together, evasion or avoidance, early adoption of potentially useful measures, engineered resilience, defence in depth, damage limitation including modularity and removal of feedback loops, and contingency, redundancy and failure management, and ultimately, individual escape. Early adoption of leucodepletion based on the possibility that it might work rather than any hard evidence was a good example of threat management. Exclusion of previously transfused donors is a robust mechanism for containing any future infection; optimal blood use structures that provide a national transfusion rate as low as possible also constitute an effective threat management strategy.

  18. Hepatitis E Virus Infection after Platelet Transfusion in an Immunocompetent Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Trouve-Buisson, Thibaut; Pouzol, Patricia; Larrat, Sylvie; Decaens, Thomas; Payen, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection causes acute liver disease, but severe infections are rare in immunocompetent patients. We describe a case of HEV infection in a previously healthy male trauma patient in France who received massive transfusions. Genotyping confirmed HEV in a transfused platelet pool and the donor. PMID:27983485

  19. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Study design and methods Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Applications Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. Conclusions The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor–recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27491665

  20. Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Samuele; Gallman, Antonia; Gowthaman, Uthaman; Liu, Dong; Chen, Pei; Liu, Jingchun; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Nascimento, Manuela Sales L.; Xu, Lan; Patel, Seema R.; Williams, Adam; Tormey, Christopher A.; Hod, Eldad A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Stowell, Sean R.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving therapeutic tool. However, a major complication in transfusion recipients is the generation of antibodies against non-ABO alloantigens on donor RBCs, potentially resulting in hemolysis and renal failure. Long-lived antibody responses typically require CD4+ T cell help and, in murine transfusion models, alloimmunization requires a spleen. Yet, it is not known how RBC-derived antigens are presented to naive T cells in the spleen. We sought to answer whether splenic dendritic cells (DCs) were essential for T cell priming to RBC alloantigens. Transient deletion of conventional DCs at the time of transfusion or splenic DC preactivation before RBC transfusion abrogated T and B cell responses to allogeneic RBCs, even though transfused RBCs persisted in the circulation for weeks. Although all splenic DCs phagocytosed RBCs and activated RBC-specific CD4+ T cells in vitro, only bridging channel 33D1+ DCs were required for alloimmunization in vivo. In contrast, deletion of XCR1+CD8+ DCs did not alter the immune response to RBCs. Our work suggests that blocking the function of one DC subset during a narrow window of time during RBC transfusion could potentially prevent the detrimental immune response that occurs in patients who require lifelong RBC transfusion support. PMID:27185856

  1. NOTE: Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Pasman, Suzanne A.; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.

    2008-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication of monozygotic (identical) twin fetuses sharing one single (monochorionic) placenta. TTTS is caused by a net inter-twin transfusion of blood through placental anastomoses, from one twin (the donor) to the other (the recipient), which link the two feto-placental circulations. Currently, the only reliable method to measure the net inter-twin transfusion clinically is when incomplete laser therapy of TTTS occurs and one of the twins becomes anemic and requires an intra-uterine transfusion of adult red blood cells. Then, differences between adult hemoglobin concentrations measured during the transfusion and at birth relate not only to the net inter-twin transfusion but also to the finite lifetime of the adult red blood cells. We have analyzed this situation, derived the differential equations of adult hemoglobin in the donor and recipient twins, given the solutions and given expressions relating the net inter-twin flow with clinically measured parameters. We have included single and multiple intra-uterine transfusions. In conclusion, because incomplete laser therapy occurs frequently, and some cases require an intra-uterine transfusion, this method may allow collecting a wealth of net inter-twin flow data from clinicians involved in laser therapy of TTTS. To aid to the widespread use of this method, we have presented the equations as clearly as possible in tables for easy use by others.

  2. Seropositivity of Hepatitis B and C among Syrian Multi-transfused Patients with Hemoglobinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yazaji, Widad; Habbal, Wafa; Monem, Fawza

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Blood transfusion is a lifesaving therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies. However, the need of frequent transfusion carries the risk of transmitting hepatitis B and C infections which are intermediately prevalent in Syria. Despite screening blood donations with sensitive methods, the risk of transmission is still present when infectious blood is donated within the window period. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of HBV and HCV seropositivity, and its association with multiple transfusions among Syrian hemoglobinopathies patients. Materials and Methods HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV were tested for 159 Syrian multi-transfused patients by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Results Thirty-nine of 159 (24.5%) multi-transfused patients were HBsAg/anti-HBc or anti-HCV positive, 26 (16%) of which never visited the dentist, and they either tested postsurgically negative for HBsAg and anti-HCV or never underwent a surgical procedure. On the contrary of anti-HCV seropositivity, HBsAg/anti-HBc seropositivity was significantly associated with the number of blood transfusions, number of blood units and age (P < 0.001). Conclusion About one-sixth of our patients most likely acquired HBV/HCV infection via blood transfusion. Administering HBV vaccine, ensuring the immune status, and monitoring hepatitis markers might considerably minimize the incidence of viral hepatitis among multi-transfused patients. PMID:27648209

  3. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Braine, H.G.; Ness, P.M.; Koester, A.; Bias, W.

    1983-02-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, researchers investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using /sup 125/I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, researchers performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n . 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n . 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n . 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n . 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient.

  4. Applying radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Clive; Davis, Rodeina; Briggs, Lynne; Gutierrez, Alfonso; Veeramani, Dhamaraj

    2012-05-01

    ISO/IEC 18000-3 mode 1 standard 13.56 MHz RFID tags have been accepted by the International Society for Blood Transfusion (ISBT) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as data carriers to integrate with and augment ISBT 128 barcode data carried on blood products. The use of 13.56 MHz RFID carrying ISBT 128 data structures allows the global deployment and use of RFID, supporting both international transfer of blood and international disaster relief. The deployment in process at the BloodCenter of Wisconsin and testing at the University of Iowa Health Center is the first FDA-permitted implementation of RFID throughout in all phases of blood banking, donation through transfusion. RFID technology and equipment selection will be discussed along with FDA-required RF safety testing; integration with the blood enterprise computing system and required RFID tag performance. Tag design and survivability is an issue due to blood bag centrifugation and irradiation. Deployment issues will be discussed. Use of RFID results in significant return on investment over the use of barcodes in the blood center operations through labor savings and error reduction.

  5. Transfusion safety: is this the business of blood centers?

    PubMed

    Slapak, Colleen; Fredrich, Nanci; Wagner, Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    ATSO is in a unique position to break down organizational silos between hospitals and blood centers through the development of a collaborative relationship between the two entities. Use of the TSO as blood center staff centralizes the role into a consultative position thereby retaining the independence of the hospitals. The TSO position then becomes a value-added service offered by the blood center designed to supplement processes within the hospital.Whether the TSO is based in the hospital or the blood center, improvements are gained through appropriate utilization of blood components, reductions in hospital costs, ongoing education of hospital staff involved in transfusion practice, and increased availability of blood products within the community. Implementation and standardization of best practice processes for ordering and administration of blood products developed by TSOs leads to improved patient outcomes. As a liaison between hospitals and blood centers, the TSO integrates the mutual goal of transfusion safety: the provision of the safest blood product to the right patient at the right time for the right reason.

  6. Post-transfusion acquired malaria complicating orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Talabiska, D G; Komar, M J; Wytock, D H; Rubin, R A

    1996-02-01

    Early infectious complications within the first 3 months of orthotopic liver transplantation are common and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Here we report the first case of transfusion-acquired malaria in an orthotopic liver transplantation recipient. The patient was found to have Plasmodium ovale malaria during evaluation of a severe febrile illness. The infection was traced to a platelet transfusion and responded to treatment with chloroquine. Risk factors associated with the development of malaria infection are identifiable and should be reviewed from the recipient and donor when possible. Routes of infection in the liver transplant patient would include blood products, the organ itself, and resurgence of latent infection. Theoretically, immunosuppression may have an impact on the disease process. Clinicians caring for these patients need to have a high index of suspicion in order to diagnose and treat malaria effectively in the post-transplant setting. Although rare, malaria should be added to the list of pathogens that can infect organ transplant recipients.

  7. Mitigating the Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Dengue in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rooks, Kelly; Seed, Clive R.; Fryk, Jesse J.; Hyland, Catherine A.; Harley, Robert J.; Holmberg, Jerry A.; Marks, Denese C.; Flower, Robert L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV 1–4) are a risk to transfusion safety, with several transfusion-transmitted (TT) cases reported globally. DENV 1–4 are endemic in over 100 countries, with seasonal outbreaks occurring in northeastern Australia. To mitigate TT-DENV risk in Australia, fresh blood components are not manufactured from donors returning from any area (domestic/overseas) with known dengue transmission. Alternatively, TT-DENV risk may be mitigated using an appropriate blood donor screening assay. We aimed to determine the rate of dengue infection in donors during dengue outbreaks in Australia. Plasma samples were collected from blood donors during local dengue outbreaks. All samples were tested for the presence of DENV RNA and selected samples were tested for DENV antigen (nonstructural protein 1, NS1) with two assays. No donors residing in high risk areas had detectable levels of DENV RNA or NS1 and no cases of DENV viremia were detected in blood donors residing in areas of Australia experiencing DENV outbreaks. Definitive conclusions could not be drawn from this study; however, the lack of detection of DENV RNA or antigen in donations suggests that the current risk of TT-DENV is low and maintaining the fresh component restriction for “at-risk” donors is appropriate. PMID:27957384

  8. Transfusion-transmitted diseases: risks, prevention and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moor, A C; Dubbelman, T M; VanSteveninck, J; Brand, A

    1999-01-01

    During the past decades major improvements in blood safety have been achieved, both in developed and developing countries. The introduction of donor counseling and screening for different pathogens has made blood a very safe product, especially in developed countries. However, even in these countries, there is still a residual risk for the transmission of several pathogens. For viruses such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the hepatitis viruses B and C, this is due mainly to window-period donations. Furthermore, the threat of newly emerging pathogens which can affect blood safety is always present. For example, the implications of the agent causing new variant Creutzfeld-Jakob disease for transfusion practice are not yet clear. Finally, there are several pathogens, e.g. CMV and parvo B19, which are common in the general donor population, and might pose a serious threat in selected groups of immunosuppressed patients. In the future, further improvements in blood safety are expected from the introduction of polymerase chain reaction for testing and from the implementation of photochemical decontamination for cellular blood products. The situation in transfusion medicine in the developing world is much less favorable, due mainly to a higher incidence and prevalence of infectious diseases.

