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Sample records for excluded ecotox open

  1. THE ECOTOX DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database provides chemical-specific toxicity information for aquatic life, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial wildlife. ECOTOX is a comprehensive ecotoxicology database and is therefore essential for providing and suppoirting high quality models needed to estimate population...

  2. Ecotoxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sachindri; Kalaichelvan, P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a science of producing and utilizing nanosized particles that are measured in nanometers. The unique size-dependent properties make the nanoparticles superior and indispensable as they show unusual physical, chemical, and properties such as conductivity, heat transfer, melting temperature, optical properties, and magnetization. Taking the advantages of these singular properties in order to develop new products is the main purpose of nanotechnology, and that is why it is regarded as “the next industrial revolution.” Although nanotechnology is quite a recent discipline, there have already high number of publications which discuss this topic. However, the safety of nanomaterials is of high priority. Whereas toxicity focuses on human beings and aims at protecting individuals, ecotoxicity looks at various trophic organism levels and intend to protect populations and ecosystems. Ecotoxicity includes natural uptake mechanisms and the influence of environmental factors on bioavailability (and thereby on toxicity). The present paper focuses on the ecotoxic effects and mechanisms of nanomaterials on microorganisms, plants, and other organisms including humans. PMID:23724300

  3. Linkage analysis of primary open-angle glaucoma excludes the juvenile glaucoma region on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Acott, T.S.; Samples, J.R. |

    1994-09-01

    The gene for one form of juvenile glaucoma has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. This raises the possibility of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) also mapping to this region if the same defective gene causes both diseases. To ask this question linkage analysis was performed on a large POAG kindred. Blood samples or skin biopsies were obtained from 40 members of this family. Individuals were diagnosed as having POAG if they met two or more of the following criteria: (1) Visual field defects compatible with glaucoma on automated perimetry; (2) Optic nerve head and/or nerve fiber layer analysis compatible with glaucomatous damage; (3) high intraocular pressures (> 20 mm Hg). Patients were considered glaucoma suspects if they only met one criterion. These individuals were excluded from the analysis. Of the 40 members, seven were diagnosed with POAG; four were termed suspects. The earliest age of onset was 38 years old, while the average age of onset was 65 years old. We performed two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, using five markers which encompass the region 1q21-q31; specifically, D1S194, D1S210, D1S212, D1S191 and LAMB2. Two-point lod scores excluded tight linkage with all markers except D1S212 (maximum lod score of 1.07 at theta = 0.0). In the multipoint analysis, including D1S210-D1S212-LAMB2 and POAG, the entire 11 cM region spanned by these markers was excluded for linkage with POAG; that is, lod scores were < -2.0. In conclusion, POAG in this family does not map to chromosome 1q21-q31 and, thus, they carry a gene that is distinct from the juvenile glaucoma gene.

  4. ECOTOX knowledgebase: Search features and customized reports

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOXicology knowledgebase (ECOTOX) is a comprehensive, publicly available knowledgebase developed and maintained by ORD/NHEERL. It is used for environmental toxicity data on aquatic life, terrestrial plants and wildlife. ECOTOX has the capability to refine and filter search...

  5. ECOTOX database; new additions and future direction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOXicology database (ECOTOX) is a comprehensive, publicly available knowledgebase developed and maintained by ORD/NHEERL. It is used for environmental toxicity data on aquatic life, terrestrial plants and wildlife. Publications are identified for potential applicability af...

  6. Ecotoxicity evaluation of selected sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stolte, Stefan; Arning, Jürgen; Uebers, Ute; Böschen, Andrea; Stepnowski, Piotr; Matzke, Marianne

    2011-10-01

    Sulfonamides (SAs) are a group of antibiotic drugs widely used in veterinary medicine. The contamination of the environment by these pharmaceuticals has raised concern in recent years. However, knowledge of their (eco)toxicity is still very basic and is restricted to just a few of these substances. Even though their toxicological analysis has been thoroughly performed and ecotoxicological data are available in the literature, a systematic analysis of their ecotoxicological potential has yet to be carried out. To fill this gap, 12 different SAs were chosen for detailed analysis with the focus on different bacteria as well as non-target organisms (algae and plants). A flexible (eco)toxicological test battery was used, including enzymes (acetylcholinesterase and glutathione reductase), luminescent marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), soil bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), limnic unicellular green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor), in order to take into account both the aquatic and terrestrial compartments of the environment, as well as different trophic levels. It was found that SAs are not only toxic towards green algae (EC₅₀=1.54-32.25 mg L⁻¹) but have even stronger adverse effect on duckweed (EC₅₀=0.02-4.89 mg L⁻¹) than atrazine - herbicide (EC₅₀=2.59 mg L⁻¹). PMID:21752420

  7. Heterogeneous photocatalysis of moxifloxacin in water: chemical transformation and ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Xander; Haylamicheal, Israel Deneke; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; Janssen, Colin R; Demeestere, Kristof

    2015-01-01

    This work provides new insights on the impact of TiO2/UV catalyzed chemical transformation of moxifloxacin on ecotoxicity effects towards the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The moxifloxacin median effect concentration (EC-50=0.78 [0.56, 1.09] mg L(-1)), determined in accordance to the OECD 72-h growth inhibition test guideline, was 7 times lower than that of the older and widely used fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin (EC-50=5.57 [4.86, 6.38] mg L(-1)). Applying heterogeneous photocatalysis as an advanced oxidation technique to degrade moxifloxacin in aqueous solution decreased the average growth inhibition from 72% to 14% after 150 min of treatment. No significant carbon mineralization was observed and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of 13 degradation products for which a chemical structure could be proposed based on accurate mass determination. Combined chemical and ecotoxicological analysis showed that as long as moxifloxacin is present in the reaction solution, it is the main compound affecting algal growth inhibition. However, also the contribution of the degradation products to the observed ecotoxicity cannot be neglected. Photocatalytically induced modifications of moxifloxacin mainly occur at the diazobicyclo-substituent as ring opening, oxidation into carbonyl groups, and hydroxylation. This results into the formation of more hydrophilic compounds with a decreased biological activity compared with moxifloxacin. The change in lipophilicity, and possibly a modified acid-base speciation, most probably also affect the cell membrane permeation of the degradation products, which might be another factor explaining the observed lower residual ecotoxicity of the photocatalytically treated reaction solutions.

  8. U.S. EPA'S ECOTOX DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In formulating hypothesis related to extrapolations across species and/or chemicals, the ECOTOX database provides researchers a means of locating high quality ecological effects data for a wide-range of terrestrial and aquatic receptors. Currently the database includes more than ...

  9. Ecotoxicity testing: science, politics and ethics.

    PubMed

    Walker, Colin H

    2008-02-01

    Animal welfare organisations have long been concerned about the use of animals for ecotoxicity testing. Ecotoxicity testing is a necessary part of the statutory risk assessment of chemicals that may be released into the environment. It is sometimes also carried out during the development of new chemicals and in the investigation of pollution in the field. This review considers the existing requirements for ecotoxicity testing, with particular reference to practices in the European Union, including the recent REACH system proposals, before discussing criticisms that have been made of existing practices for environmental risk assessment. These criticisms have been made on scientific and ethical grounds, as well as on questions of cost. A case is made for greater investment in the development of alternative testing methods, which could improve the science, as well as serving the cause of animal welfare. It has frequently been suggested that the statutory requirements for environmental risk assessment are too rigid and bureaucratic. A case is made for flexibility and the greater involvement of scientists in the risk assessment procedure, in the interests of both improved science and improved animal welfare.

  10. In Silico Models for Ecotoxicity of Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kunal; Kar, Supratik

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and their active metabolites are one of the significantly emerging environmental toxicants. The major routes of entry of pharmaceuticals into the environment are industries, hospitals, or direct disposal of unwanted or expired drugs made by the patient. The most important and distinct features of pharmaceuticals are that they are deliberately designed to have an explicit mode of action and designed to exert an effect on humans and other living systems. This distinctive feature makes pharmaceuticals and their metabolites different from other chemicals, and this necessitates the evaluation of the direct effects of pharmaceuticals in various environmental compartments as well as to living systems. In this background, the alarming situation of ecotoxicity of diverse pharmaceuticals have forced government and nongovernment regulatory authorities to recommend the application of in silico methods to provide quick information about the risk assessment and fate properties of pharmaceuticals as well as their ecological and indirect human health effects. This chapter aims to offer information regarding occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment, their persistence, environmental fate, and toxicity as well as application of in silico methods to provide information about the basic risk management and fate prediction of pharmaceuticals in the environment. Brief ideas about toxicity endpoints, available ecotoxicity databases, and expert systems employed for rapid toxicity predictions of ecotoxicity of pharmaceuticals are also discussed.

