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Sample records for excite luttinger liquid

  1. Fractional Josephson current through a Luttinger liquid with topological excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Baigeng Xing, D.Y.

    2015-07-15

    Recently, the Majorana fermion has received great attentions due to its promising application in the fault-tolerant quantum computation. This application requires more accessible methods to detect the motion and braiding of the Majorana fermions. We use a Luttinger liquid ring to achieve this goal, where the ring geometry is nontrivial in the sense that it leads to fermion-parity-dependent topological excitations. First, we briefly review the essential physics of the Luttinger liquid and the Majorana fermion, in order to give an introduction of the general framework used in the following main work. Then, we theoretically investigated the DC Josephson effect between two topological superconductors via a Luttinger liquid ring. A low-energy effective Hamiltonian is derived to show the existence of the fractional Josephson current. Also, we find that the amplitude of the Josephson current, which is determined by the correlation function of Luttinger liquid, exhibits different behaviors in terms of the parity of Luttinger liquid due to the topological excitations. Our results suggest a possible method to detect the Majorana fermions and their tunneling process.

  2. Sliding Luttinger liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-07-01

    We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T-->0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

  3. Electron lifetime in Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hur, Karyn

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the decoherence of the electron wave packet in purely ballistic one-dimensional systems described through the Luttinger liquid (LL). At a finite temperature T and long times t , we show that the electron Green’s function for a fixed wave vector close to one Fermi point decays as exp(-t/τF) —as opposed to the power-law behavior occurring at short times—and the emerging electron lifetime obeys τF-1∝T for spinful as well as spinless electrons. For strong interactions, (TτF)≪1 , reflecting that the electron is not a good Landau quasiparticle in LL’s. We justify that fractionalization is the main source of electron decoherence for spinful as well as spinless electrons clarifying the peculiar electron mass renormalization close to the Fermi points. For spinless electrons and weak interactions, our intuition can be enriched through a diagrammatic approach or Fermi golden rule and through a Johnson-Nyquist noise picture. We stress that the electron lifetime (and the fractional quasiparticles) can be revealed from Aharonov-Bohm experiments or momentum resolved tunneling. We aim to compare the results with those of spin-incoherent and chiral LL’s.

  4. Kinetic theory for interacting Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhold, Michael; Diehl, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We derive a closed set of equations for the kinetics and non-equilibrium dynamics of interacting Luttinger Liquids with cubic resonant interactions. In the presence of these interactions, the Luttinger phonons become dressed but still well defined quasi-particles, characterized by a life-time much larger then the inverse energy. This enables the separation of forward time dynamics and relative time dynamics into slow and fast dynamics and justifies the so-called Wigner approximation, which can be seen as a "local-time approximation" for the relative dynamics. Applying field theoretical methods in the Keldysh framework, i.e. kinetic and Dyson-Schwinger equations, we derive a closed set of dynamic equations, describing the kinetics of normal and anomalous phonon densities, the phonon self-energy and vertex corrections for a Gaussian non-equilibrium initial state. In the limit of low phonon densities, the results from self-consistent Born approximation are recaptured, including Andreev's scaling solution for the quasi-particle life-time in a thermal state. As an application, we compute the relaxation of an excited state to its thermal equilibrium. While the intermediate time dynamics displays exponentially fast relaxation, the last stages of thermalization are governed by algebraic laws. This can be traced back to the importance of energy and momentum conservation at the longest times, which gives rise to dynamical slow modes.

  5. Compressible Strips, Chiral Luttinger Liquids, and All That Jazz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. H.

    1996-03-01

    When the quantum Hall effect occurs in a two-dimensional electron gas, all low-energy elementary excitations are localized near the system edge. The edge acts in many ways like a one-dimensional ring of electrons, except that a finite current flows around the ring in equilibrium. This article is a brief and informal review of some of the physics of quantum Hall system edges. We discuss the implications of macroscopic {\\em compressible strip} models for microscopic {chiral Luttinger liquid} models and make an important distinction between the origin of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in fractional quantum Hall edges and in usual one-dimensional electron gas systems.

  6. A Crossed Sliding Luttinger Liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Kane, C. L.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2001-03-01

    It was recently demonstrated [1] that a stack of weakly coupled 2D planar XY-models can exhibit a sliding phase characterized by correlations that die off as a power-law with distance within a plane and exponentially with distance in the perpendicular direction. In this talk we investigate how these ideas can be extended to two-dimensional arrays of coupled quantam wires. In particular, we will focus on a crossed array of wires and demonstrate the existence of the so-called "crossed sliding Luttinger liquid" phase [2]. This phase is characterized by power-law correlations, and a two-dimensional isotropic in-plane conductivity that diverges as a power-law in temperature T as T goes to 0. It thus represents a nearly isotropic non-Fermi liquid state in two dimensions. 1. C.S. O'Hern, T.C. Lubensky, and J.Toner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2745 (1999). 2. Ranjan Mukhopadhyay, C.L. Kane, and T.C. Lubensky, condmat/0007039.

  7. Coulomb drag between helical Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainaris, N.; Gornyi, I. V.; Levchenko, A.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity ρD exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature T . In the limit of low T ,ρD vanishes with decreasing T as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where ρD diverges at T →0 irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher T for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid—because it requires peculiar umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.

  8. Direct Observation of Spin- and Charge-Density Waves in a Luttinger Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin; Marcum, Andrew; Mawardi Ismail, Arif; Fonta, Francisco; O'Hara, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    At low energy, interacting fermions in one dimension (e.g. electrons in quantum wires or fermionic atoms in 1D waveguides) should behave as Luttinger liquids. In stark contrast to Fermi liquids, the low-energy elementary excitations in Luttinger liquids are collective sound-like modes that propagate independently as spin-density and/or charge-density (i.e. particle-density) waves with generally unequal, and interaction-dependent, velocities. Here we aim to unambiguously confirm this hallmark feature of the Luttinger liquid - the phenomenon of spin-charge separation - by directly observing in real space the dynamics of spin-density and ``charge''-density waves excited in an ultracold gas of spin-1/2 fermions confined in an array of 1D optical waveguides. Starting from a two-component mixture of 6 Li atoms harmonically confined along each of the 1D waveguides, we excite low lying normal modes of the trapped system - namely the spin dipole and density dipole and quadrupole modes - and measure their frequency as a function of interaction strength. Luttinger liquid theory predicts that the spin dipole frequency is strongly dependent on interaction strength whereas the density dipole and quadrupole mode frequencies are relatively insensitive. We will also discuss extending our approach to exciting localized spin density and particle density wavepackets which should propagate at different velocities. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  9. Universal transport dynamics in a quenched tunnel-coupled Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, F. M.; Cavaliere, F.; Citro, R.; Sassetti, M.

    2016-07-01

    The transport dynamics of a quenched Luttinger liquid tunnel-coupled to a fermionic reservoir is investigated. In the transient dynamics, we show that for a sudden quench of the electron interaction universal power-law decay in time of the tunneling current occurs, ascribed to the presence of entangled compound excitations created by the quench. In sharp contrast to the usual nonuniversal power-law behavior of a zero-temperature nonquenched Luttinger liquid, the steady-state tunneling current is Ohmic and can be explained in terms of an effective quench-activated heating of the system. Our study unveils an unconventional dynamics for a quenched Luttinger liquid that could be identified in quenched cold Fermi gases.

  10. Prethermalization and thermalization of a quenched interacting Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhold, Michael; Heyl, Markus; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We study the relaxation dynamics of interacting one-dimensional fermions with band curvature after a weak quench in the interaction parameter at zero temperature. Our model lies within the class of interacting Luttinger liquids, where the harmonic Luttinger theory is extended by a weak-integrability-breaking phonon scattering term. In order to solve for the nonequilibrium time evolution, we use quantum kinetic equations exploiting the resonant but subleading character of the phonon interaction term. The interplay between phonon scattering and the quadratic Luttinger theory leads to the emergence of three distinct spatiotemporal regimes for the fermionic real-space correlation function. It features the crossover from a prequench to a prethermal state, finally evolving towards a thermal state on increasing length and time scales. The characteristic algebraically decaying real-space correlations in the prethermalized regime become modulated by an amplitude that is decaying in time according to a stretched exponential as an effect of the interactions. The asymptotic thermalization dynamics is governed by energy transport over large distances from the thermalized to the nonthermalized regions via macroscopic, dynamical slow modes. This is revealed in an algebraic decay of the system's effective temperature. The numerical value of the associated exponent agrees with the dynamical critical exponent of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. We also discuss a criterion for the applicability of this theory away from the integrable limit of noninteracting fermions.

  11. Momentum-Space Entanglement and Loschmidt Echo in Luttinger Liquids after a Quantum Quench.

    PubMed

    Dóra, Balázs; Lundgren, Rex; Selover, Mark; Pollmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Luttinger liquids (LLs) arise by coupling left- and right-moving particles through interactions in one dimension. This most natural partitioning of LLs is investigated by the momentum-space entanglement after a quantum quench using analytical and numerical methods. We show that the momentum-space entanglement spectrum of a LL possesses many universal features both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The largest entanglement eigenvalue is identical to the Loschmidt echo, i.e., the overlap of the disentangled and final wave functions of the system. The second largest eigenvalue is the overlap of the first excited state of the disentangled system with zero total momentum and the final wave function. The entanglement gap is universal both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The momentum-space entanglement entropy is always extensive and saturates fast to a time independent value after the quench, in sharp contrast to a spatial bipartitioning.

  12. Emergent ``super-solitons'' following an interaction strength quantum quench across a Luttinger liquid-Mott insulating phase boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Matthew; Yuzbashyan, Emil

    2010-03-01

    Rapid progress in cold atom experiments has motivated the study of non-equilibrium many-body dynamics following a sudden deformation of the system Hamiltonian (a ``quantum quench''). Here, we consider the dynamics of localized excitations produced via a quench across a quantum phase boundary separating critical Luttinger liquid and gapped Mott insulating states. Our initial liquid ground state is labeled by a Luttinger interaction parameter K, and subject to a density-inhomogeneity forming external potential. For the Mott insulator, we employ the quantum Sine Gordon model at the Luther-Emery (LE) point. We find that over a wide range of initial K values, the quench induces the production of relativistic, non-dispersive traveling density waves, which we dub ``super-solitons.'' The super-solitons are generated from generic antecedent localized density lumps, and appear to be a robust feature of the post-quench dynamics. An isolated exception occurs for the case of K = KLE; here, the density dynamics are generically dispersive, and depend sensitively upon the shape of the initial inhomogeneity. We show that the super-solitons do not interact, and we demonstrate that an inhomogeneous Luttinger parameter K can be used to produce super-solitons with different characteristics in the same system.

  13. Transient dynamics of spin-polarized injection in helical Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzona, A.; Carrega, M.; Dolcetto, G.; Sassetti, M.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the time evolution of spin-polarized electron wave packets injected into the edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator. In the presence of electron interactions, the system is described as a helical Luttinger liquid and injected electrons fractionalize. However, because of the presence of metallic detectors, no evidences of fractionalization are encoded in dc measurements, and in this regime the system does not show deviations from its non-interacting behavior. Nevertheless, we show that the helical Luttinger liquid nature emerges in the transient dynamics, where signatures of charge/spin fractionalization can be clearly identified.

  14. Reprint of : Transient dynamics of spin-polarized injection in helical Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzona, A.; Carrega, M.; Dolcetto, G.; Sassetti, M.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the time evolution of spin-polarized electron wave packets injected into the edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator. In the presence of electron interactions, the system is described as a helical Luttinger liquid and injected electrons fractionalize. However, because of the presence of metallic detectors, no evidences of fractionalization are encoded in dc measurements, and in this regime the system does not show deviations from its non-interacting behavior. Nevertheless, we show that the helical Luttinger liquid nature emerges in the transient dynamics, where signatures of charge/spin fractionalization can be clearly identified.

  15. One-dimensional quantum liquids with power-law interactions: the Luttinger staircase.

    PubMed

    Dalmonte, M; Pupillo, G; Zoller, P

    2010-10-01

    We study one-dimensional fermionic and bosonic gases with repulsive power-law interactions 1/|x|(β), with β>1, in the framework of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory. We obtain an accurate analytical expression linking the TLL parameter to the microscopic Hamiltonian, for arbitrary β and strength of the interactions. In the presence of a small periodic potential, power-law interactions make the TLL unstable towards the formation of a cascade of lattice solids with fractional filling, a "Luttinger staircase." Several of these quantum phases and phase transitions are realized with ground state polar molecules and weakly bound magnetic Feshbach molecules.

  16. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasiatomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi-one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them is the "quasiatomic limit." We find integral expressions for the (interchain) transport coefficients, including the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermopower, and we extract their power law dependencies on temperature. Luttinger liquid physics is manifested in a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law; the Lorenz number is larger than the Fermi liquid value by a factor between γ2 and γ4, where γ ≥1 is a measure of the electron-electron interaction strength in the system.

  17. Luttinger liquid behavior in the alternating spin-chain system copper nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenberg, B.; Ryll, H.; Kiefer, K.; Tennant, D. A.; Groitl, F.; Rolfs, K.; Manuel, P.; Khalyavin, D.; Rule, K. C.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Süllow, S.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the phase diagram of copper nitrate Cu(NO3) 2.2.5 D2O in the context of quantum phase transitions and novel states of matter. We establish this compound as an ideal candidate to study quasi-1D Luttinger liquids, 3D Bose-Einstein-Condensation of triplons, and the crossover between 1D and 3D physics. Magnetocaloric effect, magnetization, and neutron scattering data provide clear evidence for transitions into a Luttinger liquid regime and a 3D long-range ordered phase as a function of field and temperature. Theoretical simulations of this model material allow us to fully establish the phase diagram and to discuss it in the context of dimerized spin systems.

  18. Spin-incoherent one-dimensional spin-1 Bose Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.; Yip, S.-K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid of a one-dimensional spin-1 Bose gas in a harmonic trap. In this regime highly degenerate spin configurations emerge since the energy splitting between different spin states is much less than the thermal energy of the system, while the temperature is low enough that the lowest energetic orbitals are occupied. As an example we numerically study the momentum distribution of a one-dimensional spin-1 Bose gas in Tonks-Girardeau gas limit and in the sector of zero magnetization. We find that the momentum distributions broaden as the number of atoms increase due to the averaging of spin function overlaps. Large momentum (p ) asymptotic is analytically derived, showing the universal 1 /p4 dependence. We demonstrate that the spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid has a momentum distribution also distinct from spinless bosons at finite temperature.

  19. Tunneling spectroscopy of a spiral Luttinger liquid in contact with superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong E.; Levchenko, Alex

    2014-03-01

    One-dimensional wires with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, magnetic field, and strong electron-electron interactions are described by a spiral Luttinger liquid model. We develop a theory to investigate the tunneling density of states into a spiral Luttinger liquid in contact with superconductors at its two ends. This approach provides a way to disentangle the delicate interplay between superconducting correlations and strong electron interactions. If the wire-superconductor boundary is dominated by Andreev reflection, we find that in the vicinity of the interface the zero-bias tunneling anomaly reveals a power law enhancement with the unusual exponent. This zero-bias due to Andreev reflections may coexist and thus mask possible peak due to Majorana bound states. Far away from the interface strong correlations inherent to the Luttinger liquid prevail and restore conventional suppression of the tunneling density of states at the Fermi level, which acquires a Friedel-like oscillatory envelope with the period renormalized by the strength of the interaction. D.E.L. was supported by Michigan State University and in part by ARO through Contract No. W911NF-12-1-0235. A.L. acknowledges support from NSF under Grant No. PHYS-1066293, and the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  20. Luttinger-liquid behavior and superconducting correlations in {ital t}-{ital J} ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, C.A.; Poilblanc, D.

    1996-05-01

    The low-energy behavior of the isotropic {ital t}-{ital J} ladder system is investigated using exact diagonalization techniques, specifically finding the Drude weight, the charge velocity, and the compressibility. By applying the ideas of Luttinger-liquid theory, we determine the correlation exponent {ital K}{sub {rho}} which defines the behavior of the long-range correlations in the system. The boundary to phase separation is determined and a phase diagram is presented. At low electron density, a Tomonaga-Luttinger-like phase is stabilized while at higher electron densities a gapped phase with power law pairing correlations is stabilized: A large region of this gapped phase is found to exhibit dominant superconducting correlations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Intermediate fixed point in a Luttinger liquid with elastic and dissipative backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altland, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Rosenow, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In a recent work [A. Altland, Y. Gefen, and B. Rosenow, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 136401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.136401], we have addressed the problem of a Luttinger liquid with a scatterer that allows for both coherent and incoherent scattering channels. We have found that the physics associated with this model is qualitatively different from the elastic impurity setup analyzed by Kane and Fisher, and from the inelastic scattering scenario studied by Furusaki and Matveev, thus proposing a paradigmatic picture of Luttinger liquid with an impurity. Here we present an extensive study of the renormalization group flows for this problem, the fixed point landscape, and scaling near those fixed points. Our analysis is nonperturbative in the elastic tunneling amplitudes, employing an instanton calculation in one or two of the available elastic tunneling channels. Our analysis accounts for nontrivial Klein factors, which represent anyonic or fermionic statistics. These Klein factors need to be taken into account due to the fact that higher-order tunneling processes take place. In particular, we find a stable fixed point, where an incoming current is split 1/2 -1/2 between a forward and a backward scattered beams. This intermediate fixed point, between complete backscattering and full forward scattering, is stable for the Luttinger parameter g <1 .

  2. The Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with quantum impurity revisited: Critical line and phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the (1 + 1) dimensional field theoretical model, which describes the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL), interacting with a static impurity at the origin of the half line. Applying the Fermi-Bose equivalence and finite conformal transformations only, we map the model onto the Schmid model. Some details of the bosonization procedure have been given. The critical line and the phase diagram of the model follow from the renormalization group analysis of the Schmid model. The obtained critical line of the model is a hyperbola in the parameter space of the two couplings of the TLL.

  3. Spin-orbit interactions in a helical Luttinger liquid with a Kondo impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Erik

    2013-03-01

    We study the transport properties of a helical Luttinger liquid with a Kondo impurity and spin-orbit interactions. Such a system, which may be realized at the edge of a quantum spin Hall insulator with a gate-induced electric field, provides a mechanism to electrically control the conductance. A Rashba spin-orbit interaction may even change the nature of the Kondo screening [Eriksson et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 161103(R) (2012)]. Considering other types of spin-orbit interactions, together with an extended non-equilibrium analysis, we further improve the understanding of these phenomena.

  4. Luttinger liquid theory of Coulomb drag in mesoscopic rings,(Supported in part by US DOE.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazyan, T. V.; Ulloa, S. E.

    1997-03-01

    We develop a Luttinger liquid theory of the Coulomb drag of persistent currents, flowing in concentric mesoscopic rings, by incorporating non-linear corrections to the electron dispersion relation. We demonstrate that at low temperatures interactions between electrons in different rings generate an additional phase and thus alter the period of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. The resulting nondissipative(A. G. Rojo and G. D. Mahan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68) 2074 (1992). drag depends strongly on the relative parity of the electron numbers. We also show that interactions set a new temperature scale below which the linear response theory does not apply at certain values of external flux.

  5. Conductance of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires and junctions with resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Abhiram; Sen, Diptiman

    2011-03-01

    We study the effect that resistive regions have on the conductance of a quantum wire with interacting electrons which is connected to Fermi liquid leads. Using the bosonization formalism and a Rayleigh dissipation function to model the power dissipation, we use both scattering theory and Green's function techniques to derive the DC conductance. The resistive regions are generally found to lead to incoherent transport. For a single wire, we find that the resistance adds in series to the contact resistance of h/e2 for spinless electrons, and the total resistance is independent of the Luttinger parameter KW of the wire. We numerically solve the bosonic equations to illustrate what happens when a charge density pulse is incident on the wire; the results depend on the parameters of the resistive and interacting regions in interesting ways. For a junction of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires, we use a dissipationless current splitting matrix to model the junction. For a junction of three wires connected to Fermi liquid leads, there are two families of such matrices; we find that the conductance matrix generally depends on KW for one family but is independent of KW for the other family, regardless of the resistances present in the system.

  6. Conductance of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires and junctions with resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Soori, Abhiram

    2011-03-01

    We study the effect that resistive regions have on the conductance of a quantum wire with interacting electrons which is connected to Fermi liquid leads. Using the bosonization formalism and a Rayleigh dissipation function to model the power dissipation, we use Green's function techniques to derive the DC conductance. The resistive regions are generally found to lead to incoherent transport. For a single wire, we find that the resistance adds in series to the contact resistance of e2 / h for spinless electrons, and the total resistance is independent of the Luttinger parameter KW of the wire. We numerically solve the bosonic equations to illustrate what happens when a charge density pulse is incident on the wire; the results depend on the parameters of the resistive and interaction regions in interesting ways. For a junction of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires, we use a dissipationless current splitting matrix to model the junction. For a three-wire junction, there are two families of such matrices; we find that the conductance matrix depends on KW for one family but is independent of KW for the other family.

  7. Topological protection from random Rashba spin-orbit backscattering: Ballistic transport in a helical Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong-Yi; Li, Heqiu; Chou, Yang-Zhi; Foster, Matthew

    Rashba spin-orbit coupling enables irrelevant backscattering in a time-reversal symmetric helical Luttinger liquid (HLL). We study the Landauer conductance G of a HLL in the presence of random Rashba coupling as well as the density-density (Luttinger) interaction. We prove that the transport is purely ballistic (G =e2 / h) at any temperature due to the topology. The solution involves a unitary transformation that corresponds to a spin-1/2 in a random, two-component time-dependent magnetic field that preserves the projection of the spin along one fluctuating component (integrable dynamics). Our result is exact for a fixed realization of disorder, and avoids difficulties that arise in disorder-averaged perturbative calculations such as bosonization. We compare the HLL with random Rashba coupling to the Dyson model describing an ordinary spinless quantum wire with particle-hole symmetry, which exhibits non-ballistic transport even at zero temperature. This research was supported by the Welch Foundation under Grant No. C-1809 and by an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship No. BR2014-035.

  8. Quantum-critical spin dynamics in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid studied with muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, J. S.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Baker, P. J.; Xiao, F.; Williams, R. C.; Hayes, W.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that quantum-critical spin dynamics can be probed in high magnetic fields using muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR ). Our model system is the strong-leg spin ladder bis(2,3-dimethylpyridinium) tetrabromocuprate (DIMPY). In the gapless Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid phase we observe finite-temperature scaling of the μ+SR 1 /T1 relaxation rate which allows us to determine the Luttinger parameter K . We discuss the benefits and limitations of local probes compared with inelastic neutron scattering.

  9. Spin incoherent effects in momentum resolved tunneling, transport, and Coulomb drag in Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    In a one dimensional electron gas at low enough density the magnetic exchange energy J between neighboring electrons is exponentially suppressed relative to the Fermi energy, EF. At finite temperature T, the energy hierarchy J << T << EF can be reached, and we refer to this as the spin incoherent (SI) Luttinger liquid state. By using a model of a fluctuating Wigner solid, we theoretically explore the signatures of spin incoherence in the single particle Green’s function[1], momentum resolved tunneling[2], transport[3], and Coulomb drag[4]. In the SI Green’s function the spin modes of a Luttinger liquid (LL) are thermally washed out leaving only singular behavior from the charge modes. The charge modes are broadened in momentum space by an amount of order kF and the energy dependence of the tunneling density of states qualitatively changes from the low energy suppression of the LL regime to a possible low energy divergence in the SI regime. Such a state may be probed directly in momentum resolved tunneling between parallel quantum wires. Deep in the SI regime, the physics of transport and Coulomb drag can be mapped onto spinless electrons. Various crossovers in temperature and for finite systems connected to Fermi liquid leads are discussed. Both transport and Coulomb drag may exhibit interesting non-monotonic temperature dependence. [1] G. A. Fiete and L. Balents, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 226401 (2004). [2] G. A. Fiete, J. Qian, Y. Tserkovnyak, and B. I. Halperin, Phys. Rev. B 72, 045315 (2005). [3] G. A. Fiete, K. Le Hur, and L. Balents, Phys. Rev. B 72, 125416 (2005). [4] G. A. Fiete, K. Le Hur, and L. Balents, Submitted, cond-mat/0511715.

  10. Approaching many-body localization from disordered Luttinger liquids via the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Moore, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interplay of interactions and disorder in a one-dimensional fermion lattice coupled adiabatically to infinite reservoirs. We employ both the functional renormalization group (FRG) as well as matrix product state techniques, which serve as an accurate benchmark for small systems. Using the FRG, we compute the length- and temperature-dependence of the conductance averaged over 104 samples for lattices as large as 105 sites. We identify regimes in which non-Ohmic power law behavior can be observed and demonstrate that the corresponding exponents can be understood by adapting earlier predictions obtained perturbatively for disordered Luttinger liquids. In the presence of both disorder and isolated impurities, the conductance has a universal single-parameter scaling form. This lays the groundwork for an application of the functional renormalization group to the realm of many-body localization.

  11. Particle-hole symmetry and Luttinger liquids in a quantum Hall circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddaro, Stefano

    2006-03-01

    I shall present recent experimental results on edge-state transport through quantum point contacts in the quantum Hall (QH) regime. Finite-bias backscattering measurements between edge channels at filling factor ν=1 will be presented at different temperatures. Transport through the constriction displays a non-linear Luttinger-like behavior even in the integer QH regime in contrast with the linear tunneling predicted for integer edge states [1,2]. Both zero-bias enhancement and suppression of the inter-edge tunneling will be shown in a controllable way as a function of gate bias [2,3,4]. The observed evolution is connected to the local charge depletion in the constriction region and offers new insight into the link between QH charge-conjugation and Luttinger liquid description of edge channels [2]. I shall discuss the relevance of these experimental results in the context of the dynamics of the highly-correlated edge channels in the fractional QH regime [5]. Finally I shall demonstrate how charge-conjugation can be exploited in the design of new QH circuits where the transport properties of the hole component of a partially filled Landau level can be directly addressed. [1] X.-G. Wen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2206 (1990); P. Fendley et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3005 (1995). [2] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 156804 (2005). [3] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, G. Biasiol, L. Sorba., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 046801 (2004). [4] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, G. Biasiol, L. Sorba, R. Raimondi, G. Vignale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 046805 (2003). [5] A. M. Chang, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 1449 (2003).

  12. Density-functional studies of purple bronze: A paradigm Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Zoran; Satpathy, Sashi

    2003-03-01

    Using density-functional band structure calculations, we examine the electronic structure of the purple bronze Li_0.9Mo_6O_17, which exhibits a quasi-one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid behavior. Most of the physical properties are governed by the peculiar double zigzag chains found in the crystal structure of this compound. Our calculations show that the most relevant states around the Fermi level (E_f), are formed from the 4d t_2g orbitals belonging to Mo atoms that are positioned on the zigzag chains. The overall shape and dispersion width of the bands around Ef are consistent with recent ARPES tearpes measurements. We determine the Fermi surface to consist of two slightly warped planes perpendicular to the direction of the zigzag chains. The calculated nesting vector is in very good agreement with the ARPES tearpes data. * Work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy. 00 [*]bymitPermanent address: Institute for Nuclear Sciences-``Vinča'', PO Box: 522, 11001 Belgrade, Yugoslavia arpes G.-H. Gweon, et al., J. of Elect. Spect. and Related Phenomena, 117-118, 481 (2001) thebibliography

  13. Conductance through a potential barrier embedded in a Luttinger liquid: Nonuniversal scaling at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, D. N.; Wölfle, P.

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the linear response conductance of electrons in a Luttinger liquid with arbitrary interaction g2 , and subject to a potential barrier of arbitrary strength, as a function of temperature. We map the Hamiltonian in the basis of scattering states into an effective low energy Hamiltonian in current algebra form. First the renormalization group (RG) equation for weak interaction is derived in the current operator language both using the operator product expansion and the equation of motion method. To access the strong coupling regime, two methods of deducing the RG equation from perturbation theory, based on the scaling hypothesis and on the Callan-Symanzik formulation, are discussed. The important role of scale-independent terms is emphasized. The latter depend on the regularization scheme used (length versus temperature cutoff). Analyzing the perturbation theory in the fermionic representation, the diagrams contributing to the renormalization group β -function are identified. A universal part of the β -function is given by a ladder series and summed to all orders in g2 . First nonuniversal corrections beyond the ladder series are discussed and are shown to differ from the exact solutions obtained within conformal field theory which use a different regularization scheme. The RG equation for the temperature-dependent conductance is solved analytically. Our result agrees with known limiting cases.

  14. Pinning quantum phase transition for a Luttinger liquid of strongly interacting bosons.

    PubMed

    Haller, Elmar; Hart, Russell; Mark, Manfred J; Danzl, Johann G; Reichsöllner, Lukas; Gustavsson, Mattias; Dalmonte, Marcello; Pupillo, Guido; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2010-07-29

    Quantum many-body systems can have phase transitions even at zero temperature; fluctuations arising from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, as opposed to thermal effects, drive the system from one phase to another. Typically, during the transition the relative strength of two competing terms in the system's Hamiltonian changes across a finite critical value. A well-known example is the Mott-Hubbard quantum phase transition from a superfluid to an insulating phase, which has been observed for weakly interacting bosonic atomic gases. However, for strongly interacting quantum systems confined to lower-dimensional geometry, a novel type of quantum phase transition may be induced and driven by an arbitrarily weak perturbation to the Hamiltonian. Here we observe such an effect--the sine-Gordon quantum phase transition from a superfluid Luttinger liquid to a Mott insulator--in a one-dimensional quantum gas of bosonic caesium atoms with tunable interactions. For sufficiently strong interactions, the transition is induced by adding an arbitrarily weak optical lattice commensurate with the atomic granularity, which leads to immediate pinning of the atoms. We map out the phase diagram and find that our measurements in the strongly interacting regime agree well with a quantum field description based on the exactly solvable sine-Gordon model. We trace the phase boundary all the way to the weakly interacting regime, where we find good agreement with the predictions of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model. Our results open up the experimental study of quantum phase transitions, criticality and transport phenomena beyond Hubbard-type models in the context of ultracold gases.

  15. Cluster Luttinger liquids and emergent supersymmetric conformal critical points in the one-dimensional soft-shoulder Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmonte, M.; Lechner, W.; Cai, Zi; Mattioli, M.; Läuchli, A. M.; Pupillo, G.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the quantum phases of hard-core bosonic atoms in an extended Hubbard model where particles interact via soft-shoulder potentials in one dimension. Using a combination of field-theoretical methods and strong-coupling perturbation theory, we demonstrate that the low-energy phase can be a conformal cluster Luttinger liquid (CLL) phase with central charge c =1 , where the microscopic degrees of freedom correspond to mesoscopic ensembles of particles. Using numerical density-matrix renormalization-group methods, we demonstrate that the CLL phase [first predicted in M. Mattioli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.165302] is separated from a conventional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid by an exotic critical point with central charge c =3/2 . The latter is expression of an emergent conformal supersymmetry, which is not present in the original Hamiltonian. We discuss the observability of the CLL phase in realistic experimental settings with weakly dressed Rydberg atoms confined to optical lattices. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the typical features of CLLs are stable up to comparatively high temperatures. Using exact diagonalizations and quantum trajectory methods, we provide a protocol for adiabatic state preparation as well as quantitative estimates on the effects of particle losses.

  16. Hierarchical equations of motion approach to transport through an Anderson impurity coupled to interacting Luttinger liquid leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jun-ichi; Mathey, Ludwig; Härtle, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    We generalize the hierarchical equations of motion method to study electron transport through a quantum dot or molecule coupled to one-dimensional interacting leads that can be described as Luttinger liquids. Such leads can be realized, for example, by quantum wires or fractional quantum Hall edge states. In comparison to noninteracting metallic leads, Luttinger liquid leads involve many-body correlations and the single-particle tunneling density of states shows a power-law singularity at the chemical potential. Using the generalized hierarchical equations of motion method, we assess the importance of the singularity and the next-to-leading order many-body correlations. To this end, we compare numerically converged results with second- and first-order results of the hybridization expansion that is inherent to our method. As a test case, we study transport through a single-level quantum dot or molecule that can be described by an Anderson impurity model. Cotunneling effects turn out to be most pronounced for attractive interactions in the leads or repulsive ones if an excitonic coupling between the dot and the leads is realized. We also find that an interaction-induced negative differential conductance near the Coulomb blockade thresholds is slightly suppressed as compared to a first-order and/or rate equation result. Moreover, we find that the two-particle (n -particle) correlations enter as a second-order (n -order) effect and are, thus, not very pronounced at the high temperatures and parameters that we consider.

  17. New Luttinger-Liquid Physics from Photoemission on Li0.9Mo6O17

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Alvarez, J V; Mo, S -K; Allen, J W; Gweon, G -H; He, J; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David; Hochst, H

    2006-01-01

    Temperature dependent high resolution photoemission spectra of quasi-one-dimensional Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} evince a strong renormalization of its Luttinger-liquid density-of-states anomalous exponent. We trace this new effect to interacting charge neutral critical modes that emerge naturally from the two-band nature of the material. Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} is shown thereby to be a paradigm material that is capable of revealing new Luttinger physics.

  18. Systematic stability analysis of the renormalization group flow for the normal-superconductor-normal junction of Luttinger liquid wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi; Saha, Arijit

    2009-04-01

    We study the renormalization group flows of the two terminal conductance of a superconducting junction of two Luttinger liquid wires. We compute the power laws associated with the renormalization group flow around the various fixed points of this system using the generators of the SU(4) group to generate the appropriate parametrization of an S matrix representing small deviations from a given fixed point S matrix [obtained earlier in S. Das, S. Rao, and A. Saha, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155418 (2008)], and we then perform a comprehensive stability analysis. In particular, for the nontrivial fixed point which has intermediate values of transmission, reflection, Andreev reflection, and crossed Andreev reflection, we show that there are eleven independent directions in which the system can be perturbed, which are relevant or irrelevant, and five directions which are marginal. We obtain power laws associated with these relevant and irrelevant perturbations. Unlike the case of the two-wire charge-conserving junction, here we show that there are power laws which are nonlinear functions of V(0) and V(2kF) [where V(k) represents the Fourier transform of the interelectron interaction potential at momentum k ]. We also obtain the power law dependence of linear response conductance on voltage bias or temperature around this fixed point.

  19. Multiband One-Dimensional Electronic Structure and Spectroscopic Signature of Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquid Behavior in K2 Cr3 As3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, M. D.; Feng, Y.; Nicholson, C. W.; Monney, C.; Riley, J. M.; Iwasawa, H.; Refson, K.; Sacksteder, V.; Adroja, D. T.; Zhao, J.; Hoesch, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the quasi-one-dimensional superconductor K2 Cr3 As3 . We find that the Fermi surface contains two Fermi surface sheets, with linearly dispersing bands not displaying any significant band renormalizations. The one-dimensional band dispersions display a suppression of spectral intensity approaching the Fermi level according to a linear power law, over an energy range of ˜200 meV . This is interpreted as a signature of Tomonoga-Luttinger liquid physics, which provides a new perspective on the possibly unconventional superconductivity in this family of compounds.

  20. Multiband One-Dimensional Electronic Structure and Spectroscopic Signature of Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquid Behavior in K_{2}Cr_{3}As_{3}.

    PubMed

    Watson, M D; Feng, Y; Nicholson, C W; Monney, C; Riley, J M; Iwasawa, H; Refson, K; Sacksteder, V; Adroja, D T; Zhao, J; Hoesch, M

    2017-03-03

    We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the quasi-one-dimensional superconductor K_{2}Cr_{3}As_{3}. We find that the Fermi surface contains two Fermi surface sheets, with linearly dispersing bands not displaying any significant band renormalizations. The one-dimensional band dispersions display a suppression of spectral intensity approaching the Fermi level according to a linear power law, over an energy range of ∼200  meV. This is interpreted as a signature of Tomonoga-Luttinger liquid physics, which provides a new perspective on the possibly unconventional superconductivity in this family of compounds.

  1. Enhanced NMR Relaxation of Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids and the Magnitude of the Carbon Hyperfine Coupling in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, A.; Pályi, A.; Ihara, Y.; Wzietek, P.; Simon, P.; Alloul, H.; Zólyomi, V.; Koltai, J.; Kürti, J.; Dóra, B.; Simon, F.

