Science.gov

Sample records for excitation functions

  1. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  2. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  3. Highly excited strings I: Generating function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliros, Dimitri P.; Copeland, Edmund J.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    This is the first of a series of detailed papers on string amplitudes with highly excited strings (HES). In the present paper we construct a generating function for string amplitudes with generic HES vertex operators using a fixed-loop momentum formalism. We generalise the proof of the chiral splitting theorem of D'Hoker and Phong to string amplitudes with arbitrary HES vertex operators (with generic KK and winding charges, polarisation tensors and oscillators) in general toroidal compactifications E =R D - 1 , 1 ×T Dcr - D (with generic constant Kähler and complex structure target space moduli, background Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge fields and torsion). We adopt a novel approach that does not rely on a ;reverse engineering; method to make explicit the loop momenta, thus avoiding a certain ambiguity pointed out in a recent paper by Sen, while also keeping the genus of the worldsheet generic. This approach will also be useful in discussions of quantum gravity and in particular in relation to black holes in string theory, non-locality and breakdown of local effective field theory, as well as in discussions of cosmic superstrings and their phenomenological relevance. We also discuss the manifestation of wave/particle (or rather wave/string) duality in string theory.

  4. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  5. Comment on elimination of polarization dependence from optical excitation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Maseberg, Jack W.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of optical excitation functions excited by electron impact is typically accomplished by recording atomic fluorescence emitted into a small solid angle perpendicular to the incident electron beam. This measured intensity is not proportional to the emission cross section because the fluorescence exhibits an angular distribution and polarization that varies with the energy of the exciting electrons. Typically, a polarizer is set at the ''magic angle'' (54.7 degree sign ) with respect to the electron beam axis to remove this polarization dependence. The literature for the derivation of the magic angle value assumes the polarizing element is perfect. An expression for the angle that accounts for the use of a partial polarizer is presented.

  6. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bisplinghoff, J.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Engelhardt, H.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.; Gro-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Rohdje, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ro, U.; Scheid, H.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Trelle, H.; Wiedmann, W.; Ziegler, R.; Albers, D.; Bollmann, R.; Bueer, K.; Dohrmann, F.; Gasthuber, M.; Greiff, J.; Gro, A.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Schirm, N.; Scobel, W.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Cloth, P.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sterzenbach, G.

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta p{sub p} (energies T{sub p}) from 1100 to 3300MeV/c (500 to 2500MeV) in the angular range 35{degree}{le}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{le}90{degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{approx}1.4{degree} resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of T{sub p}. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Delta function excitation of waves in the earth's ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidmar, R. J.; Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Excitation of the earth's ionosphere by delta function current sheets is considered, and the temporal and spatial evolution of wave packets is analyzed for a two-component collisional F2 layer. Approximations of an inverse Fourier-Laplace transform via saddle point methods provide plots of typical wave packets. These illustrate cold plasma wave theory and may be used as a diagnostic tool since it is possible to relate specific features, e.g., the frequency of a modulation envelope, to plasma parameters such as the electron cyclotron frequency. It is also possible to deduce the propagation path length and orientation of a remote radio beacon.

  8. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Vasudevan, R. K.; Collins, L.; Strelcov, E.; Okatan, M. B.; Belianinov, A.; Baddorf, A. P.; Proksch, R.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope's tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations, such as polarization switching, ionic motion, and electrochemical reactions. The nanoscale size of the biased region, smaller or comparable to that of features such as grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this approach allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, responses measured as a function of frequency and bias can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging of inorganic and biological systems. This article reviews current progress in multidimensional scanning probe microscopy techniques based on band excitation time and voltage spectroscopies, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization, along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  9. Leptin regulation of neuronal excitability and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jenni

    2007-12-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, provides signals to specific regions of the hypothalamus to control energy homeostasis. However, the past decade of research has not only revealed that leptin receptors are widely expressed in the CNS, but has also identified numerous additional functions for this hormone in the brain. In particular, there is evidence that leptin influences neuronal excitability via the activation as well as trafficking of specific potassium channels in several brain regions. Leptin-induced alterations in neuronal excitability have been implicated in the regulation of food intake, reward behaviour and anti-convulsant effects. A number of studies have also identified a role for leptin in cognitive processes that involve activation of leptin receptors in limbic structures, such as the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin influences hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, and more recently leptin has been shown to have anti-depressant properties. Characterisation of these novel actions of leptin is providing valuable insights into the role of this hormone in the regulation of diverse neuronal functions in health and disease.

  10. Leptin regulation of neuronal excitability and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jenni

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, provides signals to specific regions of the hypothalamus to control energy homeostasis. However, the past decade of research has not only revealed that leptin receptors are widely expressed in the CNS, but has also identified numerous additional functions for this hormone in the brain. In particular, there is evidence that leptin influences neuronal excitability via the activation as well as trafficking of specific potassium channels in several brain regions. Leptin-induced alterations in neuronal excitability have been implicated in the regulation of food intake, reward behaviour and anti-convulsant effects. A number of studies have also identified a role for leptin in cognitive processes that involve activation of leptin receptors in limbic structures, such as the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin influences hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, and more recently leptin has been shown to have anti-depressant properties. Characterisation of these novel actions of leptin is providing valuable insights into the role of this hormone in the regulation of diverse neuronal functions in health and disease. PMID:18024215

  11. Density functional computations for inner-shell excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ching-Han; Chong, Delano P.

    1996-11-01

    The 1 s → π ∗ inner-shell excitation spectra of seven molecules have been studied using density functional theory along with the unrestricted generalized transition state (uGTS) approach. The exchange-correlation potential is based on a combined functional of Becke's exchange (B88) and Perdew's correlation (P86). A scaling procedure based on Clementi and Raimondi's rules for atomic screening is applied to the cc-pVTZ basis set of atoms where a partial core-hole is created in the uGTS calculations. The average absolute deviation between our predicted 1 s → π ∗ excitations eneergies and experimental values is only 0.16 eV. Singlet-triplet splittings of C 1 s → π ∗ transitions of CO, C 2H 2, C 2H 4, and C 6H 6 also agree with experimental observations. The average absolute deviation of our predicted core-electron binding energies and term values is 0.23 and 0.29 eV, respectively.

  12. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  13. Excitation function calculations for α + 93Nb nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, M.; Tel, E.; Sarpün, İ. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the excitation functions of alpha-induced reactions on the 93Nb target nucleus were calculated by using ALICE-ASH code. The hybrid model, Weisskopf-Ewing model and geometry dependent hybrid model in this code were used to understand the alpha-niobium interaction. The contribution on the nuclear interaction of compound and pre-compound processes, with variation of the incident alpha particle energy, was presented. Furthermore, the reaction cross sections were calculated by using different level density models such as Superfluid nuclear model, Fermi gas model and Kataria-Ramamurthy Fermi gas model. Obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the measured cross sections, the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models were varied. Finally, the proper choice of the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models was found to be quite important in order to obtain the more realistic cross section values.

  14. Coupled cluster Green function: Model involving single and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Shelton, William A.

    2016-04-14

    In this paper we report on the parallel implementation of the coupled-cluster (CC) Green function formulation (GF-CC) employing single and double excitations in the cluster operator (GF-CCSD). The detailed description of the underlying algorithm is provided, including the structure of ionization-potential- and electron-affinity-type intermediate tensors which enable to formulate GF-CC approach in a computationally feasible form. Several examples including calculations of ionization-potentials and electron a*ffinities for benchmark systems, which are juxtaposed against the experimental values, provide an illustration of the accuracies attainable in the GFCCSD simulations. We also discuss the structure of the CCSD self energies and discuss approximation that are geared to reduce the computational cost while maintaining the pole structure of the full GF-CCSD approach.

  15. [Ventricular pump function under ectopic excitation of the frog heart].

    PubMed

    Kibler, N A; Belogolova, A S; Vaĭkshnoraĭte, M A; Azarov, Ia E; Shmakov, D N

    2008-02-01

    The ventricular pump function under ectopic excitation of the heart was studied in decapitated and pithed adult frogs Rana temporaria (n = 21) at 18-19 degrees C. The intraventricular pressure was recorded with a catheter via ventricular wall. During pacing of the ventricular base and apex, the systolic pressure decreased (6.1 +/- 4.5 mm Hg and 8.9 +/- 5.0 mm Hg, respectively) as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (8.9 +/- 5.0 mm Hg, p < 0.05). The end-diastolic pressure decreased insignificantly both under basal and apical pacing. The systolic rate of pressure rise during dP/dtmax decreased under ventricular pacing, especially during pacing of the ventricular apex, as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (14.4 +/- 6/9 mm Hg/s and 22.1 +/- 11.2 mm Hg/s, respectively, p < 0.003). The isovolumetric relaxation (dP/dtmin) slowed during apical pacing as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (-25.1 +/- 13.6 and -35.6 +/- 18.3 mm Hg/s, respectively, p < 0.03). Ectopic excitation of the ventricular base and apex resulted in increase of the QRS duration (93 +/- 33 ms and 81 +/- 30 ms, respectively) as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (63 +/- 13 ms, p < 0.05). Thus, pacing of different ventricular areas ventricular myocardium with the ventricular pump function being reduced more obviously during the apical pacing compared to the pacing of ventricular base.

  16. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal System Excitability in Karate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Messina, Giovanni; Valenzano, Anna; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Messina, Antonietta; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in the coordination performance of karate athletes through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods Thirteen right-handed male karate athletes (25.0±5.0 years) and 13 matched non-athlete controls (26.7±6.2 years) were enrolled. A single-pulse TMS was applied using a figure-eight coil stimulator. Resting motor threshold (rMT) was determined. Surface electromyography was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110%, and 120% of rMT were considered. Functional assessment of the coordination performance was assessed by in-phase (IP) and anti-phase (AP) homolateral hand and foot coordination tasks performed at 80, 120, and 180 bpm. Results Compared to controls, athletes showed lower rMT (p<0.01), shorter MEP latency (p<0.01) and higher MEP amplitude (p<0.01), with a significant correlation (r = 0.50, p<0.01) between rMT and MEP latency. Coordination decreased with increasing velocity, and better IP performances emerged compared to AP ones (p<0.001). In general, a high correlation between rMT and coordination tasks was found for both IP and AP conditions. Conclusion With respect to controls, karate athletes present a higher corticospinal excitability indicating the presence of an activity-dependent alteration in the balance and interactions between inhibitory and facilitatory circuits determining the final output from the M1. Furthermore, the high correlation between corticospinal excitability and coordination performance could support sport-specific neurophysiological arrangements. PMID:27218465

  17. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.I. Jr.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H.; Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  18. Dissociative excitation of the N(+)(5S) state by electron impact on N2 - Excitation function and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable N(+)(5S) ions were produced in the laboratory by dissociative excitation of N2 with energetic electrons. The resulting radiative decay of the N(+)(5S) state was observed with sufficient resolution to completely resolve the doublet from the nearby N2 molecular radiation. The excitation function was measured from threshold to 500 eV. The cross section peaks at a high electron energy and also exhibits a high threshold energy both of which are typical of dissociative excitation-ionization processes. This finding complicates the explanation of electron impact on N2 as the mechanism for the source of the 2145 A 'auroral mystery feature' by further increasing the required peak cross section. It is suggested that the apparent N(+)(5S) quenching in auroras may be an artifact due to the softening of the electron energy spectrum in the auroral E region.

  19. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  20. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  1. Excitation function measurements and integral yields estimation for natZnp,x reactions at low energies.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, F S; Al Mugren, K S; Azzam, A

    2007-10-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for a number of proton-induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc in the energy range from 27.5 MeV down to their threshold energy, using the activation method on stacked foils. Excitation functions and thick target yield for the reactions leading to the formation of (67)Ga,(66)Ga,(68)Ga,(62)Zn and (65)Zn are presented and compared with earlier reported experimental data. The experimental cross-sections and the production yields are tabulated; the excitation functions and the thick target yield curves are plotted in graphs.

  2. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  3. Dielectric function for a model of laser-excited GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, Lorin X.

    2001-02-15

    We consider a model for the ultrashort pulsed-laser excitation of GaAs in which electrons are excited from the top of the valence band to the bottom of the conduction band. The linear optical response of this excited system in the visible and near-UV is calculated by solving a statically screened Bethe-Salpeter equation. Single-particle electron energies and wave functions are taken from ab initio electronic structure calculations. The screened electron-hole interaction W is calculated with a model dielectric function which includes the excited carriers. Though band-gap renormalization is neglected, dramatic changes are observed in the shape of {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) due to Pauli blocking and the enhanced screening of W. We estimate the error incurred in the static screening approximation by performing static screening calculations with the assumption that the excited carriers respond too slowly to screen W.

  4. Excited state surfaces in density functional theory: a new twist on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Paul; Williams, J A Gareth; Tozer, David J

    2009-09-07

    Excited state surfaces in density functional theory and the problem of charge transfer are considered from an orbital overlap perspective. For common density functional approximations, the accuracy of the surface will not be uniform if the spatial overlap between the occupied and virtual orbitals involved in the excitation has a strong conformational dependence; the excited state surface will collapse toward the ground state in regions where the overlap is very low. This characteristic is used to predict and to provide insight into the breakdown of excited state surfaces in the classic push-pull 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile molecule, as a function of twist angle. The breakdown is eliminated using a Coulomb-attenuated functional. Analogous situations will arise in many molecules.

  5. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\textrm {L}_{2,3}$\\end{document}L2,3 edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule. PMID:23181305

  6. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and {L}_{2,3} edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  7. Excited State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-08

    The optical response of excited states is a key property used to probe photophysical and photochemical dynamics. Additionally, materials with a large nonlinear absorption cross-section caused by two-photon (TPA) and excited state absorption (ESA) are desirable for optical limiting applications. The ability to predict the optical response of excited states would help in the interpretation of transient absorption experiments and aid in the search for and design of optical limiting materials. We have developed an approach to obtain excited state absorption spectra by combining real-time (RT) and linear-response (LR) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Being based on RT-TDDFT, our method is aimed at tackling larger molecular complexes and materials systems where excited state absorption is predominantly seen and many time-resolved experimental efforts are focused. To demonstrate our method, we have calculated the ground and excited state spectra of H₂⁺ and H₂ due to the simplicity in the interpretation of the spectra. We have validated our new approach by comparing our results for butadiene with previously published results based on quadratic response (QR). We also present results for oligofluorenes, where we compare our results with both QR-TDDFT and experimental measurements. Because our method directly measures the response of an excited state, stimulated emission features are also captured; although, these features are underestimated in energy which could be attributed to a change of the reference from the ground to the excited state.

  8. Natural orbitals from single and double excitation configuration interaction wave functions: their use in second-order configuration interaction and wave functions incorporating limited triple and quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grev, Roger S.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1992-05-01

    As an alternative to orbitals obtained from a molecular complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) wave function, we have investigated the use of natural orbitals (NOs) obtained from configuration interaction (CI) wave functions including all single and double excitations (CISD) for use in multireference CI (MRCI) studies. The specific MRCI methods investigated are (1) second-order CI (SOCI), which includes all single and double excitations with respect to a full CI in the valence space and (2) a wave function that includes all single and double excitations out of a valence space CISD reference function. The latter wave function can also be described as a single-double-triple-quadruple excitation CI in which only two electrons are allowed to simultaneously reside outside of the valence space, ``which we call CISD[TQ].'' Comparison is made with CASSCF-SOCI and full CI results for NH2 (2B1), CH3 (2A`2), and SiH2 (1B1) at equilibrium bond distances (Re) 1.5 and 2.0Re, and with full CI results for the dissociation energy of N2. The dissociation energies of N2 and C2 are also obtained using large atomic natural orbital basis sets and the results compared to CASSCF-SOCI and internally contracted MRCI results. In all, the MRCI results with CISD NOs are very similar to the CASSCF-MRCI results, and at geometries where the reference wave function is dominant, the relatively compact CISD[TQ] method yields results that are very close to SOCI. In addition to their ease of generation, the CISD NOs offer the added advantage of allowing for truncation of the CI configuration list on an orbital basis by simply deleting high-lying virtual orbitals. The errors introduced by this truncation are almost quantitatively obtained at the CISD level of theory.

  9. Testing excited-state energy-density functionals and potentials with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.

    2014-03-01

    The modified local spin density functional and the related local potential for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding potential is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax thus obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.

  10. Direct Extraction of Excitation Energies from Ensemble Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zeng-hui; Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    2017-07-01

    A very specific ensemble of ground and excited states is shown to yield an exact formula for any excitation energy as a simple correction to the energy difference between orbitals of the Kohn-Sham ground state. This alternative scheme avoids either the need to calculate many unoccupied levels as in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) or the need for many self-consistent ensemble calculations. The symmetry-eigenstate Hartree-exchange (SEHX) approximation yields results comparable to standard TDDFT for atoms. With this formalism, SEHX yields approximate double excitations, which are missed by adiabatic TDDFT.

  11. Modeling the doubly excited state with time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2008-11-01

    Multielectron excited states have become a hot topic in many cutting-edge research fields, such as the photophysics of polyenes and in the possibility of multiexciton generation in quantum dots for the purpose of increasing solar cell efficiency. However, obtaining multielectron excited states has been a major obstacle as it is often done with multiconfigurational methods, which involve formidable computational cost for large systems. Although they are computationally much cheaper than multiconfigurational wave function based methods, linear response adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density functional theory (TDDFT) are generally considered incapable of obtaining multielectron excited states. We have developed a real-time TDHF and adiabatic TDDFT approach that is beyond the perturbative regime. We show that TDHF/TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite two electrons from the ground state to the doubly excited state and that the real-time TDHF/TDDFT implicitly includes double excitation within a superposition state. We also present a multireference linear response theory to show that the real-time electron density response corresponds to a superposition of perturbative linear responses of the S0 and S2 states. As a result, the energy of the two-electron doubly excited state can be obtained with several different approaches. This is done within the adiabatic approximation of TDDFT, a realm in which the doubly excited state has been deemed missing. We report results on simple two-electron systems, including the energies and dipole moments for the two-electron excited states of H2 and HeH+. These results are compared to those obtained with the full configuration interaction method.

  12. Modeling the Excited States of Biological Chromophores within Many-Body Green's Function Theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuchen; Rohlfing, Michael; Molteni, Carla

    2010-01-12

    First-principle many-body Green's function theory (MBGFT) has been successfully used to describe electronic excitations in many materials, from bulk crystals to nanoparticles. Here we assess its performance for the calculations of the excited states of biological chromophores. MBGFT is based on a set of Green's function equations, whose key ingredients are the electron's self-energy Σ, which is obtained by Hedin's GW approach, and the electron-hole interaction, which is described by the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). The GW approach and the BSE predict orbital energies and excitation energies with high accuracy, respectively. We have calculated the low-lying excited states of a series of model biological chromophores, related to the photoactive yellow protein (PYP), rhodopsin, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), obtaining a very good agreement with the available experimental and accurate theoretical data; the order of the excited states is also correctly predicted. MBGFT bridges the gap between time-dependent density functional theory and high-level quantum chemistry methods, combining the efficiency of the former with the accuracy of the latter: this makes MBGFT a promising method for studying excitations in complex biological systems.

  13. Balanced Description of Ground-State Properties, Valence Excitations, and Charge-Transfer Excitations with Long-Range Corrected Density Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Herbert, John M.

    2009-06-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory's favorable scaling properties make it an attractive technique for the study of large, condensed-phase systems. However, in such systems conventional generalized gradient approximation functionals are plagued by spurious, low-energy charge transfer (CT) excitations. Long-range corrected (LRC) functionals, which asymptotically turn on full Hartree-Fock exchange at long range, push these CT states to higher energies. Until recently it has seemed impossible to find a long-range corrected functional that performed acceptably well for both ground- and excited-state properties. We have constructed an implemented a LRC hybrid functional that not only performs reasonably well in a battery of tests on ground-state properties and valence excitations, but also achieves reasonable accuracy for a small database of CT excitations.

  14. Assessing Accuracy of Exchange-Correlation Functionals for the Description of Atomic Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Marcin; Hanas, Martyna

    2016-09-01

    The performance of exchange-correlation functionals for the description of atomic excitations is investigated. A benchmark set of excited states is constructed and experimental data is compared to Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) calculations. The benchmark results show that for the selected group of functionals good accuracy may be achieved and the quality of predictions provided is competitive to computationally more demanding coupled-cluster approaches. Apart from testing the standard TDDFT approaches, also the role of self-interaction error plaguing DFT calculations and the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation kernels is given some insight.

  15. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  16. On the Performances of the M06 Family of Density Functionals for Electronic Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Valero, Rosendo; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2010-07-13

    We assessed the accuracy of the four members of the M06 family of functionals (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) for the prediction of electronic excitation energies of main-group compounds by time-dependent density functional theory. This is accomplished by comparing the predictions both to high-level theoretical benchmark calculations and some experimental data for gas-phase excitation energies of small molecules and to experimental data for midsize and large chromogens in liquid-phase solutions. The latter comparisons are carried out using implicit solvation models to include the electrostatic effects of solvation. We find that M06-L is one of the most accurate local functionals for evaluating electronic excitation energies, that M06-2X outperforms BHHLYP, and that M06-HF outperforms HF, although in each case, the compared functionals have the same or a similar amount of Hartree-Fock exchange. For the majority of investigated excited states, M06 emerges as the most accurate functional among the four tested, and it provides an accuracy similar to the best of the other global hybrids such as B3LYP, B98, and PBE0. For 190 valence excited states, 20 Rydberg states, and 16 charge transfer states, we try to provide an overall assessment by comparing the quality of the predictions to those of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and nine other density functionals. For the valence excited states, M06 yields a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.23 eV, whereas B3LYP, B98, and PBE0 have MADs in the range 0.19-0.22 eV. Of the functionals tested, M05-2X, M06-2X, and BMK are found to perform best for Rydberg states, and M06-HF performs best for charge transfer states, but no single functional performs satisfactorily for all three kinds of excitation. The performance of functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange is of great practical interest because of their high computational efficiency, and we find that M06-L predicts more accurate excitation energies than other such functionals.

  17. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  18. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions.

    PubMed

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s (1)S excited state of the helium atom.

  19. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J.

    2011-10-15

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s {sup 1} S excited state of the helium atom.

  20. Motor cortex excitability and connectivity in chronic stroke: a multimodal model of functional reorganization.

    PubMed

    Volz, Lukas J; Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Diekhoff, Svenja; Rehme, Anne K; Pool, Eva-Maria; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers a cascade of cellular processes, which induce neuroprotection, inflammation, apoptosis and regeneration. At the neural network level, lesions concomitantly induce cerebral plasticity. Yet, many stroke survivors are left with a permanent motor deficit, and only little is known about the neurobiological factors that determine functional outcome after stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive approaches that allow insights into the functional (re-) organization of the cortical motor system. We here combined neuronavigated TMS, MRI and analyses of connectivity to investigate to which degree recovery of hand function depends on corticospinal tract (CST) damage and biomarkers of cerebral plasticity like cortical excitability and motor network effective connectivity. As expected, individual motor performance of 12 stroke patients with persistent motor deficits was found to depend upon the degree of CST damage but also motor cortex excitability and interhemispheric connectivity. In addition, the data revealed a strong correlation between reduced ipsilesional motor cortex excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition in severely impaired patients. Interindividual differences in ipsilesional motor cortex excitability were stronger related to the motor deficit than abnormal interhemispheric connectivity or CST damage. Multivariate linear regression analysis combining the three factors accounted for more than 80 % of the variance in functional impairment. The inter-relation of cortical excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition provides direct multi-modal evidence for the disinhibition theory of the contralesional hemisphere following stroke. Finally, our data reveal a key mechanism (i.e., the excitability-related reduction in interhemispheric inhibition) accounting for the rehabilitative potential of novel therapeutic approaches which aim at modulating cortical

  1. Thick-target transmission method for excitation functions of interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Ebata, S.; Imai, S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method, called as thick-target transmission (T3) method, to obtain an excitation function of interaction cross sections. In an ordinal experiment to measure the excitation function of interaction cross sections by the transmission method, we need to change the beam energy for each cross section. In the T3 method, the excitation function is derived from the beam attenuations measured at the targets of different thicknesses without changing the beam energy. The advantage of the T3 method is the simplicity and availability for radioactive beams. To confirm the availability, we perform a simulation for the 12C + 27Al system with the PHITS code instead of actual experiments. Our results have large uncertainties but well reproduce the tendency of the experimental data.

  2. Experimental excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natural thallium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam Rebeles, R.; Van den Winkel, P.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2012-10-01

    Excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natural thallium leading to the formation of 204m,203m2+m1+g,202m,201m+g,200Pb and 202,201m+g,200m+gTl isotopes were determined up to 50 MeV. The cross sections were measured by an activation technique using stacked foil irradiation. The excitation functions of the investigated reactions are compared with data reported in literature and also with the theoretical results of TALYS nuclear reaction code. From the measured cross section data, the thick target yield for the medical interesting 203Pb isotope is calculated.

  3. Quantal density-functional theory of excited states: The state arbitrariness of the model noninteracting system

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Singh, Ranbir; Sahni, Viraht; Massa, Lou

    2003-10-01

    The quantal density-functional theory (Q-DFT) of nondegenerate excited-states maps the pure state of the Schroedinger equation to one of noninteracting fermions such that the equivalent excited state density, energy, and ionization potential are obtained. The state of the model S system is arbitrary in that it may be in a ground or excited state. The potential energy of the model fermions differs as a function of this state. The contribution of correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion to the potential and total energy of these fermions is independent of the state of the S system. The differences are solely a consequence of correlation-kinetic effects. Irrespective of the state of the S system, the highest occupied eigenvalue of the model fermions is the negative of the ionization potential. In this paper we demonstrate the state arbitrariness of the model system by application of Q-DFT to the first excited singlet state of the exactly solvable Hookean atom. We construct two model S systems: one in a singlet ground state (1s{sup 2}), and the other in a singlet first excited state (1s2s). In each case, the density and energy determined are equivalent to those of the excited state of the atom, with the highest occupied eigenvalues being the negative of the ionization potential. From these results we determine the corresponding Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) 'exchange-correlation' potential energy for the two S systems. Further, based on the results of the model calculations, suggestions for the KS-DFT of excited states are made.

  4. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  5. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-05-10

    Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2, NEVPT2, and the coupled cluster based CC2 and CC3.

  6. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. S.; Cai, F.; Xu, W. M.

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  7. Excitation functions for actinides produced in the interactions of sup 31 P with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.; Henderson, R.A.; Hall, H.L.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Brady, E.K.; Gregorich, K.E.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California )

    1991-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of various isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm from the interactions of 174- and 239-MeV {sup 31}P projectiles with {sup 248}Cm. The isotopic distributions were symmetric and displayed full widths at half maximum of 2.5, 2.5, and 2.25 mass units for Bk, Cf, and Fm, respectively. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur for those reaction channels which involve the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy is a positive quantity. The maxima of the excitation functions occur at those projectile energies which are consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The effects of the odd proton in the {sup 31}P projectile on the final isotopic distributions are discussed.

  8. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  9. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  10. Accurate excitation energies of molecules and oligomers from a semilocal density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guocai; Mo, Yuxiang; Tao, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Excitation energy plays an important role in energy conversion, biological processes, and optical devices. In this work, we apply the Tao-Mo (TM) nonempirical meta-generalized gradient approximation and the combination TMTPSS (TMx + TPSSc), with TPSSc being the correlation part of the original TPSS (Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria) to study excitation energies of small molecules and oligomers. Our test set consists of 17 molecules with 134 total excited states, including singlet, triplet, valence, and Rydberg excited states. Our calculation shows that both the TMTPSS and TM functionals yield good overall performance, with mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 0.37 eV and 0.42 eV, respectively, outperforming commonly used semilocal functionals LSDA (MAE = 0.55 eV), PBE (MAE = 0.58 eV), and TPSS (MAE = 0.47 eV). In particular, TMTPSS can yield nearly the same accuracy of B3LYP (MAE = 0.36 eV), with lower computational cost. The accuracy for semilocal density functional theory continues to hold for conjugated oligomers, but they become less accurate than hybrid functionals, due to the insufficient nonlocality.

  11. Prediction of Excitation Energies for Conjugated Oligomers and Polymers from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jianmin; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2010-01-01

    With technological advances, light-emitting conjugated oligomers and polymers have become competitive candidates in the commercial market of light-emitting diodes for display and other technologies, due to the ultralow cost, light weight, and flexibility. Prediction of excitation energies of these systems plays a crucial role in the understanding of their optical properties and device design. In this review article, we discuss the calculation of excitation energies with time-dependent density functional theory, which is one of the most successful methods in the investigation of the dynamical response of molecular systems to external perturbation, owing to its high computational efficiency.

  12. Excitation spectra and wave functions of quasiparticle bound states in bilayer Rashba superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yoichi; Nagai, Yuki; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kato, Masaru; Yanase, Youichi

    2015-11-01

    We study the excitation spectra and the wave functions of quasiparticle bound states at a vortex and an edge in bilayer Rashba superconductors under a magnetic field. In particular, we focus on the quasiparticle states at the zero energy in the pair-density wave state in a topologically non-trivial phase. We numerically demonstrate that the quasiparticle wave functions with zero energy are localized at both the edge and the vortex core if the magnetic field exceeds the critical value.

  13. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  14. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J.; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  15. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  16. Plasmon excitations in sodium atomic planes: a time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ji; Xu, Yuehua; Ke, San-Huang

    2012-08-07

    The collective electronic excitation in planar sodium clusters is studied by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The formation and development of the resonances in photoabsorption spectra are investigated in terms of the shape and size of the two-dimensional (2D) systems. The nature of these resonances is revealed by the frequency-resolved induced charge densities present on a real-space grid. For long double chains, the excitation is similar to that in long single atomic chains, showing longitudinal modes, end and central transverse modes. However, for 2D planes consisting of (n × n) atoms with n being up to 16, new 2D characteristic modes emerge regardless of the symmetries considered. For in-plane excitations, besides the equivalent end mode, mixed modes with contrary polarity occur. The relation between the frequency of the primary modes and the system size is similar to the case of a 2D electron gas but with a correction due to the realistic atomic structure. For excitations perpendicular to the plane there are corner, side center, bulk center, and circuit modes. Our calculation reveals the importance of dimensionality for plasmon excitation and how it evolves from 1D to 2D.

  17. Measurement of fusion excitation functions in the system {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier measurements of fusion reactions involving {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo projectiles and Ni-targets showed surprisingly large fusion yields at low energies which could not be explained by coupled-channels calculations. The main difference to similar measurements involving the neighboring {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo isotopes was the different slope of the excitation functions at sub-barrier energies. An analysis of a variety of experiments showed a correlation between the nuclear structure and the slope of the excitation functions, with the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} transitional nuclei ({sup 78}Kr, {sup 100}Mo) exhibiting shallower slopes than the {open_quotes}stiff{close_quotes} nuclei ({sup 86}Kr, {sup 92}Mo) measured at the same energies with respect to the barrier. In this experiment we studied the fusion excitation function involving two transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo. The measurements were performed with {sup 78}Kr beams from the ECR source at energies between 285-370 MeV. Separation of the evaporation nucleus from the elastically scattered particles was achieved by measuring time-of-flight and magnetic rigidity in the gas-filled spectrograph. The data were completely analyzed. A comparison of the cross sections with measurements for the system {sup 86}Kr + {sup 92}Mo populating the same compound nucleus {sup 178}Pt. It shows good agreement at the highest energies, but quite different falloffs of the excitation functions toward lower energies. Coupled-channels calculations, including multi-phonon excitation for the two systems, are being performed.

  18. Multiple hydrogen bonding in excited states of aminopyrazine in methanol solution: time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chai, Shuo; Yu, Jie; Han, Yong-Chang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Aminopyrazine (AP) and AP-methanol complexes have been theoretically studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The excited-state hydrogen bonds are discussed in detail. In the ground state the intermolecular multiple hydrogen bonds can be formed between AP molecule and protic solvents. The AP monomer and hydrogen-bonded complex of AP with one methanol are photoexcited initially to the S2 state, and then transferred to the S1 state via internal conversion. However the complex of AP with two methanol molecules is directly excited to the S1 state. From the calculated electronic excited energies and simulated absorption spectra, we find that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are strengthened in the electronic excited states. The strengthening is confirmed by the optimized excited-state geometries. The photochemical processes in the electronic excited states are significantly influenced by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening.

  19. Impact of Reaction Cross Section on the Unified Description of Fusion Excitation Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basrak, Z.; Eudes, P.; de la Mota, V.; Sébille, F.; Royer, G.

    A systematics of over 300 complete and incomplete fusion cross section data points covering energies beyond the barrier for fusion is presented. Owing to a usual reduction of the fusion cross sections by the total reaction cross sections and an original scaling of energy, a fusion excitation function common to all the data points is established. A universal description of the fusion exci- tation function relying on basic nuclear concepts is proposed and its dependence on the reaction cross section used for the cross section normalization is discussed. The pioneering empirical model proposed by Bass in 1974 to describe the complete fusion cross sections is rather successful for the incomplete fusion too and provides cross section predictions in satisfactory agreement with the observed universality of the fusion excitation function. The sophisticated microscopic transport DYWAN model not only reproduces the data but also predicts that fusion reaction mechanism disappears due to weakened nuclear stopping power around the Fermi energy.

  20. Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scobel, W.; Dohrmann, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Hinterberger, F.; Scobel, W.; Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Cloth, P.; Danie, R.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Flammer, J.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hebbel, K.; Hinterberger, F.; Hüskes, T.; Jahn, R.; Koch, I.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Steinbeck, S.; Sterzenbach, G.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Walker, M.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration at COSY; EDDA Collaboration

    1998-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic cross sections have been measured in narrow momentum steps Δp = 28 MeV/c in the kinetic energy range from 0.5 to 2.5 GeV and the angular range 35° ≤ Θcm ≤ 90° with a detector providing ΔΘcm ≈ 1.4° resolution and 82% solid angle coverage. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the Cooler Synchrotron COSY with an internal CH 2 fiber target; background corrections were derived from measurements with a carbon fiber target and from Monte Carlo simulations of inelastic pp contributions. Particular care was taken to monitor the luminosity as a function of beam energy. The results provide excitation functions and angular distributions of unprecedented precision and internal consistency. The measured cross sections are compared to recent phase shift analyses, and their impact on the present solution SM97 [1] is discussed.

  1. Contributions to the study of optimal biphasic pulse shapes for functional electric stimulation: an analytical approach using the excitation functional.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Antola, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    An analytical approach to threshold problems in functional electric stimulation and pacing is proposed, framed in the concept of excitation functional. This functional can be applied to nerve, muscle and myocardium stimulation by external electrodes. An optimal shape for a biphasic pulse is found, using the criteria of minimum energy dissipated in biological tissues and total charge compensation between the excitatory cathodic and the compensatory anodic phases. The method can be further developed and applied to other threshold problems in functional electric stimulation and pacing.

  2. Optimal pulse shapes for magnetic stimulation of fibers: An analytical approach using the excitation functional.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Bagnasco, Diego; Armentano-Feijoo, R; Suarez-Antola, R

    2010-01-01

    An analytical approach to threshold problems in functional magnetic stimulation of nerve and skeletal muscle fibers was recently proposed, framed in the concept of excitation functional. Three generations of available equipments for magnetic stimulation are briefly considered, stressing the corresponding pulse shape in the stimulation coils. Using the criterion of minimum energy dissipated in biological tissues, an optimal shape for a current pulse in the coil that produces a just threshold depolarization in a nerve or skeletal muscle fiber is found. The method can be further developed and applied to other threshold problems in functional electric stimulation.

  3. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha induced reactions on natCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Zaman, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The excitation functions of 66,67,68Ga, 62,63,65Zn, 61,64Cu, and 58,60Co radionuclides in the natCu(α, x) reaction were measured in the energy range from 15 to 42 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation method at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the literature data as well as the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 and TENDL-2014 libraries based on the TALYS-1.6 code. The integral yields for thick targets of the produced radionuclides were also determined from the measured excitation functions and the stopping power of natural copper.

  4. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  5. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  6. Measurement of the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg Excitation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Dragojevic, I.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Eichler, R.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.

    2010-03-19

    The excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from 259Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, 2n)258Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved 258Sg half-life of ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  7. On the calculation of Δ for electronic excitations in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myneni, Hemanadhan; Casida, Mark E.

    2017-04-01

    Excited states are often treated within the context of time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT), making it important to be able to assign the excited spin-state symmetry. While there is universal agreement on how Δ , the difference between for ground and excited states, should be calculated in a wave-function-like formalism such as the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA), confusion persists as to how to determine the spin-state symmetry of excited states in TD-DFT. We try to clarify the origins of this confusion by examining various possibilities for the parameters (σ1 ,σ2) in the formula

  8. Two-photon excitation of porphyrin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Chaix, Arnaud; Bouffard, Elise; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Marcotte, Nathalie; Mongin, Olivier; El Cheikh, Khaled; Hugues, Vincent; Auffan, Mélanie; Frochot, Céline; Morère, Alain; Maillard, Philippe; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Sailor, Michael J; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Cunin, Frédérique

    2014-12-03

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) act as a sensitizer for the 2-photon excitation of a pendant porphyrin using NIR laser light, for imaging and photodynamic therapy. Mannose-functionalized pSiNPs can be vectorized to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism to provide a 3-fold enhancement of the 2-photon PDT effect.

  9. Gravimetric polar motion excitation functions from different series of gravimetric coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Jolanta; Książek, Elżbieta

    2014-05-01

    Since its lunch in February, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has been source of data of temporal changes in Earth's gravity field. These gravity fields can be used to determine the changing mass field of the Earth caused by redistribution of the geophysical fluids, and from that excitations of polar motion. The so-called Level 2 gravity field product are available, in the form of changes in the coefficients: Cnm Snm Since 2002 until the present time there are still attempts to better process these data. In this study we estimate gravimetric excitation of polar motion using a recent series of C21, S21 coefficient. In our calculations we use several series developed by nine centers. Firstly, we compare these gravimetric functions with each other. Then we examine the compatibility of these functions with hydrological signal in observed geodetic excitation function. We focus on seasonal and subseasonal time scales. The main purpose is to explore which from these several solutions are closed to observation.

  10. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function.

  11. Functional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases motor cortex excitability in survivors of stroke.

    PubMed

    Massie, Crystal L; Tracy, Brian L; Malcolm, Matthew P

    2013-02-01

    To determine if repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the motor cortex with simultaneous voluntary muscle activation, termed functional-rTMS, will promote greater neuronal excitability changes and neural plasticity than passive-rTMS in survivors of stroke. Eighteen stroke survivors were randomized into functional-rTMS (EMG-triggered rTMS) or passive-rTMS (rTMS only; control) conditions. Measures of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF), force steadiness (coefficient of variation, CV) at 10% of maximum voluntary contraction, and pinch task muscle activity were assessed before and after rTMS. Functional-rTMS required subjects to exceed a muscle activation threshold to trigger each rTMS train; the passive-rTMS group received rTMS while relaxed. Significant interactions (time × condition) were observed in abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SICI, APB ICF, CV of force, and APB muscle activity. Functional-rTMS decreased APB SICI (p < 0.05) and increased ICF (p < 0.05) after stimulation, whereas passive-rTMS decreased APB muscle activity (p < 0.01) and decreased CV of force (p < 0.05). No changes were observed in FDI measures (EMG, ICF, SICI). Functional-rTMS increased motor cortex excitability, i.e., less SICI and more ICF for the APB muscle. Passive stimulation significantly reduced APB muscle activity and improved steadiness. Functional-rTMS promoted greater excitability changes and selectively modulated agonist muscle activity. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    PubMed

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-20

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH3 synthesis from N2 and H2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N2, with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  13. Structural damage detection using auto correlation functions of vibration response under sinusoidal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger; Markert, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Structural damage detection using time domain vibration responses has attracted more and more researchers in recent years because of its simplicity in calculation and no requirement of a finite element model. This paper proposes a new approach to locate the damage using the auto correlation function of vibration response signals under sinusoidal excitation from different measurement points of the structure, based on which a vector named Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV) is formulated. A sensitivity analysis of the normalized AMV with respect to the local stiffness shows that under several specific frequency excitations, the normalized AMV has a sharp change around the local stiffness change location, which means that even when the damage is very small, the normalized AMV is a good indicator for the damage. In order to locate the damage, a damage index is defined as the relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage. Several example cases in stiffness reduction detection of a frame structure valid the results of the sensitivity analysis, demonstrate the efficiency of the normalized AMV in damage localization and the effect of the excitation frequency on its detectability.

  14. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  15. A closer look at the apparent correlation of structural and functional connectivity in excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, Arnaud; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; König, Peter; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) of neural systems is a central focus in brain network science. It is an open question, however, how strongly the SC-FC relationship depends on specific topological features of brain networks or the models used for describing excitable dynamics. Using a basic model of discrete excitable units that follow a susceptible - excited - refractory dynamic cycle (SER model), we here analyze how functional connectivity is shaped by the topological features of a neural network, in particular its modularity. We compared the results obtained by the SER model with corresponding simulations by another well established dynamic mechanism, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, in order to explore general features of the SC-FC relationship. We showed that apparent discrepancies between the results produced by the two models can be resolved by adjusting the time window of integration of co-activations from which the FC is derived, providing a clearer distinction between co-activations and sequential activations. Thus, network modularity appears as an important factor shaping the FC-SC relationship across different dynamic models.