  11. Terrestrial short-term ecotoxicity of a green formicide.

    PubMed

    Tiepo, Erasmo N; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Resgalla, Charrid; Cotelle, Sylvie; Férard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2010-07-01

    When ants become annoying, large quantities of formicide are applied to terrestrial ecosystems in tropical regions, but awareness of the health and environmental impacts related to the use of synthetic pesticides has been increasing. The use of green pesticides to combat target organisms could reduce these impacts. In this regard, terrestrial ecotoxicity tests with higher plants (Brassica olaracea, Lactuca sativa and Mucuna aterrima), annelids (Eisenia foetida), Collembola (Folsomia candida) and soil enzyme activity analysis (diacetate fluorescein hydrolysis) were used to evaluate short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity of a green pesticide prepared from naturally-occurring organic compounds. At the highest formicide concentration tested in these experiments (i.e., 50 g kg(-1) soil) no toxicity toward terrestrial organisms was observed. The lack of short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity suggest that this green formicide can be classed as an environmentally friendly product as compared to the ecotoxicity of the most commonly used commercialized formicides.

  12. Argon Excluder Foam Compression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-25

    The argon excluder is designed to reduce the media density of the dead space between the internal modules of the end calorimeters and the concave convex head to less than that of argon. The design of the excluder includes a thin circular stainless steel plate welded to the inner side of the convex pressure vessel head at a radius of 26 and 15/16 inches. It is estimated that this plate will experience a pressure differential of approximately 40 pounds per square inch. A inner foam core is incorporated into the design of the excluder as structural support. This engineering note outlines the compression data for the foam used in the north end calorimeter argon excluder. Four test samples of approximately the same dimensions were cut and machined from large blocks of the poured foam. Two of these test samples were then subjected to varying compression magnitudes until failure. For this test failure was taken to mean plastic yielding or the point at which deformation increases without a corresponding increase in loading. The third sample was subjected to a constant compressive stress for an extended period of time, to identify any 'creeping' effects. Finally, the fourth sample was cooled to cryogenic temperatures in order to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion. The compression test apparatus consisted of a state of the art INSTROM coupled with a PC workstation. The tests were run at a constant strain rate with discrete data taken at 500 millisecond intervals. The sample data is plotted as a stress strain diagram in the results. The first test was run on sample number one at a compression rate of 0.833 mills or equivalently a strain rate of 3.245 x 10{sup -4} mil/mills. The corresponding stress was then calculated from the force measured divided by the given initial area. The test was run for thirty minutes until the mode of failure, plastic yielding, was reached. The second test was run as a check of the first using sample number two, and likewise was

  13. Aquatic ecotoxicity effect of engineered aminoclay nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moon-Hee; Hwang, Yuhoon; Lee, Hyun Uk; Kim, Bohwa; Lee, Go-Woon; Oh, You-Kwan; Andersen, Henrik R; Lee, Young-Chul; Huh, Yun Suk

    2014-04-01

    In the present study the short term aquatic ecotoxicity of water-solubilized aminoclay nanoparticles (ANPs) of ~51±31 nm average hydrodynamic diameter was characterized. An ecotoxicological evaluation was carried out utilizing standard test organisms of different phyla and trophic levels namely the eukaryotic microalga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the crustacean Daphnia magna and the bioluminescent marine bacteria Vibrio fisheri. The effective inhibitory concentration (EC50) with 95% confidence limits for the microalga was 1.29 mg/L (0.72-1.82) for the average growth rate and 0.26 mg/L (0.23-0.31) for the cell yield. The entrapping of algal cells in aggregates of ANP may play a major role in the growth inhibition of algae P. subcapitata. No inhibition was observed for V. fisheri up to 25,000 mg/L (no observed effect concentration; NOEC). For D. magna no immobilization was observed in a limit test with 100 mg/L in 24 h while in 48 h a single animal was immobilized (5% inhibition). Correspondingly, the NOEC of ANP in 24 h was 100 mg/L and the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for 48 h was 100 mg/L. Therefore it can be considered to use ANP as an algal-inhibition agent at concentrations <100 mg/L without affecting or only mildly affecting other organisms including zooplanktons, but further studies on the environmental fate and chronic toxicity of ANP is needed to confirm this. PMID:24580819

  14. Preliminary Ecotoxicity and Biodegradability Assessment of Metalworking Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerulová, Kristína; Amcha, Peter; Filická, Slávka

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of activated sludge from sewage treatment plant to degrade selected MWFs (ecotoxicity to bacterial consortium) and to evaluate the ecotoxicity by Lemna minor-higher plant. After evaluating the ecotoxicity, biodegradations rate with activated sludge was assessed on the basis of COD measurement. Preliminary study of measuring the ecotoxicity according to OECD 221 by Lemna minor shows effective concentration of Emulzin H at the rate of 81.6 mg l-1, for Ecocool 82.9 mg l-1, for BC 25 about 99.3 mg l-1, and for Dasnobor about 97.3 mg l-1. Preliminary study of measuring the ecotoxicity by bacterial consortium according to OECD 209 (STN EN ISO 8192) shows effective concentration of Blasocut BC 25 at the rate 227.4 mg l-1. According to OECD 302B, the biodegradations level of Emulzin H, Ecocool and BC 25 achieved 80% in 10 days. It can be stated that these MWFs have potential to ultimate degradation, but the statement has to be confirmed by a biodegradability test with other parameters than COD, which exhibits some disadvantages in testing O/W emulsions.

  15. Biodegradability and ecotoxicity of commercially available geothermal heat transfer fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kathrin R.; Körner, Birgit; Sacher, Frank; Conrad, Rachel; Hollert, Henner; Tiehm, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Commercially available heat transfer fluids used in borehole heat exchangers were investigated for their composition, their biodegradability as well as their ecotoxicity. The main components of the fluids are organic compounds (often glycols) for freezing protection. Biodegradation of the fluids in laboratory studies caused high oxygen depletion as well as nitrate/iron(III) reduction under anaerobic conditions. Additives such as benzotriazoles for corrosion protection were persistent. Ecotoxicity data show that the commercially available fluids caused much higher ecotoxicity than their main organic constituents. Consequently, with regard to groundwater protection pure water as heat transfer medium is recommended. The second best choice is the usage of glycols without any additives. Effects on groundwater quality should be considered during ecological-economical cost-benefit-analyses of further geothermal energy strategies. The protection of groundwater as the most important drinking water resource must take priority over the energy gain from aquifers.

  16. Statistical analysis of regulatory ecotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Isnard, P; Flammarion, P; Roman, G; Babut, M; Bastien, P; Bintein, S; Esserméant, L; Férard, J F; Gallotti-Schmitt, S; Saouter, E; Saroli, M; Thiébaud, H; Tomassone, R; Vindimian, E

    2001-11-01

    ANOVA-type data analysis, i.e.. determination of lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOECs), and no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs), has been widely used for statistical analysis of chronic ecotoxicity data. However, it is more and more criticised for several reasons, among which the most important is probably the fact that the NOEC depends on the choice of test concentrations and number of replications and rewards poor experiments, i.e., high variability, with high NOEC values. Thus, a recent OECD workshop concluded that the use of the NOEC should be phased out and that a regression-based estimation procedure should be used. Following this workshop, a working group was established at the French level between government, academia and industry representatives. Twenty-seven sets of chronic data (algae, daphnia, fish) were collected and analysed by ANOVA and regression procedures. Several regression models were compared and relations between NOECs and ECx, for different values of x, were established in order to find an alternative summary parameter to the NOEC. Biological arguments are scarce to help in defining a negligible level of effect x for the ECx. With regard to their use in the risk assessment procedures, a convenient methodology would be to choose x so that ECx are on average similar to the present NOEC. This would lead to no major change in the risk assessment procedure. However, experimental data show that the ECx depend on the regression models and that their accuracy decreases in the low effect zone. This disadvantage could probably be reduced by adapting existing experimental protocols but it could mean more experimental effort and higher cost. ECx (derived with existing test guidelines, e.g., regarding the number of replicates) whose lowest bounds of the confidence interval are on average similar to present NOEC would improve this approach by a priori encouraging more precise experiments. However, narrow confidence intervals are not only

  17. FOCUS AREA 4 BACKGROUND PAPER: AQUATIC ECOTOXICITY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In parallel with a growing literature on the presence of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) in effluents and surface waters, recent years have witnessed a steady increase in published studies on the ecotoxicity of APIs to aquatic organisms. Against this background, key issu...