    2011-10-01

    Recent transport measurements [Churchill et al. Nature Phys.NPAHAX1745-2473 5, 321 (2009)10.1038/nphys1247] found a surprisingly large, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than usual C13 hyperfine coupling (HFC) in C13 enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes. We formulate the theory of the nuclear relaxation time in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory to enable the determination of the HFC from recent data by Ihara et al. [Europhys. Lett. 90, 17 004 (2010)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/90/17004]. Though we find that 1/T1 is orders of magnitude enhanced with respect to a Fermi-liquid behavior, the HFC has its usual, small value. Then, we reexamine the theoretical description used to extract the HFC from transport experiments and show that similar features could be obtained with HFC-independent system parameters.

  2. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  3. Instability of three-band Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid: Renormalization group analysis and possible application to K2Cr3As3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jian-Jian; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Zhou, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recently discovered quasi-one-dimensional superconductor K2Cr3As3 with D3 h lattice symmetry, we study a one-dimensional three-orbital Hubbard model with generic electron repulsive interaction described by intraorbital repulsion U , interorbital repulsion U', and Hund's coupling J . As extracted from density functional theory calculation, two of the three atomic orbitals are degenerate (E' states) and the third one is nondegenerate (A1'), and the system is at incommensurate filling. With the help of bosonization, the normal state is described by a three-band Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. Possible charge density wave (CDW), spin density wave (SDW), and superconducting (SC) instabilities are analyzed by renormalization group method. The ground state depends on the ratio J /U and is sensitive to the degeneracy of E' bands. The spin-singlet SC state is favored at 0 U /2 . When the twofold degeneracy of E' bands is lifted, the SDW instability has the tendency to dominate over the spin-singlet SC state at 0

  4. Luttinger parameter of quasi-one-dimensional para -H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, G.; Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the ground-state properties of para-hydrogen in one dimension and in quasi-one-dimensional configurations using the path-integral ground-state Monte Carlo method. This method produces zero-temperature exact results for a given interaction and geometry. The quasi-one-dimensional setup has been implemented in two forms: the inner channel inside a carbon nanotube coated with H2 and a harmonic confinement of variable strength. Our main result is the dependence of the Luttinger parameter on the density within the stable regime. Going from one dimension to quasi-one dimension, keeping the linear density constant, produces a systematic increase of the Luttinger parameter. This increase is, however, not enough to reach the superfluid regime and the system always remain in the quasicrystal regime, according to Luttinger liquid theory.

  5. Tomonaga-Luttinger physics in electronic quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Jezouin, S; Albert, M; Parmentier, F D; Anthore, A; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Safi, I; Pierre, F

    2013-01-01

    In one-dimensional conductors, interactions result in correlated electronic systems. At low energy, a hallmark signature of the so-called Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids is the universal conductance curve predicted in presence of an impurity. A seemingly different topic is the quantum laws of electricity, when distinct quantum conductors are assembled in a circuit. In particular, the conductances are suppressed at low energy, a phenomenon called dynamical Coulomb blockade. Here we investigate the conductance of mesoscopic circuits constituted by a short single-channel quantum conductor in series with a resistance, and demonstrate a proposed link to Tomonaga-Luttinger physics. We reformulate and establish experimentally a recently derived phenomenological expression for the conductance using a wide range of circuits, including carbon nanotube data obtained elsewhere. By confronting both conductance data and phenomenological expression with the universal Tomonaga-Luttinger conductance curve, we demonstrate experimentally the predicted mapping between dynamical Coulomb blockade and the transport across a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with an impurity.

  6. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree–Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree–Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard–Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga–Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  7. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  8. Collective excitations and viscosity in liquid Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropo, Matti; Akola, Jaakko; Jones, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of extensive density functional/molecular dynamics simulations (over 500 atoms, up to 100 ps) of liquid bismuth at four temperatures between 573 K and 1023 K has provided details of the dynamical structure factors, the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective modes, and related properties (power spectrum, viscosity, and sound velocity). Agreement with available inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering data and with previous simulations is generally very good. The results show that density functional/molecular dynamics simulations can give dynamical information of good quality without the use of fitting functions, even at long wavelengths.

  9. Mixing of molecular excitation in a uniaxial liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1995-07-01

    The influence of the mixing of molecular excitations due to local-field effects on the dielectric and spectral properties of uniaxial liquid crystals is investigated. The general properties of the spectrum of transverse optical excitations of the medium, viz, the sum rules for the oscillator strengths, frequencies, and damping constants of the dielectric function resonances, are established. The restricted applicability of the idea of a back ground polarizability (dielectric function) in the analysis of the mixing of molecular excitations is demonstrated. Mixing is taken into account in deriving new dispersion formulas for the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric tensor, which differ significantly from those used in the literature. A range of applicability has been established for the latter. Qualitative and quantitative interpretations of controversial experimental data for an extensive list of objects are given. The occurrence of mixing of dipole-active molecular vibrations, whose intensity has been found to be strongest for polyphilic objects that form nonchiral ferroelectric phases, has been demonstrated for molecular liquids and uniaxial liquid crystals from various chemical classes for the first time. The mixing of molecular excitations is considered as a possible mechanism for {open_quotes}polarization catastrophe{close_quotes} in liquid crystals having a soft mode in hthespectrum of transverse optical modes of vibration for the high-temperature phase. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  11. On the Kohn-Luttinger conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; He Xiao

    2013-05-28

    Kohn and Luttinger [Phys. Rev. 118, 41 (1960)] showed that the conventional finite-temperature extension of the second-order many-body perturbation theory had the incorrect zero-temperature limit in metals and, on this basis, argued that the theory was incorrect. We show that this inconsistency arises from the noninclusion of the temperature effect in the energies of the zeroth-order eigenstates of the perturbation theory, which causes not only the Kohn-Luttinger conundrum but also another inconsistency with the zero-temperature many-body perturbation theory, namely, the different rates of divergence of the correlation energy in a homogeneous electron gas (HEG). We propose a renormalized many-body perturbation theory derivable from the finite-temperature extension of the normal-ordered second quantization applied to the denominators of the energy expression, which involves the energies of the zeroth-order states, as well as to the numerators. The renormalized theory is shown to have the correct zero-temperature limit and the same rate of divergence in a HEG as the zero-temperature counterpart, and is, therefore, the correct finite-temperature many-body perturbation theory.

  12. Edge physics of the quantum spin Hall insulator from a quantum dot excited by optical absorption.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E

    2014-04-11

    The gapless edge modes of the quantum spin Hall insulator form a helical liquid in which the direction of motion along the edge is determined by the spin orientation of the electrons. In order to probe the Luttinger liquid physics of these edge states and their interaction with a magnetic (Kondo) impurity, we consider a setup where the helical liquid is tunnel coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot that is excited by optical absorption, thereby inducing an effective quantum quench of the tunneling. At low energy, the absorption spectrum is dominated by a power-law singularity. The corresponding exponent is directly related to the interaction strength (Luttinger parameter) and can be computed exactly using boundary conformal field theory thanks to the unique nature of the quantum spin Hall edge.

  13. Time evolution of excitations in normal Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyukh, Y.; Rubio, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2013-05-01

    We inspect the initial and the long-time evolution of excitations in Fermi liquids by analyzing the time structure of the electron spectral function. Focusing on the short-time limit we study the electron-boson model for the homogeneous electron gas and apply the first-order (in boson propagator) cumulant expansion of the electron Green's function. In addition to a quadratic decay in time upon triggering the excitation, we identify nonanalytic terms in the time expansion similar to those found in the Fermi edge singularity phenomenon. We also demonstrate that the exponential decay in time in the long-time limit is inconsistent with the GW approximation for the self-energy. The background for this is the Paley-Wiener theorem of complex analysis. To reconcile with the Fermi liquid behavior an inclusion of higher order diagrams (in the screened Coulomb interaction) is required.

  14. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation. PMID:28084420

  15. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation.

  16. Nonlinear terahertz coherent excitation of vibrational modes of liquids.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Marco A; Finneran, Ian A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-21

    We report the first coherent excitation of intramolecular vibrational modes via the nonlinear interaction of a TeraHertz (THz) light field with molecular liquids. A terahertz-terahertz-Raman pulse sequence prepares the coherences with a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond terahertz pulse, that are then measured in a terahertz Kerr effect spectrometer via phase-sensitive, heterodyne detection with an optical pulse. The spectrometer reported here has broader terahertz frequency coverage, and an increased sensitivity relative to previously reported terahertz Kerr effect experiments. Vibrational coherences are observed in liquid diiodomethane at 3.66 THz (122 cm(-1)), and in carbon tetrachloride at 6.50 THz (217 cm(-1)), in exact agreement with literature values of those intramolecular modes. This work opens the door to 2D spectroscopies, nonlinear in terahertz field, that can study the dynamics of condensed-phase molecular systems, as well as coherent control at terahertz frequencies.

  17. Nonlinear terahertz coherent excitation of vibrational modes of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allodi, Marco A.; Finneran, Ian A.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first coherent excitation of intramolecular vibrational modes via the nonlinear interaction of a TeraHertz (THz) light field with molecular liquids. A terahertz-terahertz-Raman pulse sequence prepares the coherences with a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond terahertz pulse, that are then measured in a terahertz Kerr effect spectrometer via phase-sensitive, heterodyne detection with an optical pulse. The spectrometer reported here has broader terahertz frequency coverage, and an increased sensitivity relative to previously reported terahertz Kerr effect experiments. Vibrational coherences are observed in liquid diiodomethane at 3.66 THz (122 cm-1), and in carbon tetrachloride at 6.50 THz (217 cm-1), in exact agreement with literature values of those intramolecular modes. This work opens the door to 2D spectroscopies, nonlinear in terahertz field, that can study the dynamics of condensed-phase molecular systems, as well as coherent control at terahertz frequencies.

  18. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H/sup +/ and OH/sup -/ ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H/sub 2/O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10/sup -9/ to 4 x 10/sup -5/ for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm/sup -1/. In D/sub 2/O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H/sub 2/O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D/sub 2/O than for excitation of D/sub 2/O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H/sub 2/O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C.

  19. Acoustic excitation of liquid fuel droplets and coaxial jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Ignacio

    This experimental study focuses on two important problems relevant to acoustic coupling with condensed phase transport processes, with special relevance to liquid rocket engine and airbreathing engine combustion instabilities. The first part of this dissertation describes droplet combustion characteristics of various fuels during exposure to external acoustical perturbations. Methanol, ethanol, a liquid synthetic fuel derived from coal gasification via the Fischer-Tropsch process, and a blend of aviation fuel and the synthetic fuel are used. During acoustic excitation, the droplet is situated at or near a pressure node condition, where the droplet experiences the largest velocity perturbations, and at or near a pressure antinode condition, where the droplet is exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. For unforced conditions, the values of the droplet burning rate constant K of the different fuels are consistent with data in the literature. The location of the droplet with respect to a pressure node or antinode also has a measurable effect on droplet burning rates, which are different for different fuels and in some cases are as high as 28% above the unforced burning rate value. Estimates of flame extinction due to acoustic forcing for different fuels are also obtained. The second part of this work consists of an experimental study on coaxial jet behavior under non-reactive, cryogenic conditions, with direct applications to flow mixing and unstable behavior characterization in liquid rocket engines. These experiments, conducted with nitrogen, span a range of outer to inner jet momentum flux ratios from 0.013 to 23, and explore subcritical, nearcritical and supercritical pressure conditions, with and without acoustic excitation, for two injector geometries. Acoustic forcing at 3 kHz is utilized to maximize the pressure fluctuations within the chamber acting on the jet, reaching maximum values of 4% of the mean chamber pressure. The effect of the magnitude and phase

  20. Excitation spectra and spin gap of the half-filled Holstein-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenadler, Martin; Assaad, Fakher F.

    2013-02-01

    Single- and two-particle excitation spectra of the one-dimensional, half-filled Holstein-Hubbard model are calculated using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. In the metallic phase, the results are consistent with a Luther-Emery liquid that has gapped spin and single-particle excitations but a gapless charge mode. However, given the initially exponential dependence of the spin gap on the backscattering matrix element, the numerical excitation spectra appear gapless in the weak-coupling regime, and therefore resemble those of a Luttinger liquid. The Mott phase has the expected charge gap and gapless spin excitations. The Peierls state shows a charge, spin, and single-particle gap, a soft phonon mode, backfolded shadow bands, and soliton excitations. Arguments and numerical evidence for the existence of a nonzero spin gap throughout the metallic phase are provided in terms of equal-time spin and charge correlation functions.

  1. Femtosecond solvation dynamics in a neat ionic liquid and ionic liquid microemulsion: excitation wavelength dependence.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Aniruddha; Sahu, Kalyanasis; Dey, Shantanu; Ghosh, Subhadip; Mandal, Ujjwal; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2007-11-08

    Solvation dynamics in a neat ionic liquid, 1-pentyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetra-flouroborate ([pmim][BF4]) and its microemulsion in Triton X-100 (TX-100)/benzene is studied using femtosecond up-conversion. In both the neat ionic liquid and the microemulsion, the solvation dynamics is found to depend on excitation wavelength (lambda(ex)). The lambda(ex) dependence is attributed to structural heterogeneity in neat ionic liquid (IL) and in IL microemulsion. In neat IL, the heterogeneity arises from clustering of the pentyl groups which are surrounded by a network of cation and anions. Such a nanostructural organization is predicted in many recent simulations and observed recently in an X-ray diffraction study. In an IL microemulsion, the surfactant (TX-100) molecules aggregate in form of a nonpolar peripheral shell around the polar pool of IL. The micro-environment in such an assembly varies drastically over a short distance. The dynamic solvent shift (and average solvation time) in neat IL as well as in IL microemulsions decreases markedly as lambda(ex) increases from 375 to 435 nm. In a [pmim][BF4]/water/TX-100/benzene quaternary microemulsion, the solvation dynamics is slower than that in a microemulsion without water. This is ascribed to the smaller size of the water containing microemulsion. The anisotropy decay in an IL microemulsion is found to be faster than that in neat IL.

  2. Topological `Luttinger' invariants protected by crystal symmetry in semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, S. A.

    Luttinger's theorem is a fundamental result in the theory of interacting Fermi systems: it states that the volume inside the Fermi surface is left invariant by interactions, if the number of particles is held fixed. Although this is traditionally justified using perturbation theory, it can be viewed as arising from a momentum balance argument that examines the response of the ground state to the insertion of a single flux quantum. This reveals that the Fermi sea volume is a topologically protected quantity. Extending this approach, I show that spinless or spin-rotation-preserving fermionic systems in non-symmorphic crystals possess generalized topological `Luttinger invariants' that can be nonzero even in cases where the Fermi sea volume vanishes. A nonzero Luttinger invariant then forces energy bands to touch, leading to semimetals whose gaplessness is rooted in topology; opening a gap without symmetry breaking automatically triggers fractionalization. The existence of these invariants is linked to the inability of non-symmorphic crystals to host band insulating ground states except at special fillings. I exemplify the use of these new invariants by showing that they distinguish various classes of semimetals. Supported by the National Science Foundation via Grant No. DMR-1455366.

  3. Liquid hydrogen slosh waves excited by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank before main engine restart poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. Resettlement or reorientation of liquid propellant can be accomplished by providing the optimal acceleration to the spacecraft such that the propellant is reoriented over the tank outlet. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flowfield during the course of liquid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid-filled levels of 30, 50, 65, 70, and 80 percent have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed. Slosh wave excitations will affect the fluid stress distribution exerted on the container wall and shift the fluid mass distribution inside the container, which imposes the time-dependent variations in the moment of inertia of the container. This information is important for the spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  4. Excitation and dynamics of liquid tin micrometer droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, B.; Abhari, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of capillary breakup-based droplet generation are studied for an excitation system based on a tunable piezoelectrically actuated oscillating piston, which generates acoustic pressure waves at the dispenser nozzle. First, the non-ideal pressure boundary conditions of droplet breakup are measured using a fast response pressure probe. A structural analysis shows that the axial modes of the excitation system are the main reasons for the resonance peaks in the pressure response. Second, a correlation between the nozzle inlet pressure and the droplet timing jitter is established with the help of experiments and a droplet formation model. With decreasing wave number, the growth rate of the main excitation decreases, while noise contributions with wave numbers with higher growth rates lead to a non-deterministic structure of the droplet train. A highly coherent and monodisperse droplet stream is obtained when the excitation system is tuned to generate high acoustic pressures at the desired operation frequency and when the noise level on the jet is limited. The jet velocity, hence droplet spacing for a set frequency is then adjusted by varying the reservoir pressure, according to the trade-off between lowest wave number and acceptable timing jitter.

  5. Excited-state proton transfer of fluorescein anion as an ionic liquid component.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Catarina A B; Graça, Cátia; Maçôas, Ermelinda; Fedorov, Alexander; Afonso, Carlos A M; Martinho, José M G

    2013-11-14

    Fluorescent ionic liquids (FILs) incorporating the fluorescein anion have been prepared by anion exchange of the parent quaternary ammonium chloride (Quat(+)Cl(-)) ionic liquid. By controlling the molar ratio of fluorescein to Quat(+)Cl(-), ionic liquids incorporating different prototropic forms of fluorescein were prepared. The 1:1 molar ratio ionic liquid (FIL1) is essentially composed of monoanionic fluorescein, while dianionic fluorecein is predominant in the FIL with a 1:2 molar ratio (FIL2). The fluorescence excitation spectrum of FIL2 is markedly different from its absorption spectrum. Absorption features the fluorescein dianion, while the excitation spectrum is exclusively due to the monoanion. In FIL1, the absorption and excitation spectra are both characteristic of the monoanion. In both FILs, emission of the dianion is observed upon excitation of the monoanion. This unusual behavior is interpreted in the context of a fast deprotonation of the monoanion in the excited state. The presence of residual water in the ionic liquid is important for the proton transfer process. By lowering the pH of FIL1, the transient proton transfer is inhibited, and the emission of the monoanion could be observed. The FILs have completely different spectroscopic properties from solvated fluorescein in Quat(+)Cl(-), where the prototropic equilibrium is shifted toward the neutral forms.

  6. Optical nanoscopy with excited state saturation at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Trebbia, J.-B.; Baby, R.; Tamarat, Ph.; Lounis, B.

    2015-10-01

    Optical resolution of solid-state single quantum emitters at the nanometre scale is a challenging step towards the control of delocalized states formed by strongly and coherently interacting emitters. We have developed a simple super-resolution optical microscopy method operating at cryogenic temperatures, which is based on optical saturation of the excited state of single fluorescent molecules with a doughnut-shaped beam. Sub-10 nm resolution is achieved with extremely low excitation intensities, a million times lower than those used in room-temperature stimulated emission depletion microscopy. Compared with super-localization approaches, our technique offers a unique opportunity to super-resolve single molecules with overlapping optical resonance frequencies and paves the way to the study of coherent interactions between single emitters and to the manipulation of their degree of entanglement.

  7. Multi-pair excitations in an electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, M. E.; Holas, A.; Böhm, H. M.; Schinner, A.

    1996-07-01

    Single (particle-hole)-pair excitations, as described in the well-known Lindhard function, are restricted to a strip in the ( q, ω) plane — the so-called particle-hole continuum. We present a perturbational analysis of the dynamic dielectric function allowing a generalization of this property for n-pair contributions. Consequences for the electron energy-loss function and related quantities are discussed.

  8. Acoustic Excitation of Liquid Fuel Droplets and Coaxial Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    brakes apart from the liquid core (37). The shape of the core in a two dimensional plane intersecting the axis of symmetry of the coaxial flow...Mechanics Tool Kit, Torque Wrench, Caliper , Digital Thermometer and Multimeter. Ensure all tools associated with this experiment/test/operation are

  9. Steady States and Universal Conductance in a Quenched Luttinger Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, Edwin; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Mastropietro, Vieri; Moosavi, Per

    2017-01-01

    We obtain exact analytical results for the evolution of a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger model prepared in a domain wall initial state, i.e., a state with different densities on its left and right sides. Such an initial state is modeled as the ground state of a translation invariant Luttinger Hamiltonian {H_{λ}} with short range non-local interaction and different chemical potentials to the left and right of the origin. The system evolves for time t > 0 via a Hamiltonian {H_{λ'}} which differs from {H_{λ}} by the strength of the interaction. Asymptotically in time, as {t to ∞}, after taking the thermodynamic limit, the system approaches a translation invariant steady state. This final steady state carries a current I and has an effective chemical potential difference {μ+ - μ-} between right- (+) and left- (-) moving fermions obtained from the two-point correlation function. Both I and {μ+ - μ-} depend on {λ} and {λ'}. Only for the case {λ = λ' = 0} does {μ+ - μ-} equal the difference in the initial left and right chemical potentials. Nevertheless, the Landauer conductance for the final state, {G = I/(μ+ - μ-)}, has a universal value equal to the conductance quantum {e^2/h} for the spinless case.

  10. Excitations in a perfect magnetized quantum spin ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Andrey; Schmidiger, David; Muehlbauer, Sebastian; Severian, Gvasaliya; Bouillot, Pierre; Kollath, Corinna; Giamarchi, Thierry; Guidi, Tatiana; Bewley, Robert; Ehlers, Georg

    2013-03-01

    The strong-leg S = 1 / 2 Heisenberg spin ladder system C7(D10N)2CuBr4 is investigated in applied magnetic fields using inelastic neutron scattering anf DMRG calculations. The spectrum in the high-field Tomonaga-Luttinger spin liquid phase is found to be qualitatively different from that in the low-field spin gap phase. In the former, numerous spectral featrures, including incommensurate excitations and multi-spinon continua are identified. In contrast, the latter is dominated by long-lived magnon excitations and two-magnon bound states. An unprecedented quantitive agreement between experiment and numerical claculations is achieved. Supported by the Swiss National Fund through MANEP.

  11. Photoacoustic overtone spectroscopy of liquids with continuous wave laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzares, Carlos; I

    1991-06-01

    To study overtone absorptions in condensed phases, a technique is presented which uses a piezoelectric detector, lock-in amplification and a cw dye laser modulated at frequencies from 10 to 120 kHz with an acousto-optic modulator. Acoustic resonance frequencies calculated for a cylindrical cell are observed experimentally using liquid Si(CH 3) 4 as the sample. The acoustic signal is found to be proportional to the laser power. The fifth overtone of the CH streching mode of Si(CH 3) 4 has been recorded pure and in solutions with CCl 4. With a 1% solution of Si(CH 3) 4 in CCl 4, an absorbance of approximately 1 × 10 -5 cm -1 is detected with a dye laser power of 55 mW.

  12. Excitations from a chiral magnetized state of a frustrated quantum spin liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Zheludev, Andrey I; Tsvelik, A.; Regnault, L.-P.; Habicht, Klaus; Kiefer, K.; Roessli, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    We study excitations in weakly interacting pairs of quantum spin ladders coupled through geometrically frustrated bonds. The ground state is a disordered spin liquid, at high fields replaced by an ordered chiral helimagnetic phase. The spectra observed by high-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the prototype compound Sul Cu2Cl4 are qualitatively different from those in the previously studied frustration-free spin liquids. Beyond the critical field Hc = 3.7 T, the soft mode that drives the quantum phase transition spawns two separate excitations: a gapless Goldstone mode and a massive magnon. Additional massive quasiparticles are clearly visible below Hc, but are destroyed in the ordered phase. In their place one observes a sharply bound excitation continuum.

  13. Excitations from a Chiral Magnetized State of a Frustrated Quantum Spin Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Zheludev, A.; Tsvelik, A.; Garlea, V.O.; Regnault, L.-P.; Habicht, K.; Kiefer, K.; Roessli, B.

    2009-12-15

    We study excitations in weakly interacting pairs of quantum spin ladders coupled through geometrically frustrated bonds. The ground state is a disordered spin liquid that at high fields is replaced by an ordered chiral helimagnetic phase. The spectra observed by high-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the prototype compound Sul-Cu{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} are qualitatively different from those in the previously studied frustration-free spin liquids. Beyond the critical field H{sub c} = 3.7 T, the soft mode that drives the quantum phase transition spawns two separate excitations: a gapless Goldstone mode and a massive magnon. Additional massive quasiparticles are clearly visible below H{sub c}, but are destroyed in the ordered phase. In their place one observes a sharply bound excitation continuum.

  14. Nature of the many-body excitations in a quantum wire: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyplyatyev, O.; Schofield, A. J.; Jin, Y.; Moreno, M.; Tan, W. K.; Anirban, A. S.; Ford, C. J. B.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The natural excitations of an interacting one-dimensional system at low energy are the hydrodynamic modes of a Luttinger liquid, protected by the Lorentz invariance of the linear dispersion. We show that beyond low energies, where the quadratic dispersion reduces the symmetry to Galilean, the main character of the many-body excitations changes into a hierarchy: calculations of dynamic correlation functions for fermions (without spin) show that the spectral weights of the excitations are proportional to powers of R2/L2 , where R is a length-scale related to interactions and L is the system length. Thus only small numbers of excitations carry the principal spectral power in representative regions on the energy-momentum planes. We have analyzed the spectral function in detail and have shown that the first-level (strongest) excitations form a mode with parabolic dispersion, like that of a renormalized single particle. The second-level excitations produce a singular power-law line shape to the first-level mode and multiple power laws at the spectral edge. We have illustrated a crossover to a Luttinger liquid at low energy by calculating the local density of states through all energy scales: from linear to nonlinear, and to above the chemical potential energies. In order to test this model, we have carried out experiments to measure the momentum-resolved tunneling of electrons (fermions with spin) from/to a wire formed within a GaAs heterostructure. We observe a well-resolved spin-charge separation at low energy with appreciable interaction strength and only a parabolic dispersion of the first-level mode at higher energies. We find a structure resembling the second-level excitations, which dies away rapidly at high momentum in line with the theoretical predictions here.

  15. Excitations in a thin liquid {sup 4}He film from inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Godfrin, H.; Krotscheck, E. |; Lauter, H.J.; Leiderer, P.; Passiouk, V. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    We perform a thorough analysis of the experimental dynamic structure function measured by inelastic neutron scattering for a low-temperature ({ital T}=0.65 K) four-layer liquid {sup 4}He film. The results are interpreted in light of recent theoretical calculations of the (nonvortex) excitations in thin liquid Bose films. The experimental system consists of four outer liquid layers, adsorbed to two solid inner {sup 4}He layers, which are themselves adsorbed to a graphite substrate. Relatively intense surface (ripplon) and bulklike modes are observed. The analysis of the experimental data gives strong evidence for still other modes and supports the long-standing theoretical predictions of layerlike modes (layer phonons) associated with excitations propagating primarily within the liquid layers comprising the film. The results of the analysis are consistent with the occurrence of level crossings between modes, and the existence of a layer modes for which the theory predicts will propagate in the vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. The theory and experiment agree on the detailed nature of the ripplon; its dispersion at low momenta, its fall off in intensity at intermediate momenta, and the level crossings at high momentum. Similar to experiment, the theory yields an intense mode in the maxon-roton region which is intrepreted as the formation of the bulklike excitation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Enhanced efficiency in the excitation of higher modes for atomic force microscopy and mechanical sensors operated in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Penedo, M. Hormeño, S.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.; Raman, A.

    2014-10-27

    Recent developments in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy where several eigenmodes are simultaneously excited in liquid media are proving to be an excellent tool in biological studies. Despite its relevance, the search for a reliable, efficient, and strong cantilever excitation method is still in progress. Herein, we present a theoretical modeling and experimental results of different actuation methods compatible with the operation of Atomic Force Microscopy in liquid environments: ideal acoustic, homogeneously distributed force, distributed applied torque (MAC Mode™), photothermal and magnetostrictive excitation. From the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that magnetostriction is the strongest and most efficient technique for higher eigenmode excitation when using soft cantilevers in liquid media.

  17. Slosh wave and geyser excitations due to liquid hydrogen shut-off during draining in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of liquid hydrogen shut-off during draining, and shut-off at the moment of the incipience of a suction dip have been investigated. It shows that a large amplitude surge is observed for liquid in the container at the moment of liquid hydrogen shut-off in reduced gravity. It also shows that slosh waves accompanied by a strong geyser are developed for surge-related flow fields induced by liquid hydrogen shut-off at the incipience of a suction dip. In the slosh wave excitation, both a lower gravity environment and higher flow rate before the shut-off of liquid draining are resonsible for the initiation of greater amplitude slosh waves. Slosh wave excitation, due to shut-off during liquid hydrogen draining, shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variation in the spacecraft moment of inertia. This provides important information necessary for on-orbit guidance and attitude control of spacecraft.

  18. Ab initio study on an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hayaki, Seigo; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Sato, Hirofumi

    2013-06-06

    An excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 4'-N,N-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone in room temperature ionic liquid is theoretically investigated using RISM-SCF-SEDD, which is a hybrid method of molecular liquid theory and ab initio molecular orbital theory. The photo-excitation and proton-transfer processes are computed by considering the solvent fluctuation. The calculated absorption and emission energy are in good agreement with the experiments. The changes in the dipole moment indicate that the drastic solvation relaxation is accompanied by the excitation and an ESIPT process, which is consistent with the remarkable dynamic Stokes shift observed in the experiments. We calculated the nonequilibrium free-energy contour as a function of the proton coordinate and the solvation coordinate. We conclude that although immediately after the excitation the barrier height of the ESIPT process is relatively small, the barrier becomes larger as the solvation relaxation to the excited normal state proceeds. The solvation relaxation process is also investigated on the basis of microscopic solvation structure obtained by RISM calculations.

  19. Liquid draining shut-off induced geyser and slosh wave excitation at suction dip during draining in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of vapor ingestion, liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip, liquid hydrogen shut-off at the incipience of suction dip, and slosh wave excitation under normal and various reduced gravity environments and different flow rates of liquid during draining have been investigated. It shows that the liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip increases as the values of gravity environment decrease from normal gravity to lower reduced gravity, and also that the liquid residual increases as the flow rates of liquid increase during the courses of liquid hydrogen draining. It also shows that slosh waves accompanied by strong geyser are developed for surge-related flowfields at the moment of liquid hydrogen shut-off. Slosh wave excitation, during the liquid hydrogen shut-off, shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variation in spacecraft moment of inertia.

  20. Emergence of nontrivial magnetic excitations in a spin-liquid state of kagomé volborthite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daiki; Sugii, Kaori; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hajime; Hiroi, Zenji; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Yamashita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    When quantum fluctuations destroy underlying long-range ordered states, novel quantum states emerge. Spin-liquid (SL) states of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets, in which highly correlated spins fluctuate down to very low temperatures, are prominent examples of such quantum states. SL states often exhibit exotic physical properties, but the precise nature of the elementary excitations behind such phenomena remains entirely elusive. Here, we use thermal Hall measurements that can capture the unexplored property of the elementary excitations in SL states, and report the observation of anomalous excitations that may unveil the unique features of the SL state. Our principal finding is a negative thermal Hall conductivity κxy which the charge-neutral spin excitations in a gapless SL state of the 2D kagomé insulator volborthite Cu3V2O7(OH)2⋅2H2O exhibit, in much the same way in which charged electrons show the conventional electric Hall effect. We find that κxy is absent in the high-temperature paramagnetic state and develops upon entering the SL state in accordance with the growth of the short-range spin correlations, demonstrating that κxy is a key signature of the elementary excitation formed in the SL state. These results suggest the emergence of nontrivial elementary excitations in the gapless SL state which feel the presence of fictitious magnetic flux, whose effective Lorentz force is found to be less than 1/100 of the force experienced by free electrons. PMID:27439874

  1. Emergence of nontrivial magnetic excitations in a spin-liquid state of kagomé volborthite.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daiki; Sugii, Kaori; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hajime; Hiroi, Zenji; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Yamashita, Minoru

    2016-08-02

    When quantum fluctuations destroy underlying long-range ordered states, novel quantum states emerge. Spin-liquid (SL) states of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets, in which highly correlated spins fluctuate down to very low temperatures, are prominent examples of such quantum states. SL states often exhibit exotic physical properties, but the precise nature of the elementary excitations behind such phenomena remains entirely elusive. Here, we use thermal Hall measurements that can capture the unexplored property of the elementary excitations in SL states, and report the observation of anomalous excitations that may unveil the unique features of the SL state. Our principal finding is a negative thermal Hall conductivity [Formula: see text] which the charge-neutral spin excitations in a gapless SL state of the 2D kagomé insulator volborthite Cu3V2O7(OH)2[Formula: see text]2H2O exhibit, in much the same way in which charged electrons show the conventional electric Hall effect. We find that [Formula: see text] is absent in the high-temperature paramagnetic state and develops upon entering the SL state in accordance with the growth of the short-range spin correlations, demonstrating that [Formula: see text] is a key signature of the elementary excitation formed in the SL state. These results suggest the emergence of nontrivial elementary excitations in the gapless SL state which feel the presence of fictitious magnetic flux, whose effective Lorentz force is found to be less than 1/100 of the force experienced by free electrons.

  2. Libration induced stretching mode excitation for pump-probe spectroscopy in pure liquid water.

    PubMed

    Amir, Wafa; Gallot, Guilhem; Hache, François

    2004-10-22

    We developed an experimental approach to study pure liquid water in the infrared and avoid thermal effects. This technique is based on libration induced stretching excitation of water molecules. A direct correspondence between frequencies within the libration and OH stretching bands is demonstrated. Energy diffusion is studied in pure liquid water by measuring wave packet dynamics of OH stretching vibrator with infrared femtosecond spectroscopy. Wave packet dynamics reveals ultrafast energy dynamics and reflects 130 fs intermolecular energy transfer between water vibrators. Energy diffusion is almost two orders of magnitude faster than self diffusion in water.

  3. Similarity rules in gravity jitter-related spacecraft liquid propellant slosh waves excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially filled rotating fluids in a full-scale prototype Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant tank and various 10 percent subscale containers with identical values of similarity parameters such as Bond number, dynamical capillary number, rotational Reynolds number, and Weber number, as well as imposed gravity jitters have been investigated. It is shown that the Bond number can be used to simulate the wave characteristics of slosh wave excitation, whereas the Weber number can be used to simulate the wave amplitude of slosh-mode excitation. It is shown that a dynamical capillary number can be used to simulate the induced perturbation of the fluid stress distribution exerted on the wall. This distribution is governed by the interaction between surface tension (slosh-wave excitation along the liquid-vapor interface) and viscous (fluid stress exerted on the wall) forces.

  4. Effects of Luttinger leads on the AC conductance of a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; Qin, Chang-Dong; Wang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Kai-Di

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the joint effects of the intralead electron interaction and an external alternating gate voltage on the transport of a quantum dot coupled to two Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime. We find the transferring between two Kondo physics mechanics by investigation of differential conductance. For very weak intralead interaction, the satellite and main Kondo resonant peaks appear in the differential conductance. For moderately strong intralead interaction, all the peaks disappear and evolve into dips, which signifies that a photon-assisted single-channel Kondo (1CK) physics turns into two-channel Kondo (2CK) physics. The 1CK and 2CK mechanisms can coexist within a region of the intralead interaction parameter. The 1CK physics transits to the 2CK one gradually, not suddenly. In the limit of strong interaction, all dips disappear. When the bias voltage is small, there is no photon exchange between the quantum dot and alternative field, and the differential conductance scales as a power law both in bias voltage and in temperature. As the field becomes stronger, the quantum dot will emit and absorb photons.