  16. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra and carbonyl wagging potential energy functions of several cyclic ketones in their S 1(n, π*) electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chiang, W. Y.; Sagear, P.; Laane, J.

    1992-08-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of the n→π* transitions of cyclopentanone, 3-cyclopenten-1-one, and cyclobutanone have been analyzed to determine the vibrational energy spacings in the S 1(n, π*) electronic excited states for the out-of-plane carbonyl wagging motions. A double-minimum potential energy function was determined for each and the barriers were found to be 680, 926, and 1940 cm -1, respectively. The carbonyl wagging angles were determined to be 22°, 26°, and 41°, respectively.

  17. Calibration of excitation function measurement based on corona cage test results.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Wen, Xishan; Li, Wei; Xiao, Guozhou

    2016-11-01

    Corona cage approaches are crucial for research on the corona characteristics of conductors. Calibration is an indispensable task for determining excitation functions, which are used to predict corona performance of long transmission lines through extrapolation from measurements of short lines in corona cages. In this paper, the amplification factor G is calculated through a frequently adopted method, propagation analysis of high-frequency corona current along a short line. Another convenient calibration method, based on distributed parameter equivalent circuits, is established. The results for G obtained through propagation analysis and equivalent circuits are compared. To verify the rationality of calculation parameters in propagation analysis and equivalent circuits, a calibration experiment based on the excitation caused by a simulated monopulse current was performed. The results of the proposed calibration method and the calibration experiment are in good agreement.

  18. Fusion excitation function measurement for 6Li+64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastav, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion excitation function has been measured for the reaction of weakly bound 6Li projectile on medium mass 64Ni target at energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. Online characteristic γ-ray detection method has been used to identify and determine the cross sections of the residues. No suppression of total fusion cross section (σTF) is observed at above barrier energies. But enhancement of measured cross section with respect to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1-DBPM) calculation is observed at below barrier energies. The enhancement can not be explained by coupled channels calculation with dominant projectile and target excitations as well as one-neutron stripping reaction.

  19. Measurement of fusion excitation function for 7Li+64Ni near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Total fusion (TF) excitation function has been measured for the system 7Li + 64Ni at the energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections have been estimated through the online detection of characteristic γ-rays of the ERs. The summed ER cross sections yielding the experimental TF cross section have been compared with the theoretical one dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) prediction. The measured and the model cross sections are very close to each other at above barrier energies. However, an enhancement of the experimental TF cross section with respect to the 1DBPM prediction is observed at below barrier energies. Coupled channels (CC) calculation with inelastic excitations alone could not explain the enhancement. The origin of the enhancement is identified as due to the enhanced population of the αxn channels.

  20. Excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-04-15

    The ground state and some low-lying excited states arising from the 1s2 2s2p2 configuration of the boron isoelectronic series are studied starting from explicitly correlated multideterminant wave functions. One- and two-body densities in position space have been calculated and different expectation values such as , , , , , and , where r, r12, and R stand for the electron-nucleus, interelectronic, and two electron center of mass coordinates, respectively, have been obtained. The energetic ordering of the excited states and the fulfillment of the Hund's rules is analyzed systematically along the isoelectronic series in terms of the electron-electron and electron-nucleus potential energies. The effects of electronic correlations have been systematically studied by comparing the correlated results with the corresponding noncorrelated ones. All the calculations have been done by using the variational Monte Carlo method.

  1. Charge-Transfer Excited States in Aqueous DNA: Insights from Many-Body Green's Function Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (˜1 eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  2. Excitation energy-transfer in functionalized nanoparticles: Going beyond the Förster approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, G.; Corni, S.; Delgado, A.; Bertoni, A.; Goldoni, G.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a novel approach to treat excitation energy transfer in hybrid nanosystems composed by an organic molecule attached to a semiconductor nanoparticle. Our approach extends the customary Förster theory by considering interaction between transition multipole moments of the nanoparticle at all orders and a point-like transition dipole moment representing the molecule. Optical excitations of the nanoparticle are described through an envelope-function configuration interaction method for a single electron-hole pair. We applied the method to the prototypical case of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dot which shows a complete suppression of the energy transfer for specific transitions which could not be captured by Förster theory.

  3. Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Onigata, Chieko; Tani, Makiko; Uragami, Sayuri; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-01-01

    the median nerve at the wrist in subjects during two motor imagery conditions: holding and not holding the sensor of a pinch meter between the thumb and index finger. Our aim was to determine whether mental simulation without the muscle contraction associated with motion can increase the excitability of spinal neural function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). F-waves of the left thenar muscles were examined in 10 patients with PD under resting, holding and motor imagery conditions. For the holding condition, the subjects held the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger. For the motor imagery conditions, the subjects were asked to imagine a 50% maximal voluntary isometric contraction holding and not holding the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger (motor imagery "with"/"without sensor"). Persistence during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with persistence during resting (n=10, z=2.2509, p=0.0244, Wilcoxon test). The F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with that during resting (n=10, z=2.1915, p=0.0284, Wilcoxon test). Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease Motor imagery under the "with the sensor" condition increased excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles. Because excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles during motor imagery "with the sensor" was significantly higher than that during resting, we suggest that movement preparation for a motor imagery task is important in patients with PD.

  4. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Kullie, Ossama E-mail: ossama.kullie@unistra.fr

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn{sub 2} and Cd{sub 2} dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s{sup 2} + 6s6p), (6s{sup 2} + 6s7s), and (6s{sup 2} + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg{sub 2}. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg{sub 2} including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd{sub 2}, and Zn{sub 2}, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg{sub 2}.

  5. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  6. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical analysis of the excitation function for the 130Te(p,n)130I reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musthafa, M. M.; Singh, B. P.; Sankaracharyulu, M. G. V.; Bhardwaj, H. D.; Prasad, R.

    1995-12-01

    We report excitation function for the reaction 130Te(p,n)130I in the energy range ~=4-18 MeV. The measurements were done employing stacked foil activation technique and enriched isotope. To the best of our knowledge this excitation function has been reported for the first time. The theoretical analysis of the excitation function has been done employing both the semiclassical as well as quantum mechanical descriptions of the preequilibrium emission. In general, theoretical calculations agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Beyond Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Only Single Excitations: Methods for Computational Studies of Excited States in Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Zhang, Xing; Morrison, Adrian F; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-17

    Single-excitation methods, namely, configuration interaction singles and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), along with semiempirical versions thereof, represent the most computationally affordable electronic structure methods for describing electronically excited states, scaling as [Formula: see text] absent further approximations. This relatively low cost, combined with a treatment of electron correlation, has made TDDFT the most widely used excited-state quantum chemistry method over the past 20+ years. Nevertheless, certain inherent problems (beyond just the accuracy of this or that exchange-correlation functional) limit the utility of traditional TDDFT. For one, it affords potential energy surfaces whose topology is incorrect in the vicinity of any conical intersection (CI) that involves the ground state. Since CIs are the conduits for transitions between electronic states, the TDDFT description of photochemistry (internal conversion and intersystem crossing) is therefore suspect. Second, the [Formula: see text] cost can become prohibitive in large systems, especially those that involve multiple electronically coupled chromophores, for example, the antennae structures of light-harvesting complexes or the conjugated polymers used in organic photovoltaics. In such cases, the smallest realistic mimics might already be quite large from the standpoint of ab initio quantum chemistry. This Account describes several new computational methods that address these problems. Topology around a CI can be rigorously corrected using a "spin-flip" version of TDDFT, which involves an α → β spin-flipping transition in addition to occupied → virtual excitation of one electron. Within this formalism, singlet states are generated via excitation from a high-spin triplet reference state, doublets from a quartet, etc. This provides a more balanced treatment of electron correlation between ground and excited states. Spin contamination is problematic away from the

  8. Charge asymmetry in rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} determined using explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnosov, Nikita; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-11-28

    Very accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum-mechanical calculations are performed to determine the average values of the interparticle distances and the proton-deuteron density function for the rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} ion. The states corresponding to excitations to all bound vibrational states (v = 0, …, 22) and simultaneously excited to the first excited rotational state (N = 1) are considered. To describe each state up to 8000 explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions are used. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians are variationally optimized using a procedure that employs the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results show an increasing asymmetry in the electron distribution with the vibrational excitation as the electron density shifts towards deuteron and away from the proton.

  9. Excitation Functions and Yields for RE-186G Production by Proton Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, E.; Bonardi, M. L.; Groppi, F.; Zona, C.; Canella, L.; Manenti, S.; Marchetti, M.; Abbas, K.; Holzwarth, U.; Simonelli, F.

    2008-06-01

    Excitation functions and yields for the 181-186Re radionuclides were measured by the activation method on natural tungsten foils for the proton energies up to 17 MeV. A new data sets have been given for the investigated radionuclides. These results are compared both with the experimental literature values and the ones calculated by EMPIRE II code (version 2.19). In particular, the attention is focused on Re-186g due to its remarkable applications in Nuclear Medicine for metabolic radiotherapy of tumours.

  10. Excitation Function for the 74Se(18O,p3n) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Jacklyn; Dragojevic, Irena; Dvorak, Jan; Ellison, Paul; Gregorich, Kenneth; Stavsetra, Liv; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-02-02

    The 74Se(18O,p3n)88gNb excitation function was measured and a maximum cross section of 495+-5 mb was observed at and 18O energy of 74.0 MeV. Experimental cross sections were compared to theoretical calculations using the computer code ALICE-91 and the values were found to be in good agreement. The half life of 88gNb was determined to be around 14.56+-0.11 min.

  11. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  12. A search for parameters of universal sub-barrier fusion excitation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Wolski, R.

    2016-11-01

    Many fusion experimental data have been analyzed in terms of a simple universal function which could be used for predictions of fusion cross section below the barrier for arbitrary systems. Sub-barrier fusions based on the concept of Q -fusion value dependence were studied. It is attempted to parameterize the energy-reduced fusion excitation functions around the Coulomb barriers by an analytical phenomenological function. It was found that the speed of driving nuclei towards fusion is faster with the increase of mass asymmetry of colliding systems and those systems with a large difference of the ratio of neutrons to protons. However, a general trend with respect to total mass has not been observed. An exposition of more qualitative conclusions is hindered by apparent inconsistencies of measured fusion cross sections.

  13. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  14. Neuropeptides Function in a Homeostatic Manner to Modulate Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance. PMID:23658528

  15. Isomeric yield ratios and excitation functions in α-induced reactions on 107,109Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, R.; Saha, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Uhl, M.

    1992-07-01

    Isomeric yield ratios for the reactions 107Ag(α,3n)108In, 107Ag(α,α3n)104Ag, 109Ag(α,2n)111In, and 109Ag(α,3n)110In are determined in the energy range of 20-63 MeV α particles. Excitation functions for the above reactions as well as for the 107Ag(α,2n)109In, 107Ag(α,α2n)105Ag, 109Ag(α,4n)109In, 109Ag(α,5n)108In, and 109Ag(α,α4n)105Ag reactions are also presented. Experimental excitation functions are compared with statistical model calculations taking into account precompound particle emission. Isomeric yield ratios are found to depend strongly on the root mean square orbital angular momentum in the entrance channel. A semiempirical method for the prediction of isomeric yield ratios failed to reproduce experimental data even for compoundlike reactions. Isomeric yield ratios were also calculated in the frame of a statistical model under consideration of angular momentum effects in the preequilibrium and the equilibrium stage. Overall agreement between the theory and the experiment for isomeric yield ratios was found to be satisfactory especially at low bombarding energy when compound nucleus reaction channel is dominant. The discrepancy observed at higher bombarding energies needs to be theoretically investigated in greater detail.

  16. Excitation functions of the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne system

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, S.P.; Zurmuehle, R.; Murgatroyd, J.T.; Wimer, N.G.; Miao, Y.; Pohl, K.R.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Freer, M.; Glagola, B.

    1995-04-01

    A differentially pumped windowless {sup 20}Ne gas target and a {sup 20}Ne beam produced with the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory were used to measure angle-averaged excitation functions for binary decay of {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne into low-lying states of {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg+{sup 16}O, in the region of excitation energy in {sup 40}Ca from 51.4 to 58.2 MeV ({sup 20}Ne beam energies from 61.8 to 75.4 MeV). The {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne mass partition displays little correlated structure and there exists no evidence of intermediate width resonances in these channels with branching ratios comparable to those seen in the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg system. Angular distributions for the elastic channel are consistent with those obtained using optical-model calculations. The exictation functions for the low-lying channels in {sup 24}Mg+{sup 16}O do contain some structures, with widths varying from 400 to 800 keV in the c.m. system.

  17. Evaluation of thallium-201 production in INER's compact cyclotron based on excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, R. J.; Jiang, S. H.; Duh, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    The production of Thallium-201 via the 203Tl(p,3n) 201Pb→ 201Tl process in the compact cyclotron TR30/15 of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) was evaluated based on excitation functions. This study involves a selection of a series of parameters including proton energy, target thickness, and irradiation time that will maximize the yield of the product and minimize the radioactive impurities. The excitation functions of the 203Tl(p, xn)Pb reactions have been calculated by using the ALICE-91 and FLUKA codes, respectively. Their results were compared with that recommended in the IAEA-TECDOC-1211 report. The discrepancies among them were identified and the resulting effects on the integral yields were discussed. Based on the recommended nuclear data, a user-friendly program has been developed to estimate the activities of the product and impurities during the production process of 201Tl in INER's compact cyclotron (INERCC). This helps in understanding the effects of various parameters selected in the production process. The results reveal that the current status of the production process of 201Tl in INERCC appears to be quite optimal and the production yield is close to its theoretical prediction.

  18. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  19. The EXCITE Trial: analysis of "noncompleted" Wolf Motor Function Test items.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven L; Thompson, Paul A; Estes, Emily; Lonergan, Timothy; Merchant, Rozina; Richardson, Natasha

    2012-02-01

    This is the first study to examine Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) tasks among EXCITE Trial participants that could not be completed at baseline or 2 weeks later. Data were collected from participants who received constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) immediately at the time of randomization (CIMT-I, n = 106) and from those for whom there was a delay of 1 year in receiving this intervention (CIMT-D, n = 116). Data were collected at baseline and at a 2-week time point, during which the CIMT-I group received the CIMT intervention and the CIMT-D group did not. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were used to examine repeated binary data and count values. Group and visit interactions were assessed, adjusting for functional level, affected side, dominant side, age, and gender covariates. In CIMT-I participants, there was an increase in the proportion of completed tasks at posttest compared with CIMT-D participants, particularly with respect to those tasks requiring dexterity with small objects and total incompletes (P < .0033). Compared with baseline, 120 tasks governing distal limb use for CIMT-I and 58 tasks dispersed across the WMFT for CIMT-D could be completed after 2 weeks. Common movement components that may have contributed to incomplete tasks include shoulder stabilization and flexion, elbow flexion and extension, wrist pronation, supination and ulnar deviation, and pincer grip. CIMT training should emphasize therapy for those specific movement components in patients who meet the EXCITE criteria for baseline motor control.

  20. SLEEPLESS is a bi-functional regulator of excitability and cholinergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Robinson, James E.; Joiner, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Although sleep is conserved throughout evolution, the molecular basis of its control is still largely a mystery. We previously showed that the quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a membrane-tethered protein that is required for normal sleep in Drosophila. SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein functions, at least in part, by upregulating the levels and open probability of Shaker (Sh) potassium channels to suppress neuronal excitability and enable sleep. Consistent with this proposed mechanism, loss-of-function mutations in Sh phenocopy qvr/sss null mutants. However, sleep is more genetically modifiable in Sh than in qvr/sss mutants, suggesting that sss may regulate additional molecules to influence sleep. Results Here we show that SSS also antagonizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to reduce synaptic transmission and promote sleep. Mimicking this antagonism with the nAChR inhibitor mecamylamine or by RNAi knockdown of specific nAChR subunits is sufficient to restore sleep to qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS occurs post-transcriptionally since the levels of nAChR mRNAs are unchanged in qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS may in fact be direct, since SSS forms a stable complex with and antagonizes fly nAChR function in transfected cells. Intriguingly, lynx1, a mammalian homolog of SSS, can partially restore normal sleep to qvr/sss mutants, and lynx1 can form stable complexes with Shaker-type channels and nAChRs. Conclusions Together, our data point to an evolutionarily conserved, bi-functional role for SSS and its homologs in controlling excitability and synaptic transmission in fundamental processes of the nervous system such as sleep. PMID:24613312

  1. Chirp excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the design of broadband chirp excitation pulses. We first develop a three stage model for understanding chirp excitation in NMR. We then show how a chirp π pulse can be used to refocus the phase of the chirp excitation pulse. The resulting magnetization still has some phase dispersion in it. We show how a combination of two chirp π pulses instead of one can be used to eliminate this dispersion, leaving behind a small residual phase dispersion. The excitation pulse sequence presented here allows exciting arbitrary large bandwidths without increasing the peak rf-amplitude. Experimental excitation profiles for the residual HDO signal in a sample of 99.5 % D2O are displayed as a function of resonance offset. Although methods presented in this paper have appeared elsewhere, we present complete analytical treatment that elucidates the working of these methods.

  2. Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Onigata, Chieko; Tani, Makiko; Uragami, Sayuri; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-01-01

    Summary We analyzed thenar muscle F-waves after stimulating the median nerve at the wrist in subjects during two motor imagery conditions: holding and not holding the sensor of a pinch meter between the thumb and index finger. Our aim was to determine whether mental simulation without the muscle contraction associated with motion can increase the excitability of spinal neural function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). F-waves of the left thenar muscles were examined in 10 patients with PD under resting, holding and motor imagery conditions. For the holding condition, the subjects held the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger. For the motor imagery conditions, the subjects were asked to imagine a 50% maximal voluntary isometric contraction holding and not holding the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger (motor imagery “with”/“without sensor”). Persistence during motor imagery under the “with sensor” condition increased significantly compared with persistence during resting (n=10, z=2.2509, p=0.0244, Wilcoxon test). The F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery under the “with sensor” condition increased significantly compared with that during resting (n=10, z=2.1915, p=0.0284, Wilcoxon test). Motor imagery under the “with the sensor” condition increased excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles. Because excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles during motor imagery “with the sensor” was significantly higher than that during resting, we suggest that movement preparation for a motor imagery task is important in patients with PD. PMID:25764256

  3. Calculation of electronic excitations using wave-function in wave-function frozen-density embedding.

    PubMed

    Höfener, Sebastian; Visscher, Lucas

    2012-11-28

    Recently, a general framework suitable for general frozen-density embedding (FDE) methods was published [S. Höfener, A. S. P. Gomes, and L. Visscher, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044104 (2012)]. In the present article, we report the fragmentation of a supermolecule while treating all subsystems with coupled-cluster theory and the interaction of the subsystems with density-functional theory. This variant is denoted wave-function theory in wave-function theory FDE, or coupled-cluster theory in coupled-cluster theory FDE. Main target of this approach is not the embedding of a single molecule in large solvation shells, but rather the possibility to divide a complex system consisting of several molecules when all subsystems are to be treated with, e.g., coupled-cluster methods to provide a balanced and unbiased description. We present numerical results for hydrogen-bonded complexes which exhibit rather strong interactions. Cases with weakly interacting subsystems are expected to exhibit even higher accuracy. This facilitates the study of properties of larger complexes such as DNA base pairs with coupled-cluster methods.

  4. Calculation of electronic excitations using wave-function in wave-function frozen-density embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfener, Sebastian; Visscher, Lucas

    2012-11-01

    Recently, a general framework suitable for general frozen-density embedding (FDE) methods was published [S. Höfener, A. S. P. Gomes, and L. Visscher, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044104 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3675845. In the present article, we report the fragmentation of a supermolecule while treating all subsystems with coupled-cluster theory and the interaction of the subsystems with density-functional theory. This variant is denoted wave-function theory in wave-function theory FDE, or coupled-cluster theory in coupled-cluster theory FDE. Main target of this approach is not the embedding of a single molecule in large solvation shells, but rather the possibility to divide a complex system consisting of several molecules when all subsystems are to be treated with, e.g., coupled-cluster methods to provide a balanced and unbiased description. We present numerical results for hydrogen-bonded complexes which exhibit rather strong interactions. Cases with weakly interacting subsystems are expected to exhibit even higher accuracy. This facilitates the study of properties of larger complexes such as DNA base pairs with coupled-cluster methods.

  5. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Oña, Ofelia B; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-07

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator Sˆ(2), avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and 〈Sˆ(2)〉 expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  6. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  7. Proton and deuteron induced reactions on natGa: Experimental and calculated excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam-Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-09-01

    Cross-sections for reactions on natGa, induced by protons (up to 65 MeV) and deuterons (up to 50 MeV), producing γ-emitting radionuclides with half-lives longer than 1 h were measured in a stacked-foil irradiation using thin Ga-Ni alloy (70-30%) targets electroplated on Cu or Au backings. Excitation functions for generation of 68,69Ge, 66,67,68,72Ga and 65,69mZn on natGa are discussed, relative to the monitor reactions natAl(d,x)24,22Na, natAl(p,x)24,22Na, natCu(p,x)62Zn and natNi(p,x)57Ni. The results are compared to our earlier measurements, the scarce literature values and to the results of the code TALYS 1.6 (online database TENDL-2014).

  8. The use of coherence functions to determine dynamic excitation sources on launch vehicle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.; Halvorson, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the relative contribution of simultaneous acoustic and mechanical inputs to the response of structures under combined dynamic loads was studied. An analytical technique developed by Bendat for calculating ordinary, partial, and multiple coherence functions, using an iterative nonmatrix approach was applied to data obtained from laboratory tests on a complex structural assembly. Testing was performed in an acoustically 'live' room. Up to three random inputs, having similar spectral content and varying degrees of mutual coherence, and a single output were used. Stationary and nonstationary inputs were used. It was concluded that the technique provided an effective method of identifying sources of dynamic excitation and evaluating their relative contributions to the measured output at structural resonances, for stationary random inputs. An attempt to apply the technique to nonstationary inputs did not yield consistent results.

  9. Activity of psoralen-functionalized nanoscintillators against cancer cells upon X-ray excitation.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Jonathan P; Gregas, Molly K; Lauly, Benoit; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-06-28

    We report development of a nanoparticle-based, X-ray-activated anticancer "nanodrug" composed of yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) nanoscintillators, a fragment of the HIV-1 TAT peptide, and psoralen. In this formulation, X-ray radiation is absorbed by the Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators, which then emit UVA light. Absorption of UVA photons by nanoparticle-tethered psoralen has the potential to cross-link adenine and thymine residues in DNA. UVA-induced cross-linking by free psoralen upon activation with UVA light has previously been shown to cause apoptosis in vitro and an immunogenic response in vivo. Studies using the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line demonstrate that X-ray excitation of these psoralen-functionalized Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators yields concentration-dependent reductions in cell number when compared to control cultures containing psoralen-free Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators.

  10. Development of an optical imaging platform for functional imaging of small animals using wide-field excitation

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Intes, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The design and characterization of a time-resolved functional imager using a wide-field excitation scheme for small animal imaging is described. The optimal operation parameters are established based on phantom studies. The performance of the platform for functional imaging and the simultaneous 3D reconstruction of absorption and scattering coefficients is investigated in vitro. PMID:21258454

  11. Simultaneous functional MRI acquisition of distributed brain regions with high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To perform simultaneous functional MRI of multiple, distributed brain regions at high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency (2DRF) excitation. A tailored 2DRF excitation is used to excite several, small regions-of-interest distributed in the brain. They are acquired in a single projection image with an appropriately chosen orientation such that the different regions-of-interest can be discriminated by their position in the projection plane. Thus, they are excited and acquired simultaneously with a temporal resolution comparable to that of a single-slice measurement. The feasibility of this approach for functional neuroimaging (in-plane resolution 2 × 2 mm(2) ) at high temporal resolution (80 ms) is demonstrated in healthy volunteers for regions-of-interest in the visual and motor system using checkerboard and finger tapping block-design paradigms. Task-related brain activation could be observed in both the visual and the motor system simultaneously with a high temporal resolution. For an onset shift of 240 ms for half of the checkerboard, a delay of the hemodynamic response in the corresponding hemisphere of the visual cortex could be detected. Limiting the excited magnetization to the desired target regions with a 2DRF excitation reduces the imaging sampling requirements which can improve the temporal resolution significantly. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Calculation of atomic excitation energies by time-dependent density functional theory within a modified linear response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunping; Sugino, Osamu; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-11

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become a standard tool for investigation of electronic excited states. However, for certain types of electronic excitations, TDDFT is known to give systematically inaccurate results, which has been attributed to the insufficiency of conventional exchange-correlation functionals, such as the local density approximation (LDA). To improve TDDFT performance within LDA, a modified linear response (MLR) scheme was recently proposed, in which the responses from not only the ground state, but also the intermediate excited states are taken into account. This scheme was shown to greatly improve TDDFT performance on the prediction of Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies of molecules. Yet, for a validation of this TDDFT-MLR scheme for excitation energies, there remain issues to be resolved regarding Rydberg transitions of single atoms before going to larger systems. In the present work, we show an adapted algorithm to construct the intermediate excited states for rare-gas atoms. With the technique, Rydberg transition energies can be well decoded from LDA, as will also be shown in the application of the TDDFT-MLR scheme to other types of atoms.

  13. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  14. Decoherence in Optically Excited Semiconductors: a perspective from non-equilibrium Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Kuljit Singh

    Decoherence is central to our understanding of the transition from the quantum to the classical world. It is also a way of probing the dynamics of interacting many-body systems. Photoexcited semiconductors are such systems in which the transient dynamics can be studied in considerable detail experimentally. Recent advances in spectroscopy of semiconductors provide powerful tools to explore many-body physics in new regimes. An appropriate theoretical framework is necessary to describe new physical effects now accessible for observation. We present a possible approach in this thesis, and discuss results of its application to an experimentally relevant scenario. The major portion of this thesis is devoted to a formalism for the multi-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy of semiconductors. A perturbative treatment of the electromagnetic field is used to derive a closed set of differential equations for the multi-particle correlation functions, which take into account the many-body effects up to third order in the field. A diagrammatic method is developed, in which we retain all features of the double-sided Feynman diagrams for bookkeeping the excitation scenario, and complement them by allowing for the description of interactions. We apply the formalism to study decoherence between the states of optically excited excitons embedded in an electron gas, and compare it with the decoherence between these states and the ground state. We derive a dynamical equation for the two-time correlation functions of excitons, and compare it with the corresponding equation for the interband polarization. It is argued, and verified by numerical calculation, that the decay of Raman coherence depends sensitively on how differently the superimposed exciton states interact with the electron gas, and that it can be much slower than the decay of interband polarization. We also present a new numerical approach based on the length gauge for modeling the time-dependent laser-semiconductor interaction

  15. Excited states of DNA base pairs using long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-09-10

    In this work, we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP, and LC-PBE0, with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement, a smaller attenuation parameter is needed, which leads to nonoptimum performance for ground-state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge-transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly, we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance is obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional, which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange. Thus, this work highlights the difficulties in obtained LC functionals, which provides a good description of both ground- and excited-state properties.

  16. Excited States of DNA Base Pairs Using Long-Range Corrected Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP, and LC-PBE0, with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement, a smaller attenuation parameter is needed, which leads to nonoptimum performance for ground-state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge-transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly, we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance is obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional, which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange. Thus, this work highlights the difficulties in obtained LC functionals, which provides a good description of both ground- and excited-state properties.

  17. Response functions and spectrum of collective excitations of fractional-quantum-Hall-effect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ana; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1993-03-01

    We calculate the electromagnetic response functions of a fractional-quantum-Hall-effect (FQHE) system within the framework of the fermion Chern-Simons theory for the FQHE, which we developed before. Our results are valid in a semiclassical expansion around the average-field approximation (AFA). We reexamine the AFA and the role of fluctuations. We argue that, order-by-order in the semiclassical expansion, the response functions obey the correct symmetry properties required by Galilean and gauge invariance and by the incompressibility of the fluid. In particular, we find that the low-momentum limit of the semiclassical approximation to the response functions is exact and that it saturates the f-sum rule. We obtain the spectrum of collective excitations of FQHE systems in the low-momentum limit. We find a rich spectrum of modes which includes a host of quasiparticle-quasihole bound states and, in general, two collective modes coalescing at the cyclotron frequency. The Hall conductance is obtained from the current-density correlation function, and it has the correct value already at the semiclassical level. We applied these results to the problem of the screening of external charges and fluxes by the electron fluid, and obtained asymptotic expressions of the charge and current-density profiles, for different types of interactions. Finally, we reconsider the anyon superfluid within our scheme and derive the spectrum of collective modes for interacting hard-core bosons and semions. In addition to the gapless phase mode, we find a set of gapped collective modes.

  18. Dimensionality of electronic excitations in organic semiconductors: A dielectric function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Nelson, Jenny; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Etchegoin, Pablo G.

    2007-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation on the effective dimensionality (associated with the degree of delocalization) of electronic excitations in thin organic films using the dielectric function as obtained from ellipsometry. To this end, we study first the best analytical representation of the optical dielectric function of these materials and compare different approaches found in the literature: (i) the harmonic oscillator approximation, (ii) the standard critical-point model (SCP), (iii) the model dielectric function (MDF), and (iv) the Forouhi-Bloomer model. We use these models to analyze variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry raw data for a thin poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) film deposited on quartz (taken as an archetypal sample). The superiority of the SCP model for PFO films and a wide range of other spin-coated conjugated polymers (and guest-molecules in polymers) is demonstrated. Moreover, we show how the SCP model can be used to gain physical information on the microscopic structure. As an example, we show that the delocalization of excitons decreases for nonconjugated polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and polyimide, while the conjugation length and exciton delocalization are, respectively, enhanced in cases where a planar conformation (e.g., β phase of PFO) or a high degree of crystallinity [e.g., poly(3-hexylthiophene)] is achieved. As an additional example, we employ the SCP excitonic model to investigate the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of crystalline and glassy PFO films. We propose that the SCP excitonic model should be adopted as the standard choice to model the optical properties of polymer thin films from ellipsometry data.

  19. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Aurore; Simis, Marcel; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Bertolucci, Federica; Huerta-Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Chisari, Carmelo; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation-TMS) and brain oscillations (electroencephalography-EEG). In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke) were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold-MT-of the affected and unaffected sides) and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres) and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  20. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Aurore; Simis, Marcel; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Bertolucci, Federica; Huerta-Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Chisari, Carmelo; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS) and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG). In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke) were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides) and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres) and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery. PMID:28539912

  1. Excited state geometry optimizations by analytical energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Mahito; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-04-14

    An analytical excitation energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) is presented. This is based on a previous analytical TDDFT gradient formalism, which avoids solving the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham equation for each nuclear degree of freedom. In LC-TDDFT, exchange interactions are evaluated by combining the short-range part of a DFT exchange functional with the long-range part of the Hartree-Fock exchange integral. This LC-TDDFT gradient was first examined by calculating the excited state geometries and adiabatic excitation energies of small typical molecules and a small protonated Schiff base. As a result, we found that long-range interactions play a significant role even in valence excited states of small systems. This analytical LC-TDDFT gradient was also applied to the investigations of small twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) systems. By comparing with calculated ab initio multireference perturbation theory and experimental results, we found that LC-TDDFT gave much more accurate absorption and fluorescence energies of these systems than those of conventional TDDFTs using pure and hybrid functionals. For optimized excited state geometries, LC-TDDFT provided fairly different twisting and wagging angles of these small TICT systems in comparison with conventional TDDFT results.

  2. An accurate density functional theory calculation for electronic excitation energies: the least-squares support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Sun, Shi-Ling; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hui; Li, Hong-Zhi; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-05-14

    Support vector machines (SVMs), as a novel type of learning machine, has been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce least-squares (LS) SVMs to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation with LS-SVM correction approach has been applied to evaluate the electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules. The newly introduced LS-SVM approach reduces the root-mean-square deviation of the calculated electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules from 0.32 to 0.11 eV for the B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculation. Thus, the LS-SVM correction on top of B3LYP/6-31G(d) is a better method to correct electronic excitation energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results which are impossible to obtain experimentally.

  3. Narrow structure in the excitation function of η photoproduction off the neutron.

    PubMed

    Werthmüller, D; Witthauer, L; Keshelashvili, I; Aguar-Bartolomé, P; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Glazier, D I; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Huber, G M; Jaegle, I; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Käser, A; Kashevarov, V L; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kruglov, S P; Krusche, B; Kulbardis, A; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Maghrbi, Y; Mancell, J; Manley, D M; Marinides, Z; Martinez, M; McGeorge, J C; McNicoll, E F; Metag, V; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ostrick, M; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Pheron, F; Polonski, A; Prakhov, S N; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Sober, D; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P

    2013-12-06

    The photoproduction of η mesons off nucleons bound in 2H and 3He has been measured in coincidence with recoil protons and recoil neutrons for incident photon energies from threshold up to 1.4 GeV. The experiments were performed at the Mainz MAMI accelerator, using the Glasgow tagged photon facility. Decay photons from the η→2γ and η→3π0 decays and the recoil nucleons were detected with an almost 4π electromagnetic calorimeter combining the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. The data from both targets are of excellent statistical quality and show a narrow structure in the excitation function of γn→nη. The results from the two measurements are consistent, taking into account the expected effects from nuclear Fermi motion. The best estimates for position and intrinsic width of the structure are W=(1670±5)  MeV and Γ=(30±15)  MeV. For the first time precise results for the angular dependence of this structure have been extracted.

  4. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  5. Optical properties and dynamics excitation relaxation in reduced graphene oxide functionalized with nanostructured porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenfouch, M.; Bajjou, O.; Baïtoul, M.; Mongwaketsi, N.; Maaza, M.; Wery Venturini, J.

    2015-04-01

    Few layers of reduced graphene oxide (FRGO) were functionalized with porphyrins self assembled nanostructure. These new hybrid nanocomposites were investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-visible, Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and photoluminescence. The structural and morphological results show strong interactions between these hybrids components. Moreover, steady state photoluminescence (PL) of both porphyrin nanorods (PN) and (PN)/FRGO composite show clearly the PL quenching confirming a charge transfer from porphyrin molecules to graphene sheets. In addition, the relaxation kinetics of the PN and (PN)/FRGO were studied by means of time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) and the excitation density in the sample was of 1017 cm3/pulse. The major change of the carrier dynamics in porphyrin nanorods after their interaction with FRGO was in the increase in the fast time constants, which found to be slower at 650 nm, τ1 = 196 ps and τ2 = 1171 ps. This has been explained by the change in their energy band gap due to the role of FRGO as doping related to the size of the nanometer-scale sp2 clusters, which leads to a slower interband carrier recombination.

  6. Functional imaging of living Paramecium by means of confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Fronte, Paola; Raimondo, Marco; Fato, Marco; DeLeo, Gianluca; Beltrame, Francesco; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giberto; Ramoino, Paola

    2002-05-01

    Confocal and Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy allow gathering three-dimensional and temporal information from biological systems exploiting fluorescence labeling and autofluorescence properties. In this work we study biological events linked to functionality in Paramecium primaurelia. The internalization of material in ciliated one-celled organisms (protozoa) occurs via different mechanisms, even if most of nutrients, particulate or not, is taken up by food vacuoles formed at the bottom of the oral cavity. The endocytosis of small-sized molecules occurs at the parasomal sacs, located next the ciliar basal bodies. Vital fluorescent dyes (BSA-FITC, WGA-FITC, dextran-Texas Red, cholesteryl-Bodipy) and autofluorescence were used to study formation, movement, and fusion of vesicles during endocytosis and phagocytosis of Paramecium primaurelia. By immobilizing living cells pulsed with food vacuole and endosome markers at successive times after chasing in unlabeled medium, the intracellular movement and fusion of food vacuoles and of endosomes were visualized. A temporal analysis of fluorescence images and the false-color technique were used. Starting from time series or 3D data sets composite images were generated by associating with each originally acquired image a different color corresponding to each sampling point in time and along the z-axis. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging attempts are also outlined.

  7. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  8. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  9. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  10. Excitation Functions and Production Rates of Radionuclides Produced in the Proton Bombardment of natPr and natLa

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, C.; Steyn, G.F.; Walt, T.N. van der; Nortier, F.M.; Szelecsenyi, F.; Kovacs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Excitation functions and production rates are presented for various radionuclides formed in the bombardment of natPr and natLa with protons. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions based on the geometry dependent hybrid model. Alternative production routes for 139Pr and 139Ce are investigated.

  11. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  12. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  13. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  14. Natural excitation orbitals from linear response theories: Time-dependent density functional theory, time-dependent Hartree-Fock, and time-dependent natural orbital functional theory.

    PubMed

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2017-01-28

    Straightforward interpretation of excitations is possible if they can be described as simple single orbital-to-orbital (or double, etc.) transitions. In linear response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT), the (ground state) Kohn-Sham orbitals prove to be such an orbital basis. In contrast, in a basis of natural orbitals (NOs) or Hartree-Fock orbitals, excitations often employ many orbitals and are accordingly hard to characterize. We demonstrate that it is possible in these cases to transform to natural excitation orbitals (NEOs) which resemble very closely the KS orbitals and afford the same simple description of excitations. The desired transformation has been obtained by diagonalization of a submatrix in the equations of linear response time-dependent 1-particle reduced density matrix functional theory (LR-TDDMFT) for the NO transformation, and that of a submatrix in the linear response time-dependent Hartree-Fock (LR-TDHF) equations for the transformation of HF orbitals. The corresponding submatrix is already diagonal in the KS basis in the LR-TDDFT equations. While the orbital shapes of the NEOs afford the characterization of the excitations as (mostly) simple orbital-to-orbital transitions, the orbital energies provide a fair estimate of excitation energies.

  15. Effects of cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation on motor cortex excitability and motor function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Leo, Antonino; Manuli, Alfredo; Sciarrone, Francesca; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-01-07

    The cerebellum regulates several motor functions through two main mechanisms, the cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI) and the motor surround inhibition (MSI). Although the exact cerebellar structures and functions involved in such processes are partially known, Purkinje cells (PC) and their surrounding interneuronal networks may play a pivotal role concerning CBI and MSI. Cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been proven to shape specific cerebellar components in a feasible, safe, effective, and non-invasive manner. The aim of our study was to characterize the cerebellar structures and functions subtending CBI and MSI using a tACS approach. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent a cerebellar tACS protocol at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, or a sham-tACS over the right cerebellar hemisphere. We measured the tACS aftereffects on motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, CBI induced by tACS (tiCBI) at different frequencies, MSI, and hand motor task performance. None of the participants had any side effect related to tACS. After 50-Hz tACS, we observed a clear tiCBI-50Hz weakening (about +30%, p < 0.001) paralleled by a MEP amplitude increase (about +30%, p = 0.001) and a reduction of the time required to complete some motor task (about -20%, p = 0.01), lasting up to 30 min. The 300-Hz tACS induced a selective, specific tiCBI-300Hz and tiCBI-50Hz modulation in surrounding muscles (about -15%, p = 0.01) and MSI potentiation (about +40%, p < 0.001). The 10-Hz tACS and the sham-tACS were ineffective (p > 0.6). Our preliminary data suggest that PC may represent the last mediator of tiCBI and that the surrounding interneuronal network may have an important role in updating MSI, tiCBI, and M1 excitability during tonic muscle contraction, by acting onto the PC. The knowledge of these neurophysiological issues offers new cues to design innovative, non-invasive neuromodulation protocols to shape cerebellar-cerebral functions.

  16. Testing an excited-state energy density functional and the associated potential with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanadhan, M.; Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K.

    2014-06-01

    The modified local spin density (MLSD) functional and the related local potential for excited states is tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The exchange functional for an excited state is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding exchange potential is given by an analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behaviour by employing the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) correction to it. ɛmax so obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the MLSD functional with self-interaction correction for the orbitals involved in the transition. It is shown that the two match quite accurately. The match becomes even better by tuning the LB correction with respect to a parameter in it.

  17. Excited state property of hardly photodissociable heme-CO adduct studied by time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takehiro; Pal, Biswajit; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-11-10

    While most of CO-bound hemes are easily photodissociated with a quantum yield of nearly unity, we occasionally encounter a CO-heme which appears hardly photodissociable under the ordinary measurement conditions of resonance Raman spectra using CW laser excitation and a spinning cell. This study aims to understand such hemes theoretically, that is, the excited-state properties of the five-coordinate heme-CO adduct (5cH) as well as the 6c heme-CO adduct (6cH) with a weak axial ligand. Using a hybrid density functional theory, we scrutinized the properties of the ground and excited spin states of the computational models of a 5cH and a water-ligated 6cH (6cH-H(2)O) and compared these properties with those of a photodissociable imidazole-ligated 6cH (6cH-Im). Jahn-Teller softening for the Fe-C-O bending potential in the a(1)-e excited state was suggested. The excited-state properties of 6cH-Im and 5cH were further studied with time-dependent DFT theory. The reaction products of 6cH-Im and 5cH were assumed to be quintet and triplet states, respectively. According to the time-dependent DFT calculations, the Q excited state of 6cH-Im, which is initially a pure pi-pi state, crosses the Fe-CO dissociative state (2A') without large elongation of the Fe-CO bond. In contrast, the Q state of the 5cH does not cross the Fe-CO dissociative state but results in the formation of the excited spin state with a bent Fe-C-O. Consequently, photoisomerization from linear to bent Fe-C-O in the 5cH is a likely mechanism for apparent nonphotodissociation.