  18. Don't exclude students.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Colin

    2016-07-01

    I have just started applying for my first job. I use the website NHS Jobs, but students are oft en excluded by the 'pre-application questions'. These ask if I am registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Council, which I'm not yet. PMID:27380689

  19. Don't exclude students.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Colin

    2016-07-01

    I have just started applying for my first job. I use the website NHS Jobs, but students are oft en excluded by the 'pre-application questions'. These ask if I am registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Council, which I'm not yet.

  20. Ecotoxicity evaluation of a liquid detergent using the automatic biotest ECOTOX.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Ullah, Waheed; Ali, Imran; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2013-08-01

    Synthetic detergents are common pollutants reaching aquatic environments in different ways after usage at homes, institutions and industries. In this study a liquid detergent, used for dish washing, was evaluated for its toxicity during long- and short-term tests using the automatic biotest ECOTOX. Different parameters of Euglena gracilis like motility, swimming velocity, gravitactic orientation, cell compactness and cell growth were used as end points. In short-term experiments, the maximum adverse effects on motility, velocity, cell shape and gravitaxis were observed after 1 h of exposure. With further increase in exposure time to the detergent a slight recovery of these parameters was observed. In long-term experiments, the detergent caused severe disturbances to E. gracilis. Motility, cell growth and cell compactness (shape) with EC50 values of 0.064, 0.18 and 2.05 %, respectively, were found as the most sensitive parameters to detergent stress. There was a slight positive effect on gravitactic orientation at the lowest two concentrations; at higher concentrations of the detergent cells orientation was highly impaired giving EC50 values of 1.75 and 2.52 % for upward swimming and r-value, respectively.

  1. Beta-blockers in the environment: part II. Ecotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Maszkowska, Joanna; Stolte, Stefan; Kumirska, Jolanta; Łukaszewicz, Paulina; Mioduszewska, Katarzyna; Puckowski, Alan; Caban, Magda; Wagil, Marta; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2014-09-15

    The increasing consumption of beta-blockers (BB) has caused their presence in the environment to become more noticeable. Even though BB are safe for human and veterinary usage, ecosystems may be exposed to these substances. In this study, three selected BB: propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol were subjected to ecotoxicity study. Ecotoxicity evaluation was based on a flexible ecotoxicological test battery including organisms, representing different trophic levels and complexity: marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), soil/sediment bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). All the ecotoxicological studies were supported by instrumental analysis to measure deviation between nominal and real test concentrations. Based on toxicological data from the green algae test (S. vacuolatus) propranolol and metoprolol can be considered to be harmful to aquatic organisms. However, sorption explicitly inhibits the hazardous effects of BB, therefore the risks posed by these compounds for the environment are of minor importance. PMID:24975494

  2. Beta-blockers in the environment: part II. Ecotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Maszkowska, Joanna; Stolte, Stefan; Kumirska, Jolanta; Łukaszewicz, Paulina; Mioduszewska, Katarzyna; Puckowski, Alan; Caban, Magda; Wagil, Marta; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2014-09-15

    The increasing consumption of beta-blockers (BB) has caused their presence in the environment to become more noticeable. Even though BB are safe for human and veterinary usage, ecosystems may be exposed to these substances. In this study, three selected BB: propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol were subjected to ecotoxicity study. Ecotoxicity evaluation was based on a flexible ecotoxicological test battery including organisms, representing different trophic levels and complexity: marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), soil/sediment bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). All the ecotoxicological studies were supported by instrumental analysis to measure deviation between nominal and real test concentrations. Based on toxicological data from the green algae test (S. vacuolatus) propranolol and metoprolol can be considered to be harmful to aquatic organisms. However, sorption explicitly inhibits the hazardous effects of BB, therefore the risks posed by these compounds for the environment are of minor importance.

  3. Ecotoxicity assessment of stabilized/solidified foundry sludge.

    PubMed

    Coz, Alberto; Andrés, Ana; Irabien, Angel

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the leachates from a foundry sludge and the derived products based on the stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes. Foundry sludge is an industrial hazardous waste containing inorganic and organic pollutants. The immobilization of the foundry waste has been performed using different S/S procedures based on cement or lime as binder agents and foundry sand fines, calcium-magnesium lignosulfonate, silica fume, activated carbon and black carbon as additives. The waste and stabilized/solidified derived products have been evaluated according to environmental considerations. The relation between the chemical composition and the ecotoxicity of the leachates has been studied in this paper. The ecotoxicity of the leachates has been related to the heavy metals and the organic pollutants by an empirical logarithmic linear expression. Different parameters of the logarithmic fitting have been obtained for the studied binder agents and additives allowing the establishment of a relationship between the S/S process and the ecotoxicity of the derived products. Results of this study have wide-ranging implications for immediate management strategies of waste with organic and inorganic pollutants in addition to application in long-term remediation efforts. PMID:15074704

  4. 46 CFR 69.61 - Excluded spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excluded spaces. 69.61 Section 69.61 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.61 Excluded spaces. (a) Excluded space means an enclosed space which is excluded from volume (V) in calculating gross tonnage. Except as under paragraph...

  5. 46 CFR 69.61 - Excluded spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded spaces. 69.61 Section 69.61 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.61 Excluded spaces. (a) Excluded space means an enclosed space which is excluded from volume (V) in calculating gross tonnage. Except as under paragraph...

  6. 46 CFR 69.61 - Excluded spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excluded spaces. 69.61 Section 69.61 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.61 Excluded spaces. (a) Excluded space means an enclosed space which is excluded from volume (V) in calculating gross tonnage. Except as under paragraph...

  7. 46 CFR 69.61 - Excluded spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excluded spaces. 69.61 Section 69.61 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.61 Excluded spaces. (a) Excluded space means an enclosed space which is excluded from volume (V) in calculating gross tonnage. Except as under paragraph...

  8. 46 CFR 69.61 - Excluded spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excluded spaces. 69.61 Section 69.61 Shipping COAST... OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.61 Excluded spaces. (a) Excluded space means an enclosed space which is excluded from volume (V) in calculating gross tonnage. Except as under paragraph...

  9. THE ECOTOX DATABASE AND ECOLOGICAL SOIL SCREENING LEVEL (ECO-SSL) WEB SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's ECOTOX database (http://www.epa.gov/ecotox/) provides a web browser search interface for locating aquatic and terrestrial toxic effects information. Data on more than 8100 chemicals and 5700 terrestrial and aquatic species are included in the database. Information is ...

  10. Excluding interlopers from asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakovic, B.; Radovic, V.

    2014-07-01

    from AstDys database. Next, all family members that do not meet adopted criteria (based on physical and spectral characteristics) are excluded from the initial catalogue. Finally, the HCM analysis is performed again using the improved catalogue. Results: We apply this approach to the Themis family. In the first step the HCM links 3061 asteroids to the family. Among them we identify 113 potential interlopers. After removing interlopers, in the second run of the HCM, the total number of members has decreased to 2847. Thus, 101 extra objects have been excluded from the membership list (see Figure).

  11. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7...

  16. Bioventing remediation and ecotoxicity evaluation of phenanthrene-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    García Frutos, F Javier; Escolano, Olga; García, Susana; Babín, Mar; Fernández, M Dolores

    2010-11-15

    The objectives of soil remediation processes are usually based on threshold levels of soil contaminants. However, during remediation processes, changes in bioavailability and metabolite production can occur, making it necessary to incorporate an ecotoxicity assessment to estimate the risk to ecological receptors. The evolution of contaminants and soil ecotoxicity of artificially phenanthrene-contaminated soil (1000 mg/kg soil) during soil treatment through bioventing was studied in this work. Bioventing was performed in glass columns containing 5.5 kg of phenanthrene-contaminated soil and uncontaminated natural soil over a period of 7 months. Optimum conditions of mineralisation (humidity=60% WHC; C/N/P=100:20:1) were determined in a previous work. The evolution of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, phenanthrene concentration and soil toxicity were studied on sacrificed columns at periods of 0, 3 and 7 months. Toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms was determined using a multispecies system in the soil columns (MS-3). In the optimal bioventing treatability test, we obtained a reduction rate in phenanthrene concentration higher that 93% after 7 months of treatment. The residual toxicity obtained at the end of the treatment was not attributed to the low phenanthrene concentration, but to the ammonia used to restore the optimal C/N ratio.