  9. [Blood transfusion and adjunctive therapy in the bleeding trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2008-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the most common cause of potentially preventable death in massive trauma. In addition to the early identification of potential bleeding sources and angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, in-hospital management will aim at maintain tissue oxygenation with volume replacement using crystalloids, colloids and RBC. In general, RBC transfusion is recommended to maintain hemoglobin between 7-10g/dL. The complex combination of clotting factors and platelets consumption, loss and dilution, shock, hypothermia, acidosis and colloid-induced hemostatic alterations leads to coagulopathic bleeding. Most guidelines recommend the use of FFP in significant bleeding complicated by coagulopathy (PT, aPTT >1.5 times control). Platelets should be administered to maintain a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L (100 x 10(9)/L in patients with traumatic brain injury). However, standard laboratory tests have poor correlation with in vivo coagulopathy and the test results are not rapidly available. Empiric guidelines derived from mathematical hemodilution models developed in elective surgery settings may not be appropriate for trauma settings where significant bleeding may have already occurred. Moreover, coagulopathy is frequently present on admission in severely injured patients. Recent litterature suggests that FFP and platelets should be given early and more often to injured patients requiring massive transfusion. The place of adjunctive hemostatic therapy is discussed.

  10. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Kickler, T S; Braine, H G; Ness, P M; Koester, A; Bias, W

    1983-02-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, we investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using 125I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, we performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n = 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n = 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n = 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n = 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient.

  11. Plasma Transfusion: History, Current Realities, and Novel Improvements.

    PubMed

    Watson, Justin J J; Pati, Shibani; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death after trauma. Early transfusion of plasma and balanced transfusion have been shown to optimize survival, mitigate the acute coagulopathy of trauma, and restore the endothelial glycocalyx. There are a myriad of plasma formulations available worldwide, including fresh frozen plasma, thawed plasma, liquid plasma, plasma frozen within 24 h, and lyophilized plasma (LP). Significant equipoise exists in the literature regarding the optimal plasma formulation. LP is a freeze-dried formulation that was originally developed in the 1930s and used by the American and British military in World War II. It was subsequently discontinued due to risk of disease transmission from pooled donors. Recently, there has been a significant amount of research focusing on optimizing reconstitution of LP. Findings show that sterile water buffered with ascorbic acid results in decreased blood loss with suppression of systemic inflammation. We are now beginning to realize the creation of a plasma-derived formulation that rapidly produces the associated benefits without logistical or safety constraints. This review will highlight the history of plasma, detail the various types of plasma formulations currently available, their pathophysiological effects, impacts of storage on coagulation factors in vitro and in vivo, novel concepts, and future directions.

  12. Velocity Measurements on the Electric Gun Developed at the TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory (Snelheidheidsmetingen aan de bij het Prins Maurits Laboratorium Ontwikkelde Electric Gun)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    8217te veel’ aluminium explodeert. Dit wordt weergegeven door het gearceer.1e gebied. Doordat er een stuk aluminiumn over het koper uitsteekt explodeert...worden de beperkingen van de verschillende meetmethoden toegelicht. De grootste fout komt uit de snelheidsmeting. Het aantal fibers (6 stuks ), de

  13. The Deleterious Effect of Red Blood Cell Storage on Microvascular Response to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Garrett, Cristen A.; Hendrick, Leah E.; Croce, Martin A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The transfusion of relatively older red blood cells (RBCs) has been associated with both morbidity and mortality in trauma patients in observational studies. Although the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain unclear, alterations in the microcirculation as a result of the transfusion of relatively older blood may be a causative factor. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated microvascular perfusion in trauma patients during RBC transfusion. Methods Anemic but otherwise stable trauma ICU patients with orders for transfusion were identified. Thenar muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) was measured continuously by near infrared spectroscopy during the course of transfusion of one RBC unit. Sublingual microcirculation was observed by sidestream dark field illumination microscopy before and after transfusion of one RBC unit. Thenar muscle StO2 was recorded over the course of transfusion. Pre- and post-transfusion perfused capillary vascular density (PCD) was determined by semi-quantitative image analysis. Changes in StO2 and PCD relative to age of RBC unit were evaluated using mixed models that adjusted for baseline StO2 and Spearman's correlation, respectively. Results Overall, 93 patients were recruited for study participation, 69% were male and average Injury Severity Score was 26.4. Average pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 mg/dL and the average age of RBC unit transfused was 29.4 days. Average peri-transfusion StO2 was negatively associated with increasing RBC age (slope -0.11, p = 0.0014). Change in PCD from pre- to post-transfusion was found to correlate negatively with RBC storage age (Spearman correlation = -0.27, p = 0.037). Conclusions The transfusion of relatively older RBC units was associated with a decline in both StO2 and PCD. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that transfusions of older RBC units are associated with the inhibition of regional microvascular perfusion. In patients requiring multiple units of RBCs

  14. Severe Childhood Anaemia and Blood Transfusion in a Nigerian Secondary Level Facility.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade; Fetuga, Bolanle; Olowonyo, Michael; Adekoya, Adesola; Adetola, Oluseyi; Ajetunmobi, Adebimpe

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the pattern and immediate outcome of severe childhood anaemia requiring blood transfusion at a secondary level of care in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey of children hospitalized in a secondary health facility in Ogun State, Nigeria, with packed cell volume <20% and who received blood transfusion was done. Of the 253 children admitted between March 2013 and June 2014, 79 (31.2%) had severe anaemia and were transfused with blood. Two-thirds had multiple transfusions. Higher rates of blood transfusion were obtained among underweight children. Fever (98.7%), hypoglycaemia (65.8%) and tender liver (54.4%) were the leading co-morbidities. The case fatality rate was 21.5%. Respiratory distress, convulsions and altered sensorium were significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, severe anaemia was associated with major morbidities and mortality at the secondary level of paediatric care in Nigeria.

  15. How we manage AB plasma inventory in the blood center and transfusion service.

    PubMed

    Yazer, Mark; Eder, Anne F; Land, Kevin J

    2013-08-01

    The growing use of group AB plasma in the United States in recent years poses unique challenges to blood centers and transfusion services. Blood centers must collect sufficient plasma components from a limited pool of group AB donors while taking steps to improve transfusion safety that further restricts the available supply. Transfusion services, on the other hand, must use the finite resource in the most conscientious and medically appropriate manner. Recently, many investigations have challenged long-held beliefs about transfusion practice and appropriate indications for blood components across a variety of specialties. Balancing supply and demand of group AB plasma requires collaboration between blood suppliers and transfusion services, and opportunities for improvement exist on both sides of the equation.

  16. Neurocognitive Profiles of Preterm Infants Randomly Assigned to Lower or Higher Hematocrit Thresholds for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Amy L.; Richman, Lynn; Lindgren, Scott; Nopoulos, Peg; Bell, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Preterm infants are frequently transfused with red blood cells based on standardized guidelines or clinical concern that anemia taxes infants’ physiological compensatory mechanisms and thereby threatens their health and well-being. The impact of various transfusion guidelines on long-term neurocognitive outcome is not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate long-term neurocognitive outcome on children born prematurely and treated at birth with different transfusion guidelines. Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were examined at school age for 56 preterm infants randomly assigned to a liberal (n = 33) or restrictive (n = 23) transfusion strategy. Tests of intelligence, achievement, language, visual-spatial/motor, and memory skills were administered. Between-group differences were assessed. Results Those in the liberal transfusion group performed more poorly than those in the restrictive group on measures of associative verbal fluency, visual memory, and reading. Conclusions Findings highlight possible long-term neurodevelopmental consequences of maintaining higher hematocrit levels. PMID:21360360

  17. A clinical audit on the practice of platelet transfusions at a tertiary paediatric referral centre.

    PubMed

    Jamal, R; Hoe, T S; Ong, L C; Afifah, I; Khuzaiah, R; Doraisamy, G

    1998-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indicated in a wide variety of clinical conditions especially those with thrombocytopenia. However, without proper clinical practice guidelines, inappropriate transfusions are bound to happen. To ascertain the provision of a quality and appropriate practice of platelet transfusions, an audit study was carried out over a period of one month at the Paediatric Institute, Kuala Lumpur Hospital. A prospective audit was performed during that period whilst a retrospective collection of data was carried out for the previous month for comparison. Based on a set of criteria agreed upon by the audit committee, it was found that in 18.5% (22 of 119) of the cases, the indications for platelet transfusions were inappropriate. The audit committee concluded that there is a need for a more detailed clinical practice guideline for local use to reduce or lower the incidence of inappropriate transfusions of platelets.