  18. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-07

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex.

  19. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region.

  20. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: Formalism, implementation, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  1. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: formalism, implementation, and performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-14

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  2. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  3. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Cardiovascular Function by Influencing the Excitability of Subfornical Organ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M.; Ferguson, Alastair V.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure. PMID:25144759

  5. Evaporation residue excitation function and spin distribution for 31P + 170Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanto, G.; Madhavan, N.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mukul, Ish; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Roy, A.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D. A.; Chavan, P. B.; Sadhukhan, J.; Pal, S.; Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Varinderjit; Sinha, A. K.; Ramamurthy, V. S.

    2013-09-01

    Background: Synthesis of a doubly magic spherical nucleus beyond 82208Pb126 is a key question in contemporary nuclear physics. Such nuclei can exist solely because of shell stabilization. As the formation cross section of super heavy elements is prohibitively low, attempts have been made to understand stabilizing effects of closed proton (Z) and neutron (N) shells in the vicinity of 82208Pb126.Purpose: The present work attempts to elucidate the stabilizing effect of shell closure, in general, and the same of Z=82, in particular.Methods: The evaporation residue (ER) excitation function and ER-gated γ-multiplicity distribution have been measured for the reaction 31P + 170Er at a laboratory energy range of 134-172 MeV. The measurements have been carried out using the HYbrid Recoil mass Analyzer (HYRA) in gas-filled mode and a 4π spin spectrometer consisting of 29 NaI(Tl) detectors. Results of the present reaction have been compared with those of the reaction 30Si + 170Er. Statistical model calculation has been performed for both the systems.Results: The two reactions, induced by 30Si and 31P projectiles, resulted in compound nuclei (CN) 200Pb (Z=82) and 201Bi (Z=83), respectively. To reproduce experimental ER cross sections, the liquid drop fission barrier (Bf) had to be scaled in the statistical model calculation. The scaling factor (Kf) varies from 0.75 to 1.05 and 0.90 to 1.05 for 30Si and 31P induced reactions, respectively. No significant differences have been found between γ-multiplicity distribution and the distribution moments of the two systems.Conclusions: No clear signature has been observed in favor of extra stability of the ERs with closed proton shell (Z=82) as Kf values of the two systems match within errors. More exclusive measurements and comparison between more systems forming CN/ER around Z=82 are desirable.

  6. Deactivation pathways of the electronic excitation of ions of lanthanide complexes in polymers with functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.; Shablya, A. V.; Goĭkhman, M. Ya.; Yakimanskiĭ, A. V.; Podeshvo, I. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    Complexes Eu(TTA)3phen and Eu(MBTA)3phen, as well as complexes Tb(MBTA)3phen and Tb(TTA)3phen, which do not luminesce in solutions, are shown to luminesce in polymer films (TTA is thenoyltrifluoroacetone, MBTA is n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoroacetone, and phen is o-phenanthroline). Luminescence of complexes of Eu and Tb in films of a polymer, poly(methylene-bis-anthranilamide) 1,6-hexamethylenedicarboxylic acid (PAA-5), having a high concentration of functional anthranilate groups, is studied. From the behavior of the luminescence intensity (I lum), the luminescence decay time, and the luminescence spectra of complexes of these lanthanides in polymer films, the following regular features were revealed. (i) During the film preparation at 90°C, Ln complexes are attached to PAA-5 via anthranilate groups. (ii) Irradiation of these films in the range of the absorption band of ligands (TTA or MBTA) leads to deactivation of the electronic excitation of ions according to the diketone detachment mechanism and to further binding of complexes to polymers. In this case, I lum(Eu(III)) decreases because the introduction of anthranilate groups of the polymer into the first coordination sphere of Eu(III) complexes enhances the nonradiative deactivation of these ions, whereas I lum(Tb(III)) increases since the introduction of these groups suppresses the nonradiative deactivation of Tb complexes through triplet states of ligands (TTA and MBTA). (iii) Upon storage of films in the dark (20°C), complexes detach themselves from the polymer and return to their initial structure. In PAA-5 films into which Eu and Tb complexes were simultaneously introduced, the color of the emission from the irradiation spot changes from red to green.

  7. Altered neuronal excitability underlies impaired hippocampal function in an animal model of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Grüter, Thomas; Wiescholleck, Valentina; Dubovyk, Valentyna; Aliane, Verena; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis is accompanied by severe attentional deficits, and impairments in associational-memory processing and sensory information processing that are ascribed to dysfunctions in prefrontal and hippocampal function. Disruptions of glutamatergic signaling may underlie these alterations: Antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) results in similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral changes in rodents and/or humans as those that occur in psychosis, raising the question as to whether changes in glutamatergic transmission may be intrinsic to the pathophysiology of the disease. In an animal model of psychosis that comprises treatment with the irreversible NMDAR-antagonist, MK801, we explored the cellular mechanisms that may underlie hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis. MK801-treatment resulted in a profound loss of hippocampal LTP that was evident 4 weeks after treatment. Whereas neuronal expression of the immediate early gene, Arc, was enhanced in the hippocampus by spatial learning in controls, MK801-treated animals failed to show activity-dependent increases in Arc expression. By contrast, a significant increase in basal Arc expression in the absence of learning was evident compared to controls. Paired-pulse (PP) facilitation was increased at the 40 ms interval indicating that NMDAR and/or fast GABAergic-mediated neurotransmission was disrupted. In line with this, MK801-treatment resulted in a significant decrease in GABA(A), and increase in GABA(B)-receptor-expression in PFC, along with a significant increase of GABA(B)- and NMDAR-GluN2B expression in the dentate gyrus. NMDAR-GluN1 or GluN2A subunit expression was unchanged. These data suggest that in psychosis, deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory may be caused by a loss of hippocampal LTP that arises through enhanced hippocampal neuronal excitability, altered GluN2B and GABA receptor expression and an uncoupling of the hippocampus-prefrontal cortex circuitry. PMID:26042007

  8. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dixon, David A.

    2002-11-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectraof pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data, particularly for low-lying excited states. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitation energies, respectively, for low-lying singlet excited states. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra, particularly the excitation energies for low-lying excited states, of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons, which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of a practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic γ-diketones need to be reexamined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  9. Excited States of DNA Base Pairs Using Long-Range Corrected Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-09-10

    In this work we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC-functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP and LC-PBE0 with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement a smaller attenuation parameter was needed which leads to non-optimum performance for ground state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair, but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance was obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange.

  10. A simplified Tamm-Dancoff density functional approach for the electronic excitation spectra of very large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimme, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Two approximations in the Tamm-Dancoff density functional theory approach (TDA-DFT) to electronically excited states are proposed which allow routine computations for electronic ultraviolet (UV)- or circular dichroism (CD) spectra of molecules with 500-1000 atoms. Speed-ups compared to conventional time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) treatments of about two to three orders of magnitude in the excited state part at only minor loss of accuracy are obtained. The method termed sTDA ("s" for simplified) employs atom-centered Löwdin-monopole based two-electron repulsion integrals with the asymptotically correct 1/R behavior and perturbative single excitation configuration selection. It is formulated generally for any standard global hybrid density functional with given Fock-exchange mixing parameter ax. The method performs well for two standard benchmark sets of vertical singlet-singlet excitations for values of ax in the range 0.2-0.6. The mean absolute deviations from reference data are only 0.2-0.3 eV and similar to those from standard TD-DFT. In three cases (two dyes and one polypeptide), good mutual agreement between the electronic spectra (up to 10-11 eV excitation energy) from the sTDA method and those from TD(A)-DFT is obtained. The computed UV- and CD-spectra of a few typical systems (e.g., C60, two transition metal complexes, [7]helicene, polyalanine, a supramolecular aggregate with 483 atoms and about 7000 basis functions) compare well with corresponding experimental data. The method is proposed together with medium-sized double- or triple-zeta type atomic-orbital basis sets as a quantum chemical tool to investigate the spectra of huge molecular systems at a reliable DFT level.

  11. Description of ground and excited electronic states by ensemble density functional method with extended active space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Martínez, Todd J.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2017-08-01

    An extended variant of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, the REKS(4,4) method, designed to describe the ground electronic states of strongly multireference systems is modified to enable calculation of excited states within the time-independent variational formalism. The new method, the state-interaction state-averaged REKS(4,4), i.e., SI-SA-REKS(4,4), is capable of describing several excited states of a molecule involving double bond cleavage, polyradical character, or multiple chromophoric units. We demonstrate that the new method correctly describes the ground and the lowest singlet excited states of a molecule (ethylene) undergoing double bond cleavage. The applicability of the new method for excitonic states is illustrated with π stacked ethylene and tetracene dimers. We conclude that the new method can describe a wide range of multireference phenomena.

  12. Quantal Density Functional Theory(Q-DFT) of Degenerate Ground and Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Viraht; Pan, Xiaoyin

    2002-03-01

    We present here Q-DFT (V.Sahni et al, PRL 87), 113002 (2001), and references therein. of degenerate states with degeneracy g. We describe : (a) The transformation from a degenerate ground or excited pure state of the interacting system to an S (single Slater determinant) system of noninteracting Fermions with equivalent density, total energy, and ionization potential; (b) The construction of g S systems to reproduce a subspace ensemble density and energy. The density and energy are defined via the ensemble density matrix formed from the degenerate ground or excited pure states of the interacting system; (c) The construction of an S system with a g-fold degenerate highest occupied level, (which leads to g Slater determinants (C.A. Ullrich and W. Kohn, PRL 87), 093001(2001).), to reproduce the ground or excited state ensemble density and energy.

  13. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke A; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  14. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  15. Extension of the excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natSn up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.

    2017-01-01

    Using the stacked-foil activation technique, cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on natural Sn targets were determined up to 50 MeV. Excitation functions are reported for the product nuclides 116mSb, 117Sb, 118mSb, 120mSb 122m+gSb, 124m+gSb, 110Sn(cum), 113m+gSn(cum), 117mSn, 110mIn(cum), 110gIn, 111m+gIn(cum), 113mIn, 114mIn 115mIn. Comparison with earlier published data at lower energy is discussed. For all excitation functions a theoretical calculation using the TALYS 1.6 (on-line TENDL-2015 library) code is shown.

  16. Excitation functions for complete-fusion and transfer reactions in {sup 4}He interaction with {sup 197}Au nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-04-15

    Excitation functions are measured for the fusion reactions {sup 197}Au({sup 4}He, xn){sup 201-xn}Tl that are induced by alpha-particle interaction with gold nuclei in the energy range 14-36 MeV and in which x neutrons (0 {<=} x {<=} 3) are evaporated. The stack-activation technique was used to record and separate reaction products. Experimental data on the fusion reactions followed by evaporation of one to three neutrons agree with results of previous studies. For the radiative-capture reaction {sup 197}Au({sup 4}He,{gamma}){sup 201}Tl, the upper limit on the cross section proved to be much lower. The excitation functions for the reactions subjected to measurements are compared with the results of calculations based on the statistical model and with the results of an experiment performed previously in a {sup 6}He beam.

  17. Excitation Functions for Complete Fusion and Transfer Reactions in the Interaction of 4He Nuclei with 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the fusion reaction 197Au(αxn)201-xnTl with the evaporation of x neutrons (0⩽x⩽3) in the energy range 14-36 MeV. The induced-activation method was used for registration and identification of the reaction products. The experimental cross sections for the (1-3)-neutron evaporation residues are in good agreement with the results known from literature. For the radiation capture reaction 197Au(α,γ)201Tl, the upper limit was obtained essentially lower. The excitation functions for the measured reactions are compared with calculations in the frame of the statistical model, as well as with formerly measured similar data with a 6He beam.

  18. Excitation Functions for Complete Fusion and Transfer Reactions in the Interaction of 4He Nuclei with 197Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-05-22

    Excitation functions have been measured for the fusion reaction 197Au({alpha}xn)201-xnTl with the evaporation of x neutrons (0{<=}x{<=}3) in the energy range 14-36 MeV. The induced-activation method was used for registration and identification of the reaction products. The experimental cross sections for the (1-3)-neutron evaporation residues are in good agreement with the results known from literature. For the radiation capture reaction 197Au({alpha},{gamma})201Tl, the upper limit was obtained essentially lower. The excitation functions for the measured reactions are compared with calculations in the frame of the statistical model, as well as with formerly measured similar data with a 6He beam.

  19. Excitation functions for complete-fusion and transfer reactions in 4He interaction with 197Au nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-04-01

    Excitation functions are measured for the fusion reactions 197Au(4He, xn)201-xn Tl that are induced by alpha-particle interaction with gold nuclei in the energy range 14 36 MeV and in which x neutrons (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are evaporated. The stack-activation technique was used to record and separate reaction products. Experimental data on the fusion reactions followed by evaporation of one to three neutrons agree with results of previous studies. For the radiative-capture reaction 197Au(4He,γ)201Tl, the upper limit on the cross section proved to be much lower. The excitation functions for the reactions subjected to measurements are compared with the results of calculations based on the statistical model and with the results of an experiment performed previously in a 6He beam.

  20. Excitation Functions of Helion-Induced Nuclear Reactions for the Production of the Medical Radioisotope 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, Ye.; Qaim, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Excitation functions were measured by the stacked-foil technique for the reactions 100Ru(α,n)103Pd, 101Ru(α,2n)103Pd, 101Ru(3He,n)103Pd, and 102Ru(3He,2n)103Pd for incident energies up to 25 and 34 MeV for α-particles and 3He ions, respectively. The integral thick target yields of the product radionuclide 103Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the above-named four reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 KBq/μAh, respectively, at the maximum energy of the incident particle. The data are compared with the results of statistical model calculations and other charged particle induced reaction investigations.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations for the excitation spectra of III-V ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhenhua; Liang, Ching-Tarng; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2017-08-01

    We adopted the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the linear augmented Slater-type orbitals basis and the cluster averaging method to compute the excitation spectra of III-V ternary alloys with arbitrary concentration x . The TDDFT was carried out with the use of adiabatic meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA), which contains the 1 /q2 singularity in the dynamical exchange-correlation kernel [fXC,00(q ) ] as q →0 . We found that, by using wave functions obtained in local density approximation while using mGGA to compute self-energy correction to the band structures, we can get good overall agreement between theoretical results and experimental data for the excitation spectra. Thus, our paper provides some insight into the theoretical calculation of optical spectra of semiconductor alloys.

  2. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  3. Imaging of rotational wave-function in photodissociation of rovibrationally excited HCl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygoryeva, K.; Rakovský, J.; Votava, O.; Fárník, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a visualization of quantum mechanical phenomena with the velocity map imaging (VMI) technique, combining vibrationally mediated photodissociation (VMP) of a simple diatomic HCl with the VMI of its H-photofragments. Free HCl molecules were excited by a pump infrared (IR) laser pulse to particular rotational J levels of the v = 2 vibrational state, and subsequently a probe ultraviolet laser photodissociated the molecule at a fixed wavelength of 243.07 nm where also the H-fragments were ionized. The molecule was aligned by the IR excitation with respect to the IR laser polarization, and this alignment was reflected in the angular distribution of the H-photofragments. In particular, the highest degree of molecular alignment was achieved for the J =1 ←0 transition, which exclusively led to the population of a single rotational state with M = 0. The obtained images were analyzed for further details of the VMP dynamics, and different J states were studied as well. Additionally, we investigated the dynamic evolution of the excited states by changing the pump-probe laser pulse delay; the corresponding images reflected dephasing due to a coupling between the molecular angular momentum and nuclear spin. Our measurements confirmed previous observation using the time-of-flight technique by Sofikitis et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 144307 (2007)]. We observed a partial recovery of the originally excited state after 60 ns in agreement with the previous observation.

  4. Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, L.; Behera, B.R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Atutov, S.N.; Mai, B.; Stancari, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Mariotti, E.; Khanbekyan, A.; Veronesi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr isotopes produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion-evaporation reaction have been measured at E{sub lab}=75-130 MeV via characteristic {alpha} decays by means of an electrostatic deflector and a semiconductor detector. Data have been compared with calculations giving barrier-passing (capture) cross sections and probabilities of the compound nucleus decay into different channels according to the standard statistical model.

  5. Functional Effects of Schizophrenia-Linked Genetic Variants on Intrinsic Single-Neuron Excitability: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Halnes, Geir; Devor, Anna; Witoelar, Aree; Bettella, Francesco; Djurovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yunpeng; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a large number of genetic risk factors for schizophrenia (SCZ) featuring ion channels and calcium transporters. For some of these risk factors, independent prior investigations have examined the effects of genetic alterations on the cellular electrical excitability and calcium homeostasis. In the present proof-of-concept study, we harnessed these experimental results for modeling of computational properties on layer V cortical pyramidal cells and identified possible common alterations in behavior across SCZ-related genes. Methods We applied a biophysically detailed multicompartmental model to study the excitability of a layer V pyramidal cell. We reviewed the literature on functional genomics for variants of genes associated with SCZ and used changes in neuron model parameters to represent the effects of these variants. Results We present and apply a framework for examining the effects of subtle single nucleotide polymorphisms in ion channel and calcium transporter-encoding genes on neuron excitability. Our analysis indicates that most of the considered SCZ-related genetic variants affect the spiking behavior and intracellular calcium dynamics resulting from summation of inputs across the dendritic tree. Conclusions Our results suggest that alteration in the ability of a single neuron to integrate the inputs and scale its excitability may constitute a fundamental mechanistic contributor to mental disease, alongside the previously proposed deficits in synaptic communication and network behavior. PMID:26949748

  6. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C 60 fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1--T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (..phi..ISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1--S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ..phi..ISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (..tau..avg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (..tau..avg approx. 17 us and 54 us for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas ..tau..avg approx. 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited- state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  7. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  8. Double excitations and state-to-state transition dipoles in π-π∗ excited singlet states of linear polyenes: Time-dependent density-functional theory versus multiconfigurational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Ivan A.; Tafur, Sergio; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of static and dynamic electron correlation on the nature of excited states and state-to-state transition dipole moments is studied with a multideterminant wave function approach on the example of all-trans linear polyenes ( C4H6 , C6H8 , and C8H10 ). Symmetry-forbidden singlet nAg states were found to separate into three groups: purely single, mostly single, and mostly double excitations. The excited-state absorption spectrum is dominated by two bright transitions: 1Bu-2Ag and 1Bu-mAg , where mAg is the state, corresponding to two-electron excitation from the highest occupied to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The richness of the excited-state absorption spectra and strong mixing of the doubly excited determinants into lower- nAg states, reported previously at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory, were found to be an artifact of the smaller active space, limited to π orbitals. When dynamic σ-π correlation is taken into account, single- and double-excited states become relatively well separated at least at the equilibrium geometry of the ground state. This electronic structure is closely reproduced within time-dependent density-functional theory (TD DFT), where double excitations appear in a second-order coupled electronic oscillator formalism and do not mix with the single excitations obtained within the linear response. An extension of TD DFT is proposed, where the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) is invoked after the linear response equations are solved (a posteriori TDA). The numerical performance of this extension is validated against multideterminant-wave-function and quadratic-response TD DFT results. It is recommended for use with a sum-over-states approach to predict the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules.

  9. Voiced Excitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    for purposes of vocoding in high noise environments: Task 1: Estimation of voiced excitation functions using skin surface vibration...High Noise Environments. The work on “ Voiced Excitations” shows that the surface vibrations of neck skin, during voicing , carry a great deal of...5 in this report). For field use, it may be better to obtain data from another location on the neck or face. A pressure function of voiced speech is

  10. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  11. A preliminary transcranial magnetic stimulation study of cortical inhibition and excitability in high-functioning autism and Asperger disorder.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Peter G; Rinehart, Nicole J; Tonge, Bruce J; Bradshaw, John L; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2010-08-01

    Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Participants were diagnosed by experienced clinicians strictly according to DSM-IV criteria. Participants with HFA (nine males, two females; mean age 16y 8mo, SD 4y 5mo) or Asperger disorder (11 males, three females; mean age 19y 1mo, SD 4y 2mo) and neurotypical participants (eight males, three females; mean age 19y 0mo, SD 3y 1mo) were administered a paired-pulse TMS paradigm intended to assess motor cortical inhibition and excitability. Responses to TMS were recorded by electromyography. Cortical inhibition was significantly reduced in the HFA group compared with both the Asperger disorder (p<0.001) and neurotypical (p<0.001) groups, suggesting disruption of activity at gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors. There was no group difference in cortical excitability. Cortical inhibition deficits may underlie motor dysfunction in autism, and perhaps even relate to specific clinical symptoms (e.g. repetitive behaviours). These findings provide novel evidence for a possible neurobiological dissociation between HFA and Asperger disorder based on GABAergic function.

  12. Crossed-beams and theoretical studies of the O((3)P) + H(2)O --> HO(2) + H reaction excitation function.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Amy L; Zhang, Jianming; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Minton, Timothy K; Camden, Jon P; Paci, Jeffrey T; Schatz, George C

    2007-11-01

    Hyperthermal collisions of ground-state atomic oxygen with H2O have been investigated, with special attention paid to the H-atom elimination reaction, O((3)P) + H(2)O(X (1)A(1)) --> HO(2)((2)A') + H((2)S). This reaction was observed in a crossed-beams experiment, and the relative excitation function in the region around its energy threshold (50-80 kcal mol(-1)) was measured. Direct dynamics calculations were also performed at two levels of theory, B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and MP2/6-31G(d,p). The shape of the B3LYP excitation function closely matches that of the experiment. The calculations provided a detailed description of the dynamics and revealed a striking dependence of the reaction mechanism on collision energy, where the cross section rises from a threshold near 60 kcal mol(-1) to a peak at approximately 115 kcal mol(-1) and then decreases at higher energies as secondary dissociation of the internally excited HO(2) product becomes dominant. The calculations show that the cross section for H-atom elimination (O + H(2)O --> HO(2) + H) is about 10-25% that of the H-atom abstraction (O + H(2)O --> OH + OH) cross section for collision energies in the 70-160 kcal mol(-1) range.

  13. Evaporation residue excitation function measurements in 50Ti- and 54Cr-induced reactions with lanthanide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Bennett, M. E.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Cross sections for the production of shell-stabilized evaporation residues in the 50Ti+Gd160 , 159Tb, 162Dy , and 54Cr+Dy162 reactions are reported. The compound nucleus excitation energy range considered principally covers the 4 n evaporation channel with segments of the 3 n and 5 n channels also measured. The resultant production cross sections are for nuclides with Z =86 -90 . From an analysis based on a statistical model, it is concluded that a larger fission probability than that predicted by the Bohr-Wheeler transition-state theory is needed to describe the data. This outcome is attributed to the influence of collective nuclear excitations. Subsequently, the expected stability enhancement against fission due to the influence of the magic N =126 shell is not evident. The x n excitation functions measured in previous experiments in the reactions 48Ca+Gd154 , 159Tb,Dy162 , and 165Ho are combined with the present data for Z >20 projectiles to illustrate systematic behavior of measured cross sections as a function of the difference in fission barrier and neutron separation energy.

  14. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl− ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-01-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl− ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl− ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl− transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl− lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K+ and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  15. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-04-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl(-) ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl(-) ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl(-) transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl(-) lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions-high membrane conductance and passive distribution-enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K(+) and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  16. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  17. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-01-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood–brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean −10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve −1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n= 5) and heart rate (HR) (−32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n= 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons. PMID:23629509

  18. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-07-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood-brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean -10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve -1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n = 5) and heart rate (HR) (-32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n = 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons.

  19. Understanding the effects of packing and chemical terminations on the optical excitations of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Draxl, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    In a first-principles study based on many-body perturbation theory, we analyze the optical excitations of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with increasing packing density and different terminations, considering for comparison the corresponding gas-phase molecules and dimers. Intermolecular coupling increases with the density of the chromophores independently of the functional groups. The intense π → π* resonance that triggers photo-isomerization is present in the spectra of isolated dimers and diluted SAMs, but it is almost completely washed out in tightly packed architectures. Intermolecular coupling is partially inhibited by mixing differently functionalized azobenzene derivatives, in particular when large groups are involved. In this way, the excitation band inducing the photo-isomerization process is partially preserved and the effects of dense packing partly counterbalanced. Our results suggest that a tailored design of azobenzene-functionalized SAMs which optimizes the interplay between the packing density of the chromophores and their termination can lead to significant improvements in the photo-switching efficiency of these systems.

  20. Central chemoreflex activation induces sympatho-excitation without altering static or dynamic baroreflex function in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Saku, Keita; Tohyama, Takeshi; Shinoda, Masako; Kishi, Takuya; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Takuya; Oga, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Central chemoreflex activation induces sympatho-excitation. However, how central chemoreflex interacts with baroreflex function remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the impact of central chemoreflex on the dynamic as well as static baroreflex functions under open-loop conditions. In 15 anesthetized, vagotomized Sprague-Dawley rats, we isolated bilateral carotid sinuses and controlled intra-sinus pressure (CSP). We then recorded sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) at the celiac ganglia, and activated central chemoreflex by a gas mixture containing various concentrations of CO2 Under the baroreflex open-loop condition (CSP = 100 mmHg), central chemoreflex activation linearly increased SNA and arterial pressure (AP). To examine the static baroreflex function, we increased CSP stepwise from 60 to 170 mmHg and measured steady-state SNA responses to CSP (mechanoneural arc), and AP responses to SNA (neuromechanical arc). Central chemoreflex activation by inhaling 3% CO2 significantly increased SNA irrespective of CSP, indicating resetting of the mechanoneural arc, but did not change the neuromechanical arc. As a result, central chemoreflex activation did not change baroreflex maximum total loop gain significantly (-1.29 ± 0.27 vs. -1.68 ± 0.74, N.S.). To examine the dynamic baroreflex function, we randomly perturbed CSP and estimated transfer functions from 0.01 to 1.0 Hz. The transfer function of the mechanoneural arc approximated a high-pass filter, while those of the neuromechanical arc and total (CSP-AP relationship) arcs approximated a low-pass filter. In conclusion, central chemoreflex activation did not alter the transfer function of the mechanoneural, neuromechanical, or total arcs. Central chemoreflex modifies hemodynamics via sympatho-excitation without compromising dynamic or static baroreflex AP buffering function. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the

  1. Many-body Green's function GW and Bethe-Salpeter study of the optical excitations in a paradigmatic model dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Faber, C; Boulanger, P; Duchemin, I; Attaccalite, C; Blase, X

    2013-11-21

    We study within the many-body Green's function GW and Bethe-Salpeter formalisms the excitation energies of a paradigmatic model dipeptide, focusing on the four lowest-lying local and charge-transfer excitations. Our GW calculations are performed at the self-consistent level, updating first the quasiparticle energies, and further the single-particle wavefunctions within the static Coulomb-hole plus screened-exchange approximation to the GW self-energy operator. Important level crossings, as compared to the starting Kohn-Sham LDA spectrum, are identified. Our final Bethe-Salpeter singlet excitation energies are found to agree, within 0.07 eV, with CASPT2 reference data, except for one charge-transfer state where the discrepancy can be as large as 0.5 eV. Our results agree best with LC-BLYP and CAM-B3LYP calculations with enhanced long-range exchange, with a 0.1 eV mean absolute error. This has been achieved employing a parameter-free formalism applicable to metallic or insulating extended or finite systems.

  2. Resveratrol Attenuates Aβ-Induced Early Hippocampal Neuron Excitability Impairment via Recovery of Function of Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongqiang; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Na; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-03-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) is not only the morphological hallmark but also the initiator of the pathology process of AD. As a natural compound found in grapes, resveratrol shows a protective effect on the pathophysiology of AD, but the underlying mechanism is not very clear. This study was to investigate whether resveratrol could attenuate Aβ-induced early impairment in hippocampal neuron excitability and the underlying mechanism. The excitability and voltage-gated potassium currents were examined in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. It was found that Aβ25-35 increased the excitability of neurons. Resveratrol could reverse the Aβ25-35-induced increase in the frequency of repetitive firing and the spike half-width of action potential (AP). Moreover, resveratrol can attenuate Aβ25-35-induced decreases in transient potassium channel (I A ) and delay rectifier potassium channel (I K(DR)) of neurons. It was also found that resveratrol could decline the increase of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway induced by Aβ25-35. The results suggest that resveratrol alleviates Aβ25-35-induced dysfunction in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons via recovery of the function of I A and I K(DR) by inhibiting the increase of PKA and the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  3. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc.

    PubMed

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-20

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and 'angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex.

  4. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc

    PubMed Central

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E.; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and ‘angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex. PMID:26787348

  5. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  6. Combined effects of gas pressure and exciting frequency on electron energy distribution functions in hydrogen capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Sugai, H.

    2013-02-15

    The combined effects of the variation of hydrogen pressure (40-400 mTorr) and exciting frequency (13.56-50 MHz) on the electron energy probability function (EEPF) and other plasma parameters in capacitively coupled hydrogen H{sub 2} discharge at fixed discharge voltage were investigated using rf-compensated Langmuir probe. At a fixed exciting frequency of 13.56 MHz, the EEPF evolved from Maxwellian-like distribution to a bi-Maxwellian distribution when the H{sub 2} pressure increased, possibly due to efficient vibrational excitation. The electron density largely increased to a peak value and then decreased with the increase of H{sub 2} pressure. Meanwhile, the electron temperature and plasma potential significantly decrease and reaching a minimum at 120 mTorr beyond, which saturated or slightly increases. On the other hand, the dissipated power and electron density markedly increased with increasing the exciting frequency at fixed H{sub 2} pressure and voltage. The electron temperatures negligibly dependent on the driving frequency. The EEPFs at low pressure 60 mTorr resemble Maxwellian-like distribution and evolve into a bi-Maxwellian type as frequency increased, due to a collisonless (stochastic) sheath-heating in the very high frequency regime, while the EEPF at hydrogen pressure {>=}120 mTorr retained a bi-Maxwellian-type distribution irrespective of the driving frequency. Such evolution of the EEPFs shape with the driving frequency and hydrogen pressure has been discussed on the basis of electron diffusion processes and low threshold-energy inelastic collision processes taking place in the discharge. The ratio of stochastic power to bulk power heating ratio is dependent on the hydrogen pressure while it is independent on the driving frequency.

  7. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: Investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Killian; Mazouin, Laurent; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard, which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (x c ) functionals for ensembles. Following Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245131], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble x c energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble x c potential in the strongly correlated limit have been rationalized by means of a generalized adiabatic connection formalism. Finally, functional-driven errors induced by ground-state density-functional approximations have been studied. In the strictly symmetric case or in the weakly correlated regime, combining ensemble exact exchange with ground-state correlation functionals gives better ensemble energies than when calculated with the ground-state exchange-correlation functional. However, when approaching the asymmetric equiensemble in the strongly correlated regime, the former approximation leads to highly curved ensemble energies with negative slope which is unphysical. Using both ground-state exchange and correlation functionals gives much better results in that case. In fact, exact ensemble energies are almost recovered in some density domains. The analysis of density-driven errors is left for future work.

  8. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-09

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  9. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O with /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Welch, R.B.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 90- to 150-MeV /sup 16/O ions. A comparison of the maxima of the mass-yield curves measured in this experiment with those for the reactions of /sup 18/O ions with /sup 249/Cf shows different shifts from those that have been measured for reactions of the /sup 16,18/O and /sup 20,22/Ne ion pairs with /sup 248/Cm. However, the shifts appear similar to those recently measured for reactions of these ion pairs with /sup 254/Es.

  10. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic potential energy curves and excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingang; Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom; Cox, Hazel

    2006-07-28

    Orbital energies, ionization potentials, molecular constants, potential energy curves, and the excitation spectrum of O(2) are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The calculated negative highest occupied molecular orbital energy (-epsilon(HOMO)) is compared with the energy difference ionization potential for five exchange correlation functionals consisting of the local density approximation (LDAxc), gradient corrected Becke exchange plus Perdew correlation (B(88X)+P(86C)), gradient regulated asymptotic correction (GRAC), statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP), and van Leeuwen and Baerends asymptotically correct potential (LB94). The potential energy curves calculated using TDDFT with the TDA at internuclear distances from 1.0 to 1.8 A are divided into three groups according to the electron configurations. The 1pi(u) (4)1pi(g) (2) electron configuration gives rise to the X (3)Sigma(g) (-), a (1)Delta(g), and b (1)Sigma(g) (+) states; the 1pi(u) (3)1pi(g) (3) electron configuration gives rise to the c (1)Sigma(u) (-), C (3)Delta(u), and A (3)Sigma(u) (+) states; and the B (3)Sigma(u) (-), A (1)Delta(u), and f (1)Sigma(u) (+) states are determined by the mixing of two or more electron configurations. The excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule, calculated with the aforementioned exchange correlation functionals, shows that the results are quite sensitive to the choice of functional. The LDAxc and the B(88X)+P(86C) functionals produce similar spectroscopic patterns with a single strongly absorbing band positioned at 19.82 and 19.72 eV, respectively, while the asymptotically corrected exchange correlation functionals of the SAOP and the LB94 varieties yield similar excitation spectra where the computed strongly absorbing band is located at 16.09 and 16.42 eV, respectively. However, all of the exchange correlation functionals yield only one strongly absorbing band (oscillator strength

  11. Excitation functions for the production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Excitation energy dependence of the cross sections of the reactions {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 50}Ti{sub 28},1n){sup 257}Rf{sub 153} and {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 58}Fe{sub 32},1n){sup 265}Hs{sub 157} is calculated and compared with the experimental data measured at GSI-Darmstadt. Such a dependence is also calculated for the reaction {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 86}Kr{sub 50},1n){sup 293}118{sub 175} reported recently by the Berkeley group, and for reactions which may lead to the synthesis of element 119 and production of its odd-Z descendants. Recommendations for future experiments based on the present study are presented. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  12. Equilibrium structure and anharmonic potential function of phosgene: Microwave spectra of vibrationally excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Munetaka; Sugie, Masaaki; Takeo, Harutoshi; Matsumura, Chi; Kuchitsu, Kozo

    1984-06-01

    The vibrational satellites in the microwave spectra of 35Cl 2CO were measured and analyzed for the ν2, ν3, 2 ν3, ν4, ν5, ν6, and ν2 + ν3 states. The rotational constants for the ν5 state were first estimated by an analysis of anharmonic potential constants derived from the available rotational constants for the other excited states and other isotopic species and the electron diffraction intensity, and used for the assignment of its weak satellites. The Coriolis resonance between ν2 and ν4 was analyzed, and the difference in their wavenumbers, ν˜4 - ν˜2 = 9.553(3) cm-1, was obtained. The sign of the perturbation (positive) was determined using the infrared band envelope.

  13. A simplified relativistic time-dependent density-functional theory formalism for the calculations of excitation energies including spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom

    2005-10-15

    In the present work we have proposed an approximate time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) formalism to deal with the influence of spin-orbit coupling effect on the excitation energies for closed-shell systems. In this formalism scalar relativistic TDDFT calculations are first performed to determine the lowest single-group excited states and the spin-orbit coupling operator is applied to these single-group excited states to obtain the excitation energies with spin-orbit coupling effects included. The computational effort of the present method is much smaller than that of the two-component TDDFT formalism and this method can be applied to medium-size systems containing heavy elements. The compositions of the double-group excited states in terms of single-group singlet and triplet excited states are obtained automatically from the calculations. The calculated excitation energies based on the present formalism show that this formalism affords reasonable excitation energies for transitions not involving 5p and 6p orbitals. For transitions involving 5p orbitals, one can still obtain acceptable results for excitations with a small truncation error, while the formalism will fail for transitions involving 6p orbitals, especially 6p1/2 spinors.

  14. Longest-Wavelength Electronic Excitations of Linear Cyanines: The Role of Electron Delocalization and of Approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Ii, Barry Moore; Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-11-12

    The lowest-energy/longest-wavelength electronic singlet excitation energies of linear cyanine dyes are examined, using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and selected wave function methods in comparison with literature data. Variations of the bond-length alternation obtained with different optimized structures produce small differences of the excitation energy in the limit of an infinite chain. Hybrid functionals with range-separated exchange are optimally 'tuned', which is shown to minimize the delocalization error (DE) in the cyanine π systems. Much unlike the case of charge-transfer excitations, small DEs are not strongly correlated with better performance. A representative cyanine is analyzed in detail. Compared with accurate benchmark data, TDDFT with 'pure' local functionals gives too high singlet excitation energies for all systems, but DFT-based ΔSCF calculations with a local functional severely underestimates the energies. TDDFT strongly overestimates the difference between singlet and triplet excitation energies. An analysis points to systematically much too small magnitudes of integrals from the DFT components of the exchange-correlation response kernel as the likely culprit. The findings support previous suggestions that the differential correlation energy between the ground and excited state is not correctly produced by TDDFT with most functionals.

  15. Functional testing of space flight induced changes in tonic motor control by using limb-attached excitation and load devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallasch, Eugen; Kozlovskaya, Inessa

    2007-02-01

    Long term space flights induce atrophy and contractile changes on postural muscles such effecting tonic motor control. Functional testing of tonic motor control structures is a challenge because of the difficulties to deliver appropriate test forces on crew members. In this paper we propose two approaches for functional testing by using limb attached loading devices. The first approach is based on a frequency and amplitude controllable moving magnet exciter to deliver sinusoidal test forces during limb postures. The responding limb deflection is recorded by an embedded accelerometer to obtain limb impedance. The second approach is based on elastic limb loading to evoke self-excited oscillations during arm extensions. Here the contraction force at the oscillation onset provides information about limb stiffness. The rationale for both testing approaches is based on Feldman's λ-model. An arm expander based on the second approach was probed in a 6-month MIR space flight. The results obtained from the load oscillations, confirmed that this device is well suited to capture space flight induced neuromuscular changes.

  16. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  17. Genetic inhibition of CaMKII in dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons reduces functional excitatory synapses and enhances intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Klug, Jason R; Mathur, Brian N; Kash, Thomas L; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T; Robison, A J; Anderson, Mark E; Deutch, Ariel Y; Lovinger, David M; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response.

  18. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  19. Sodium channel function and the excitability of human cutaneous afferents during ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Grosskreutz, Julian; Burke, David

    2002-01-01

    The changes in excitability of cutaneous afferents in the median nerve of healthy subjects were compared during 13 min of ischaemia and during 13 min continuous depolarizing DC. In addition, intermittent polarizing currents were used to compensate for or to accentuate the threshold change produced by ischaemia. Measurements were made alternately of the ischaemic (or current-induced) changes in threshold, refractoriness and, in some experiments, supernormality. The strength-duration time constant (τSD) was calculated from the thresholds to test stimuli of different duration. During ischaemia for 13 min, the threshold decreased steadily by 34 % over the initial 8 min, reached a plateau and increased slightly over the final few minutes. However, with continuous depolarizing DC, the threshold decreased linearly with the applied current, by 55 % with strong current ramps. Intermittent injection of hyperpolarizing DC was used to compensate for the ischaemic threshold change, but the compensating current increased progressively and did not reach a plateau as had occurred with the ischaemic threshold change. During ischaemia, τSD increased to a plateau, following the threshold more closely than the current required to compensate for threshold. Refractoriness, on the other hand, increased more steeply than the applied compensating current. There were similar discrepancies in the relationships of τSD and refractoriness to supernormality. The smaller-than-expected threshold change during ischaemia could result from limitations on the change in excitability produced by ischaemic metabolites acting on the gating and/or permeability of Na+ channels. Intermittent depolarizing DC was applied during the ischaemic depolarization to determine whether it would reduce or accentuate the discrepancies noted during ischaemia alone. The extent of the threshold change was greater than with ischaemia alone, and there was a greater change in τSD and a proportionately smaller change in

  20. Correlated wave functions for the ground and some excited states of the iron atom.

    PubMed

    Buendía, E; Gálvez, F J; Sarsa, A

    2006-04-21

    We study the states arising from the [Ar]4s(2)3d6 and [Ar]4s(1)3d7 configurations of iron atom with explicitly correlated wave functions. The variational wave function is the product of the Jastrow correlation factor times a model function obtained within the parametrized optimized effective potential framework. A systematic analysis of the dependence of both the effective potential and the correlation factor on the configuration and on the term is carried out. The ground state of both, the cation, Fe+, and anion, Fe-, are calculated with correlated wave functions and the ionization potential and the electron affinity are obtained.

  1. Channels active in the excitability of nerves and skeletal muscles across the neuromuscular junction: basic function and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Barbara E

    2008-06-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the activation of motoneurons and their corresponding muscle cells is essential for interpreting basic neurophysiology in nerves, the heart, and skeletal and smooth muscle. This review article is intended to clarify how channels work in nerves, neuromuscular junctions, and muscle function and what happens when these channels are defective. Highlighting the human diseases that result from defective ion channels is likely to be interesting to students in helping them choose to learn about channel physiology.