  17. Stormwater retention basin efficiency regarding micropollutant loads and ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sébastian, Christel; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Perrodin, Yves; Visiedo, Régis

    2014-01-01

    Retention basin efficiency in micropollutant removal has not been very well studied, in particular for pollutants highlighted by the European Water Framework Directive of 2000 such as pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alkylphenols. This study is based on in situ experiments carried out on a stormwater retention basin with the aim of estimating the basin efficiency in trapping and removing micropollutants from stormwater run-off from an industrial catchment drained by a separate sewer system. Along with stormwater, the basin receives some dry weather effluent flows, which are supposedly non-polluted. Ninety-four substances from five families (metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PBDEs, alkylphenols and pesticides) were analyzed during 10 event campaigns in urban wet weather discharges at the inlet and outlet of the basin. The ecotoxicity of the samples was also tested. The results show high inter-event variability in both chemical and ecotoxic characteristics. They indicate good event efficiency concerning heavy metals and most PAHs. The studied pesticides, mainly found in the dissolved fraction, were not trapped. Particulate fraction study highlighted that settling is not the main process explaining micropollutant removal in a retention basin, as was noted for alkylphenols and PBDEs. PMID:24622545

  18. Stormwater retention basin efficiency regarding micropollutant loads and ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sébastian, Christel; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Perrodin, Yves; Visiedo, Régis

    2014-01-01

    Retention basin efficiency in micropollutant removal has not been very well studied, in particular for pollutants highlighted by the European Water Framework Directive of 2000 such as pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alkylphenols. This study is based on in situ experiments carried out on a stormwater retention basin with the aim of estimating the basin efficiency in trapping and removing micropollutants from stormwater run-off from an industrial catchment drained by a separate sewer system. Along with stormwater, the basin receives some dry weather effluent flows, which are supposedly non-polluted. Ninety-four substances from five families (metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PBDEs, alkylphenols and pesticides) were analyzed during 10 event campaigns in urban wet weather discharges at the inlet and outlet of the basin. The ecotoxicity of the samples was also tested. The results show high inter-event variability in both chemical and ecotoxic characteristics. They indicate good event efficiency concerning heavy metals and most PAHs. The studied pesticides, mainly found in the dissolved fraction, were not trapped. Particulate fraction study highlighted that settling is not the main process explaining micropollutant removal in a retention basin, as was noted for alkylphenols and PBDEs.

  19. Tamoxifen ecotoxicity and resulting risks for aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Orias, Frédéric; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain; Durrieu, Claude; Aubrat, Marion; Hombert, Thibault; Wigh, Adriana; Perrodin, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Tamoxifen, a drug used to treat cancer, is regularly found in hydrosystems at concentrations of several hundred ng L(-1). To characterize its ecotoxicity, we implemented a battery of bioassays on organisms belonging to 3 different trophic levels: Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for primary producers, Daphnia magna (immobilization, grazing and reproduction) for primary consumers, and Danio rerio for secondary consumers (embryotoxicity test). In view of the results obtained and the ecotoxicity values of tamoxifen available in the literature, we established a PNEC (Predictive No Effect Concentration) equal to 81 ng L(-1) for continental water. This PNEC allowed us to calculate Risk Quotients (RQ) for 4 continental hydrosystems in 4 different countries in which measures of tamoxifen had already been performed on surface waters. In two of the situations studied, RQs were higher than 1, reaching a maximum of 2.6. These results show the need to deepen the characterization of ecotoxicological risks linked to the discharge of tamoxifen in surface waters. In addition, we propose applying this approach to other drug residues detected in the environment. PMID:25666175

  20. Life-Cycle Perspectives on Aquatic Ecotoxicity of Common Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mehrkesh, Amirhossein; Karunanithi, Arunprakash T

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the aquatic ecotoxicity impacts of production- and use-phase release of five common ionic liquids (ILs). Integrating toxicity data, physical properties, and fate and transport parameters with the USEtox model, we report, for the first time, the freshwater ecotoxicity characterization factors for [Bmim](+)[Br](-), [Bmim](+)[Cl], [Bmim](+)[BF4](-), [Bmim](+)[PF6](-), and [BPy](+)[Cl](-) as 624, 748, 823, 927, and 1768 CTUe/kg, respectively. IL Production life cycle inventories were modeled and utilized to estimate their production-side ecotoxicity impacts. Literature on environmental aspects of ILs propagates either their green characteristics (no air emissions and high recyclability) or their nongreen aspects due to toxicity concerns of their release to water. This study adds a third dimension by showing that the upstream ecotoxicity impacts of producing ILs could outweigh the potential ecotoxicity impacts of direct release during use. Furthermore, for the studied ILs, an average of 83% of ecotoxicity impacts associated with their production can be linked to chemicals and materials released during the upstream synthesis steps, while only 17% of ecotoxicity impacts relate to life-cycle energy consumption. The findings underscore the need to develop sustainable synthesis routes, tight control over chemical releases during production, and careful selection of precursor materials and production processes.

  1. Life-Cycle Perspectives on Aquatic Ecotoxicity of Common Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mehrkesh, Amirhossein; Karunanithi, Arunprakash T

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the aquatic ecotoxicity impacts of production- and use-phase release of five common ionic liquids (ILs). Integrating toxicity data, physical properties, and fate and transport parameters with the USEtox model, we report, for the first time, the freshwater ecotoxicity characterization factors for [Bmim](+)[Br](-), [Bmim](+)[Cl], [Bmim](+)[BF4](-), [Bmim](+)[PF6](-), and [BPy](+)[Cl](-) as 624, 748, 823, 927, and 1768 CTUe/kg, respectively. IL Production life cycle inventories were modeled and utilized to estimate their production-side ecotoxicity impacts. Literature on environmental aspects of ILs propagates either their green characteristics (no air emissions and high recyclability) or their nongreen aspects due to toxicity concerns of their release to water. This study adds a third dimension by showing that the upstream ecotoxicity impacts of producing ILs could outweigh the potential ecotoxicity impacts of direct release during use. Furthermore, for the studied ILs, an average of 83% of ecotoxicity impacts associated with their production can be linked to chemicals and materials released during the upstream synthesis steps, while only 17% of ecotoxicity impacts relate to life-cycle energy consumption. The findings underscore the need to develop sustainable synthesis routes, tight control over chemical releases during production, and careful selection of precursor materials and production processes. PMID:26599072

  2. ARVO-CL: The OpenCL version of the ARVO package — An efficient tool for computing the accessible surface area and the excluded volume of proteins via analytical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buša, Ján; Hayryan, Shura; Wu, Ming-Chya; Buša, Ján; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-11-01

    Introduction of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and computing using GPUs in recent years opened possibilities for simple parallelization of programs. In this update, we present the modernized version of program ARVO [J. Buša, J. Dzurina, E. Hayryan, S. Hayryan, C.-K. Hu, J. Plavka, I. Pokorný, J. Skivánek, M.-C. Wu, Comput. Phys. Comm. 165 (2005) 59]. The whole package has been rewritten in the C language and parallelized using OpenCL. Some new tricks have been added to the algorithm in order to save memory much needed for efficient usage of graphical cards. A new tool called ‘input_structure’ was added for conversion of pdb files into files suitable for work with the C and OpenCL version of ARVO.