  18. Effect of Plasma and Red Blood Cell Transfusions on Survival in Patients with Combat Related Traumatic Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    certificate. Apheresis platelets were not avail- able for transfusion during the study period; as a result FWB was transfused when platelets were indicated...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 and hypothermia, transfusion of plasma, RBCs, and platelets in a...Ad- mission platelet concentrations were not recorded into the database. Massive transfusion was defined as 10 units of RBCs and FWB combined in 24

  19. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  20. Clinical transfusion practice update: haemovigilance, complications, patient blood management and national standards.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Wood, Erica M; Cole-Sinclair, Merrole F

    2013-09-16

    Blood transfusion is not without risk. Although the risks of HIV and hepatitis transmission have diminished, haemovigilance programs highlight that other significant transfusion hazards remain. Sepsis from bacterial contamination is the most common residual infectious hazard in developed countries, and events due to clerical error are problematic. Unnecessary transfusions should be avoided. New national guidelines on patient blood management (PBM) emphasise holistic approaches, including strategies to reduce transfusion requirements. Perioperative PBM should incorporate preoperative haemoglobin and medication optimisation, intraoperative blood conservation, and consideration of restrictive postoperative transfusion and cell-salvage techniques. When massive transfusion is required, hospitals should implement massive transfusion protocols. These protocols reduce mortality, improve communication and facilitate adequate provision of blood products. They should include multidisciplinary team involvement and guidelines for use of blood components and adjunctive agents. Although fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell and platelet to red blood cell ratios of ≥ 1 : 2 appear to reduce mortality in trauma patients who receive massive transfusion, there is insufficient evidence to recommend specific ratios. Systematic reviews have found no significant benefit of recombinant activated factor VII in critical bleeding, and an increase in thromboembolic events; specialist haematology advice is therefore recommended when considering use of this agent. The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards address use of blood and blood products, and provide important transfusion principles for adoption by all clinicians. Storage of red cells in additive solution results in changes, known as the "storage lesion", and studies to determine the clinical effect of the age of blood at transfusion are ongoing.

  1. Association Between Blood Transfusions and 12-Month Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kleczynski, Pawel; Dziewierz, Artur; Bagienski, Maciej; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2017-02-07

    Blood transfusions are considered as an important predictor of adverse outcome in patients with severe aortic (AS) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We sought to investigate the association between blood transfusions and mortality after TAVI. We enrolled 101 consecutive patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI. Patients who required transfusion were defined as patients in whom at least one unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) was transfused in the perioperative period. Twelve-month outcomes were assessed based on Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. A total of 28 (27.7%) patients required blood transfusion after TAVI. Baseline characteristics of the patients with and without a transfusion were similar. Median amount of PRBCs was 2 (interquartile range, 2-4). Twelvemonth all-cause mortality was higher in patients with than without a blood transfusion (39.3% versus 9.6%; P = 0.001). Importantly, the need for a blood transfusion after TAVI was an independent predictor of higher mortality rates after 12 months (hazard ratio (HR) 2.84 95%CI (1.06-7.63); P = 0.039; (HR for incomplete coronary revascularization 10.86, 95%CI 3.72-31.73; P < 0.001; HR for a history of stroke/TIA 3.93, 95%CI 1.39-11.07; P < 0.001). The duration of inhospital stay was longer in patients requiring transfusion (16.0 (14.0-22.0) versus 7.0 (7.0-11.5) days; P = 0.014). In conclusion, blood transfusions after TAVI were associated with higher mortality rates after 12 months, longer in-hospital stay, and were identified as an independent predictor of impaired clinical outcome.

  2. Wide Variations in Blood Product Transfusion Practices among Providers Who Care for Patients with Acute Leukemia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Alexander B; Lee, Eun-Ju; Sekeres, Mikkael; Steensma, David P; Zelterman, Daniel; Prebet, Thomas; DeZern, Amy; Komrokji, Rami; Litzow, Mark; Luger, Selina; Stone, Richard; Erba, Harry P; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Lee, Alfred I; Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Barbarotta, Lisa; Kasberg, Stephanie; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2017-01-01

    Background Transfusion of blood products is a key component of the supportive management in patients with acute leukemia (AL). However high-quality trial evidence and clinical outcome data to support specific transfusion goals for blood products for patients with AL remain limited leading to diverse transfusion practices. The primary objective of this study was to determine the spectrum of transfusion patterns in a variety of care settings among providers who treat AL patients. Study design and Methods A 31-question survey queried providers caring for AL patients about the existence of institutional guidelines for transfusion of blood products, transfusion triggers for hemoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLTs), and fibrinogen in various settings including inpatient, outpatient, and before procedures. Results We analyzed 130 responses and identified divergent transfusion Hb goals in hospitalized and ambulatory patients, fibrinogen goals for cryoprecipitate transfusions, and variation in practice for use of certain PLTs and red blood cell products. The least variable transfusion patterns were reported for PLT goals in thrombocytopenia and in the setting of invasive procedures such as bone marrow biopsy and lumbar punctures. Conclusions This survey confirmed wide variations in blood product transfusion practices across several clinical scenarios in patients with AL. The findings emphasized the need for large prospective randomized trials to develop standardized evidence-based guidelines for blood product transfusions in patients with AL with the goal of limiting unnecessary transfusions without compromising outcomes. PMID:27878822

  3. FIBTEM provides early prediction of massive transfusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Prediction of massive transfusion (MT) among trauma patients is difficult in the early phase of trauma management. Whole-blood thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) tests provide immediate information about the coagulation status of acute bleeding trauma patients. We investigated their value for early prediction of MT. Methods This retrospective study included patients admitted to the AUVA Trauma Centre, Salzburg, Austria, with an injury severity score ≥16, from whom blood samples were taken immediately upon admission to the emergency room (ER). ROTEM® analyses (extrinsically-activated test with tissue factor (EXTEM), intrinsically-activated test using ellagic acid (INTEM) and fibrin-based extrinsically activated test with tissue factor and the platelet inhibitor cytochalasin D (FIBTEM) tests) were performed. We divided patients into two groups: massive transfusion (MT, those who received ≥10 units red blood cell concentrate within 24 hours of admission) and non-MT (those who received 0 to 9 units). Results Of 323 patients included in this study (78.9% male; median age 44 years), 78 were included in the MT group and 245 in the non-MT group. The median injury severity score upon admission to the ER was significantly higher in the MT group than in the non-MT group (42 vs 27, P < 0.0001). EXTEM and INTEM clotting time and clot formation time were significantly prolonged and maximum clot firmness (MCF) was significantly lower in the MT group versus the non-MT group (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Of patients admitted with FIBTEM MCF 0 to 3 mm, 85% received MT. The best predictive values for MT were provided by hemoglobin and Quick value (area under receiver operating curve: 0.87 for both parameters). Similarly high predictive values were observed for FIBTEM MCF (0.84) and FIBTEM A10 (clot amplitude at 10 minutes; 0.83). Conclusions FIBTEM A10 and FIBTEM MCF provided similar predictive values for massive transfusion in trauma patients to the most predictive

  4. THE MANAGEMENT OF TRANSFUSION SERVICES, ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Dzenana; Mujicic, Ermina; Coric, Jozo; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The hospital blood bank (HBB) need to timely provide adequate amounts of blood and blood products for surgeries. For various surgical programs are performed assessments of the average number of blood doses needed for surgery. By using two types of requisitions BT/AB (blood type/antibody) and BT/AB/MT (blood type/antibody/match test) for pretransfusion immunohaematological testing in General Hospital “Prim. Dr. Abdulah Nakas” is achieved more rational consumption of blood and blood derivatives and financial savings through reduced number of matching tests (MT). Goal: To determine the total amount of pre-operative requisitions (BT/AB and BT/AB/MT) for blood and blood products at surgical departments of the General Hospital “Prim. Dr. Abdulah Nakas” in the period from June 1, 2014 – December 31, 2014 and analyze the consumption/return of blood in reserve in relation to the surgical disciplines, the total number of savings in MT. Conduct assessments MSBOS (Maximum Surgical Blood Ordering Schedule). Results: The total amount of preoperative requisitions for blood and blood products in surgical wards was 927 requests from which 623 demands or 67.2% is tested by BT/MT, while 304 or 32.8% was tested by BT/AB/MT. Transfused in total was 617 units of blood and blood products, 275 units were not transfused. Probability of transfusions for surgery was 51.3, the highest in the case of surgical intensive care 70.4 and the lowest for the department of general surgery 37.2%. Assessment of indicators of efficient resource management indicates they are the best at the delivery ward 0.89, while a total for surgical wards is 0.69. In total for surgery on the average were required 2.1 units of blood. By using two types of requisitions for pretransfusion immunohaematological testing (BT/AB and CG/AB/MT) is achieved more rational use of MT. In 623 requests for BT/AB only 61 MT were performed. Average of blood units issued in accordance with these requirements is 0

  5. Should we believe in transfusion-associated enterocolitis? Applying a GRADE to the literature.

    PubMed

    Hay, Susanne; Zupancic, John A F; Flannery, Dustin D; Kirpalani, Haresh; Dukhovny, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    Numerous observational studies appear to demonstrate an association between packed red blood cell (pRBC) transfusions and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). However, the limited numbers of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) do not support a causal relationship between pRBC transfusion and NEC. We sought to determine the quality of the evidence behind transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TANEC), and to formulate a GRADE-based recommendation regarding transfusion practices to reduce the risk of TANEC. A systematic search including MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and clinical trials registries was performed for studies assessing the association between transfusion and NEC. Teams of two paired reviewers independently screened studies for eligibility, assessed risk of bias using the GRADE framework, and collected data from each eligible study. We examined studies for two time points following transfusion: within 48h if this was available, and otherwise at any time after transfusion. In total, 23 observational studies and three RCTs met inclusion criteria. The average rating for the quality of evidence of individual studies was between "very low" and "low." On pooling studies for GRADE review, we observed an inconsistency of results. This led to a final overall quality of "very low" for the evidence for an association between transfusions and necrotizing enterocolitis. The pooled outcome of NEC for observational/case control studies was an odds ratio of 1.13 (95% CI: 0.99-1.29) when TANEC was defined as occurring within 48 hours of transfusion. For NEC occurring at any time post-transfusion, the pooled OR was 1.95 (1.60-2.38). Conversely, the pooled outcome of NEC for the RCT data had an odds ratio of 0.6 (0.3, 1.21) with NEC being less frequent in the liberal transfusion group compared to the restrictive transfusion group. The overall quality of the evidence for TANEC is "very low," suggesting very little

  6. Opposite effects of interleukin-2 on normal and transfusion-suppressed healing of experimental intestinal anastomoses.