  5. Nonvolatile liquid anthracenes for facile full-colour luminescence tuning at single blue-light excitation

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh; Hollamby, Martin J.; Aimi, Junko; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Kobayashi, Kenji; Hagiwara, Keita; Yoshizawa, Michito; Möhwald, Helmuth; Nakanishi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Nonvolatile room-temperature luminescent molecular liquids are a new generation of organic soft materials. They possess high stability, versatile optical properties, solvent-free fluid behaviour and can effectively accommodate dopant dye molecules. Here we introduce an approach to optimize anthracene-based liquid materials, focussing on enhanced stability, fluorescence quantum yield, colour tunability and processability, with a view to flexible electronic applications. Enveloping the anthracene core in low-viscosity branched aliphatic chains results in stable, nonvolatile, emissive liquid materials. Up to 96% efficient energy-transfer-assisted tunable emission is achieved by doping a minute amount of acceptor dye in the solvent-free state. Furthermore, we use a thermoresponsive dopant to impart thermally controllable luminescence colours. The introduced strategy leading to diverse luminescence colours at a single blue-light excitation can be an innovative replacement for currently used luminescent materials, providing useful continuous emissive layers in developing foldable devices. PMID:23736114

  6. Estimation of ground- and excited-state dipole moments of oxazine 1 in liquid and liquid crystalline media.

    PubMed

    Gilani, A Ghanadzadeh; Moghadam, M; Zakerhamidi, M S

    2011-06-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of a laser dye, oxazine-1 (OX1), in liquid and liquid crystalline media were studied at room temperature. The solvatochromic method was used to determine the ground- and excited-state dipole moments by means of Lippert-Mataga, Bakshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet polarity functions. The solvent polarity has no large and regular effect on the spectral behavior of OX1, and thus it might be considered as a poor solvatochromic indicator dye. In addition, applicability of solvatochromic method for this dye in anisotropic media was investigated. On the other hand, nature and degree of the solute-solvent interactions were characterized using correlation of multi-parameter solvent polarity scales. Due to the theoretical restrictions and the dye molecular structure, deviations from the solvatochromic correlation were observed.

  7. Estimation of ground- and excited-state dipole moments of oxazine 1 in liquid and liquid crystalline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Moghadam, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.

    2011-06-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of a laser dye, oxazine-1 (OX1), in liquid and liquid crystalline media were studied at room temperature. The solvatochromic method was used to determine the ground- and excited-state dipole moments by means of Lippert-Mataga, Bakshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet polarity functions. The solvent polarity has no large and regular effect on the spectral behavior of OX1, and thus it might be considered as a poor solvatochromic indicator dye. In addition, applicability of solvatochromic method for this dye in anisotropic media was investigated. On the other hand, nature and degree of the solute-solvent interactions were characterized using correlation of multi-parameter solvent polarity scales. Due to the theoretical restrictions and the dye molecular structure, deviations from the solvatochromic correlation were observed.

  8. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (Trot), excitation temperature (Texc), electron number density (ne), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ~ 1000 K and ~ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ~ 3 × 1015 cm- 3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (< 1 mm3 volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction.

  9. Red and blue shift of liquid water's excited states: A many body perturbation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, accurate optical absorption spectrum of liquid H2O is calculated in the energy range of 5-20 eV to probe the nature of water's excited states by means of many body perturbation approach. Main features of recent inelastic X-ray measurements are well reproduced, such as a bound excitonic peak at 7.9 eV with a shoulder at 9.4 eV as well as the absorption maximum at 13.9 eV, followed by a broad shoulder at 18.4 eV. The spectrum is dominated by excitonic effects impacting the structures of the spectrum at low and higher energy regimes mixed by single particle effects at high energies. The exciton distribution of the low-energy states, in particular of S1, is highly anisotropic and localized mostly on one water molecule. The S1 state is essentially a HOCO-LUCO (highest occupied crystal orbital - lowest unoccupied crystal orbital) transition and of intra-molecular type, showing a localized valence character. Once the excitation energy is increased, a significant change in the character of the electronically excited states occurs, characterized through emergence of multiple quasi-particle peaks at 7.9 eV in the quasi-particle (QP) transition profile and in the occurring delocalized exciton density distribution, spread over many more water molecules. The exciton delocalization following a change of the character of excited states at around 7.9 eV causes the blue shift of the first absorption band with respect to water monomer S1. However, due to reduction of the electronic band gap from gas to liquid phase, following enhanced screening upon condensation, the localized S1 state of liquid water is red-shifted with respect to S1 state of water monomer. For higher excitations, near vertical ionization energy (11 eV), quasi-free electrons emerge, in agreement with the conduction band electron picture. Furthermore, the occurring red and blue shift of the excited states are independent of the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions to the

  10. Simulation of liquid flows in micro mixers in presence of electrical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, I.; Ehrhard, P.

    2002-11-01

    Microfluidic devices for chemical engineering or total analysis systems often involve components for liquid mixing. In general, mixing employs (i) convective processes to increase the ''interfacial area'' between miscible liquids and (ii) subsequent molecular diffusion. Since the Reynolds number in microfluidic devices is usually small, we cannot rely on effects such as turbulence to obtain stirring. We exploit the electrical double layer (EDL) for that purpose. Charged particles (ions), usually contained in liquids, are distributed such that net charges are present immediately at the walls while the liquid bulk is electrically neutral. We apply an external time--dependent electrical field to induce forces and, thus, convective motion. By this means, the ''interfacial area'' between the liquids is increased and allows for effective diffusion. In our numerical simulations, the EDL is modeled via an asymptotically derived set of boundary conditions. We discuss both the effect of an obstacle within the mixing channel and the effect of a folded channel. Parameters like excitation frequency and amplitude are further explored to optimize the mixing efficiency.

  11. Development of High-Throughput Liquid Treatment System using Slot Antenna Excited Microwave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takitou, Sho; Ito, Michiko; Takashima, Seigou; Nomura, Norio; Kitagawa, Tominori; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to plasma production under liquid and its industrial applications as well as investigation of chemical reactions as a result of plasma-liquid interactions. In various kinds of plasma production techniques, we have proposed pulsed microwave excited plasma using slot antenna, where damage to the slot electrode can be minimized and plasma volume can be increased. Furthermore, we have proposed an in-line microwave plasma system where plasma is efficiently produced under reduced pressures using Venturi effect, and have demonstrated enhancement of organic decomposition efficiency. For practical use of the plasma liquid treatment, however, cost-effective and more efficient treatment system with high treatment capability is required. In this study, we propose further enhancement of the treatment speed by designing four-parallel-type liquid treatment device where four discharges for the treatment are performed using one microwave power source. Decomposition speed of newly-developed plasma system is investigated. Not only high decomposition rate but also enhanced energy efficiency is realized.

  12. Continuous excitations of the triangular-lattice quantum spin liquid YbMgGaO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paddison, Joseph A. M.; Daum, Marcus; Dun, Zhiling; Ehlers, Georg; Liu, Yaohua; Stone, Matthew B.; Zhou, Haidong; Mourigal, Martin

    2016-12-01

    A quantum spin liquid (QSL) is an exotic state of matter in which electrons’ spins are quantum entangled over long distances, but do not show magnetic order in the zero-temperature limit. The observation of QSL states is a central aim of experimental physics, because they host collective excitations that transcend our knowledge of quantum matter; however, examples in real materials are scarce. Here, we report neutron-scattering experiments on YbMgGaO4, a QSL candidate in which Yb3+ ions with effective spin-1/2 occupy a triangular lattice. Our measurements reveal a continuum of magnetic excitations--the essential experimental hallmark of a QSL--at very low temperature (0.06 K). The origin of this peculiar excitation spectrum is a crucial question, because isotropic nearest-neighbour interactions do not yield a QSL ground state on the triangular lattice. Using measurements in the field-polarized state, we identify antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbour interactions, spin-space anisotropies, and chemical disorder between the magnetic layers as key ingredients in YbMgGaO4.

  13. Quantitative force and dissipation measurements in liquids using piezo-excited atomic force microscopy: a unifying theory.

    PubMed

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Raman, Arvind

    2011-12-02

    The use of a piezoelectric element (acoustic excitation) to vibrate the base of microcantilevers is a popular method for dynamic atomic force microscopy. In air or vacuum, the base motion is so small (relative to tip motion) that it can be neglected. However, in liquid environments the base motion can be large and cannot be neglected. Yet it cannot be directly observed in most AFMs. Therefore, in liquids, quantitative force and energy dissipation spectroscopy with acoustic AFM relies on theoretical formulae and models to estimate the magnitude of the base motion. However, such formulae can be inaccurate due to several effects. For example, a significant component of the piezo excitation does not mechanically excite the cantilever but rather transmits acoustic waves through the surrounding liquid, which in turn indirectly excites the cantilever. Moreover, resonances of the piezo, chip and holder can obscure the true cantilever dynamics even in well-designed liquid cells. Although some groups have tried to overcome these limitations (either by theory modification or better design of piezos and liquid cells), it is generally accepted that acoustic excitation is unsuitable for quantitative force and dissipation spectroscopy in liquids. In this paper the authors present a careful study of the base motion and excitation forces and propose a method by which quantitative analysis is in fact possible, thus opening this popular method for quantitative force and dissipation spectroscopy using dynamic AFM in liquids. This method is validated by experiments in water on mica using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, which can measure the actual base motion. Finally, the method is demonstrated by using small-amplitude dynamic AFM to extract the force gradients and dissipation on solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) molecules on mica.

  14. Emergence of nontrivial magnetic excitations in a spin-liquid state of kagomé volborthite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Daiki; Sugii, Kaori; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hajime; Hiroi, Zenji; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Yamashita, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    When quantum fluctuations destroy underlying long-range ordered states, novel quantum states emerge. Spin-liquid (SL) states of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets, in which highly correlated spins fluctuate down to very low temperatures, are prominent examples of such quantum states. SL states often exhibit exotic physical properties, but the precise nature of the elementary excitations behind such phenomena remains entirely elusive. Here, we use thermal Hall measurements that can capture the unexplored property of the elementary excitations in SL states, and report the observation of anomalous excitations that may unveil the unique features of the SL state. Our principal finding is a negative thermal Hall conductivity κxyκxy which the charge-neutral spin excitations in a gapless SL state of the 2D kagomé insulator volborthite Cu3V2O7(OH)2ṡ2H2O exhibit, in much the same way in which charged electrons show the conventional electric Hall effect. We find that κxyκxy is absent in the high-temperature paramagnetic state and develops upon entering the SL state in accordance with the growth of the short-range spin correlations, demonstrating that κxyκxy is a key signature of the elementary excitation formed in the SL state. These results suggest the emergence of nontrivial elementary excitations in the gapless SL state which feel the presence of fictitious magnetic flux, whose effective Lorentz force is found to be less than 1/100 of the force

  15. Ultrafast vibrational relaxation of liquid H 2O following librational combination band excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieffo, L.; Shattuck, J.; Amsden, J. J.; Erramilli, S.; Ziegler, L. D.

    2007-11-01

    Dispersed pump-probe responses excited by ˜165 fs pulses resonant with the bend-libration combination band in neat H 2O centered at 2130 cm -1 are reported. This is the first IR pump-probe study of the energy relaxation dynamics in this region of the liquid water spectrum. The observed transient responses are best described by a kinetic model where the initial combination band energy relaxes via a concerted process to a bend fundamental and low frequency modes. The bend subsequently decays to another intermediate vibrational level, presumably the librational band, before this energy is distributed to low frequency modes and appears as heat as well in the sample volume in accordance with the results of Lindner et al. [L. Lindner, P. Vohringer, M.S. Pshenichnikov, D. Cringus, D.A. Wiersma, M. Mostovoy, Chem. Phys. Lett. 421 (2006) 329]. The lifetime of the bend-libration combination band is determined to be 140 ± 15 fs and the lifetime of the libration levels, leading to the hot ground state from the delayed heating route, is 840 ± 100 fs. This libration decay rate is consistent with the results of previous IR pump-probe measurement analyses for the appearance of heat following excitation resonant with the bend or stretch fundamentals. An additional pulse width limited absorption component is seen in all responses which may be attributed to the underlying continuum of intermolecular states in this region of the H 2O spectrum.

  16. Doubly-excited pulse-waves on flowing liquid films: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebayo, Idris; Xie, Zhihua; Che, Zhizhao; Wray, Alex; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The interaction patterns between doubly-excited pulse waves on a flowing liquid film are studied both experimentally and numerically. The flowing film is constituted on an inclined glass substrate while pulse-waves are excited on the film surface by means of a solenoid valve connected to a relay which receives signals from customised Matlab routines. The effect of varying the system parameters i.e. film flow rate, inter-pulse interval and substrate inclination angle on the pulse interaction patterns are then studied. Results show that different interaction patterns exist for these binary pulses; which include a singular behaviour, complete merger, partial merger and total non-coalescence. A regime map of these patterns is then plotted for each inclination angles examined, based on the film Re and the inter-pulse interval. Finally, the individual effect of the system parameters on the merging distance of these binary pulses in the merger mode is then studied and the results validated using both numerical simulations and mathematical modelling. Funding from the Nigerian Government (for Idris Adebayo), and the EPSRC through a programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1) gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Nonradiative deactivation of excited hemicyanines studied with submolecular spatial resolution by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gassin, Gaelle; Villamaina, Diego; Vauthey, Eric

    2011-03-02

    The excited-state dynamics of aminostilbazolium dyes is known to be dominated by nonradiative deactivation through large-amplitude motion. In order to identify the coordinate(s) responsible for this process, the excited-state lifetimes of two dialkylaminostyryl-methylpyridinium iodides have been measured at liquid-liquid interfaces using time-resolved surface second harmonic generation. We found that the decay time of the excited-states of both compounds was increasing with the viscosity of the apolar phase, consisting of n-alkanes of varying length, but was unaffected by that of the polar phase, made of water/glycerol mixtures. This indicates that the nonradiative deactivation is associated with the twist of the dialkylaniline group, which is located in the apolar part of the molecule.

  18. Liquid sloshing in partly-filled laterally-excited circular tanks equipped with baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Mohammadi, M. M.; Jarrahi, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Linear potential theory in conjunction with the conformal mapping technique are employed to develop rigorous mathematical models for two-dimensional transient sloshing in non-deformable baffled horizontal circular cylindrical vessels, filled with inviscid incompressible fluids to arbitrary depths, and subjected to arbitrary time-dependent lateral accelerations. Three common baffle configurations are considered, namely, a pair of free surface-touching horizontal side baffles, and a central surface-piercing or bottom-mounted vertical baffle of arbitrary extension. The first few normalized antisymmetric/symmetric sloshing frequencies of the partially-filled tanks are tabulated for selected baffle extension and fill depth ratios. Also, the effects of liquid fill depth or baffle length parameter on the impulsive, total and modal convective mass ratios are examined. A ramp-step function is used to replicate the lateral acceleration excitation encountered in an idealized turning maneuver. Durbin's numerical Laplace transform inversion scheme was applied to solve the resulting truncated linear sets of ordinary differential equations in the time-domain. The effects of excitation input time, fill level, and baffle configuration/extension on the force and moment amplification factors are illustrated through appropriate design charts. Furthermore, the transient hydrodynamic responses to a real seismic event are calculated and the effectiveness of baffle configuration/length on suppression of the induced destabilizing lateral forces are examined. Limiting cases are considered and rigorous verifications are made by comparison with the available data as well as with the numerical simulations performed by using a commercial CFD software package.

  19. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  20. Kohn-Luttinger superconductivity in monolayer and bilayer semimetals with the Dirac spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Mitskan, V. A.; Korovushkin, M. M.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of Coulomb interaction in an ensemble of Dirac fermions on the formation of superconducting pairing in monolayer and bilayer doped graphene is studied using the Kohn-Luttinger mechanism disregarding the Van der Waals potential of the substrate and impurities. The electronic structure of graphene is described using the Shubin-Vonsovsky model taking into account the intratomic, interatomic, and interlayer (in the case of bilayer graphene) Coulomb interactions between electrons. The Cooper instability is determined by solving the Bethe-Saltpeter integral equation. The renormalized scattering amplitude is obtained with allowance for the Kohn-Luttinger polarization contributions up to the second order of perturbation theory in the Coulomb interaction. It plays the role of effective interaction in the Bethe-Salpeter integral equation. It is shown that the allowance for the Kohn-Luttinger renormalizations as well as intersite Coulomb interaction noticeably affects the competition between the superconducting phases with the f-wave and d + id-wave symmetries of the order parameter. It is demonstrated that the superconducting transition temperature for an idealized graphene bilayer with significant interlayer Coulomb interaction between electrons is noticeably higher than in the monolayer case.

  1. Direct determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquids and shale oil by laser excited Shpol'skii spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.; Iles, M.

    1980-07-01

    This article reports that tunable, dye laser excitation of Shpol'skii effect spectra provides a potentially useful means of determining PAH compounds directly in coal liquids and shale oil without prior isolation of the PAH fraction by chromatographic or other techniques. The data reported were obtained by selecting excitation wavelengths within the response curve of a single dye, 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4 oxadiazole (PBD). The characteristic low temperature excitation spectra of PAH compounds in appropriate Shpol'skii matrices are known to be sharp (FWHM approx. 10cm/sup -1/). The luminescence of four individual PAHs is included. The analytical results obtained for a typical solvent refined coal and shale oil sample are summarized. 2 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  2. Contribution of tuned liquid column gas dampers to the performance of offshore wind turbines under wind, wave, and seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargi, Khosrow; Dezvareh, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Amin

    2016-09-01

    The main intention of the present study is to reduce wind, wave, and seismic induced vibrations of jackettype offshore wind turbines (JOWTs) through a newly developed vibration absorber, called tuned liquid column gas damper (TLCGD). Using a Simulink-based model, an analytical model is developed to simulate global behavior of JOWTs under different dynamic excitations. The study is followed by a parametric study to explore efficiency of the TLCGD in terms of nacelle acceleration reduction under wind, wave, and earthquake loads. Study results indicate that optimum frequency of the TLCGD is rather insensitive to excitation type. In addition, while the gain in vibration control from TLCGDs with higher mass ratios is generally more pronounced, heavy TLCGDs are more sensitive to their tuned frequency such that ill-regulated TLCGD with high mass ratio can lead to destructive results. It is revealed that a well regulated TLCGD has noticeable contribution to the dynamic response of the JOWT under any excitation.

  3. Evidence of scattering of bulk elementary excitations in isotopically pure liquid helium-II at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    This short report is concerned with experimental investigations of bulk elementary excitations (BEEs) in the isotopically pure liquid helium-II at low temperatures below 100 mK. The evidence of BEEs' scattering is introduced in this work. Two identical Au-heaters were used to generate BEEs. The first pulsed heater generates BEE beams to record them. The second heater serves to generate BEE beams in order to scatter the first beams, operating delay time between pulses of the heaters. Experimental signals were recorded by several bolometers situated both above and below the liquid surface: scattered BEEs are travelling in the liquid from the pulsed heater to the bolometer; scattered BEEs, reaching the liquid surface, evaporate 4He-atoms detected by two bolometers positioned in a vacuum; scattered signals are reflected from the liquid surface back to the liquid and are detected by the other bolometer situated in the liquid. It is manifested that the experimental results showed a dramatic decrease in peaks of recorded signals. Also, signal losses for different heater powers were calculated.

  4. Equivalent mechanical model of large-amplitude liquid sloshing under time-dependent lateral excitations in low-gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Miao; Junfeng, Li; Tianshu, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Subjected to external lateral excitations, large-amplitude sloshing may take place in propellant tanks, especially for spacecraft in low-gravity conditions, such as landers in the process of hover and obstacle avoidance during lunar soft landing. Due to lateral force of the order of gravity in magnitude, the amplitude of liquid sloshing becomes too big for the traditional equivalent model to be accurate. Therefore, a new equivalent mechanical model, denominated the "composite model", that can address large-amplitude lateral sloshing in partially filled spherical tanks is established in this paper, with both translational and rotational excitations considered. The hypothesis of liquid equilibrium position following equivalent gravity is first proposed. By decomposing the large-amplitude motion of a liquid into bulk motion following the equivalent gravity and additional small-amplitude sloshing, a better simulation of large-amplitude liquid sloshing is presented. The effectiveness and accuracy of the model are verified by comparing the slosh forces and moments to results of the traditional model and CFD software.

  5. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  6. Interfacial solvation and excited state photophysical properties of 7-aminocoumarins at silica/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debjani

    The properties of solutes adsorbed at interfaces can be very different compared to bulk solution limits. This thesis examines how polar, hydrophilic silica surfaces and different solvents systematically change a solute's equilibrium and dynamic solvation environment at solid/liquid interfaces. The primary tools used in these studies are steady state fluorescence spectroscopy and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) --a fluorescence method capable resolving fluorescence emission on the picosecond timescale. To sample adsorbed solutes, TCSPC experiments were carried out in total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. These studies used total of six different 7-aminocoumarin dyes to isolate the effects of molecular and electronic structure on solute photophysical behavior. Fluorescence lifetimes measured in the TIR geometry are compared to the lifetimes of coumarins in bulk solution using different solvents to infer interfacial polarity and excited state solute conformation and dynamics. Steady state emission experiments measuring the behavior of the coumarins adsorbed at silica surfaces from bulk methanol solutions show that all coumarins had a similar affinity DeltaG ads ˜ - 25-30 kJ/mole. Despite these similar adsorption energetics solute structure had a very pronounced effect on the tendency of solutes to aggregate and form multilayers. Our finding suggests that hydrogen bonding donating properties of the silica surface plays a dominant role in determining the interfacial behavior of these solutes. The silica surface also had pronounced effects on the time dependent emission of some solutes. In particular, the strong hydrogen bond donating properties of the silica surface inhibit formation of a planar, charge transfer state through hydrogen bond donation to the solute's amine group. A consequence of this interaction is that the time dependent emission from solutes adsorbed at the surface appears to be more similar to emission from solutes in nonpolar

  7. Pressure-induced emergence of unusually high-frequency transverse excitations in a liquid alkali metal: Evidence of two types of collective excitations contributing to the transverse dynamics at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Taras; Ruocco, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-09-14

    Unlike phonons in crystals, the collective excitations in liquids cannot be treated as propagation of harmonic displacements of atoms around stable local energy minima. The viscoelasticity of liquids, reflected in transition from the adiabatic to elastic high-frequency speed of sound and in absence of the long-wavelength transverse excitations, results in dispersions of longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) collective excitations essentially different from the typical phonon ones. Practically, nothing is known about the effect of high pressure on the dispersion of collective excitations in liquids, which causes strong changes in liquid structure. Here dispersions of L and T collective excitations in liquid Li in the range of pressures up to 186 GPa were studied by ab initio simulations. Two methodologies for dispersion calculations were used: direct estimation from the peak positions of the L/T current spectral functions and simulation-based calculations of wavenumber-dependent collective eigenmodes. It is found that at ambient pressure, the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are well separated, while at high pressures, the transverse current spectral functions, density of vibrational states, and dispersions of collective excitations yield evidence of two types of propagating modes that contribute strongly to transverse dynamics. Emergence of the unusually high-frequency transverse modes gives evidence of the breakdown of a regular viscoelastic theory of transverse dynamics, which is based on coupling of a single transverse propagating mode with shear relaxation. The explanation of the observed high-frequency shift above the viscoelastic value is given by the presence of another branch of collective excitations. With the pressure increasing, coupling between the two types of collective excitations is rationalized within a proposed extended viscoelastic model of transverse dynamics.

  8. Focus: Phase-resolved nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy—From charge dynamics in solids to molecular excitations in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, Thomas Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael

    2015-06-07

    Intense terahertz (THz) electric field transients with amplitudes up to several megavolts/centimeter and novel multidimensional techniques are the key ingredients of nonlinear THz spectroscopy, a new area of basic research. Both nonlinear light-matter interactions including the non-perturbative regime and THz driven charge transport give new insight into the character and dynamics of low-energy excitations of condensed matter and into quantum kinetic phenomena. This article provides an overview of recent progress in this field, combining an account of technological developments with selected prototype results for liquids and solids. The potential of nonlinear THz methods for future studies of low-frequency excitations of condensed-phase molecular systems is discussed as well.

  9. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.

  10. Role of structural relaxations and vibrational excitations in the high-frequency dynamics of liquids and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Song-Ho

    2006-09-01

    We present theoretical investigation on the high-frequency collective dynamics in liquids and glasses at microscopic length scales and in the terahertz frequency region based on the mode-coupling theory for ideal liquid-glass transition. We focus on recently investigated issues from inelastic-x-ray-scattering and computer-simulation studies for dynamic structure factors and longitudinal and transversal current spectra: the anomalous dispersion of the high-frequency sound velocity and the nature of the low-frequency excitation called the boson peak. It will be discussed how the sound mode interferes with other low-lying modes present in the system. Thereby, we provide a systematic explanation of the anomalous sound-velocity dispersion in systems—ranging from high temperature liquid down to deep inside the glass state—in terms of the contributions from the structural-relaxation processes and from vibrational excitations called the anomalous-oscillation peak (AOP). A possibility of observing negative dispersion—the decrease of the sound velocity upon increase of the wave number—is argued when the sound-velocity dispersion is dominated by the contribution from the vibrational dynamics. We also show that the low-frequency excitation, observable in both of the glass-state longitudinal and transversal current spectra at the same resonance frequency, is the manifestation of the AOP. As a consequence of the presence of the AOP in the transversal current spectra, it is predicted that the transversal sound velocity also exhibits the anomalous dispersion. These results of the theory are demonstrated for a model of the Lennard-Jones system.

  11. Combination and simultaneous resonances of gas bubbles oscillating in liquids under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2017-03-01

    The multi-frequency acoustic excitation has been employed to enhance the effects of oscillating bubbles in sonochemistry for many years. In the present paper, nonlinear dynamic oscillations of bubble under dual-frequency acoustic excitation are numerically investigated within a broad range of parameters. By investigating the power spectra and the response curves of oscillating bubbles, two unique features of bubble oscillations under dual-frequency excitation (termed as "combination resonance" and "simultaneous resonance") are revealed and discussed. Specifically, the amplitudes of the combination resonances are quantitatively compared with those of other traditional resonances (e.g. main resonances, harmonics). The influences of several paramount parameters (e.g., the bubble radius, the acoustic pressure amplitude, the energy allocation between two component waves) on nonlinear bubble oscillations are demonstrated.

  12. Excitation-energy dependence of solvation dynamics in room-temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeon; Park, Sang-Won; Shim, Youngseon; Kim, Hyung J.; Jung, YounJoon

    2016-07-01

    Influence of the excitation energy of a probe solute molecule on its solvation dynamics and emission spectrum in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (EMI+PF6-) is studied via molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained model description. By exciting the probe at different energies, each with an extremely narrow distribution, ensuing solvent relaxation and its dynamic variance are monitored using the isoconfigurational ensemble method. Resulting Stokes shift function, S(t), indicates that long-time solvent relaxation becomes slower with the decreasing excitation energy and approaches the equilibrium correlation function, C(t), of solvent fluctuations. This suggests that the system excited at the red-edge of the spectrum observes linear response better than that at the blue-edge. A detailed analysis of nonequilibrium trajectories shows that the effect of initial configurations on variance of relaxation dynamics is mainly confined to short times; it reaches a maximum around 0.1 ≲ t ≲ 1 ps and diminishes as time further increases. The influence of the initial velocity distribution, on the other hand, tends to grow with time and dominates the long-time variations of dynamics. The emission spectrum shows the red-edge effect in accord with previous studies.

  13. Influence of an amorphous wall on the distribution of localized excitations in a colloidal glass-forming liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Shreyas; Hima Nagamanasa, K.; Sood, A. K.; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the nature of the glass transition has been the holy grail of condensed matter physics and statistical mechanics for several decades. A phenomenological aspect that makes glass formation a conceptually formidable problem is that structural and dynamic correlations in glass-forming liquids are too subtle to be captured at the level of conventional two-point functions. As a consequence, a host of theoretical techniques, such as quenched amorphous configurations of particles, have been devised and employed in simulations and colloid experiments to gain insights into the mechanisms responsible for these elusive correlations. Very often, though, the analysis of spatio-temporal correlations is performed in the context of a single theoretical framework, and critical comparisons of microscopic predictions of competing theories are thereby lacking. Here, we address this issue by analysing the distribution of localized excitations, which are building blocks of relaxation as per the dynamical facilitation (DF) theory, in the presence of an amorphous wall, a construct motivated by the random first-order transition theory (RFOT). We observe that spatial profiles of the concentration of excitations exhibit complex features such as non-monotonicity and oscillations. Moreover, the smoothly varying part of the concentration profile yields a length scale {ξc} , which we compare with a previously computed length scale {ξ\\text{dyn}} . Our results suggest a method to assess the role of dynamical facilitation in governing structural relaxation in glass-forming liquids.

  14. Correcting spherical aberrations in a biospecimen using a transmissive liquid crystal device in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy has enabled the visualization of deep regions in a biospecimen. However, refractive-index mismatches in the optical path cause spherical aberrations that degrade spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal, especially during observation at deeper regions. Recently, we developed transmissive liquid-crystal devices for correcting spherical aberration without changing the basic design of the optical path in a conventional laser scanning microscope. In this study, the device was inserted in front of the objective lens and supplied with the appropriate voltage according to the observation depth. First, we evaluated the device by observing fluorescent beads in single- and two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopes. Using a 25× water-immersion objective lens with a numerical aperture of 1.1 and a sample with a refractive index of 1.38, the device recovered the spatial resolution and the fluorescence signal degraded within a depth of ±0.6 mm. Finally, we implemented the device for observation of a mouse brain slice in a two-photon excitation laser scanning microscope. An optical clearing reagent with a refractive index of 1.42 rendered the fixed mouse brain transparent. The device improved the spatial resolution and the yellow fluorescent protein signal within a depth of 0-0.54 mm.

  15. Model of resistances in systems of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Abhiram; Sen, Diptiman

    2011-07-01

    In a recent paper, we combined the technique of bosonization with the concept of a Rayleigh dissipation function to develop a model for resistances in one-dimensional systems of interacting spinless electrons [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/93/57007 93, 57007 (2011)]. We also studied the conductance of a system of three wires by using a current splitting matrix M at the junction. In this paper, we extend our earlier work in several ways. The power dissipated in a three-wire system is calculated as a function of M and the voltages applied in the leads. By combining two junctions of three wires, we examine a system consisting of two parallel resistances. We study the conductance of this system as a function of the M matrices and the two resistances; we find that the total resistance is generally quite different from what one expects for a classical system of parallel resistances. We do a sum over paths to compute the conductance of this system when one of the two resistances is taken to be infinitely large. We study the conductance of a three-wire system of interacting spin-1/2 electrons, and show that the charge and spin conductances can generally be different from each other. Finally, we consider a system of two wires that are coupled by a dissipation function, and we show that this leads to a current in one wire when a voltage bias is applied across the other wire.

  16. Effect of asymmetric gravity jitter excited slosh waves at liquid-vapor interface under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric gravity jitter oscillations, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids (cryogenic liquid helium and helium vapor) in a sub-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant dewar tank imposed by time-dependent various directions of background gravity environment have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitter imposed on the time-dependent variations of the direction of background gravity induced a greater amplitude of oscillations and a stronger degree of asymmetry in liquid-vapor interface geometry than that made by the higher frequency gravity jitter. Furthermore, the greater the components of background gravity in radial and circumferential directions will provide a greater contribution in driving more to the increasing amplitude and degrees of symmetry of liquid-vapor interface profiles which, in turn, modify the disturbance of moment of inertia and angular momentum of spacecraft.

  17. Asymmetric gravity jitter excited slosh waves at a liquid-vapor-solid interface in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric gravity jitter oscillations is investigated focusing on the surface tension effect on partially filled rotating fluids in a sub-scale gravity probe-B spacecraft propellant dewar tank. Data obtained revealed that the lower frequency gravity jitter imposed on the time-dependent variations of the background gravity direction induced a greater amplitude of oscillations and a stronger degree of asymmetry in liquid-vapor interface geometry than that caused by the higher frequency gravity jitter. It is also found that the greater the components of background gravity in radial and circumferential directions the greater the contribution to driving more toward increasing amplitude and degrees of asymmetry of the liquid-vapor interface profiles, which in turn modify the disturbance of moment of inertia and angular momentum of spacecraft.

  18. Effect of the Bethe surface description on the electronic excitations induced by energetic proton beams in liquid water and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; de Vera, Pablo; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    The irradiation of biological systems by energetic ion beams has multiple applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadrontherapy for cancer treatment or protection of astronauts against space radiation. Therefore, for a better control and understanding of the effects of radiation damage in living tissues, it is necessary to advance an accurate description of the energy loss from the ion beam to the target. In the present work we use the dielectric formalism to calculate the probability for an energetic proton to produce electronic excitations in two targets of high biological interest, namely, liquid water and DNA. Also, the mean energy of the electronic excitations in these targets is found as a function of the incident proton energy. The electronic response of the target, characterized by its energy-loss function (ELF), is described by several models that fit the available experimental optical data (at zero momentum transfer), but use different approaches to obtain the Bethe surface, that is, to extend the ELF to any energy and momentum transferred.

  19. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2009-06-30

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48-54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton-Cabrera-Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299-358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications.

  20. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Checa, Antonio G.; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48–54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton–Cabrera–Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299–358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications. PMID:19528636

  1. Neutron-scattering investigation of the excitation spectrum of liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, I. V. Lauter, H.; Puchkov, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The results of the investigation of the temperature evolution of the scattering law S(Q, {omega}) of superfluid helium measured in the wave-vector range 0.3 < Q < 0.8 A{sup -1} and helium temperatures from 1.0 to 2.2 K are reported. The investigations have been performed on the high-flux reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (France) with the IN6 neutron inelastic-scattering spectrometer. The deviation of the experimental scattering law of liquid helium from the damping harmonic oscillator model, which was previously observed independently in the experiments with the IN6 spectrometer and with the DIN-2PI spectrometer (at the IBR-2 reactor, Dubna, Russia) and were more recently called extrapeak, has been corroborated. The temperature dependence of the extrapeak parameters has been determined. This dependence makes it possible to propose hypotheses on the nature of the extrapeak.

  2. Magnetic excitations in the kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden magnetic quantum critical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Urbano, Ricardo; Curro, Nicholas J; Pines, David; Bauer, E D

    2009-11-06

    We report Knight-shift experiments on the superconducting heavy-electron material CeCoIn5 that allow one to track with some precision the behavior of the heavy-electron Kondo liquid in the superconducting state with results in agreement with BCS theory. An analysis of the 115In nuclear quadrupole resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate T1(-1) measurements under pressure reveals the presence of 2d magnetic quantum critical fluctuations in the heavy-electron component that are a promising candidate for the pairing mechanism in this material. Our results are consistent with an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point located at slightly negative pressure in CeCoIn5 and provide additional evidence for significant similarities between the heavy-electron materials and the high-T(c) cuprates.

  3. Collective excitations and the nature of Mott transition in undoped gapped graphene.

    PubMed

    Jafari, S A

    2012-08-01

    The particle-hole continuum (PHC) for massive Dirac fermions provides an unprecedented opportunity for the formation of two collective split-off states, one in the singlet and the other in the triplet (spin-1) channel, when the short-range interactions are added to the undoped system. Both states are close in energy and are separated from the continuum of free particle-hole excitations by an energy scale of the order of the gap parameter Δ. They both disperse linearly with two different velocities, reminiscent of spin-charge separation in Luttinger liquids. When the strength of Hubbard interactions is stronger than a critical value, the velocity of singlet excitation, which we interpret as a charge composite boson, becomes zero and renders the system a Mott insulator. Beyond this critical point the low-energy sector is left with a linearly dispersing triplet mode-a characteristic of a Mott insulator. The velocity of the triplet mode at the Mott criticality is twice the velocity of the underlying Dirac fermions. The phase transition line in the space of U and Δ is in qualitative agreement with our previous dynamical mean field theory calculations.

  4. Few-body route to one-dimensional quantum liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente, Manuel; Öhberg, Patrik

    2016-11-01

    Gapless many-body quantum systems in one spatial dimension are universally described by the Luttinger liquid effective theory at low energies. Essentially, only two parameters enter the effective low-energy description, namely, the speed of sound and the Luttinger parameter. These are highly system dependent and their calculation requires accurate nonperturbative solutions of the many-body problem. Here we present a simple theoretical method that only uses collisional information to extract the low-energy properties of spinless one-dimensional systems. Our results are in remarkable agreement with available results for integrable models and from large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of one-dimensional helium and hydrogen isotopes. Moreover, we estimate theoretically the critical point for spinodal decomposition in one-dimensional 4He and show that the exponent governing the divergence of the Luttinger parameter near the critical point is exactly 1/2, in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Singlet-Triplet Excitations and Long-Range Entanglement in the Spin-Orbital Liquid Candidate FeSc2S4.