  3. Research Trends of Ecotoxicity of Nanoparticles in Soil Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Kim, Shin Woong; Kwak, Jin Il; Nam, Sun-Hwa; Shin, Yu-Jin

    2010-01-01

    We are consistently being exposed to nanomaterials in direct and/or indirect route as they are used in almost all the sectors in our life. Nations across the worlds are now trying to put global regulation policy on nanomaterials. Sometimes, they are reported to be more toxic than the corresponding ion and micromaterials. Therefore, safety research of nanoparticles has huge implications on a national economics. In this study, we evaluated and analyzed the research trend of ecotoxicity of nanoparticles in soil environment. Test species include terrestrial plants, earthworms, and soil nematode. Soil enzyme activities were also discussed. We found that the results of nanotoxicity studies were affected by many factors such as physicochemical properties, size, dispersion method and test medium of nanoparticle, which should be considered when conducting toxicity researches. In particular, more researches on the effect of physico chemical properties and fate of nanoparticles on toxicity effect should be conducted consistently. PMID:24278532

  4. Ecotoxicity assessment using ciliate cells in millifluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Illing, Rico; Burkart, Corinna; Pfitzner, Daniel; Jungmann, Dirk; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-03-01

    Precise analysis of the aquatic cells and their responses to the toxic chemicals, i.e., water disinfective agents, is of crucial importance due to their role in the ecosystem. We demonstrate the application of the droplets based millifluidic tool for isolating and longtime monitoring of single Paramecium tetraurelia cells using a large number of water-in-oil emulsion droplets. Due to the automated monitoring of the fluorescence signal, the droplets containing cells are distinguished from the empty reservoirs. A viability indicator is used to follow the metabolic dynamic of the cells in every single droplet. Finally, we perform ecotoxicity tests in droplets, exposing the encapsulated paramecia cells to silver nitrate for determination of EC50 levels, and compare the output with the conventional microtiter plate assay. PMID:27051472

  5. EPA MED-DULUTH'S ECOTOX AND ECO-SSL WEB APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOX (ECOTOXicology Database) system developed by the USEPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Mid-Continent Ecology Division in Duluth, MN (MED-Duluth), provides a web browser search interface for locating aquatic and terrestrial toxic...

  6. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per...

  7. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per...

  8. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per...

  9. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per...

  10. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per...

  11. How Many Pupils Are Being Excluded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirling, Margaret

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the problem of British children permanently excluded from school, especially those excluded "unofficially" usually for behavioral difficulties. The article presents evidence of the incidence of unofficial exclusions, schools' options for dealing with exclusions, possible consequences of exclusions, and possible future…

  12. 42 CFR 403.768 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 403.768 Section 403.768 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... of Participation, and Payment § 403.768 Excluded services. In addition to items and services...

  13. 15 CFR 923.33 - Excluded lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.33 Excluded lands. (a) The boundary of a State's coastal zone must exclude lands owned, leased, held in trust or whose use is otherwise by law...

  14. 15 CFR 923.33 - Excluded lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.33 Excluded lands. (a) The boundary of a State's coastal zone must exclude lands owned, leased, held in trust or whose use is otherwise by law...

  15. 15 CFR 923.33 - Excluded lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.33 Excluded lands. (a) The boundary of a State's coastal zone must exclude lands owned, leased, held in trust or whose use is otherwise by law...

  16. 15 CFR 923.33 - Excluded lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.33 Excluded lands. (a) The boundary of a State's coastal zone must exclude lands owned, leased, held in trust or whose use is otherwise by law...

  17. 15 CFR 923.33 - Excluded lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Boundaries § 923.33 Excluded lands. (a) The boundary of a State's coastal zone must exclude lands owned, leased, held in trust or whose use is otherwise by law...

  18. Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Thangarajan, Ramya

    2015-06-01

    In this work, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) species were compared between solution culture and soil system. Firstly, the adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was compared using a number of non-allophanic and allophanic soils. Secondly, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were examined using germination, phytoavailability, earthworm, and soil microbial activity tests. Both As-spiked soils and As-contaminated sheep dip soils were used to test bioavailability and ecotoxicity. The sheep dip soil which contained predominantly As(V) species was subject to flooding to reduce As(V) to As(III) and then used along with the control treatment soil to compare the bioavailability between As species. Adsorption of As(V) was much higher than that of As(III), and the difference in adsorption between these two species was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. In the solution culture, there was no significant difference in bioavailability and ecotoxicity, as measured by germination and phytoavailability tests, between these two As species. Whereas in the As-spiked soils, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were higher for As(III) than As(V), and the difference was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. Bioavailability of As increased with the flooding of the sheep dip soils which may be attributed to the reduction of As(V) to As(III) species. The results in this study have demonstrated that while in solution, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity do not vary between As(III) and As(V), in soils, the latter species is less bioavailable than the former species because As(V) is more strongly retained than As(III). Since the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of As depend on the nature of As species present in the environment, risk-based remediation approach should aim at controlling the dynamics of As transformation.

  19. Microbial ecotoxicity and mutagenicity of 1-hydroxypyrene and its photoproducts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, H M; Shi, X; Ero, I; Jayasinghe, A; Dong, S; Yu, H

    2001-11-01

    1-Hydroxypyrene (1-HP) is a carcinogenic and slightly water-soluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Ecotoxicity and mutagenicity of 1-HP and its photoproducts, and the effect of Mn2+ and Cu2+ on their mutagenicity were measured with microbial assay in this study. The assay includes spread plate counting, direct counting, microbial mineralization of 14C-UL-D-glucose and Mutatox Test. At the concentration examined (0.8 microM), the photoproducts (after 1.5 h solar irradiation) of 1-HP inhibited microbial glucose mineralization activity (by 64%) after microbial assemblages of a local reservoir site were exposed for 1 day. However, heterotrophic bacteria were able to utilize 1-HP photoproducts as the growth substrates and increase viability counts by up to 4.75-folds. 1-HP exhibited positive response to Mutatox Test in both direct medium and S-9 medium, with the lowest observable effective concentration of 0.625 microM in the test with direct medium. After photolysis, 1-HP decreased its mutagenicity. Mn2+ (312.5 microM-5 mM) and Cu2+ (6.25-100 microM) themselves are not mutagenic. However, addition of the metal ions before or after photolysis modifies the light readings of 1-HP during the test. Therefore, presence of metal ions could affect the genotoxicity of 1-HP in aquatic environments, depending on timing of the addition. PMID:11680740

  20. Ecotoxicity and biodegradability of new brominated flame retardants: a review.

    PubMed

    Ezechiáš, M; Covino, S; Cajthaml, T

    2014-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been routinely used as additives in a number of consumer products for several decades in order to reduce the risk of fire accidents. Concerns about the massive use of these substances have increased due to their possible toxicity, endocrine disrupting properties and occurrence in almost all the environmental compartments, including humans and wildlife organisms. Several conventional BFRs (e.g. polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE)) have been included in the list of Persistent Organic Pollutants and their use has been restricted because of their established toxicity and environmental persistence. Over the past few years, these compounds have been replaced with "new" BFRs (NBFRs). Despite the fact that NBFRs are different chemical molecules than traditional BFRs, most of physical-chemical properties (e.g. aromatic moiety, halogen substitution, lipophilic character) are common to both groups; therefore, their fate in the environment is potentially similar to the banned BFRs. Therefore, this article has been compiled to summarize the published scientific data regarding the biodegradability of the most widely used NBFRs, a key factor in their potential persistency in the environment, and their ecotoxicological effects on humans and test organisms. The data reviewed here document that the mechanisms through NBFRs exibit their ecotoxicity and the processes leading to their biotransformation in the environment are still poorly understood. Thus emphasis is placed on the need for further research in these areas is therefore emphasized, in order to avoid the massive use of further potentially harmful and recalcitrant substances of anthropogenic origin.

  1. Interest of dynamic tests in acute ecotoxicity assessment in algae

    SciTech Connect

    Jouany, J.M.; Ferard, J.F.; Vasseur, P.; Gea, J.; Truhaut, R.; Rast, C.

    1983-04-01

    Sorption of toxics by algae may be important and occurs very early. Thus, a decrease of the experimental toxic concentrations in the medium results in understating toxicity when tests are conducted under static conditions. In this work, two different methods of exposure of algae (Chlorella vulgaris) are studied, the static test and the pseudodynamic test. Acute effects (biological and analytical effects) of inorganic compounds (Cu/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Pb/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 6 +/) have been evaluated for 96 hr of exposure; in each case, IC50 is much lower in the dynamic condition than in the static one. The percentage of reduction varies from 55 to 75% after 96 hr. Accumulation of metal by chlorellae is greater when testing by the pseudodynamic way, with Cu/sup 2 +/ and Pb/sup 2 +/. But in the case of Cd/sup 2 +/ and Cr/sup 6 +/, the concentration factors are similar in the two kinds of exposure. These results point out the advantage of the pseudodynamic test, of which the methodology is very easy, for a more realistic assessment of acute ecotoxicity in these organisms.