  2. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    PubMed Central

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Martens, M.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B1) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  3. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Martens, M.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B{sub 1}) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  4. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  5. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chang-Guo N.; Dixon, David A. )

    2002-11-01

    Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectra of pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitations energies, respectively. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic y-diketones need to be re-examined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  6. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Reiss, Timo O; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example--broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of I(z)--> I(x) over resonance offsets of +/-20 kHz and RF variability of +/-5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform I(z) to greater than 0.98 I(x), with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2 degrees, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  7. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Thomas E.; Reiss, Timo O.; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example—broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of Iz → Ix over resonance offsets of ±20 kHz and RF variability of ±5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform Iz to greater than 0.98 Ix, with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2°, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  8. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  9. A crucial role of fractional occupation numbers of natural orbitals (NOs) in the description of double excitations in response time-dependent NO functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a crucial role of fractional occupation numbers (FONs) of natural orbitals (NOs) in the description of double excitations in time-dependent NO functional theory (TDNOFT). An analytical dependence of the double excitation energy ωα on the ratio of the FONs is derived in a model from the matrix diagonalization problem. In the large ratio Heitler-London limit the derived formula reproduces the correct asymptotics of ωα of the ionic state of double excitation character. In the small ratio Møller-Plesset, MP limit the reverse relation of static MP perturbation theory emerges in the dynamical response theory to provide ωα .

  10. [Study of the "stimulus--excitation" function in the peripheral portion of the frog taste analyzer].

    PubMed

    Shmarov, D A; Samoĭlov, V O

    1979-04-01

    The intensity of glossopharyngeal nerve afferent discharges in the frog was studied during stimulation of gustatory receptors by caffeine, acetic acid, saccharose and sodium chloride ranging widely in the concentration changes. It was shown, that the function "stimulus-exitation" for the summary discharges in response on the coffeine and acetic acid was being logaryphmic. The character of off-effects dependence on the concentration of bitter and sour stimuli. Was proved to be the same. The curve "stimulus-exitation" for the saccharose was "S" shaped, but for the sodium chloride it might be described by the power function with the exponent equal 0,8.

  11. Corticospinal excitability as a predictor of functional gains at the affected upper limb following robotic training in chronic stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin; Bobrow, James E; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Cramer, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Robotic training can help improve function of a paretic limb following a stroke, but individuals respond differently to the training. A predictor of functional gains might improve the ability to select those individuals more likely to benefit from robot-based therapy. Studies evaluating predictors of functional improvement after a robotic training are scarce. One study has found that white matter tract integrity predicts functional gains following a robotic training of the hand and wrist. Objective. To determine the predictive ability of behavioral and brain measures in order to improve selection of individuals for robotic training. Twenty subjects with chronic stroke participated in an 8-week course of robotic exoskeletal training for the arm. Before training, a clinical evaluation, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were each measured as predictors. Final functional gain was defined as change in the Box and Block Test (BBT). Measures significant in bivariate analysis were fed into a multivariate linear regression model. Training was associated with an average gain of 6 ± 5 blocks on the BBT (P < .0001). Bivariate analysis revealed that lower baseline motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on TMS, and lower laterality M1 index on fMRI each significantly correlated with greater BBT change. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, baseline MEP magnitude was the only measure that remained significant. Subjects with lower baseline MEP magnitude benefited the most from robotic training of the affected arm. These subjects might have reserve remaining for the training to boost corticospinal excitability, translating into functional gains. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Coynel, David; Gschwind, Leo; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Ripke, Stephan; Spalek, Klara; Sullivan, Patrick; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2014-03-05

    Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2,824) and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32,143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity, and psychopathology.

  13. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Kenneth; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range of 0-50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high-energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound-to-bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  14. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range 0 to 50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound to bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  15. Study of excitation functions of alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on holmium for 167Tm production.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Király, B; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

    2010-03-01

    (167)Tm is a candidate radioisotope for both nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy due to its emitted Auger-electrons, low energy X- and gamma-rays. In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions for production of medically relevant radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions on rare earths, the (165)Ho(alpha,2n)(167)Tm reaction and the (165)Ho(alpha,n)(168)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,3n)(166)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,4n)(165)Tm side reactions were measured up to 40 MeV by the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured results were compared to the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical curves. Thick target yields, impurity levels and specific activities were deduced and compared with the same parameters for other charged particle production routes of (167)Tm. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of excitation functions of alpha induced reactions on natXe: Production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Király, B.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Sonck, M.; Kovalev, S. F.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    Excitation functions were measured for alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural xenon leading to the formation of the radionuclides 129m(rel),129g,131m,131mg,133m,135m,137m,139cumBa and 129cum,130mg,132,134m,135m,136mg,138mgCs from the respective thresholds up to 40 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. The feasibility of the production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs by using gas target technology was investigated. Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production routes of 131Cs was given.

  17. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  18. Determination of excitation profile and dielectric function spatial nonuniformity in porous silicon by using WKB approach.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Yurkevich, Igor V; Canham, Leigh T; Loni, Armando; Kaplan, Andrey

    2014-11-03

    We develop an analytical model based on the WKB approach to evaluate the experimental results of the femtosecond pump-probe measurements of the transmittance and reflectance obtained on thin membranes of porous silicon. The model allows us to retrieve a pump-induced nonuniform complex dielectric function change along the membrane depth. We show that the model fitting to the experimental data requires a minimal number of fitting parameters while still complying with the restriction imposed by the Kramers-Kronig relation. The developed model has a broad range of applications for experimental data analysis and practical implementation in the design of devices involving a spatially nonuniform dielectric function, such as in biosensing, wave-guiding, solar energy harvesting, photonics and electro-optical devices.

  19. Density-functional theory study of vibrational relaxation of CO stretching excitation on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakong, Sung; Kratzer, Peter; Han, Xu; Laß, Kristian; Weingart, Oliver; Hasselbrink, Eckart

    2008-11-01

    A first-principles theory is presented for calculating the lifetime of adsorbate vibrations on semiconductor or insulator surfaces, where dissipation of the vibrational energy to substrate phonons is the dominant relaxation mechanism. As an example, we study the stretching vibration of CO/Si(100), where a lifetime of 2.3 ns has been measured recently [K. Laß, X. Han, and E. Hasselbrink, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 051102 (2005)]. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for the local modes of the adsorbate, including their anharmonic coupling, are combined with force field calculations for the substrate phonons. Using the DFT-Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, we have determined the most stable adsorption site for CO on top of the lower Si atom of the Si surface dimer, the local normal modes of CO, and the multidimensional potential energy surface for the CO vibrations. The anharmonic stretching frequency of adsorbed CO obtained in DFT-PBE is 5% lower than the experimental value, while the B3LYP functional reproduces the CO stretching frequency with only 1.4% error. The coupling between the anharmonic vibrational modes and the phonon continuum is evaluated within first-order perturbation theory, and transition rates for the CO vibrational relaxation are calculated using Fermi's golden rule. The lifetime of 0.5 ns obtained with DFT-PBE is in qualitative agreement with experiment, while using vibrational frequencies from the B3LYP functional gives a much too long lifetime as compared to experiment. We find that the numerical value of the lifetime is very sensitive to the harmonic frequencies used as input to the calculation of the transition rate. An empirical adjustment of these frequencies yields excellent agreement between our theory and experiment. From these calculations we conclude that the most probable microscopic decay channel of the CO stretching mode is into four lateral shift/bending quanta and one phonon.

  20. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  1. Calculations of Excitation Functions of Some Structural Fusion Materials for ( n, t) Reactions up to 50 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aktı, N. N.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2010-06-01

    Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, the working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n, t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27Al( n, t)25Mg, 51V( n, t)49Ti, 52Cr( n, t)50V, 55Mn( n, t)53Cr and 56Fe( n, t)54Mn reactions have been carried out up to 50 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the geometry dependent hybrid model, hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, we have calculated ( n, t) reaction cross-sections by using new evaluated semi-empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  2. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  3. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  4. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Excitable Cells: Modulators of Mitochondrial and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2•−) is generated under specific bioenergetic conditions at several sites within the electron-transport system; most is converted to H2O2 inside and outside the mitochondrial matrix by superoxide dismutases. H2O2 is a major chemical messenger that, in low amounts and with its products, physiologically modulates cell function. The redox state and ROS scavengers largely control the emission (generation scavenging) of O2•−. Cell ischemia, hypoxia, or toxins can result in excess O2•− production when the redox state is altered and the ROS scavenger systems are overwhelmed. Too much H2O2 can combine with Fe2+ complexes to form reactive ferryl species (e.g., Fe(IV) = O•). In the presence of nitric oxide (NO•), O2•− forms the reactant peroxynitrite (ONOO−), and ONOOH-induced nitrosylation of proteins, DNA, and lipids can modify their structure and function. An initial increase in ROS can cause an even greater increase in ROS and allow excess mitochondrial Ca2+ entry, both of which are factors that induce cell apoptosis and necrosis. Approaches to reduce excess O2•− emission include selectively boosting the antioxidant capacity, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation to reduce generation of O2•− by inducing proton leak, and reversibly inhibiting electron transport. Mitochondrial cation channels and exchangers function to maintain matrix homeostasis and likely play a role in modulating mitochondrial function, in part by regulating O2•− generation. Cell-signaling pathways induced physiologically by ROS include effects on thiol groups and disulfide linkages to modify posttranslationally protein structure to activate/inactivate specific kinase/phosphatase pathways. Hypoxia-inducible factors that stimulate a cascade of gene transcription may be mediated physiologically by ROS. Our knowledge of the role played by ROS and their scavenging systems in

  5. Corticospinal excitability as a predictor of functional gains at the affected upper limb following robotic training in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J.; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P.; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin; Bobrow, James E.; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic training can help improve function of a paretic limb following a stroke, but individuals respond differently to the training. A predictor of functional gains might improve the ability to select those individuals more likely to benefit from robot based therapy. Studies evaluating predictors of functional improvement after a robotic training are scarce. One study has found that white matter tract integrity predicts functional gains following a robotic training of the hand and wrist. Objective Determine the predictive ability of behavioral and brain measures to improve selection of individuals for robotic training. Methods Twenty subjects with chronic stroke participated in an 8-week course of robotic exoskeletal training for the arm. Before training, a clinical evaluation, fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were each measured as predictors. Final functional gain was defined as change in the Box and Block Test (BBT). Measures significant in bivariate analysis were fed into a multivariate linear regression model. Results Training was associated with an average gain of 6±5 blocks on the BBT (p<0.0001). Bivariate analysis revealed that lower baseline motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on TMS, and lower laterality M1 index on fMRI each significantly correlated with greater BBT change. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, baseline MEP magnitude was the only measure that remained significant. Conclusion Subjects with lower baseline MEP magnitude benefited the most from robotic training of the affected arm. These subjects might have reserve remaining for the training to boost corticospinal excitability, translating into functional gains. PMID:24642382

  6. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  7. Speed-Up of the Excited-State Benchmarking: Double-Hybrid Density Functionals as Test Cases.

    PubMed

    Bremond, Eric; Savarese, Marika; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel José; Sancho-García, Juan Carlos; Adamo, Carlo

    2017-10-04

    The EX6-0, EX7-0 and EX7-1 representative benchmark sets are developed for the fast evaluation of the performance of a density functional, or more generally of a computational protocol, in modeling low-lying valence singlet-singlet excitation energies of organic dyes within the range of 1.5 to 4.5 eV. All sets share the advantage of being small (a maximum of 7 molecules), but providing statistical errors representative of larger and extended databases. To that extent, the EX7-1 benchmark set goes a step further and is composed by systems as small as possible in order to alleviate the associated computational cost. The reliability of all the sets is assessed through the benchmarking of 15 modern double-hybrid density functionals. The investigation shows not only that the 3 benchmark sets provide close error metrics for each density functional, but also that when taking advantage of the Resolution-of-the-Identity and a balanced triple-\\zeta basis set (e.g., def2-TZVP), double hybrids overperform the `popular' hybrids in modeling vertical absorption, emission, and adiabatic energies.

  8. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  9. Assessment of the Global and Regional Land Hydrosphere and Its Impact on the Balance of the Geophysical Excitation Function of Polar Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wińska, Małgorzata; Nastula, Jolanta; Kołaczek, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The impact of continental hydrological loading from land water, snow and ice on polar motion excitation, calculated as hydrological angular momentum (HAM), is difficult to estimate, and not as much is known about it as about atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and oceanic angular momentum (OAM). In this paper, regional hydrological excitations to polar motion are investigated using monthly terrestrial water storage data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission and from the five models of land hydrology. The results show that the areas where the variance shows large variability are similar for the different models of land hydrology and for the GRACE data. Areas which have a small amplitude on the maps make an important contribution to the global hydrological excitation function of polar motion. The comparison of geodetic residuals and global hydrological excitation functions of polar motion shows that none of the hydrological excitation has enough energy to significantly improve the agreement between the observed geodetic excitation and geophysical ones.

  10. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yi; Ulrich, Brittany; Issa, Fadi A; Wan, Jijun; Papazian, Diane M

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf). By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  11. New Approaches to Exciting Exergame-Experiences for People with Motor Function Impairments.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Martina; Gómez-Martinho, Ignacio; Meneses, Juan; Martínez, José-Fernán

    2017-02-12

    The work presented here suggests new ways to tackle exergames for physical rehabilitation and to improve the players' immersion and involvement. The primary (but not exclusive) purpose is to increase the motivation of children and adolescents with severe physical impairments, for doing their required exercises while playing. The proposed gaming environment is based on the Kinect sensor and the Blender Game Engine. A middleware has been implemented that efficiently transmits the data from the sensor to the game. Inside the game, different newly proposed mechanisms have been developed to distinguish pure exercise-gestures from other movements used to control the game (e.g., opening a menu). The main contribution is the amplification of weak movements, which allows the physically impaired to have similar gaming experiences as the average population. To test the feasibility of the proposed methods, four mini-games were implemented and tested by a group of 11 volunteers with different disabilities, most of them bound to a wheelchair. Their performance has also been compared to that of a healthy control group. Results are generally positive and motivating, although there is much to do to improve the functionalities. There is a major demand for applications that help to include disabled people in society and to improve their life conditions. This work will contribute towards providing them with more fun during exercise.

  12. New Approaches to Exciting Exergame-Experiences for People with Motor Function Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Martina; Gómez-Martinho, Ignacio; Meneses, Juan; Martínez, José-Fernán

    2017-01-01

    The work presented here suggests new ways to tackle exergames for physical rehabilitation and to improve the players’ immersion and involvement. The primary (but not exclusive) purpose is to increase the motivation of children and adolescents with severe physical impairments, for doing their required exercises while playing. The proposed gaming environment is based on the Kinect sensor and the Blender Game Engine. A middleware has been implemented that efficiently transmits the data from the sensor to the game. Inside the game, different newly proposed mechanisms have been developed to distinguish pure exercise-gestures from other movements used to control the game (e.g., opening a menu). The main contribution is the amplification of weak movements, which allows the physically impaired to have similar gaming experiences as the average population. To test the feasibility of the proposed methods, four mini-games were implemented and tested by a group of 11 volunteers with different disabilities, most of them bound to a wheelchair. Their performance has also been compared to that of a healthy control group. Results are generally positive and motivating, although there is much to do to improve the functionalities. There is a major demand for applications that help to include disabled people in society and to improve their life conditions. This work will contribute towards providing them with more fun during exercise. PMID:28208682

  13. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  14. Fluorescence Excitation Function Produced Through Photoexcitation of the Rydberg States b, cn, and o3 of N2 in the 80-100 nm Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. C.; Judge, D. L.; Singh, T. S.; Mu, X. L.; Nee, J. B.; Chiang, S. Y.; Fung, H. S.

    2006-12-01

    Fluorescence excitation functions produced through photoexcitation of N2 using synchrotron radiation in the spectral region between 80 and 100 nm have been studied. Two broadband detectors were employed to simultaneously monitor fluorescence in the 115-320 nm and 300-700 nm region, respectively. The peaks in the VUV Fluorescence excitation functions are found to correspond to excitation of absorption transitions from the ground electronic state to the Rydberg states of b, cn (with n= 4-9), and o3 of N2. The relative fluorescence production cross sections for the observed peaks are determined. No fluorescence has been produced through excitation of the most dominating absorption features of the b-X transition except the (1,0), (5,0), and (6,0) bands, in excellent agreement with the recent lifetime measurements [1] and theoretical calculations [2]. In addition, fluorescence peaks correlate with the long vibrational progression of the c4 (v = 0-7) has also been observed. Weak fluorescence excitation peaks are also found to correlate with the excitation of the (1,0), (2,0), and (3,0) bands of the o3 VX transition. The present results provide important information for further unraveling of complicated and intriguing interactions among the excited electronic states of N2. Furthermore, solar photon excitation of N2 leading to the production of c4(0) may provide useful data required for evaluation and analysis of dayglow models of the c4(0) issue of the Earth's atmosphere [3]. Detailed results will be presented. This research is based on work supported by NSF grant ATM-0096761. [1] Sprengers, J. P., W. Ubachs, and K. G. H. Baldwin, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 144301 (2005). [2] Lewis, B. R., S. T. Gibson, W. Zhang, H. Lefebvre-Brion, and J.-M. Robbe, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 144302 (2005). [3] e.g., Meier, R. R., Space Sci. Rev., 58, 1 (1991).

  15. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  16. Implications of cortical balanced excitation and inhibition, functional heterogeneity, and sparseness of neuronal activity in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong

    2015-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies often report inconsistent findings, probably due to brain properties such as balanced excitation and inhibition and functional heterogeneity. These properties indicate that different neurons in the same voxels may show variable activities including concurrent activation and deactivation, that the relationships between BOLD signal and neural activity (i.e., neurovascular coupling) are complex, and that increased BOLD signal may reflect reduced deactivation, increased activation, or both. The traditional general-linear-model-based-analysis (GLM-BA) is a univariate approach, cannot separate different components of BOLD signal mixtures from the same voxels, and may contribute to inconsistent findings of fMRI. Spatial independent component analysis (sICA) is a multivariate approach, can separate the BOLD signal mixture from each voxel into different source signals and measure each separately, and thus may reconcile previous conflicting findings generated by GLM-BA. We propose that methods capable of separating mixed signals such as sICA should be regularly used for more accurately and completely extracting information embedded in fMRI datasets. PMID:26341939

  17. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  18. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory via linear response.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J

    2015-12-21

    A fully numerical method for the time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation is presented in a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. The integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. We introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  19. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    DOE PAGES

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; ...

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using amore » numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.« less

  20. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  1. S1 and S2 excited states of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores: a time-dependent density functional theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Ding, Yong; Cui, Ganglong; Liu, Yajun

    2007-04-19

    In concert with the recent photoabsorption experiments of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores (Nielsen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 018304), quantum chemical calculations using time-dependent density functional theory coupled with different functionals and under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation were made on the first two excited states (S1 and S2) of two retinal chromophores: 11-cis and all-trans protonated Schiff bases. The calculated vertical excitation energies (Tv) and oscillator strengths (f) are consistent with the experimental absorption bands. The experimentally observed phenomenon that the transition dipole moment (mu) of S2 is much smaller that of S1 was interpreted by 3D representation of transition densities. The different optical behaviors (linear and nonlinear optical responds) of the excited states were investigated by considering different strengths of external electric fields.

  2. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  3. Reaction Mechanisms in 12C+93Nb System:. Excitation Functions and Recoil Range Distributions Below 7 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.; Chaubey, A. K.

    The experiments were performed to study excitation functions (EFs) of evaporation residues (ERs), i.e. 103,102,101Ag, 101,100,99Pd, 101,100Rh, 97Ru, 96Tc, 95Tc, 94Tc, 93Mom, 92Nbm populated in the reactions induced by 12C on 93Nb for exploring the reaction dynamics involved at energies ≈ 47-75 MeV. The activation technique followed by offline γ-ray spectrometry has been employed to measure EFs. These measurements were simulated with other reported values available in literature as well as with theoretical predictions based on computer code PACE-2. The effect of variation of level density parameter involved in this code has also been studied. An excellent agreement was found between theoretical and experimental values in some of the fusion evaporation channels. However, significant enhancement of cross-section as observed in α-emission channels may be due to incomplete fusion (ICF) process and/or direct reaction process. To confirm the aforesaid reaction mechanism, Recoil Range Distributions (RRDs) of various ERs have been measured at ≈ 80 MeV. Moreover, an attempt is made to separate the percentage relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured RRDs data. Further, the relative percentage ICF fraction, also estimated from EFs data, was found to be sensitive with the projectile energy.

  4. Significant role of level-density parameters in probing nuclear dissipation with light-ion-induced fission excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of the ratio of level-density parameters at saddle to that at ground-state configuration (af/an) on the sensitivity of fission cross sections (σfiss) to presaddle dissipation effects by comparing fission excitation functions measured in the 3He + 197Au (208Pb) reactions with three distinct types of model calculations: the standard Bohr-Wheeler theory with af/an = 1 (i) and af/an ≠ 1 (ii) as well as the Langevin approach with af/an ≠ 1 (iii). It is shown that both cases (i) and (ii) cannot provide a reasonable, satisfactory description of the measured σfiss. A presaddle friction strength (β) of (4-4.5) × 1021 s-1 is extracted through reproducing data with Langevin simulations. We find from the comparison of the experimental and calculated σfiss in cases (ii) and (iii) that a precise determination of β depends sensitively on af/an. The finding indicates that level-density parameters play a significant role in accurately probing presaddle friction; that is, to stringently constrain β it is important to take into account a realistic and an elaborate evaluation of af/an in theoretical calculations. We further find that high energy increases the sensitivity of σfiss to β, suggesting that in experiments, to obtain precise information of presaddle dissipation by measuring σfiss, it is best to populate a compound nucleus with high energy.

  5. Benchmarking Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited State Geometries of Organic Molecules in Gas-Phase and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Guido, Ciro A; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2013-05-14

    We analyze potentials and limits of the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) approach for the determination of excited-state geometries of organic molecules in gas-phase and in solution. Three very popular DFT exchange-correlation functionals, two hybrids (B3LYP and PBE0) and one long-range corrected (CAM-B3LYP), are here investigated, and the results are compared to the correlated RI-CC2 wave function approach. Solvent effects are further analyzed by means of a polarizable continuum model. A total of 15 organic chromophores (including both small molecules and larger push-pull systems) are considered as prototypes of n → π* and π → π* singlet excitations. Our analysis allows to point out specific correlations between the accuracy of the various functionals and the type of excitation and/or the type of chemical bonds involved. We find that while the best ground-state geometries are obtained with PBE0 and B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP yields the most accurate description of electronic and geometrical characteristics of excited states, both in gas-phase and in solution.

  6. The 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Os reaction: Measurement and analysis of the excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Sharma, R. P.; Rashid, M. H.

    1998-03-01

    Excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for the production of 183Osm,g by 7Li-induced reactions on 181Ta are obtained from the measurements of the residual activities by the conventional stacked-foils technique from threshold to 50 MeV. The excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for nuclear reaction 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Osm,g are compared with the theoretical statistical model calculation by using the ALICE/91, STAPRE, and CASCADE codes. In the energy range of the present measurement the excitation functions are fitted fairly well by both the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model and the hybrid model of Blann with initial exciton number n0=7 (nn=4, np=3, nh=0) using the ALICE/91 code. The experimental isomeric cross-section ratios are also reproduced fairly well by the calculation using the STAPRE code. However, the CASCADE code calculations slightly underpredict the cross section but reproduce the shape. In general, the statistical model under a suitable set of global assumptions, can reproduce the excitation function as well as isomeric cross-section ratios.

  7. Benchmarking DFT and TD-DFT Functionals for the Ground and Excited States of Hydrogen-Rich Peptide Radicals.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Denis; Cauët, Emilie; Frison, Gilles

    2014-08-12

    We assess the pros and cons of a large panel of DFT exchange-correlation functionals for the prediction of the electronic structure of hydrogen-rich peptide radicals formed after electron attachment on a protonated peptide. Indeed, despite its importance in the understanding of the chemical changes associated with the reduction step, the question of the attachment site of an electron and, more generally, of the reduced species formed in the gas phase through electron-induced dissociation (ExD) processes in mass spectrometry is still a matter of debate. For hydrogen-rich peptide radicals in which several positive groups and low-lying π* orbitals can capture the incoming electron in ExD, inclusion of full Hartree-Fock exchange at long-range interelectronic distance is a prerequisite for an accurate description of the electronic states, thereby excluding several popular exchange-correlation functionals, e.g., B3LYP, M06-2X, or CAM-B3LYP. However, we show that this condition is not sufficient by comparing the results obtained with asymptotically correct range-separated hybrids (M11, LC-BLYP, LC-BPW91, ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97X-D) and with reference CASSCF-MRCI and EOM-CCSD calculations. The attenuation parameter ω significantly tunes the spin density distribution and the excited states vertical energies. The investigated model structures, ranging from methylammonium to hexapeptide, allow us to obtain a description of the nature and energy of the electronic states, depending on (i) the presence of hydrogen bond(s) around the cationic site(s), (ii) the presence of π* molecular orbitals (MOs), and (iii) the selected DFT approach. It turns out that, in the present framework, LC-BLYP and ωB97 yields the most accurate results.

  8. A comprehensive study of sensorimotor cortex excitability in chronic cocaine users: Integrating TMS and functional MRI data☆

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Colleen A.; DeVries, William; Dowdle, Logan T.; West, Julia A.; Siekman, Bradley; Li, Xingbao; George, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disruptions in motor control are often overlooked features of chronic cocaine users. During a simple sensorimotor integration task, for example, cocaine users activate a larger area of cortex than controls but have lower functional connectivity between the cortex and dorsal striatum, which is further correlated with poor performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether abnormal cortical excitability in cocaine users was related to disrupted inhibitory or excitatory mechanisms, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods A battery of TMS measures were acquired from 87 individuals (50 cocaine dependent, 37 controls). Functional MRI data were acquired from a subset of 28 individuals who performed a block-design finger tapping task. Results TMS measures revealed that cocaine users had significantly higher resting motor thresholds and higher intracortical cortical facilitation (ICF) than controls. There was no between-group difference in either measure of cortical inhibition. Task-evoked BOLD signal in the motor cortex was significantly correlated with ICF in the cocaine users. There was no significant difference in brain-skull distance between groups. Conclusion These data demonstrated that cocaine users have disrupted cortical facilitation (as measured with TMS), which is related to elevated BOLD signal. Cortical inhibition, however, is largely intact. Given the relationship between ICF and glutamatergic agents, this may be a potentially fruitful and treatable target in addiction. Finally, among controls the distance from the scalp to the cortex was correlated with the motor threshold which may be a useful parameter to integrate into therapeutic TMS protocols in the future. PMID:26541870

  9. Asymptotic correction approach to improving approximate exchange-correlation potentials: Time-dependent density-functional theory calculations of molecular excitation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casida, Mark E.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2000-11-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation of excitation spectra places certain demands on the DFT exchange-correlation potential, vxc, that are not met by the functionals normally used in molecular calculations. In particular, for high-lying excitations, it is crucial that the asymptotic behavior of vxc be correct. In a previous paper, we introduced a novel asymptotic-correction approach which we used with the local density approximation (LDA) to yield an asymptotically corrected LDA (AC-LDA) potential [Casida, Casida, and Salahub, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 70, 933 (1998)]. The present paper details the theory underlying this asymptotic correction approach, which involves a constant shift to incorporate the effect of the derivative discontinuity (DD) in the bulk region of finite systems, and a spliced asymptotic correction in the large r region. This is done without introducing any adjustable parameters. We emphasize that correcting the asymptotic behavior of vxc is not by itself sufficient to improve the overall form of the potential unless the effect of the derivative discontinuity is taken into account. The approach could be used to correct vxc from any of the commonly used gradient-corrected functionals. It is here applied to the LDA, using the asymptotically correct potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB94) in the large r region. The performance of our AC-LDA vxc is assessed for the calculation of TD-DFT excitation energies for a large number of excitations, including both valence and Rydberg states, for each of four small molecules: N2, CO, CH2O, and C2H4. The results show a significant improvement over those from either the LB94 or the LDA functionals. This confirms that the DD is indeed an important element in the design of functionals. The quality of TDLDA/LB94 and TDLDA/AC-LDA oscillator strengths were also assessed in what we believe to be the first rigorous assessment of TD-DFT molecular oscillator strengths in comparison with

  10. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    provide interpretation of absorption spectra with respect to molecular structure for excitation by electromagnetic waves at frequencies within the...IR and UV-visible ranges. The absorption spectrum corresponding to excitation states of As-H2O complexes consisting of relatively small numbers of...As emphasized previously [17], the absorption spectrum of H2O clusters should be of significance for interpretation of absorption spectra

  11. Structures and properties of electronically excited chromophores in solution from the polarizable continuum model coupled to the time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Mennucci, Benedetta; Cappelli, Chiara; Guido, Ciro Achille; Cammi, Roberto; Tomasi, Jacopo

    2009-04-02

    This paper provides an overview of recent research activities concerning the quantum-mechanical description of structures and properties of electronically excited chromophores in solution. The focus of the paper is on a specific approach to include solvent effects, namely the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Such a method represents an efficient strategy if coupled to proper quantum-mechanical descriptions such as the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). As a result, the description of molecules in the condensed phase can be extended to excited states still maintaining the computational efficiency and the physical reliability of the ground-state calculations. The most important theoretical and computational aspects of the coupling between PCM and TDDFT are presented and discussed together with an example of application to the study of the low-lying electronic excited states of push-pull chromophores in different solvents.

  12. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu(3+), Bi(3+):REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-06-16

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.

  13. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum, carbonyl wagging, and ring-puckering potential energy functions of 3-cyclopenten-1-one in its S1(n,π*) electronic excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagear, Paul; Laane, Jaan

    1995-05-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum of 3-cyclopenten-1-one has been recorded in the 308-330 nm region, and the electronic origin for the S1(n,π*) state of A2 symmetry was observed at 30 229 cm-1. The observed spectrum consists of more than 80 bands involving primarily ν3 (carbonyl stretch), ν29 (carbonyl out-of-plane wagging), and ν30 (ring puckering). Bands were also assigned to combinations with seven other vibrational modes. The energies for the v=0 to 11 quantum states of ν29 were measured and used to determine a one-dimensional potential energy function. This function has energy minima at wagging angles of ±24° and a barrier to inversion of 939 cm-1. Four bands associated with ν30 were observed and were used to determine an asymmetric single-minimum one-dimensional ring-puckering potential energy function for the S1(n,π*) state. The ring-puckering energy levels in the ν29 vibrational excited states are little changed from the v=0 state indicating that there is little interaction between the carbonyl wagging and the ring-puckering motions.

  14. Why are time-dependent density functional theory excitations in solids equal to band structure energy gaps for semilocal functionals, and how does nonlocal Hartree-Fock-type exchange introduce excitonic effects?

    PubMed

    Izmaylov, Artur F; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2008-07-21

    We examine the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) equations for calculating excitation energies in solids with Gaussian orbitals and analytically show that for semilocal functionals, their lowest eigenvalue collapses to the minimum band orbital energy difference. With the introduction of nonlocal Hartree-Fock-type exchange (as in hybrid functionals), this result is no longer valid, and the lowest TD-DFT eigenvalue reflects the appearance of excitonic effects. Previously reported "charge-transfer" problems with semilocal TD-DFT excitations in molecules can be deduced from our analysis by taking the limit to infinite lattice constant.

  15. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  16. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics: Optical Excitation Function of H(1s-2p) Produced by electron Impact from Threshold to 1.8 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; McConkey, J. W.; Bray, I.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The optical excitation function of prompt Lyman-Alpha radiation, produced by electron impact on atomic hydrogen, has been measured over the extended energy range from threshold to 1.8 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum-ultraviolet mono- chromator system was used to measure the emitted Lyman-Alpha radiation. The absolute H(1s-2p) electron impact excitation cross section was obtained from the experimental optical excitation function by normalizing to the accepted optical oscillator strength, with corrections for polarization and cascade. Statistical and known systematic uncertainties in our data range from +/- 4% near threshold to +/- 2% at 1.8 keV. Multistate coupling affecting the shape of the excitation function up to 1 keV impact energy is apparent in both the present experimental data and present theoretical results obtained with convergent close- coupling (CCC) theory. This shape function effect leads to an uncertainty in absolute cross sections at the 10% level in the analysis of the experimental data. The derived optimized absolute cross sections are within 7% of the CCC calculations over the 14 eV-1.8 keV range. The present CCC calculations converge on the Bethe- Fano profile for H(1s-2p) excitation at high energy. For this reason agreement with the CCC values to within 3% is achieved in a nonoptimal normalization of the experimental data to the Bethe-Fano profile. The fundamental H(1s-2p) electron impact cross section is thereby determined to an unprecedented accuracy over the 14 eV - 1.8 keV energy range.

  17. Derivation of the RPA (Random Phase Approximation) Equation of ATDDFT (Adiabatic Time Dependent Density Functional Ground State Response Theory) from an Excited State Variational Approach Based on the Ground State Functional.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Tom; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-09-09

    The random phase approximation (RPA) equation of adiabatic time dependent density functional ground state response theory (ATDDFT) has been used extensively in studies of excited states. It extracts information about excited states from frequency dependent ground state response properties and avoids, thus, in an elegant way, direct Kohn-Sham calculations on excited states in accordance with the status of DFT as a ground state theory. Thus, excitation energies can be found as resonance poles of frequency dependent ground state polarizability from the eigenvalues of the RPA equation. ATDDFT is approximate in that it makes use of a frequency independent energy kernel derived from the ground state functional. It is shown in this study that one can derive the RPA equation of ATDDFT from a purely variational approach in which stationary states above the ground state are located using our constricted variational DFT (CV-DFT) method and the ground state functional. Thus, locating stationary states above the ground state due to one-electron excitations with a ground state functional is completely equivalent to solving the RPA equation of TDDFT employing the same functional. The present study is an extension of a previous work in which we demonstrated the equivalence between ATDDFT and CV-DFT within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  18. Leptin Enhances NMDA-Induced Spinal Excitation in Rats: A Functional Link between Adipocytokine and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yinghong; Wang, Shuxing; Ma, Yuxin; Lim, Grewo; Kim, Hyangin; Mao, Jianren

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that leptin (an adipocytokine) played an important role in nociceptive behavior induced by nerve injury, but the cellular mechanism of this action remains unclear. Using the whole cell patch-clamp recording from rat’s spinal cord slices, we showed that superfusion of leptin onto spinal cord slices dose-dependently enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated currents in spinal cord lamina II neurons. At the cellular level, the effect of leptin on spinal NMDA-induced currents was mediated through the leptin receptor and the JAK2/STAT3 (but not PI3K or MAPK) pathway, as the leptin effect was abolished in leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice and inhibited by a JAK/STAT inhibitor. Moreover, we demonstrated in naïve rats that a single intrathecal administration of leptin enhanced spontaneous biting, scratching and licking behavior induced by intrathecal NMDA and that repeated intrathecal administration of leptin elicited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which was attenuated by the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Intrathecal leptin also upregulated the expression of NMDA receptors and pSTAT3 within the rat’s spinal cord dorsal horn and intrathecal MK-801 attenuated this leptin effect as well. Our data demonstrate a relationship between leptin and NMDA receptor-mediated spinal neuronal excitation and its functional role in nociceptive behavior. Since leptin contributes to nociceptive behavior induced by nerve injury, the present findings suggest an important cellular link between the leptin’s spinal effect and the NMDA receptor-mediated cellular mechanism of neuropathic pain. PMID:21376468

  19. [Changes in the excitability of the spinal motor neurons during sessions of functional biocontrol in patients with different forms of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, O V; Sheliakin, A M; Pinchuk, D Iu; Pisar'kova, E V

    1993-01-01

    Excitability changes at the segmentary level of the spine were examined during functional bioregulation sessions administered to patients with various forms of infantile cerebral paralysis (spastic diplegia, spastic hemiparesis) by recording N- and M-responses of musculus soleus and musculus gastrocnemius medial head. Neurophysiologic disorders were revealed at the spinal level depending on the disease form. The authors suppose that presynaptic inhibition is to a greater measure impaired in spastic hemiparesis, whereas spastic diplegia is associated with more extensive involvement even of spinal inhibitory mechanisms proper. Sessions of functional bioregulation resulted in clinical improvement and in development of a trend to normalization of spinal reflectory excitability. Such changes were recorded in musculus soleus of children with spastic diplegia and in gastrocnemius muscle median head of those with spastic hemiparesis. Possible effects of directed afferent currents on structure and function of supraspinal systems regulating spinal mechanisms activity are discussed.

  20. Reply to Comment on 'Excited states of DNA base pairs using long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-09-18

    In this work we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC-functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP and LC-PBE0 with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement a smaller attenuation parameter was needed which leads to non-optimum performance for ground state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair, but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance was obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange.

  1. Ab Initio Geometry and Bright Excitation of Carotenoids: Quantum Monte Carlo and Many Body Green’s Function Theory Calculations on Peridinin

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, Emanuele; Varsano, Daniele; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we report the singlet ground state structure of the full carotenoid peridinin by means of variational Monte Carlo (VMC) calculations. The VMC relaxed geometry has an average bond length alternation of 0.1165(10) Å, larger than the values obtained by DFT (PBE, B3LYP, and CAM-B3LYP) and shorter than that calculated at the Hartree–Fock (HF) level. TDDFT and EOM-CCSD calculations on a reduced peridinin model confirm the HOMO–LUMO major contribution of the Bu+-like (S2) bright excited state. Many Body Green’s Function Theory (MBGFT) calculations of the vertical excitation energy of the Bu+-like state for the VMC structure (VMC/MBGFT) provide an excitation energy of 2.62 eV, in agreement with experimental results in n-hexane (2.72 eV). The dependence of the excitation energy on the bond length alternation in the MBGFT and TDDFT calculations with different functionals is discussed. PMID:26580027

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the excited-state hydrogen-bonding characteristics of polyaniline in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yahong; Duan, Yuping; Liu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study was carried out to study the excited-state of hydrogen-bonding characteristics of polyaniline (PANI) in aqueous environment. The hydrogen-bonded PANI-H2O complexes were studied using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The electronic excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths of the low-lying electronically excited states for hydrogen-bonded complexes were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The ground-state geometric structures were optimized, and it is observed that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds Csbnd N ⋯ Hsbnd O and Nsbnd H ⋯ Osbnd H were formed in PANI-H2O complexes. The formed hydrogen bonds influenced the bond lengths, the charge distribution, as well as the spectral characters of the groups involved. It was concluded that all the hydrogen-bonded PANI-H2O complexes were primarily excited to the S1 states with the largest oscillator strength. In addition, the orbital transition from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) involved intramolecular charge redistribution resulting to increase the electron density of the quinonoid rings.

  3. Vibration testing based on impulse response excited by pulsed-laser ablation: Measurement of frequency response function with detection-free input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosokawa, Takahiko

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a non-contact vibration-measurement system that is based on impulse excitation by laser ablation (i.e. laser excitation) to measure the high-frequency-vibration characteristics of objects. The proposed method makes it possible to analyse the frequency response function just by measuring the output (acceleration response) of a test object excited by pulsed-laser ablation. This technique does not require detection of the input force. Firstly, using a rigid block, the pulsed-laser-ablation force is calibrated via Newton's second law. Secondly, an experiment is conducted in which an object whose natural frequency lies in the high-frequency domain is excited by pulsed-laser ablation. The complex frequency spectrum obtained by Fourier transform of the measured response is then divided by the estimated pulsed-laser-ablation force. Finally, because of the error involved in the trigger position of the response with respect to the impulse arrival time, the phase of the complex Fourier transform is modified by accounting for the response dead time. The result is the frequency response function of the object. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by a vibration test of an aluminium block.

  4. Modeling laser induced molecule excitation using real-time time-dependent density functional theory: application to 5- and 6-benzyluracil.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Toşa, Valer

    2015-02-28

    The fully propagated real time-dependent density functional theory method has been applied to study the laser-molecule interaction in 5- and 6-benzyluracil (5BU and 6BU). The molecular geometry optimization and the time-dependent electronic dynamics propagation were carried out using the M11-L local meta-NGA (nonseparable gradient approximations) exchange-correlation functional together with the def2-TZVP basis set. Different laser field parameters like direction, strength, and wavelength have been varied in order to estimate the conditions for an efficient excitation of the molecules. The results show that the two molecules respond differently to the applied laser field and therefore specific laser field parameters have to be chosen for each of them in order to get efficient and selective excitation behavior. It was also found that from the molecular excitation point of view not only the magnitude of the transition dipoles between the involved orbitals but also their orientation with respect to the laser field is important. On the other hand, it was shown that the molecular excitation is a very complex overlapping of different one-electron orbital depopulation-population processes of the occupied and virtual orbitals.

  5. Excited-State Electronic Structure with Configuration Interaction Singles and Tamm-Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Isborn, Christine M; Luehr, Nathan; Ufimtsev, Ivan S; Martínez, Todd J

    2011-06-14

    Excited-state calculations are implemented in a development version of the GPU-based TeraChem software package using the configuration interaction singles (CIS) and adiabatic linear response Tamm-Dancoff time-dependent density functional theory (TDA-TDDFT) methods. The speedup of the CIS and TDDFT methods using GPU-based electron repulsion integrals and density functional quadrature integration allows full ab initio excited-state calculations on molecules of unprecedented size. CIS/6-31G and TD-BLYP/6-31G benchmark timings are presented for a range of systems, including four generations of oligothiophene dendrimers, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and the PYP chromophore solvated with 900 quantum mechanical water molecules. The effects of double and single precision integration are discussed, and mixed precision GPU integration is shown to give extremely good numerical accuracy for both CIS and TDDFT excitation energies (excitation energies within 0.0005 eV of extended double precision CPU results).