    PubMed

    Laurita, N J; Deisenhofer, J; Pan, LiDong; Morris, C M; Schmidt, M; Johnsson, M; Tsurkan, V; Loidl, A; Armitage, N P

    2015-05-22

    Theoretical models of the spin-orbital liquid (SOL) FeSc2S4 have predicted it to be in close proximity to a quantum critical point separating a spin-orbital liquid phase from a long-range ordered magnetic phase. Here, we examine the magnetic excitations of FeSc2S4 through time-domain terahertz spectroscopy under an applied magnetic field. At low temperatures an excitation emerges that we attribute to a singlet-triplet excitation from the SOL ground state. A threefold splitting of this excitation is observed as a function of applied magnetic field. As singlet-triplet excitations are typically not allowed in pure spin systems, our results demonstrate the entangled spin and orbital character of singlet ground and triplet excited states. Using experimentally obtained parameters we compare to existing theoretical models to determine FeSc2S4's proximity to the quantum critical point. In the context of these models, we estimate the characteristic length of the singlet correlations to be ξ/(a/2)≈8.2 (where a/2 is the nearest neighbor lattice constant), which establishes FeSc2S4 as a SOL with long-range entanglement.

  6. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin's resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  7. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Eric Scott

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin`s resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Excitation of convective motions and surface hydrodynamic soliton-type waves in liquid crystals by a Gaussian laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, R. S.; Alaverdyan, R. B.; Arakelyan, A. G.; Nersisyan, S. Ts; Chilingaryan, Yu S.

    2004-03-01

    The possibility of exciting convective motions with a toroidal symmetry in a disordered liquid-crystal cell with an open surface, which is locally heated by a Gaussian laser beam, is demonstrated experimentally. A perturbation of the free surface of the liquid crystal and a convective hydrodynamic motion are determined by temperature gradients. It is shown that a radial distribution of the director of a nematic liquid crystal appears in the convection region. Under certain experimental conditions, soliton-type hydrodynamic orientation waves are observed at the free surface of a nematic liquid crystal. It is found experimentally that the velocity of these waves is determined solely by the liquid-crystal parameters and is independent of the incident laser-radiation power.

  9. Self-energies, renormalization factor, Luttinger sum rule and quasiparticle structure of the Hubbard systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J. )

    1992-07-10

    In this paper, the authors give a method for obtaining the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of the self-energy beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. This self-energy is constructed from several dielectric response functions. The second step is the determination of the quasiparticle band structure calculation which is performed from an appropriate modification of the augmented plane wave method. The third step consists in the determination of the renormalized density of states deduced from the spectral functions. The analysis of the renormalized density of states of the strongly correlated systems leads to the conclusion that there exist three types of resonances in their electronic structures, the lower energy resonances (LER), the middle energy resonances (MER) and the upper energy resonances (UER). In addition, the authors analyze the conditions for which the Luttinger theorem is satisfied. All of these questions are determined in a characteristic example which allows to test the theoretical method.

  10. Pulsed photoconductivity in diamond upon quasi-continuous laser excitation at 222 nm at the formation of an electron-hole liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, E. I.; Genin, D. E.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-06-01

    An order-of-magnitude enhancement of the pulsed photocurrent in a polycrystalline diamond sample synthesized by chemical vapor deposition is observed under the conditions of formation of an electron-hole liquid. Nonequilibrium charge carriers are excited by laser pulses at a wavelength of 222 nm with FWHM pulse duration of 18 ns and peak intensity above 2.5 MW/cm2 upon cooling the sample to 90 K. For peak intensities of laser excitation lower than 1 MW/cm2, sample cooling from 300 to 90 K leads to a decrease in pulsed photocurrent by about a factor of 5. The observed increase in pulsed photocurrent is attributed to the formation of the electron-hole liquid.

  11. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding of the chromophore coumarin 153 in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Hao, Ce; Wang, Se; Dong, Hong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the electronic excited-state intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the chromophore coumarin 153 (C153) and the room-temperature ionic liquid N,N-dimethylethanolammonium formate (DAF), both the geometric structures and the infrared spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex C153-DAF(+) in the excited state were studied by a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. We theoretically demonstrated that the intermolecular hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) in the hydrogen-bonded C153-DAF(+) complex is significantly strengthened in the S(1) state by monitoring the spectral shifts of the C=O group and O-H group involved in the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3). Moreover, the length of the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom decreased from 1.693 Å to 1.633 Å upon photoexcitation. This was also confirmed by the increase in the hydrogen-bond binding energy from 69.92 kJ mol(-1) in the ground state to 90.17 kJ mol(-1) in the excited state. Thus, the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening of the coumarin chromophore in an ionic liquid has been demonstrated theoretically for the first time.

  12. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  13. Dimensional reduction of the Luttinger Hamiltonian and g -factors of holes in symmetric two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserev, D. S.; Sushkov, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    The spin-orbit interaction of holes in zinc-blende semiconductors is much stronger than that of electrons. This makes the hole systems very attractive for possible spintronics applications. In three dimensions (3D), the dynamics of holes is described by well-known Luttinger Hamiltonian. However, most recent spintronics applications are related to two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures where dynamics in one direction is frozen due to quantum confinement. The confinement results in dimensional reduction of the Luttinger Hamiltonian, 3 D →2 D . Due to the interplay of the spin-orbit interaction, the external magnetic field, and the lateral gate potential imposed on the heterostructure, the reduction is highly nontrivial and as yet unknown. In the present work we perform the reduction and hence derive the general effective Hamiltonian which describes spintronics effects in symmetric 2D heterostructures. In particular, we do the following: (i) derive the spin-orbit interaction and the Darwin interaction related to the lateral gate potential, (ii) determine the momentum-dependent out-of-plane g -factor, (iii) point out that there are two independent in-plane g -factors, (iv) determine momentum dependencies of the in-plane g -factors.

  14. The Kohn-Luttinger mechanism and phase diagram of the superconducting state in the Shubin-Vonsovsky model

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Val'kov, V. V.; Mitskan, V. A.; Korovuskin, M. M.

    2013-10-15

    Using the Shubin-Vonsovsky model in the weak-coupling regime W > U > V (W is the bandwidth, U is the Hubbard onsite repulsion, and V is the Coulomb interaction at neighboring sites) based on the Kohn-Luttinger mechanism, we determined the regions of the existence of the superconducting phases with the d{sub xy}, p, s, and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} symmetry types of the order parameter. It is shown that the effective interaction in the Cooper channel considerably depends not only on single-site but also on intersite Coulomb correlations. This is demonstrated by the example of the qualitative change and complication of the phase diagram of the superconducting state. The superconducting (SC) phase induction mechanism is determined taking into account polarization contributions in the second-order perturbation theory in the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained for the angular dependence of the superconducting gap in different channels are compared with angule-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results. The influence of long-range hops in the phase diagram and critical superconducting transition temperature in different channels is analyzed. The conditions for the appearance of the Kohn-Luttinger superconductivity with the d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} symmetry and high critical temperatures T{sub c} {approx} 100 K near the half-filling are determined.

  15. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  16. Search for 2 ν β β decay of 136Xe to the 01+ excited state of 136Ba with the EXO-200 liquid xenon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Belov, V.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Burenkov, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chambers, C.; Chaves, J.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Danilov, M.; Daugherty, S. J.; Davis, J.; Delaquis, S.; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dilling, J.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Feyzbakhsh, S.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Hall, C.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M. J.; Johnson, A.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; King, J.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Njoya, O.; Nelson, R.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Retière, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tsang, R.; Twelker, K.; Vogel, P.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Waite, A.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Winick, T. A.; Wood, J.; Xu, Q. Y.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.; EXO-200 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    EXO-200 is a single phase liquid xenon detector designed to search for neutrinoless β β decay of 136Xe to the ground state of 136Ba. We report here on a search for the two-neutrino β β decay of 136Xe to the first 0+ excited state, 01+, of 136Ba based on a 100 kg yr exposure of 136Xe. Using a specialized analysis employing a machine learning algorithm, we obtain a 90% CL half-life sensitivity of 1.7 ×1024 yr. We find no statistically significant evidence for the 2 ν β β decay to the excited state resulting in a lower limit of T1/2 2 ν (0+→01+) > 6.9 ×1023 yr at 90% CL. This observed limit is consistent with the estimated half-life of 2.5 ×1025 yr.

  17. Modulation of the excited state intramolecular electron transfer reaction and dual fluorescence of crystal violet lactone in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2010-07-22

    The influence of polarity, viscosity, and hydrogen bond donating ability of the medium on the fluorescence behavior of crystal violet lactone (CVL), which undergoes excited state electron transfer reaction and exhibits dual fluorescence from two different electronic states, termed as CT(A) and CT(B), has been studied in six different room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) using steady state and time-resolved emission techniques. It is shown that the excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) transformation and dual fluorescence of CVL can be controlled by appropriate choice of the ILs. While dual fluorescence of CVL is clearly observed in pyrrolidinium IL, the molecule exhibits a single fluorescence band in ammonium IL. While the second emission from the CT(B) state can barely be seen in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ILs, dual fluorescence is quite prominent in 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium IL, [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. These contrasting results have been explained taking into account the hydrogen bonding interactions of the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ions (mediated through the C(2)-hydrogen) with CVL and the viscosity of the ILs. The excited state CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction kinetics has been studied in IL by monitoring the time-evolution of the CT(B) emission in [bmMim][Tf(2)N]. The solvation dynamics in this IL has been studied by following the dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift of C153, which is used as a probe molecule. A comparison of the excited state reaction time and solvation time suggests that the rate of the CT(A) --> CT(B) reaction in moderately viscous ILs is primarily dictated by the rate of solvation. Very little or negligible excitation wavelength dependence of the emission behavior of CVL can be observed in these ILs.

  18. Properties of bound, resonant, and regular continuum states of the excitation spectrum of symmetric liquid 4He films at T=0 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    Elementary excitations in rather thick symmetric films of liquid 4He at T=0 K are investigated. They are characterized by a momentum ħq parallel to the surface and may be described by bound or continuum states, which are obtained by solving a Bogoliubov-type equation formulated within the framework of the paired-phonon analysis and the hypernetted-chain approximation. Films of coverages nc=0.3 and 0.4 Å-2 confined by simple Gaussian potentials are studied. The excitation spectrum is numerically evaluated by discretizing the associated eigenvalue problem in a finite box. The evolution of the energy levels as a function of the box size is explored. Examples of the calculated energies and wave functions are displayed in a series of figures. Two differing sorts of continuum states may be distinguished. Depending on the behavior of their excitation energies as a function of the box size on the one hand, and the spatial distribution of their wave functions inside the film and in the asymptotic region far apart from the interface layer on the other, the continuum solutions can be separated into two classes of excitations: (a) the ``regular'' continuum states and (b) the ``resonant modes.'' The matrix elements of the particle-hole potential and the penetration factors of the most important states are examined. The lowest-lying branch of states is always bound and for qexcitations. In the atomic scale regime, 1.1 Å-1excitations of the system. Our results support the occurrence of the repulsion between ``bulk'' and ripplon excitations proposed by Pitaevskii and Stringari. The strength of contributions originated from different normal modes to the liquid structure function is evaluated. While for very small values of momenta (q<=0.2 A

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microemulsions composed of tripled-chain surface active ionic liquids, RTILs, and biological solvent: an excitation wavelength dependence study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kundu, Niloy; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-08-15

    In this article we have reported the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study in our earlier characterized surface active ionic liquids (SAILs)-containing microemulsion, i.e., N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P13][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/isopropyl myristate ([IPM]) and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([N3111][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/[IPM] microemulsions (Banerjee, C.; Mandal, S.; Ghosh, S.; Kuchlyan, J.; Kundu, N.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 3927-3934). The occurrence of effective FRET from the donor, coumarin-153 (C-153) to the acceptor rhodamine 6G (R6G) is evident from the decrease in the steady state fluorescence intensity of the donor with addition of acceptor and subsequent increase in the fluorescence intensity of the acceptor in the presence of donor. The excitation wavelength dependent FRET from C-153 to R6G has also been performed to assess the dynamic heterogeneity of these confined systems. In time-resolved experiments, the significant rise time of the acceptor in the presence of the donor further confirms the occurrence of FRET. The multiple donor-acceptor (D-A) distances, for various microemulsions, obtained from the rise times of the acceptor emission in the presence of a donor can be rationalized from the varying distribution of the donor, C-153, in the different regions of the microemulsion. Time-resolved measurement reveals that with increasing excitation wavelength from 408 to 440 nm, the contribution of the faster rise component of FRET increases significantly due to the close proximity of the C-153 and R6G in the polar region of the microemulsion where occurrence of FRET is very high. Moreover, we have also studied the FRET with variation of R (R = [room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)]/[surfactant]) and shown that the effect of excitation wavelength on FRET is similar irrespective of R values.

  20. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  1. Magnetically stabilized nematic order. II. Critical states and algebraically ordered nematic spin liquids in one-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Hui; Zhou Fei

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the Zeeman-field-driven quantum phase transitions between singlet spin liquids and algebraically ordered O(2) nematic spin liquids of spin-one bosons in one-dimensional optical lattices. We find that the critical behavior is characterized by condensation of hardcore bosons instead of ideal magnons in high-dimensional lattices. Critical exponents are strongly renormalized by hardcore interactions and critical states are equivalent to the free Fermion model up to the Friedel oscillations. We also find that the algebraically ordered nematic spin liquids close to critical points are fully characterized by the Luttinger-liquid dynamics with Luttinger-liquid parameters magnetically tunable. The Bethe ansatz solution has been applied to determine the critical magnetization and nematic correlations.

  2. Search for 2νββ decay of Xe136 to the 01+ excited state of Ba136 with the EXO-200 liquid xenon detector

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; ...

    2016-03-08

    EXO-200 is a single phase liquid xenon detector designed to search for neutrinoless ββ decay of 136Xe to the ground state of 136Ba. We report here on a search for the two-neutrino ββ decay of 136Xe to the first 0+ excited state, 0+1, of Ba136 based on a 100 kg yr exposure of 136Xe. Using a specialized analysis employing a machine learning algorithm, we obtain a 90% CL half-life sensitivity of 1.7×1024 yr. We find no statistically significant evidence for the 2νββ decay to the excited state resulting in a lower limit of T2ν1/2 (0+ → 0+1) > 6.9 ×1023more » yr at 90% CL. In conclusion, this observed limit is consistent with the estimated half-life of 2.5×1025 yr.« less

  3. Collective excitations of strongly coupled bilayer charged Bose liquids in the third-frequency-moment sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, Murat; Tanatar, B.

    2008-09-01

    We calculate the collective excitation modes of strongly coupled bilayer charged Bose systems. We employ the dielectric matrix formulation to study the correlation effects within the random-phase approximation (RPA), the self consistent field approximation Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjölander (STLS), and the quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA), which satisfies the third-frequency-moment (⟨ω3⟩) sum rule. We find that the QLCA predicts a long-wavelength correlation-induced energy gap in the out-of-phase plasmon mode, similar to the situation in electronic bilayer systems. The energy gap and the plasmon density of states are studied as a function of interlayer separation and coupling parameter rs . The results should be helpful for experimental investigations.

  4. Unusual magnetic excitations in the weakly ordered spin- 12 chain antiferromagnet Sr2CuO3: Possible evidence for Goldstone magnon coupled with the amplitude mode

    DOE PAGES

    Sergeicheva, E. G.; Sosin, S. S.; Prozorova, L. A.; ...

    2017-01-18

    We report on an electron spin resonance (ESR) study of a nearly one-dimensional (1D) spin-1/2 chain antiferromagnet, Sr2CuO3, with extremely weak magnetic ordering. The ESR spectra at T > TN, in the disordered Luttinger-spin-liquid phase, reveal nearly ideal Heisenberg-chain behavior with only a very small, field-independent linewidth, ~1/T. In the ordered state, below TN, we identify field-dependent antiferromagnetic resonance modes, which are well described by pseudo-Goldstone magnons in the model of a collinear biaxial antiferromagnet. Additionally, we observe a major resonant mode with unusual and strongly anisotropic properties, which is not anticipated by the conventional theory of Goldstone spin waves.more » Lastly, we propose that this unexpected magnetic excitation can be attributed to a field-independent magnon mode renormalized due to its interaction with the high-energy amplitude (Higgs) mode in the regime of weak spontaneous symmetry breaking.« less

  5. Nonexistence of the Luttinger-Ward functional and misleading convergence of skeleton diagrammatic series for hubbard-like models.

    PubMed

    Kozik, Evgeny; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine

    2015-04-17

    The Luttinger-Ward functional Φ[G], which expresses the thermodynamic grand potential in terms of the interacting single-particle Green's function G, is found to be ill defined for fermionic models with the Hubbard on-site interaction. In particular, we show that the self-energy Σ[G]∝δΦ[G]/δG is not a single-valued functional of G: in addition to the physical solution for Σ[G], there exists at least one qualitatively distinct unphysical branch. This result is demonstrated for several models: the Hubbard atom, the Anderson impurity model, and the full two-dimensional Hubbard model. Despite this pathology, the skeleton Feynman diagrammatic series for Σ in terms of G is found to converge at least for moderately low temperatures. However, at strong interactions, its convergence is to the unphysical branch. This reveals a new scenario of breaking down of diagrammatic expansions. In contrast, the bare series in terms of the noninteracting Green's function G0 converges to the correct physical branch of Σ in all cases currently accessible by diagrammatic Monte Carlo calculations. In addition to their conceptual importance, these observations have important implications for techniques based on the explicit summation of the diagrammatic series.

  6. Nonexistence of the Luttinger-Ward Functional and Misleading Convergence of Skeleton Diagrammatic Series for Hubbard-Like Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozik, Evgeny; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    The Luttinger-Ward functional Φ [G ] , which expresses the thermodynamic grand potential in terms of the interacting single-particle Green's function G , is found to be ill defined for fermionic models with the Hubbard on-site interaction. In particular, we show that the self-energy Σ [G ]∝δ Φ [G ]/δ G is not a single-valued functional of G : in addition to the physical solution for Σ [G ] , there exists at least one qualitatively distinct unphysical branch. This result is demonstrated for several models: the Hubbard atom, the Anderson impurity model, and the full two-dimensional Hubbard model. Despite this pathology, the skeleton Feynman diagrammatic series for Σ in terms of G is found to converge at least for moderately low temperatures. However, at strong interactions, its convergence is to the unphysical branch. This reveals a new scenario of breaking down of diagrammatic expansions. In contrast, the bare series in terms of the noninteracting Green's function G0 converges to the correct physical branch of Σ in all cases currently accessible by diagrammatic Monte Carlo calculations. In addition to their conceptual importance, these observations have important implications for techniques based on the explicit summation of the diagrammatic series.

  7. Renormalization group flow of the Luttinger-Ward functional: Conserving approximations and application to the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentrop, J. F.; Meden, V.; Jakobs, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the renormalization group flow of the Luttinger-Ward functional and of its two-particle-irreducible vertex functions, given a cutoff in the two-particle interaction. We derive a conserving approximation to the flow and relate it to the fluctuation exchange approximation as well as to nonconserving approximations introduced in an earlier publication [J. F. Rentrop, S. G. Jakobs, and V. Meden, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48, 145002 (2015), 10.1088/1751-8113/48/14/145002]. We apply the different approximate flow equations to the single-impurity Anderson model in thermal equilibrium at vanishing temperature. Numerical results for the effective mass, the spin susceptibility, the charge susceptibility, and the linear conductance reflect the similarity of the methods to the fluctuation exchange approximation. We find the majority of the approximations to deviate stronger from the exact results than one-particle-irreducible functional renormalization group schemes. However, we identify a simple static two-particle-irreducible flow scheme which performs remarkably well and produces an exponential Kondo-like scale in the renormalized level position.

  8. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  9. Optimum geometry of tuned liquid column-gas damper for control of offshore jacket platform vibrations under seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyed Amin; Zahrai, Seyed Mehdi; Bargi, Khosrow

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a tuned liquid column-gas damper, TLCGD, on the suppression of seismicinduced vibrations of steel jacket platforms is evaluated. TLCGD is an interesting choice in the case of jacket platforms because it is possible to use the structural elements as the horizontal column of the TLCGD. The objective here is to find the optimum geometric parameters, namely orientation and configuration of vertical columns, length ratio, and area ratio of the TLCGD, considering nonlinear damping of the TLCGD and water-structure interaction between the jacket platform and sea water. The effects of different characteristics of ground motion such as PGA and frequency content on the optimum geometry are also investigated and it is observed that these features have some influence on the optimum area ratio. Finally it is observed that pulse arrangement of ground acceleration is one of the most important parameters affecting the efficiency of a TLCGD. In other words, it is found that the TLCGD's capability to reduce the RMS responses depends only on the frequency content of the ground acceleration, but its capability to reduce the maximum responses depends on both the frequency content and the pulse arrangement of the ground acceleration.

  10. Separation and characterization of NOM by high-performance liquid chromatography and on-line three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, F C; Evans, R D; Dillon, P J

    2003-08-15

    By using high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with on-line three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence detection, we measured fluorescence properties of natural organic matter (NOM) as a function of molecular size (MS) and polarity. The work was carried out with Suwannee River Fulvic Acid, Aldrich Humic Acid, and a naturally occurring river NOM sample. Significant differences in fluorescence maximum pattern were found as NOM was separated chromatographically based on MS and polarity. There existed a strong relationship between MS, fluorescence pattern, and polarity. Humic-, fulvic-, and protein-like fluorescence fractions had distinct hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature. The results suggest that HPSEC may be better for characterizing major fulvic-like fluorescence and smaller MS fractions but not those having humic- and protein-like fluorescence and larger MS, which may be strongly adsorbed onto the HPSEC column because of their hydrophobic nature. This study has significant implications for further understanding the nature of NOM and its complexation with trace metals.

  11. Transmissive liquid-crystal device for correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in biospecimen in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-12-01

    All aberrations produced inside a biospecimen can degrade the quality of a three-dimensional image in two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. Previously, we developed a transmissive liquid-crystal device to correct spherical aberrations that improved the image quality of a fixed-mouse-brain slice treated with an optical clearing reagent. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism. The motivation for this study is that asymmetric aberration can be induced by the shape of a biospecimen and/or by a complicated refractive-index distribution in a sample; this can considerably degrade optical performance even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescence beads. The device was inserted between the objective lens and microscope revolver and succeeded in improving the spatial resolution and fluorescence signal of a bead image that was originally degraded by asymmetric aberration. Finally, we implemented the device for observing a fixed whole mouse brain with a sloping surface shape and complicated internal refractive-index distribution. The correction with the device improved the spatial resolution and increased the fluorescence signal by ˜2.4×. The device can provide a simple approach to acquiring higher-quality images of biospecimens.

  12. Red-light-controllable liquid-crystal soft actuators via low-power excited upconversion based on triplet-triplet annihilation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhen; Xu, Ming; Li, Fuyou; Yu, Yanlei

    2013-11-06

    A red-light-controllable soft actuator has been achieved, driven by low-power excited triplet-triplet annihilation-based upconversion luminescence (TTA-UCL). First, a red-to-blue TTA-based upconversion system with a high absolute quantum yield of 9.3 ± 0.5% was prepared by utilizing platinum(II) tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin (PtTPBP) as the sensitizer and 9,10-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)anthracene (BDPPA) as the annihilator. In order to be employed as a highly effective phototrigger of photodeformable cross-linked liquid-crystal polymers (CLCPs), the PtTPBP&BDPPA system was incorporated into a rubbery polyurethane film and then assembled with an azotolane-containing CLCP film. The generating assembly film bent toward the light source when irradiated with a 635 nm laser at low power density of 200 mW cm(-2) because the TTA-UCL was effectively utilized by the azotolane moieties in the CLCP film, inducing their trans-cis photoisomerization and an alignment change of the mesogens via an emission-reabsorption process. It is the first example of a soft actuator in which the TTA-UCL is trapped and utilized to create photomechanical effect. Such advantages of using this novel red-light-controllable soft actuator in potential biological applications have also been demonstrated as negligible thermal effect and its excellent penetration ability into tissues. This work not only provides a novel photomanipulated soft actuation material system based on the TTA-UCL technology but also introduces a new technological application of the TTA-based upconversion system in photonic devices.

  13. Towards an easy-to-use tuberculosis diagnosis through exhaled breath analysis: a liquid fluorimeter with an excitation at 265 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, J.; Dupoy, M.; Vignoud, S.; Ricaud, J. L.; Tran-Thi, T.; Karpe, S.; Novelli-Rousseau, A.; Mallard, F.

    2013-03-01

    The struggle against tuberculosis is one of the World Health Organization priorities. Identifying in a short time, patients with active tuberculosis, would bring a tremendous improvement to the current situation. Recovering from this infectious and deadly disease (2 million of death per year) is possible with a correct diagnosis to give an appropriate treatment. Unfortunately, most common tuberculosis diagnoses have few drawbacks: - skin tests: not reliable at 100% and need an incubation of 2 days before the diagnosis, - blood tests: costly and sophisticated technology, - chest X-ray: the first step before the sputum tests used for a bacterial culture with a final diagnosis given within 2 weeks. A tuberculosis test based on exhaled breath analysis is a prospective and noninvasive solution, cheap and easy to use and to transport. This test lies on a fluoregenic detection of niacin, a well-known mycobacterium tuberculosis specific metabolite. In this paper, it is assumed that the selected probe is specific to niacin and that exhaled breath does not contain any interfering species. To address this problem, a fluorimeter is developed with a cheap and cooled CCD ( 2k$) as a sensor, to easily determine the suitable "fluorescent zone". In comparing aqueous solutions with and without niacin, 250 pM of niacin have been detected. With a commercial fluorimeter (Fluorolog from Horiba), only 200 nM of niacin are detected. The present detection remains 10 times above the estimated targeted value for a tuberculosis test. The excitation source is a LED, which typically emits 20 °W at 265 nm through an optical fiber. The emission signal is detected around 545 nm. A typical light exposure lasts 700 seconds. Analysis of biomarkers with a liquid fluorimeter is generic and promising as health diagnosis.

  14. Mise en évidence d'états excités dans les spectres de photoionisation du cyclohexane et du diméthyl 2-2-butane liquides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanovas, J.; Guelfucci, J. P.; Caselles, O.

    1991-07-01

    Excited states are probably occurring, at an intermediate stage, in the VUV photoionization process of liquid hydrocarbons, as suggested by a Stern-Volmer behaviour when interacting with electron quenchers. They are here detected in the VUV photoionization spectrum of cyclohexane and dimethyl-2-2-butane in liquid phase. Some of the discernable peaks can be assigned as valence and Rydberg states, yet observed in gas phase. Supplementary peaks are observed, the existence of which is to be interpretated. L'existence d'états excités dans le processus de photoionisation VUV des hydrocarbures en phase liquide - précédemment suggérée par l'observation de la loi de Stern-Volmer lors de l'interaction avec des capteurs d'électrons - est ici détectée en traçant le spectre de photoionisation VUV du cyclohexane et du diméthyl-2-2-butane purs en phase liquide. Certains des pics observés coïncident avec les états de valence et de Rydberg de ces mêmes corps en phase gaz. Il apparaît des pics supplémentaires dont la nature doit être précisée.

  15. Fermi Surface Evolution and Luttinger Theorem in NaxCoO2: A Systematic Photoemission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. B.; Pan, Z. H.; Sekharan, A. K. P.; Sato, T.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Jin, Rongying; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Fedorov, A. V.; Wang, Z.; Ding, H.

    2005-01-01

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} for a wide range of Na concentrations (0.3 {le} x {le} 0.72). In all the metallic samples at different x, we observed (i) only a single holelike Fermi surface centered around {Gamma} and (ii) its area changes with x according to the Luttinger theorem. We also observed a surface state that exhibits a larger Fermi surface area. The e{prime}{sub g} band and the associated small Fermi surface pockets near the K points predicted by band calculations are found to sink below the Fermi energy in a manner almost independent of the doping and temperature.

  16. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  17. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  18. What determines the rate of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids? A study in [bmim][PF6].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2012-05-14

    The kinetics of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction and dynamics of solvation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) was studied in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazloium hexafluorophosphate, [bmim][PF(6)], by monitoring the dual fluorescence of the system. The picosecond time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) of DMABN exhibit decay of the locally excited (LE) emission intensity and shift of the ICT emission peak position with time, thus capturing the kinetics of evolution of the ICT state from the LE state and solvent relaxation of the ICT state. These results show that the LE→ICT transformation rate is determined not by the slow dynamics of solvation in ionic liquid, but is controlled mainly by the rate of structural reorganization of the molecule, which accompanies the electron-transfer process in this polar viscous medium. Even though both solvent reorganization around photo-excited DMABN and structural rearrangement of the molecule are dependent on the viscosity of the medium, it is the latter process that contributes to the viscosity dependence of the LE→ICT transformation.

  19. The novel metallic states of the cuprates: Topological Fermi liquids and strange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir; Chowdhury, Debanjan

    2016-12-01

    We review ideas on the nature of the metallic states of the hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors, with an emphasis on the connections between the Luttinger theorem for the size of the Fermi surface, topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), and critical theories involving changes in the size of the Fermi surface. We begin with the derivation of the Luttinger theorem for a Fermi liquid, using momentum balance during a process of flux insertion in a lattice electronic model with toroidal boundary conditions. We then review the TQFT of the ℤ spin liquid, and demonstrate its compatibility with the toroidal momentum balance argument. This discussion leads naturally to a simple construction of "topological" Fermi liquid states: the fractionalized Fermi liquid (FL*) and the algebraic charge liquid (ACL). We present arguments for a description of the pseudogap metal of the cuprates using ℤ-FL* or ℤ-ACL states with Ising-nematic order. These pseudogap metal states are also described as Higgs phases of a SU(2) gauge theory. The Higgs field represents local antiferromagnetism, but the Higgs-condensed phase does not have long-range antiferromagnetic order: the magnitude of the Higgs field determines the pseudogap, the reconstruction of the Fermi surface, and the Ising-nematic order. Finally, we discuss the route to the large Fermi surface Fermi liquid via the critical point where the Higgs condensate and Ising nematic order vanish, and the application of Higgs criticality to the strange metal.

  20. Fluorescence response of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids: observation of photobleaching under mild excitation condition and multiphoton confocal microscopic study of the fluorescence recovery dynamics.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Kotni; Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Rangaraj, Nandini; Samanta, Anunay

    2010-02-11

    The fluorescence behavior of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino) benzonitrile has been studied in room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) as a function of temperature, excitation wavelength, and exposure time. Dual emission from the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of the molecule has been observed and the relative intensities of the two emission bands and the peak position of the ICT emission are found consistent with the viscosity and polarity of the ILs. Temperature dependence study reveals a blue shift of the ICT emission peak with lowering of temperature indicating that under this condition the emission occurs from incompletely solvated state of the molecule. The observed excitation wavelength dependence of the emission behavior has been attributed to the microheterogeneity of the media. Exposure of the solution to the exciting radiation under very mild condition is found to influence the relative intensities of the two emission bands; an enhancement of the LE emission accompanied by a slight decrease of the ICT emission is observed. The emission intensities, however, return almost to their original values when the exposed solution is kept in the dark. The observation has been attributed to photoreaction of the exposed molecules and the recovery to replenishment of phototransformed molecules by the surrounding unexposed molecules. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching has been studied by multiphoton confocal fluorescence microscopic technique to obtain insight into the recovery dynamics. The diffusion coefficient estimated from this study is found to be lower than that predicted by the Stokes-Einstein equation by a factor of nearly 7 indicating the microheterogeneous nature of the ILs.

  1. Synchrotron-radiation study of weak fluorescence from neat liquids of simple alkenes: Anomalous excitation spectra as evidence for wavelength-dependent photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshihisa; Daino, Yoshihiko; Tai, Akira; Hakushi, Tadao ); Okada, Tadashi )

    1989-07-19

    Fluorescence excitation spectra of trans-2-octene, trans-cyclooctene, 2-methyl-2-butene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene were measured by using synchrotron radiation as a tunable light source in the vacuum UV and UV region. The wavelength dependence of the fluorescence yields provides direct evidence for the long-proposed assignment that the emissive state is the {pi},R(3s) Rydberg state, which in turn gives the carbene-derived photoproducts.

  2. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  3. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  4. Highly sensitive quantitation of pesticides in fruit juice samples by modeling four-way data gathered with high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence excitation-emission detection.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, Milagros; Pinto, Licarion; Véras, Germano; de Araújo Gomes, Adriano; Culzoni, María J; Ugulino de Araújo, Mário C; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2016-07-01

    A study regarding the acquisition and analytical utilization of four-way data acquired by monitoring excitation-emission fluorescence matrices at different elution time points in a fast HPLC procedure is presented. The data were modeled with three well-known algorithms: PARAFAC, U-PLS/RTL and MCR-ALS, the latter conveniently adapted to model third-order data. The second-order advantage was exploited when analyzing samples containing uncalibrated components. The best results were furnished with the algorithm U-PLS/RTL. This fact is indicative of both no peak time shifts occurrence among samples and high colinearity among spectra. Besides, this latent-variable structured algorithm is capable of better handle the need of achieving high sensitivity for the analysis of one of the analytes. In addition, a significant enhancement in both predictions and analytical figures of merit was observed for carbendazim, thiabendazole, fuberidazole, carbofuran, carbaryl and 1-naphtol, when going from second- to third-order data. LODs obtained were ranged between 0.02 and 2.4μgL(-1).

  5. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  6. Determination of high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high performance liquid chromatography fractions of coal tar standard reference material 1597a via solid-phase nanoextraction and laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Walter B.; Alfarhani, Bassam; Moore, Anthony F. T.; Bisson, Cristina; Wise, Stephen A.; Campiglia, Andres D.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an alternative approach for the analysis of high molecular weight – polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) with molecular mass 302 Da in complex environmental samples. This is not a trivial task due to the large number of molecular mass 302 Da isomers with very similar chromatographic elution times and similar, possibly even virtually identical, mass fragmentation patterns. The method presented here is based on 4.2 K laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy, a high resolution spectroscopic technique with the appropriate selectivity for the unambiguous determination of PAHs with the same molecular mass. The potential of this approach is demonstrated here with the analysis of a coal tar standard reference material (SRM) 1597a. Liquid chromatography fractions were submitted to the spectroscopic analysis of five targeted isomers, namely dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene. Prior to analyte determination, the liquid chromatographic fractions were pre-concentrated with gold nanoparticles. Complete analysis was possible with microliters of chromatographic fractions and organic solvents. The limits of detection varied from 0.05 (dibenzo[a,l]pyrene) to 0.24 μg L−1 (dibenzo[a,e]pyrene). The excellent analytical figures of merit associated to its non-destructive nature, which provides ample opportunity for further analysis with other instrumental methods, makes this approach an attractive alternative for the determination of PAH isomers in complex environmental samples. PMID:26653471

  7. Determination of high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high performance liquid chromatography fractions of coal tar standard reference material 1597a via solid-phase nanoextraction and laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Walter B; Alfarhani, Bassam; Moore, Anthony F T; Bisson, Cristina; Wise, Stephen A; Campiglia, Andres D

    2016-02-01

    This article presents an alternative approach for the analysis of high molecular weight - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) with molecular mass 302 Da in complex environmental samples. This is not a trivial task due to the large number of molecular mass 302 Da isomers with very similar chromatographic elution times and similar, possibly even virtually identical, mass fragmentation patterns. The method presented here is based on 4.2K laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy, a high resolution spectroscopic technique with the appropriate selectivity for the unambiguous determination of PAHs with the same molecular mass. The potential of this approach is demonstrated here with the analysis of a coal tar standard reference material (SRM) 1597a. Liquid chromatography fractions were submitted to the spectroscopic analysis of five targeted isomers, namely dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene. Prior to analyte determination, the liquid chromatographic fractions were pre-concentrated with gold nanoparticles. Complete analysis was possible with microliters of chromatographic fractions and organic solvents. The limits of detection varied from 0.05 (dibenzo[a,l]pyrene) to 0.24 µg L(-1) (dibenzo[a,e]pyrene). The excellent analytical figures of merit associated to its non-destructive nature, which provides ample opportunity for further analysis with other instrumental methods, makes this approach an attractive alternative for the determination of PAH isomers in complex environmental samples.