  2. Ecotoxicity of climbazole, a fungicide contained in antidandruff shampoo.

    PubMed

    Richter, Elisabeth; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A; Coors, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Emerging pollutants such as personal care products can reach the environment via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and digested sludge. Only recently, the antidandruff agent and antimycotic climbazole was detected for the first time in a WWTP effluent with concentrations up to 0.5 µg/L. Climbazole acts as a C14-demethylase inhibitor (DMI) fungicide and thus has a high efficacy against fungi, but knowledge of its potential environmental impact is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize climbazole's ecotoxicity by conducting standard biotests with organisms representing different trophic levels from the aquatic as well as the terrestrial ecosystems. It was found that the toxicity of climbazole is mostly similar to that of other DMI fungicides, whereas it proved to be particularly toxic to primary producers. The lowest median effective concentrations (EC50s) were determined for Lemna minor, at 0.013 mg/L (biomass yield), and Avena sativa, at 18.5 mg/kg soil dry weight (shoot biomass). Reduction of frond size in water lentils and shoot length in higher plants suggested an additional plant growth-retarding mode of action of climbazole. In addition, it was demonstrated here that for an ionizable compound such as climbazole, the soil pH can have a considerable influence on phytotoxicity.

  3. Terrestrial ecotoxicity of short aliphatic protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Peric, Brezana; Martí, Esther; Sierra, Jordi; Cruañas, Robert; Iglesias, Miguel; Garau, Maria Antonia

    2011-12-01

    A study of the ecotoxicity of different short aliphatic protic ionic liquids (PILs) on terrestrial organisms was conducted. Tests performed within the present study include those assessing the effects of PILs on soil microbial functions (carbon and nitrogen mineralization) and terrestrial plants. The results show that the nominal lowest-observed-adverse-effect concentration (LOAEC) values were 5,000 mg/kg (dry soil) for the plant test in two species (Lolium perenne, Allium cepa), 1,000 mg/kg (dry soil) for the plant test in one species (Raphanus sativus), and 10,000 mg/kg (dry soil) for carbon and nitrogen microbial transformation tests (all concentrations are nominal). Most of the median effective concentration values (EC50) were above 1,000 mg/kg (dry soil). Based on the obtained results, these compounds can be described as nontoxic for soil microbiota and the analyzed plants, and potentially biodegradable in soils, as can be deduced from the respirometric experiment. The toxicity rises with the increase of complexity of the PILs molecule (branch and length of aliphatic chain) among the three PILs analyzed. PMID:21935980

  4. Assessment of respiration activity and ecotoxicity of composts containing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Michał; Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka

    2013-03-01

    The research was conducted to determine if introducing biodegradable polymer materials to the composting process would affect selected biological properties of mature compost. Determination of biological properties of composts composed of testing their respiration activity and toxicity. Respiration activity was measured in material from the composting process by means of OxiTop Control measuring system. The ecotoxicity of composts was estimated by means of a set of biotests composed of three microbiotests using five test organisms. Introduction of polymer materials caused a decrease in respiration activity of mature compost. Similar dependencies as in the case of mass loss were registered. Compost to which a biodegradable polymer with the highest content of starch was added revealed the smallest difference in comparison with organic material composted without polymers. Lower content of starch in a polymer caused lower respiration activity of composts, whereas microorganism vaccine might have accelerated maturing of composts, thus contributing to the smallest respiration of compost. In composts containing biopolymers the following were observed: an increase in germination inhibition--2.5 times, roots growth inhibition--1.8 times, growth inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens--four times and luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri--1.6 times in comparison with the control (compost K1). Composts containing biopolymers were classified as toxicity class III, whereas the compost without polymer addition as class II.

  5. Ecotoxicity of climbazole, a fungicide contained in antidandruff shampoo.

    PubMed

    Richter, Elisabeth; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A; Coors, Anja

    2013-12-01

    Emerging pollutants such as personal care products can reach the environment via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and digested sludge. Only recently, the antidandruff agent and antimycotic climbazole was detected for the first time in a WWTP effluent with concentrations up to 0.5 µg/L. Climbazole acts as a C14-demethylase inhibitor (DMI) fungicide and thus has a high efficacy against fungi, but knowledge of its potential environmental impact is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize climbazole's ecotoxicity by conducting standard biotests with organisms representing different trophic levels from the aquatic as well as the terrestrial ecosystems. It was found that the toxicity of climbazole is mostly similar to that of other DMI fungicides, whereas it proved to be particularly toxic to primary producers. The lowest median effective concentrations (EC50s) were determined for Lemna minor, at 0.013 mg/L (biomass yield), and Avena sativa, at 18.5 mg/kg soil dry weight (shoot biomass). Reduction of frond size in water lentils and shoot length in higher plants suggested an additional plant growth-retarding mode of action of climbazole. In addition, it was demonstrated here that for an ionizable compound such as climbazole, the soil pH can have a considerable influence on phytotoxicity. PMID:23982925

  6. Assessment of respiration activity and ecotoxicity of composts containing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Michał; Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka

    2013-03-01

    The research was conducted to determine if introducing biodegradable polymer materials to the composting process would affect selected biological properties of mature compost. Determination of biological properties of composts composed of testing their respiration activity and toxicity. Respiration activity was measured in material from the composting process by means of OxiTop Control measuring system. The ecotoxicity of composts was estimated by means of a set of biotests composed of three microbiotests using five test organisms. Introduction of polymer materials caused a decrease in respiration activity of mature compost. Similar dependencies as in the case of mass loss were registered. Compost to which a biodegradable polymer with the highest content of starch was added revealed the smallest difference in comparison with organic material composted without polymers. Lower content of starch in a polymer caused lower respiration activity of composts, whereas microorganism vaccine might have accelerated maturing of composts, thus contributing to the smallest respiration of compost. In composts containing biopolymers the following were observed: an increase in germination inhibition--2.5 times, roots growth inhibition--1.8 times, growth inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens--four times and luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri--1.6 times in comparison with the control (compost K1). Composts containing biopolymers were classified as toxicity class III, whereas the compost without polymer addition as class II. PMID:23290616

  7. Removal of ecotoxicity and COD from tank truck cleaning wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dries, Jan; De Schepper, Wim; Geuens, Luc; Blust, Ronny

    2013-01-01

    Tank truck cleaning (TTC) activities generate highly complex wastewater. In a previous study, we found that a significant ecotoxic effect was still present in biologically treated TTC wastewater. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the removal of acute toxicity from TTC wastewater by a sequence of technologies routinely applied for industrial wastewater. Acute toxicity was assayed with the widely applied and standardized Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition test. During a 5-month period, raw wastewater was grab-sampled from a full-scale TTC company and treated by the different unit operations on a laboratory scale. Chemical pretreatment of the wastewater by coagulation with FeCl3 removed approx. 38% of the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) and reduced the bioluminescence inhibition by 8%. Biological treatment with activated sludge subsequently removed another 77% of the remaining COD. This treatment step also reduced the bioluminescence inhibition but the removal efficiency varied strongly from 5 to 92% for the different samples. Powdered activated carbon almost completely removed the remaining COD and inhibition in all samples. The results suggest that conventional technologies did not suffice for complete removal of toxicity from TTC wastewater, and that advanced wastewater treatment technologies such as activated carbon are required for a satisfactory detoxification. PMID:24292468

  8. Ecotoxicity monitoring and bioindicator screening of oil-contaminated soil during bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weihang; Zhu, Nengwu; Cui, Jiaying; Wang, Huajin; Dang, Zhi; Wu, Pingxiao; Luo, Yidan; Shi, Chaohong

    2016-02-01

    A series of toxicity bioassays was conducted to monitor the ecotoxicity of soils in the different phases of bioremediation. Artificially oil-contaminated soil was inoculated with a petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium containing Burkholderia cepacia GS3C, Sphingomonas GY2B and Pandoraea pnomenusa GP3B strains adapted to crude oil. Soil ecotoxicity in different phases of bioremediation was examined by monitoring total petroleum hydrocarbons, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of seed germination and plant growth), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and bacterial luminescence. Although the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was reduced by 64.4%, forty days after bioremediation, the phytotoxicity and Photobacterium phosphoreum ecotoxicity test results indicated an initial increase in ecotoxicity, suggesting the formation of intermediate metabolites characterized by high toxicity and low bioavailability during bioremediation. The ecotoxicity values are a more valid indicator for evaluating the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques compared with only using the total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations. Among all of the potential indicators that could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of plant height, shoot weight and root fresh weight), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and luminescence of P. phosphoreum were the most sensitive.