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, T; Wobbes, T; Hendriks, T

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was done to investigate whether administration of interleukin-2 (IL-2) can abrogate the negative effects of blood transfusions on anastomotic healing. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recently, the authors showed that blood transfusion severely impairs anastomotic repair and significantly increases the susceptibility to intra-abdominal septic complications in rats. It has been reported that blood transfusions suppress IL-2 production and that IL-2 may stimulate wound healing. METHODS: Lewis rats underwent resection and anastomosis of both the ileum and colon. Subsequently, they received either 3 mL of saline (control and IL-2 groups) or 3 mL of blood from brown Norway donors (transfusion and transfusion/IL-2 groups) intravenously. From the operation onward, the animals in the IL-2 and transfusion/IL-2 groups received daily injections of 5.4 x 10(5) IU of IL-2 in dextrose solution subcutaneously; the rats in the other groups received only the dextrose solution. The animals were killed 3 or 7 days after the operation and examined for septic complications and anastomotic repair. RESULTS: Transfusion led to an enhanced incidence of anastomotic abscesses, which was almost completely abrogated after IL-2 administration. The anastomotic strength was consistently and significantly reduced after transfusion. Seven days after surgery, the anastomotic strength was completely restored by IL-2 treatment. For instance, the average bursting pressure (+/- the standard deviation) of the ileal anastomoses in the control, transfusion, and transfusion/IL-2 groups were 86 +/- 15, 32 +/- 8,* and 63 +/- 10 mmHg* [symbol: see text] on day 3 and 293 +/- 36, 227 +/- 16,* and 299 +/- 19 mmHg on day 7, respectively (where * = significant vs. control group and [symbol: see text] = significant vs. transfusion group). In addition, IL-2 administration elevated the anastomotic hydroxyproline content, which was significantly decreased by transfusion alone, to the level found in the

  7. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  8. The lost art of whole blood transfusion in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor A; Bjerkvig, Christopher K; Williams, Steve; Eliassen, Håkon S; Fosse, Theodor K; Torvanger, Hans; Cap, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The optimal resuscitation fluid for uncontrolled bleeding and hemorrhagic shock in both pre- and in-hospital settings has been an ongoing controversy for decades. Hemorrhage continues to be a major cause of death in both the civilian and military trauma population, and survival depends on adequacy of hemorrhage control and resuscitation between onset of bleeding and arrival at a medical treatment facility. The terms far-forward and austere are defined, respectively, as the environment where professional health care providers normally do not operate and a setting in which basic equipment and capabilities necessary for resuscitation are often not available. The relative austerity of a treatment setting may be a function of timing rather than just location, as life-saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock becomes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a feasible life-saving procedure when facing significant hemorrhage.

  9. [How to analyze an incident of the transfusion chain].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Lassale, B

    2009-03-01

    Incidents and accidents analysis is one part of risk management in healthcare organisations. It is based on methods such as healthcare process analysis and the Association of Litigation and Risk Management (ALARM) method, to understand not only immediate causes but also root causes. The goal is to implement relevant remedial and preventive actions to secure healthcare processes. The hospital's risk management unit has to be involved in the methodological analysis of every grade zero transfusion incident. The system is based on a retrospective analysis process in compliance with the French National Authority for Health's ongoing requirements for risk reactive approach, allowing to identify failures and start relevant actions. Healthcare teams should overcome difficulties in order to be totally involved in the process. Human factors recognition, establishment of clear and effective communication between individuals and critical points of control should provide optimum quality care services that are safe and free of unnecessary risks.

  10. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy.

  11. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Assal, Rami El; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Cell cryopreservation enables maintaining cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation. PMID:24995723

  12. Irradiation of hemoderivatives for transfusion in immunodepressed patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, J. Fernandez; Castillo, Elsa Lidia

    In this paper we describe a methodology for irradiating hemotherapeutic products that allows the use of radiator GAMMA-CELL-500-001. Irradiation conditions for PVC 300 mL bags were characterized in which blood plasma, erythrocyte and thrombocyte concentrates, and leukocyte mass were packed. Lacking suitable systems in a 10-40 Gy dose range, we modified the Fricke dosimeter system and verified it according to international standards. This modified system showed good repeatibility and homogeinity of results and linearity in the 10-40 Gy range. The linear correlation coefficient was 0.9966, and the reproductibility was ± 2%. More than 300 bags were processed by this established methodology. Hemoderivatives were transfused to patients with malignant hemopathic disorders, subjected to treatment with cytostatics and immunosuppressors, and in general immunodepressed. At present, results are promising from dosimetric and clinical points of view.

  13. Australia Antigen and Antibody in Transfused Children with Thalassaemia*

    PubMed Central

    Vierucci, A.; London, W. T.; Blumberg, B. S.; Sutnick, A. I.; Ragazzini, F.

    1972-01-01

    As a consequence of frequent transfusions, 10% of 169 Italian patients with thalassaemia developed Au(1) and 20% anti-Au(1). Au(1) persisted in the children in whom it was detected for the duration of the study (2-7 years) or until the patient died. Anti-Au(1) was less persistent. In these children, Au(1) or anti-Au(1) was detected, but not both, suggesting that patients with persistent Au(1) and antibody formers represent two distinct subgroups of the thalassaemia population. Au(1) was more common in males and in patients less than 7 years old, and was associated with earlier death; whereas antibody was more common in females, and in children older than 7 years, and was associated with longer survival. PMID:4628729

  14. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  15. [Pathogen inactivation of platelets: organization consequences for platelet transfusion].

    PubMed

    Chavarin, P; DePutter, C; Boussoulade, F; Acquart, S; Vidal, M; Argaud, C; Fabrigli, P; Garraud, O

    2011-08-01

    In the past few years, pathogen reduction technologies for labile blood products have been part of the enhancement of global transfusion safety regarding residual risks of transmitting infectious pathogens. Having carried out a feasibility study for the implementation of pathogen inactivation of platelet concentrates by means of the amotosalen/HCl/UVA (Intercept™) technology, and participated to a reinforced haemovigilance study, we took the opportunity to analyze the organization consequences for platelet concentrates inventory and distribution. This impact study first indicated that those novel needs forced the blood donation service, as well as the labile blood product preparation laboratory, to review and improve practices; secondly, it showed that the routine implementation has little (no major) consequence in the overall organization, independently of the economic consequences (not covered here).

  16. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  17. Risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by blood transfusions before the implementation of HIV-1 antibody screening. The Transfusion Safety Study Group.

    PubMed

    Busch, M P; Young, M J; Samson, S M; Mosley, J W; Ward, J W; Perkins, H A

    1991-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection for patients transfused before routine anti-HIV-1 screening of blood donors was instituted in March 1985. A model was developed for estimating both the proportion and the number of transfusion recipients in the San Francisco Bay area who were infected by HIV-1 during each of the 7 years preceding routine donor screening for anti-HIV-1. The model is based on analysis of 1) donation histories of HIV-1-infected donors identified at the regional blood center; 2) HIV-1 seroprevalence estimates for homosexual and bisexual men in San Francisco; and 3) HIV-1 infection and survival rates for recipients traced by the Transfusion Safety Study and Irwin Memorial Blood Centers' Look Back Program. The incidence of transfusion-associated HIV-1 infection is estimated to have risen rapidly from the first occurrence in 1978 to a peak in late 1982 of approximately 1.1 percent per transfused unit. The decrease after 1982 coincided with the implementation of high-risk donor deferral measures. It is estimated that, overall, approximately 2135 transfusion recipients were infected with HIV-1 in the San Francisco region alone. This number suggests a higher prevalence of transfusion-associated HIV-1 infection than has been generally recognized and indicates the need for continued tracing of potentially exposed recipients. The data also strongly support the effectiveness of early donor education and self-exclusion measures and emphasize the importance of continued research and development in this area.