  8. Striped states in quantum Hall effect: Deriving a low-energy theory from Hartree-Fock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatnikova, Anna

    2002-03-01

    In their influential work, MacDonald and Fisher [PRB 61 5724 2000] suggested a phenomenological coupled Luttinger liquid theory to describe the low energy excitations of the striped quantum Hall state. We extend that work and explicitly derive the Luttinger liquid model using a microscopic Hartree-Fock description, in which the low energy excitations are represented by coherent states localized around the edges of the stripes. Our approach allows us to obtain analytical expressions for all of the parameters of the Luttinger liquid theory and of the equivalent hydrodynamic theory, suggested by Fogler and Vinokur [PRL 84 5828 2000]. As examples of the use of these results, we explicitly calculate the low-energy excitation spectrum and study tunneling into the striped state. Addressing a recent controversy regarding the possible instability of the striped state towards crystallization, we use our coherent-state approach to show the existence of the instability and analytically construct the stripe-crystal ground state.

  9. Fermi Liquid Behavior in Quasi 1-D Conductors via Angular Magnetoresistance Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. J.; Naughton, M. J.

    1998-03-01

    A body of evidence appears to be developing which suggests that electronic conduction in the q1D TMTSF molecular conductors can not be explained solely by Fermi liquid theory. Recent magnetotransport(G.M. Danner and P.M. Chaikin, Phys. Rev. Lett., 75), 4690 (1995). and photoemission(F. Zwick, et al. al.,) Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3982 (1997). experiments even point to a lack of a Fermi surface. We present angular-dependent magnetoresistance data on (TMTSF)_2PF6 under pressure, accompanied by calculations/simulations based on Boltzman transport (which explicitly require the existence of a Fermi surface). Based on rather good agreement between the two results, we maintain that a Fermi liquid description works, at least for the pressures employed. We will attempt to define the parameter space where Fermi liquid theory works, and where other (e.g. Luttinger) theories may be required.

  10. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  11. Non-Fermi-Liquid and Topological States with Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook; Xu, Cenke; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon

    2013-11-01

    We argue that a class of strongly spin-orbit-coupled materials, including some pyrochlore iridates and the inverted band gap semiconductor HgTe, may be described by a minimal model consisting of the Luttinger Hamiltonian supplemented by Coulomb interactions, a problem studied by Abrikosov and collaborators. It contains twofold degenerate conduction and valence bands touching quadratically at the zone center. Using modern renormalization group methods, we update and extend Abrikosov’s classic work and show that interactions induce a quantum critical non-Fermi-liquid phase, stable provided time-reversal and cubic symmetries are maintained. We determine the universal power-law exponents describing various observables in this Luttinger-Abrikosov-Beneslavskii state, which include conductivity, specific heat, nonlinear susceptibility, and the magnetic Gruneisen number. Furthermore, we determine the phase diagram in the presence of cubic and/or time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations, which includes a topological insulator and Weyl semimetal phases. Many of these phases possess an extraordinarily large anomalous Hall effect, with the Hall conductivity scaling sublinearly with magnetization σxy˜M0.51.

  12. Non-Fermi-liquid and topological states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook; Xu, Cenke; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon

    2013-11-15

    We argue that a class of strongly spin-orbit-coupled materials, including some pyrochlore iridates and the inverted band gap semiconductor HgTe, may be described by a minimal model consisting of the Luttinger Hamiltonian supplemented by Coulomb interactions, a problem studied by Abrikosov and collaborators. It contains twofold degenerate conduction and valence bands touching quadratically at the zone center. Using modern renormalization group methods, we update and extend Abrikosov's classic work and show that interactions induce a quantum critical non-Fermi-liquid phase, stable provided time-reversal and cubic symmetries are maintained. We determine the universal power-law exponents describing various observables in this Luttinger-Abrikosov-Beneslavskii state, which include conductivity, specific heat, nonlinear susceptibility, and the magnetic Gruneisen number. Furthermore, we determine the phase diagram in the presence of cubic and/or time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations, which includes a topological insulator and Weyl semimetal phases. Many of these phases possess an extraordinarily large anomalous Hall effect, with the Hall conductivity scaling sublinearly with magnetization σ(xy)∼M0.51.

  13. Electron spectral function and algebraic spin liquid for the normal state of underdoped high T(c) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Rantner, W; Wen, X G

    2001-04-23

    We propose to describe the spin fluctuations in the normal state (spin-pseudogap phase) of underdoped high T(c) cuprates as a manifestation of an algebraic spin liquid. Within the slave boson implementation of spin-charge separation, the normal state is described by massless Dirac fermions, charged bosons, and a gauge field. The gauge interaction, as an exact marginal perturbation, drives the mean-field free-spinon fixed point to a new spin-quantum fixed point-the algebraic spin liquid. Luttinger-liquid-like line shapes for the electron spectral function are obtained in the normal state, and we show how a coherent quasiparticle peak appears as spin and charge recombine.

  14. Excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one.

  15. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  16. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    optical study. Film formation goes a step beyond adsorption; some surfactants form monolayers or multilayers at the interface. A polymer microfilm or a polymer-particle matrix can be synthesized at the liquid-liquid boundary. Such films exhibit unique adsorption and ion-intercalation properties of their own. Electrowetting refers broadly to the phenomenon in which an applied voltage modulates the shape of a liquid-liquid interface, essentially by altering the surface tension. Electric fields can be used to induce droplets on solid substrates to change shape, or to affect the structure of liquid-liquid emulsions. Various chemical reactions can be performed at the liquid-liquid boundary. Liquid-liquid microelectrodes allow detailed study of ion-transfer kinetics at the interface. Photochemical processes can also be used to control the conformations of molecules adsorbed at the interface. But how much precise control do we actually have on the state of the interfacial region? Several contributions to this issue address a system which has been studied for decades in electrochemistry, but remains essentially unfamilar to physicists. This is the interface between two immiscible electrolytic solutions (ITIES), a progressing interdisciplinary field in which condensed-matter physics and physical chemistry meet molecular electrochemistry. Why is it so exciting? The reason is simple. The ITIES is chargeable: when positioned between two electrodes it can be polarized, and back- to-back electrical double layers form on both sides of the liquid-liquid interface. Importantly, the term immiscible refers not only to oil and water but also to the electrolytes. Inorganic electrolytes, such as alkali halides, tend to stay in water, whereas organic electrolytes, such as tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate, stay in oil. This behaviour arises because energies of the order of 0.2-0.3 eV are needed to drive ions across the interface. As long as these free energies of transfer are not exceeded by

  17. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  18. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  19. Superfluidity, Bose-Einstein condensation and dimensions of liquid 4He in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Glyde, Henry

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) calculations of the superfluid fraction, ρS / ρ , and the one-body density matrix (OBDM) (Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)) of liquid 4He confined in nanopores are presented. The goal is to determine the effective dimensions of the liquid in the nanopore. We simulate a cylinder of liquid of diameter dL surrounded by 5 Åof inert solid 4He in a nanopore of diameter d; d = dL + 10 Å. The PIMC ρS (T) / ρ and OBDM scales as a 1D Luttinger Liquid at extremely small liquid pore diameters only, dL = 6 Åwhere the liquid atoms form a 1D line at the center of the pore. In the range 8 <=dL <= 22 Åthe PIMC ρS (T) / ρ scales as a 2D liquid. In this dL range the liquid fills the pores in cylindrical layers. There is a cross over from 2D to 3D scaling at larger dL ~= 22 Å. In the range 8 <=dL <= 22 Å, the TC predicted using the Kosterlitz-Thouless 2D scaling criterion of the OBDM agrees well with the TC obtained from ρS (T) / ρ . Superflow observed in pores of diameter (18 < d < 32 Å) is apparently standard static superflow with the low TC arising from its 2D character. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, USDOE, ER46680.

  20. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  1. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  2. Dimensionless ratios: Characteristics of quantum liquids and their phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi-Cong; Chen, Yang-Yang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Römer, Rudolf A.; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Dimensionless ratios of physical properties can characterize low-temperature phases in a wide variety of materials. As such, the Wilson ratio (WR), the Kadowaki-Woods ratio, and the Wiedemann-Franz law capture essential features of Fermi liquids in metals, heavy fermions, etc. Here we prove that the phases of many-body interacting multicomponent quantum liquids in one dimension (1D) can be described by WRs based on the compressibility, susceptibility, and specific heat associated with each component. These WRs arise due to additivity rules within subsystems reminiscent of the rules for multiresistor networks in series and parallel—a novel and useful characteristic of multicomponent Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids (TLL) independent of microscopic details of the systems. Using experimentally realized multispecies cold atomic gases as examples, we prove that the Wilson ratios uniquely identify phases of TLL, while providing universal scaling relations at the boundaries between phases. Their values within a phase are solely determined by the stiffnesses and sound velocities of subsystems and identify the internal degrees of freedom of said phase such as its spin degeneracy. This finding can be directly applied to a wide range of 1D many-body systems and reveals deep physical insights into recent experimental measurements of the universal thermodynamics in ultracold atoms and spins.

  3. Transient absorption of vibrationally excited water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, H. J.; Nienhuys, H.-K.; Gallot, G.; Lascoux, N.; Gale, G. M.; Leicknam, J.-C.; Bratos, S.

    2002-02-01

    We study the spectral response of the transition between the first and the second excited state of the O-H stretch vibration of HDO dissolved in liquid D2O with two-color femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy. The spectral response of this transition differs strongly from the fundamental absorption spectrum of the O-H stretch vibration. In addition, excitation of the O-H stretch vibration is observed to lead to a change of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of liquid water. We show that both these observations can be described with a refined quantum-mechanical version of the Lippincott-Schroeder model for hydrogen-bonded OH⋯O systems.

  4. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  5. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  6. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  7. 15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. 1 BEHIND. OVERHEAD CRANE DANGLES AT TOP OF PHOTO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  8. Geomagnetic excitation of nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, C.; Vondrák, J.

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis of Malkin (2013), who demonstrated that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks. We found that if the numerical integration of Brzeziński broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved (Vondrák & Ron, 2014). Nevertheless, this approach assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks leads to a stepwise change in the position of celestial pole, which is physically not acceptable. Therefore we introduce a simple continuous excitation function that hypothetically describes the influence of geomagnetic jerks, and leads to rapid but continuous changes of pole position. The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations and this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets, and prove that the agreement is improved significantly.

  9. Slosh wave excitation and stability of spacecraft fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the pressure of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitters excite slosh waves with higher ratio of maximum amplitude to wave length than that of the slosh waves generated by the higher frequency gravity jitters.

  10. Gravity-jitters and excitation of slosh waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.; Wu, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the pressure of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitters excite slosh waves with higher ratio of maximum amplitude to wave length than that of the slosh waves generated by the higher frequency gravity jitters.

  11. Exotic quantum clusters and non-equilibrium dynamics of Rydberg excitations in one-dimensional optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Marco

    2016-12-01

    In this mini-review, we report results from M. Mattioli, et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165302 (2013)], M. Dalmonte, et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 045106 (2015)] and M. Mattioli, et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 113039 (2015)], where it is shown that Rydberg atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices are a useful tool to investigate the equilibrium phase diagram and the non-equilibrium dynamics of extended Hubbard models and Kinetically Constrained Models, respectively. Atoms weakly-dressed to an high-lying Rydberg state, which interact with a constant potential extended over several lattice sites, can be in an exotic quantum liquid state, the cluster Luttinger liquid phase [42, 43]. Furthermore, we show how a many-body model of interacting three-level atoms in the V-shaped configuration, where one of the level is a Rydberg state, might relax to equilibrium according to the same rules, so-called kinetic constraints, which are known to reproduce the characteristic dynamical arrest and separation of timescales of real glass-forming materials [62].

  12. Roles of viscosity, polarity, and hydrogen-bonding ability of a pyrrolidinium ionic liquid and its binary mixtures in the photophysics and rotational dynamics of the potent excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer probe 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sarthak; Ghosh, Surajit; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-06-06

    The room-temperature ionic liquid [C3mpyr][Tf2N] and its binary mixtures with methanol and acetonitrile provide microenvironments of varying viscosity, polarity, and hydrogen-bonding ability. The present work highlights their effects on the photophysics and rotational dynamics of a potent excited-state intramolecular double-proton-transfer (ESIDPT) probe, 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol [BP(OH)2]. The rotational diffusion of the proton-transferred diketo (DK) tautomer in [C3mpyr][Tf2N] ionic liquid was analyzed for the first time from the experimentally obtained temperature-dependent fluorescence anisotropy data using Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) hydrodynamic theory and Gierer-Wirtz quasihydrodynamic theory (GW-QHT). It was found that the rotation of the DK tautomer in neat ionic liquid is governed solely by the viscosity of the medium, as the experimentally observed boundary-condition parameter, Cobs, was very close to the GW boundary-condition parameter (CGW). On the basis of photophysical studies of BP(OH)2 in IL-cosolvent binary mixtures, we suggest that methanol molecules form hydrogen bonds with the cationic counterpart of the DK tautomers, as evidenced by the greater extent of the decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of BP(OH)2 upon addition of methanol compared to acetonitrile. It is also possible for the methanol molecules to form hydrogen bonds with the constituents of the RTIL, which is supported by the lesser extent of the decrease in the viscosity of the medium upon addition of methanol, leading to a less effective decrease in the rotational relaxation time compared to that observed upon acetonitrile addition.

  13. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  14. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-excited slosh waves during propellant reorientation with a geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Slosh wave excitation induced by a resettling flowfield activated by 1.0-Hz impulsive thrust during the course of liquid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid-fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70, and 80 percent has been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves of various frequencies excited by the resettling flowfield are discussed. Slosh wave excitations shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  15. Spin waves and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik-Romanov, A.S.; Sinha, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes both simple spin waves (magnons) and complicated excitations in magnetic systems. The following subjects are covered: - various methods of magnetic excitation investigations such as neutron scattering on magnetic excitations, spin-wave excitation by radio-frequency, power light scattering on magnons and magnetic excitation observation within the light-absorption spectrum; - oscillations of magnetic electron systems coupled with phonons, nuclear spin systems and localized impurity modes: - low-dimensional magnetics, amorphous magnetics and spin glasses.

  16. Proteins of Excitable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1969-01-01

    Excitable membranes have the special ability of changing rapidly and reversibly their permeability to ions, thereby controlling the ion movements that carry the electric currents propagating nerve impulses. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the specific signal which is released by excitation and is recognized by a specific protein, the ACh-receptor; it induces a conformational change, triggering off a sequence of reactions resulting in increased permeability. The hydrolysis of ACh by ACh-esterase restores the barrier to ions. The enzymes hydrolyzing and forming ACh and the receptor protein are present in the various types of excitable membranes. Properties of the two proteins directly associated with electrical activity, receptor and esterase, will be described in this and subsequent lectures. ACh-esterase has been shown to be located within the excitable membranes. Potent enzyme inhibitors block electrical activity demonstrating the essential role in this function. The enzyme has been recently crystallized and some protein properties will be described. The monocellular electroplax preparation offers a uniquely favorable material for analyzing the properties of the ACh-receptor and its relation to function. The essential role of the receptor in electrical activity has been demonstrated with specific receptor inhibitors. Recent data show the basically similar role of ACh in the axonal and junctional membranes; the differences of electrical events and pharmacological actions are due to variations of shape, structural organization, and environment. PMID:19873642

  17. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  18. Experiments on excitation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. C.

    Recent trends in the experimentation on chemical and biochemical excitation waves are presented. In the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is the most suitable chemical laboratory system for the study of wave propagation in excitable medium, the efficient control of wave dynamics by electrical fields and by light illumination is illustrated. In particular, the effects of a feedback control are shown. Further new experiments in this system are concerned with three-dimensional topologies and boundary effects. Important biological applications are found in the aggregation of slime mould amoebae, in proton waves during oscillatory glycolysis, and in waves of spreading depression in neuronal tissue as studied by experiments in chicken retina. Numerical simulations with appropriate reaction-diffusion models complement a large number of these experimental findings.

  19. Photothermal excitation setup for a modified commercial atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Holger; Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-02-15

    High-resolution imaging in liquids using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy is known to suffer from additional peaks in the resonance spectrum that are unrelated to the cantilever resonance. These unwanted peaks are caused by acoustic modes of the liquid and the setup arising from the indirect oscillation excitation by a piezoelectric transducer. Photothermal excitation has been identified as a suitable method for exciting the cantilever in a direct manner. Here, we present a simple design for implementing photothermal excitation in a modified Multimode scan head from Bruker. Our approach is based on adding a few components only to keep the modifications as simple as possible and to maintain the low noise level of the original setup with a typical deflection noise density of about 15 fm/√(Hz) measured in aqueous solution. The success of the modification is illustrated by a comparison of the resonance spectra obtained with piezoelectric and photothermal excitation. The performance of the systems is demonstrated by presenting high-resolution images on bare calcite in liquid as well as organic adsorbates (Alizarin Red S) on calcite with simultaneous atomic resolution of the underlying calcite substrate.

  20. Excitable scale free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  1. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  2. Laser-sustained liquid bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Delville, J.-P.

    2004-02-01

    The stabilization of free-standing liquid bridges encounters a fundamental limitation associated to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. Classically in weightless conditions, a liquid column breaks when its length exceeds its circumference. We overcome this fundamental limitation using a new technique, based on the optical-radiation pressure of a continuous laser wave, to form and stabilize pure dielectric bridges far beyond the instability onset. Since control over aspect ratio and orientation are simply realized by adjusting the waist and the direction of the exciting laser, these laser-sustained liquid columns also behave as reconfigurable optical waveguides and provide an appealing example of self-adapted optical microsystem based on microfluidics.

  3. Pulse excitation of bolometer bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusk, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    Driving bolometer bridge by appropriately phased excitation pulses increases signal-to-noise ratio of bolometer sensor which operates on a chopped light beam. Method allows higher applied voltage than is possible by conventional ac or dc excitation.

  4. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  5. Persistence of well-defined collective excitations in a molten transition metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Bermejo, F. J.; Saboungi, M. L.; Price, D. L.; Alvarez, M.; Roessli, B.; Cabrillo, C.; Ivanov, A.; Materials Science Division; Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas; Paul Scherrer Inst.; Inst. Laue Langevin

    2000-07-02

    Well-defined microscopic collective excitations are found in liquid Ni at 1763 K by means of inelastic neutron scattering. Such excitations are supported by the liquid despite an anharmonic character of its thermodynamic functions. Consideration of the detailed shape of the interionic pair potential provides a way to understand why atomic motions at microscopic scales behave in a way much closer to the alkali metals than to the liquefied rare gases.

  6. The Magical Geometry of 1D Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamadeala, Eugeniu

    We investigate the edge properties of Abelian topological phases in two spatial dimensions. We discover that many of them support multiple fully chiral edge phases, with surprising and measurable experimental consequences. Using the machinery of conformal field theory and integral quadratic forms we establish that distinct chiral edge phases correspond to genera of positive-definite integral lattices. This completes the notion of bulk-boundary correspondence for topological phases. We establish that by tuning inter-channel interactions the system can be made to transition between the different edge phases without closing the bulk gap. Separately we construct a family of one-dimensional models, called Perfect Metals, with no relevant mass-generating operators. These theories describe stable quantum critical phases of interacting fermions, bosons or spins in a quantum nanowire. These models rigorously answer a long-standing question about the existence of stable metallic phases in one and two spatial dimensions in the presence of generic disorder. Separately, they are the first example of a stable phase of an infinite parallel array of coupled Luttinger liquids. We perform a detailed study of the transport properties of Perfect Metals and show that in addition to violating the Wiedemann-Franz law, they naturally exhibit low power-law dependence of electric and thermal conductivities on temperature all the way to zero temperature. We dub this phenomenological set of properties a hyperconductor because in some sense, hyperconductors are better conductors that superconductors, which may have thermal conductivities that are exponentially small in temperature.

  7. Get excited: reappraising pre-performance anxiety as excitement.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison Wood

    2014-06-01

    Individuals often feel anxious in anticipation of tasks such as speaking in public or meeting with a boss. I find that an overwhelming majority of people believe trying to calm down is the best way to cope with pre-performance anxiety. However, across several studies involving karaoke singing, public speaking, and math performance, I investigate an alternative strategy: reappraising anxiety as excitement. Compared with those who attempt to calm down, individuals who reappraise their anxious arousal as excitement feel more excited and perform better. Individuals can reappraise anxiety as excitement using minimal strategies such as self-talk (e.g., saying "I am excited" out loud) or simple messages (e.g., "get excited"), which lead them to feel more excited, adopt an opportunity mind-set (as opposed to a threat mind-set), and improve their subsequent performance. These findings suggest the importance of arousal congruency during the emotional reappraisal process.

  8. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  9. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  10. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  11. Metastable Interactions: Dissociative Excitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    participate. The mercuric halide compounds HgBr2 , HgCl 2 , and HgI2 are of recent interest because of laser output achieved on the B2 E - X2 E transition in...the * respective mercuric halide radicals in the range of 400-600 nm. Population inversion has been obtained by photodissociation and electron impact...excitation in mixtures o the mercuric - halide compounds and the rare gases. Chang and -* Burnham (3) have noted Improved laser efficiency and improved

  12. Vibrational spraying of liquid by a thin rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. A.

    2008-02-01

    The phenomenon of liquid spraying by a thin rod bent at a right angle and excited with a piezoelectric transducer at one end is observed when the rod touches the open liquid surface at the bending site. The spraying may be accompanied by the formation of a liquid jet, which is emitted from the free end of the bent rod.

  13. Excitability in Dictyostelium development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David

    2013-03-01

    Discovering how populations of cells reliably develop into complex multi-cellular structures is a key challenge in modern developmental biology. This requires an understanding of how networks at the single-cell level, when combined with intercellular signaling and environmental cues, give rise to the collective behaviors observed in cellular populations. I will present work in collaboration with the Gregor lab, showing that the signal-relay response of starved cells of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can be well modeled as an excitable system. This is in contrast to existing models of the network that postulate a feed-forward cascade. I then extend the signal-relay model to describe how spatial gradient sensing may be achieved via excitability. One potential advantage of relying on feedback for gradient sensing is in preventing ``cheaters'' that do not produce signals from taking over the population. I then combine these models of single-cell signaling and chemotaxis to perform large-scale agent-based simulations of aggregating populations. This allows direct study of how variations in single-cell dynamics modify population behavior. In order to further test this model, I use the results of a screen for mutant cell lines that exhibit altered collective patterns. Finally, I use an existing FRET movie database of starved cell populations at varying cell densities and dilution rates to study heterogeneity in repeated spatio-temporal activity patterns.

  14. Multiphonon excitations in boson quantum films

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Krotscheck, E. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamical excitations in thin liquid films of {sup 4}He adsorbed to a substrate are investigated by using a microscopic theory of excitations that includes multiple-phonon scattering. We study the dispersion relation, excitation mechanisms, transition densities, and particle currents as a function of surface coverage. A primary new result is that we have included three-phonon scattering processes in the calculation of the dynamic structure function and the one-body current densities. With the exception that our ground state is determined by our variational theory, rather than taken from experiment, our work on the dynamic structure function is the generalization of that of Jackson [Phys. Rev. A {bold 4}, 2386 (1971)] to inhomogeneous systems (films). Using sum rules for the dynamic structure function as a guide, we suggest a simple scaling argument for improving the agreement between our dynamic structure function and the experimental one. The addition of three-phonon contributions bring about the following changes. First, the energy of most modes is lowered by a non-negligible amount for finite momentum excitations. Second, the film{close_quote}s surface mode is the exception; it is only slightly affected. Third, for monolayer films there is large scattering at high energies at intermediate values of momenta. This scattering can be traced back to an anomalously large contribution to the two-particle density of states. Fourth, all modes with energy above a critical energy decay, and the associated peaks of the dynamic structure function are broadened. Fifth, the maxonlike character is enhanced in the bulklike modes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  16. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  17. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  18. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  19. Optically excited states in positronium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. H.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Magnotta, F.; Dermer, Charles D.; Failor, R. A.; Jones, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical excitation are reported of the 1 3S-2 3P transition in positronium, and a second excitation from n=2 to higher n states. The experiment used light from two pulsed dye lasers. Changes in the positronium annihilation rate during and after the laser pulse were used to deduce the excited state populations. The n=2 level was found to be saturable and excitable to a substantial fraction of n=2 positronium to higher levels. Preliminary spectroscopic measurements were performed on n=14 and n=15 positronium.

  20. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  1. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  2. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  3. Double excitations in finite systems.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, P; Sangalli, D; Berger, J A; Sottile, F; Molinari, L G; Reining, L; Onida, G

    2009-01-28

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is widely used in the study of linear response properties of finite systems. However, there are difficulties in properly describing excited states, which have double- and higher-excitation characters, which are particularly important in molecules with an open-shell ground state. These states would be described if the exact TDDFT kernel were used; however, within the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, the calculated excitation energies have a strict single-excitation character and are fewer than the real ones. A frequency-dependent xc kernel could create extra poles in the response function, which would describe states with a multiple-excitation character. We introduce a frequency-dependent xc kernel, which can reproduce, within TDDFT, double excitations in finite systems. In order to achieve this, we use the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W(omega), which can describe these excitations, and from this we obtain the xc kernel. Using a two-electron model system, we show that the frequency dependence of W does indeed introduce the double excitations that are instead absent in any static approximation of the electron-hole screening.

  4. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  5. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis.

  6. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  7. Algebraic spin liquid in an exactly solvable spin model

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Kivelson, Steven A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    We have proposed an exactly solvable quantum spin-3/2 model on a square lattice. Its ground state is a quantum spin liquid with a half integer spin per unit cell. The fermionic excitations are gapless with a linear dispersion, while the topological 'vison' excitations are gapped. Moreover, the massless Dirac fermions are stable. Thus, this model is, to the best of our knowledge, the first exactly solvable model of half-integer spins whose ground state is an 'algebraic spin liquid.'

  8. Search for 2νββ decay of Xe136 to the 01+ excited state of Ba136 with the EXO-200 liquid xenon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Belov, V.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Burenkov, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chambers, C.; Chaves, J.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Danilov, M.; Daugherty, S. J.; Davis, J.; Delaquis, S.; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dilling, J.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Feyzbakhsh, S.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Hall, C.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M. J.; Johnson, A.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; King, J.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Njoya, O.; Nelson, R.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Retière, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tsang, R.; Twelker, K.; Vogel, P.; Vuilleumier, J. -L.; Waite, A.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Winick, T. A.; Wood, J.; Xu, Q. Y.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.

    2016-03-08

    EXO-200 is a single phase liquid xenon detector designed to search for neutrinoless ββ decay of 136Xe to the ground state of 136Ba. We report here on a search for the two-neutrino ββ decay of 136Xe to the first 0+ excited state, 0+1, of Ba136 based on a 100 kg yr exposure of 136Xe. Using a specialized analysis employing a machine learning algorithm, we obtain a 90% CL half-life sensitivity of 1.7×1024 yr. We find no statistically significant evidence for the 2νββ decay to the excited state resulting in a lower limit of T1/2 (0+ → 0+1) > 6.9 ×1023 yr at 90% CL. In conclusion, this observed limit is consistent with the estimated half-life of 2.5×1025 yr.

  9. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  10. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  11. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes.

  12. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes. PMID:28091555

  13. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  14. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  15. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  16. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  17. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  18. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  19. Electrostatic Tuning of Cellular Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Sara I.; Parkkari, Teija; Hammarström, Sven; Elinder, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated ion channels regulate the electric activity of excitable tissues, such as the heart and brain. Therefore, treatment for conditions of disturbed excitability is often based on drugs that target ion channels. In this study of a voltage-gated K channel, we propose what we believe to be a novel pharmacological mechanism for how to regulate channel activity. Charged lipophilic substances can tune channel opening, and consequently excitability, by an electrostatic interaction with the channel's voltage sensors. The direction of the effect depends on the charge of the substance. This was shown by three compounds sharing an arachidonyl backbone but bearing different charge: arachidonic acid, methyl arachidonate, and arachidonyl amine. Computer simulations of membrane excitability showed that small changes in the voltage dependence of Na and K channels have prominent impact on excitability and the tendency for repetitive firing. For instance, a shift in the voltage dependence of a K channel with −5 or +5 mV corresponds to a threefold increase or decrease in K channel density, respectively. We suggest that electrostatic tuning of ion channel activity constitutes a novel and powerful pharmacological approach with which to affect cellular excitability. PMID:20141752

  20. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  2. Microscopic study of edge excitations of spin-polarized and spin-unpolarized ν=2/3 fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Hai; Sreejith, G. J.; Jain, Jainendra K.

    2012-09-01

    The edge of spin-unpolarized or spin-polarized ν=2/3 fractional quantum Hall states is predicted by the effective theory to support a backward-moving neutral mode in addition to a forward-moving charge mode. We study this issue from a microscopic perspective where these states are identified with an effective filling factor of 2 of composite fermions, but with an effective magnetic field that is antiparallel to the external field. A simple counting from the composite fermion description suggests that there might be two backward-moving edge modes, but explicit calculations show that one of these is projected out of the low-energy sector, while the remaining mode provides a good microscopic account of the actual counterpropagating edge mode. The forward-moving modes are identified as “Schur modes,” obtained by multiplying the ground-state wave function by the symmetric Schur polynomials. The edge of the 2/3 spin unpolarized state provides a particularly striking realization of “spin-charge separation” in one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids, with the spin and charge modes moving in opposite directions.

  3. Quantum spin liquids: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savary, Lucile; Balents, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Quantum spin liquids may be considered ‘quantum disordered’ ground states of spin systems, in which zero-point fluctuations are so strong that they prevent conventional magnetic long-range order. More interestingly, quantum spin liquids are prototypical examples of ground states with massive many-body entanglement, which is of a degree sufficient to render these states distinct phases of matter. Their highly entangled nature imbues quantum spin liquids with unique physical aspects, such as non-local excitations, topological properties, and more. In this review, we discuss the nature of such phases and their properties based on paradigmatic models and general arguments, and introduce theoretical technology such as gauge theory and partons, which are conveniently used in the study of quantum spin liquids. An overview is given of the different types of quantum spin liquids and the models and theories used to describe them. We also provide a guide to the current status of experiments in relation to study quantum spin liquids, and to the diverse probes used therein.

  4. Excitation with quantum light. I. Exciting a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, J. C. López; Laussy, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a two-part study of the excitation of an optical target by quantum light. In this first part, we introduce the problematic and address the first case of interest, that of exciting the quantum harmonic oscillator, corresponding to, e.g., a single-mode passive cavity or a noninteracting bosonic field. We introduce a mapping of the Hilbert space that allows to chart usefully the accessible regions. We then consider the quantum excitation from single-photon sources in the form of a two-level system under various regimes of (classical) pumping: incoherent, coherent, and in the Mollow triplet regime. We close this first part with an overview of the material to be covered in the subsequent work.

  5. Sadomasochism, sexual excitement, and perversion.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, O F

    1991-01-01

    Sadomasochism, an ingredient of infantile sexuality, is an essential part of normal sexual functioning and love relations, and of the very nature of sexual excitement. Sadomasochistic elements are also present in all sexual perversions. Sadomasochism starts out as the potential for erotic masochism in both sexes, and represents a very early capacity to link aggression with the libidinal elements of sexual excitement. Sexual excitement may be considered a basic affect that overcomes primitive splitting of love and hatred. Erotic desire is a more mature form of sexual excitement. Psychoanalytic exploration makes it possible to uncover the unconscious components of sexual excitement: wishes for symbiotic fusion and for aggressive penetration and intermingling; bisexual identifications; the desire to transgress oedipal prohibitions and the secretiveness of the primal scene, and to violate the boundaries of a teasing and withholding object. The relation between these wishes and the development of erotic idealization processes in both sexes is explored in the context of a critical review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature.

  6. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  7. Coupled wire construction of chiral spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomale, Ronny; Meng, Tobias; Neupert, Titus; Greiter, Martin

    We develop a coupled wire construction of chiral spin liquids. The starting point are individual wires of electrons in the Mott regime that are subject to a Zeeman field and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Suitable spin-flip couplings between the wires yield an Abelian chiral spin liquid state which supports spinon excitations above a bulk gap, and chiral edge states. The approach generalizes to non-Abelian chiral spin liquids at level k with parafermionic edge states. RT is supported by the European Research Council through ERC-StG-336012-TOPOLECTRICS. MG and RT are supported by DFG-SFB 1170.

  8. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  9. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  10. Stochastic excitation of stellar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Reza

    2001-05-01

    Since more than about thirty years, solar oscillations are thought to be excited stochastically by the turbulent motions in the solar convective zone. It is currently believed that oscillations of stars lower than 2 solar masses - which possess an upper convective zone - are excited stochastically by turbulent convection in their outer layers. Providing that accurate measurements of the oscillation amplitudes and damping rates are available it is possible to evaluate the power injected into the modes and thus - by comparison with the observations - to constrain current theories. A recent theoretical work (Samadi & Goupil, 2001; Samadi et al., 2001) supplements and reinforces the theory of stochastic excitation of star vibrations. This process was generalized to a global description of the turbulent state of their convective zone. The comparison between observation and theory, thus generalized, will allow to better know the turbulent spectrum of stars, and this in particular thanks to the COROT mission.

  11. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  12. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGES

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; ...

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  13. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  14. Recurrent Excitation in Neocortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Rodney J.; Koch, Christof; Mahowald, Misha; Martin, Kevan A. C.; Suarez, Humbert H.

    1995-08-01

    The majority of synapses in the mammalian cortex originate from cortical neurons. Indeed, the largest input to cortical cells comes from neighboring excitatory cells. However, most models of cortical development and processing do not reflect the anatomy and physiology of feedback excitation and are restricted to serial feedforward excitation. This report describes how populations of neurons in cat visual cortex can use excitatory feedback, characterized as an effective "network conductance," to amplify their feedforward input signals and demonstrates how neuronal discharge can be kept proportional to stimulus strength despite strong, recurrent connections that threaten to cause runaway excitation. These principles are incorporated into models of cortical direction and orientation selectivity that emphasize the basic design principles of cortical architectures.

  15. Modeling excitable systems: Reentrant tachycardia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett L.; Hellen, Edward H.; Leise, Esther M.

    2010-01-01

    Excitable membranes are an important type of nonlinear dynamical system, and their study can be used to provide a connection between physical and biological circuits. We discuss two models of excitable membranes important in cardiac and neural tissues. One model is based on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations, and the other is based on a three-transistor excitable circuit. We construct a circuit that simulates reentrant tachycardia and its treatment by surgical ablation. This project is appropriate for advanced undergraduates as a laboratory capstone project or as a senior thesis or honors project and can also be a collaborative project, with one student responsible for the computational predictions and another for the circuit construction and measurements.

  16. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  17. Chiral Spin-Orbital Liquids with Nodal Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, W. M. H.; Andrade, E. C.; Miranda, E.; Pereira, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    Strongly correlated materials with strong spin-orbit coupling hold promise for realizing topological phases with fractionalized excitations. Here, we propose a chiral spin-orbital liquid as a stable phase of a realistic model for heavy-element double perovskites. This spin liquid state has Majorana fermion excitations with a gapless spectrum characterized by nodal lines along the edges of the Brillouin zone. We show that the nodal lines are topological defects of a non-Abelian Berry connection and that the system exhibits dispersing surface states. We discuss some experimental signatures of this state and compare them with properties of the spin liquid candidate Ba2YMoO6.

  18. Excited-to-excited-state scattering using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Satya Sainadh; Narayanan, Andal

    2015-11-01

    Weak measurements are a subset of measurement processes in quantum mechanics wherein the system, which is being measured, interacts very weakly with the measuring apparatus. Measurement values of observables undergoing a weak interaction and their amplification are concepts that have sharpened our understanding of interaction processes in quantum mechanics. Recent experiments show that naturally occurring processes such as resonance fluorescence from excited states of an atom can exhibit weak value amplification effect. In this paper we theoretically analyze the process of elastic resonance fluorescence from a V -type three-level atomic system, using the well-known Weiskopff-Wigner (WW) theory of spontaneous emission. Within this theory we show that a weak interaction regime can be identified and for suitable choices of initial and final excited states the mean scattering time between these states show an amplification effect during interaction with the vacuum bath modes of the electromagnetic field. We thus show that a system-bath interaction can show weak value amplification. Using our theory we reproduce the published experimental results carried out in such a system. More importantly, our theory can calculate scattering time scales in elastic resonance scattering between multiple excited states of a single atom or between common excited state configurations of interacting multiatom systems.