  9. Leaching behaviour and ecotoxicity evaluation of chars from the pyrolysis of forestry biomass and polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, M; Mendes, S; Lapa, N; Gonçalves, M; Mendes, B; Pinto, F; Lopes, H

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the environmental risk of chars derived from the pyrolysis of mixtures of pine, plastics, and scrap tires, by studying their leaching potential and ecotoxicity. Relationships between chemical composition and ecotoxicity were established to identify contaminants responsible for toxicity. Since metallic contaminants were the focus of the present study, an EDTA washing step was applied to the chars to selectively remove metals that can be responsible for the observed toxicity. The results indicated that the introduction of biomass to the pyrolysis feedstock enhanced the acidity of chars and promote the mobilisation of inorganic compounds. Chars resulting from the pyrolysis of blends of pine and plastics did not produce ecotoxic eluates. A relationship between zinc concentrations in eluates and their ecotoxicity was found for chars obtained from mixtures with tires. A significant reduction in ecotoxicity was found when the chars were treated with EDTA, which was due to a significant reduction in zinc in chars after EDTA washing.

  10. Ecotoxicity monitoring and bioindicator screening of oil-contaminated soil during bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weihang; Zhu, Nengwu; Cui, Jiaying; Wang, Huajin; Dang, Zhi; Wu, Pingxiao; Luo, Yidan; Shi, Chaohong

    2016-02-01

    A series of toxicity bioassays was conducted to monitor the ecotoxicity of soils in the different phases of bioremediation. Artificially oil-contaminated soil was inoculated with a petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium containing Burkholderia cepacia GS3C, Sphingomonas GY2B and Pandoraea pnomenusa GP3B strains adapted to crude oil. Soil ecotoxicity in different phases of bioremediation was examined by monitoring total petroleum hydrocarbons, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of seed germination and plant growth), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and bacterial luminescence. Although the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was reduced by 64.4%, forty days after bioremediation, the phytotoxicity and Photobacterium phosphoreum ecotoxicity test results indicated an initial increase in ecotoxicity, suggesting the formation of intermediate metabolites characterized by high toxicity and low bioavailability during bioremediation. The ecotoxicity values are a more valid indicator for evaluating the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques compared with only using the total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations. Among all of the potential indicators that could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of plant height, shoot weight and root fresh weight), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and luminescence of P. phosphoreum were the most sensitive. PMID:26491984

  11. [Review of ecotoxicity and mechanism of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic organisms].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Zhao, Jian; Li, Na; Li, Feng-Min; Xing, Bao-Shan

    2010-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanoproducts, ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) attracts increasing attention and research. This paper reviews the ecotoxicity and mechanisms of NPs to aquatic organisms systematically. Toxic effects of different classes of NPs to bacteria, algae, invertebrates and fish in aquatic environments were firstly summarized, possible toxicity mechanisms were then expounded and the relationship between toxicity mechanisms and unique physicochemical properties of NPs was also analyzed. The processes of NPs uptake and membrane penetration at the cell and molecular level were discussed and presented. In the natural water, NPs behaviors are influenced by water chemistry conditions, so toxic effect to aquatic organisms is different from that in laboratory conditions, which should be paid with increased attention and effort. Finally, bottle-necks and challenges of NPs ecotoxicity research and existing problems of test and analytical methods were analyzed and the future directions of research were suggested. PMID:20698250

  12. Computational ecotoxicology: simultaneous prediction of ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology has brought great advances to many fields of modern science. A manifold of applications of nanoparticles have been found due to their interesting optical, electrical, and biological/chemical properties. However, the potential toxic effects of nanoparticles to different ecosystems are of special concern nowadays. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles are still poorly understood. Quantitative-structure activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) models have just started being useful computational tools for the assessment of toxic effects of nanomaterials. But most QSAR/QSTR models have been applied so far to predict ecotoxicity against only one organism/bio-indicator such as Daphnia magna. This prevents having a deeper knowledge about the real ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles, and consequently, there is no possibility to establish an efficient risk assessment of nanomaterials in the environment. In this work, a perturbation model for nano-QSAR problems is introduced with the aim of simultaneously predicting the ecotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several assay organisms (bio-indicators), by considering also multiple measures of ecotoxicity, as well as the chemical compositions, sizes, conditions under which the sizes were measured, shapes, and the time during which the diverse assay organisms were exposed to nanoparticles. The QSAR-perturbation model was derived from a database containing 5520 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), and it was shown to exhibit accuracies of ca. 99% in both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, three different nickel-based nanoparticles (Ni) with experimental values reported in the literature were predicted. The predictions were found to be in very good agreement with the experimental evidences, confirming that Ni-nanoparticles are not ecotoxic when compared with other nanoparticles. The results

  13. Ecotoxicity of selected nano-materials to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Blaise, C; Gagné, F; Férard, J F; Eullaffroy, P

    2008-10-01

    Present knowledge concerning the ecotoxic effects of nano-materials is very limited and merits to be documented more fully. For this purpose, we appraised the toxicity of nine metallic nano-powders (copper zinc iron oxide, nickel zinc iron oxide, yttrium iron oxide, titanium dioxide, strontium ferrite, indium tin oxide, samarium oxide, erbium oxide, and holmium oxide) and of two organic nano- powders (fullerene-C60 and single-walled carbon nanotube or SWCNT). After a simple process where nano-powders (NPs) were prepared in aqueous solution and filtered, they were then bioassayed across several taxonomic groups including decomposers (bacteria), primary producers (micro-algae), as well as primary and secondary consumers (micro-invertebrates and fish). Toxicity data generated on the 11 NPs reflected a wide spectrum of sensitivity that was biological level-, test-, and endpoint-specific. With all acute and chronic tests confounded for these 11 NPs, toxicity responses spanned over three orders of magnitude: >463 mg/L (24 h LC50 of the invertebrate Thamnoplatyurus platyurus for fullerene-C60) / 0.3 mg/L (96 h EC50 of the invertebrate Hydra attenuata for indium tin oxide), that is a ratio of 1543. On the basis of the MARA (Microbial Array for Risk Assessment) assay toxic fingerprint concept, it is intimated that NPs may have different modes of toxic action. When mixed in a 1:1 ratio with a certified reference material (CRM) sediment, two solid phase assays and an elutriate assay, respectively, showed that five NPs (copper zinc iron oxide, samarium oxide, erbium oxide, holmium oxide, and SWCNT) were able to increase both CRM sediment toxicity and its elutriate toxicity. This initial investigation suggests that chemicals emerging from nanotechnology may pose a risk to aquatic life in water column and sediment compartments and that further studies on their adverse effects are to be encouraged.

  14. Ecotoxicity of waste water from industrial fires fighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobes, P.; Danihelka, P.; Janickova, S.; Marek, J.; Bernatikova, S.; Suchankova, J.; Baudisova, B.; Sikorova, L.; Soldan, P.

    2012-04-01

    As shown at several case studies, waste waters from extinguishing of industrial fires involving hazardous chemicals could be serious threat primary for surrounding environmental compartments (e.g. surface water, underground water, soil) and secondary for human beings, animals and plants. The negative impacts of the fire waters on the environment attracted public attention since the chemical accident in the Sandoz (Schweizerhalle) in November 1986 and this process continues. Last October, special Seminary on this topic has been organized by UNECE in Bonn. Mode of interaction of fire waters with the environment and potential transport mechanisms are still discussed. However, in many cases waste water polluted by extinguishing foam (always with high COD values), flammable or toxic dangerous substances as heavy metals, pesticides or POPs, are released to surface water or soil without proper decontamination, which can lead to environmental accident. For better understanding of this type of hazard and better coordination of firemen brigades and other responders, the ecotoxicity of such type of waste water should be evaluated in both laboratory tests and in water samples collected during real cases of industrial fires. Case studies, theoretical analysis of problem and toxicity tests on laboratory model samples (e.g. on bacteria, mustard seeds, daphnia and fishes) will provide additional necessary information. Preliminary analysis of waters from industrial fires (polymer material storage and galvanic plating facility) in the Czech Republic has already confirmed high toxicity. In first case the toxicity may be attributed to decomposition of burned material and extinguishing foams, in the latter case it can be related to cyanides in original electroplating baths. On the beginning of the year 2012, two years R&D project focused on reduction of extinguish waste water risk for the environment, was approved by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic.

  15. Outcast England. How Schools Exclude Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Jenny; And Others

    The number of black children "excluded" each month from schools in England and Wales is greatly out of proportion to their relative enrollment. Exclusion includes suspension for a fixed or indefinite term or expulsion from a particular school, and can include in-school exclusions of isolation. The term "black children" is taken to include various…

  16. 10 CFR 490.3 - Excluded vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excluded vehicles. 490.3 Section 490.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 490.3... has a fleet or to calculate alternative fueled vehicle acquisition requirements, the...