  18. Storings analyse Ten Behoeve van het Materieelverzorgingsplan (Failure Analysis for the Maintenance Plan)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    van kwantitatieve normen voor logistieke parameters, op grond waarvan de logistieke ondersteuning ontworpen moet worden. Binnen ILS wordt de logistieke...ondersteuning zodanig ingericht dat aan van tevoren vastgestelde kwantitatieve normen voor bescbikbaarheid, inzetbaarheid, betrouwbaarbeid en...9] ’Richtlijnen ten aanzien van het materieelverzorgingsplan’. Deze docuinenten geven de uitgangspunten en normen die de opsteller in acht moet nemen

  19. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  20. Epidemiology of Transfusion Transmitted Infection among Patients with β-Thalassaemia Major in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Kiani, Rizwan; Anwar, Muhammad; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Abbasi, Saleem; Abbas Zaheer, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Transfusion Transmitted Infections (TTIs) continue to be a major risk in transfusions in many parts of the world. The transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients are particularly at risk of acquiring TTIs. The current study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study of 1253 multitransfused thalassaemia major patients was conducted in five different centres of Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and Karachi. The study subjects were screened for HIV, HCV, and HBV. The screening was performed at two centres: Department of Pathology, Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (SZAB) Medical University, and Blood Transfusion Services, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, from July to December 2015. The confirmatory screening was performed by Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CLIA). Results. Out of the 1253 multiple transfused patients, 317 (25.3%) were infected with TTIs. HCV was positive in 273 cases (21.7%), HBV in 38 cases (3.0%), and HIV in 6 cases (0.5%). Conclusion. HCV was the leading TTI in multitransfused thalassaemia major patients in the study. Presence of HIV in thalassaemia patients is a recent disturbing development in Pakistan. Improved regulation of blood banks including use of internationally or nationally evaluated kits will bring down the incidence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. More stringent behavioral and serological pretransfusion screening of blood for TTIs must be implemented in blood banks. PMID:27559490

  1. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  2. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Blood Transfusion Reduction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Young-Jun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Jin, Cheng; Prakash, Jatin; Park, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) accompanies the risk of bleeding and need for transfusion. There are several methods to reduce postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion. One such method is using tranexamic acid during TKA. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether tranexamic acid reduces postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion after TKA. Materials and Methods A total of 100 TKA patients were included in the study. The tranexamic acid group consisted of 50 patients who received an intravenous injection of tranexamic acid. The control included 50 patients who received a placebo injection. The amounts of drainage, postoperative hemoglobin, and transfusion were compared between the groups. Results The mean amount of drainage was lower in the tranexamic acid group (580.6±355.0 mL) than the control group (886.0±375.5 mL). There was a reduction in the transfusion rate in the tranexamic acid group (48%) compared with the control group (64%). The hemoglobin level was higher in the tranexamic acid group than in the control group at 24 hours postoperatively. The mean units of transfusion were smaller in the tranexamic acid group (0.76 units) than in the control group (1.28 units). Conclusions Our data suggest that intravenous injection of tranexamic acid decreases the total blood loss and transfusion after TKA. PMID:27595071

  3. A joint latent class analysis for adjusting survival bias with application to a trauma transfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jing; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Choi, Sangbum; Hong, Chuan; Piao, Jin; del Junco, Deborah J.; Fox, Erin E.; Rahbar, Elaheh; Holcomb, John B.

    2015-01-01

    There is no clear classification rule to rapidly identify trauma patients who are severely hemorrhaging and may need substantial blood transfusions. Massive transfusion (MT), defined as the transfusion of at least 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h of hospital admission, has served as a conventional surrogate that has been used to develop early predictive algorithms and establish criteria for ordering an MT protocol from the blood bank. However, the conventional MT rule is a poor proxy, because it is likely to misclassify many severely hemorrhaging trauma patients as they could die before receiving the 10th red blood cells transfusion. In this article, we propose to use a latent class model to obtain a more accurate and complete metric in the presence of early death. Our new approach incorporates baseline patient information from the time of hospital admission, by combining respective models for survival time and usage of blood products transfused within the framework of latent class analysis. To account for statistical challenges, caused by induced dependent censoring inherent in 24-h sums of transfusions, we propose to estimate an improved standard via a pseudo-likelihood function using an expectation-maximization algorithm with the inverse weighting principle. We evaluated the performance of our new standard in simulation studies and compared with the conventional MT definition using actual patient data from the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study. PMID:26256455

  4. Anticipated Transfusion Requirements and Mortality in Patients with Orthopedic and Solid Organ Injuries.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Devon S; Ashman, Zane; Kim, Dennis Y; Plurad, David S

    2016-10-01

    Long bone fractures are cited as an etiology for significant blood loss; however, there is scant supporting literature. We examined the relationship between long bone fractures, blood transfusions, and solid organ injuries. We hypothesize that transfusions are rare with long bone fractures in the absence of a liver or splenic injury. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with femur, tibia, and humerus fractures. Outcomes included transfusion requirements and mortality. A total of 1837 patients were included. There were 182 patients with at least one solid organ injury. A greater portion of patients with femur fractures and a lower proportion of patients with tibia fractures required transfusion. Adjusting for solid organ injuries, there was no difference in transfusions for any patient with these fractures compared with the group, or when grouped by organ injury severity. A solid organ injury significantly increases the risk of death among patients with long bone fractures. Blood loss requiring transfusion in patients with orthopedic and solid organ injuries should not be attributed to the presence of fractures alone. The need for transfusions in these patients should lower the threshold for reimaging or intervention for the solid organ injury. Further study is warranted to quantify blood loss by fracture type with or without solid organ.

  5. Red cell alloimmunization in a diverse population of transfused patients with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexis A; Cunningham, Melody J; Singer, Sylvia T; Neufeld, Ellis J; Vichinsky, Elliott; Yamashita, Robert; Giardina, Patricia; Kim, Hae-Young; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2011-04-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is the primary treatment for severe forms of thalassaemia. Pre-storage screening has resulted in decreased transfusion-transmitted infections, but anti-RBC antibodies remain a major problem. We report on 697 participants who had ever received transfusions. Allo- and autoantibody rates were compared with respect to splenectomy status, ethnicity, diagnosis, duration of transfusions, treatment centre, and age at transfusion initiation, together with rates before and after 1990, when leucoreduction methods were routine at thalassaemia treatment centres. Allo- and autoantibodies were reported in 115 (16·5%) and 34 (4·9%) subjects, respectively. Splenectomized patients were more likely to have alloantibodies [odds ratio (OR) = 2·528, P ≤ 0·0001], or autoantibodies (OR = 2·590, P = 0·0133). Alloantibodies occurred in 19 of 91 (21%) splenectomized subjects who started transfusion after 1990, and only 18 of 233 (7·7%) nonsplenectomized subjects (P < 0·001). Data from this study demonstrate that RBC antibodies continue to develop in chronically transfused thalassaemia patients at a high rate. Splenectomy preceded the development of antibodies in most cases. Increased rates of RBC sensitization among splenectomized patients is concerning and deserves further study.

  6. A joint latent class analysis for adjusting survival bias with application to a trauma transfusion study.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jing; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Choi, Sangbum; Hong, Chuan; Piao, Jin; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Rahbar, Elaheh; Holcomb, John B

    2016-01-15

    There is no clear classification rule to rapidly identify trauma patients who are severely hemorrhaging and may need substantial blood transfusions. Massive transfusion (MT), defined as the transfusion of at least 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h of hospital admission, has served as a conventional surrogate that has been used to develop early predictive algorithms and establish criteria for ordering an MT protocol from the blood bank. However, the conventional MT rule is a poor proxy, because it is likely to misclassify many severely hemorrhaging trauma patients as they could die before receiving the 10th red blood cells transfusion. In this article, we propose to use a latent class model to obtain a more accurate and complete metric in the presence of early death. Our new approach incorporates baseline patient information from the time of hospital admission, by combining respective models for survival time and usage of blood products transfused within the framework of latent class analysis. To account for statistical challenges, caused by induced dependent censoring inherent in 24-h sums of transfusions, we propose to estimate an improved standard via a pseudo-likelihood function using an expectation-maximization algorithm with the inverse weighting principle. We evaluated the performance of our new standard in simulation studies and compared with the conventional MT definition using actual patient data from the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Mass casualty events: blood transfusion emergency preparedness across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Heidi; Glasgow, Simon; Kristoffersen, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Transfusion support is a key enabler to the response to mass casualty events (MCEs). Transfusion demand and capability planning should be an integrated part of the medical planning process for emergency system preparedness. Historical reviews have recently supported demand planning for MCEs and mass gatherings; however, computer modeling offers greater insights for resource management. The challenge remains balancing demand and supply especially the demand for universal components such as group O red blood cells. The current prehospital and hospital capability has benefited from investment in the management of massive hemorrhage. The management of massive hemorrhage should address both hemorrhage control and hemostatic support. Labile blood components cannot be stockpiled and a large surge in demand is a challenge for transfusion providers. The use of blood components may need to be triaged and demand managed. Two contrasting models of transfusion planning for MCEs are described. Both illustrate an integrated approach to preparedness where blood transfusion services work closely with health care providers and the donor community. Preparedness includes appropriate stock management and resupply from other centers. However, the introduction of alternative transfusion products, transfusion triage, and the greater use of an emergency donor panel to provide whole blood may permit greater resilience.