  19. Directional excitation without breaking reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Hamidreza; Dubois, Marc; Wang, Yuan; Shen, Y. Ron; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a mechanism for directional excitation without breaking reciprocity. This is achieved by embedding an impedance matched parity-time symmetric potential in a three-port system. The amplitude distribution within the gain and loss regions is strongly influenced by the direction of the incoming field. Consequently, the excitation of the third port is contingent on the direction of incidence while transmission in the main channel is immune. Our design improves the four-port directional coupler scheme, as there is no need to implement an anechoic termination to one of the ports.

  20. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  1. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  2. News CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

  3. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  4. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  5. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    1997-03-01

    In this talk I give a short review of the history and the current state of theoretical research on spiral wave patterns in excitable media. I start with the theoretical model of wave propagation in excitable media proposed in 1946 by Wiener and Rosenblueth(N. Wiener and A. Rosenblueth, The mathematical formulation of the problem of conduction of impulses in a network of connected excitable elements, specifically in cardiac muscle, Arch. Inst. Cardiol. Mexico 16 (1946) 205). This model describes spiral waves rotating around obstacles. I show how, by taking additionally into account curvature effects and gradual recovery of the medium after passage of an excitation wave, the model is generalized to describe freely rotating spiral waves and the breakup which produces spirals. In the context of this kinematic model, complex dynamics of spiral waves, i.e. their meandering, drift and resonance, is discussed. Instabilities of spiral waves in confined geometries, i.e. inside a circular region and on a sphere, are analyzed. At the end, I show how spiral waves in such systems can be efficiently controlled by application of a delayed global feedback. The talk is based on the review paper(A. S. Mikhailov, V. A. Davydov, and V. S. Zykov, Complex dynamics of spiral waves and motion of curves, Physica D 70 (1994) 1) and the monograph(A. S. Mikhailov, Foundations of Synergetics I, 2nd revised edition (Springer, Berlin, 1994)).

  6. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  7. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced field reflectors,'' is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  8. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-12-31

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced ``field reflectors,`` is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  9. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  10. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2016-07-12

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  11. Exciting cytoskeleton-membrane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomovitz, R.; Gov, N. S.

    2008-10-01

    Propagating waves on the surface of cells, over many micrometers, involve active forces. We investigate here the mechanical excitation of such waves when the membrane is perturbed by an external oscillatory force. The external perturbation may trigger the propagation of such waves away from the force application. This scheme is then suggested as a method to probe the properties of the excitable medium of the cell, and learn about the mechanisms that drive the wave propagation. We then apply these ideas to a specific model of active cellular membrane waves, demonstrating how the response of the system to the external perturbation depends on the properties of the model. The most outstanding feature that we find is that the excited waves exhibit a resonance phenomenon at the frequency corresponding to the tendency of the system to develop a linear instability. Mechanical excitation of membrane waves in cells at different frequencies can therefore be used to characterize the properties of the mechanism underlying the existence of these waves.

  12. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  13. Quantum Spin Liquids and Fractionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misguich, Grégoire

    This chapter discusses quantum antiferromagnets which do not break any symmetries at zero temperature - also called "spin liquids" - and focuses on lattice spin models with Heisenberg-like (i.e. SU(2)-symmetric) interactions in dimensions larger than one. We begin by discussing the Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem and its recent extension to D > 1 by Hastings (2004), which establishes an important distinction between spin liquids with an integer and with a half-integer spin per unit cell. Spin liquids of the first kind, "band insulators", can often be understood by elementary means, whereas the latter, "Mott insulators", are more complex (featuring "topological order") and support spin-1/2 excitations (spinons). The fermionic formalism (Affleck and Marston, 1988) is described and the effect of fluctuations about mean-field solutions, such as the possible creation of instabilities, is discussed in a qualitative way. In particular, we explain the emergence of gauge modes and their relation to fractionalization. The concept of the projective symmetry group (X.-G. Wen, 2002) is introduced, with the aid of some examples. Finally, we present the phenomenology of (gapped) short-ranged resonating-valence-bond spin liquids, and make contact with the fermionic approach by discussing their description in terms of a fluctuating Z 2 gauge field. Some recent references are given to other types of spin liquid, including gapless ones.

  14. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  15. Neutron star structure and collective excitations of finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, N.; Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    A method is introduced that establishes relations between properties of collective excitations in finite nuclei and the phase transition density nt and pressure Pt at the inner edge separating the liquid core and the solid crust of a neutron star. A theoretical framework that includes the thermodynamic method, relativistic nuclear energy density functionals, and the quasiparticle random-phase approximation is employed in a self-consistent calculation of (nt,Pt) and collective excitations in nuclei. Covariance analysis shows that properties of charge-exchange dipole transitions, isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances, and pygmy dipole transitions are correlated with the core-crust transition density and pressure. A set of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals, characterized by systematic variation of the density dependence of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter, is used to constrain possible values for (nt,Pt). By comparing the calculated excitation energies of giant resonances, energy-weighted pygmy dipole strength, and dipole polarizability with available data, we obtain the weighted average values: nt=0.0955±0.0007 fm-3 and Pt=0.59±0.05 MeV fm-3. This approach crucially depends on experimental results for collective excitations in nuclei and, therefore, accurate measurements are necessary to further constrain the structure of the crust of neutron stars.

  16. Excitations of Superfluid He4 Beyond the Roton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhel, Asaad; Glyde, Henry

    2001-03-01

    Excitations of Superfluid ^4He Beyond the Roton. A. R. SAKHEL and H. R. GLYDE, University of Delaware - We present a Quantum Field Theoretical Model that reproduces the basic features of the temperature dependence of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) as observed in the inelastic-neutron scattering results at IRIS, (J.V. Pierce, R.T. Azuah, B.Fåk, A.R. Sakhel, H.R. Glyde, and W.G. Stirling, to be published.) UK. The range of the wavevector Q beyond the roton (Q > 2.0Åis considered. The model is able to simulate the decay of the excitations into two rotons when the excitation energy exceeds 2Δ, where Δ is the roton energy. The model is based on the formulation of S(Q,ω) of Gavoret and Nozières.(J. Gavoret and Nozières, Ann. Phys.), 28, 349-399 (1964). The component of dynamic susceptibility involving the condensate is modelled by an equation of the form: \\chis = n n_0(T) Λ G Λ where Λ is a vertex, G the renormalized single particle Green's function, n the density of ^4He at SVP and n_0(T) the condensate fraction as a function of temperature. The dynamic susceptibility involving states above the condensate is modelled by a damped harmonic oscillator function.(H. R. Glyde, Excitation in Liquid and Solid Helium), Oxford, Clarendron Press (1994).

  17. Comprehensive Studies of Ultrafast Laser Excited Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhijiang; Mo, Mianzhen; Russell, Brandon; Tsui, Ying; Wang, Xijie; Ng, Andrew; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric excitation of solids by ultrafast laser pulses is an important approach to generate warm dense matter in laboratory. Electrical conductivity, structural dynamics and lattice stabilities are the most important properties in ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter. To investigate these properties, we have developed multiple advanced capabilities at SLAC recently, including the measurement of semi-DC electrical conductivity with ultrafast THz radiation, the study of solid and liquid structural dynamics by ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), and the investigation of lattice stability using frequency domain interferometry (FDI) on both front and rear surfaces. Due to the non-reversible nature in exciting solid to warm dense matter, all these diagnostics are implemented with single-shot approaches, reducing the uncertainties due to shot-to-shot fluctuations. In this talk, we will introduce these novel capabilities and present some highlighted studies in warm dense gold, which was uniformly excited by ultrafast laser pulses at 400nm. We appreciate the supports from DOE FES under FWP #100182.

  18. Electroviscoelasticity of liquid/liquid interfaces: fractional-order model.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Lazarevic, Mihailo P

    2005-02-01

    A number of theories that describe the behavior of liquid-liquid interfaces have been developed and applied to various dispersed systems, e.g., Stokes, Reiner-Rivelin, Ericksen, Einstein, Smoluchowski, and Kinch. A new theory of electroviscoelasticity describes the behavior of electrified liquid-liquid interfaces in fine dispersed systems and is based on a new constitutive model of liquids. According to this model liquid-liquid droplet or droplet-film structure (collective of particles) is considered as a macroscopic system with internal structure determined by the way the molecules (ions) are tuned (structured) into the primary components of a cluster configuration. How the tuning/structuring occurs depends on the physical fields involved, both potential (elastic forces) and nonpotential (resistance forces). All these microelements of the primary structure can be considered as electromechanical oscillators assembled into groups, so that excitation by an external physical field may cause oscillations at the resonant/characteristic frequency of the system itself (coupling at the characteristic frequency). Up to now, three possible mathematical formalisms have been discussed related to the theory of electroviscoelasticity. The first is the tension tensor model, where the normal and tangential forces are considered, only in mathematical formalism, regardless of their origin (mechanical and/or electrical). The second is the Van der Pol derivative model, presented by linear and nonlinear differential equations. Finally, the third model presents an effort to generalize the previous Van der Pol equation: the ordinary time derivative and integral are now replaced with the corresponding fractional-order time derivative and integral of order p<1.

  19. Atom-Molecule Coherence in a One-Dimensional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, R.; Orignac, E.

    2005-09-01

    We study a model of one-dimensional fermionic atoms with a narrow Feshbach resonance that allows them to bind in pairs to form bosonic molecules. We show that at low energy, a coherence develops between the molecule and fermion Luttinger liquids. At the same time, a gap opens in the spin excitation spectrum. The coherence implies that the order parameters for the molecular Bose-Einstein condensation and the atomic BCS pairing become identical. Moreover, both bosonic and fermionic charge density wave correlations decay exponentially, in contrast with a usual Luttinger liquid. We exhibit a Luther-Emery point where the systems can be described in terms of noninteracting pseudofermions. At this point we discuss the threshold behavior of density-density response functions.

  20. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  1. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; ...

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  2. Liquid ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported. PMID:25886321

  3. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  4. Light baryons and their excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-11-01

    We study ground states and excitations of light octet and decuplet baryons within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev equations. We improve upon similar approaches by explicitly taking into account the momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. We perform calculations in both the three-body Faddeev framework and the quark-diquark approximation in order to assess the impact of the latter on the spectrum. Our results indicate that both approaches agree well with each other. The resulting spectra furthermore agree one-to-one with experiment, provided well-known deficiencies of the rainbow-ladder approximation are compensated for. We also discuss the mass evolution of the Roper and the excited Δ with varying pion mass and analyze the internal structure in terms of their partial wave decompositions.

  5. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  6. Volumetric display with holographic multi-photon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Kumagai, Kota

    2016-10-01

    We developed a volumetric display with holographic two- and multi-photon excitations using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The holographic technique has advantages of increasing the number of voxels of the volumetric graphics per unit time, increasing the total input energy to the volumetric display because the maximum energy incident at a point in the display material is limited by the damage threshold, and controlling the size, shape and spatial position of voxels. We demonstrated a volumetric display with stacked multi-color fluorescence plates.

  7. Excitations in a four-leg antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Zheludev, Andrey I; Regnault, L.-P.; Chung, J.-H.; Qiu, Y.; Boehm, Martin; Habicht, Klaus; Meissner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering is used to investigate magnetic excitations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum spin-liquid system Cu$_2$Cl$_{4}\\cdot$ D$_8$C$_4$SO$_2$. Contrary to previously conjectured models that relied on bond-alternating nearest neighbor interactions in the spin chains, the dominant interactions are actually next-nearest-neighbor in-chain antiferromagnetic couplings. The appropriate Heisenberg Hamiltonian is equivalent to that of a $S=1/2$ 4-leg spin-tube with almost perfect one dimensionality and no bond alternation. A partial geometric frustration of rung interactions induces a small incommensurability of short-range spin correlations.

  8. Excitations in a Four-Leg Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Spin Tube,

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Zheludev, Andrey I; Regnault, L.-P.; Chung, J.-H.; Qiu, Y.; Boehm, Martin; Habicht, Klaus; Meissner, Michael; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A

    2008-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering is used to investigate magnetic excitations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum spin-liquid system Cu2Cl4 D8C4SO2. Contrary to previously conjectured models that relied on bond-alternating nearest-neighbor interactions in the spin chains, the dominant interactions are actually next-nearest-neighbor in-chain antiferromagnetic couplings. The appropriate Heisenberg Hamiltonian is equivalent to that of a S 1=2 4-leg spin-tube with almost perfect one dimensionality and no bond alternation. A partial geometric frustration of rung interactions induces a small incommensurability of short-range spin correlations.

  9. Excitations in a four-leg antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin tube.

    PubMed

    Garlea, V O; Zheludev, A; Regnault, L-P; Chung, J-H; Qiu, Y; Boehm, M; Habicht, K; Meissner, M

    2008-01-25

    Inelastic neutron scattering is used to investigate magnetic excitations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum spin-liquid system Cu(2)Cl(4).D(8)C(4)SO(2). Contrary to previously conjectured models that relied on bond-alternating nearest-neighbor interactions in the spin chains, the dominant interactions are actually next-nearest-neighbor in-chain antiferromagnetic couplings. The appropriate Heisenberg Hamiltonian is equivalent to that of a S=1/2 4-leg spin-tube with almost perfect one dimensionality and no bond alternation. A partial geometric frustration of rung interactions induces a small incommensurability of short-range spin correlations.

  10. Studies of Highly Excited Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-02

    collisions with photoions produced by the absorption of two blue laser photons or to an effect varying as the square of the number of excited atoms. Since...Physique Atomique , F-91191. (4). Our calculations indicate values of a = 3x 108 Gif-sur-Yvette. France. ., (d Permanent address: Fakultat fur Physik...collisions with points of particular importance for this experi- photoions produced by the absorption of two blue- -- ment. First, the atomic beam is

  11. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  12. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  13. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  14. Self-excited multifractal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, V.; Sornette, D.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce the self-excited multifractal (SEMF) model, defined such that the amplitudes of the increments of the process are expressed as exponentials of a long memory of past increments. The principal novel feature of the model lies in the self-excitation mechanism combined with exponential nonlinearity, i.e. the explicit dependence of future values of the process on past ones. The self-excitation captures the microscopic origin of the emergent endogenous self-organization properties, such as the energy cascade in turbulent flows, the triggering of aftershocks by previous earthquakes and the "reflexive" interactions of financial markets. The SEMF process has all the standard stylized facts found in financial time series, which are robust to the specification of the parameters and the shape of the memory kernel: multifractality, heavy tails of the distribution of increments with intermediate asymptotics, zero correlation of the signed increments and long-range correlation of the squared increments, the asymmetry (called "leverage" effect) of the correlation between increments and absolute value of the increments and statistical asymmetry under time reversal.

  15. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  16. Comparison of laser excited fluorescence and photoacoustic limits of detection for static and flow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voigtman, E.; Jurgensen, A.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence and photoacoustic characteristics of a windowless flow cell intended for liquid chromatographic applications are compared with respective characteristics of a static cuvette cell. In addition, a photoionization mode of operation for the flow cell is exhibited which utilizes the ionization products of two-photon excitation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in n-alkanes to effect a sensitive detection of those PAHs.

  17. An incompressible state of a photo-excited electron gas

    PubMed Central

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Watanabe, Masamitsu; Nasyedkin, Kostyantyn; Kono, Kimitoshi; Konstantinov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrons in a magnetic field can form new states of matter characterized by topological properties and strong electronic correlations as displayed in the integer and fractional quantum Hall states. In these states, the electron liquid displays several spectacular characteristics, which manifest themselves in transport experiments with the quantization of the Hall resistance and a vanishing longitudinal conductivity or in thermodynamic equilibrium when the electron fluid becomes incompressible. Several experiments have reported that dissipationless transport can be achieved even at weak, non-quantizing magnetic fields when the electrons absorb photons at specific energies related to their cyclotron frequency. Here we perform compressibility measurements on electrons on liquid helium demonstrating the formation of an incompressible electronic state under these resonant excitation conditions. This new state provides a striking example of irradiation-induced self-organization in a quantum system. PMID:26007282

  18. Superheating water by CW excitation of gold nanodots.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michael T; Green, Andrew J; Richardson, Hugh H

    2012-03-14

    A temperature-dependent photoluminescent thin film of Al(0.94)Ga(0.06)N doped with Er(3+) is used to measure the temperature of lithographically prepared gold nanodots. The gold nanodots and thin film are excited simultaneously with a continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. The gold nanodot is submersed under water, and the dot is subsequently heated. The water immediately surrounding the nanodot is superheated beyond the boiling point up to the spinodal decomposition temperature at 594 ± 17 K. The spinodal decomposition has been confirmed with the observation of critical opalescence. We characterize the laser scattering that occurs in unison with spinodal decomposition due to an increased coherence length associated with the liquid-liquid transition.

  19. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-15

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the “forest of peaks” frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  20. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation.

    PubMed

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the "forest of peaks" frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  1. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  2. Liquid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    In contrast to lithium batteries, the electrochromic windows are used under the sunlight, which requires the stability against UV-light, in addition to the usual electrochemical and thermal stabilities. Thus, the selection of the electrode materials and the combination with the electrolytes should be carefully performed in terms of stability requirements. Recently many reports in relation to those subjects were published. Therefore only fundamental properties of liquid electrolytes required for the electrochromic research are reviewed in this chapter.

  3. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid.

  4. On Diversity of Configurations Generated by Excitable Cellular Automata with Dynamical Excitation Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Excitable cellular automata with dynamical excitation interval exhibit a wide range of space-time dynamics based on an interplay between propagating excitation patterns which modify excitability of the automaton cells. Such interactions leads to formation of standing domains of excitation, stationary waves and localized excitations. We analyzed morphological and generative diversities of the functions studied and characterized the functions with highest values of the diversities. Amongst other intriguing discoveries we found that upper boundary of excitation interval more significantly affects morphological diversity of configurations generated than lower boundary of the interval does and there is no match between functions which produce configurations of excitation with highest morphological diversity and configurations of interval boundaries with highest morphological diversity. Potential directions of future studies of excitable media with dynamically changing excitability may focus on relations of the automaton model with living excitable media, e.g. neural tissue and muscles, novel materials with memristive properties and networks of conductive polymers.

  5. Elementary Excitations and Dynamic Structure of Quantum Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarela, M.

    The equations of motion method for studying excitations and dynamic structure of quantum fluids is reviewed in this series of lectures. The method is based on the least action principle where one minimizes the action integral of the dynamic system. As a result one gets the continuity equations, which connect the density fluctuations and currents to an external driving force. The external force is assumed to infinitesimal and the response of the system to that is linear. The real poles of the linear response function determine the elementary excitation modes and the imaginary part of the self energy defines the continuum limit and gives the finite lifetime of the decaying modes. Our dynamic wave function contains time-dependent one- and two-particle correlation functions, which includes couplings between three modes. Thus one mode can split into two modes if energy and momentum are conserved. We begin with the Feenberg's β-derivative formulation of the optimized ground state and then derive general equations of motion for the dynamic system from the least action principle. We show how the simplest one-body approximation leads to the Feynman theory of excitations. By including the fluctuating two-body correlation function within the uniform limit one recovers the correlated basic function approximation. The fully consistent theory gives a good account of the elementary excitations and we show results on current patterns in the maxon-roton regions and on the precursor of the liquid-solid phase transition. Finally we apply the method to the excitations of the impurity and derive the hydrodynamic effective mass of the 3He impurity in 4He and the 3He dynamic structure function.

  6. Chiral non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Shouvik; Lee, Sung-Sik

    2014-07-01

    A non-Fermi liquid state without time-reversal and parity symmetries arises when a chiral Fermi surface is coupled with a soft collective mode in two space dimensions. The full Fermi surface is described by a direct sum of chiral patch theories, which are decoupled from each other in the low-energy limit. Each patch includes low-energy excitations near a set of points on the Fermi surface with a common tangent vector. General patch theories are classified by the local shape of the Fermi surface, the dispersion of the critical boson, and the symmetry group, which form the data for distinct universality classes. We prove that a large class of chiral non-Fermi liquid states exists as stable critical states of matter. For this, we use a renormalization group scheme where low-energy excitations of the Fermi surface are interpreted as a collection of (1+1)-dimensional chiral fermions with a continuous flavor labeling the momentum along the Fermi surface. Due to chirality, the Wilsonian effective action is strictly UV finite. This allows one to extract the exact scaling exponents although the theories flow to strongly interacting field theories at low energies. In general, the low-energy effective theory of the full Fermi surface includes patch theories of more than one universality classes. As a result, physical responses include multiple universal components at low temperatures. We also point out that, in quantum field theories with extended Fermi surface, a noncommutative structure naturally emerges between a coordinate and a momentum which are orthogonal to each other. We show that the invalidity of patch description for Fermi liquid states is tied with the presence of UV/IR mixing associated with the emergent noncommutativity. On the other hand, UV/IR mixing is suppressed in non-Fermi liquid states due to UV insensitivity, and the patch description is valid.

  7. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  8. Excitation of slosh waves associated with low frequency impulsive reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid and vapor within a tank in reduced gravity to enable liquid outflow or vapor venting. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior to main engine restart poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the stability of the most efficient technique for propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage and weight penalties. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flow field activated by 0.1 Hz low frequency, impulsive reverse gravity acceleration, during reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70 and 80 percent, have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed. Slosh wave excitation shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which impose time dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for the spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  9. Stability and single-particle properties of bosonized Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, A.; Kwon, H.-J.; Marston, J. B.

    1994-07-01

    We study the stability and single-particle properties of Fermi liquids in spatial dimensions greater than one via bosonization. For smooth nonsingular Fermi-liquid interactions we obtain Shankar's renormalization-group flows to second order in the BCS coupling and reproduce well-known results for quasiparticle lifetimes. We demonstrate by explicit calculation that spin-charge separation does not occur when the Fermi-liquid interactions are regular. We also explore the relationship between quantized bosonic excitations and zero-sound modes and present a concise derivation of both the spin and the charge collective-mode equations. Finally we discuss some aspects of singular Fermi-liquid interactions.

  10. Contactless Inductive Bubble Detection in a Liquid Metal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gundrum, Thomas; Büttner, Philipp; Dekdouk, Bachir; Peyton, Anthony; Wondrak, Thomas; Galindo, Vladimir; Eckert, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bubbles in liquid metals is important for many technical applications. The opaqueness and the high temperature of liquid metals set high demands on the measurement system. The high electrical conductivity of the liquid metal can be exploited for contactless methods based on electromagnetic induction. We will present a measurement system which consists of one excitation coil and a pickup coil system on the opposite sides of the pipe. With this sensor we were able to detect bubbles in a sodium flow inside a stainless steel pipe and bubbles in a column filled with a liquid Gallium alloy. PMID:26751444

  11. Turbulent swirling jets with excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi, Rahmat; Farokhi, Saeed

    1988-01-01

    An existing cold-jet facility at NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to produce swirling flows with controllable initial tangential velocity distribution. Two extreme swirl profiles, i.e., one with solid-body rotation and the other predominated by a free-vortex distribution, were produced at identical swirl number of 0.48. Mean centerline velocity decay characteristics of the solid-body rotation jet flow exhibited classical decay features of a swirling jet with S - 0.48 reported in the literature. However, the predominantly free-vortex distribution case was on the verge of vortex breakdown, a phenomenon associated with the rotating flows of significantly higher swirl numbers, i.e., S sub crit greater than or equal to 0.06. This remarkable result leads to the conclusion that the integrated swirl effect, reflected in the swirl number, is inadequate in describing the mean swirling jet behavior in the near field. The relative size (i.e., diameter) of the vortex core emerging from the nozzle and the corresponding tangential velocity distribution are also controlling factors. Excitability of swirling jets is also investigated by exciting a flow with a swirl number of 0.35 by plane acoustic waves at a constant sound pressure level and at various frequencies. It is observed that the cold swirling jet is excitable by plane waves, and that the instability waves grow about 50 percent less in peak r.m.s. amplitude and saturate further upstream compared to corresponding waves in a jet without swirl having the same axial mass flux. The preferred Strouhal number based on the mass-averaged axial velocity and nozzle exit diameter for both swirling and nonswirling flows is 0.4.

  12. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid.

  13. Excited states in 129I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Venkova, Ts.; Bucurescu, D.; Mărginean, N.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Căta-Danil, Gh.; Atanasova, L.; Căta-Danil, I.; Detistov, P.; Filipescu, D.; Ghiţă, D.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states in 129I were populated with the 124Sn(7Li,2n) reaction at 23 MeV. In-beam measurements of γ-ray coincidences were performed with an array of eight HPGe detectors and five LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors. Based on the γγ coincidence data, a positive parity band structure built on the 7/2+ ground state was established and the πg7/2 configuration at oblate deformation was assigned to it. The results are compared to interacting Boson-Fermion model (IBFM) and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations.

  14. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  15. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    Variations of Earth rotation on sub-daily to secular timescales are caused by mass redistributions in the Earth system as a consequence of geophysical processes and gravitational influences. Forced oscillations of polar motion are superposed by free oscillations of the Earth, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation. In order to study the interactions between externally induced polar motion and the Earth's free oscillations, a non-linear gyroscopic model has been developed. In most of the former investigations on polar motion, the Chandler wobble is introduced as a damped oscillation with predetermined frequency and amplitude. However, as the effect of rotational deformation is a backcoupling mechanism of polar motion on the Earth's rotational dynamics, both period and amplitude of the Chandler wobble are time-dependent when regarding additional excitations from, e.g., atmospheric or oceanic mass redistributions. The gyroscopic model is free of any explicit information concerning amplitude, phase, and period of free oscillations. The characteristics of the Earth's free oscillation is reproduced by the model from rheological and geometrical parameters and rotational deformation is taken into account. This enables to study the time variable Chandler oscillation when the gyro is forced with atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum from the global atmospheric ECHAM3-T21 general circulation model together with the ocean model for circulation and tides OMCT driven by ECHAM including surface pressure. Besides, mass redistributions in the Earth's body due to gravitational and loading deformations are regarded and external torques exerted by Moon and Sun are considered. The numerical results of the gyro are significantly related with the geodetically observed time series of polar motion published by the IERS. It is shown that the consistent excitation is capable to counteract the damping and thus to maintain the Chandler amplitude. Spectral analyses of the ECHAM

  16. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  17. Momentum distribution and non-Fermi-liquid behavior in low-doped two-orbital model: Finite-size cluster quantum Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, Vladimir A.; Krasavin, Andrey V.; Zhumagulov, Yaroslav V.

    2016-12-01

    The two-dimensional two-orbital Hubbard model is studied with the use of a finite-size cluster world-line quantum Monte Carlo algorithm. This model is widely used for simulation of the band structure of FeAs clusters, which are structure elements of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. The choice of a special basis set of hypersites allowed us to take into account four-fermion operator terms and to overcome partly the sign problem. Spectral functions and the density of states for various parameters of the model are obtained in the undoped and low-doped regimes. The correlated distortion of the spectral density with the change of doping is observed, and the applicability of the "hard-band" approximation in the doped regime is demonstrated. Profiles of the momentum distribution are obtained for the first Brillouin zone; they have pronounced jump near the Fermi level, which decreases with the growth of the strength of the interaction. The invariance of the Fermi surface with respect to the strength of the interaction is testified. Nesting is found in the case of electron and hole doping. Fermi-liquid parameters of the model are derived. The Z factor grows sharply with the increasing of the level of doping and monotonously decreases with the growth of the strength of the interaction. Moreover, electron-hole doping asymmetry of the Z factor is revealed. The non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the deviation from Luttinger theorem are observed.

  18. Gene circuit designs for noisy excitable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    Certain cellular processes take the form of activity pulses that can be interpreted in terms of noise-driven excitable dynamics. Here we present an overview of different gene circuit architectures that exhibit excitable pulses of protein expression, when subject to molecular noise. Different types of excitable dynamics can occur depending on the bifurcation structure leading to the specific excitable phase-space topology. The bifurcation structure is not, however, linked to a particular circuit architecture. Thus a given gene circuit design can sustain different classes of excitable dynamics depending on the system parameters.

  19. Two regimes of the parametrically self-exciting ultrasonic standing waves.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Zinoviy; Goldberg, Iliya; Goldberg, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses a nonlinear multi-wave mechanism for the parametrically self-exciting standing waves in a plane-parallel liquid layer driven at one end of the layer. The dependence of this process on the number of parametrically self-exciting waves and the frequency detuning between the frequency "f" of the pump wave and the nearest natural frequency are analyzed. It is found that two regimes with different thresholds are possible. One of them is characterized by self-exciting subharmonic frequencies close to f/2 and the second has a much lower threshold and the presence of a self-exciting subharmonic at a frequency near to the smallest natural frequency. Three dimensionless parameters determining each regime are introduced.

  20. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  1. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  2. Three-photon excitation in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Bahlmann, Karsten; Schrader, Martin; Soini, Aleksi; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    We show experiments proving the feasibility of scanning fluorescence microscopy by three-photon excitation. Three-photon excitation fluorescence axial images are shown of polystyrene beads stained with the fluorophore 2,5- bis(4-biphenyl)oxazole (BBO). Three-photon excitation is performed at an excitation wavelength of 900 nm and with pulses of 130 fs duration provided by a mode-locked titanium-sapphire laser. Fluorescence is collected between 350 and 450 nm. The fluorescence image signal features a third-order dependence on the excitation power, also providing intrinsic 3-D imaging. The resolution of a three-photon excitation microscope is increased over that of a comparable two-photon excitation microscope.

  3. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Ault, Earl R.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  4. Optically Imaged Striped Domains of Nonequilibrium Electronic and Nuclear Spins in a Fractional Quantum Hall Liquid.

    PubMed

    Moore, John N; Hayakawa, Junichiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Yusa, Go

    2017-02-17

    Using photoluminescence microscopy enhanced by magnetic resonance, we visualize in real space both electron and nuclear polarization occurring in nonequilibrium fraction quantum Hall (FQH) liquids. We observe stripelike domain regions comprising FQH excited states which discretely form when the FQH liquid is excited by a source-drain current. These regions are deformable and give rise to bidirectionally polarized nuclear spins as spin-resolved electrons flow across their boundaries.

  5. Optically Imaged Striped Domains of Nonequilibrium Electronic and Nuclear Spins in a Fractional Quantum Hall Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John N.; Hayakawa, Junichiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Yusa, Go

    2017-02-01

    Using photoluminescence microscopy enhanced by magnetic resonance, we visualize in real space both electron and nuclear polarization occurring in nonequilibrium fraction quantum Hall (FQH) liquids. We observe stripelike domain regions comprising FQH excited states which discretely form when the FQH liquid is excited by a source-drain current. These regions are deformable and give rise to bidirectionally polarized nuclear spins as spin-resolved electrons flow across their boundaries.

  6. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  7. Transport currents in Bose quantum liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Apaja, V.; Krotscheck, E.; Rimnac, A.; Zillich, R. E.

    2006-09-07

    Until now, most of what has been said about excitations in quantum liquids has concerned the dynamic structure function, which is observable by means of neutron scattering. The dynamic structure function can be calculated using standard linear response theory. However, at this level one needs only transition densities <0{rho}n> or transition currents <0jn>, which are oscillatory in time and hence do not describe mass transport. In this work we go a step further and study transport currents in excited states, , which requires the calculation of to second order. For that purpose, we take a well-tested microscopic theory of inhomogeneous quantum liquids and extend it to find the currents formed when helium atoms scatter off a helium slab or when excitations evaporate atoms (a setup experimented by A. F. G. Wyatt's group in Exeter). Current conservation was already a major theoretical problem encountered by R. Feynman and led him to introduce backflow corrections. We show that perfect current conservation is expected only for exact solutions of the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation. This is the first extensive theoretical study of transport phenomena in a quantum liquid based on an accurate microscopic theory.

  8. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  9. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  10. Decoherence and relaxation of a single electron in a one-dimensional conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marguerite, A.; Cabart, C.; Wahl, C.; Roussel, B.; Freulon, V.; Ferraro, D.; Grenier, Ch.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.; Jonckheere, T.; Rech, J.; Martin, T.; Degiovanni, P.; Cavanna, A.; Jin, Y.; Fève, G.

    2016-09-01

    We study the decoherence and relaxation of a single elementary electronic excitation propagating in a one-dimensional chiral conductor. Using two-particle interferences in the electronic analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment, we analyze quantitatively the decoherence scenario of a single electron propagating along a quantum Hall edge channel at filling factor 2. The decoherence results from the emergence of collective neutral excitations induced by Coulomb interaction and leading, in one dimension, to the destruction of the elementary quasiparticle. This study establishes the relevance of electron quantum optics setups to provide stringent tests of strong interaction effects in one-dimensional conductors described by the Luttinger liquids paradigm.

  11. Cosmology with liquid mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, David W.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Liquid mirrors provide an exciting means to obtain large optical telescopes for substantially lower costs than conventional technologies. The liquid mirror concept has been demonstrated in the lab with the construction of a diffraction limited 1.5 m mirror. The mirror surface, using liquid mercury, forms a perfect parabolic shape when the mirror cell is rotated at a uniform velocity. A liquid mirror must be able to support a heavy mercury load with minimal flexure and have a fundamental resonant frequency that is as high as possible, to suppress the amplitude of surface waves caused by small vibrations transmitted to the mirror. To minimize the transmission of vibrations to the liquid surface, the entire mirror rests on an air bearing. This necessitates the mirror cell being lightweight, due to the limited load capabilities of the air bearing. The mirror components must also have physical characteristics which minimize the effects of thermal expansion with ambient temperature fluctuations in the observatory. In addition, the 2.7 m mirror construction is designed so that the techniques used may be readily extended to the construction of large mirrors. To attain the goals of a lightweight, rigid mirror, a composite laminant construction was used. The mirror consists of a foam core cut to the desired parabolic shape, with an accuracy of a few mm. An aluminum hub serves as an anchor for the foam and skin, and allows precise centering of the mirror on the air bearing and drive system. Several plys of Kevlar, covered in an epoxy matrix, are then applied to the foam. A final layer of pure epoxy is formed by spin casting. This final layer is parabolic to within a fraction of a mm. An aluminum ring bonded to the circumference of the mirror retains the mercury, and incorporates stainless-steel hard-points for the attachment of balance weights.

  12. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  13. Excitement in shame: the price we pay.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Stewart L

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of excitement in shame, extending the theoretical underpinnings of my work (Aledort, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009) on narcissism and the omnipotent child syndrome. Shame, excitement, and early narcissistic self-states are complexly intermingled, each influencing the other. Empathy alone is insufficient; the passion connected to shame can be easily hidden. Detailed case studies describe a model for working with the excitement in shame, how it functions, and how it gets resolved.

  14. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  15. Ultraviolet Excitation Photothermal Spectroscopy of Non-Labeled Amino Acids and Visible Light-Induced Signal Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Satoshi; Harata, Akira

    2008-05-01

    A measurement system for ultraviolet-laser excitation photothermal lens spectroscopy has been designed and constructed for measuring dilute amino acids in liquid solutions. An ultraviolet laser beam is generated as the fourth harmonic of a Ti:sapphire laser in the wavelength range of 212 to 220 nm. Photothermal lens spectra of alanine, phenylalanine, serine, and tryptophan are observed. Photothermal lens spectra of these samples are coincident with their absorption spectra. It is demonstrated that photothermal lens signals of the amino acids can be amplified by simultaneous excitation with a visible laser. This ultraviolet-excitation visible-enhancement system is applicable to photoacoustic detection.

  16. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  17. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  18. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Clark D; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D

    2013-05-28

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting ẑ-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  19. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  20. Quasiparticle excitations in superdeformed [sup 192]Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, P. ); Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P. ); Cederwall, B.; Clark, R.M. ); Crowell, B. ); Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M. ); Gall, B.; Hannachi, F. ); Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L. ); Korichi, A. ); Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. (Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence

    1995-04-01

    For the first time, two excited superdeformed (SD) bands have been observed in the double closed shell superdeformed nucleus [sup 192]Hg. One of the SD bands exhibits a pronounced peak in the dynamic moment of inertia which is interpreted as a crossing between two excited SD configurations involving the [ital N]=7 intruder and the [512]5/2 orbitals. This is only the second occurrence of such a crossing in a SD nucleus around [ital A]=190. The second excited SD band has near identical transition energies to an excited SD band in [sup 191]Hg.