  6. Solute-Solvent Charge-Transfer Excitations and Optical Absorption of Hydrated Hydroxide from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Daniel; Sprik, Michiel

    2014-06-10

    The electronic structure of simple hydrated ions represents one of the most challenging problems in electronic-structure theory. Spectroscopic experiments identified the lowest excited state of the solvated hydroxide as a charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state. In the present work we report computations of the absorption spectrum of the solvated hydroxide ion, treating both solvent and solute strictly at the same level of theory. The average absorption spectrum up to 25 eV has been computed for samples taken from periodic ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The experimentally observed CTTS state near the onset of the absorption threshold has been analyzed at the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and with a hybrid density-functional. Based on results for the lowest excitation energies computed with the HSE hybrid functional and a Davidson diagonalization scheme, the CTTS transition has been found 0.6 eV below the first absorption band of liquid water. The transfer of an electron to the solvent can be assigned to an excitation from the solute 2pπ orbitals, which are subject to a small energetic splitting due to the asymmetric solvent environment, to the significantly delocalized lowest unoccupied orbital of the solvent. The distribution of the centers of the excited state shows that CTTS along the OH(-) axis of the hydroxide ion is avoided. Furthermore, our simulations indicate that the systematic error arising in the calculated spectrum at the GGA originates from a poor description of the valence band energies in the solution.

  7. Ground- and excited-state properties of inorganic solids from full-potential density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Vidya, R.; Vajeeston, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2003-12-01

    The development in theoretical condensed-matter science based on density-functional theory (DFT) has reached a level where it is possible, from "parameter-free" quantum mechanical calculations to obtain total energies, forces, vibrational frequencies, magnetic moments, mechanical and optical properties and so forth. The calculation of such properties are important in the analyses of experimental data and they can be predicted with a precision that is sufficient for comparison with experiments. It is almost impossible to do justice to all developments achieved by DFT because of its rapid growth. Hence, it has here been focused on a few advances, primarily from our laboratory. Unusual bonding behaviors in complex materials are conveniently explored using the combination of charge density, charge transfer, and electron-localization function along with crystal-orbital Hamilton-population analyses. It is indicated that the elastic properties of materials can reliably be predicted from DFT calculations if one takes into account the structural relaxations along with gradient corrections in the calculations. Experimental techniques have their limitations in studies of the structural stability and pressure-induced structural transitions in hydride materials whereas the present theoretical approach can be applied to reliably predict properties under extreme pressures. From the spin-polarized, relativistic full-potential calculations one can study novel materials such as ruthenates, quasi-one-dimensional oxides, and spin-, charge-, and orbital-ordering in magnetic perovskite-like oxides. The importance of orbital-polarization correction to the DFT to predict the magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal compounds and magnetic moments in lanthanides and actinides are emphasized. Apart from the full-potential treatment, proper magnetic ordering as well as structural distortions have to be taken into account to predict correctly the insulating behavior of transition-metal oxides

  8. Quantal Density Functional Theory (Q-DFT) of Excited States: The State Arbitrariness of the Model Noninteracting Fermion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Marlina; Singh, Ranbir; Sahni, Viraht

    2003-03-01

    Within Q-DFT(V. Sahni, L. Massa, R.Singh, and M. Slamet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87), 113002(2001)., the system of electrons in a nondegenerate excited state as described by the schrödinger equation, is transformed to one of noninteracting fermions such that the equivalent excited state density, energy, and ionization potential are obtained. The state of the model fermion system is arbitrary in that it may be in a ground or excited state. (The correaponding local effective potential energies differ, their difference being solely due to Correlation-Kinetic effects.) In either case, the highest occupied eigenvalue is the negative of the ionization potential. We demonstrate the state arbitrariness of the model system by application of Q-DFT to the first excited singlet state of the exactly solvable Hooke's atom. We construct two model systems: one in a singlet ground state (textstyle1s^2), and the other in a singlet first excited state (1s2s). The density and energy obtained from each model are the same as that of the interacting system, with the highest occupied eigenvalue in each case being the negative of the ionization potential.

  9. Testing Noncollinear Spin-Flip, Collinear Spin-Flip, and Conventional Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Predicting Electronic Excitation Energies of Closed-Shell Atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefei; Yang, Ke R; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-05-13

    Conventional time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is based on a closed-shell Kohn-Sham (KS) singlet ground state with the adiabatic approximation, using either linear response (KS-LR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (KS-TDA); these methods can only directly predict singly excited states. This deficiency can be overcome by using a triplet state as the reference in the KS-TDA approximation and "exciting" the singlet by a spin flip (SF) from the triplet; this is the method suggested by Krylov and co-workers, and we abbreviate this procedure as SF-KS-TDA. SF-KS-TDA can be applied either with the original collinear kernel of Krylov and co-workers or with a noncollinear kernel, as suggested by Wang and Ziegler. The SF-KS-TDA method does bring some new practical difficulties into play, but it can at least formally model doubly excited states and states with double-excitation character, so it might be more useful than conventional TDDFT (both KS-LR and KS-TDA) for photochemistry if these additional difficulties can be surmounted and if it is accurate with existing approximate exchange-correlation functionals. In the present work, we carried out calculations specifically designed to understand better the accuracy and limitations of the conventional TDDFT and SF-KS-TDA methods; we did this by studying closed-shell atoms and closed-shell monatomic cations because they provide a simple but challenging testing ground for what we might expect in studying the photochemistry of molecules with closed-shell ground states. To test their accuracy, we applied conventional KS-LR and KS-TDA and 18 versions of SF-KS-TDA (nine collinear and nine noncollinear) to the same set of vertical excitation energies (including both Rydberg and valence excitations) of Be, B(+), Ne, Na(+), Mg, and Al(+). We did this for 10 exchange-correlation functionals of various types, both local and nonlocal. We found that the GVWN5 and M06 functionals with nonlocal kernels in spin-flip calculations

  10. Lowest excited states and optical absorption spectra of donor-acceptor copolymers for organic photovoltaics: a new picture emerging from tuned long-range corrected density functionals.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Laxman; Doiron, Curtis; Sears, John S; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-07

    Polymers with low optical gaps are of importance to the organic photovoltaics community due to their potential for harnessing a large portion of the solar energy spectrum. The combination along their backbones of electron-rich and electron-deficient fragments contributes to the presence of low-lying excited states that are expected to display significant charge-transfer character. While conventional hybrid functionals are known to provide unsatisfactory results for charge-transfer excitations at the time-dependent DFT level, long-range corrected (LRC) functionals have been reported to give improved descriptions in a number of systems. Here, we use such LRC functionals, considering both tuned and default range-separation parameters, to characterize the absorption spectra of low-optical-gap systems of interest. Our results indicate that tuned LRC functionals lead to simulated optical-absorption properties in good agreement with experimental data. Importantly, the lowest-lying excited states (excitons) are shown to present a much more localized nature than initially anticipated.

  11. Effect of electron energy distribution functions on plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet in a diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. P.; Chen, L.; Funk, M.; Sundararajan, R.; Nozawa, T.; Samukawa, S.

    2013-07-15

    Plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) in diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave has been studied by using dielectric-based VUV sensors. Evolution of plasma VUV in the diffusion plasma as a function of the distance from the power coupling surface is investigated. Experimental results have indicated that the energy and spatial distributions of plasma VUV are mainly controlled by the energy distribution functions of the plasma electrons, i.e., electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The study implies that by designing EEDF of plasma, one could be able to tailor plasma VUV in different applications such as in dielectric etching or photo resist smoothing.

  12. Expectations of the Kohn-Sham operator in a natural-orbital functional environment: An adiabatic response theory with single and double excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-09-01

    A combined adiabatic approach is proposed in which orbital expectations of the Kohn-Sham operator (KSEs) are embedded into the matrix environment of time-dependent phase-including natural-orbital functional theory (TDPINOFT). Analytical diagonalization of a model molecular matrix eigenvalue problem shows that the resultant TDNOFT-KSE combines strong sides of both adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and TDPINOFT. Around the equilibrium, like in TDDFT, the energy of a single excitation of the model is evaluated with the KSEs. In its turn, the TDPINOFT environment provides an effective Hartree-exchange-correlation (Hxc) kernel, which properly diverges in the bond dissociation limit. This environment also generates a double excitation, the energy of which is related to the ratio of fractional occupation numbers of the natural orbitals.

  13. Experimental study of the excitation functions of proton induced nuclear reactions on (167)Er for production of medically relevant (167)Tm.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Király, B; Spahn, I; Ignatyuk, A V

    2010-02-01

    (167)Tm (T(1/2)=9.25d) is a candidate radioisotope for medical therapy and diagnostics due to its Auger-electron and low-energy X- and gamma-ray emission. Excitation functions of the (167)Er(p,n)(167)Tm reaction and (168)Er(p,n)(168)Tm, (167)Er(p,2n)(166)Tm, (166)Er(p,2n)(165)Tm disturbing reactions were measured up to 15MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured excitation functions agree well with the results of ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS nuclear reaction model codes. The thick target yield of (167)Tm in the 15-8MeV energy range is 6.9MBq/microAh. A short comparison of charged particle production routes of (167)Tm is given. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Peruvosid (CD412) on excitability and functional refractory period of atrial and ventricular tissues in cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moleiro, Frederico; Anselmi, Alfonso; Suárez, Régulo; Suárez, José Angel; Drayer, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Attempts were made to produce myocarditis by Trypanosoma cruzi inoculation in healthy dog puppies 6 to 8 weeks old. Significant electrocardiographic abnormalities were produced, coinciding with interstitial inflammatory processes in the cardiac tissue and with degenerative changes in the myocardial fibres. In puppies showing these changes, profound changes in the excitability and the functional refractory period of the atrial and ventricular muscular tissue were observed. The administration of Peruvosid in doses of 0·0240 to 0·0647 mg./kg. tended to diminish the excitability, previously increased by the inflammatory process, at the same time increasing the functional refractory period duration which had previously been shortened. The fact that Peruvosid corrects these fundamental factors in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias suggests that the drug may be useful in the treatment of cardiac insufficiency produced by Chagas' myocardiopathy, in which arrhythmias are one of the basic characteristics. Images PMID:4985863

  15. Excitation functions of some (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) reactions from threshold to 16 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Doczi, R.; Buczko, C.M.; Csikai, J.; Semkova, V.; Fenyvesi, A.; Yamamuro, N.

    1998-06-01

    Precise cross sections were measured for the {sup 90}Zr(n,{alpha}){sup 87m}Sr, {sup 94}Zr(n,{alpha}){sup 91}Sr, {sup 92}Mo(n,{alpha}){sup 89m+g}Zr, {sup 45}Sc(n,{alpha}){sup 42}K, {sup 51}V(n,{alpha}){sup 48}Sc, {sup 59}Co(n,{alpha}){sup 56}Mn, {sup 93}Nb(n,{alpha}){sup 90m}Y, {sup 92}Mo(n,p){sup 92m}Nb, {sup 96}(n,p){sup 96}Nb, {sup 97}Mo(n,p){sup 97m+g}Nb, {sup 90}Zr(n,p){sup 90m}Y, {sup 91}Zr(n,p){sup 91m}Y, {sup 92}Zr(n,p){sup 92}Y, and {sup 60}Ni(n,p){sup 60m+g}Co reactions in the 7- to 14.7-MeV neutron energy range. Excitation functions were completed with a number of new differential data. Spectrum-averaged (n,{alpha}) and (n,p) cross sections were measured for the {sup 54}Fe(n,{alpha}){sup 51}Cr, {sup 68}Zn(n,{alpha}){sup 65}Ni, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58m+g}Co, {sup 64}Zn(n,p){sup 64}Cu, {sup 59}Co(n,p){sup 59}Fe, {sup 94}Zr(n,p){sup 94}Y, {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 46}Ti(n,p){sup 46m+g}Sc, {sup 47}Ti(n,p){sup 47}Sc, {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc, and {sup 62}Ni(n,{alpha}){sup 59}Fe reactions in addition to those aforementioned using a thick target Be(d,n) neutron field at E{sub d} = 9.72 MeV. Results were compared with the ENDF/B-VI, IRDF90, JENDL-3, BROND, JEF-2, CENDL-2, and ADL-3 data files and the SINCROS-II system for testing the validation of differential data and the nuclear model calculations.

  16. Transition moments between excited electronic states from the Hermitian formulation of the coupled cluster quadratic response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholska, Aleksandra M.; Lesiuk, Michał; Moszynski, Robert

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new method for the computation of the transition moments between the excited electronic states based on the expectation value formalism of the coupled cluster theory [B. Jeziorski and R. Moszynski, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 48, 161 (1993)]. The working expressions of the new method solely employ the coupled cluster operator T and an auxiliary operator S that is expressed as a finite commutator expansion in terms of T and T†. In the approximation adopted in the present paper, the cluster expansion is limited to single, double, and linear triple excitations. The computed dipole transition probabilities for the singlet-singlet and triplet-triplet transitions in alkali earth atoms agree well with the available theoretical and experimental data. In contrast to the existing coupled cluster response theory, the matrix elements obtained by using our approach satisfy the Hermitian symmetry even if the excitations in the cluster operator are truncated, but the operator S is exact. The Hermitian symmetry is slightly broken if the commutator series for the operator S are truncated. As a part of the numerical evidence for the new method, we report calculations of the transition moments between the excited triplet states which have not yet been reported in the literature within the coupled cluster theory. Slater-type basis sets constructed according to the correlation-consistency principle are used in our calculations.

  17. Transition moments between excited electronic states from the Hermitian formulation of the coupled cluster quadratic response function.

    PubMed

    Tucholska, Aleksandra M; Lesiuk, Michał; Moszynski, Robert

    2017-01-21

    We introduce a new method for the computation of the transition moments between the excited electronic states based on the expectation value formalism of the coupled cluster theory [B. Jeziorski and R. Moszynski, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 48, 161 (1993)]. The working expressions of the new method solely employ the coupled cluster operator T and an auxiliary operator S that is expressed as a finite commutator expansion in terms of T and T(†). In the approximation adopted in the present paper, the cluster expansion is limited to single, double, and linear triple excitations. The computed dipole transition probabilities for the singlet-singlet and triplet-triplet transitions in alkali earth atoms agree well with the available theoretical and experimental data. In contrast to the existing coupled cluster response theory, the matrix elements obtained by using our approach satisfy the Hermitian symmetry even if the excitations in the cluster operator are truncated, but the operator S is exact. The Hermitian symmetry is slightly broken if the commutator series for the operator S are truncated. As a part of the numerical evidence for the new method, we report calculations of the transition moments between the excited triplet states which have not yet been reported in the literature within the coupled cluster theory. Slater-type basis sets constructed according to the correlation-consistency principle are used in our calculations.

  18. Density functional study of multiplicity-changing valence and Rydberg excitations of p-block elements: delta self-consistent field, collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (DFT), and conventional time-dependent DFT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Peverati, Roberto; Truhlar, Donald G; Valero, Rosendo

    2011-07-28

    A database containing 17 multiplicity-changing valence and Rydberg excitation energies of p-block elements is used to test the performance of density functional theory (DFT) with approximate density functionals for calculating relative energies of spin states. We consider only systems where both the low-spin and high-spin state are well described by a single Slater determinant, thereby avoiding complications due to broken-symmetry solutions. Because the excitations studied involve a spin change, they require a balanced treatment of exchange and correlation, thus providing a hard test for approximate density functionals. We test three formalisms for predicting the multiplicity-changing transition energies. First is the ΔSCF method; we also test time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), both in its conventional form starting from the low-spin state and in its collinear spin-flip form starting from the high-spin state. Very diffuse basis functions are needed to give a qualitatively correct description of the Rydberg excitations. The scalar relativistic effect needs to be considered when quantitative results are desired, and we include it in the comparisons. With the ΔSCF method, most of the tested functionals give mean unsigned errors (MUEs) larger than 6 kcal/mol for valence excitations and MUEs larger than 3 kcal/mol for Rydberg excitations, but the performance for the Rydberg states is much better than can be obtained with time-dependent DFT. It is surprising to see that the long-range corrected functionals, which have 100% Hartree-Fock exchange at large inter-electronic distance, do not improve the performance for Rydberg excitations. Among all tested density functionals, ΔSCF calculations with the O3LYP, M08-HX, and OLYP functionals give the best overall performance for both valence and Rydberg excitations, with MUEs of 2.1, 2.6, and 2.7 kcal/mol, respectively. This is very encouraging since the MUE of the CCSD(T) coupled cluster method with quintuple

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding of the chromophore coumarin 153 in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Hao, Ce; Wang, Se; Dong, Hong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the electronic excited-state intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the chromophore coumarin 153 (C153) and the room-temperature ionic liquid N,N-dimethylethanolammonium formate (DAF), both the geometric structures and the infrared spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex C153-DAF(+) in the excited state were studied by a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. We theoretically demonstrated that the intermolecular hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) in the hydrogen-bonded C153-DAF(+) complex is significantly strengthened in the S(1) state by monitoring the spectral shifts of the C=O group and O-H group involved in the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3). Moreover, the length of the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom decreased from 1.693 Å to 1.633 Å upon photoexcitation. This was also confirmed by the increase in the hydrogen-bond binding energy from 69.92 kJ mol(-1) in the ground state to 90.17 kJ mol(-1) in the excited state. Thus, the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening of the coumarin chromophore in an ionic liquid has been demonstrated theoretically for the first time.

  20. Measurement of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re excitation function of natural tungsten by using a 100-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jungran; Lee, Jieun; Lee, Samyol

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the proton-induced excitation function for the natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re nuclear reaction has been measured in the energy region below 100 MeV by using the 100-MeV proton linear accelerator at the Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. The stacked foil activation technique was adopted in the present study. The gamma-rays generated from the proton-irradiated samples were measured by using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with a HPGe detector. The 27Al(p,3p+n)24Na reaction was used as a monitor reaction for proton flux monitoring. The nuclear reactions of natW(p,xn)177,178,179Re were observed in the present study. The proton-induced excitation functions of natural tungsten were derived from the delayed gamma-ray yield of the produced nucleus. The present results were compared with the previous experimental excitation function data of Yu. E. Titarenko et al. [1].

  1. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra and carbonyl wagging and ring-puckering potential energy functions of cyclobutanone and its 2,2,4,4-d4 isotopomer in the S1(n,π*) electronic excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    1994-03-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of cyclobutanone and its 2,2,4,4-d4 isotopomer have been recorded in the 305-335 nm region. The electronic band origin of the d0 molecule for the S1(n,π*) state of A2 symmetry occurs at 30 292 cm-1 (30 265 cm-1 for the d4 molecule). The observed spectra consisting of more than 50 bands for each isotopomer involve ν7, ν8, and ν9 (the three A1 ring vibrations) as well as ν20(C=O in-plane wag), ν26 (C=O out-of-plane wag), and ν27 (ring puckering). Five bands associated with the excited vibrational states of ν26 in the S1(n,π*) electronic state were observed for each isotopic species, and these were used to determine the one-dimensional potential energy functions for the C=O out-of-plane wagging. The C=O wagging angle was determined to be 39° and the barrier to inversion is 2149 cm-1 (2188 cm-1 for the deuteride). For the ring-puckering in the S1 state the lowest three vibrational energy spacings were found to be 106, 166, and 185 cm-1 as compared to values of 35, 57, and 65 cm-1 in the S0 ground state. Several ring-puckering potential energy functions with varying degrees of asymmetry are capable of reproducing the observed results. In all cases, however, the v=0 puckering state lies above any barrier to planarity. A two-dimensional potential function which fits the observed data was also determined in terms of the wagging and puckering coordinates.

  2. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  3. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems.

  4. Highly efficient implementation of pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory for the calculation of excitation energies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixiang; Hughes, Thomas; Giesen, Dave; Halls, Mathew D; Goldberg, Alexander; Vadicherla, Tati Reddy; Sastry, Madhavi; Patel, Bhargav; Sherman, Woody; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-06-15

    We have developed and implemented pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the quantum mechanics package Jaguar to calculate restricted singlet and restricted triplet, as well as unrestricted excitation energies with either full linear response (FLR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) with the pseudospectral length scales, pseudospectral atomic corrections, and pseudospectral multigrid strategy included in the implementations to improve the chemical accuracy and to speed the pseudospectral calculations. The calculations based on pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory with full linear response (PS-FLR-TDDFT) and within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (PS-TDA-TDDFT) for G2 set molecules using B3LYP/6-31G*(*) show mean and maximum absolute deviations of 0.0015 eV and 0.0081 eV, 0.0007 eV and 0.0064 eV, 0.0004 eV and 0.0022 eV for restricted singlet excitation energies, restricted triplet excitation energies, and unrestricted excitation energies, respectively; compared with the results calculated from the conventional spectral method. The application of PS-FLR-TDDFT to OLED molecules and organic dyes, as well as the comparisons for results calculated from PS-FLR-TDDFT and best estimations demonstrate that the accuracy of both PS-FLR-TDDFT and PS-TDA-TDDFT. Calculations for a set of medium-sized molecules, including Cn fullerenes and nanotubes, using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(**) basis set show PS-TDA-TDDFT provides 19- to 34-fold speedups for Cn fullerenes with 450-1470 basis functions, 11- to 32-fold speedups for nanotubes with 660-3180 basis functions, and 9- to 16-fold speedups for organic molecules with 540-1340 basis functions compared to fully analytic calculations without sacrificing chemical accuracy. The calculations on a set of larger molecules, including the antibiotic drug Ramoplanin, the 46-residue crambin protein, fullerenes up to C540 and nanotubes up to 14×(6,6), using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G

  5. Organic electronic materials: recent advances in the DFT description of the ground and excited states using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

    PubMed

    Körzdörfer, Thomas; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Density functional theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TD-DFT) are powerful tools enabling the theoretical prediction of the ground- and excited-state properties of organic electronic materials with reasonable accuracy at affordable computational costs. Due to their excellent accuracy-to-numerical-costs ratio, semilocal and global hybrid functionals such as B3LYP have become the workhorse for geometry optimizations and the prediction of vibrational spectra in modern theoretical organic chemistry. Despite the overwhelming success of these out-of-the-box functionals for such applications, the computational treatment of electronic and structural properties that are of particular interest in organic electronic materials sometimes reveals severe and qualitative failures of such functionals. Important examples include the overestimation of conjugation, torsional barriers, and electronic coupling as well as the underestimation of bond-length alternations or excited-state energies in low-band-gap polymers. In this Account, we highlight how these failures can be traced back to the delocalization error inherent to semilocal and global hybrid functionals, which leads to the spurious delocalization of electron densities and an overestimation of conjugation. The delocalization error for systems and functionals of interest can be quantified by allowing for fractional occupation of the highest occupied molecular orbital. It can be minimized by using long-range corrected hybrid functionals and a nonempirical tuning procedure for the range-separation parameter. We then review the benefits and drawbacks of using tuned long-range corrected hybrid functionals for the description of the ground and excited states of π-conjugated systems. In particular, we show that this approach provides for robust and efficient means of characterizing the electronic couplings in organic mixed-valence systems, for the calculation of accurate torsional barriers at the polymer

  6. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu3+, Bi3+:REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be

  7. Excitability of nodose ganglion cells and their role in vago-vagal reflex control of gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kirsteen N

    2003-12-01

    A large body of evidence has demonstrated that vagal afferent neurones show non-uniform properties and that distinct neuronal populations can be identified within the nodose ganglia. Of particular interest is recent work illustrating the significant degree of plasticity displayed by vagal sensory neurones; alterations in vagal afferent neuronal excitability might be important in the development and maintenance of gastrointestinal pathological states. Although it is unclear whether such adaptations are mimicked centrally, recent studies suggest that tonic afferent vagal inputs act as a 'brake' on inputs to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. It would be reasonable to assume, therefore, that plasticity in the excitability of vagal afferent neurones would have dramatic consequences for the regulation and modulation of gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflexes.

  8. Development of an excited-state calculation method for large systems using dynamical polarizability: A divide-and-conquer approach at the time-dependent density functional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we developed an excited-state calculation method for large systems using dynamical polarizabilities at the time-dependent density functional theory level. Three equivalent theories, namely, coupled-perturbed self-consistent field (CPSCF), random phase approximation (RPA), and Green function (GF), were extended to linear-scaling methods using the divide-and-conquer (DC) technique. The implementations of the standard and DC-based CPSCF, RPA, and GF methods are described. Numerical applications of these methods to polyene chains, single-wall carbon nanotubes, and water clusters confirmed the accuracy and efficiency of the DC-based methods, especially DC-GF.

  9. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Zarycz, M Natalia C; Provasi, Patricio F; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  10. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 48/Ca ions with /sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Fowler, M.M.; Daniels, W.R.; von Gunten, H.R.; Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Gregorich, K.; Welch, R.; Seaborg, G.T.; Bruechle, W.

    1985-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 234- to 294-MeV /sup 40/Ca ions and with 239- to 318-MeV /sup 48/Ca ions. The maxima of the isotopic distributions for these elements occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions. The shapes of the distributions and the half-widths of about 2.5 mass numbers are quite similar to those observed previously for reactions of /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 248/Cm. In general, the excitation functions for /sup 40/Ca show maxima near the Coulomb barrier while those for /sup 48/Ca are about 20 MeV above the barrier. The cross sections decrease rather slowly with increasing projectile energy over the energy range studied, indicating that the additional projectile energy is not manifested as excitation energy of these actinide products.

  11. Complementary functions of SK and Kv7/M potassium channels in excitability control and synaptic integration in rat hippocampal dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aparicio, Pedro; Murphy, Ricardo; Storm, Johan F

    2014-01-01

    The dentate granule cells (DGCs) form the most numerous neuron population of the hippocampal memory system, and its gateway for cortical input. Yet, we have only limited knowledge of the intrinsic membrane properties that shape their responses. Since SK and Kv7/M potassium channels are key mechanisms of neuronal spiking and excitability control, afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and synaptic integration, we studied their functions in DGCs. The specific SK channel blockers apamin or scyllatoxin increased spike frequency (excitability), reduced early spike frequency adaptation, fully blocked the medium-duration AHP (mAHP) after a single spike or spike train, and increased postsynaptic EPSP summation after spiking, but had no effect on input resistance (Rinput) or spike threshold. In contrast, blockade of Kv7/M channels by XE991 increased Rinput, lowered the spike threshold, and increased excitability, postsynaptic EPSP summation, and EPSP–spike coupling, but only slightly reduced mAHP after spike trains (and not after single spikes). The SK and Kv7/M channel openers 1-EBIO and retigabine, respectively, had effects opposite to the blockers. Computational modelling reproduced many of these effects. We conclude that SK and Kv7/M channels have complementary roles in DGCs. These mechanisms may be important for the dentate network function, as CA3 neurons can be activated or inhibition recruited depending on DGC firing rate. PMID:24366266

  12. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C.; Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  13. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4}, PH{sub 3}, SH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  14. In Vitro Assessment Reveals Parameters-Dependent Modulation on Excitability and Functional Connectivity of Cerebellar Slice by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongyu; Zhang, Guanghao; Weng, Xiechuan; Han, Yao; Lang, Yiran; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xiaobo; Wang, Kun; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural excitability and plasticity. There is still controversy concerning the cortical response to rTMS of different frequencies. In this study, a novel in vitro paradigm utilizing the Multi-Electrodes Array (MEA) system and acute cerebellar slicing is described. In a controllable environment that comprises perfusion, incubation, recording and stimulation modules, the spontaneous single-unit spiking activity in response to rTMS of different frequencies and powers was directly measured and analyzed. Investigation using this in vitro paradigm revealed frequency-dependent modulation upon the excitability and functional connectivity of cerebellar slices. The 1-Hz rTMS sessions induced short-term inhibition or lagged inhibition, whereas 20-Hz sessions induced excitation. The level of modulation is influenced by the value of power. However the long-term response fluctuated without persistent direction. The choice of evaluation method may also interfere with the interpretation of modulation direction. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term functional connectivity was strengthened by 1-Hz rTMS and weakened by 20-Hz rTMS. PMID:27000527

  15. Semiclassical treatment of excitation and electron loss in A{sup q+}+H(1s) collisions using spherical Bessel functions

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L. F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.; Sevila, I.; Suarez, J.; Pons, B.

    2006-07-15

    We perform monocentric close-coupling calculations to obtain partial and total cross sections for excitation and electron loss in bare A{sup q+}+H(1s) collisions, with 1{<=}q{<=}6, for intermediate (E=40 keV/amu) to high (E=7000 keV/amu) impact energies. We use underlying basis sets of even-tempered Slater-type orbitals and confined spherical Bessel functions and compare the accuracy of the cross sections derived from these two implementations. Scaling rules are then established for the partial excitation cross sections of interest in fusion plasma research. We also undertake impact parameter first-Born calculations using the spherical Bessel underlying set to compare in the course of collision the close-coupling and perturbative descriptions of the ionization process.

  16. Source mechanism of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, inferred from waveform inversion of the effective excitation functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the source mechanism of long-period (LP) events observed at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, based on waveform inversions of their effective excitation functions. The effective excitation function, which represents the apparent excitation observed at individual receivers, is estimated by applying an autoregressive filter to the LP waveform. Assuming a point source, we apply this method to seven LP events the waveforms of which are characterized by simple decaying and nearly monochromatic oscillations with frequency in the range 1-3 Hz. The results of the waveform inversions show dominant volumetric change components accompanied by single force components, common to all the events analyzed, and suggesting a repeated activation of a sub-horizontal crack located 300 m beneath the summit crater lakes. Based on these results, we propose a model of the source process of LP seismicity, in which a gradual buildup of steam pressure in a hydrothermal crack in response to magmatic heat causes repeated discharges of steam from the crack. The rapid discharge of fluid causes the collapse of the fluid-filled crack and excites acoustic oscillations of the crack, which produce the characteristic waveforms observed in the LP events. The presence of a single force synchronous with the collapse of the crack is interpreted as the release of gravitational energy that occurs as the slug of steam ejected from the crack ascends toward the surface and is replaced by cooler water flowing downward in a fluid-filled conduit linking the crack and the base of the crater lake. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Excited states of large open-shell molecules: an efficient, general, and spin-adapted approach based on a restricted open-shell ground state wave function.

    PubMed

    Roemelt, Michael; Neese, Frank

    2013-04-11

    A spin-adapted configuration interaction with singles method that is based on a restricted open-shell reference function (ROCIS) with general total spin S is presented. All excited configuration state functions (CSFs) are generated with the aid of a spin-free second quantization formalism that only leads to CSFs within the first order interacting space. By virtue of the CSF construction, the formalism involves higher than singly excited determinants but not higher than singly excited configurations. Matrix elements between CSFs are evaluated on the basis of commutator relationships using a symbolic algebra program. The final equations were, however, hand-coded in order to maximize performance. The method can be applied to fairly large systems with more than 100 atoms in reasonable wall-clock times and also parallelizes well. Test calculations demonstrate that the approach is far superior to UHF-based configuration interaction with single excitations but necessarily falls somewhat short of quantitative accuracy due to the lack of dynamic correlation contributions. In order to implicitly account for dynamic correlation in a crude way, the program optionally allows for the use of Kohn-Sham orbitals in combination with a modest downscaling of two-electron integrals (DFT/ROCIS). All two-electron integrals of Kohn-Sham orbitals that appear in the Hamiltonian matrix are reduced by a total of three scaling parameters that are suitable for a wide range of molecules. Test calculations on open-shell organic radicals as well as transition metal complexes demonstrate the wide applicability of the method and its ability to calculate the electronic spectra of large molecular systems.

  18. Geomagnetic excitation of nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, C.; Vondrák, J.

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis of Malkin (2013), who demonstrated that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks. We found that if the numerical integration of Brzeziński broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved (Vondrák & Ron, 2014). Nevertheless, this approach assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks leads to a stepwise change in the position of celestial pole, which is physically not acceptable. Therefore we introduce a simple continuous excitation function that hypothetically describes the influence of geomagnetic jerks, and leads to rapid but continuous changes of pole position. The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations and this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets, and prove that the agreement is improved significantly.

  19. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  20. Charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the 7-azaindole dimer. A hybrid configuration interactions singles/time-dependent density functional theory description.

    PubMed

    Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M

    2006-01-26

    The hybrid configuration interaction singles/time dependent density functional theory approach of Dreuw and Head-Gordon [Dreuw, A.; Head-Gordon, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 4007] has been applied to study the potential energy landscape and accessibility of the charge-transfer pipi* excited state in the dimer of 7-azaindole, which has been traditionally considered a model for DNA base pairing. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state preferentially stabilizes the product of a single proton transfer. In this situation, the crossing between this state and the photoactive electronic state of the dimer is accessible. It is found that the charge-transfer pipi* excited state has a very steep potential energy profile with respect to any single proton-transfer coordinate and, in contrast, an extremely flat potential energy profile with respect to the stretch of the single proton-transfer complex. This is predicted to bring about a pair of rare fragments of the 7-azaindole dimer, physically separated and hence having very long lifetimes. This could have implications in the DNA base pairs of which the system is an analogue, in the form of replication errors.

  1. Electronic Excitations in Push-Pull Oligomers and Their Complexes with Fullerene from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory with Polarizable Embedding.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Björn; Rohlfing, Michael; Andrienko, Denis

    2014-08-12

    We present a comparative study of excited states in push-pull oligomers of PCPDTBT and PSBTBT and prototypical complexes with a C60 acceptor using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We analyze excitations in oligomers up to a length of 5 nm and find that for both materials the absorption energy practically saturates for structures larger than two repeat units due to the localized nature of the excitation. In the bimolecular complexes with C60, the transition from Frenkel to charge transfer excitons is generally exothermic and strongly influenced by the acceptor's position and orientation. The high CT binding energy of the order of 2 eV results from the lack of an explicit molecular environment. External polarization effects are then modeled in a GW-BSE based QM/MM approach by embedding the donor-acceptor complex into a polarizable lattice. The lowest charge transfer exciton is energetically stabilized by about 0.5 eV, while its binding energy is reduced to about 0.3 eV. We also identify a globally unbound charge transfer state with a more delocalized hole at higher energy while still within the absorption spectrum, which opens another potential pathway for charge separation. For both PCPDTBT and PSBTBT, the energetics are largely similar with respect to absorption and the driving force to form intermediate charge transfer excitations for free charge generation. These results support that the higher power conversion efficiency observed for solar cells using PSBTBT as donor material is a result of molecular packing rather than of the electronic structure of the polymer.

  2. Excitation function and yield for the (103)Rh(d,2n)(103)Pd nuclear reaction: Optimization of the production of palladium-103.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Alí Santoro, María Del Carmen; Cotogno, Giulio; Duchemin, Charlotte; Haddad, Ferid; Holzwarth, Uwe; Groppi, Flavia

    2017-03-06

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for the generation of (103)Pd were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on rhodium targets at deuteron energies up to Ed=33MeV. The excitation functions of the reactions (103)Rh(d,xn)(101,103)Pd, (103)Rh(d,x)(100g,cum,101m,g,102m,g)Rh and (103)Rh(d,2p)(103)Ru have been measured, and the Thick-Target Yield for (103)Pd has been calculated.

  3. Evaluation of excitation functions of proton and deuteron induced reactions on enriched tellurium isotopes with special relevance to the production of iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M N; Sudár, S; Hussain, M; Malik, A A; Shah, H A; Qaim, S M

    2010-09-01

    Cross-section data for the production of medically important radionuclide (124)I via five proton and deuteron induced reactions on enriched tellurium isotopes were evaluated. The nuclear model codes, STAPRE, EMPIRE and TALYS, were used for consistency checks of the experimental data. Recommended excitation functions were derived using a well-defined statistical procedure. Therefrom integral yields were calculated. The various production routes of (124)I were compared. Presently the (124)Te(p,n)(124)I reaction is the method of choice; however, the (125)Te(p,2n)(124)I reaction also appears to have great potential.

  4. Solvent effects on optical excitations of poly para phenylene ethynylene studied by QM/MM simulations based on many-body Green's functions theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, B.; Karttunen, M.; Baumeier, B.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic excitations in dilute solutions of poly para phenylene ethynylene (poly-PPE) are studied using a QM/MM approach combining many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation with polarizable force field models. Oligomers up to a length of 7.5 nm (10 repeat units) functionalized with nonyl side chains are solvated in toluene and water, respectively. After equilibration using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), the system is partitioned into a quantum region (backbone) embedded into a classical (side chains and solvent) environment. Optical absorption properties are calculated solving the coupled QM/MM system self-consistently and special attention is paid to the effects of solvents. The model allows to differentiate the influence of oligomer conformation induced by the solvation from electronic effects related to local electric fields and polarization. It is found that the electronic environment contributions are negligible compared to the conformational dynamics of the conjugated PPE. An analysis of the electron-hole wave function reveals a sensitivity of energy and localization characteristics of the excited states to bends in the global conformation of the oligomer rather than to the relative of phenyl rings along the backbone.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: A Green's function model for ferromagnetism and spin excitations of (Ga, Mn)As diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gui-Bin; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2009-11-01

    We study (Ga, Mn)As diluted magnetic semiconductors in terms of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida quantum spin model in Green's function approach. Random distributions of the magnetic atoms are treated by using an analytical average of magnetic configurations. Average magnetic moments and spin excitation spectra as functions of temperature can be obtained by solving self-consistent equations, and the Curie temperature TC is given explicitly. TC is proportional to magnetic atomic concentration, and there exists a maximum for TC as a function of carrier concentration. Applied to (Ga, Mn)As, the theoretical results are consistent with experiment and the experimental TC can be obtained with reasonable parameters. This modelling can also be applied to other diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  6. Construction and surface/interface behavior of bio-functional surface layer by microwave-excited Ar/H2O plasma-induced polyethylene glycol polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z.; Ogino, A.; Nagatsu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Ar/H2O microwave-excited surface-wave plasma-induced grafting-polymerization and crosslinking technique was presented to construct a bio-functional surface layer. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to diagnose Ar/H2O plasma. The surface/interface behavior especially the aging effect of hydroxyl groups over the grafted PEG spacer layer was investigated by measuring water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the addition of water vapor into Ar plasma can optimize the concentration of hydroxyl functional groups on surface; grafted PEG spacer layer can provide a long-term hydrophilicity of PU films, and alleviate the aging effect of hydroxyl functional groups.

  7. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  8. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  9. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  10. On Diversity of Configurations Generated by Excitable Cellular Automata with Dynamical Excitation Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Excitable cellular automata with dynamical excitation interval exhibit a wide range of space-time dynamics based on an interplay between propagating excitation patterns which modify excitability of the automaton cells. Such interactions leads to formation of standing domains of excitation, stationary waves and localized excitations. We analyzed morphological and generative diversities of the functions studied and characterized the functions with highest values of the diversities. Amongst other intriguing discoveries we found that upper boundary of excitation interval more significantly affects morphological diversity of configurations generated than lower boundary of the interval does and there is no match between functions which produce configurations of excitation with highest morphological diversity and configurations of interval boundaries with highest morphological diversity. Potential directions of future studies of excitable media with dynamically changing excitability may focus on relations of the automaton model with living excitable media, e.g. neural tissue and muscles, novel materials with memristive properties and networks of conductive polymers.

  11. The physiological basis of Glottal electromagnetic micropower sensors (GEMS) and their use in defining an excitation function for the human vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Gregory Clell

    1999-10-01

    The definition, use, and physiological basis of Glottal Electromagnetic Micropower Sensors (GEMS) is presented. These sensors are a new type of low power (<20 milliwatts radiated) microwave regime (900 MHz to 2.5 GHz) multi-purpose motion sensor developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GEMS are sensitive to movement in an adjustable field of view (FOV) surrounding the antennae. In this thesis, the GEMS has been utilized for speech research, targeted to receive motion signals from the subglottal region of the trachea. The GEMS signal is analyzed to determine the physiological source of the signal, and this information is used to calculate the subglottal pressure, effectively an excitation function for the human vocal tract. For the first time, an excitation function may be calculated in near real time using a noninvasive procedure. Several experiments and models are presented to demonstrate that the GEMS signal is representative of the motion of the subglottal posterior wall of the trachea as it vibrates in response to the pressure changes caused by the folds as they modulate the airflow supplied by the lungs. The vibrational properties of the tracheal wall are modeled using a lumped-element circuit model. Taking the output of the vocal tract to be the audio pressure captured by a microphone and the input to be the subglottal pressure, the transfer function of the vocal tract (including the nasal cavities) can be approximated every 10-30 milliseconds using an autoregressive moving-average model. Unlike the currently utilized method of transfer function approximation, this new method only involves noninvasive GEMS measurements and digital signal processing and does not demand the difficult task of obtaining precise physical measurements of the tract and subsequent estimation of the transfer function using its cross-sectional area. The ability to measure the physical motion of the trachea enables a significant number of potential applications

  12. 1s22p3 and 1s22s23l, l = s,p,d, excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-07-15

    For some members of the boron isoelectronic series and starting from explicitly correlated wave functions, six low-lying excited states have been studied. Three of them arise from the 1s(2)2p(3) configuration, and the other three from the 1s(2)2s(2)3l, l = s,p,d, configurations. This work follows a previous one on both the 1s(2)2s(2)2p-(2)P ground state and the four excited states coming from the 1s(2)2s2p(2) configuration. Energies, one- and two-body densities in position space and some other two-body properties in position and momentum spaces have been obtained. A systematic analysis of the energetic ordering of the states as a function of the total orbital angular momentum and spin is performed in terms of the electron-nucleus and electron-electron potential energies and the role of the angular correlation is discussed. All calculations have been carried out by using the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  13. Excitation function for H+O2 reaction: A study of zero-point energy effects and rotational distributions in trajectory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, A. J. C.