  8. A retrospective study of transfusion practices in a Tertiary Care Institute

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Babita; Pehlajani, NK; Sinha, Mithilesh K; Tripathy, Swagata

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Excessive requests for cross matching blood which is more than the blood required for transfusion are usually based on worst case assumptions leading to overestimation of blood usage. We investigated the blood ordering pattern and transfusion practices so as to incorporate a blood ordering schedule for streamlining the use of blood in various hospital departments. Methods: The study was conducted over a period of 19 months in a 350 bedded tertiary teaching hospital. Source of data was blood bank requisition forms and blood bank registers of patients who underwent elective or emergency procedures in the hospital, for which blood was ordered. Data were entered in MS Excel and analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: The blood bank was requested to prepare 10,594 units of blood for 2556 patients. The blood utilised was 16.04% of total cross matched blood, leaving 83.9% of units cross matched but not transfused to patient for whom it was prepared, i.e., wasted. The surgery department had the highest number of units cross matched and transfused. The least number of units cross matched and wasted due to non-transfusion were from the Department of Oncology. Conclusion: The current deficiency of explicit maximum blood order schedule in our hospital is the major factor responsible for high cross match: transfusion ratio. Therefore, a maximal surgical blood order schedule has been suggested to the hospital transfusion committee to implement maximum surgical blood order schedules for selected procedures. PMID:28216700

  9. One size will never fit all: the future of research in pediatric transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Cassandra D; Mondoro, Traci Heath; Ambruso, Daniel R; Sanchez, Rosa; Sloan, Steven R; Luban, Naomi L C; Widness, John A

    2014-11-01

    There is concern at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and among transfusion medicine specialists regarding the small number of investigators and studies in the field of pediatric transfusion medicine (PTM). Accordingly, the objective of this article is to provide a snapshot of the clinical and translational PTM research considered to be of high priority by pediatricians, neonatologists, and transfusion medicine specialists. Included is a targeted review of three research areas of importance: (i) transfusion strategies, (ii) short- and long-term clinical consequences, and (iii) transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases. The recommendations by PTM and transfusion medicine specialists represent opportunities and innovative strategies to execute translational research, observational studies, and clinical trials of high relevance to PTM. With the explosion of new biomedical knowledge and increasingly sophisticated methodologies over the past decade, this is an exciting time to consider transfusion medicine as a paradigm for addressing questions related to fields such as cell biology, immunology, neurodevelopment, outcomes research, and many others. Increased awareness of PTM as an important, fertile field and the promotion of accompanying opportunities will help establish PTM as a viable career option and advance basic and clinical investigation to improve the health and wellbeing of children.

  10. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS.

  11. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2017-01-31

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model.

  12. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H.; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R.; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F.; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M.; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B.; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model. PMID:28139732

  13. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation and pretransplant blood transfusion on pancreatic islet allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Picon, G.; McGeorge, M.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been shown to have a strong immunosuppressive effect both experimentally and clinically. Pretransplant blood transfusions have also been shown to have a strong beneficial effect in the outcome of organ transplantation. A study was made of the effect of TLI and pretransplant blood transfusions, alone and in combination, as an immunosuppressive modality in the isolated pancreatic islet transplant in the rat model. Donor rats (Fischer RT1v1) were kept on a 50% DL-ethionine supplemented diet for 4-6 weeks prior to pancreas removal. Recipient rats (Lewis RT1) were made diabetics prior to transplantation by iv injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). Transfusion protocol consisted of a biweekly transfusion of 2 ml of either donor specific or third party transfusions. Total lymphoid irradiation was carried out by daily administration of 200 rads during one week prior to transplantation. Transplantation of the isolated islets was performed by intraportal injection. Syngeneic transplant of one and a half donor pancreata in each recipient reverted the diabetic condition indefinitely (greater than 100 days). Untreated allogenic grafts had a mean survival time (MST) of 5.2 days. Total lymphoid irradiation in dosages of 800, 1000, and 1200 rads, as the only immunosuppressive regimen, prolonged the MST of allografts to 15.3, 16.5, and 21.8 days, respectively (P less than .05). Pretransplant third party blood transfusion had no effect on allograft survival (MST 6.0). When donor specific blood transfusions were given, the MST was prolonged to 25.3 days (P less than .05). When TLI was administered to recipients of donor specific transfusions, the MST of the allografts did not show any statistical significant difference when compared with untreated animals. This abrogation of the beneficial effect of specific blood transfusion was observed in all dosages of TLI employed: 800 rad (MST 3.0), 1000 rad (MST 8.0), 1200 rad (MST 5.18).

  14. Abdominopelvic hemorrhage: correlation of CT positivity with the subsequent decision to perform blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chong, Suzanne T; Ellis, James H; Cohan, Richard H; Knoepp, Ursula S; Langley, Travis J; Lau, Darryl; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of computed tomography (CT) on the decision to administer blood transfusions in patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage (trauma, surgery, invasive procedure, and spontaneous) and to determine the clinical parameters most likely to influence the decision to administer blood transfusions in patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage. In this IRB approved and HIPPA compliant study, retrospective analysis was performed on 298 patients undergoing abdominal and pelvic CT for suspected abdominopelvic hemorrhage and the CT reports and electronic medical records were reviewed. Odds ratios and 95% CI were calculated to compare the odds of abdominopelvic hemorrhage and transfusion for categorical and continuous predictors. The presence of abdominopelvic hemorrhage by CT was significantly associated with blood transfusions for trauma patients (p-value <0.0001) only. 106 patients with suspected spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage had the lowest CT positivity rate (n = 23, 21.7%) but the highest blood transfusion rate (n = 62, 58.5%) compared to the patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage from known preceding causes. In patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage, low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels immediately prior to obtaining the CT study were more predictive for receiving a blood transfusion (p-value <0.0001) than the presence of hemorrhage by CT. CT positivity is strongly correlated with the decision to administer blood transfusions for patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage from trauma, indicating that CT studies play a significant role in determining the clinical management of trauma patients. For patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage, the decision to transfuse depends not on the CT study but on the patient's hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. CT studies should therefore not be performed for the sole purpose of determining the need for blood transfusion in patients with spontaneous

  15. Safety of blood transfusions using 27 gauge neonatal PICC lines: an in vitro study on hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Repa, A; Mayerhofer, M; Cardona, F; Worel, N; Deindl, P; Pollak, A; Berger, A; Haiden, N

    2013-12-01

    Blood transfusions are required by the majority of extremely premature infants. Packed red blood cells (PRBCs) are usually applied via simple peripheral cannulas. In situations where no peripheral venous access is achievable, 27 Gauge (G) neonatal PICC lines - that are ideally exclusively dedicated to application of parenteral nutrition - may represent a useful alternative access for PRBC transfusions. However, transfusion via small scaled catheters may damage PRBCs and lead to hemolysis. We here evaluate whether transfusion of irradiated PRBCs via 27 G PICC lines leads to hemolysis in vitro.Experimental transfusions of gamma-irradiated PRBCs were performed at increasing velocities (2.5, 3.7, 5 ml/h; full force manual push approximating 30 ml/h) via 27 G PICC lines of 20 and 30 cm length. Parameters of hemolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, potassium and free hemoglobin) were measured from the supernatants of transfused PRBCs and the percentage of hemolysis was calculated.Potassium and lactate dehydrogenase after transfusion at increasing velocities did not differ significantly from negative controls. Free hemoglobin levels showed a small but significant increase at the slowest transfusion speed (2.5 ml/h) using the 30 cm 27 G PICC line, with a relative hemolysis of only 0.13%. A manual push (approximating 30 ml/h) showed no significant changes of parameters from baseline.We conclude that transfusion of gamma-irradiated PRBCs using a 27 G neonatal PICC line does not cause clinically relevant hemolysis in vitro. Clinical studies are needed to confirm the feasibility and safety of the approach in vivo.

  16. Frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patients undergoing cleft lip and palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O.; Desalu, Ibironke; Ladeinde, Akinola L.; Adeyemo, Titilope A.; Mofikoya, Bolaji O.; Hassan, Olakunle O.; Akanmu, Alani S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to determine the frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patientsundergoing cleft lip and palate surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Setting and Design: A prospective study of transfusion rate in cleft surgery conducted at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Material and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients who required cleft lip and palate surgery were recruited into the study. Data collected included age, sex and weight of patients, type of cleft defects, type of surgery done, preoperative haematocrit, duration of surgery, amount of blood loss during surgery, the number of units of blood cross-matched and those used. Each patient was made to donate a unit of homologous blood prior to surgery. Results: There were 52 females and 48 males with a mean age of 64.4 ± 101.1 months (range, 3-420 months). The most common cleft defect was isolated cleft palate (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip (28%). Cleft palate repair was the most common procedure (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip repair (41%). The mean estimated blood loss was 95.8 ± 144.9 ml (range, 2-800ml). Ten (10%) patients (CL=2; CP=5, BCL=1; CLP=2) were transfused but only two of these were deemed appropriate based on percentage blood volume loss. The mean blood transfused was 131.5 ± 135.4ml (range, 35-500ml). Six (60%) of those transfused had a preoperative PCV of < 30%. Only 4.9% of patients who had unilateral cleft lip surgery were transfused as compared with 50% for CLP surgery, 11% for CP surgery, and 10% for bilateral cleft lip surgery. Conclusions: The frequency of blood transfusion in cleft lip and palate surgery was 10% with a cross-match: transfusion ratio of 10 and transfusion index of 0.1. A "type and screen" policy is advocated for cleft lip and palate surgery. PMID:20924451

  17. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  18. Respiratory Impairment after Early Red Cell Transfusion in Pediatric Patients with ALI/ARDS.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Surender; Sanfilippo, Dominic; Shoemaker, Allen; Curtis, Scott; Zuiderveen, Sandra; Ndika, Akunne; Stoiko, Michael; Hassan, Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In the first 48 hours of ventilating patients with acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a multipronged approach including packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is undertaken to maintain oxygen delivery. Hypothesis. We hypothesized children with ALI/ARDS transfused within 48 hours of initiating mechanical ventilation would have worse outcome. The course of 34 transfused patients was retrospectively compared to 45 nontransfused control patients admitted to the PICU at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2009. Results. Mean hemoglobin (Hb) prior to transfusion was 8.2 g/dl compared to 10.1 g/dl in control. P/F ratio decreased from 135.4 ± 7.5 to 116.5 ± 8.8 in transfused but increased from 148.0 ± 8.0 to 190.4 ± 17.8 (P < 0.001) in control. OI increased in the transfused from 11.7 ± 0.9 to 18.7 ± 1.6 but not in control. Ventilator days in the transfused were 15.6 ± 1.7 versus 9.5 ± 0.6 days in control (P < 0.001). There was a trend towards higher rates of MODS in transfused patients; 29.4% versus 17.7%, odds ratio 1.92, 95% CI; 0.6-5.6 Fisher exact P < 0.282. Conclusion. This study suggests that early transfusions of patients with ALI/ARDS were associated with increased ventilatory needs.