  1. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  2. Liquid annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the specific impulse varies with the square root of the temperature and inversely with the square root of the molecular weight of the propellant. Typical values for specific impulse corresponding to various rocket concepts are shown. The Liquid Annulus core concept consists of a fuel element which will be arranged in a moderator block. The advantages as seen for the system are: high specific impulse; structural material will all run at low temperature; and lower fission product inventory because of evaporation. It is felt that this concept is worth at least a first look because of the promise of very high specific impulse. Because of the low thrust, one would probably need a cluster of engines. This is not necessarily bad because there would be some redundancy, but because of the low thrust one might have to refuel while running. Depending on the fuel vaporization, material can be included in the uranium that is injected as one is running along.

  3. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-07

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10(-8)-10(-7), corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  4. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-01

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10-8-10-7, corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  5. Ionic Liquids and Poly(ionic liquid)s for Morphosynthesis of Inorganic Materials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Rui; Yuan, Jiayin; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-10-06

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are new, innovative ionic solvents with rich physicochemical properties and intriguing pre-organized solvent structures; these materials offer great potential to impact across versatile areas of scientific research, for example, synthetic inorganic chemistry. Recent use of ILs as precursors, templates, and solvents has led to inorganic materials with tailored sizes, dimensionalities, morphologies, and functionalities that are difficult to obtain, or even not accessible, by using conventional solvents. Poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) polymerized from IL monomers also raise the prospect of modifying nucleation, growth, and crystallization of inorganic objects, shedding light on the synthesis of a wide range of new materials. Here we survey recent key progress in using ILs and PILs in the field of synthetic inorganic chemistry. As well as highlighting the unique features of ILs and PILs that enable advanced synthesis, the effects of adding other solvents to the final products, along with the emerging applications of the created inorganic materials will be discussed. We finally provide an outlook on several development opportunities that could lead to new advancements of this exciting research field.

  6. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-08-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons.

  7. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  8. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  9. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  10. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Peter F.; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  11. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  12. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  13. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  14. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications.

  15. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  16. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.

  17. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  18. Rapid prototyping of electrochromatography chips for improved two-photon excited fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Claudia; Beyreiss, Reinhild; Geissler, David; Jezierski, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2014-04-15

    In the present study, we introduce two-photon excitation at 532 nm for label-free fluorescence detection in chip electrochromatography. Two-photon excitation at 532 nm offers a promising alternative to one-photon excitation at 266 nm, as it enables the use of economic chip materials instead of fused silica. In order to demonstrate these benefits, one-photon and two-photon induced fluorescence detection are compared in different chip layouts and materials with respect to the achievable sensitivity in the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Customized chromatography chips with cover or bottom slides of different material and thickness are produced by means of a rapid prototyping method based on liquid-phase lithography. The design of thin bottom chips (180 μm) enables the use of high-performance immersion objectives with low working distances, which allows one to exploit the full potential of two-photon excitation for a sensitive detection. The developed method is applied for label-free analysis of PAHs separated on a polymer monolith inside polymer glass sandwich chips made from fused silica or soda-lime glass. The obtained limits of detection range from 40 nM to 1.95 μM, with similar sensitivities in fused silica thin bottom chips for one-photon and two-photon excitation. In deep-UV non- or less-transparent devices two-photon excitation is mandatory for label-free detection of aromatics with high sensitivity.

  19. Numerical simulation of excited jet mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. N.; Hankey, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of unsteady flow in jet mixing layers, both with and without external excitation, has been performed by solving the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Computations were performed on a CRAY X-MP computer using MacCormick's explicit finite difference algorithm. Different excitation methods were investigated and were shown to be very effective in controlling the well organized periodic production, shedding and pairing of large scale vortex structures. It is found that pressure excitation was generally more effective than temperature excitation, and that grid refinement results in substantial improvement in the resolution of unsteady features. The location and orientation, in addition to the frequency, of the excitation source are shown to have a significant influence on the production and interaction of large scale vortex structures in the jet mixing layer.

  20. Excited States of Non-Isolated Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsika, S.; Kozak, C.; Kistler, K.

    2009-06-01

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of nucleobases is very important because of their biological role as the building blocks in DNA and RNA. Great progress has been made in understanding the excited-state properties of single bases. In order to understand the photophysical properties of nucleobases in complex environments we have investigated their excited states (a) in aqueous solutions and (b) as π-stacked dimers in DNA. The solvatochromic shifts of the excited states of pyrimidine nucleobases in aqueous solution have been investigated using a combined QM/MM procedure where the quantum mechanical solute is described using high level multireference configuration interaction methods while molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the structure of the solvent around the solute in an average way. The excited states of π-stacked nucleobases have also been investigated using various ab initio methods. The effect of the environment on the excited states and conical intersections is investigated.

  1. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  2. Loss of excitation of synchronous generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krištof, Vladimír; Mešter, Marián

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of study of loss-of-excitation phenomena simulations. Loss of excitation is a very common fault in synchronous machine operating and can be caused by short circuit of the field winding, unexpected field breaker open or loss-of-excitation relay mal-operation. According to the statistic [1], the generator failure due to loss-of-excitation accounts for 69% of all generator failures. There has been concern over possible incorrect operation of the relay when operating the generator in the under-excited region, during stable transient swings and during major system disturbances. This article can serve as inputs for system operators in preparation of operation area or protection relaying area.

  3. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  4. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  5. Method and apparatus for isotope-selectively exciting gaseous or vaporous uranium hexafluoride molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fill, E.E.; Jetter, H.L.; Volk, R.

    1981-06-09

    A method of isotope-selectively exciting gaseous or vaporous uranium hexafluoride molecules by subjecting them to the action of a monochromatic iodine laser beam, the frequency of which can be adjusted and tuned to an absorption band of the molecules to be excited, the laser beam being scattered by liquid and/or solid nitrogen to obtain a triple raman-scattering. In a preferred embodiment, the laser has an emission frequency of 7600 to 7610 cm-1 and the tuning is effected by means of a magnetic field. An apparatus suitable for carrying out such a method comprises a high-performance iodine laser and an optical resonator into which the emission beam or pulses of the laser are focused, one or more dewar vessels filled with liquid or solid nitrogen being located within the optical resonator. In a preferred embodiment, the laser beam tube is located between the poles of an electromagnet.

  6. Universality of the Phonon-Roton Spectrum in Liquids and Superfluidity of 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, Viktor; Trigger, Sergey; Litinski, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Based on numerous experimental data on inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering in liquids, we assert that the phonon-roton spectrum of collective excitations, predicted by Landau for superfluid helium, is a universal property of the liquid state. We show that the existence of the roton minimum in the spectrum of collective excitations is caused by the short-range order in liquids. Using the virial theorem, we assume that one more branch of excitations should exist in He II, whose energy spectrum differs from the phonon-roton spectrum. Such excitations are associated with the pole of single-particle Green function, which can have a gap at small values of momenta.

  7. [Propagation of autowaves in capillaries thick with moving viscous excitable medium].

    PubMed

    Davydov, V A; Davydov, N V

    2015-01-01

    We consider the propagation of autowaves in the moving liquid excitable medium. The shapes of the autowave fronts in cases of the Poiseuille and Couette flows are determined in flat capillaries within a kinematic approach. We show the existence of a critical velocity for the flows above which the autowave fronts should break off. The possibility of a diode effect--the one-way capillary conductivity--is studied. The results of computer simulations are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Electro-optical parameters in excited states of some spectrally active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Closca, Valentina; Rusu, Cristina Marcela; Morosanu, Cezarina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2014-08-01

    The spectral shifts measured in different solvents are expressed as functions of the solvent macroscopic parameters. The value of the correlation coefficient multiplying the functions of electric permittivity was determined by statistical means. The correlation coefficient depends on the electric dipole moment of the spectrally active molecules. The electro-optical parameters in the ground state of the solute molecules can be approximated by molecular modeling. The excited state parameters are usually estimated using the results obtained both by HyperChem Programme and solvatochromic study. The importance of this approximate method is that it offers information about of the excited state of solute molecule for which our measuring possibilities are very restrictive. The information about the excited electronic state is affected by the limits in which the theories of liquid solutions are developed. Our results refer to two molecules of vitamins from B class, namely B3 and B6.

  9. Fluorescence anisotropy excitation by polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, J.; Patas, A.; Althoff, J.; Lindinger, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report improved fluorescence contrast between dyes by two-photon excitation with polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber utilizing the anisotropy of the dye molecules. Particularly phase- and polarization-tailored pulse shapes are employed for two-photon excited fluorescence of dyes in a liquid environment at the distal end of the kagome fiber. The distortions due to the optical fiber properties are precompensated in order to receive predefined polarization-shaped laser pulses after the kagome fiber. This enables to optimally excite one dye in one polarization direction and simultaneously the other dye in the other polarization direction. The presented method has a high potential for endoscopic applications due to the unique properties of kagome fibers for guiding ultrashort laser pulses.

  10. Increasing average power in medical ultrasonic endoscope imaging system by coded excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhou, Hao; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2008-12-01

    Medical ultrasonic endoscope is the combination of electronic endoscope and ultrasonic sensor technology. Ultrasonic endoscope sends the ultrasonic probe into coelom through biopsy channel of electronic endoscope and rotates it by a micro pre-motor, which requires that the length of ultrasonic probe is no more than 14mm and the diameter is no more than 2.2mm. As a result, the ultrasonic excitation power is very low and it is difficult to obtain a sharp image. In order to increase the energy and SNR of ultrasonic signal, we introduce coded excitation into the ultrasonic imaging system, which is widely used in radar system. Coded excitation uses a long coded pulse to drive ultrasonic transducer, which can increase the average transmitting power accordingly. In this paper, in order to avoid the overlapping between adjacent echo, we used a four-figure Barker code to drive the ultrasonic transducer, which is modulated at the operating frequency of transducer to improve the emission efficiency. The implementation of coded excitation is closely associated with the transient operating characteristic of ultrasonic transducer. In this paper, the transient operating characteristic of ultrasonic transducer excited by a shock pulse δ(t) is firstly analyzed, and then the exciting pulse generated by special ultrasonic transmitting circuit composing of MD1211 and TC6320. In the final part of the paper, we designed an experiment to validate the coded excitation with transducer operating at 5MHz and a glass filled with ultrasonic coupling liquid as the object. Driven by a FPGA, the ultrasonic transmitting circuit output a four-figure Barker excitation pulse modulated at 5MHz, +/-20 voltage and is consistent with the transient operating characteristic of ultrasonic transducer after matched by matching circuit. The reflected echo from glass possesses coded character, which is identical with the simulating result by Matlab. Furthermore, the signal's amplitude is higher.

  11. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Capeloto, Otávio Augusto; Zanuto, Vitor Santaella; Malacarne, Luis Carlos; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Lukasievicz, Gustavo Vinicius Bassi; Bialkowski, Stephen Edward; Astrath, Nelson Guilherme Castelli

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density. PMID:26856622

  12. Inclination Excitation in Compact Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-05-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. We have explored the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination in this class of solar systems. The two mechanisms we discuss are self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially (nearly) coplanar planetary systems and perturbations by additional unseen larger bodies in the outer regions of the solar systems. For both of these scenarios, we determine the regimes of parameter space for which orbital inclination can be effectively excited. For compact planetary systems with the observed architectures, we find that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation, resulting in a negligible scatter in impact parameter and a subsequently stable transiting system. In contrast, companions in the outer solar system can be effective in driving variations of the inclination angles of the inner planetary orbits, leading to significant scatter in impact parameter and resultantly non-transiting systems. We present the results of our study, the regimes in which each excitation method - self-excitation of inclination and excitation by a perturbing secondary - are relevant, and the magnitude of the effects.

  13. Chirp excitation of ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Jennifer E; Lee, Sang Jun; Croxford, Anthony J; Wilcox, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Most ultrasonic guided wave methods require tone burst excitations to achieve some degree of mode purity while maintaining temporal resolution. In addition, it is often desirable to acquire data using multiple frequencies, particularly during method development when the best frequency for a specific application is not known. However, this process is inconvenient and time-consuming, particularly if extensive signal averaging at each excitation frequency is required to achieve a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio. Both acquisition time and data storage requirements may be prohibitive if responses from many narrowband tone burst excitations are measured. Here chirp excitations are utilized to address the need to both test at multiple frequencies and achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio to minimize acquisition time. A broadband chirp is used to acquire data at a wide range of frequencies, and deconvolution is applied to extract multiple narrowband responses. After optimizing the frequency and duration of the desired tone burst excitation, a long-time narrowband chirp is used as the actual excitation, and the desired tone burst response is similarly extracted during post-processing. Results are shown that demonstrate the efficacy of both broadband and narrowband chirp excitations.

  14. Gluonic Excitations and Experimental Hall-D at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Justin

    2014-07-01

    A new tagged photon beam facility is being constructed in experimental Hall-D at Jefferson Lab as a part of the 12 GeV upgrade program. The 9 GeV linearly-polarized photon beam will be produced via coherent Bremsstrahlung using the CEBAF electron beam, incident on a diamond radiator. The GlueX experiment in Hall-D will use this photon beam to search for and study the pattern of gluonic excitations in the meson spectrum produced through photoproduction reactions with a liquid hydrogen target. Recent lattice QCD calculations predict a rich spectrum of hybrid mesons, that are formed by exciting the gluonic field that couples the quarks. A subset of these hybrid mesons are predicted to have exotic quantum numbers which cannot be formed from a simple qq^- pair, and thus provide an ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime. In these proceedings the status of the construction and installation of the GlueX detector will be presented, in addition to simulation results for some reactions of interest in hybrid meson searches.

  15. Interfacial Phenomena of Magnetic Fluid with Permanent Magnet in a Longitudinally Excited Container

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Seiichi; Wakuda, Hirofumi; Yano, Tetsuya

    2008-02-21

    This paper describes the magnetic fluid sloshing in a longitudinally excited container. Liquid responses of magnetic fluid with a permanent magnet in a circular cylindrical container subject to vertical vibration are investigated. Experiments are performed on a vibration- testing system which provided longitudinal excitation. A cylindrical container made with the acrylic plastic is used in the experiment. A permanent magnet is in the state of floating in a magnetic fluid. The disk-shaped and ring-shaped magnets are examined. The different interfacial phenomena from the usual longitudinal liquid sloshing are observed. It is found that the wave motion frequency of magnetic fluid with a disk-shaped magnet in the container subject to vertical vibration is exactly same that of the excitation. In the case of ring-shaped magnet, the first symmetrical mode of one-half subharmonic response is dominant at lower excitation frequencies. The magnetic fluid disintegration of the free surface was also observed by a high-speed video camera system.

  16. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  17. Ionization of excited xenon atoms by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Daniel A.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    2004-08-01

    Measured cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited Xe atoms are not presently available. Therefore, we combine in this work the formalisms of the binary encounter approximation and Sommerfeld’s quantization of atomic orbits and derive from first-principles cross sections for ionization of excited atoms by electrons of low and moderate energies (up to a few hundred eV ). The approach of this work can be used to calculate the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited atoms and atomic ions other than xenon.

  18. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  19. Vibrational excitation of CO by blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    Lasers excited by blackbody radiation are of interest for power beaming applications in space. In such a system sunlight is collected and focused into a blackbody cavity, heating it to approximately 2000 K. An appropriate absorbing molecule is vibrationally heated but not translationally heated when passed through the blackbody cavity. The vibrationally excited gas is then mixed with a lasant resulting in laser emission. The number density of CO molecules within a blackbody radiation field of a given temperature and pressure is calculated. Such calculations show the degree of excitation achievable, under ideal conditions, from blackbody pumping.

  20. Liquid helium in disorder and boson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albergamo, Francesco; Pearce, Jonathan; Glyde, Henry; Daughton, David; Mulders, Norbert; Bossy, Jacques; Schober, Helmut

    2005-03-01

    Neutron scattering measurements of the excitations of liquid ^4He confined in three porous media focusing on temperatures around the superfluid-normal fluid critical temperature Tc are presented and discussed. The three porous media are Vycor (Tc= 2.05 K at SVP), 44 å pore diameter gelsil (Tc= 1.92 K at SVP) and 25 å pore diameter gelsil (Tc 1.0 K at SVP) ^[1,2]. In all these media, liquid ^4He supports well-defined phonon-roton excitations above Tc, in the "normal" phase (up Tλ= 2.17 K at SVP). Since well-defined excitations are associated with Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), this suggests that there is BEC in the "normal" phase. Also, since there is no superflow, this BEC is apparently localized in the media separated by regions of normal fluid. In this picture, the superfluid-normal transition in disorder is associated with an extended-localized BEC crossover with localized BEC remaining above Tc ^[3]. ^[1]F. Albergamo et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, 014514 (2004) ^[2]J. V. Pearce et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 145303 (2004)) ^[3]H. R. Glyde et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2646 (2000)

  1. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  2. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  3. How to excite a rogue wave

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

  4. Nonlinear excited waves on the interventricular septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Using a novel ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, we observe some phase singularities in propagating excited waves on a human cardiac interventricular septum (IVS) for a healthy young male. We present a possible physical model explaining one-dimensional dynamics of phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS. We show that at least one of the observed phase singularities in the excited waves on the IVS can be explained by the Bekki-Nozaki hole solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation without any adjustable parameters. We conclude that the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is such a suitable model for one-dimensional dynamics of cardiac phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS.

  5. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  6. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  7. Inclination Excitation in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of planetary systems with little or no excited inclination between the inferred orbits. This present study examines the magnitude and efficacy of three potential mechanisms for exciting orbital inclination in these systems: self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially coplanar planetary systems, perturbations by larger bodies within the planetary systems, and perturbations by massive bodies external to the systems. For each of these mechanisms, we determine the regime(s) of parameter space for which orbital inclination excitation is effective. This work provides constraints on the properties (masses and orbital elements) of possible additional bodies in observed planetery systems, and on their dynamical history. One interesting application is to consider the relative size of the external perturbations both in and out of clusters.

  8. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, N.; Seki, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures. PMID:25897634

  9. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  10. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  11. Magnetic Excitation for Spin Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Mehmed, Oral; Brown, Gerald V.

    1997-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Laboratory (DSRL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a facility used for vibration testing of structures under spinning conditions. The current actuators used for excitation are electromagnetic shakers which are configured to apply torque to the rig's vertical rotor. The rotor is supported radially and axially by conventional bearings. Current operation is limited in rotational speed, excitation capability, and test duration. In an effort to enhance its capabilities, the rig has been initially equipped with a radial magnetic bearing which provides complementary excitation and shaft support. The new magnetic feature has been used in actual blade vibration tests and its performance has been favorable. Due to the success of this initial modification further enhancements are planned which include making the system fully magnetically supported. This paper reports on this comprehensive effort to upgrade the DSRL with an emphasis on the new magnetic excitation capability.

  12. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  13. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |; Galili, T.; Levanon, H.

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  14. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  15. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  16. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  17. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  18. Intrinsic asymmetry of polar motion excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, C.

    2012-12-01

    Anisotropy of the pole tide and Earth triaxiality make the polar motion excitation asymmetric with respect to and y pole coordinates (Okamoto and Sasao 1977). After having proposed a general description of these non isotropic effects, we show that there are significant in light of the contemporaneous accuracy of the pole coordinates and cannot be cast aside in the interpretation of the Chandler wobble excitation

  19. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  20. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-06-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopic investigations of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen and shock-compressed liquid nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of liquid nitrogen and liquid nitromethane shock compressed to several high pressure/high temperature states were recorded using single-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Vibrational frequencies were extracted from the data by computer spectral simulation techniques. Vibrational frequencies of liquid nitrogen were found to increase monotonically up to /approx/17.5 GPa single shock and /approx/30 GPa double shock and then to decrease with further increases in pressure. The consequence of the decrease in vibrational frequency on the Grueneisen mode gamma and its effect on the N/sub 2/ equation-of-state is discussed. A model is developed that includes the thermally-excited vibrational state transitions in the synthesized spectral fits of the nitromethane CARS data. The adequacy of the model for interpretation of CARS spectra in both ambient and shock-compressed nitromethane is discussed. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Heat Transfer from Optically Excited Gold Nanostructures into Water, Sugar, and Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew J.

    Nanotechnology has introduced a wide variety of new behaviors to study and understand. Metal nanostructures are of particular interest due to their ability to generate large amounts of heat when irradiated at the plasmon resonance. Furthermore, heat dissipation at the nanoscale becomes exceedingly more complicated with respect to bulk behavior. What are the credentials for a heat carrier to move across an interface? Is it important for both materials to have similar vibrational density of states? What changes if one material is a liquid? All of these questions have open ended answers, each of which hold potential for new technologies to be exploited once understood. This dissertation will discuss topics exploring the transfer of heat from an optically excited gold nanoparticle into a surrounding liquid. Gold nanostructures are created using conventional electron beam lithography with lift-off. The nanostructures are deposited onto a thin film thermal sensor composed of AlGaN:Er3+. Erbium(III) has two thermally coupled excited states that can be excited with a 532nm laser. The relative photoluminescence from these excited states are related by a Boltzmann factor and are thusly temperature dependent. A scanning optical microscope collects an image of Er3+ photoluminescence while simultaneously exciting the gold nanostructure. The nanostructure temperature is imaged which is directly related to the surrounding's heat dissipation properties. The first of two topics discuss the heat dissipation and phase change properties of water. A gold nanostructure is submersed under water and subsequently heated with a 532 nm laser. The water immediately surrounding the nanodot is can be superheated beyond the boiling point up to the spinodal decomposition temperature at 594 +/- 17 K. The spinodal decomposition has been confirmed with the observation of critical opalescence. We characterize the laser scattering that occurs in unison with spinodal decomposition due to an increased

  3. Localized and propagating excitations in gapped phases of spin systems with bond disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utesov, O. I.; Sizanov, A. V.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    Using the conventional T-matrix approach, we discuss gapped phases in one-, two-, and three-dimensional (3D) spin systems (both with and without a long-range magnetic order) with bond disorder and with weakly interacting bosonic elementary excitations. This work is motivated by recent experimental and theoretical activity in spin-liquid-like systems with disorder and in the disordered interacting boson problem. In particular, we apply our theory to both paramagnetic low-field and fully polarized high-field phases in dimerized spin-1/2 systems and in integer-spin magnets with large single-ion easy-plane anisotropy D with disorder in exchange coupling constants (and/or D). The elementary excitation spectrum and the density of states are calculated in the first order in defects concentration c ≪1. In 2D and 3D systems, the scattering on defects leads to a finite damping of all propagating excitations in the band except for states lying near its edges. We demonstrate that the analytical approach is inapplicable for states near the band edges and our numerical calculations reveal their localized nature. We find that the damping of propagating excitations can be much more pronounced in considered systems than in magnetically ordered gapless magnets with impurities. In 1D systems, the disorder leads to localization of all states in the band, while those lying far from the band edges (short-wavelength excitations) can look like conventional wave packets.

  4. How much double excitation character do the lowest excited states of linear polyenes have?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wormit, Michael; Schirmer, Jochen; Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    Doubly excited states play important roles in the low-energy region of the optical spectra of polyenes and their investigation has been subject of theoretical and experimental studies for more than 30 years now and still is in the focus of ongoing research. In this work, we address the question why doubly excited states play a role in the low-energy region of the optical spectrum of molecular systems at all, since from a naive point of view one would expect their excitation energy approximately twice as large as the one of the corresponding single excitation. Furthermore, we show that extended-ADC(2) is well suited for the balanced calculation of the low-lying excited 21Ag-, 11Bu- and 11Bu+ states of long all- trans polyenes, which are known to possess substantial double excitation character. A careful re-investigation of the performance of TDDFT calculations for these states reveals that the previously reported good performance for the 21Ag- state relies heavily on fortuitous cancellation of errors. Finally, the title question is answered such that for short polyenes the lowest excited 21Ag- and 11Bu- states can clearly be classified as doubly excited, whereas the 11Ag- ground state is essentially represented by the (ground-state) HF determinant. For longer polyenes, in addition to increasing double excitation contributions in the 21Ag- and 11Bu- states, the ground state itself aquires substantial double excitation character (45% in C 22H 24), so that the transition from the ground state to these excited states should not be addressed as the excitation of two electrons relative to the 11Ag- ground state.

  5. Dynamics of liquid-liquid displacement.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Renate; Ramiasa, Melanie; Ralston, John

    2009-07-21

    Capillary driven liquid-liquid displacement in a system with two immiscible liquids of comparable viscosity was investigated by means of optical high speed video microscopy. For the first time, the impact of substrate wettability on contact line dynamics in liquid-liquid systems was studied. On all substrates, qualitatively different dynamics, in two distinct velocity regimes, were found. Hydrodynamic models apply to the fast stage of initial spreading, while nonhydrodynamic dissipation dominates contact line motion in a final stage at low speed, where the molecular kinetic theory (MKT) successfully captured the dynamics. The MKT model parameter values showed no systematic dependence on substrate wettability. This unexpected result is interpreted in terms of local contact line pinning.

  6. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  7. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  8. Tailoring dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticle excitation bands towards excitation wavelength selective imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; ...

    2015-01-01

    One of the key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. Finally, this work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs.

  9. Liquid level sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid level sensing device comprising a load cell supporting a column or stack of segments freely resting on one another. The density of each element is substantially identical to that of the surrounding liquid. The elements are freely guided within a surrounding tube. As each element is exposed above the liquid level, its weight will be impressed through the column to the load cell, thereby providing a signal at the load cell directly proportional to the liquid level elevation.

  10. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-28

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000)] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ≤ N ≤ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ≤ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B(u)(-) states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B(u)(-) state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ≥ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  11. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000), 10.1007/s002149900083] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ⩽ N ⩽ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ⩽ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B_u^- states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B_u^- state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ⩾ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  12. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  13. Liquid detection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Thomas O.

    1987-01-01

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  14. Evidence for a spinon Fermi surface in a triangular-lattice quantum-spin-liquid candidate.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Li, Yao-Dong; Wo, Hongliang; Li, Yuesheng; Shen, Shoudong; Pan, Bingying; Wang, Qisi; Walker, H C; Steffens, P; Boehm, M; Hao, Yiqing; Quintero-Castro, D L; Harriger, L W; Frontzek, M D; Hao, Lijie; Meng, Siqin; Zhang, Qingming; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jun

    2016-12-05

    A quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in which spins are highly entangled and remain disordered down to zero temperature. Such a state of matter is potentially relevant to high-temperature superconductivity and quantum-information applications, and experimental identification of a quantum spin liquid state is of fundamental importance for our understanding of quantum matter. Theoretical studies have proposed various quantum-spin-liquid ground states, most of which are characterized by exotic spin excitations with fractional quantum numbers (termed 'spinons'). Here we report neutron scattering measurements of the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet YbMgGaO4 that reveal broad spin excitations covering a wide region of the Brillouin zone. The observed diffusive spin excitation persists at the lowest measured energy and shows a clear upper excitation edge, consistent with the particle-hole excitation of a spinon Fermi surface. Our results therefore point to the existence of a quantum spin liquid state with a spinon Fermi surface in YbMgGaO4, which has a perfect spin-1/2 triangular lattice as in the original proposal of quantum spin liquids.

  15. Evidence for a spinon Fermi surface in a triangular-lattice quantum-spin-liquid candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yao; Li, Yao-Dong; Wo, Hongliang; Li, Yuesheng; Shen, Shoudong; Pan, Bingying; Wang, Qisi; Walker, H. C.; Steffens, P.; Boehm, M.; Hao, Yiqing; Quintero-Castro, D. L.; Harriger, L. W.; Frontzek, M. D.; Hao, Lijie; Meng, Siqin; Zhang, Qingming; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jun

    2016-12-01

    A quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in which spins are highly entangled and remain disordered down to zero temperature. Such a state of matter is potentially relevant to high-temperature superconductivity and quantum-information applications, and experimental identification of a quantum spin liquid state is of fundamental importance for our understanding of quantum matter. Theoretical studies have proposed various quantum-spin-liquid ground states, most of which are characterized by exotic spin excitations with fractional quantum numbers (termed ‘spinons’). Here we report neutron scattering measurements of the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet YbMgGaO4 that reveal broad spin excitations covering a wide region of the Brillouin zone. The observed diffusive spin excitation persists at the lowest measured energy and shows a clear upper excitation edge, consistent with the particle-hole excitation of a spinon Fermi surface. Our results therefore point to the existence of a quantum spin liquid state with a spinon Fermi surface in YbMgGaO4, which has a perfect spin-1/2 triangular lattice as in the original proposal of quantum spin liquids.

  16. Evidence for a spinon Fermi surface in a triangular-lattice quantum-spin-liquid candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yao; Li, Yao-Dong; Wo, Hongliang; Li, Yuesheng; Shen, Shoudong; Pan, Bingying; Wang, Qisi; Walker, H. C.; Steffens, P.; Boehm, M.; Hao, Yiqing; Quintero-Castro, D. L.; Harriger, L. W.; Frontzek, M. D.; Hao, Lijie; Meng, Siqin; Zhang, Qingming; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jun

    2016-12-05

    A quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in which spins are highly entangled and remain disordered down to zero temperature. Such a state of matter is potentially relevant to high-temperature superconductivity and quantum-information applications, and experimental identification of a quantum spin liquid state is of fundamental importance for our understanding of quantum matter. Theoretical studies have proposed various quantum-spin-liquid ground states, most of which are characterized by exotic spin excitations with fractional quantum numbers (termed ‘spinons’). In this paper, we report neutron scattering measurements of the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet YbMgGaO4 that reveal broad spin excitations covering a wide region of the Brillouin zone. The observed diffusive spin excitation persists at the lowest measured energy and shows a clear upper excitation edge, consistent with the particle–hole excitation of a spinon Fermi surface. Finally, our results therefore point to the existence of a quantum spin liquid state with a spinon Fermi surface in YbMgGaO4, which has a perfect spin-1/2 triangular lattice as in the original proposal of quantum spin liquids.

  17. Evidence for a spinon Fermi surface in a triangular-lattice quantum-spin-liquid candidate

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Yao; Li, Yao-Dong; Wo, Hongliang; ...

    2016-12-05

    A quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in which spins are highly entangled and remain disordered down to zero temperature. Such a state of matter is potentially relevant to high-temperature superconductivity and quantum-information applications, and experimental identification of a quantum spin liquid state is of fundamental importance for our understanding of quantum matter. Theoretical studies have proposed various quantum-spin-liquid ground states, most of which are characterized by exotic spin excitations with fractional quantum numbers (termed ‘spinons’). In this paper, we report neutron scattering measurements of the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet YbMgGaO4 that reveal broad spin excitations covering amore » wide region of the Brillouin zone. The observed diffusive spin excitation persists at the lowest measured energy and shows a clear upper excitation edge, consistent with the particle–hole excitation of a spinon Fermi surface. Finally, our results therefore point to the existence of a quantum spin liquid state with a spinon Fermi surface in YbMgGaO4, which has a perfect spin-1/2 triangular lattice as in the original proposal of quantum spin liquids.« less

  18. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludko, David V.; Bell, Simon C.; Vredenbregt, Edgar J. D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2007-09-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes splitting predicted by the model was verified experimentally, showing excellent agreement. 780 nm lasers were used to cool and excite atoms within a magneto-optical trap, and the atoms were then illuminated by a 776 nm imaging laser. Several excited-state imaging techniques, including blue cascade fluorescence, on-resonance absorption, and DCI have been demonstrated. Initial results show that improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will be required to accurately determine the excited state fraction. We have demonstrated magnetic field gradient compression of the cold atom cloud, and expect that further progress on compression and additional cooling will achieve sufficient diffraction contrast for quantitative state-selective imaging.

  19. Asymptotic properties of mathematical models of excitability.

    PubMed

    Biktasheva, I V; Simitev, R D; Suckley, R; Biktashev, V N

    2006-05-15

    We analyse small parameters in selected models of biological excitability, including Hodgkin-Huxley (Hodgkin & Huxley 1952 J. Physiol.117, 500-544) model of nerve axon, Noble (Noble 1962 J. Physiol.160, 317-352) model of heart Purkinje fibres and Courtemanche et al. (Courtemanche et al. 1998 Am. J. Physiol.275, H301-H321) model of human atrial cells. Some of the small parameters are responsible for differences in the characteristic time-scales of dynamic variables, as in the traditional singular perturbation approaches. Others appear in a way which makes the standard approaches inapplicable. We apply this analysis to study the behaviour of fronts of excitation waves in spatially extended cardiac models. Suppressing the excitability of the tissue leads to a decrease in the propagation speed, but only to a certain limit; further suppression blocks active propagation and leads to a passive diffusive spread of voltage. Such a dissipation may happen if a front propagates into a tissue recovering after a previous wave, e.g. re-entry. A dissipated front does not recover even when the excitability restores. This has no analogy in FitzHugh-Nagumo model and its variants, where fronts can stop and then start again. In two spatial dimensions, dissipation accounts for breakups and self-termination of re-entrant waves in excitable media with Courtemanche et al. kinetics.

  20. Targeting individual excited states in DMRG.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorando, Jonathan; Hachmann, Johannes; Kin-Lic Chan, Garnet

    2007-03-01

    The low-lying excited states of π-conjugated molecules are important for the development of novel devices such as lasers, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors [1,2]. The ab-intio Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) provides a powerful way to explore the electronic structure of quasi-one-dimensional systems such as conjugated organic oligomers. However, DMRG is limited to targeting only low-lying excited states through state-averaged DMRG (SDMRG). There are several drawbacks; state-averaging degrades the accuracy of the excited states and is limited to at most a few of the low-lying states [3]. In this study, we present a new method for targeting higher individual excited states. Due to progress in the field of numerical analysis presented by Van Der Horst and others [4], we are able to target individual excited states of the Hamiltonian. This is accomplished by modifying the Jacobi-Davidson algorithm via a ``Harmonic Ritz'' procedure. We will present studies of oligoacenes and polyenes that compare the accuracy of SDMRG and Harmonic Davidson DMRG. [1] Burroughes, et al. , Nature 347, 539 (1990). [2] Shirota, J. Mater. Chem. 10, 1, (2000). [3] Ramasesha, Pati, Krishnamurthy, Shuai, Bredas, Phys. Rev. B. 54, 7598, (1997). [4] Bai, Demmel, Dongarra, Ruhe, Van Der Horst, Templates for the Solution of Algebraic Eigenvalue Problems, SIAM, 2000.

  1. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  2. [Pre-excitation syndrome in monozygotic twins].

    PubMed

    Mispireta, J L; Cárdenas, M; Attié, F; Martínez-Ríos, M A; Medrano, G A

    1976-01-01

    A family group of seven members is presented, two of which have pre-excitation syndrome. These subjects are identical twin brothers. One of them has the W-P-W syndrome tipe B, and the other has L-G-L syndrome. The latter had an associated atrial-septal defect, and the other twin had no associated cardiovascular lesions. Both underwent electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic studies, as well as His bundle electrograms. In the case with W-P-W, the diagnosis was made by electrocardiography, and was confirmed by vertocardiography. The His bundle electrogram showed the habitual findings in this type of pre-excitation. The His bundle potential was preceded by the beginning of the delta wave. The patient with W-P-W had episodes of supraventricular paroxysmal tachycardia, some of these with antegrade conduction through the normal pathway, and others with conduction through the anomalous pathway. The other had a L-G-L syndrome, demonstrated by electrocardiography and vectorcardiography. During the register of the His bundle electrogram, he did not present pre-excitation, the tracings in basal conditions as well as during atrial stimulation were normal. The conclusion is that many factors exist which back up the hypothesis that the pre-excitation syndromes occur because of anomalous pathways, and that this type of alteration might have a sex linked genetic basis. This presumption appears to be confirmed by the presence of pre-excitation in identical twin brothers. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  3. Theory of elementary excitations in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Cottam, M. G.