    1993-07-01

    The excitation function of the H+O2 (v=0)→OH+O reaction has been determined from trajectory calculations using the HO2 DMBE IV potential energy surface. Reactive cross sections for thirteen translational energies, corresponding to a total of a quarter of a million trajectories, have been computed covering the range 65≤Etr/kJ mol-1≤550. Various schemes for analyzing the trajectories, three of which aim to correct approximately for the zero-point energy problem of classical dynamics, have been investigated. One of these schemes aims to correct also for known requirements on rotational distributions, e.g., for the fact that by Hund's rules for the coupling of angular momentum the product OH (2Π) molecule always rotates. It has been found that zero-point energy effects and lowest-J constraints on rotational distributions may have a crucial role, especially close to the threshold energy of reaction. Agreement with recent measurements of absolute reactive cross sections is generally satisfactory but, unlike experiment, no sharp maximum is found on the excitation function in the vicinity of Etr=170 kJ mol-1. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. There is also good agreement with existing experimental data on the products rotational distribution.

  14. Excitation functions of proton induced reactions on natOs up to 65 MeV: Experiments and comparison with results from theoretical codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-02-01

    Activation of thin natOs targets, electrodeposited on Ni backings, was investigated for the first time in stacked foil irradiations with 65 MeV and 34 MeV proton beams. Assessments of the produced radionuclides by high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy yielded excitation functions for formation of 184, 185, 186m,m+g, 187m+g, 188m+g, 189m2+m1+g, 190m2,m1+g, 192m1+gIr and 185cum, 191m+gOs, 183m+gRe. Where available comparisons with the reaction cross sections obtained in 2 earlier studies on enriched 192Os were made. Reduced uncertainty on cross sections is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the 27Al(p,x)22,24Na, natNi(p,x)57Ni and natTi(p,x)48V monitor reactions over wide relevant energy ranges. Confirmation of monitoring took place by assessment of excitation functions of 61Cu, 56Ni, 55,56,57,58Co and 52Mn induced in the Ni backings and comparison with a recent compilation for most of these radionuclides. Contributing reactions and overall cross sections are discussed and were evaluated in comparison with the results of the theoretical code TALYS 1.6 (values from the on-line library TENDL-2013).

  15. Testing time-dependent density functional theory with depopulated molecular orbitals for predicting electronic excitation energies of valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer states and potential energies near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2014-09-14

    Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with most exchange-correlation functionals is well known to systematically underestimate the excitation energies of Rydberg and charge-transfer excited states of atomic and molecular systems. To improve the description of Rydberg states within the KS TDDFT framework, Gaiduk et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 253005 (2012)] proposed a scheme that may be called HOMO depopulation. In this study, we tested this scheme on an extensive dataset of valence and Rydberg excitation energies of various atoms, ions, and molecules. It is also tested on a charge-transfer excitation of NH{sub 3}-F{sub 2} and on the potential energy curves of NH{sub 3} near a conical intersection. We found that the method can indeed significantly improve the accuracy of predicted Rydberg excitation energies while preserving reasonable accuracy for valence excitation energies. However, it does not appear to improve the description of charge-transfer excitations that are severely underestimated by standard KS TDDFT with conventional exchange-correlation functionals, nor does it perform appreciably better than standard TDDFT for the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  16. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra, conformation, and carbonyl wagging potential energy function of cyclopentanone and its deuterated isotopomers in the S1 (n,π*) electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    1993-04-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of cyclopentanone and its 2,2,5,5-d4 isotopomer have been recorded in the 305-335 nm region. In addition, the spectra of d1, d2, and d3 species were obtained from isotopic mixtures. The electronic band origin of the d0 molecule for the S1 (n,π*) state of A2 symmetry occurs at 30 276 cm-1, while that of the d4 molecule is at 30 265 cm-1. More than 100 fluorescence bands were assigned for each species. These arise from combinations of ν3 (C=O stretch), ν11 (ring-angle bending), ν18 (ring twisting), ν25 (C=O out-of-plane wag), ν26 (ring bending), and ν36 (C=O in-plane wag) and their vibrational excited states. The vibrational frequencies for ν3, ν11, and ν36 are significantly lower in the S1 state than the S0 ground state. However, the out-of-plane ring modes ν18 and ν26 are only slightly shifted. A progression observed for ν26 does indicate that in the S1 state, the bent ring conformation lies about 500 cm-1 above the ring-twisting minimum and corresponds to a saddle point in the two-dimensional ring-twisting/ring-bending potential energy surface. Band progressions for ν18 can be used to calculate the ring-twisting barriers (the barriers to planarity) for the d0 and d4 isotopomers to be 1433 and 1240 cm-1, respectively. Because of limited data, however, these values may be as much as several hundred cm-1 too high. The energies for the C=O out-of-plane wagging states up to v25=9 for each isotopomer were determined for the S1 state and these were used to calculate the C=O wagging potential energy functions for each. In the S1 state, the barrier to inversion of the C=O group is 672±10 cm-1 and the wagging angle is 22°±1°.

  17. Abnormal corticospinal tract function and motor cortex excitability in non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers: A TMS study.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Torres-Vega, Reidenis; Medrano Montero, Jacqueline; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimeé; Auburger, Georg; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate if the corticospinal tract is affected in the prodromal stage of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), prior to development of the cerebellar syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 37 non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers and in age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent clinical assessment and transcranial magnetic stimulation to determine corticospinal tract integrity to the right abductor pollicis brevis and tibialis anterior muscles. Non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers showed significantly higher resting and active motor thresholds for both muscles, and prolonged cortical silent periods and central motor conduction times (CMCT), compared to controls. CMCT to the tibialis anterior correlated directly with CAG repeat size, and inversely with predicted time to ataxia onset. Findings provide novel electrophysiological evidence for affection of the corticospinal tract and motor cortex in prodromal SCA2. Slowed conduction in the corticospinal tract to the lower limbs reflects polyglutamine neurotoxicity, and predicts time to ataxia onset. Identification of corticospinal tract damage and decreases motor cortical excitability in the prodromal stage of SCA2 allows early disease monitoring. This will become important as soon as effective neuroprotective treatment will be available. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  19. The best orbital and pair function for describing ionic and excited states on top of the exact ground state.

    PubMed

    Klaiman, Shachar; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2014-11-21

    Many-body processes inevitably lead to the transition from one many-body wavefunction to another. Due to the complexity of the initial and final states many-body wavefunctions, one often wishes to try and describe such transitions using only a single-particle function. While there are numerous types of orbitals and densities which are commonly used, the question remains which one is optimal and in which sense. Here we present the optimal one and two body functions whose anti-symmetrized product with the initial state yields the maximal overlap with the final state. A definition of the above optimal condition and its rigorous proof are given. The resulting optimal functions shed additional light on the well-known Dyson orbital and reduced transition matrix, demonstrating further their physical meaning as independent functions.

  20. Assessment of density functional theory based Î'SCF (self-consistent field) and linear response methods for longest wavelength excited states of extended π-conjugated molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2014-07-01

    Computational investigation of the longest wavelength excitations in a series of cyanines and linear n-acenes is undertaken with the use of standard spin-conserving linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) as well as its spin-flip variant and a ΔSCF method based on the ensemble DFT. The spin-conserving linear response TD-DFT fails to accurately reproduce the lowest excitation energy in these π-conjugated systems by strongly overestimating the excitation energies of cyanines and underestimating the excitation energies of n-acenes. The spin-flip TD-DFT is capable of correcting the underestimation of excitation energies of n-acenes by bringing in the non-dynamic electron correlation into the ground state; however, it does not fully correct for the overestimation of the excitation energies of cyanines, for which the non-dynamic correlation does not seem to play a role. The ensemble DFT method employed in this work is capable of correcting for the effect of missing non-dynamic correlation in the ground state of n-acenes and for the deficient description of differential correlation effects between the ground and excited states of cyanines and yields the excitation energies of both types of extended π-conjugated systems with the accuracy matching high-level ab initio multireference calculations.

  1. Assessment of density functional theory based ΔSCF (self-consistent field) and linear response methods for longest wavelength excited states of extended π-conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2014-07-14

    Computational investigation of the longest wavelength excitations in a series of cyanines and linear n-acenes is undertaken with the use of standard spin-conserving linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) as well as its spin-flip variant and a ΔSCF method based on the ensemble DFT. The spin-conserving linear response TD-DFT fails to accurately reproduce the lowest excitation energy in these π-conjugated systems by strongly overestimating the excitation energies of cyanines and underestimating the excitation energies of n-acenes. The spin-flip TD-DFT is capable of correcting the underestimation of excitation energies of n-acenes by bringing in the non-dynamic electron correlation into the ground state; however, it does not fully correct for the overestimation of the excitation energies of cyanines, for which the non-dynamic correlation does not seem to play a role. The ensemble DFT method employed in this work is capable of correcting for the effect of missing non-dynamic correlation in the ground state of n-acenes and for the deficient description of differential correlation effects between the ground and excited states of cyanines and yields the excitation energies of both types of extended π-conjugated systems with the accuracy matching high-level ab initio multireference calculations.

  2. Assessment of density functional theory based ΔSCF (self-consistent field) and linear response methods for longest wavelength excited states of extended π-conjugated molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2014-07-14

    Computational investigation of the longest wavelength excitations in a series of cyanines and linear n-acenes is undertaken with the use of standard spin-conserving linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) as well as its spin-flip variant and a ΔSCF method based on the ensemble DFT. The spin-conserving linear response TD-DFT fails to accurately reproduce the lowest excitation energy in these π-conjugated systems by strongly overestimating the excitation energies of cyanines and underestimating the excitation energies of n-acenes. The spin-flip TD-DFT is capable of correcting the underestimation of excitation energies of n-acenes by bringing in the non-dynamic electron correlation into the ground state; however, it does not fully correct for the overestimation of the excitation energies of cyanines, for which the non-dynamic correlation does not seem to play a role. The ensemble DFT method employed in this work is capable of correcting for the effect of missing non-dynamic correlation in the ground state of n-acenes and for the deficient description of differential correlation effects between the ground and excited states of cyanines and yields the excitation energies of both types of extended π-conjugated systems with the accuracy matching high-level ab initio multireference calculations.

  3. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Daniel W; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J J; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host-guest complex (TTF⊂CBPQT(4+)). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host-guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. However, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  4. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  5. Postnatal Excitability Development and Innervation by Functional Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Terminals in Neurons of the Rat Spinal Sacral Dorsal Commissural Nucleus: an Electrophysiological Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun

    2016-11-01

    The sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) in the spinal cord receives both somatic and visceral primary afferents. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels are preferentially expressed in certain fine primary afferents. However, knowledge of the SDCN neurons postnatal excitability development and their contacts with TRPV1 fibers remains elusive. Here, whole-cell recordings were conducted in spinal cord slices to evaluate the postnatal development of SDCN neurons and their possible contacts with functional TRPV1-expressing terminals. SDCN neurons in neonatal (postnatal day (P) 1-2), young (P8-10), and adult rats (P35-40) have different electrophysiological properties. SDCN neurons in neonatal rats have higher frequency of spontaneous firing, higher resting membrane potential, and lower presynaptic glutamate release probability. However, no difference in quantal release was found. At all developmental stages, TRPV1 activation with the selective agonist capsaicin increases glutamate release in the presence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks action potential-dependent and polysynaptic neurotransmission, indicating that functional TRPV1 fibers innervate SDCN neurons directly. Capsaicin-induced presynaptic glutamate release onto SDCN neurons depends on external Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels; voltage-dependent calcium channels had a slighter impact. In contrast, capsaicin blocked C fiber-evoked synaptic transmission, indicating that TRPV1 activation has opposite effects on spontaneous asynchronous and action potential-dependent synchronous glutamate release. These data indicate that excitability of SDCN neurons undergoes a developmental shift, and these neurons receive functional TRPV1 terminals from early postnatal stage. The opposite action of capsaicin on asynchronous and synchronous glutamate release should be taken into account when TRPV1 channels are considered as therapeutic targets.

  6. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors for excited states within time-dependent density functional theory in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Laktionov, Andrey; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we have proposed a scheme for the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings and nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory using a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions [I. Tavernelli, E. Tapavicza, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124107 (2009)]. As demonstrated in a later work [I. Tavernelli, B. F. E. Curchod, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 196101 (2009)], this approach is rigorous in the case of the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings between the ground state and any excited state. In this work, we extend this formalism to the case of coupling between pairs of singly excited states with the same spin multiplicity. After proving the correctness of our formalism using the electronic oscillator approach by Mukamel and co-workers [S. Tretiak and S. Mukamel, Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 102, 3171 (2002)], we tested the method on a model system, namely, protonated formaldimine, for which we computed S1/S2 nonadiabatic coupling vectors and compared them with results from high level (MR-CISD) electronic structure calculations.

  7. Excitation functions for some W, Ta and Hf radionuclides obtained by deuteron irradiation of 181Ta up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Daraban, L.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Ignatyuk, A.; Rebeles, R. Adam; Baba, M.

    2009-10-01

    Experimental excitation functions for deuteron induced reactions up to 40 MeV on mono-isotopic Ta ( 181Ta) were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. From high resolution gamma spectrometry and X-ray analysis cross-section data for the production of 181W, 177,178g,180g,182m+gTa, and 179m2,180mHf were determined. Comparison with the scarce earlier published data are presented and results for values predicted by different theoretical codes, adapted for more reliable calculations for d-induced reactions, are included. Thick target yields for 182m+g,180g,178gTa and 181W were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves. Using dose conversion factors and irradiation scenarios, possible occupational doses to maintenance or scientific personnel around high power accelerators where Ta based structural elements (collimators, beam stoppers, shielding) are present could be derived.

  8. Proteins of Excitable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1969-01-01

    Excitable membranes have the special ability of changing rapidly and reversibly their permeability to ions, thereby controlling the ion movements that carry the electric currents propagating nerve impulses. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the specific signal which is released by excitation and is recognized by a specific protein, the ACh-receptor; it induces a conformational change, triggering off a sequence of reactions resulting in increased permeability. The hydrolysis of ACh by ACh-esterase restores the barrier to ions. The enzymes hydrolyzing and forming ACh and the receptor protein are present in the various types of excitable membranes. Properties of the two proteins directly associated with electrical activity, receptor and esterase, will be described in this and subsequent lectures. ACh-esterase has been shown to be located within the excitable membranes. Potent enzyme inhibitors block electrical activity demonstrating the essential role in this function. The enzyme has been recently crystallized and some protein properties will be described. The monocellular electroplax preparation offers a uniquely favorable material for analyzing the properties of the ACh-receptor and its relation to function. The essential role of the receptor in electrical activity has been demonstrated with specific receptor inhibitors. Recent data show the basically similar role of ACh in the axonal and junctional membranes; the differences of electrical events and pharmacological actions are due to variations of shape, structural organization, and environment. PMID:19873642

  9. Core-excitation energy calculations with a long-range corrected hybrid exchange-correlation functional including a short-range Gaussian attenuation (LCgau-BOP).

    PubMed

    Song, Jong-Won; Watson, Mark A; Nakata, Ayako; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2008-11-14

    We report the calculations of core-excitation energies of first-row atoms using the time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) and the long-range correction (LC) scheme for exchange-correlation functionals, including LC-BOP, Coulomb-attenuated method BLYP, and our recently developed LCgau-BOP method, which includes a flexible portion of short-range Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange through the inclusion of a Gaussian function in the LC scheme. We show that the LC scheme completely fails to improve the poor accuracy of conventional generalized gradient approximation functionals, while the LCgau scheme gives an accuracy which is an order of magnitude better than BLYP and significantly better than B3LYP. A reoptimization of the two parameters controlling the inclusion of short-range HF exchange in the LCgau method enables the errors to be reduced to the order of 0.1 eV which is competitive with the best DFT methods we are aware of. This reparametrization does not affect the LC scheme and therefore maintains the high accuracy of predicted reaction barrier heights. Moreover, while there is some loss in accuracy in thermochemical predictions compared to the previously optimized LCgau-BOP, rms errors in the atomization energies over the G2 test set are found to be comparable to B3LYP. Finally, we attempt to rationalize the success of the LC and LCgau schemes in terms of the well-known self-interaction error (SIE) of conventional functionals. To estimate the role of the SIE, we examine the total energy calculations for systems with a fractional number of electrons, not only in the highest occupied molecular orbital but also in the 1s-characterized core orbital. Our conclusion is that the inclusion of short-range HF exchange in LC-type functionals can significantly alleviate the problems of the SIE in the core region. In particular, we confirm that the absence of the SIE diagnostics in the core orbital energies correlates with the accurate prediction of core-excitation

  10. Electronic Absorption Spectra and Carbonyl Wagging Potential Energy Functions for Cyclobutanone, Cyclopentanone and Tetrahydrofuran-3-one in their S1(n, pi*) Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soono; Laane, Jaane

    1999-10-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra of cyclobutanone, cyclopentanone and tetrahydrofuran-3-one were recorded and analyzed in the 28,000-44,000 cm-1 region. More than 40 absorption bands were assigned for cyclobutanone. These arise from combinations of three ring (<7,<8 and <9), the C=O in-plane waggings(<20), the C=O out-of-plane waggings(<26) and the ring puckering(<27) vibrations. Assigned bands were compared with previously recorded jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra (FES). Additional C=O out-of-plane wagging bands were found for cyclopentanone and tetrahydrofuran-3-one and the potential energy function for this vibration in cyclopentanone and tetrahydrofuran-3-one were recalculated.

  11. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 18/O with /sup 248/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Nurmia, M.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; von Gunten, H.R.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1983-06-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 97- to 122-MeV /sup 18/O ions and of isotopes of Bk through No in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 91- to 150-MeV /sup 18/O ions. The cross sections and widths of the mass distributions for the actinides produced in these reactions are very similar for transfer of the same numbers of nucleons. A semiquantitative comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on a simple model shows that calculations of this type are helpful in selection of projectile-target systems and optimum energies for production of specific actinide isotopes and for synthesis of as yet unknown heavy isotopes and elements. Comparisons of experimental results with calculations show that, in general, about half of the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred to the actinide product.

  12. Evaluation of excitation functions of 3He- and α-particle induced reactions on antimony isotopes with special relevance to the production of iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M N; Sudár, S; Hussain, M; Malik, A A; Qaim, S M

    2011-01-01

    Cross section data were evaluated for the production of the medically important positron emitter (124)I (T(1/2)=4.18d) via (3)He- and α-particle induced reactions on Sb isotopes. The consistency in the measured data available in the literature was checked against the cross section calculations of three nuclear model codes (i.e. STAPRE, EMPIRE and TALYS). The recommended excitation functions obtained by a statistical procedure were used to derive the integral yields. An assessment of the (124)I yields and associated radioisotopic impurities suggests that the (123)Sb(α,3n)(124)I process over the energy range of E(α)=45 → 32 MeV could be of potential interest for the production of (124)I.

  13. Extension of excitation functions up to 50 MeV for activation products in deuteron irradiations of Pr and Tm targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-09-01

    Extension up to 50 MeV incident deuteron energy is presented for excitation functions of activation products formed in monoisotopic Tm (169Tm) and Pr (141Pr). By stacked foil irradiations direct and/or cumulative production of 140,139m,138Nd, 138mPr, 141,139,137m,135Ce on Pr and 166,169Yb, 166,167,168Tm on Tm targets were measured. Confirmation of earlier experimental results for all investigated radionuclides is found and the influence of the higher energy on thick target yields and batch production of medically relevant radionuclides (140Nd, 139Pr (as decay product of 139mNd), 166,169Yb, 167Tm) is discussed. A comparison of experimental values with TALYS1.6 code results (predicted values from TENDL-2015 on-line library) shows a better description of the (d,pxn) reactions than older ones.

  14. Functional involvement of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in anethol-induced changes in Ca(2+) dependent excitability of F1 neurons in Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Zahra; Hassanpour-Ezatti, Majid; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2011-07-01

    The effects of anethol, the major component of anise oil, on the Ca(2+)-dependent excitability and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in snail neurons were examined using intracellular recording. Anethol (0.5%) significantly broadened the spike, reduced the firing frequency and enhanced the AHP amplitude. In contrast, anethol (2%) significantly increased the firing frequency and decreased the AHP. Blockade of Ca(2+) channels after anethol application depolarized the membrane potential and significantly reduced the firing rate. Furthermore, in the presence of anethol (0.5%) a significant decrease in the AHP was observed by Ca(2+) channels blockage. Here, anethol-induced functional modification of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels is suggested.

  15. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  16. Excitation function for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural ytterbium for production of high specific activity 177g Lu in no-carrier-added form for metabolic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Groppi, Flavia; Gandini, Andrea; Gini, Luigi; Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Bonardi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for generation of no-carrier-added Lu radionuclides were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on natural Yb targets at energies up to E(d)=18.18 MeV. Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Yb(d,xn)(169,170,171,172,173,174g,174m,176m,177g)Lu and (nat)Yb(d,pxn)(169,175,177)Yb have been measured, among them three ((169)Lu, (174m)Lu and (176m)Lu) are reported for the first time. The upper limit of the contamination from the long-lived metastable level (177m)Lu was evaluated too. Thick-target yields for all investigated radionuclides are calculated.

  17. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  18. Application of the dressed time-dependent density functional theory for the excited states of linear polyenes.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Grzegorz; Włodarczyk, Radosław

    2009-04-15

    Dressed Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (Maitra et al., J Chem Phys 2004, 120, 5932) is applied to selected linear polyenes. Limits of validity of the approximation are briefly discussed. The implementation strategy is described. Results for the 2(1)B(u) and 2(1)A(g) states of selected linear polyenes are presented and compared with accessible experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Knockout of the BK β4-subunit promotes a functional coupling of BK channels and ryanodine receptors that mediate a fAHP-induced increase in excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Bugay, Vladislav; Ling, Ling; Chuang, Hui-Hsui; Jaffe, David B.

    2016-01-01

    BK channels are large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels with diverse properties. Knockout of the accessory BK β4-subunit in hippocampus dentate gyrus granule neurons causes BK channels to change properties from slow-gated type II channels to fast-gated type I channels that sharpen the action potential, increase the fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP) amplitude, and increase spike frequency. Here we studied the calcium channels that contribute to fast-gated BK channel activation and increased excitability of β4 knockout neurons. By using pharmacological blockers during current-clamp recording, we find that BK channel activation during the fAHP is dependent on ryanodine receptor activation. In contrast, L-type calcium channel blocker (nifedipine) affects the BK channel-dependent repolarization phase of the action potential but has no effect on the fAHP. Reducing BK channel activation during the repolarization phase with nifedipine, or during the fAHP with ryanodine, indicated that it is the BK-mediated increase of the fAHP that confers proexcitatory effects. The proexcitatory role of the fAHP was corroborated using dynamic current clamp. Increase or decrease of the fAHP amplitude during spiking revealed an inverse relationship between fAHP amplitude and interspike interval. Finally, we show that the seizure-prone ryanodine receptor gain-of-function (R2474S) knockin mice have an unaltered repolarization phase but larger fAHP and increased AP frequency compared with their control littermates. In summary, these results indicate that an important role of the β4-subunit is to reduce ryanodine receptor-BK channel functional coupling during the fAHP component of the action potential, thereby decreasing excitability of dentate gyrus neurons. PMID:27146987

  20. Measurements of Excitation Functions and Line Polarizations for Electron Impact Excitation of the n = 2, 3 States of Atomic Hydrogen in the Energy Range 11 - 2000 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J.; Franklin, B.; Shemansky, D.

    1993-01-01

    The electron-atomic hydrogen scattering system is an important testing ground for theoretical models and has received a great deal of attention from experimentalists and theoreticians alike over the years. A complete description of the excitation process requires a knowledge of many different parameters, and experimental measurements of these parameters have been performed in various laboratories around the world. As far as total cross section data are concerned it has been noted that the discrepancy between the data of Long et al. and Williams for n = 2 excitations needs to be resolved in the interests of any further refinement of theory. We report new measurements of total cross sections and atomic line polarizations for both n=2 and n=3 excitations at energies from threshold to 2000 eV...

  1. Reduced sensory synaptic excitation impairs motor neuron function via Kv2.1 in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Emily V; Simon, Christian M; Pagiazitis, John G; Chalif, Joshua I; Vukojicic, Aleksandra; Drobac, Estelle; Wang, Xiaojian; Mentis, George Z

    2017-07-01

    Behavioral deficits in neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to the selective dysfunction of vulnerable neurons via cell-autonomous mechanisms. Although vulnerable neurons are embedded in neuronal circuits, the contributions of their synaptic partners to disease process are largely unknown. Here we show that, in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a reduction in proprioceptive synaptic drive leads to motor neuron dysfunction and motor behavior impairments. In SMA mice or after the blockade of proprioceptive synaptic transmission, we observed a decrease in the motor neuron firing that could be explained by the reduction in the expression of the potassium channel Kv2.1 at the surface of motor neurons. Chronically increasing neuronal activity pharmacologically in vivo led to a normalization of Kv2.1 expression and an improvement in motor function. Our results demonstrate a key role of excitatory synaptic drive in shaping the function of motor neurons during development and the contribution of its disruption to a neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Double excitations in finite systems.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, P; Sangalli, D; Berger, J A; Sottile, F; Molinari, L G; Reining, L; Onida, G

    2009-01-28

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is widely used in the study of linear response properties of finite systems. However, there are difficulties in properly describing excited states, which have double- and higher-excitation characters, which are particularly important in molecules with an open-shell ground state. These states would be described if the exact TDDFT kernel were used; however, within the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, the calculated excitation energies have a strict single-excitation character and are fewer than the real ones. A frequency-dependent xc kernel could create extra poles in the response function, which would describe states with a multiple-excitation character. We introduce a frequency-dependent xc kernel, which can reproduce, within TDDFT, double excitations in finite systems. In order to achieve this, we use the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W(omega), which can describe these excitations, and from this we obtain the xc kernel. Using a two-electron model system, we show that the frequency dependence of W does indeed introduce the double excitations that are instead absent in any static approximation of the electron-hole screening.

  3. Pre- and postsynaptic excitation and inhibition at octopus optic lobe photoreceptor terminals; implications for the function of the 'presynaptic bags'.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Stefania; Moccia, Francesco; Di Cristo, Carlo; Caputi, Luigi; Di Cosmo, Anna; Brown, Euan R

    2007-10-01

    Synaptic transmission was examined in the plexiform zone of Octopus vulgaris optic lobes using field-potential recording from optic lobe slices. Stimulation of the optic nerve produced pre- and postsynaptic field potentials. Transmission was abolished in calcium-free seawater, L- glutamate or the AMPA/Kainate receptor blocker CNQX (EC(50), 40 microm), leaving an intact presynaptic field potential. ACh markedly reduced or blocked and d-tubocurarine augmented both pre- and postsynaptic field potentials, while alpha-bungarotoxin and atropine were without effect. Paired-pulse stimulation showed short-term depression of pre- and postsynaptic components with a half-time of recovery of approximately 500 ms. The depression was partially relieved in the presence of d-tubocurarine (half-time of recovery, 350 ms). No long-term changes in synaptic strength were induced by repetitive stimulation. A polyclonal antibody raised against a squid glutamate receptor produced positive staining in the third radial layer of the plexiform zone. No positive staining was observed in the other layers. Taking into account previous morphological data and our results, we propose that the excitatory terminations of the photoreceptors are in the innermost layer of the plexiform zone where the transmitter is likely to be glutamate and postsynaptic receptors are AMPA/kainate-like. Thus, the function of the terminal bags is to provide a location for a presynaptic cholinergic inhibitory shunt. The results imply that this arrangement provides a temporal filter for visual processing and enhances the perception of moving vs. stationary objects.

  4. Tunable Excited-State Properties and Dynamics as a Function of Pt–Pt Distance in Pyrazolate-Bridged Pt(II) Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Kelley, Matthew S. J.; Fransted, Kelly A.; Chakraborty, Arnab; Schatz, George C.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chen, Lin X.

    2016-02-04

    The influence of molecular structure on excited state properties and dynamics of a series of cyclometalated platinum dimers was investigated through a combined experimental and theoretical approach using femtosecond transient absorption (fs TA) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The molecules have the general formula [Pt(ppy)(µ-R2pz)]2 where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, pz = pyrazolate and R = H, Me, Ph, or tBu, and are strongly photoluminescent at room temperature. The distance between the platinum centers in this A frame geometry can be varied depending on the steric bulk of the bridging pyrazolate ligands that exert structural constraints and compress the Pt-Pt distance. At large Pt-Pt distances there is little interaction between the subunits and the chromophore behaves similar to a monomer with excited states described as mixtures of ligand-centered and metal-to-ligand charge transfer (LC/MLCT) transitions. When the Pt(II) centers are brought closer together with bulky bridging ligands, they interact through their orbitals and the S1 and T1 states are best characterized as metal metal to ligand charge transfer (MMLCT) in character. The results of the fs TA experiments reveal that intersystem crossing (ISC) occurs on ultrafast timescales (τS1 < 200 fs) while there are two relaxation processes occurring within the triplet manifold, τ1 = 0.5 – 3.2 ps and τ2 = 20 – 70 ps; the longer time constants correspond to the presence of bulkier bridging ligands. DFT calculations illustrate that the Pt-Pt distances further contract in the T1 3MMLCT states, therefore slower relaxation may be related to a larger structural reorganization. Subsequent investigations using faster time resolution are planned to measure the ISC process as well as to identify any potential coherent interaction(s) between the platinum centers that may occur.

  5. Cerebellar cortex granular layer interneurons in the macaque monkey are functionally driven by mossy fiber pathways through net excitation or inhibition.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Heiney, Shane A; Kim, Gyutae; Blazquez, Pablo M

    2013-01-01

    The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs) and granular layer output neurons (granule cells). GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL) during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by "eye position fields" and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties.

  6. A Functional Threshold for Long-Term Use of Hand and Arm Function Can Be Determined: Predictions From a Computational Model and Supporting Data From the Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheol E.; Wolf, Steven L.; Arbib, Michael A.; Winstein, Carolee J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although spontaneous use of the more-affected arm and hand after stroke is an important determinant of participation and quality of life, a number of patients exhibit decreases in use following rehabilitative therapy. A previous neurocomputational model predicted that if the dose of therapy is sufficient to bring performance above a certain threshold, training can be stopped. Objective The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that there exists a threshold for function of the paretic arm and hand after therapy. If function is above this threshold, spontaneous use will increase in the months following therapy. In contrast, if function is below this threshold, spontaneous use will decrease. Methods New computer simulations are presented showing that changes in arm use following therapy depend on a performance threshold. This prediction was tested by reanalyzing the data from the Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) trial, a phase III randomized controlled trial in which participants received constraint-induced movement therapy for 2 weeks and were tested both 1 week and 1 year after therapy. Results The results demonstrate that arm and hand function measured immediately after therapy predicts, on average, the long-term change of arm use. Above a functional threshold, use improves. Below this threshold, use decreases. Limitations The reanalysis of the EXCITE trial data provides a “group” threshold above which a majority of patients, but not all, improve spontaneously. A goal of future research is to provide the means to assess when patients reach their individual threshold. Conclusion Understanding of the causal and nonlinear relationship between limb function and daily use is important for the future development of cost-effective interventions and prevention of “rehabilitation in vain.” PMID:19797304

  7. Excitable scale free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  8. Two-Axis Acceleration of Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Parallel Excitation of Phase-Tagged Slices and Half k-Space Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Nencka, Andrew S.; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Whole brain functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging requires acquisition of a time course of gradient-recalled (GR) volumetric images. A method is developed to accelerate this acquisition using GR echo-planar imaging and radio frequency (RF) slice phase tagging. For N-fold acceleration, a tailored RF pulse excites N slices using a uniform-field transmit coil. This pulse is the Fourier transform of the profile for the N slices with a predetermined RF phase tag on each slice. A multichannel RF receive coil is used for detection. For n slices, there are n/N groups of slices. Signal-averaged reference images are created for each slice within each slice group for each member of the coil array and used to separate overlapping images that are simultaneously received. The time-overhead for collection of reference images is small relative to the acquisition time of a complete volumetric time course. A least-squares singular value decomposition method allows image separation on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Twofold slice acceleration is demonstrated using an eight-channel RF receive coil, with application to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in the human brain. Data from six subjects at 3 T are reported. The method has been extended to half k-space acquisition, which not only provides additional acceleration, but also facilitates slice separation because of increased signal intensity of the central lines of k-space coupled with reduced susceptibility effects. PMID:22432957

  9. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-02-28

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  10. Assessment of Density Functional Theory for Describing the Correlation Effects on the Ground and Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Filatov, Michael; Gozem, Samer; Schapiro, Igor; Olivucci, Massimo; Ferré, Nicolas

    2013-09-10

    In the quest for a cost-effective level of theory able to describe a large portion of the ground and excited potential energy surfaces of large chromophores, promising approaches are rooted in various approximations to the exact density functional theory (DFT). In the present work, we investigate how generalized Kohn-Sham DFT (GKS-DFT), time-dependent DFT (TDDFT), and spin-restricted ensemble-DFT (REKS) methods perform along three important paths characterizing a model retinal chromophore (the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation) in a region of near-degeneracy (close to a conical intersection) with respect to reference high-level multiconfigurational wave function methods. If GKS-DFT correctly describes the closed-shell charge transfer state, only TDDFT and REKS approaches give access to the open-shell diradical, one which sometimes corresponds to the electronic ground state. It is demonstrated that the main drawback of the usual DFT-based methods lies in the absence of interactions between the charge transfer and the diradicaloid configurations. Hence, we test a new computational scheme based on the State-averaged REKS (SA-REKS) approach, which explicitly includes these interactions into account. The State-Interaction SA-REKS (SI-SA-REKS) method significantly improves on the REKS and the SA-REKS results for the target system. The similarities and differences between DFT and wave function-based approaches are analyzed according to (1) the active space dimensions of the wave function-based methods and (2) the relative electronegativities of the allyl and protonated Schiff base moieties.

  11. Excited state proton-coupled electron transfer in 8-oxoG-C and 8-oxoG-A base pairs: a time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment, the repair efficiency of DNA thymine cyclobutane dimers (T<>T) on UV excitation of 8-oxoG base paired either to C or A was reported. An electron transfer mechanism from an excited charge transfer state of 8-oxoG-C (or 8-oxoG-A) to T<>T was proposed and 8-oxoG-A was found to be 2-3 times more efficient than 8-oxoG-C in repair of T<>T. Intra base pair proton transfer (PT) in charge transfer (CT) excited states of the base pairs was proposed to quench the excited state and prevent T<>T repair. In this work, we investigate this process with TD-DFT calculations of the excited states of 8-oxoG-C and 8-oxoG-A base pairs in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs using long-range corrected density functional, ωB97XD/6-31G* method. Our gas phase calculations showed that CT excited state ((1)ππ*(CT)) of 8-oxoG-C appears at lower energy than the 8-oxoG-A. For 8-oxoG-C, TD-DFT calculations show the presence of a conical intersection (CI) between the lowest (1)ππ*(PT-CT) excited state and the ground state which likely deactivates the CT excited state via a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The (1)ππ*(PT-CT) excited state of 8-oxoG-A base pair lies at higher energy and its crossing with ground state is inhibited because of a high energy gap between (1)ππ*(PT-CT) excited state and ground state. Thus the gas phase calculations suggest the 8-oxoG-A would have longer excited state lifetimes. When the effect of solvation is included using the PCM model, both 8-oxoG-A and 8-oxoG-C show large energy gaps between the ground state and both the excited CT and PT-CT states and suggest little difference would be found between the two base pairs in repair of the T<>T lesion. However, in the FC region the solvent effect is greatly diminished owing to the slow dielectric response time and smaller gaps would be expected.

  12. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  13. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  14. Novel use of UV broad-band excitation and stretched exponential function in the analysis of fluorescent dissolved organic matter: study of interaction between protein and humic-like components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, Suraj Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2017-09-01

    A combination of broad-band UV radiation (UV A and UV B; 250-400 nm) and a stretched exponential function (StrEF) has been utilised in efforts towards convenient and sensitive detection of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM). This approach enables accessing the gross fluorescence spectral signature of both protein-like and humic-like components in a single measurement. Commercial FDOM components are excited with the broad-band UV excitation; the variation of spectral profile as a function of varying component ratio is analysed. The underlying fluorescence dynamics and non-linear quenching of amino acid moieties are studied with the StrEF (exp(-V[Q] β )). The complex quenching pattern reflects the inner filter effect (IFE) as well as inter-component interactions. The inter-component interactions are essentially captured through the ‘sphere of action’ and ‘dark complex’ models. The broad-band UV excitation ascertains increased excitation energy, resulting in increased population density in the excited state and thereby resulting in enhanced sensitivity.

  15. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  16. Description of excited states in [Re(Imidazole)(CO)3 (Phen)](+) including solvent and spin-orbit coupling effects: Density functional theory versus multiconfigurational wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Fumanal, Maria; Daniel, Chantal

    2016-10-15

    The low-lying electronic excited states of [Re(imidazole)(CO)3 (phen)](+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ranging between 420 nm and 330 nm have been calculated by means of relativistic spin-orbit time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and wavefunction approaches (state-average-CASSCF/CASPT2). A direct comparison between the theoretical absorption spectra obtained with different methods including SOC and solvent corrections for water points to the difficulties at describing on the same footing the bands generated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT), intraligand (IL) transition, and ligand-to-Ligand- charge transfer (LLCT). While TD-DFT and three-roots-state-average CASSCF (10,10) reproduce rather well the lowest broad MLCT band observed in the experimental spectrum between 420 nm and 330 nm, more flexible wavefunctions enlarged either by the number of roots or by the number of active orbitals and electrons destabilize the MLCT states by introducing IL and LLCT character in the lowest part of the absorption spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Excitation function for the production of 262Bh (Z = 107) in theodd-Z projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Sudowe, R.; Zielinski, P.M.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.

    2005-05-16

    The excitation function for production of 262Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn,n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from 262Bh and 2 decay chains originating from 261Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540 +180 - 150 pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than fives times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of 262Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction 209Bi(54Cr,n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the ''Optimum Energy Rule'' proposed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  18. Acupuncture Relieves the Excessive Excitation of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Cortex Axis Function and Correlates with the Regulatory Mechanism of GR, CRH, and ACTHR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Jun; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Qie, Li-Li

    2014-01-01

    It had been indicated in the previous studies that acupuncture relieved the excessive excitation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis (HPAA) function induced by stress stimulation. But the changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) induced by acupuncture have not been detected clearly. The objective of the study was to observe the impacts of acupuncture on the protein expressions of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone receptor (ACTHR), and GR under the physiological and stress states. The results showed that under the stress state, acupuncture upregulated the protein expression of GR in the hippocampus, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and pituitary gland, downregulated the protein expression of GR in the adrenal cortex, and obviously reduced the protein expressions of CRH and ACTHR. Under the physiological state, acupuncture promoted GR protein expression in the hippocampus and CRH protein expression in the hippocampus and PVN. The results explained that acupuncture regulated the stress reaction via promoting the combination of glucocorticoids (GC) with GR, and GR protein expression. The increase of GR protein expression induced feedback inhibition on the overexpression of CRH and ACTHR, likely decreased GC level, and caused the reduction of GR protein expression in the adrenal cortex.

  19. Density functional theory calculations on rhodamine B and pinacyanol chloride. Optimized ground state, dipole moment, vertical ionization potential, adiabatic electron affinity and lowest excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan C; Selsby, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    The ground state configuration of the gas phase cationic dyes pinacyanol chloride and rhodamine B are optimized with HF/6-311 + G(2d,2p) method and basis set. B3PW91/6-311 + G(2df,2p) functional and basis set is used to calculate the Mulliken atom charge distribution, total molecular energy, the dipole moment, the vertical ionization potential, the adiabatic electron affinity and the lowest excited triplet state, the last three as an energy difference between separately calculated open shell and ground states. The triplet and extra electron states are optimized to find the relaxation energy. In the ground state optimization of both dyes the chloride anion migrates to a position near the center of the chromophore. For rhodamine B the benzoidal group turns perpendicular to the chromophore plane. For both dyes, the LUMO is mostly of π character associated with the aromatic part of the molecule containing the chromophore. The highest occupied MOs consist of three almost degenerate eigenvectors involving the chloride anion coordinated with σ electrons in the molecular framework. The fourth highest MO is of π character. For both molecules in the gas phase ionization process the chloride anion loses the significant fraction of electric charge. In electron capture, the excess charge goes mainly on the dye cation.