  19. The prevention of adverse reactions to transfusions in patients with haemoglobinopathies: a proposed algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bennardello, Francesco; Fidone, Carmelo; Spadola, Vincenzo; Cabibbo, Sergio; Travali, Simone; Garozzo, Giovanni; Antolino, Agostino; Tavolino, Giuseppe; Falla, Cadigia; Bonomo, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion therapy remains the main treatment for patients with severe haemoglobinopathies, but can cause adverse reactions which may be classified as immediate or delayed. The use of targeted prevention with drugs and treatments of blood components in selected patients can contribute to reducing the development of some reactions. The aim of our study was to develop an algorithm capable of guiding behaviours to adopt in order to reduce the incidence of immediate transfusion reactions. Materials and methods Immediate transfusion reactions occurring over a 7-year period in 81 patients with transfusion-dependent haemoglobinopathies were recorded. The patients received transfusions with red cell concentrates that had been filtered prestorage. Various measures were undertaken to prevent transfusion reactions: leucoreduction, washing the red blood cells, prophylactic administration of an antihistamine (loratidine 10 mg tablet) or an antipyretic (paracetamol 500 mg tablet). Results Over the study period 20,668 red cell concentrates were transfused and 64 adverse transfusion reactions were recorded in 36 patients. The mean incidence of reactions in the 7 years of observation was 3.1‰. Over the years the incidence gradually decreased from 6.8‰ in 2004 to 0.9‰ in 2010. Discussion Preventive measures are not required for patients who have an occasional reaction, because the probability that such a type of reaction recurs is very low. In contrast, the targeted use of drugs such as loratidine or paracetamol, sometimes combined with washing and/or double filtration of red blood cells, can reduce the rate of recurrent (allergic) reactions to about 0.9‰. The system for detecting adverse reactions and training staff involved in transfusion therapy are critical points for reliable collection of data and standardisation of the detection system is recommended for those wanting to monitor the incidence of all adverse reactions, including minor ones. PMID:23736930

  20. A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Robinson, Richard D.; Schrader, Chet D.; Leuck, JoAnna; Barra, Michael; Buca, Stefan; Shedd, Andrew; Bui, Andrew; Zenarosa, Nestor R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated. Methods Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data. Results A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05). Conclusions An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation. PMID:27429680

  1. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  2. Respiratory Impairment after Early Red Cell Transfusion in Pediatric Patients with ALI/ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Surender; Sanfilippo, Dominic; Shoemaker, Allen; Curtis, Scott; Zuiderveen, Sandra; Ndika, Akunne; Stoiko, Michael; Hassan, Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In the first 48 hours of ventilating patients with acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a multipronged approach including packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is undertaken to maintain oxygen delivery. Hypothesis. We hypothesized children with ALI/ARDS transfused within 48 hours of initiating mechanical ventilation would have worse outcome. The course of 34 transfused patients was retrospectively compared to 45 nontransfused control patients admitted to the PICU at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2009. Results. Mean hemoglobin (Hb) prior to transfusion was 8.2 g/dl compared to 10.1 g/dl in control. P/F ratio decreased from 135.4 ± 7.5 to 116.5 ± 8.8 in transfused but increased from 148.0 ± 8.0 to 190.4 ± 17.8 (P < 0.001) in control. OI increased in the transfused from 11.7 ± 0.9 to 18.7 ± 1.6 but not in control. Ventilator days in the transfused were 15.6 ± 1.7 versus 9.5 ± 0.6 days in control (P < 0.001). There was a trend towards higher rates of MODS in transfused patients; 29.4% versus 17.7%, odds ratio 1.92, 95% CI; 0.6–5.6 Fisher exact P < 0.282. Conclusion. This study suggests that early transfusions of patients with ALI/ARDS were associated with increased ventilatory needs. PMID:22957223

  3. Frequency and Pattern of Noninfectious Adverse Transfusion Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jooyoung; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Sinyoung; Alghamdi, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although transfusion is a paramount life-saving therapy, there are multiple potential significant risks. Therefore, all adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) episodes require close monitoring. Using the computerized reporting system, we assessed the frequency and pattern of non-infectious ATRs. Methods We analyzed two-year transfusion data from electronic medical records retrospectively. From March 2013 to February 2015, 364,569 units of blood were transfused. Of them, 334,582 (91.8%) records were identified from electronic nursing records. For the confirmation of ATRs by blood bank physicians, patients' electronic medical records were further evaluated. Results According to the nursing records, the frequency of all possible transfusion-related events was 3.1%. After the blood bank physicians' review, the frequency was found to be 1.2%. The overall frequency of febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) to red blood cells (RBCs), platelet (PLT) components, and fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs) were 0.9%, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively, and allergic reactions represented 0.3% (RBCs), 0.9% (PLTs), and 0.9% (FFPs), respectively. The pre-storage leukocyte reduction significantly decreased the frequency of FNHTRs during the transfusion of RBCs (P<0.01) or PLTs (P≒0.01). Conclusions The frequency of FNHTRs, allergic reactions, and "no reactions" were 22.0%, 17.0%, and 60.7%, respectively. Leukocyte-reduction was associated with a lower rate of FNHTRs, but not with that of allergic reactions. The development of an effective electronic reporting system of ATRs is important in quantifying transfusion-related adverse events. This type of reporting system can also accurately identify the underlying problems and risk factors to further the quality of transfusion care for patients. PMID:26522757

  4. Transfusion audit of blood products using the World Health Organization Basic Information Sheet in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, H; Kani, C; Fallah-Abed, P; Lalooha, F; Mohammadi, N

    2012-12-04

    We assessed the practicality of using the transfusion Basic Information Sheet (BIS) for data collection, to determine the overall adequacy of physician documentation of blood product transfusion, and to make an audit of the appropriateness of blood product transfusion. The transfusion process and clinical indications for transfusions administered to adult hospitalized patients in 3 tertiary care teaching hospitals in Qazvin were prospectively reviewed. Adequate documentation was achieved in 62.6% of all transfusion episodes, range 41%-73%, depending on the medical specialty; 15.7% of red blood cells and whole blood requests, 40.8% of platelet requests and 34.1% of fresh frozen plasma requests were inappropriate. BIS-based information along with data collection can be used to provide feedback regarding the effectiveness of and compliance with local and national transfusion guidelines.

  5. Electrolyte and acid/base changes in dogs undergoing autologous blood transfusion via a cell salvage device

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Jodie L.; Thieman Mankin, Kelley M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This study reports electrolyte and acid/base disturbances observed in clinical cases receiving autologous transfusion of blood processed by a cell salvage device. The records of 12 client-owned dogs that received an autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device with pre- and post-autologous transfusion blood work available were reviewed. Blood work from the 12 case dogs was compared to blood work from 12 control dogs with similar diseases. Control dogs received similar surgical treatment and were administered a similar volume per kg of packed red blood cells as case dogs, but did not undergo autologous transfusion. Case dogs that received autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device were significantly more likely to experience a decrease in ionized calcium and magnesium levels post-transfusion than were control dogs. Calcium and magnesium levels should be closely monitored during and after autologous transfusion. Calcium and/or magnesium supplementation may be required. PMID:26345136

  6. Homologous whole blood transfusion during treatment of severe anemia in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Debenham, John James; Atencia, Rebeca

    2014-09-01

    A 12-yr-old female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) was presented as severely emaciated and with generalized muscle weakness. Hematology and biochemistry revealed severe anemia and hypokalemia. The chimpanzee was treated supportively and symptomatically; although initially stable, the animal deteriorated rapidly on day 5, becoming depressed and jaundiced with further deterioration of anemia. To address the decline, a prompt transfusion of compatible and cross-matched fresh whole blood from a healthy adult male chimpanzee was administered over 120 min. During transfusion, an immediate reduction in the recipient's tachycardia was noted and substantial clinical improvement continued over 24 hr posttransfusion; no adverse transfusion reactions were observed.

  7. Mayor Erythropoietic Response after Deferasirox Treatment in a Transfusion-Dependent Anemic Patient with Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lisette, Del Corso; Enrico, Balleari; Eleonora, Arboscello; Riccardo, Ghio; Manlio, Mencoboni; Omar, Racchi

    2013-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm frequently complicated by transfusion dependent anemia. Both anemia and transfusion-dependence are associated with a poor outcome, at least in part because of toxic effects of iron overload (IOL). Iron-chelating therapy (ICT) is increasingly used in order to prevent IOL in this setting. Here, we describe the case of a 73-year-old man affected by PMF and severe transfusion-dependent anemia who experienced a dramatic erythroid response after being treated with deferasirox to prevent IOL. PMID:24307957

  8. Mayor erythropoietic response after deferasirox treatment in a transfusion-dependent anemic patient with primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lisette, Del Corso; Enrico, Balleari; Eleonora, Arboscello; Riccardo, Ghio; Manlio, Mencoboni; Omar, Racchi

    2013-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm frequently complicated by transfusion dependent anemia. Both anemia and transfusion-dependence are associated with a poor outcome, at least in part because of toxic effects of iron overload (IOL). Iron-chelating therapy (ICT) is increasingly used in order to prevent IOL in this setting. Here, we describe the case of a 73-year-old man affected by PMF and severe transfusion-dependent anemia who experienced a dramatic erythroid response after being treated with deferasirox to prevent IOL.