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the main physical properties (such as energy profiles, localization, scale laws, multifractal analysis, transmission spectra, transmission fingerprints, electronic structures, magnetization curves and thermodynamic properties) of the elementary excitations that can propagate in multilayered structures with constituents arranged in a quasiperiodic fashion. These excitations include plasmon-polaritons, spin waves, light waves and electrons, among others. A complex fractal or multifractal profile of the energy spectra is the common feature among these excitations. The quasiperiodic property is formed by the incommensurate arrangement of periodic unit cells and can be of the type referred to as deterministic (or controlled) disorder. The resulting excitations are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (as for the Fibonacci sequence) or singular continuous (as for the Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey particular recursion relations, and they can be considered as intermediate systems between a periodic crystal and the random amorphous solids, thus defining a novel description of disorder. A discussion is also included of some spectroscopic techniques used to probe the excitations, emphasizing Raman and Brillouin light scattering.

  4. Tone-excited jet: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Lepicovsky, J.; Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.; Burrin, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study to understand the phenomenon of broadband jet-noise amplification produced by upstream discrete-tone sound excitation has been carried out. This has been achieved by simultaneous acquisition of the acoustic, mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and instability-wave pressure data. A 5.08 cm diameter jet has been tested for this purpose under static and also flight-simulation conditions. An open-jet wind tunnel has been used to simulate the flight effects. Limited data on heated jets have also been obtained. To improve the physical understanding of the flow modifications brought about by the upstream discrete-tone excitation, ensemble-averaged schlieren photographs of the jets have also been taken. Parallel to the experimental study, a mathematical model of the processes that lead to broadband-noise amplification by upstream tones has been developed. Excitation of large-scale turbulence by upstream tones is first calculated. A model to predict the changes in small-scale turbulence is then developed. By numerically integrating the resultant set of equations, the enhanced small-scale turbulence distribution in a jet under various excitation conditions is obtained. The resulting changes in small-scale turbulence have been attributed to broadband amplification of jet noise. Excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiments. It has also shown that the relative velocity effects are the same for the excited and the unexcited jets.

  5. Liquid/liquid/solid contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borocco, Marine; Pellet, Charlotte; Authelin, Jean-René; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Compagnie des Interfaces Team

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have investigated solid/liquid/air interfaces and their corresponding wetting properties. We discuss what happens in less-studied liquid/liquid/solid systems, and focus on questions of dynamical wetting in a tube, having in mind applications in detergency. We use a capillary tube filled with water and containing a slug of silicone oil (or vice-versa), and present a series of experiments to determine static and dynamic wetting properties corresponding to this situation. We also discuss interfacial aging of such systems.

  6. Propagation of a liquid-liquid explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, F.H.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1981-08-01

    Direct contact between two liquids, one cold and the other hot, may be precluded by the presence of a vapor film. Bridging of this film by one or both fluids results in rapid local boiling, which may initiate a propagating liquid-liquid explosion. A mechanism is discussed for the propagation that involves implosion of the film, rapid mixing of the fluids, heat exchange to warm the cold fluid above the temperature for spontaneous nucleation, and the explosive generation of vapor, which in turn continues to sustain the film implosion. Plausibility for the model is demonstrated by means of numerical studies by high-speed computer.

  7. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  8. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  9. Structural Transitions at Ionic Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-12-17

    Recent advances in experimental and computational techniques have allowed for an accurate description of the adsorption of ionic liquids on metallic electrodes. It is now well-established that they adopt a multilayered structure and that the composition of the layers changes with the potential of the electrode. In some cases, potential-driven ordering transitions in the first adsorbed layer have been observed in experiments probing the interface on the molecular scale or by molecular simulations. This perspective gives an overview of the current understanding of such transitions and of their potential impact on the physical and (electro)chemical processes at the interface. In particular, peaks in the differential capacitance, slow dynamics at the interface, and changes in the reactivity have been reported in electrochemical studies. Interfaces between ionic liquids and metallic electrodes are also highly relevant for their friction properties, the voltage-dependence of which opens the way to exciting applications.

  10. Heavy fermion spin liquid in herbertsmithite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Msezane, A. Z.; Popov, K. G.; Stephanovich, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    We analyze recent heat capacity measurements in herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 single crystal samples subjected to strong magnetic fields. We show that the temperature dependence of specific heat Cmag formed by quantum spin liquid at different magnetic fields B resembles the electronic heat capacity Cel of the HF metal YbRh2Si2. We demonstrate that the spinon effective mass Mmag* ∝Cmag / T exhibits a scaling behavior like that of Cel / T. We also show that the recent measurements of Cmag are compatible with those obtained on powder samples. These observations allow us to conclude that ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 holds a stable strongly correlated quantum spin liquid, and a possible gap in the spectra of spinon excitations is absent even under the application of very high magnetic fields of 18 T.

  11. Patterns of conductivity in excitable automata with updatable intervals of excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    We define a cellular automaton where a resting cell excites if number of its excited neighbors belong to some specified interval and boundaries of the interval change depending on ratio of excited and refractory neighbors in the cell's neighborhood. We calculate excitability of a cell as a number of possible neighborhood configurations that excite the resting cell. We call cells with maximal values of excitability conductive. In exhaustive search of functions of excitation interval updates we select functions which lead to formation of connected configurations of conductive cells. The functions discovered are used to design conductive, wirelike, pathways in initially nonconductive arrays of cells. We demonstrate that by positioning seeds of growing conductive pathways it is possible to implement a wide range of routing operations, including reflection of wires, stopping wires, formation of conductive bridges, and generation of new wires in the result of collision. The findings presented may be applied in designing conductive circuits in excitable nonlinear media, reaction-diffusion chemical systems, neural tissue, and assemblies of conductive polymers.

  12. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  13. Spin-charge separation of dark-state polaritons in a Rydberg medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiao-Feng; Svetlichnyy, P.; Kennedy, T. A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The propagation of light fields through a quasi one-dimensional cold atomic gas, exciting atomic Rydberg levels of large principal quantum number under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency, can lead to a stable two-mode Luttinger liquid system. Atomic van der Waals interactions induce a coupling of bosonic field modes that display both photonic and atomic character, the Rydberg dark-state polaritons (RDPs). It is shown that by tunable control of the van der Waals coupling, the RDP may decouple into independent ‘spin’ and ‘charge’ fields which propagate at different speeds, analogous to spin-charge separation of electrons in a one-dimensional metal.

  14. Fluctuations and Stochastic Processes in One-Dimensional Many-Body Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stimming, H.-P.; Mauser, N. J.; Mazets, I. E.

    2010-07-02

    We study the fluctuation properties of a one-dimensional many-body quantum system composed of interacting bosons and investigate the regimes where quantum noise or, respectively, thermal excitations are dominant. For the latter, we develop a semiclassical description of the fluctuation properties based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process. As an illustration, we analyze the phase correlation functions and the full statistical distributions of the interference between two one-dimensional systems, either independent or tunnel-coupled, and compare with the Luttinger-liquid theory.

  15. Low frequency dynamics of disordered XY spin chains and pinned density waves: from localized spin waves to soliton tunneling.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Michael M

    2002-05-06

    A long-standing problem of the low-energy dynamics of a disordered XY spin chain is reexamined. The case of a rigid chain is studied, where the quantum effects can be treated quasiclassically. It is shown that, as the frequency decreases, the relevant excitations change from localized spin waves to two-level systems to soliton-antisoliton pairs. The linear-response correlation functions are calculated. The results apply to other periodic glassy systems such as pinned density waves, planar vortex lattices, stripes, and disordered Luttinger liquids.

  16. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  17. Stationary Phonon Squeezing by Optical Polaron Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenkort, T.; Axt, V. M.; Kuhn, T.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that a stationary squeezed phonon state can be prepared by a pulsed optical excitation of a semiconductor quantum well. Unlike previously discussed scenarios for generating squeezed phonons, the corresponding uncertainties become stationary after the excitation and do not oscillate in time. The effect is caused by two-phonon correlations within the excited polaron. We demonstrate by quantum kinetic simulations and by a perturbation analysis that the energetically lowest polaron state comprises two-phonon correlations which, after the pulse, result in an uncertainty of the lattice momentum that is continuously lower than in the ground state of the semiconductor. The simulations show the dynamics of the polaron formation process and the resulting time-dependent lattice uncertainties.

  18. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  19. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  20. Photothermal measurements using a localized excitation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, L. C.; Murphy, J. C.

    1981-08-01

    Optical-beam deflection (OBD) photothermal imaging uses spatially localized excitation to observe spatial variations in the sample surface temperature. This paper analyzes OBD signals produced by localized excitation in terms of three-dimensional thermal diffusion in the sample and in the fluid region in contact with the sample. The dependence of the signals on the local optical absorption coefficient, on gas/sample thermal properties, on modulation frequency, and on the probe/excitation beam radii are discussed with special attention being given to determining the spatial resolution possible for OBD imaging. A criterion for photothermal ''saturation'' appropriate to localized optical absorption is developed. Finally, a new variant of the OBD technique is introduced, which is especially adapted to studying optical and thermal boundaries in the plane of the sample. Some comparisons between theory and experiment are provided which illustrate transverse thermal diffusion.

  1. Resonance Raman excitation profiles of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of lycopene has been examined in acetone solvent and excitation profiles of the three fundamentals ν1, ν2, and ν3 have been determined. The excitation data and the visible spectrum have been analyzed using two-mode and three-mode vibrational models, with the two-mode model involving virtual states of ν1 and ν2 giving the best fit to the data. This mode mixing or Duskinsky effect was not observed for β-carotene. The single-mode and three-mode theories which have been used to explain the corresponding data for β-carotene are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data of lycopene. Equations for calculating excitation profiles and visible spectra are given.

  2. On modulations of the Chandler wobble excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, L.; Bizouard, C.

    2012-12-01

    We derive the Chandler wobble excitation from the polar motion (PM) observations by using the Panteleev corrective filtering. The latter method is based on inversion of the Euler-Liouville equation, with additional filtering in the Chandler frequency band. The excitation reconstruction reveals amplitude changes different from the one observed in the Chandler wobble itself. Their main feature, well observable over the length of the day (LOD), is the presence of a 18.6-year amplitude modulation synchronous with the lunar orbital precession cycle and tidal effects. The filtering of oceanic and atmospheric excitation in the Chandler frequency band also reveals a coherent 18.6-year oceanic pattern. Most probably the ocean provide a channel for the tidal energy transfer.

  3. Chandler wobble excitation reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Different methods of geodetic excitation reconstruction from observations of the polar motion are compared. Among them Wilson-Jeffreys filter, Tikhonov regularization, Panteleev corrective smoothing. Reconstruction of Chandler excitation is an inverse problem, aggravated by the strong annual oscillation, which is nearby in frequency band. Special attempts to filter annual oscillation out were undertaken, among them the harmonic model subtraction, Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) and Panteleev smoothing. Obtained results compared one with another and with geophysical excitations, such as atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum, El Nino event, solar and lunar tides. Amplitude and phase correlation analysis was performed. Phase change of the Chandler oscillation in the 30-th of the XX century found a partial explanation. This work is supported by grant of the President of Russia MK-4234.2009.5

  4. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  5. Minimizing broadband excitation under dissipative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Optimal control theory is employed for the task of minimizing the excited-state population of a dye molecule in solution. The spectrum of the excitation pulse is contained completely in the absorption band of the molecule. Only phase control is studied which is equivalent to optimizing the transmission of the pulse through the medium. The molecular model explicitly includes two electronic states and a single vibrational mode. The other degrees of freedom are classified as bath modes. The surrogate Hamiltonian method is employed to incorporate these bath degrees of freedom. Their influence can be classified as electronic dephasing and vibrational relaxation. In accordance with experimental results, minimal excitation is associated with a negatively chirped pulses. Optimal pulses with more complex transient structure are found to be superior to linearly chirped pulses. The difference is enhanced when the fluence is increased. The improvement degrades when dissipative effects become more dominant.

  6. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  7. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  8. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  9. Self-excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    The novel effect of self-excitation of surface plasmons (SESP) in a plasmonic nanocavity is predicted, and its theory is developed from first principles. It is assumed that the cavity is formed by a nanogap between two metals and contains polarizable inclusions. Basing on the dyadic Green's function of the structure, the equations for the field in the cavity are investigated. It is shown that under certain conditions the field becomes unstable that leads to its self-excitation. The threshold criterion for self-excitation as well as the frequency of self-oscillation are derived in an analytical form. The SESP effect is explained in terms of a positive feedback for the polarization of inclusions provided by the field reflected from the cavity walls. These findings suggest a principally new avenue to surface plasmon generation which does not employ stimulated emission and is different from SPASER or plasmon laser.

  10. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  11. Excited baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2012-04-01

    We briefly describe the 1/Nc expansion method for studying baryon masses. Two approaches of the large Nc excited baryons have been proposed so far. The first one, based on the Hartree picture, treats the baryon as a ground state core and an excited quark and the second one, suggested recently, considers the baryon globally, without decoupling the system. The masses of excited states of mixed orbital symmetry of nonstrange and strange baryons belonging to the lowest [70, -] multiplet are calculated in the 1/Nc expansion to order 1/Nc with the new method which allows to considerably reduce the number of linearly independent operators entering the mass formula. The status of the resonance Λ(1405) is discussed.

  12. Comparison of vapor formation of water at the solid/water interface to colloidal solutions using optically excited gold nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Baral, Susil; Green, Andrew J; Livshits, Maksim Y; Govorov, Alexander O; Richardson, Hugh H

    2014-02-25

    The phase transformation properties of liquid water to vapor is characterized by optical excitation of the lithographically fabricated single gold nanowrenches and contrasted to the phase transformation properties of gold nanoparticles located and optically excited in a bulk solution system [two and three dimensions]. The 532 nm continuous wave excitation of a single gold nanowrench results in superheating of the water to the spinodal decomposition temperature of 580 ± 20 K with bubble formation below the spinodal decomposition temperature being a rare event. Between the spinodal decomposition temperature and the boiling point liquid water is trapped into a metastable state because a barrier to vapor nucleation exists that must be overcome before the thermodynamically stable state is realized. The phase transformation for an optically heated single gold nanowrench is different from the phase transformation of optically excited colloidal gold nanoparticles solution where collective heating effects dominates and leads to the boiling of the solution exactly at the boiling point. In the solution case, the optically excited ensemble of nanoparticles collectively raises the ambient temperature of water to the boiling point where liquid is converted into vapor. The striking difference in the boiling properties of the single gold nanowrench and the nanoparticle solution system can be explained in terms of the vapor-nucleation mechanism, the volume of the overheated liquid, and the collective heating effect. The interpretation of the observed regimes of heating and vaporization is consistent with our theoretical modeling. In particular, we explain with our theory why the boiling with the collective heating in a solution requires 3 orders of magnitude less intensity compared to the case of optically driven single nanowrench.

  13. Measurement of excited layer thickness in highly photo-excited GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lingliang; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Tao; Wu, Shengli; Li, Fuli; Gao, Guilong

    2016-10-01

    Highly photo-excited layer thickness in GaAs is measured using a pump probe arrangement. A normally incident pump illumination spatially modulated by a mask will induce a corresponding refractive index change distribution in the depth direction due to edge scattering and attenuation absorption effect, which can deflect the probe beam passing through this excited region. Maximum deflection of the probe beam will be limited by the thickness of excited layer, and thus can also be employed to measure the thickness of the photo-excited layer of the material. Theoretical calculation confirms the experimental results. This method can find its application in measurements of photo-excited layer thickness of many kinds of materials and be significant to study the characteristics of materials in laser machining, grating and waveguide fabricating.

  14. Influence of excitation and deexcitation processes on the dynamics of laser-excited argon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, M.; Schlanges, M.; Bornath, Th.; Krainov, V. P.

    2015-03-01

    The excitation of atomic clusters by intense infrared laser pulses leads to the creation of highly charged ions and to the emission of energetic photons. These phenomena, which follow from ionization processes occurring in the cluster, depend significantly on the population of ground states and excited states in the laser-produced nanoplasma. This makes it necessary to account for collisional excitation and deexcitation processes. We investigate the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with argon clusters by means of a nanoplasma model. Considering laser excitation with single and double pulses, we analyze the role of excitation and deexcitation processes in detail and calculate the yield of highly charged ions and of energetic photons in different wavelength regimes.

  15. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  16. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-01-03

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  17. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  18. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  19. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  20. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  1. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  2. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  3. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2010-05-20

    We present total, energy-sharing and triple differential cross sections for one-photon, double ionization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned, excited P states. We employ a recently developed hybrid atomic orbital/ numerical grid method based on the finite-element discrete-variable representation and exterior complex scaling. Comparisons with calculated results for the ground-state atoms, as well as analogous results for ground-state and excited helium, serve to highlight important selection rules and show some interesting effects that relate to differences between inter- and intra-shell electron correlation.

  4. Elementary spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Khalil

    2014-12-01

    Elementary spin excitations (magnons) play a fundamental role in condensed matter physics, since many phenomena e.g. magnetic ordering, electrical (as well as heat) transport properties, ultrafast magnetization processes, and most importantly electron/spin dynamics can only be understood when these quasi-particles are taken into consideration. In addition to their fundamental importance, magnons may also be used for information processing in modern spintronics. Here the concept of spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets is discussed and reviewed. Starting with a historical introduction, different classes of magnons are introduced. Different theoretical treatments of spin excitations in solids are outlined. Interaction of spin-polarized electrons with a magnetic surface is discussed. It is shown that, based on the quantum mechanical conservation rules, a magnon can only be excited when a minority electron is injected into the system. While the magnon creation process is forbidden by majority electrons, the magnon annihilation process is allowed instead. These fundamental quantum mechanical selection rules, together with the strong interaction of electrons with matter, make the spin-polarized electron spectroscopies as appropriate tools to excite and probe the elementary spin excitations in low-dimensional magnets e.g ultrathin films and nanostructures. The focus is put on the experimental results obtained by spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy and spin-polarized inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. The magnon dispersion relation, lifetime, group and phase velocity measured using these approaches in various ultrathin magnets are discussed in detail. The differences and similarities with respect to the bulk excitations are addressed. The role of the temperature, atomic structure, number of atomic layers, lattice strain, electronic complexes and hybridization at the interfaces are outlined. A possibility of simultaneous probing of magnons and phonons

  5. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  6. Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    So, P T; Dong, C Y; Masters, B R; Berland, K M

    2000-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. This technology enables noninvasive study of biological specimens in three dimensions with submicrometer resolution. Two-photon excitation of fluorophores results from the simultaneous absorption of two photons. This excitation process has a number of unique advantages, such as reduced specimen photodamage and enhanced penetration depth. It also produces higher-contrast images and is a novel method to trigger localized photochemical reactions. Two-photon microscopy continues to find an increasing number of applications in biology and medicine.

  7. Liquid-crystalline nanoparticles: Hybrid design and mesophase structures

    PubMed Central

    Greget, Romain; Dominguez, Cristina; Nagy, Zsuzsanna T; Guillon, Daniel; Gallani, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Summary Liquid-crystalline nanoparticles represent an exciting class of new materials for a variety of potential applications. By combining supramolecular ordering with the fluid properties of the liquid-crystalline state, these materials offer the possibility to organise nanoparticles into addressable 2-D and 3-D arrangements exhibiting high processability and self-healing properties. Herein, we review the developments in the field of discrete thermotropic liquid-crystalline nanoparticle hybrids, with special emphasis on the relationship between the nanoparticle morphology and the nature of the organic ligand coating and their resulting phase behaviour. Mechanisms proposed to explain the supramolecular organisation of the mesogens within the liquid-crystalline phases are discussed. PMID:22509204

  8. Local energy landscape in a simple liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-11-26

    It is difficult to relate the properties of liquids and glasses directly to their structure because of complexity in the structure that defies precise definition. The potential energy landscape (PEL) approach is a very insightful way to conceptualize the structure-property relationship in liquids and glasses, particularly the effect of temperature and history. However, because of the highly multidimensional nature of the PEL it is hard to determine, or even visualize, the actual details of the energy landscape. In this article we introduce a modified concept of the local energy landscape (LEL), which is limited in phase space, and demonstrate itsmore » usefulness using molecular dynamics simulation on a simple liquid at high temperatures. The local energy landscape is given as a function of the local coordination number, the number of the nearest-neighbor atoms. The excitation in the LEL corresponds to the so-called β-relaxation process. The LEL offers a simple but useful starting point to discuss complex phenomena in liquids and glasses.« less

  9. Local energy landscape in a simple liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-11-26

    It is difficult to relate the properties of liquids and glasses directly to their structure because of complexity in the structure that defies precise definition. The potential energy landscape (PEL) approach is a very insightful way to conceptualize the structure-property relationship in liquids and glasses, particularly the effect of temperature and history. However, because of the highly multidimensional nature of the PEL it is hard to determine, or even visualize, the actual details of the energy landscape. In this article we introduce a modified concept of the local energy landscape (LEL), which is limited in phase space, and demonstrate its usefulness using molecular dynamics simulation on a simple liquid at high temperatures. The local energy landscape is given as a function of the local coordination number, the number of the nearest-neighbor atoms. The excitation in the LEL corresponds to the so-called β-relaxation process. The LEL offers a simple but useful starting point to discuss complex phenomena in liquids and glasses.

  10. A lateral field excited ZnO film bulk acoustic wave sensor working in viscous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Jingjing; Xu, Yan; Li, Dehua; Zhang, Liuyin; Liu, Weihui

    2013-09-01

    We present a lateral field excited ZnO film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) operated in pure-shear mode and analyze its performances in viscous liquids. The electrodes of the device are located on the film surface and normal to the c-axis of the ZnO film. The proposed device works near 1.44 GHz with a Q-factor up to 360 in air and 310 in water, which are higher than those of the quasi-shear thickness field excited FBAR. The resonant frequency is decreased with the increasing square root of the product of the viscosity and density with a linear dependence in the viscosity below 148.7 mPa s. The mass sensitivity of 670 Hz cm2 ng-1 was measured by monitoring the frequency change during the volatilization of saline solution loaded on the resonator. In addition, the levels of the noise and the mass resolutions were measured in various viscous environments. The proposed device yields the mass resolution of 670 Hz cm2 ng-1 and the high mass resolution of 0.06 ng cm-2. These results indicated that the lateral field excited ZnO FBAR had superior sensitivity for the bio-sensing applications in viscous biological liquids.

  11. Optical Switching of Nematic Liquid Crystal Film based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Makiko; Delgado, Silverio; Nuno, Zachary; Hirst, Linda; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated an all-optical technique to reversibly switch the spatial orientation of nematic liquid crystal molecules from homeotropic to planar in a few micron thick films. Our method leverages the highly localized electric fields that are generated in the near-field of a densely packed gold nanoparticle layer when the samples are excited by light resonant with the localized surface plasmon absorption. We present simulations and control measurements for off-resonance excitation, where the switching behavior is not observed. Using polarized microscopy and transmission measurements, we observe this switching over a temperature range starting several degrees below and up to the isotropic transition, and at on-resonance excitation power less than 10 μW. In addition, we controllably vary the in-plane directionality of the liquid crystal molecules in the planar state by altering the linear polarization of the incident excitation. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1056860 and ECC-1227034.

  12. Internal resonances and dynamic responses in equivalent mechanical model of partially liquid-filled vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M.; Gendelman, O. V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper treats dynamical responses in an equivalent mechanical model for oscillations of a liquid in partially filled vessel under horizontal harmonic ground excitation. Such excitation may lead to hydraulic impacts. The liquid sloshing mass is modeled by equivalent pendulum, which can impact the vessel walls. Parameters of the equivalent pendulum for well-explored case of cylindrical vessels are used. The hydraulic impacts are modeled by high-power potential function. Conditions for internal resonances are formulated. A non-resonant behavior and dynamic response related to 3:1 internal resonance are explored. When the excitation amplitude exceeds certain critical value, the system exhibits multiple steady state solutions. Quasi-periodic solutions appear in relatively narrow range of parameters. Numerical continuation links between resonant regimes found asymptotically for small excitation amplitude, and high-amplitude responses with intensive impacts.

  13. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  14. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    PubMed

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  15. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  16. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  17. Continuous transitions between composite Fermi liquid and Landau Fermi liquid: A route to fractionalized Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkeshli, Maissam; McGreevy, John

    2012-08-01

    One of the most successful theories of a non-Fermi-liquid metallic state is the composite Fermi-liquid (CFL) theory of the half-filled Landau level. In this paper, we study continuous quantum phase transitions out of the CFL state and into a Landau Fermi liquid, in the limit of no disorder and fixed particle number. This transition can be induced by tuning the bandwidth of the Landau level relative to the interaction energy, for instance through an externally applied periodic potential. We find a transition to the Landau Fermi liquid through a gapless Mott insulator with a Fermi surface of neutral fermionic excitations. In the presence of spatial symmetries, we also find a direct continuous transition between the CFL and the Landau Fermi liquid. The transitions have a number of characteristic observable signatures, including the presence of two crossover temperature scales, resistivity jumps, and vanishing compressibility. When the composite fermions are paired instead, our results imply quantum critical points between various non-Abelian topological states, including the ν=1/2 Moore-Read Pfaffian [Ising × U(1) topological order], a version of the Kitaev B phase (Ising topological order), and paired electronic superconductors. To study such transitions, we use a projective construction of the CFL, which goes beyond the conventional framework of flux attachment to include a broader set of quantum fluctuations. These considerations suggest a possible route to fractionalized Mott insulators by starting with fractional quantum Hall states and tuning the Landau-level bandwidth.

  18. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  19. Two-color temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging with tunable-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Abrigo, Gerald; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chien, Fan-Ching

    2017-02-01

    Wavelength tunable temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) is conducted to visualize optical sectioning images of multiple fluorophore-labeled specimens through the optimal two-photon excitation (TPE) of each type of fluorophore. The tunable range of excitation wavelength was determined by the groove density of the grating, the diffraction angle, the focal length of lenses, and the shifting distance of the first lens in the beam expander. Based on a consideration of the trade-off between the tunable-wavelength range and axial resolution of temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging, the presented system demonstrated a tunable-wavelength range from 770 to 920 nm using a diffraction grating with groove density of 830 lines/mm. TPE fluorescence imaging examination of a fluorescent thin film indicated that the width of the axial confined excitation was 3.0±0.7 μm and the shifting distance of the temporal focal plane was less than 0.95 μm within the presented wavelength tunable range. Fast different wavelength excitation and three-dimensionally rendered imaging of Hela cell mitochondria and cytoskeletons and mouse muscle fibers were demonstrated. Significantly, the proposed system can improve the quality of two-color TFMPEM images through different excitation wavelengths to obtain higher-quality fluorescent signals in multiple-fluorophore measurements.

  20. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  1. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  2. Excitation of atmospheric oscillations by volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Hiroo; Mori, Jim; Harkrider, David G.

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the mechanism of atmospheric oscillations with periods of about 300 s which were observed for the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1982 El Chichon eruptions. Two distinct spectral peaks, at T = 270 and 230 s for the Pinatubo eruption and at T = 195 and 266 s for the El Chichon eruptions, have been reported. We found similar oscillations for the 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 1883 Krakatoa eruptions. To explain these observations, we investigated excitation problems for two types of idealized sources, 'mass injection' and 'energy injection' sources, placed in an isothermal atmosphere. In general, two modes of oscillations, 'acoustic' and 'gravity' modes, can be excited. For realistic atmospheric parameters, the acoustic and gravity modes have a period of 275 and 304 s, respectively. For a realistic time history of eruption, atmospheric oscillations with an amplitude of 50 to 100 Pa (0.5 to 1 mbar) can be excited by an energy injection source with a total energy of 10(exp 17) J. This result is consistent with the observations and provides a physical basis for interpretation of atmospheric oscillations excited by volcanic eruptions.

  3. On the excitation of Goodwin's oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider the necessary condition for excitation of long-periodic Goodwin's oscillations and short-periodic sawtooth oscillations in the Goodwin model with fixed delay in the induced investment. Also, using the method of equivalent linearization we evaluate the amplitude of steady-state oscillation.

  4. Coherent Rydberg Excitation in Thermal Microcells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Robert

    2011-05-01

    In order to create quantum devices based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism, it is necessary to have a confinement of the excitation volume to less than the blockade radius in a frozen gas of atoms; i.e. the excitation times need to be shorter than the timescales of the respective dephasing mechanisms. While ultracold gases seem to be the obvious choice, our approach utilizes thermal atomic vapor in small glass cells which offer multiple advantages like good optical access and scalability. Such a system can be realized by confining the atoms to geometries in the micron regime. Decoherence effects like resonant interactions of the Rydberg atoms with polaritonic excitations in the glass have been studied and can be minimized by the appropriate choice of Rydberg states. Using a bandwidth-limited pulsed laser system for the Rydberg excitation we observe coherent Rabi oscillations on the nanosecond timescale. In collaboration with Renate Daschner, Harald Kuebler, Bernhard Huber, Thomas Baluktsian, Andreas Koelle, James Shaffer, and Tilman Pfau.

  5. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    PubMed

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research.

  6. Supersolitons: Solitonic Excitations in Atomic Soliton Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2008-10-03

    We show that, by tuning interactions in nonintegrable vector nonlinear Schroedinger equations modeling Bose-Einstein condensates and other relevant physical systems, it is possible to achieve a regime of elastic particlelike collisions between solitons. This would allow one to construct a Newton's cradle with solitons and supersolitons: localized collective excitations in solitary-wave chains.

  7. New Logic Circuit with DC Parametric Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Masanori; Kaneda, Hisayoshi

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that dc parametric excitation is possible in a circuit named JUDO, which is composed of two resistively-connected Josephson junctions. Simulation study proves that the circuit has large gain and properties suitable for the construction of small, high-speed logic circuits.

  8. Residual Excitation and Ego-Defensive Attributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Earle, Walter B.

    It has been suggested that egotistical attributions for success and failure are mediated by the affective reactions resulting from achievement outcomes. To establish the motivational impact of failure-related affect on subsequent ego-defensive attributions, an excitation transfer paradigm was used to manipulate the negative feelings elicited by…

  9. On the Electronically Excited States of Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Kowalski, Karol; Fan, Peng-Dong; Valiev, Marat; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna

    2008-10-09

    Vertical excitation energies in uracil in the gas phase and in water solution are investigated by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basis set effects are found to be important for converged results. The analysis of electronic wave functions reveals that the lowest singlet states are predominantly of a singly excited character and are therefore well described by single-reference equation-of-motion methods augmented by a perturbative triples correction to account for dynamical correlation. Our best estimates for the vertical excitation energies for the lowest singlet n and are 5.0±0.1 eV and 5.3±0.1 eV, respectively. The solvent effects for these states are estimated to be +0.5 eV and ±0.1 eV, respectively. We attribute the difference between the computed vertical excitations and the maximum of the experimental absorption to strong vibronic interaction between the lowest A00 and A0 states leading to intensity borrowing by the forbidden transition.

  10. Dipolar excitation in the third stability region.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, Nikolai V; Chernyak, Eugenii Ya; Stepanov, Vladimir A

    2016-01-01

    Dipole resonant excitation of ions creates instability bands which follow iso-β lines where β is the characteristic exponent (stability parameter). Instability bands are exited most effectively on the fundamental frequency π= βΩ/2. Here π is the angle resonance frequency of the dipolar voltage applied to x or y pair rods of the analyzer, and Ω is the angle frequency of the main drive voltage. Our goal is to study the mass peak shape in the third stability region with dipolar resonance excitation of the instability band with respect to the resonance frequency π and the dipolar potential amplitude. Numerical integration of the ion motion equations with a given ion source emittance is used to investigate peak shapes and ion transmission. We show that it is possible to vary the resolution power at any part of the third stability region. A change of the dipolar potential phase leads to a periodical variation of the resolution with period π.The most effective dipolar excitation in the y direction is along βy near the stability boundary. The mass peak shape is calculated also for a quadrupole with round rods. The best peak shape (small tails and high resolution) takes place for the rod set with r/r0=1.130. Dipolar excitation increases the transmission by approximately 5-10% at a given resolution.

  11. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  12. Contour Line Portraits: Excited about Artistic Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Kari Gertz

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project that encouraged students, boosted their self-confidence, and got them excited about their artistic abilities--while producing amazing results. This lesson effectively develops artistic ability by compelling students to see that drawing is quite simply breaking down objects into the…

  13. Contextual fear conditioning depresses infralimbic excitability.

    PubMed

    Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Cruz, Emmanuel; Criado-Marrero, Marangelie; Porter, James T

    2016-04-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show hypo-active ventromedial prefrontal cortices (vmPFC) that correlate with their impaired ability to discriminate between safe and dangerous contexts and cues. Previously, we found that auditory fear conditioning depresses the excitability of neurons populating the homologous structure in rodents, the infralimbic cortex (IL). However, it is undetermined if IL depression was mediated by the cued or contextual information. The objective of this study was to examine whether contextual information was sufficient to depress IL neuronal excitability. After exposing rats to context-alone, pseudoconditioning, or contextual fear conditioning, we used whole-cell current-clamp recordings to examine the excitability of IL neurons in prefrontal brain slices. We found that contextual fear conditioning reduced IL neuronal firing in response to depolarizing current steps. In addition, neurons from contextual fear conditioned animals showed increased slow afterhyperpolarization potentials (sAHPs). Moreover, the observed changes in IL excitability correlated with contextual fear expression, suggesting that IL depression may contribute to the encoding of contextual fear.

  14. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  15. Magnetic Excitations from Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.; Woo, H.; Perring, T. G.; Goka, H.; Gu, G. D.; Xu, G.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.

    2004-03-01

    While it is generally believed that antiferromagnetic spin excitations play a significant role in the pairing mechanism of copper-oxide superconductors [1], the nature of the magnetic excitations themselves remains a matter of controversy. Recent measurements of the dispersion of spin excitations in superconducting YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x (YBCO) have attracted much attention. Here we present the results of comprehensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the momentum- and energy-dependent spectra of the magnetic fluctuations in La_0.875Ba_0.125CuO_4, which exhibits inhomogeneous, charge-stripe order. We will also point out universalities and differences in the magnetic excitation spectra compared to related charge-stripe ordered compounds and high-temperature superconductors, including La_2-xSr_xNiO4 and YBCO. JMT, HW, GDG and GX are supported by U.S. Department of Energy contract # DE-AC02-98CH1088 [1] J. Orenstein and A. J. Millis, Science 288, 468 (2000).

  16. Ekectron-Impact Excitation of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, A. J.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Electron-impact excitation cross sections are calculated for ground and excited states of C+ using the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. We used the configurations 1s2 2s2 nl (3 s <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 2 pnl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2p2 nl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 3s2 , and 1s2 2 s 3d2 , resulting in 890 LS terms and 2048 LSJ levels. Excitation cross sections for the 1s2 2s2 2 p2 P -->4 P,2 D,2 S transitions are in good agreement with experiment. Combined with previous calculations for C and Cq+ (q = 2- 5), sufficient excitation, ionization, and recombination atomic data is now available to generate high quality collisional-radiative coefficients for the entire C isonuclear sequence. Work supported in part by grants from NASA, NSF, and DOE.

  17. Synthesis of laughter by modifying excitation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Thati, Sathya Adithya; Kumar K, Sudheer; Yegnanarayana, B

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a method to synthesize laughter by modifying the excitation source information is presented. The excitation source information is derived by extracting epoch locations and instantaneous fundamental frequency using zero frequency filtering approach. The zero frequency filtering approach is modified to capture the rapidly varying instantaneous fundamental frequency in natural laugh signals. The nature of variation of excitation features in natural laughter is examined to determine the features to be incorporated in the synthesis of a laugh signal. Features such as pitch period and strength of excitation are modified in the utterance of vowel /a/ or /i/ to generate the laughter signal. Frication is also incorporated wherever appropriate. Laugh signal is generated by varying parameters at both call level and bout level. Experiments are conducted to determine the significance of different features in the perception of laughter. Subjective evaluation is performed to determine the level of acceptance and quality of synthesis of the synthesized laughter signal for different choices of parameter values and for different input types.

  18. Excitation system for rotating synchronous machines

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.; Driscoll, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A system for providing DC current to a rotating superconducting winding is provided. The system receives current feedback from the superconducting winding and determines an error signal based on the current feedback and a reference signal. The system determines a control signal corresponding to the error signal and provides a positive and negative superconducting winding excitation voltage based on the control signal.

  19. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  20. Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2011-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.