  20. Kohn-Sham Decomposition in Real-Time Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory: An Efficient Tool for Analyzing Plasmonic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Tuomas P; Kuisma, Mikael; Puska, Martti J; Nieminen, Risto M; Erhart, Paul

    2017-10-10

    Electronic excitations can be efficiently analyzed in terms of the underlying Kohn-Sham (KS) electron-hole transitions. While such a decomposition is readily available in the linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) approaches based on the Casida equations, a comparable analysis is less commonly conducted within the real-time-propagation TDDFT (RT-TDDFT). To improve this situation, we present here an implementation of a KS decomposition tool within the local-basis-set RT-TDDFT code in the free GPAW package. Our implementation is based on postprocessing of data that is readily available during time propagation, which is important for retaining the efficiency of the underlying RT-TDDFT to large systems. After benchmarking our implementation on small benzene derivatives by explicitly reconstructing the Casida eigenvectors from RT-TDDFT, we demonstrate the performance of the method by analyzing the plasmon resonances of icosahedral silver nanoparticles up to Ag561. The method provides a clear description of the splitting of the plasmon in small nanoparticles due to individual single-electron transitions as well as the formation of a distinct d-electron-screened plasmon resonance in larger nanoparticles.

  1. Excitation function for the production of {sup 262}Bh (Z=107) in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden, C.M. III; Nelson, S.L.; Duellmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Zielinski, P.M.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.

    2006-01-15

    The excitation function for production of {sup 262}Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from {sup 262}Bh and 2 decay chains originating from {sup 261}Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540{sub -150}{sup +180} pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than five times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of {sup 262}Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction {sup 209}Bi({sup 54}Cr, n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the optimum energy rule proposed by SwiaPtecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  2. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning. PMID:26167305

  3. Menthol Enhances Nicotine Reward-Related Behavior by Potentiating Nicotine-Induced Changes in nAChR Function, nAChR Upregulation, and DA Neuron Excitability.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; McKinney, Sheri; Lester, Henry A

    2017-04-12

    Understanding why the quit rate among smokers of menthol cigarettes is lower than non-menthol smokers requires identifying the neurons that are altered by nicotine, menthol, and acetylcholine. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) mediate the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine. Using mouse models, we show that menthol enhances nicotine-induced changes in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on midbrain DA neurons. Menthol plus nicotine upregulates nAChR number and function on midbrain DA neurons more than nicotine alone. Menthol also enhances nicotine-induced changes in DA neuron excitability. In a conditioned place preference (CPP) assay, we observed that menthol plus nicotine produces greater reward-related behavior than nicotine alone. Our results connect changes in midbrain DA neurons to menthol-induced enhancements of nicotine reward-related behavior and may help explain how smokers of menthol cigarettes exhibit reduced cessation rates.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 12 April 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.72.

  4. Channel coupling effects on the fusion excitation functions for {sup 28}Si+{sup 90,94}Zr in sub- and near-barrier regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Verma, Shashi; Saxena, Mansi; Goyal, Savi; Siwal, Davinder; Garg, Ritika; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, R.; Madhavan, N.; Jhingan, A.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Varughese, T.; Golda, K. S.; Muralithar, S.; Prasad, E.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, B. R.; Pramanik, U. D.

    2010-04-15

    Fusion excitation functions and angular distributions of evaporation residues (ERs) have been measured for {sup 28}Si+{sup 90,94}Zr systems around the Coulomb barrier using the recoil mass spectrometer, Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer (HIRA). For both systems, the experimental fusion cross sections are strongly enhanced compared to the predictions of the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1-d BPM) below the barrier. Coupled channels formalism has been employed to theoretically explain the observed sub-barrier fusion cross section enhancement. The enhancement could be explained by considering the coupling of the low-lying inelastic states of the projectile and target in the {sup 28}Si+{sup 90}Zr system. In the sub-barrier region, the measured fusion cross sections for {sup 28}Si+{sup 94}Zr turned out to be about an order of magnitude higher than the ones for the {sup 28}Si+{sup 90}Zr system, which could not be explained by coupling to inelastic states alone. This observation indicates the importance of multinucleon transfer reaction channels with positive Q values in the sub-barrier fusion cross section enhancement, because {sup 90,94}Zr are believed to have similar collective strengths. This implies that no strong isotopic dependence of fusion cross sections is expected as far as the couplings to collective inelastic states are concerned. In addition, the role of projectile and multiphonon couplings in the enhancement has been explored.

  5. Acupuncture Relieves the Excessive Excitation of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Cortex Axis Function and Correlates with the Regulatory Mechanism of GR, CRH, and ACTHR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Jun; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Qie, Li-Li

    2014-01-01

    It had been indicated in the previous studies that acupuncture relieved the excessive excitation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis (HPAA) function induced by stress stimulation. But the changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) induced by acupuncture have not been detected clearly. The objective of the study was to observe the impacts of acupuncture on the protein expressions of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone receptor (ACTHR), and GR under the physiological and stress states. The results showed that under the stress state, acupuncture upregulated the protein expression of GR in the hippocampus, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and pituitary gland, downregulated the protein expression of GR in the adrenal cortex, and obviously reduced the protein expressions of CRH and ACTHR. Under the physiological state, acupuncture promoted GR protein expression in the hippocampus and CRH protein expression in the hippocampus and PVN. The results explained that acupuncture regulated the stress reaction via promoting the combination of glucocorticoids (GC) with GR, and GR protein expression. The increase of GR protein expression induced feedback inhibition on the overexpression of CRH and ACTHR, likely decreased GC level, and caused the reduction of GR protein expression in the adrenal cortex. PMID:24761151

  6. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  7. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  8. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  9. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  10. Calculation of the total electron excitation cross section in the Born approximation using Slater wave functions for the Li (2s yields 2p), Li (2s yields 3p), Na (3s yields 4p), Mg (3p yields 4s), Ca (4s yields 4p) and K (4s yields 4p) excitations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simsic, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Excitation of neutral atoms by inelastic scattering of incident electrons in gaseous nebulae were investigated using Slater Wave functions to describe the initial and final states of the atom. Total cross sections using the Born Approximation are calculated for: Li(2s yields 2p), Na(3s yields 4p), k(4s yields 4p). The intensity of emitted radiation from gaseous nebulae is also calculated, and Maxwell distribution is employed to average the kinetic energy of electrons.

  11. Functional network overlap as revealed by fMRI using sICA and its potential relationships with functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and sparseness of neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation.

  12. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  13. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  14. Molecular and vibrational structure of tetroxo d0 metal complexes in their excited states. a study based on time-dependent density functional calculations and Franck-Condon theory.

    PubMed

    Jose, Linta; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom

    2012-02-23

    We have applied time dependent density functional theory to study excited state structures of the tetroxo d(0) transition metal complexes MnO(4)(-), TcO(4)(-), RuO(4), and OsO(4). The excited state geometry optimization was based on a newly implemented scheme [Seth et al. Theor. Chem. Acc. 2011, 129, 331]. The first excited state has a C(3v) geometry for all investigated complexes and is due to a "charge transfer" transition from the oxygen based HOMO to the metal based LUMO. The second excited state can uniformly be characterized by "charge transfer" from the oxygen HOMO-1 to the metal LUMO with a D(2d) geometry for TcO(4)(-), RuO(4), and OsO(4) and two C(2v) geometries for MnO(4)(-). It is finally found that the third excited state of MnO(4)(-) representing the HOMO to metal based LUMO+1 orbital transition has a D(2d) geometry. On the basis of the calculated excited state structures and vibrational modes, the Franck-Condon method was used to simulate the vibronic structure of the absorption spectra for the tetroxo d(0) transition metal complexes. The Franck-Condon scheme seems to reproduce the salient features of the experimental spectra as well as the simulated vibronic structure for MnO(4)(-) generated from an alternative scheme [Neugebauer J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 1168] that does not apply the Franck-Condon approximation.

  15. Benchmarking singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular semiconductors for singlet fission: Tuning the amount of HF exchange and adjusting local correlation to obtain accurate functionals for singlet-triplet gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Vertical and adiabatic singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular p-type semiconductors calculated with various DFT functionals and wave-function based approaches are benchmarked against MS-CASPT2/cc-pVTZ reference values. A special focus lies on the singlet-triplet gaps that are very important in the process of singlet fission. Singlet fission has the potential to boost device efficiencies of organic solar cells, but the scope of existing singlet-fission compounds is still limited. A computational prescreening of candidate molecules could enlarge it; yet it requires efficient methods accurately predicting singlet and triplet excitation energies. Different DFT formulations (Tamm-Dancoff approximation, linear response time-dependent DFT, Δ-SCF) and spin scaling schemes along with several ab initio methods (CC2, ADC(2)/MP2, CIS(D), CIS) are evaluated. While wave-function based methods yield rather reliable singlet-triplet gaps, many DFT functionals are shown to systematically underestimate triplet excitation energies. To gain insight, the impact of exact exchange and correlation is in detail addressed.

  16. Excitement in shame: the price we pay.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Stewart L

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of excitement in shame, extending the theoretical underpinnings of my work (Aledort, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009) on narcissism and the omnipotent child syndrome. Shame, excitement, and early narcissistic self-states are complexly intermingled, each influencing the other. Empathy alone is insufficient; the passion connected to shame can be easily hidden. Detailed case studies describe a model for working with the excitement in shame, how it functions, and how it gets resolved.

  17. Iodine-124 production: excitation function for the 124Te(d,2n) 124I and 124Te(d,3n) 123I reactions from 7 to 24 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzbakht, Mahmoud L.; Schlyer, David J.; Finn, Ronald D.; Laguzzi, Guiseppe; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-06-01

    The excitation function for the production of 124I and 123I from deuterons on 124Te has been measured over the energy interval of 7.5 to 23.6 MeV. The target used was a compressed tellurium powder target. The thick target yields for both radioisotopes have been calculated, radiochemical purity was determined and recovery of the isotopically enriched tellurium has been investigated.

  18. Iodine-124 production: Excitation function for the {sup 124}Te(d,2n){sup 124}I and {sup 124}Te(d,3n){sup 123}I reactions from 7 to 24 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzbakht, M.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Finn, R.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-11-01

    The excitation function for the production of I-124 and I-123 from deuterons on tellurium-124 has been measured over the energy interval of 7.5 to 23.6 MeV. The target used was a compressed tellurium powder target. The thick target yields for both radioisotopes have been calculated, radiochemical purity was determined and recovery of the isotopically enriched tellurium has been investigated.

  19. Iodine-124 production: Excitation function for the [sup 124]Te(d,2n)[sup 124]I and [sup 124]Te(d,3n)[sup 123]I reactions from 7 to 24 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzbakht, M.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Finn, R.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    The excitation function for the production of I-124 and I-123 from deuterons on tellurium-124 has been measured over the energy interval of 7.5 to 23.6 MeV. The target used was a compressed tellurium powder target. The thick target yields for both radioisotopes have been calculated, radiochemical purity was determined and recovery of the isotopically enriched tellurium has been investigated.

  20. Excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one.

  1. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  2. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: Formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  3. Time-dependent coupling of electron energy distribution function, vibrational kinetics of the asymmetric mode of CO2 and dissociation, ionization and electronic excitation kinetics under discharge and post-discharge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-01-01

    A time-dependent self-consistent model based on the coupling of the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) with the non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics of the asymmetric mode, as well as a simplified global model, have been implemented for a pure CO2 plasma. The simplified time-dependent global model takes into account dissociation and ionization as well as the reverse of these processes. It also takes into account the excitation/de-excitation of an electronic excited state at 10.5 eV. The model has been applied to describe the discharge and post-discharge conditions typically met in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and in a moderate-pressure microwave discharge. The reported results show the strong coupling between the excited state and the electron energy distribution kinetics due to superelastic (vibrational and electronic) collisions. Moreover, the dissociation rate from a pure vibrational mechanism can become competitive with the corresponding rate from the direct electron impact mechanism at high values of vibrational temperature.

  4. Excited-state potential-energy surfaces of metal-adsorbed organic molecules from linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field density-functional theory (ΔSCF-DFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2013-07-01

    Accurate and efficient simulation of excited state properties is an important and much aspired cornerstone in the study of adsorbate dynamics on metal surfaces. To this end, the recently proposed linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field method by Gavnholt et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 075441 (2008)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.78.075441 presents an efficient alternative to time consuming quasi-particle calculations. In this method, the standard Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory are solved with the constraint of a non-equilibrium occupation in a region of Hilbert-space resembling gas-phase orbitals of the adsorbate. In this work, we discuss the applicability of this method for the excited-state dynamics of metal-surface mounted organic adsorbates, specifically in the context of molecular switching. We present necessary advancements to allow for a consistent quality description of excited-state potential-energy surfaces (PESs), and illustrate the concept with the application to Azobenzene adsorbed on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces. We find that the explicit inclusion of substrate electronic states modifies the topologies of intra-molecular excited-state PESs of the molecule due to image charge and hybridization effects. While the molecule in gas phase shows a clear energetic separation of resonances that induce isomerization and backreaction, the surface-adsorbed molecule does not. The concomitant possibly simultaneous induction of both processes would lead to a significantly reduced switching efficiency of such a mechanism.

  5. Measurement of excitation functions of helion-induced reactions on enriched Ru targets for production of medically important 103Pd and 101mRh and some other radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Skakun, Ye; Qaim, S M

    2008-05-01

    Excitation functions were determined by the stacked-foil and induced radioactivity measurement technique for the reactions (100)Ru(alpha,n)(103)Pd, (101)Ru(alpha,2n)(103)Pd, (101)Ru((3)He,n)(103)Pd, and (102)Ru((3)He,2n)(103)Pd, producing the therapeutic radionuclide (103)Pd, and for the reactions (101)Ru((3)He,x)(101 m)Rh(Cum) and (102)Ru((3)He,x)(101 m)Rh(Cum), producing the medically interesting radionuclide (101 m)Rh. Data were also measured for the reactions (101)Ru((3)He,pn+d)(102 m,g)Rh, (102)Ru((3)He,p2n+dn+t)(102 m,g)Rh, (101)Ru((3)He,x)(101 g)Rh(Cum), (102)Ru((3)He,x)(101 g)Rh(Cum), (101)Ru((3)He,3n)(101)Pd, (102)Ru((3)He,4n)(101)Pd, (101)Ru((3)He,4n)(100)Pd, and (101)Ru((3)He,p3n+d2n+tn)(100)Rh, producing other palladium and rhodium isotopes/isomers. The energy ranges covered were up to 25 MeV for alpha-particles and up to 34 MeV for (3)He ions. The radioactivity of the radionuclide (103)Pd induced in thin metallic foils of the enriched ruthenium isotopes was measured by high-resolution X-ray spectrometry and the radioactivities of other radionuclides by gamma-ray spectrometry. The integral thick target yields of the radionuclide (103)Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the first four of the above-named reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 kBq/microAh, respectively, at the maximum investigated energies of the incident particles. The integral thick target yields of the radionuclide (101 m)Rh amount to 16.1 and 2.9 MBq/microAh for (101)Ru and (102)Ru targets, respectively, at 34 MeV energy of incident (3)He ions. The integral yields of the other observed radionuclides were also deduced from the excitation functions of the above-mentioned respective nuclear reactions. The excitation functions and integral yields of some rare reaction products were also determined. The experimental excitation functions of some reactions are compared with the predictions of nuclear model calculations. In general, good agreement was obtained.

  6. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  7. Direct non-Born-Oppenheimer variational calculations of all bound vibrational states corresponding to the first rotational excitation of D{sub 2} performed with explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-05-07

    Direct variational calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed are done for all rovibrational states of the D{sub 2} molecule corresponding to first excited rotational level (the N = 1 states). All-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are used in the calculations. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized with the aid of analytically calculated energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results allow to determine the ortho-para spin isomerization energies as a function of the vibrational quantum number.

  8. Sadomasochism, sexual excitement, and perversion.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, O F

    1991-01-01

    Sadomasochism, an ingredient of infantile sexuality, is an essential part of normal sexual functioning and love relations, and of the very nature of sexual excitement. Sadomasochistic elements are also present in all sexual perversions. Sadomasochism starts out as the potential for erotic masochism in both sexes, and represents a very early capacity to link aggression with the libidinal elements of sexual excitement. Sexual excitement may be considered a basic affect that overcomes primitive splitting of love and hatred. Erotic desire is a more mature form of sexual excitement. Psychoanalytic exploration makes it possible to uncover the unconscious components of sexual excitement: wishes for symbiotic fusion and for aggressive penetration and intermingling; bisexual identifications; the desire to transgress oedipal prohibitions and the secretiveness of the primal scene, and to violate the boundaries of a teasing and withholding object. The relation between these wishes and the development of erotic idealization processes in both sexes is explored in the context of a critical review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature.

  9. Subcycle dynamics of high-order-harmonic generation of He atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory, we have performed three-dimensional (3D) ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the dynamical behavior of the subcycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of ˜1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He [M. Chini et al., Sci. Rep. 3, 1105 (2013), 10.1038/srep01105]. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the subcycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several interesting features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra.

  10. Single determinant calculations of excited state polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Dan; Norman, Patrick; Ågren, Hans

    1997-12-01

    We apply response theory to simulate excited state polarizabilities emphasizing the possibility to do so by means of optimization of a ground state single determinant only. The excited state polarizabilities are given by the double residues of the cubic response functions. A set of molecules with varying ground state configurations and properties have been considered: water, ozone, formaldehyde, ethylene, butadiene, cyclobutadiene, pyridine, pyrazine and s-tetrazine. The results have been compared to excited state experiments where available and with linear response calculations of the multi-determinant optimized excited state. It is shown that calculations of excited state polarizabilities based on a ground state optimized single determinant work well for most of the cases investigated. This contention is exemplified by the fact the gas phase value from an electrochromism experiment for the polarizability of the 1 1B2 excited state of formaldehyde is better reproduced by ground state cubic response theory than by the corresponding separate state linear response function calculation, and by that the calculations call for an experimental reinvestigation of the excited state polarizabilities of s-tetrazine. A few prerequisites are given: The excited state should be isolated in energy, the ordering of the main contributing states should be reproduced, and the geometric conformation of the excited state in question should not be very different from the ground state geometry. The computational and formal advantages of the approach are discussed.

  11. Application of unfolded principal component analysis-radial basis function neural network for determination of celecoxib in human serum by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Bahrami, Gholamreza; Abdolmaleki, Sajjad; Sadrjavadi, Komail; Majnooni, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-03-01

    This study describes a simple and rapid approach of monitoring celecoxib (CLX). Unfolded principal component analysis-radial basis function neural network (UPCA-RBFNN) and excitation-emission spectra were combined to develop new model in the determination of CLX in human serum samples. Fluorescence landscapes with excitation wavelengths from 250 to 310 nm and emission wavelengths in the range 280-450 nm were obtained. The figures of merit for the developed model were evaluated. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was also used as a standard method. Accuracy of the method was investigated by analysis of the serum samples spiked with various concentration of CLX and a recovery of 103.63% was obtained. The results indicated that the proposed method is an interesting alternative to the traditional techniques normally used for determining CLX such as HPLC.

  12. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-04-07

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  13. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: Linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-04-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  14. Connecting quantum state resolved scattering data directly to chemical kinetics: Energy transfer distribution functions for the collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited molecules from state resolved probes of the bath

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, C.A.; Flynn, G.W.

    1997-03-01

    An energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E), for the collisional relaxation of a highly vibrationally excited donor molecule (C{sub 6}F{sub 6}, pyrazine) is constructed for the first time from experimental data on the bath (CO{sub 2}) energy gain. A prescription for mapping bath quantum state resolved data onto P(E,E) is described in detail. Analysis of earlier experimental data allows a calculation of the high {Delta}E=E{minus}E region ({minus}7000 cm{sup {minus}1}{lt}E{minus}E{lt}{minus}1500 cm{sup {minus}1}) of P(E,E) for the above systems. Comparison of the P(E,E) functions reveals that C{sub 6}F{sub 6} is a more efficient donor molecule than pyrazine, in agreement with previous experiments and trajectory calculations. In addition, resonance like structures in the P(E,E) functions arising from long range force mediated, V{endash}V excitation of the carbon dioxide {nu}{sub 3} mode are discussed. These results indicate that accurate P(E,E) functions can be determined from experiments involving probes of the bath energy gain. This technique can be expected to provide stringent tests of current energy transfer theory and can, in principle, be used in conjunction with measurements of thermal kinetics to obtain energy dependent unimolecular rate constants, k{sub E}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awamleh, L; Pun, H; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2015-04-01

    Acute inflammatory dental pain is a prevalent condition often associated with limited jaw movements. Mustard oil (MO, a small-fiber excitant/inflammatory irritant) application to the rat molar tooth pulp induces increased excitability (i.e., central sensitization) of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons that can be modulated by MDH application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO). The objectives of the study were to determine whether MO application to the rat right maxillary first molar tooth pulp affects left face-M1 excitability manifested as altered intracortical microstimulation thresholds for evoking electromyographic activity in the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle), and whether MSO application to face-M1 can modulate this MO effect. Under Ketamine general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats had a microelectrode positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) face-M1 site. Then MO (n = 16) or control solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed tooth pulp, and RAD threshold was monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was then applied to the face-M1, and RAD thresholds were monitored every 15 min for 120 min. ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni was used to analyze data (p < 0.05). Within 15 min of MO (but not control) pulp application, RAD thresholds increased significantly (p < 0.001) as compared to baseline. One hour following MSO (but not saline) application to the face-M1, RAD thresholds decreased significantly (p = 0.005) toward baseline. These novel findings suggest that acute inflammatory dental pain is associated with decreased face-M1 excitability that may be dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes and related to mechanisms underlying limited jaw movements in acute orofacial pain conditions.

  17. Does anodal transcranial direct current stimulation enhance excitability of the motor cortex and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bastani, A; Jaberzadeh, S

    2012-04-01

    The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on corticomotor excitability and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The secondary aim is to find a-tDCS optimal parameters for its maximal effects. Electronic databases were searched for studies into the effect of a-tDCS when compared to no stimulation. Studies which met the inclusion criteria were assessed and methodological quality was examined using PEDro and Downs and Black (D&B) assessment tools. Data from seven studies revealed increase in corticomotor excitability with a small but significant effect size (0.31 [0.14, 0.48], p=0.0003) in healthy subjects and data from two studies in subjects with stroke indicated significant results with moderate effect size (0.59 [0.24, 0.93], p=0.001) in favor of a-tDCS. Likewise, studies examining motor function demonstrated a small and non-significant effect (0.39 [-0.17, 0.94], p=0.17) in subjects with stroke and a large but non-significant effect (0.92 [-1.02, 2.87], p=0.35) in healthy subjects in favor of improvement in motor function. The results also indicate that efficacy of a-tDCS is dependent on current density and duration of application. A-tDCS increases corticomotor excitability in both healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The results also show a trend in favor of motor function improvement following a-tDCS. A-tDCS is a non-invasive, cheap and easy-to-apply modality which could be used as a stand-alone technique or as an adds-on technique to enhance corticomotor excitability and the efficacy of motor training approaches. However, the small sample size of the included studies reduces the strength of the presented evidences and any conclusion in this regard should be considered cautiously.

  18. Electron impact excitation of Hg/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, D. H.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Dunn, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    A crossed charged beam technique was employed in the investigation reported. The ion beam was crossed at right angles by a magnetically confined electron beam. Cross sections were determined as a function of electron impact energy. Considerable structure in the excitation cross section appears immediately above the threshold. It is pointed out that a primary application of cross sections is related to the calculation of plasma rate coefficients.

  19. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  20. Impedimetric Sensing Proprieties of ITO Electrodes Functionalized with PEDOT:PSS/Azo-Calix[4]Arene for the Detection of Al3+ Ions Under Light Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echabaane, M.; Rouis, A.; Mahjoub, M. A.; Bonnamour, I.; Ben Ouada, H.

    2017-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of the sensitivity of the azo-calix[4]arene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin film deposited on the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface toward aluminum ions (Al3+) under light excitation. Thin films were deposited by the spin-coating technique. Adhesion of these films to the ITO surface was highlighted by performing contact angle measurements. Then, interfaces of the azo-calix[4]arene/PEDOT:PSS thin film were characterized by impedance measurements using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Obtained impedance spectra were fitted using an equivalent circuit. Finally, evolutions of the different components of this circuit were studied. These evolutions show that the sensitivity of the azo-calix[4]arene/PEDOT:PSS/ITO electrode is remarkably improved under illumination.

  1. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  2. Molecular excitation energies to high-lying bound states from time-dependent density-functional response theory: Characterization and correction of the time-dependent local density approximation ionization threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casida, Mark E.; Jamorski, Christine; Casida, Kim C.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of time-dependent density-functional response theory (TD-DFRT) for the calculation of high-lying bound electronic excitation energies of molecules. TD-DFRT excitation energies are reported for a large number of states for each of four molecules: N2, CO, CH2O, and C2H4. In contrast to the good results obtained for low-lying states within the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA), there is a marked deterioration of the results for high-lying bound states. This is manifested as a collapse of the states above the TDLDA ionization threshold, which is at -ɛHOMOLDA (the negative of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy in the LDA). The -ɛHOMOLDA is much lower than the true ionization potential because the LDA exchange-correlation potential has the wrong asymptotic behavior. For this reason, the excitation energies were also calculated using the asymptotically correct potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB94) in the self-consistent field step. This was found to correct the collapse of the high-lying states that was observed with the LDA. Nevertheless, further improvement of the functional is desirable. For low-lying states the asymptotic behavior of the exchange-correlation potential is not critical and the LDA potential does remarkably well. We propose criteria delineating for which states the TDLDA can be expected to be used without serious impact from the incorrect asymptotic behavior of the LDA potential.

  3. GAMA/WiggleZ: the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies and their redshift evolution to z = 0.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Michael B.; Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Couch, Warrick J.; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Prescott, M.; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David

    2016-07-01

    We present radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The radio AGN are separated into low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z < 0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as {˜ } (1+z)^{0.06^{+0.17}_{-0.18}} assuming pure density evolution or {˜ } (1+z)^{0.46^{+0.22}_{-0.24}} assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by {˜ } (1+z)^{2.93^{+0.46}_{-0.47}} assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed, the best-fitting HERG evolution is parametrized by {˜ } (1+z)^{7.41^{+0.79}_{-1.33}}. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (≳1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.

  4. Effect of motor imagery on excitability of spinal neural function and its impact on the accuracy of movement-considering the point at which subjects subjectively determine the 50%MVC point.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Yuki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effect of motor imagery on the accuracy of motion and the excitability of spinal neural function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy volunteers (males, 15; females, 15; mean age, 20.3 ± 1.0 years) were recruited. F-waves was recorded at rest, while holding a sensor, and while using motor imagery. Next, subjects learned 50% maximum voluntary contraction. The pinch force was measured without visual feedback before and after motor imagery. F-waves were analyzed with respect to persistence and the F/M amplitude ratio. Correction time and coefficient of variation were calculated from the pinch force. [Results] Persistence and F/M amplitude ratio ware significantly higher in the holding sensor and motor imagery conditions than in the resting condition. In addition, persistence under motor imagery was significantly higher than that in the holding sensor condition. No significant differences were observed in relative values of correction time and coefficient of variation between the two pinch action conditions. The pinch force in task 2 approximated a more authentic 50%MVC than that in task 1. [Conclusion] Motor imagery increases the excitability of spinal neural function, suggesting that it also affects accurate control of muscle force.

  5. Excitation functions of 125Te(p, xn)-reactions from their respective thresholds up to 100 MeV with special reference to the production of 124I.

    PubMed

    Hohn, A; Nortier, F M; Scholten, B; van der Walt, T N; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2001-08-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 125Te(p, xn) (119,120m, 120g, 121,122,123,124,125)I were measured for the first time from their respective thresholds up to 100 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Thin samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition of 98.3% enriched 125Te on Ti-backing. In addition to experimental studies, excitation functions were calculated by the modified hybrid model code ALICE-IPPE. The experimental and theoretical data generally showed good agreement. From the measured cross section data, integral yields of (123,124,125)I were calculated. The energy range Ep 21 --> 15 MeV appears to be very suitable for the production of the medically interesting radionuclide 124I (T(1/2) = 4.18 d; I(beta)+ = 25%). The thick target yield of 124I amounts to 81 MBq/microA h and the level of 125I-impurity to 0.9%. The 125Te(p,2n)124I reaction gives 124I yield about four times higher than the commonly used 124Te(p,n)124I and 124Te(d,2n)124I reactions. The proposed production energy range is too high for small cyclotrons but large quantities of 124I can be produced with medium-sized commercial machines.

  6. Effect of motor imagery on excitability of spinal neural function and its impact on the accuracy of movement-considering the point at which subjects subjectively determine the 50%MVC point

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yuki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effect of motor imagery on the accuracy of motion and the excitability of spinal neural function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy volunteers (males, 15; females, 15; mean age, 20.3 ± 1.0 years) were recruited. F-waves was recorded at rest, while holding a sensor, and while using motor imagery. Next, subjects learned 50% maximum voluntary contraction. The pinch force was measured without visual feedback before and after motor imagery. F-waves were analyzed with respect to persistence and the F/M amplitude ratio. Correction time and coefficient of variation were calculated from the pinch force. [Results] Persistence and F/M amplitude ratio ware significantly higher in the holding sensor and motor imagery conditions than in the resting condition. In addition, persistence under motor imagery was significantly higher than that in the holding sensor condition. No significant differences were observed in relative values of correction time and coefficient of variation between the two pinch action conditions. The pinch force in task 2 approximated a more authentic 50%MVC than that in task 1. [Conclusion] Motor imagery increases the excitability of spinal neural function, suggesting that it also affects accurate control of muscle force. PMID:28174464

  7. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  8. 15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. 1 BEHIND. OVERHEAD CRANE DANGLES AT TOP OF PHOTO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  9. Neutron transfer versus inelastic surface vibrations in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Gautam, Manjeet

    2015-02-01

    This work deeply analyzed the relative importance of the neutron transfer channels and inelastic surface vibrations of colliding nuclei in the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of various heavy ion systems using an energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential (EDWSP) model in conjunction with a one-dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel formulation using the code CCFULL. The multi-phonon vibrational states of colliding nuclei and the nucleon transfer channels are found to be dominant internal degrees of freedom. The coupling between the relative motion of reactants and these relevant channels produces anomalously large sub-barrier fusion enhancement over the expectations of the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. In some cases, the influence of neutron transfer dominates over the couplings to low lying surface vibrational states of collision partners. Furthermore, the effects of coupling to inelastic surface excitations and the impact of neutron transfer channels with positive ground state Q-values are imitated due to energy dependence in the Woods-Saxon potential. In the EDWSP model calculations, a wide range for the diffuseness parameter, which is much larger than the value extracted from the elastic scattering data, is needed to account for the observed fusion enhancement in the close vicinity of the Coulomb barrier.

  10. Role of ribose in the initial excited state structural dynamics of thymidine in water solution: a resonance Raman and density functional theory investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin-Ming; Wang, Hui-gang; Zheng, Xuming; Phillips, David Lee

    2008-12-11

    Resonance Raman spectra were obtained for thymidine and thymine with excitation wavelengths in resonance with the approximately 260 nm band absorption spectrum. The spectra indicate that the Franck-Condon (FC) region photodissociation dynamics of thymidine have multidimensional character with motion predominantly along the nominal C5=C6 stretch + C6-H bend nu17 (delta = 0.75, lambda = 468 cm(-1)), the nominal thymine ring stretch + C6-H bend + N1-C1, stretch nu29 (delta = 0.73, lambda = 363 cm(-1)), the nominal thymine ring stretch + C5-CH3/ N1-C1, stretch nu37 (delta = 0.69, lambda = 292 cm(-1)), and accompanied by the moderate and minor changes in the nu40, nu20 and nu23, nu55, nu60, nu61, nu63 modes. A preliminary resonance Raman intensity analysis was done, and these results for thymidine and thymine were compared to each other. The roles of ribose in the FC structure dynamics of thymidine were explored and the results were used to correlate to its lifetime constants tau1 and tau2 for two nonradiative decay channels. Spi/Sn conical intersection versus a distorted structure of Spi,min in the FC region was briefly discussed.

  11. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  12. Patterns of conductivity in excitable automata with updatable intervals of excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    We define a cellular automaton where a resting cell excites if number of its excited neighbors belong to some specified interval and boundaries of the interval change depending on ratio of excited and refractory neighbors in the cell's neighborhood. We calculate excitability of a cell as a number of possible neighborhood configurations that excite the resting cell. We call cells with maximal values of excitability conductive. In exhaustive search of functions of excitation interval updates we select functions which lead to formation of connected configurations of conductive cells. The functions discovered are used to design conductive, wirelike, pathways in initially nonconductive arrays of cells. We demonstrate that by positioning seeds of growing conductive pathways it is possible to implement a wide range of routing operations, including reflection of wires, stopping wires, formation of conductive bridges, and generation of new wires in the result of collision. The findings presented may be applied in designing conductive circuits in excitable nonlinear media, reaction-diffusion chemical systems, neural tissue, and assemblies of conductive polymers.

  13. Excitation by rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tammadge, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard methods of excitation are not always practical when a single mode of known frequency requires investigation. This form of investigation is often required on a modified aircraft. A new method of excitation was developed and proved in flight, which consists of firing small rocket charges attached to the aircraft structure. Damping values at gradually increasing airspeeds are obtained, as in Stick Jerk tests, and flutter speeds predicted.

  14. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  15. Operant conditioning to increase ankle control or decrease reflex excitability improves reflex modulation and walking function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2013-06-01

    Ankle clonus is common after spinal cord injury (SCI) and is attributed to loss of supraspinally mediated inhibition of soleus stretch reflexes and maladaptive reorganization of spinal reflex pathways. The maladaptive reorganization underlying ankle clonus is associated with other abnormalities, such as coactivation and reciprocal facilitation of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL), which contribute to impaired walking ability in individuals with motor-incomplete SCI. Operant conditioning can increase muscle activation and decrease stretch reflexes in individuals with SCI. We compared two operant conditioning-based interventions in individuals with ankle clonus and impaired walking ability due to SCI. Training included either voluntary TA activation (TA↑) to enhance supraspinal drive or SOL H-reflex suppression (SOL↓) to modulate reflex pathways at the spinal cord level. We measured clonus duration, plantar flexor reflex threshold angle, timed toe tapping, dorsiflexion (DF) active range of motion, lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), walking foot clearance, speed and distance, SOL H-reflex amplitude modulation as an index of reciprocal inhibition, presynaptic inhibition, low-frequency depression, and SOL-to-TA clonus coactivation ratio. TA↑ decreased plantar flexor reflex threshold angle (-4.33°) and DF active range-of-motion angle (-4.32°) and increased LEMS of DF (+0.8 points), total LEMS of the training leg (+2.2 points), and nontraining leg (+0.8 points), and increased walking foot clearance (+ 4.8 mm) and distance (+12.09 m). SOL↓ decreased SOL-to-TA coactivation ratio (-0.21), increased nontraining leg LEMS (+1.8 points), walking speed (+0.02 m/s), and distance (+6.25 m). In sum, we found increased voluntary control associated with TA↑ outcomes and decreased reflex excitability associated with SOL↓ outcomes.

  16. Effects of intrinsic degrees of freedom in enhancement of sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy-dependent one-dimensional barrier penetration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have analyzed the role of barrier modification effects (barrier height, barrier position, barrier curvature) introduced due to the energy-dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) and the coupled channel model on the sub-barrier fusion dynamics of {}_{16}^{32,36} {{S}} + {}_{40}^{90,96} {{Zr}} reactions. The influence of inelastic surface excitations of colliding pairs and multi-neutron transfer channels is found to be a dominant mode of couplings. The coupling of relative motion of colliding nuclei to these dominant intrinsic degrees of freedom leads to a substantially large fusion enhancement at below-barrier energies over the expectations of one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The coupled channel calculations based upon static Woods-Saxon potential must include the internal nuclear structure degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei for complete description of experimental data. On the other hand, theoretical calculations based upon the EDWSP model along with Wong formula provide a complete description of sub-barrier fusion enhancement of various heavy-ion fusion reactions. In EDWSP model calculations, significantly larger values of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.98 fm to a = 0.85 fm are required to address the observed sub-barrier fusion enhancement of {}_{16}^{32,36} {{S}} + {}_{40}^{90,96} {{Zr}} reactions. Furthermore, within the context of EDWSP model, it is possible to achieve an agreement with the experimental fusion cross-sectional data within 10 %. For four heavy-ion fusion reactions, only at 4 fusion data points out of 90 fusion data points deviates exceeding 5 %, while 86 fusion data points lie within 5 % and hence the EDWSP model is able to account the above-barrier portion of the fusion cross-sectional data within 5 % with a probability greater than 90 %.

  17. An efficient synthesis approach for electromagnetic near- and far-field contoured patterns using alternative narrow-beam field functions transformed from the radiations of linearly excited array antennas with least computational complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsi-Tseng

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an effective scheme to accelerate the computational efficiency in synthesizing the electromagnetic contoured patterns spanned by the radiations of phased array antennas, which is applicable to synthesize both the near- and far-field patterns. The core concept is to adapt/create closed-form and simple formulations with least computational unknowns to be used in the iterative synthesis procedure. The efficiency is assured by avoiding the cumbersome numerical integration/summation for the radiation fields in the synthesis procedure. Thus, the scheme first transforms the conventional field basis functions (FBFs) defined by the radiations of every array elements into a set of global FBFs arising from the radiations of a set of overlapped virtual arrays, where each of the virtual arrays is properly excited by a Gaussian taper to avoid the ray caustic problems encountered in the asymptotic evaluations. The new FBFs (NFBFs) created by this transformation have radiation fields focused in narrow spans in contrast to the wide patterns of conventional FBFs and may reduce the number of FBFs in the computation if a small coverage area is considered. Furthermore, the closed-form formulations of global NFBFs are obtained by asymptotic evaluation and may dramatically reduce the computational time. This approach is implemented with the use of successive projection method, which also provides closed-form formulations to update the excitations in each iterative step, to synthesize the near- and far-field contoured patterns to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency.

  18. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  19. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  20. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  1. New measurements of excitation functions of 186W(p,x) nuclear reactions up to 65 MeV. Production of a 178W/178mTa generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2017-01-01

    New experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natW are presented in the 32-65 MeV energy range. The cross-sections for natW(p,xn)186,184m,184g,183, 182m,182g,181Re, natW(p,x)178W, natW(p,x)183,182, 180m, 177,176,175Ta, 175Hf and 177Lu were measured via an activation method by using a stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results were compared with predicted values obtained with the nuclear reaction code TALYS (results taken from the TENDL 2014 and TENDL 2015 on-line libraries). Production routes of the medically relevant radionuclides 186Re, the 178W → 178Ta generator and 181W are discussed.

  2. Global excitation of wave phenomena in a dissipative multiconstituent medium. I - Transfer function of the earth's thermosphere. II - Impulsive perturbations in the earth's thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Herrero, F. A.; Varosi, F.

    1984-01-01

    A transfer function approach is taken in constructing a spectral model of the acoustic-gravity wave response in a multiconstituent thermosphere. The model is then applied to describing the thermospheric response to various sources around the globe. Zonal spherical harmonics serve to model the horizontal variations in propagating waves which, when integrated with respect to height, generate a transfer function for a vertical source distribution in the thermosphere. Four wave components are characterized as resonance phenomena and are associated with magnetic activity and ionospheric disturbances. The waves are either trapped or propagate, the latter becoming significant when possessing frequencies above 3 cycles/day. The energy input is distributed by thermospheric winds. The disturbances decay slowly, mainly due to heat conduction and diffusion. Gravity waves appear abruptly and are connected to a sudden switching on or off of a source. Turn off of a source coincides with a reversal of the local atmospheric circulation.

  3. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  4. Excitation functions of natGe(p,xn)71,72,73,74 As reactions up to 100 MeV with a focus on the production of 72 As for medical and 73 As for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Spahn, I; Steyn, G F; Nortier, F M; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2007-09-01

    Excitation functions for the formation of the arsenic radionuclides (71)As, (72)As, (73)As and (74)As in the interaction of protons with (nat)Ge were measured from the respective threshold energy up to 100 MeV. The conventional stacked-foil technique was used and the needed thin samples were prepared by sedimentation. Irradiations were done at three cyclotrons: CV 28 and injector of COSY at Forschungszentrum Jülich, and Separate Sector Cyclotron at iThemba LABS, Somerset West. The radioactivity was measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The measured cross section data were compared with the literature data as well as with the nuclear model calculations. In both cases, the results generally agree but there are discrepancies in some areas, the results of nuclear model calculation and some of the literature data being somewhat higher than our data. The integral yields of the four radionuclides were calculated from the measured excitation functions. The beta(+) emitting nuclide (72)As (T(1/2)=26.01 h) can be produced with reasonable radionuclidic purity ((71)As impurity: <10%) over the energy range E(p) = 18-->8 MeV; the yield of 93 MBq/microAh is, however, low. The radionuclide (73)As (T(1/2)=80.30 d), a potentially useful indicator in environmental studies, could be produced with good radionuclidic purity ((74)As impurity: <11%) over the energy range E(p) = 30 --> 18 MeV, provided, a decay time of about 60 days is allowed. Its yield would then correspond to 2.4 MBq/microAh, and GBq amounts could be produced when using a high current target.