  9. RBC AGE AND POTENTIATION OF TRANSFUSION RELATED PATHOLOGY IN TRAUMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukodepleted older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: i) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation, and ii) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology. PMID:21496048

  10. Red blood cell age and potentiation of transfusion-related pathology in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-04-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukoreduced older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: 1) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide-mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation and 2) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology.

  11. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in an era of TRALI risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, John C; Grant, Michelle L; Karp, Julie K

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare complication of transfusion, for which the true incidence remains obscure, since there are a number of factors that may lead to misdiagnosis. Despite this, it continues to be the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality. Here we present a historical case of TRALI in an elderly female who received group AB plasma and discuss how current mitigation strategies would likely have prevented its occurrence. It is important to remember that both immune and non-immune factors play a role in TRALI pathogenesis, and although current preventative strategies may decrease TRALI's incidence, they likely will not eliminate it.

  12. [Managing of platelet transfusion refractoriness of haematological malignancies. Experience IPC-EFSAM].

    PubMed

    Dettori, I; Ladaique, P

    2014-11-01

    The platelet refractoriness is a complication of transfusion treatments potentially dramatic in onco-haematology. Chemo-treatment of haematological malignancies or packs of allogeneic bone marrow transplants require iterative platelet transfusion requirements. The discovery of a platelet refractoriness along with its support should be the most reactive as possible but also adapted to the cause. In the case of allo-immunization, it may be expected. The purpose of this presentation is to recall the different etiologies and perform a feedback on the support transfusion platelet of onco-haematology adult patients at Institut Paoli-Calmettes (IPC) in partnership with the EFSAM.

  13. Washing red blood cells and platelets transfused in cardiac surgery reduces post-operative inflammation and number of transfusions: Results of a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cholette, Jill M; Henrichs, Kelly F; Alfieris, George M; Powers, Karen S.; Phipps, Richard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Swartz, Michael; Gensini, Francisco; Daugherty, L. Eugene; Nazarian, Emily; Rubenstein, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, Dawn; Eaton, Michael; Lerner, Norma B; Blumberg, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objective Children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are susceptible to additional inflammatory and immunogenic insults from blood transfusions. We hypothesize that washing red blood cells (RBC) and platelets transfused to these patients will reduce post-operative transfusion-related immune modulation and inflammation. Design Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University hospital pediatric cardiac intensive care unit. Patients Children from birth to 17 years old undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. Interventions Children were randomized to an unwashed or washed RBC and platelet transfusion protocol for their surgery and postoperative care. All blood was leukoreduced, irradiated, and ABO identical. Plasma was obtained for laboratory analysis: pre-op, immediately, six and 12 hours after CPB. Primary outcome was the 12-hour post-CPB interleukin (IL)-6: IL-10 ratio. Secondary measures were IL levels, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical outcomes. Measurements and main results 162 subjects were studied, 81 per group. 34 subjects (17 per group) did not receive any blood transfusions. Storage duration of blood products was similar between groups. Among transfused subjects, the 12-hour IL ratio was significantly lower in the washed group (3.8 v. 4.8; p=0.04) secondary to lower IL-6 levels (post-CPB: 65 v.100 pg/ml; p = 0.06; 6 hour: 89 v.152 pg/ml; p = 0.02; 12-hour: 84 v.122 pg/ml; p = 0.09). Post-operative CRP was lower in subjects receiving washed blood (38 v. 43 mg/L; p = 0.03). There was a numerical, but not statistically significant decrease in total blood product transfusions (203 v. 260) and mortality (2 v. 6 deaths) in the washed group compared to the unwashed group. Conclusions Washed blood transfusions in cardiac surgery reduced inflammatory biomarkers, number of transfusions, donor exposures, and were associated with a non-significant trend towards reduced mortality. A larger study powered to test for clinical

  14. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  15. Detection of malaria infection in blood transfusion: a comparative study among real-time PCR, rapid diagnostic test and microscopy: sensitivity of Malaria detection methods in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Gholamreza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ahmad; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Zeraati, Hojjat; Alipour, Mohsen; Azizi, Ebrahim; Keshavarz, Hossein

    2011-06-01

    The transmission of malaria by blood transfusion was one of the first transfusion-transmitted infections recorded in the world. Transfusion-transmitted malaria may lead to serious problems because infection with Plasmodium falciparum may cause rapidly fatal death. This study aimed to compare real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and light microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium spp. in blood transfusion, both in endemic and non-endemic areas of malaria disease in Iran. Two sets of 50 blood samples were randomly collected. One set was taken from blood samples donated in blood bank of Bandar Abbas, a city located in a malarious-endemic area, and the other set from Tehran, a non-endemic one. Light microscopic examination on both thin and thick smears, RDTs, and real-time PCR were performed on the blood samples and the results were compared. Thin and thick light microscopic examinations of all samples as well as RDT results were negative for Plasmodium spp. Two blood samples from endemic area were positive only with real-time PCR. It seems that real-time PCR as a highly sensitive method can be helpful for the confirmation of malaria infection in different units of blood transfusion organization especially in malaria-endemic areas where the majority of donors may be potentially infected with malaria parasites.

  16. SHOT conference report 2016: serious hazards of transfusion - human factors continue to cause most transfusion-related incidents.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, P H B

    2016-12-01

    The Annual SHOT Report for incidents reported in 2015 was published on 7 July at the SHOT symposium. Once again, the majority of reports (77·7%) were associated with mistakes ('human factors'). Pressures and stress in the hospital environment contributed to several error reports. There were 26 deaths where transfusion played a part, one due to haemolysis from anti-Wr(a) (units issued electronically). The incidence of haemolysis due to this antibody has increased in recent years. Transfusion-associated circulatory overload is the most common contributor to death and major morbidity. Reports of delays to transfusion have increased, some caused by the failure of correct patient identification. There were seven ABO-incompatible red cell transfusions (one death) with an additional six to allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Near-miss reporting and analysis is useful and demonstrated nearly 300 instances of wrong blood in tube, which could have resulted in ABO-incompatible transfusion had the error not been detected. Errors with anti-D immunoglobulin continue, and preliminary data from the new survey of new anti-D found in pregnancy has shown that sensitisation occurs in some women even with apparently 'ideal' care. For the first time, the SHOT report now incorporates a chapter on donor events.

  17. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  18. Characterization of the cation-binding capacity of a potassium-adsorption filter used in red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Muto, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yukio; Maeda, Takao; Odate, Takayuki; Shimanaka, Kimio; Kusano, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    A K(+) -adsorption filter was developed to exchange K(+) in the supernatant of stored irradiated red blood cells with Na(+) . To date, however, the filter's adsorption capacity for K(+) has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we characterized the cation-binding capacity of this filter. Artificial solutions containing various cations were continuously passed through the filter in 30 mL of sodium polystyrene sulfonate at 10 mL/min using an infusion pump at room temperature. The cation concentrations were measured before and during filtration. When a single solution containing K(+) , Li(+) , H(+) , Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , or Al(3+) was continuously passed through the filter, the filter adsorbed K(+) and the other cations in exchange for Na(+) in direct proportion to the valence number. The order of affinity for cation adsorption to the filter was Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >K(+) >H(+) >Li(+) . In K(+) -saturated conditions, the filter also adsorbed Na(+) . After complete adsorption of these cations on the filter, their concentration in the effluent increased in a sigmoidal manner over time. Cations that were bound to the filter were released if a second cation was passed through the filter, despite the different affinities of the two cations. The ability of the filter to bind cations, especially K(+) , should be helpful when it is used for red blood cell transfusion at the bedside. The filter may also be useful to gain a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of sodium polystyrene sulfonate.

  19. Charge-Exchange Excitation of the Isobaric Analog State and Implication for the Nuclear Symmetry Energy and Neutron Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Loc, Bui Minh; Zegers, R. G. T.

    The charge-exchange (p, n) or (3He,t) reaction can be considered as elastic scattering of proton or 3He by the isovector term of the optical potential that flips the projectile isospin. Therefore, the accurately measured charge-exchange scattering cross section for the isobaric analog states can be a good probe of the isospin dependence of the optical potential, which is determined exclusively within the folding model by the difference between the neutron and proton densities and isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. On the other hand, the same isospin- and density-dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction can also be used in a Hartree-Fock calculation of asymmetric nuclear matter, to estimate the nuclear matter energy and its asymmetry part. As a result, the fine-tuning of the isospin dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction against the measured (p, n) or (3He,t) cross sections should allow us to make some realistic prediction of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. Moreover, given the neutron skin of the target related directly to the neutron-proton difference of the ground-state density, it can be well probed in the analysis of the charge-exchange (3He,t) reactions at medium energies when the two-step processes can be neglected and the t-matrix interaction can be used in the folding calculation.

  20. 75 FR 22817 - Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation... Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation Safety'' (EID public... of risk from, and prioritization of response to, emerging infectious diseases relevant to...