  5. Excitation functions of 124Te(d,xn)124,125I reactions from threshold up to 14 MeV: comparative evaluation of nuclear routes for the production of 124I.

    PubMed

    Bastian, T H; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2001-09-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 124Te(d,xn)124-125I were measured from their respective thresholds up to 14.0 MeV via the stacked-foil technique. Thin samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition of 99.8% enriched 124Te on Ti-backing. The excitation function of the 124Te(d,n)125I reaction was measured for the first time. The present data for the 124Te(d,2n)124I reaction are by an order of magnitude higher than the literature experimental data but are in good agreement with the results of a hybrid model calculation. From the measured cross sections, integral yields of 124,125I were calculated. The energy range Ed = 14 --> 10 MeV appears to be the best compromise between 124I-yield and 1251-impurity. The calculated 124I-yield amounts to 17.5 MBq/microA h and the 125I-impurity to 1.7%. A critical evaluation of the three nuclear routes for the production of 124I, viz. 124Te(d,2n)-, 124Te(p,n)- and 125Te(p,2n)-processes, is given. The reaction studied in this work proved to be least suitable. The 124Te(p,n)-reaction gives 124I of the highest radionuclidic purity, and a small-sized cyclotron is adequate for production purposes. The 125Te(p,2n)-reaction is more suitable at a medium-sized cyclotron: the yield of 124I is four times higher than in the other two reactions but the level of 0.9% 125I-impurity is relatively high.

  6. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  7. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  8. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  9. [Effect of aprindine in patients with normal and pre-damaged impulse forming and excitation conducting system/First communication; Sinus node function (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pantlen, H; Runge, M; Luckmann, E

    1980-01-01

    In 18 patients the influence of aprindine on sinus node function has been evaluated. The criteria were heart rate in spontaneous rhythm, sinus node recovery time (SRT), and the warm-up period after atrial stimulation with frequencies between 90 and 140/min. After aprindine the spontaneous rate increased significantly, whereas SRT and the warm-up period were not affected significantly. The patients with sinu-atrial disease showed a shortening of the spontaneous cycle-length and a decrease in SRT after aprindine. The results are discussed regarding the electrophysiological characteristics of the sinus node (slow current, automaticity) and their changes produced by stimulation and aprindine.

  10. Spin waves and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik-Romanov, A.S.; Sinha, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes both simple spin waves (magnons) and complicated excitations in magnetic systems. The following subjects are covered: - various methods of magnetic excitation investigations such as neutron scattering on magnetic excitations, spin-wave excitation by radio-frequency, power light scattering on magnons and magnetic excitation observation within the light-absorption spectrum; - oscillations of magnetic electron systems coupled with phonons, nuclear spin systems and localized impurity modes: - low-dimensional magnetics, amorphous magnetics and spin glasses.

  11. Comparing modern measurements of the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C excitation function with previous values

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Kevin W.; Massey, Thomas N.; Ingram, David C.

    2013-04-19

    A possible means of active interrogation of special nuclear materials is detection of signature emissions following induced photofission. This method requires a probe gamma-ray beam to induce the photofission. The {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction is a candidate for the source of this probe beam. The reaction is prolific and the produced 15.1 MeV gamma-ray is close to a photofission cross-section peak for {sup 235,238}U and {sup 238,239}Pu. In order to model an active interrogation system using the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction as a source probe an accurate value for its differential crosssection must be included in data libraries. Measurements of the differential cross-section for the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction have been carried out with a BGO detector and found to differ from previous measurements reported by Kavanagh (1958) and Kuan (1964). The discrepancy in the measurements may be explained by examining the detector response function used by Kavanagh and presumably Kuan to that modeled with MCNP5. A comparison of the MCNP5 and Kavanagh detector response functions normalized to the 15.1 MeV gamma-ray peak pulse height shows a factor of approximately 1.7 difference in integrated counts. Applying this correction to the differential cross-section previously reported by Kuan brings the values into agreement, within uncertainties, to the more recent measurements. The evaluation of the detector response function for the 15.1 MeV gamma-ray signal in the NaI detector reported by Kavanagh to that modeled by MCNP5 is shown. This result is applied to the comparison of recent measurements on the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction differential cross-section to those previously reported.

  12. Direct transient stability assessment with excitation control

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, A.A.; Vittal, V.; Ni, Y.X.; Pota, H.R.; Nodehi, K.; Zein-Eldin, H.M.; Vaahedi, E.; Kim

    1989-02-01

    Recently the authors incorporated the effect of excitation control on the transient energy of a multi-machine power system during the first swing. The models used are: the generator represented by the two-axis model and the exciter represented by one gain, one time constant and one limiter. In this paper the parameters of the newly developed transient energy function, which assumes a constant average internal EMF, are computed. The critical value of this transient energy is determined and its use in transient stability assessment is investigated. A procedure for transient stability assessment using the new energy function has been developed and successfully applied to fault disturbances in two test networks.

  13. Electron energy distribution functions and fractional power transfer in “cold” and excited CO{sub 2} discharge and post discharge conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pietanza, L. D. Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2016-01-15

    A Boltzmann equation, in the presence of superelastic vibrational and electronic collisions and of electron-electron Coulomb collisions, has been solved in CO{sub 2} plasma in discharge and post discharge conditions. Superelastic vibrational collisions play an important role in affecting the electron energy distribution function (eedf) in a wide range of the reduced electric field E/N and of vibrational temperatures characterizing the vibrational modes of CO{sub 2}. An important result is the dependence of fractional power losses and of the relevant rate coefficients on the vibrational temperatures of the system. Superelastic electronic collisions, on the other hand, are the main processes affecting eedf and related quantities in the post discharge conditions (i.e., E/N = 0). In particular at low vibrational temperatures, the superelastic electronic collisions form an important plateau in the eedf, largely influencing the rate coefficients and the fractional power transfer.

  14. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  15. Polar motion excitation from several models of land hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The impact of land hydrosphere mass variations on polar motion excitation is still not sufficiently estimated and not known as well as the role of the atmosphere and ocean. A comparison of the hydrological excitation function (Hydrological Angular Momentum - HAM) with observed geodetic excitation functions (GAM) is a common method of assessing of the influence of land hydrology on polar motion excitation function. HAM can be estimated either from global models of the land hydrosphere or from the Earth's gravity field variations. Our previous attempt to assess the role of land hydrology in the excitation balance using the hydrological angular momentum (HAM) estimates from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data and hydrological models was not conclusive (Brzeziński et al., 2009, Nastula et al., 2011, Wińska et al., 2016). We found for example that gravimetric-hydrological excitation functions, based on the Gravity and Climate Recovery Experiment (GRACE) gravity fiels determined from the several processing centers differed significantly. Additionally hydrological excitation computed from different hydrological models differed significantly in amplitudes and phases. In this work we re - estimate hydrological polar motion excitation functions from several hydrological models and climate models and from GRACE gravity fields. Our investigations are focused on the influence of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation functions at seasonal and non-seasonal time scales and comprises two steps: • first determinations hydrological excitation functions (HAM) from regional distribution of Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS). • the second comparison of the global HAM with hydrological signal in the observed geodetic excitation function of polar motion.

  16. Competitive Energy and Electron Transfer in β-Functionalized Free-Base Porphyrin-Zinc Porphyrin Dimer Axially Coordinated to C60 : Synthesis, Supramolecular Formation and Excited-State Processes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Thomas, Michael B; Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Wang, Hong; D'Souza, Francis

    2017-09-18

    Simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer events involving different acceptor sites in a newly assembled supramolecular triad comprised of covalently linked free-base porphyrin-zinc porphyrin dyad, H2 P-ZnP axially coordinated to electron acceptor fullerene, has been successfully demonstrated. The dyad was connected through the β-pyrrole positions of the porphyrin macrocycle instead of the traditionally used meso-positions for better electronic communication. Interestingly, the β-pyrrole functionalization modulated the optical properties to such an extent that it was possible to almost exclusively excite the zinc porphyrin entity in the supramolecular triad. The measured binding constant for the complex with 1:1 molecular stoichiometry was in the order of 10(4)  m(-1) revealing moderately stable complex formation. An energy level diagram constructed using optical, electrochemical and computational results suggested that both the anticipated energy and electron events are thermodynamically feasible in the triad. Consequently, it was possible to demonstrate occurrence of excited state energy transfer to the covalently linked H2 P, and electron transfer to the coordinated ImC60 from studies involving steady-state and time-resolved emission, and femto- and nanosecond transient absorption studies. The estimated energy transfer was around 67 % in the dyad with a rate constant of 1.1×10(9)  s(-1) . In the supramolecular triad, the charge separated state was rather long-lived although it was difficult to arrive the exact lifetime of charge separated state from nanosecond transient spectral studies due to overlap of strong triplet excited signals of porphyrin in the monitoring wavelength window. Nevertheless, simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer in the appropriately positioned energy and electron acceptor entities in a supramolecular triad was possible to demonstrate in the present study, a step forward to unraveling the complex

  17. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  18. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, George; Cohen, Saul; Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-01-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  19. On Emulation of Flueric Devices in Excitable Chemical Medium

    PubMed Central

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Flueric devices are fluidic devices without moving parts. Fluidic devices use fluid as a medium for information transfer and computation. A Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) medium is a thin-layer spatially extended excitable chemical medium which exhibits travelling excitation wave-fronts. The excitation wave-fronts transfer information. Flueric devices compute via jets interaction. BZ devices compute via excitation wave-fronts interaction. In numerical model of BZ medium we show that functions of key flueric devices are implemented in the excitable chemical system: signal generator, and, xor, not and nor Boolean gates, delay elements, diodes and sensors. Flueric devices have been widely used in industry since late 1960s and are still employed in automotive and aircraft technologies. Implementation of analog of the flueric devices in the excitable chemical systems opens doors to further applications of excitation wave-based unconventional computing in soft robotics, embedded organic electronics and living technologies. PMID:27997561

  20. First generation TREN dendrimers functionalized with naphthyl and/or dansyl units. Ground and excited state electronic interactions and protonation effects.

    PubMed

    Passaniti, Paolo; Maestri, Mauro; Ceroni, Paola; Bergamini, Giacomo; Vögtle, Fritz; Fakhrnabavi, Hassan; Lukin, Oleg

    2007-04-01

    We report the photophysical properties (absorption and emission spectra, quantum yield, and lifetime) of five dendrimers of first generation based on a TREN (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) skeleton functionalized at the periphery with naphthyl and/or 5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (hereafter called dansyl) chromophores. Each dendrimer comprises one tertiary amine unit in the core and three branches carrying a sulfonimido unit at the periphery, each one substituted by two identical or different moieties. In particular, TD6 and TN6 contain dansyl (D) or naphthyl (N) units, respectively, while TD3B3, TN3B3 and TN3D3 contain dansyl, naphthyl or benzyl (B) units at the periphery. The spectroscopic behaviour of these dendrimers has been investigated in acetonitrile solution and compared with that of reference compounds. For all dendrimers the absorption bands are red shifted compared to those of monomeric naphthyl and dansyl reference compounds. Moreover, the intense naphthyl and dansyl fluorescence is greatly quenched because of strong interactions between the two aromatic moieties linked by a sulfonimido unit. Protonation of the amine units of the dendrimers by addition of CF(3)SO(3)H (triflic) acid causes a decrease in intensity of the luminescence and a change in the shape of the emission bands. The shapes of the titration curves depend on the dendrimer, but in any case the effect of acid can be fully reversed by successive addition of base (tributylamine). The obtained results reveal that among the intradendrimer interactions the most important one is that taking place (via mesomeric interaction) between the various chromophores and a pair of sulfonimido groups.

  1. On the Driving Force of the Excited-State Proton Shuttle in the Green Fluorescent Protein: A Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) Study of the Intrinsic Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Alessio; Cimino, Paola; Donati, Greta; Hratchian, Hrant P; Frisch, Michael J; Rega, Nadia

    2016-10-11

    We simulated the intrinsic reaction path of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) proton shuttle in both the ground state (S0) and first singlet excited state (S1), accounting for the main energetic and steric effects of the protein in a convenient model including the chromophore, the crystallographic water, and the residues directly involved in the proton transfer event. We adopted density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) levels to define the potential energy surfaces of the two electronic states, and we compared results obtained by the Damped Velocity Verlet and the Hessian-based Predictor-Corrector integrators of the intrinsic reaction coordinate, which gave a comparable and consistent picture of the mechanism. We show that, at S1, the GFP proton transfer becomes favored, with respect to S0, as suggested by the experimental evidence. As an important finding, this change is strictly related to the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond network composing the reaction path, which, in S1, relaxes to a tighter and planar configuration, as a consequence of the photoinduced relaxation in the GFP chromophore structure, thus prompting more effectively for the proton shuttle. Therefore, we give an unprecedented direct proof of the key role played by the photoinduced structural relaxation of the GFP on the chromophore photoacidity, validating, in particular, the hypothesis of Fang and co-workers [Nature 2009, 462, 200].

  2. Experiments on excitation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. C.

    Recent trends in the experimentation on chemical and biochemical excitation waves are presented. In the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is the most suitable chemical laboratory system for the study of wave propagation in excitable medium, the efficient control of wave dynamics by electrical fields and by light illumination is illustrated. In particular, the effects of a feedback control are shown. Further new experiments in this system are concerned with three-dimensional topologies and boundary effects. Important biological applications are found in the aggregation of slime mould amoebae, in proton waves during oscillatory glycolysis, and in waves of spreading depression in neuronal tissue as studied by experiments in chicken retina. Numerical simulations with appropriate reaction-diffusion models complement a large number of these experimental findings.

  3. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  4. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  5. Pulse excitation of bolometer bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusk, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    Driving bolometer bridge by appropriately phased excitation pulses increases signal-to-noise ratio of bolometer sensor which operates on a chopped light beam. Method allows higher applied voltage than is possible by conventional ac or dc excitation.

  6. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  7. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  8. Chemical waves in inhomogeneous excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselko, Jerzy; Showalter, Kenneth

    1991-04-01

    Propagating chemical waves are typically studied in homogeneous, excitable reaction mixtures. Chemical waves in an inhomogeneous excitable medium are examined in this paper. Cation exchange beads, loaded with ferroin, are bathed in Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction mixtures containing no catalyst. Spiral waves are spontaneously initiated above a critical bromate concentration, which is dependent on the size of the ferroin-loaded beads. At high bromate concentrations, irregular patterns are formed due to an overcrowding of spirals. An upper limit in the number of individual waves is exhibited, which is independent on the bead size. Regular and irregular patterns are analyzed by calculating spatial correlation functions from digital images.

  9. Get excited: reappraising pre-performance anxiety as excitement.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison Wood

    2014-06-01

    Individuals often feel anxious in anticipation of tasks such as speaking in public or meeting with a boss. I find that an overwhelming majority of people believe trying to calm down is the best way to cope with pre-performance anxiety. However, across several studies involving karaoke singing, public speaking, and math performance, I investigate an alternative strategy: reappraising anxiety as excitement. Compared with those who attempt to calm down, individuals who reappraise their anxious arousal as excitement feel more excited and perform better. Individuals can reappraise anxiety as excitement using minimal strategies such as self-talk (e.g., saying "I am excited" out loud) or simple messages (e.g., "get excited"), which lead them to feel more excited, adopt an opportunity mind-set (as opposed to a threat mind-set), and improve their subsequent performance. These findings suggest the importance of arousal congruency during the emotional reappraisal process.

  10. Spin-flip, tensor equation-of-motion configuration interaction with a density-functional correction: A spin-complete method for exploring excited-state potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2015-12-21

    We revisit the formalism of the spin-adapted, spin-flip (SA-SF) configuration-interaction singles (CIS) method based on a tensor equation-of-motion formalism that affords proper spin eigenstates without sacrificing single-reference simplicity. Matrix elements for SA-SF-CIS are then modified in a manner similar to collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (SF-TDDFT), to include a DFT exchange-correlation correction. The performance of this method, which we call SA-SF-DFT, is evaluated numerically and we find that it systematically improves the energies of electronic states that exhibit significant spin contamination within the conventional SF-TDDFT approach. The new method cures the state assignment problem that plagues geometry optimizations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using traditional SF-TDDFT, without sacrificing computational efficiency, and furthermore provides correct topology at conical intersections, including those that involve the ground state, unlike conventional TDDFT. As such, SA-SF-DFT appears to be a promising method for generating excited-state potential energy surfaces at DFT cost.

  11. Excitation functions of 120Te(d,xn)121,120m,gI reactions from threshold up to 13.5 MeV: comparative studies on the production of 120gI.

    PubMed

    Hohn, A; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2000-04-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 120Te(d,xn)121,120m,gI were measured for the first time from their respective thresholds up to 13.5 MeV. Thin samples prepared by electrolytic deposition of 99.0% enriched 120Te on Ti-backing were used. Integral yields of 121,120m,gI were calculated from the measured cross section data. A comparison of the 122Te(p,3n)-, 120Te(p,n)- and 120Te(d,2n)-processes for the production of 120gI is given. The 120Te(d,2n)-process is unsuitable for production purposes since the yield of 120gI is very low and the level of 121I impurity very high. The choice lies either on the 122Te(p,3n)- or the 120Te(p,n)-reaction and is governed by the available proton energy and the financial resources for procuring the enriched target material.

  12. Excitation functions of heavy residues produced in the 14N+103Rh reaction up to 400 MeV: Analysis of the pre-equilibrium mechanism with the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Steyn, G. F.; Singh, N. L.; Chatterjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    The excitation functions of heavy residues, produced in the interaction of 14N with 103Rh, have been measured over the projectile energy region from a threshold up to 400 MeV by means of the activation method in conjunction with γ-ray spectroscopy. Cross sections for 15 reaction residues are presented, namely, 104Cd, Ag-105103, Pd-10199, 97,99,101Rh, Ru,9795, and Tc-9694. The experimental data are compared with theoretical model predictions using the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model as implemented in the recently released alice2014 code. The theory assumes that the dominant pre-equilibrium mechanism includes multinucleon and cluster emissions in the initial stages of the interaction between the projectile and the target nucleus. Overall, the theoretical predictions provide a satisfactory agreement with the trend of the present experimental results for most of the observed reaction residues. This provides strong evidence that the underlying reaction mechanisms in the code are appropriately described. Overall, the Obninsk level densities give the best results in the present study.

  13. Phospholipase A2 – nexus of aging, oxidative stress, neuronal excitability, and functional decline of the aging nervous system? Insights from a snail model system of neuronal aging and age-associated memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Petra M.; Watson, Shawn N.; Wildering, Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    The aging brain undergoes a range of changes varying from subtle structural and physiological changes causing only minor functional decline under healthy normal aging conditions, to severe cognitive or neurological impairment associated with extensive loss of neurons and circuits due to age-associated neurodegenerative disease conditions. Understanding how biological aging processes affect the brain and how they contribute to the onset and progress of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases is a core research goal in contemporary neuroscience. This review focuses on the idea that changes in intrinsic neuronal electrical excitability associated with (per)oxidation of membrane lipids and activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes are an important mechanism of learning and memory failure under normal aging conditions. Specifically, in the context of this special issue on the biology of cognitive aging we portray the opportunities offered by the identifiable neurons and behaviorally characterized neural circuits of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis in neuronal aging research and recapitulate recent insights indicating a key role of lipid peroxidation-induced PLA2 as instruments of aging, oxidative stress and inflammation in age-associated neuronal and memory impairment in this model system. The findings are discussed in view of accumulating evidence suggesting involvement of analogous mechanisms in the etiology of age-associated dysfunction and disease of the human and mammalian brain. PMID:25538730

  14. Excitation of a slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad; French, D. M.; Luginsland, J. W.

    2012-12-15

    The Green's function on a slow wave structure is constructed. The Green's function includes all radial modes, and for each radial mode, all space harmonics. We compare the analytic solution of the frequency response on the slow wave structure with that obtained from a particle-in-cell code. Favorable comparison is obtained when the first few lower order modes are resonantly excited. This gives some confidence in the prediction of converting a pulse train into radiation using a slow wave structure.

  15. Core excitation of Li by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1985-07-01

    Cross sections for the excitation of a core electron, which leads to autoionization, in lithium (Li) atomic system by electron impact have been calculated with use of the single-configuration Hartree-Fock wave function within the asymptotic Green's-function approximation (AGFA) in the low-bombarding-energy region. Comparison is made with available results. Our investigation demonstrates that the AGFA supports the R-matrix as well as the distorted-wave Born-approximation behavior.

  16. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  17. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  18. Metastable Interactions: Dissociative Excitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    participate. The mercuric halide compounds HgBr2 , HgCl 2 , and HgI2 are of recent interest because of laser output achieved on the B2 E - X2 E transition in...the * respective mercuric halide radicals in the range of 400-600 nm. Population inversion has been obtained by photodissociation and electron impact...excitation in mixtures o the mercuric - halide compounds and the rare gases. Chang and -* Burnham (3) have noted Improved laser efficiency and improved

  19. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  20. Self-excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    The novel effect of self-excitation of surface plasmons (SESP) in a plasmonic nanocavity is predicted, and its theory is developed from first principles. It is assumed that the cavity is formed by a nanogap between two metals and contains polarizable inclusions. Basing on the dyadic Green's function of the structure, the equations for the field in the cavity are investigated. It is shown that under certain conditions the field becomes unstable that leads to its self-excitation. The threshold criterion for self-excitation as well as the frequency of self-oscillation are derived in an analytical form. The SESP effect is explained in terms of a positive feedback for the polarization of inclusions provided by the field reflected from the cavity walls. These findings suggest a principally new avenue to surface plasmon generation which does not employ stimulated emission and is different from SPASER or plasmon laser.

  1. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  2. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Enrico; Pastore, Mariachiara; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  3. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  4. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  5. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Criteria to assess charge-transfer (CT) and `CT-like' character of electronic excitations are examined. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with non-hybrid, hybrid, and tuned long-range corrected (LC) functionals is compared with with coupled-cluster (CC) benchmarks. The test set includes an organic CT complex, two `push-pull' donor-acceptor chromophores, a cyanine dye, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Proper CT is easily identified. Excitations with significant density changes upon excitation within regions of close spatial proximity can also be diagnosed. For such excitations, the use of LC functionals in TDDFT sometimes leads to dramatic improvements of the singlet energies, similar to proper CT, which has led to the concept of `CT-like' excitations. However, `CT-like' excitations are not like charge transfer, and the improvements are not obtained for the right reasons. The triplet excitation energies are underestimated for all systems, often severely. For the `CT-like' candidates, when going from a non-hybrid to an LC functional the error in the singlet-triplet (S/T) separation changes from negative to positive, providing error compensation. For the cyanine, the S/T separation is too large with all functionals, leading to the best error compensation for non-hybrid functionals.

  6. Excited electronic states and spectroscopy of unsymmetrically substituted polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takao

    2013-09-01

    α-Methyl-ω-phenylpolyenes, Me-(CH=CH)N-Ph, (MPPNs) with N = 2, 3, and 4 were synthesized. Fluorescence, absorption, and excitation spectra of MPPNs have been measured under different conditions along with those of β-methylstyrene. It is shown that there is a forbidden singlet (π, π*) excited state located at energies below the absorbing state for MPPNs with N = 3 and 4. Excitation energies of these polyenes are determined as a function of N. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependence of the relative intensity of the fluorescence spectrum and its solvent shift behavior extract estimates of the various physical parameters that characterize excitation energies and excited-state dynamical behavior of MPPN with N = 3. The singlet excited states of the MPPNs were compared with those of the α,ω-diphenylpolyenes and α,ω-dimethylpolyenes.

  7. Excited electronic states and spectroscopy of unsymmetrically substituted polyenes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takao

    2013-09-07

    α-Methyl-ω-phenylpolyenes, Me-(CH=CH)N-Ph, (MPPNs) with N = 2, 3, and 4 were synthesized. Fluorescence, absorption, and excitation spectra of MPPNs have been measured under different conditions along with those of β-methylstyrene. It is shown that there is a forbidden singlet (π, π∗) excited state located at energies below the absorbing state for MPPNs with N = 3 and 4. Excitation energies of these polyenes are determined as a function of N. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependence of the relative intensity of the fluorescence spectrum and its solvent shift behavior extract estimates of the various physical parameters that characterize excitation energies and excited-state dynamical behavior of MPPN with N = 3. The singlet excited states of the MPPNs were compared with those of the α,ω-diphenylpolyenes and α,ω-dimethylpolyenes.

  8. Excitation entanglement entropy in two dimensional conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Yavartanoo, H.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze how excitations affect the entanglement entropy for an arbitrary entangling interval in a 2d conformal field theory (CFT) using the holographic entanglement entropy techniques as well as direct CFT computations. We introduce the excitation entanglement entropy ΔhS , the difference between the entanglement entropy generic excitations and their arbitrary conformal descendants denoted through h . The excitation entanglement entropy, unlike the entanglement entropy, is a finite quantity (independent of the cutoff), and hence a good physical observable. We show that the excitation entanglement entropy for any given interval is uniquely specified by a local second order differential equation sourced by the one point function of the energy momentum tensor computed in the excited background state, and two boundary and smoothness conditions. We analyze low and high temperature behavior of the excitation entanglement entropy and show that ΔhS grows as a function of temperature. We prove an "integrated positivity" for the excitation entanglement entropy, that although ΔhS can be positive or negative, its average value is always positive. We also discuss the mutual and multipartite information and (strong) subadditivity inequality in the presence of generic excitations and their conformal descendants.

  9. Excitability in Dictyostelium development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David

    2013-03-01

    Discovering how populations of cells reliably develop into complex multi-cellular structures is a key challenge in modern developmental biology. This requires an understanding of how networks at the single-cell level, when combined with intercellular signaling and environmental cues, give rise to the collective behaviors observed in cellular populations. I will present work in collaboration with the Gregor lab, showing that the signal-relay response of starved cells of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can be well modeled as an excitable system. This is in contrast to existing models of the network that postulate a feed-forward cascade. I then extend the signal-relay model to describe how spatial gradient sensing may be achieved via excitability. One potential advantage of relying on feedback for gradient sensing is in preventing ``cheaters'' that do not produce signals from taking over the population. I then combine these models of single-cell signaling and chemotaxis to perform large-scale agent-based simulations of aggregating populations. This allows direct study of how variations in single-cell dynamics modify population behavior. In order to further test this model, I use the results of a screen for mutant cell lines that exhibit altered collective patterns. Finally, I use an existing FRET movie database of starved cell populations at varying cell densities and dilution rates to study heterogeneity in repeated spatio-temporal activity patterns.

  10. Energy calculation of 2s2 1S, 2p2 1D, 3s2 1S, 3p2 1D, 3d2 1G, 4p2 1D, 4d2 1D, 4f2 1I doubly excited states using a new wave function to four terms for 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, B.; Sow, M.; Gning, Y.; Traore, A.; Ndao, A. S.; Wague, A.

    2016-06-01

    Calculation of the energy levels of atoms and ions with 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15 are carried out in this paper using a Hyllerass approximation. The method used is one of Screen Constant by Nuclear Charge Unit to calculate the total energy of two-electron atomic systems in ground and different doubly excited states. Employing a new wave function including correlation, we were able to calculate excited states (nl)2 (n ≤ 4). The Comparison of these results with the ones of other methods shows a good agreement.

  11. The temperature dependence of electrical excitability in fish hearts.

    PubMed

    Vornanen, Matti

    2016-07-01

    Environmental temperature has pervasive effects on the rate of life processes in ectothermic animals. Animal performance is affected by temperature, but there are finite thermal limits for vital body functions, including contraction of the heart. This Review discusses the electrical excitation that initiates and controls the rate and rhythm of fish cardiac contraction and is therefore a central factor in the temperature-dependent modulation of fish cardiac function. The control of cardiac electrical excitability should be sensitive enough to respond to temperature changes but simultaneously robust enough to protect against cardiac arrhythmia; therefore, the thermal resilience and plasticity of electrical excitation are physiological qualities that may affect the ability of fishes to adjust to climate change. Acute changes in temperature alter the frequency of the heartbeat and the duration of atrial and ventricular action potentials (APs). Prolonged exposure to new thermal conditions induces compensatory changes in ion channel expression and function, which usually partially alleviate the direct effects of temperature on cardiac APs and heart rate. The most heat-sensitive molecular components contributing to the electrical excitation of the fish heart seem to be Na(+) channels, which may set the upper thermal limit for the cardiac excitability by compromising the initiation of the cardiac AP at high temperatures. In cardiac and other excitable cells, the different temperature dependencies of the outward K(+) current and inward Na(+) current may compromise electrical excitability at temperature extremes, a hypothesis termed the temperature-dependent depression of electrical excitation.

  12. Multiphonon excitations in boson quantum films

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Krotscheck, E. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamical excitations in thin liquid films of {sup 4}He adsorbed to a substrate are investigated by using a microscopic theory of excitations that includes multiple-phonon scattering. We study the dispersion relation, excitation mechanisms, transition densities, and particle currents as a function of surface coverage. A primary new result is that we have included three-phonon scattering processes in the calculation of the dynamic structure function and the one-body current densities. With the exception that our ground state is determined by our variational theory, rather than taken from experiment, our work on the dynamic structure function is the generalization of that of Jackson [Phys. Rev. A {bold 4}, 2386 (1971)] to inhomogeneous systems (films). Using sum rules for the dynamic structure function as a guide, we suggest a simple scaling argument for improving the agreement between our dynamic structure function and the experimental one. The addition of three-phonon contributions bring about the following changes. First, the energy of most modes is lowered by a non-negligible amount for finite momentum excitations. Second, the film{close_quote}s surface mode is the exception; it is only slightly affected. Third, for monolayer films there is large scattering at high energies at intermediate values of momenta. This scattering can be traced back to an anomalously large contribution to the two-particle density of states. Fourth, all modes with energy above a critical energy decay, and the associated peaks of the dynamic structure function are broadened. Fifth, the maxonlike character is enhanced in the bulklike modes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Length of excitable knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present extensive numerical simulations of an excitable medium to study the long-term dynamics of knotted vortex strings for all torus knots up to crossing number 11. We demonstrate that FitzHugh-Nagumo evolution preserves the knot topology for all the examples presented, thereby providing a field theory approach to the study of knots. Furthermore, the evolution yields a well-defined minimal length for each knot that is comparable to the ropelength of ideal knots. We highlight the role of the medium boundary in stabilizing the length of the knot and discuss the implications beyond torus knots. We also show that there is not a unique attractor within a given knot topology.

  14. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  15. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  16. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  17. Ion yields in UV-MALDI mass spectrometry as a function of excitation laser wavelength and optical and physico-chemical properties of classical and halogen-substituted MALDI matrixes.

    PubMed

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W; Hillenkamp, Franz; Karas, Michael; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2012-08-07

    The laser wavelength constitutes a key parameter in ultraviolet-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI-MS). Optimal analytical results are only achieved at laser wavelengths that correspond to a high optical absorption of the matrix. In the presented work, the wavelength dependence and the contribution of matrix proton affinity to the MALDI process were investigated. A tunable dye laser was used to examine the wavelength range between 280 and 355 nm. The peptide and matrix ion signals recorded as a function of these irradiation parameters are displayed in the form of heat maps, a data representation that furnishes multidimensional data interpretation. Matrixes with a range of proton affinities from 809 to 866 kJ/mol were investigated. Among those selected are the standard matrixes 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA) as well as five halogen-substituted cinnamic acid derivatives, including the recently introduced 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA) and α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA) matrixes. With the exception of DHB, the highest analyte ion signals were obtained toward the red side of the peak optical absorption in the solid state. A stronger decline of the molecular analyte ion signals generated from the matrixes was consistently observed at the low wavelength side of the peak absorption. This effect is mainly the result of increased fragmentation of both analyte and matrix ions. Optimal use of multiply halogenated matrixes requires adjustment of the excitation wavelength to values below that of the standard MALDI lasers emitting at 355 (Nd:YAG) or 337 nm (N(2) laser). The combined data provide new insights into the UV-MALDI desorption/ionization processes and indicate ways to improve the analytical sensitivity.

  18. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited.

    PubMed

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Criteria to assess charge-transfer (CT) and CT-like character of electronic excitations are examined. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations with non-hybrid, hybrid, and tuned long-range corrected (LC) functionals are compared with coupled-cluster (CC) benchmarks. The test set comprises an organic CT complex, two push-pull donor-acceptor chromophores, a cyanine dye, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Proper CT is easily identified. Excitations with significant density changes upon excitation within regions of close spatial proximity can also be diagnosed. For such excitations, the use of LC functionals in TDDFT sometimes leads to dramatic improvements of the singlet energies, similar to proper CT. It is shown that such CT-like excitations do not have the characteristics of physical charge transfer, and improvements with LC functionals may not be obtained for the right reasons. The TDDFT triplet excitation energies are underestimated for all systems, often severely. For the CT-like candidates, the singlet-triplet (S/T) separation changes from negative with a non-hybrid functional to positive with a tuned LC functional. For the cyanine, the S/T separation is systematically too large with TDDFT, leading to better error compensation for the singlet energy with a non-hybrid functional.

  19. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  20. How myosin motors power cellular functions: an exciting journey from structure to function: based on a lecture delivered at the 34th FEBS Congress in Prague, Czech Republic, July 2009.

    PubMed

    Llinas, Paola; Pylypenko, Olena; Isabet, Tatiana; Mukherjea, Monalisa; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors such as myosins are allosteric enzymes that power essential motility functions in the cell. Structural biology is an important tool for deciphering how these motors work. Myosins produce force upon the actin-driven conformational changes controlling the sequential release of the hydrolysis products of ATP (Pi followed by ADP). These conformational changes are amplified by a 'lever arm', which includes the region of the motor known as the converter and the adjacent elongated light chain binding region. Analysis of four structural states of the motor provides a detailed understanding of the rearrangements and pathways of communication in the motor that are necessary for detachment from the actin track and repriming of the motor. However, the important part of the cycle in which force is produced remains enigmatic and awaits new high-resolution structures. The value of a structural approach is particularly evident from clues provided by the structural states of the reverse myosin VI motor. Crystallographic structures have revealed that rearrangements within the converter subdomain occur, which explains why this myosin can produce a large stroke in the opposite direction to all other myosins, despite a very short lever arm. By providing a detailed understanding of the motor rearrangements, structural biology will continue to reveal essential information and help solve current enigma, such as how actin promotes force production, how motors are tuned for specific cellular roles or how motor/cargo interactions regulate the function of myosin in the cell.

  1. Optically excited states in positronium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. H.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Magnotta, F.; Dermer, Charles D.; Failor, R. A.; Jones, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical excitation are reported of the 1 3S-2 3P transition in positronium, and a second excitation from n=2 to higher n states. The experiment used light from two pulsed dye lasers. Changes in the positronium annihilation rate during and after the laser pulse were used to deduce the excited state populations. The n=2 level was found to be saturable and excitable to a substantial fraction of n=2 positronium to higher levels. Preliminary spectroscopic measurements were performed on n=14 and n=15 positronium.

  2. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  3. The Novel KV7.2/KV7.3 Channel Opener ICA-069673 Reveals Subtype-Specific Functional Roles in Guinea Pig Detrusor Smooth Muscle Excitability and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Provence, Aaron; Malysz, John

    2015-01-01

    The physiologic roles of voltage-gated KV7 channel subtypes (KV7.1–KV7.5) in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) are poorly understood. Here, we sought to elucidate the functional roles of KV7.2/KV7.3 channels in guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673 [N-(2-chloro-5-pyrimidinyl)-3,4-difluorobenzamide]. We employed a multilevel experimental approach using Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, isometric DSM tension recordings, fluorescence Ca2+ imaging, and perforated whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Western blot experiments revealed the protein expression of KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits in DSM tissue. In isolated DSM cells, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy further confirmed protein expression for KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits, where they localize within the vicinity of the cell membrane. ICA-069673 inhibited spontaneous phasic, pharmacologically induced, and nerve-evoked contractions in DSM isolated strips in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of ICA-069673 on DSM spontaneous phasic and tonic contractions were abolished in the presence of the KV7 channel inhibitor XE991 [10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone dihydrochloride]. Under conditions of elevated extracellular K+ (60 mM), the effects of ICA-069673 on DSM tonic contractions were significantly attenuated. ICA-069673 decreased the global intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DSM cells, an effect blocked by the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine. ICA-069673 hyperpolarized the membrane potential and inhibited spontaneous action potentials of isolated DSM cells, effects that were blocked in the presence of XE991. In conclusion, using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673, this study provides strong evidence for a critical role for the KV7.2- and KV7.3-containing channels in DSM function at both cellular and tissue levels. PMID:26087697

  4. Collisional excitation of interstellar methyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are used to determine the collisional excitation rates of methyl cyanide under interstellar molecular cloud conditions. The required Q(L,M) as a function of kinetic temperature were determined by averaging fixed energy IOS (infinite order sudden) results over appropriate Boltzmann distributions of collision energies. At a kinetic temperature of 40 K, rates within a K ladder were found to be accurate to generally better than about 30 percent.

  5. Love waves excited by a moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzes the characteristics of surface Love waves excited by the moment of an oscillating torsional force with a point of action that moves uniformly and rectilinearly along the free flat boundary of a medium having the structure of a "layer on a half-space." The azimuthal-angular distribution of the amplitude and Doppler shift in frequency of the wave modes is studied as a function of the motion velocity of a vibrating source and the parameters of the medium.

  6. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  7. Excited-State Dynamics of Overlapped Optically-Allowed 1Bu+ and Optically-Forbidden 1Bu− or 3Ag− Vibronic Levels of Carotenoids: Possible Roles in the Light-Harvesting Function

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Miki, Takeshi; Christiana, Rebecca; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The unique excited-state properties of the overlapped (diabatic) optically-allowed 1Bu+ and the optically-forbidden 1Bu− or 3Ag− vibronic levels close to conical intersection (‘the diabatic pair’) are summarized: Pump-probe spectroscopy after selective excitation with ∼100 fs pulses of all-trans carotenoids (Cars) in nonpolar solvent identified a symmetry selection rule in the diabatic electronic mixing and diabatic internal conversion, i.e., ‘1Bu+-to-1Bu− is allowed but 1Bu+-to-3Ag− is forbidden’. On the other hand, pump-probe spectroscopy after coherent excitation with ∼30 fs of all-trans Cars in THF generated stimulated emission with quantum beat, consisting of the long-lived coherent diabatic cross term and a pair of short-lived incoherent terms. PMID:20480049

  8. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  9. On the Electronically Excited States of Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Kowalski, Karol; Fan, Peng-Dong; Valiev, Marat; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna

    2008-10-09

    Vertical excitation energies in uracil in the gas phase and in water solution are investigated by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basis set effects are found to be important for converged results. The analysis of electronic wave functions reveals that the lowest singlet states are predominantly of a singly excited character and are therefore well described by single-reference equation-of-motion methods augmented by a perturbative triples correction to account for dynamical correlation. Our best estimates for the vertical excitation energies for the lowest singlet n and are 5.0±0.1 eV and 5.3±0.1 eV, respectively. The solvent effects for these states are estimated to be +0.5 eV and ±0.1 eV, respectively. We attribute the difference between the computed vertical excitations and the maximum of the experimental absorption to strong vibronic interaction between the lowest A00 and A0 states leading to intensity borrowing by the forbidden transition.

  10. Excitation of photon echo by noise pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruzdin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of photon echo by noise pulses that are formed by modulation of the carrying frequency with Gauss noise is modeled. The modeling is based on optical Bloch equations the solution of which for noise pulse realizations is constructed by their stepwise approximation. In terms of the formalism of state transfer matrices, the two- and three-pulse excitation modes are analyzed. The complex envelopes of the primary and stimulated echo responses are determined. In the linear (low-level-signal) mode, the shape of the two-pulse echo corresponds to that of the time delayed and inverted noise pulse. The boundary of the linear mode, upon exceeding of which distortions of the shape of the noise pulse become noticeable, is determined. The shape of the stimulated (three-pulse) echo in the linear mode corresponds to that of the autocorrelation function of the noise pulse realization. Upon passage beyond the boundary of the linear mode, the shape of the three-pulse echo corresponds either to the cross-correlation function of distorted noise pulses (with different intensities) or to the autocorrelation function of distorted pulses (with the same intensities). The modeled photon echo excitation modes can be used in photon echo processors to process signals in the light range.

  11. Vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved electronic excitation cross sections of positron-H2 scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark; Fursa, Dmitry; Savage, Jeremy; Bray, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved electronic excitation cross sections of positron-H2 scattering have been calculated using the single-centre molecular convergent close-coupling (CCC) method. The adiabatic-nuclei approximation was utilized to model the above scattering processes and obtain the vibrationally resolved positron-H2 scattering length. As previously demonstrated, the CCC results are converged and accurately account for virtual and physical positronium formation by coupling basis functions with large orbital angular momentum. Here vibrationally resolved integrated and differential cross sections are presented over a wide energy range and compared with previous calculations and available experiments. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Curtin University.

  12. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  13. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  14. Comparison of acoustic and mechanical excitation for modal response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, B. G.; Stevens, J. R.

    An acoustic field is examined as an alternate to mechanical excitation of a test specimen to measure modal response. A square, flat plate with clamped edges is used because classical analytical solutions to its modal analysis are readily available. A small hammer with a built-in force transducer is used to mechanically