  17. 10 CFR 490.3 - Excluded vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excluded vehicles. 490.3 Section 490.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 490.3... has a fleet or to calculate alternative fueled vehicle acquisition requirements, the...

  18. 10 CFR 490.3 - Excluded vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excluded vehicles. 490.3 Section 490.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 490.3... has a fleet or to calculate alternative fueled vehicle acquisition requirements, the...

  19. 10 CFR 490.3 - Excluded vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excluded vehicles. 490.3 Section 490.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 490.3... has a fleet or to calculate alternative fueled vehicle acquisition requirements, the...

  20. 10 CFR 490.3 - Excluded vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded vehicles. 490.3 Section 490.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 490.3... has a fleet or to calculate alternative fueled vehicle acquisition requirements, the...

  1. Polyelectrolyte solutions: Excluded-volume considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoussi, Hedi; Karasz, Frank E.

    1993-12-01

    We provide experimental evidence for the electrostatically related excluded-volume effects on the colligative properties and the single chain behavior of polyelectrolyte solutions in the dilute regime. The data are compared to the theory developed by Fixman, Skolnick, Odijk, and Houwaart. Good agreement between these theoretical considerations and the experimental data is observed.

  2. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Drugs and biologicals. Drugs and biologicals are excluded from payment under the Medicare home health benefit. (1) A drug is any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans or animals as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of disease or other condition or for the relief...

  3. 42 CFR 410.102 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... improve the functioning of a malformed body member. An example would be services furnished as part of a... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 410.102 Section 410.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE...

  4. 42 CFR 460.96 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 460.96 Section 460.96 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  5. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... excluded from home health coverage. (e) Services covered under the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. Services that are covered under the ESRD program and are contained in the composite rate reimbursement methodology, including any service furnished to a Medicare ESRD beneficiary that is directly related to...

  6. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... excluded from home health coverage. (e) Services covered under the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. Services that are covered under the ESRD program and are contained in the composite rate reimbursement methodology, including any service furnished to a Medicare ESRD beneficiary that is directly related to...

  7. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... excluded from home health coverage. (e) Services covered under the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. Services that are covered under the ESRD program and are contained in the composite rate reimbursement methodology, including any service furnished to a Medicare ESRD beneficiary that is directly related to...

  8. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... excluded from home health coverage. (e) Services covered under the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) program. Services that are covered under the ESRD program and are contained in the composite rate reimbursement methodology, including any service furnished to a Medicare ESRD beneficiary that is directly related to...

  9. 42 CFR 460.96 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excluded services. 460.96 Section 460.96 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  10. 42 CFR 460.96 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excluded services. 460.96 Section 460.96 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  11. 42 CFR 460.96 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excluded services. 460.96 Section 460.96 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  12. 42 CFR 460.96 - Excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... procedures. (e) Services furnished outside of the United States, except as follows: (1) In accordance with... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excluded services. 460.96 Section 460.96 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  13. Parents of Excluded Pupils: Customers, Partners, Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Gale; Pirrie, Anne; McCluskey, Gillean; Cullen, MairiAnn

    2013-01-01

    This article presents data drawn from interviews with a range of service providers and with the parents of pupils permanently excluded from alternative provision in England. The findings are considered in the context of recent policy developments in the area of children and families. These include the neo-liberal framing of parents as customers…

  14. ECOTOX (ECOTOXICOLOGY DATABASE): AN ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOX (ECOTOXicology Database) system developed by the U.S. EPA, National Health and Environmental Effecrs Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Mid-Continent Ecology Division in Duluth, MN, (MED-Duluth), provides a web browser search interface for locating aquatic and terrestrial t...

  15. A review of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) for assessing the ecotoxicity of phthalate esters

    SciTech Connect

    Parkerton, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    Dialkyl phthalate esters represent an important class of high production volume, industrial chemicals spanning a wide range of chemical properties. Over the last two decades, numerous studies have been conducted to characterize the ecotoxicity of phthalate esters. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a synthesis of the available ecotoxicity literature using a QSAR paradigm. Results from this analysis provide several important insights. First, a mechanistic explanation is provided to account for the general lack of ecotoxicity observed for higher molecular weight phthalates possessing alkyl chains of six or more carbons. Second, studies that appear as outliers are identified due to either experimental artifacts (e.g., physical effects on daphnids due to testing at concentrations exceeding water solubility) or questionable experimental methods (e.g., toxicity tests based on nominal concentrations). Lastly, differences in ecotoxicity between species appear to be due, in part, to differences in test organisms biotransformation capacities. The utility of adopting a QSAR-based approach for risk assessment will be discussed.

  16. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  17. 21 CFR 1404.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded Parties List System 1404.950 Section 1404... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means the... entitled, “List of Parties Excluded or Disqualified from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement...

  18. [Intraoperative sonography to exclude thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Jakab, Ferenc; Szabó, Gyozo János

    2007-08-12

    The authors present the case of a 29-year-old female with stab wound to the abdomen. After the initial fluid resuscitation and preliminary radiographic examinations immediate laparotomy was indicated due to hypovolaemic circulatory collapse. Splenectomy and gastric suture were necessary. Following the urgent interventions a wound of the left diaphragm was noticed during the extended abdominal exploration. According to the prior examinations and the operative situation it was not clear whether the injury is penetrating. In order to avoid explorative thoracotomy intraoperative ultrasonography was performed: the transducer and the acoustic gel were placed into sterile plastic bag and the organs above the diaphragm were examined from the abdominal cavity. With this method intrathoracic injury close to the diaphragm could be clearly excluded.

  19. Predictive modeling studies for the ecotoxicity of ionic liquids towards the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Roy, Kunal

    2014-06-01

    Hazardous potential of ionic liquids is becoming an issue of high concern with increasing application of these compounds in various industrial processes. Predictive toxicological modeling on ionic liquids provides a rational assessment strategy and aids in developing suitable guidance for designing novel analogues. The present study attempts to explore the chemical features of ionic liquids responsible for their ecotoxicity towards the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus by developing mathematical models using extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices along with other categories of chemical descriptors. The entire study has been conducted with reference to the OECD guidelines for QSAR model development using predictive classification and regression modeling strategies. The best models from both the analyses showed that ecotoxicity of ionic liquids can be decreased by reducing chain length of cationic substituents and increasing hydrogen bond donor feature in cations, and replacing bulky unsaturated anions with simple saturated moiety having less lipophilic heteroatoms.

  20. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of exhaust particulates from diesel-powered buses.

    PubMed

    Kováts, Nora; Acs, András; Ferincz, Arpád; Kovács, Anikó; Horváth, Eszter; Kakasi, Balázs; Jancsek-Turóczi, Beatrix; Gelencsér, András

    2013-10-01

    Diesel exhaust is one of the major sources of fine and ultra-fine particulate matter in urban air. Toxicity of diesel-powered engine emissions has been quite widely assessed; however, much less information is available on their ecotoxicity. In our study, the kinetic version of the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition bioassay based on the ISO 21338:2010 standard was used to characterise the ecotoxicity of diesel-powered buses. It is a direct contact test in which solid samples are tested in suspension and test organisms are in direct contact with toxic particles. The age of the selected buses fell into a wide range; the oldest one was produced in 1987. Diesel engines of different emission standards (Euro0-Euro4) were included. Measured EC50 values of Euro0-Euro1 engine emissions fell into the same range, 1.24-0.96 μg ml(-1), respectively. On the contrary, emission of Euro4 vehicle proved to be non-toxic. Genotoxic potential of the samples was also estimated, using the colorimetric SOS-chromotest™. Genotoxicity was detected also for Euro0 and Euro1 buses, showing correlation with the ecotoxic potential. The fact that the particulates from Euro4 vehicles did not show ecotoxic/genotoxic effect implies that replacing old Euro1 and Euro2 buses can be a highly effective solution for reducing environmental hazard of automotive emissions. The whole-aerosol testing method is a cheap alternative that can be used in engine developments and emission control.

  1. Ecotoxicity and fungal deterioration of recycled polypropylene/wood composites: effect of wood content and coupling.

    PubMed

    Sudár, András; López, María J; Keledi, Gergely; Vargas-García, M Carmen; Suárez-Estrella, Francisca; Moreno, Joaquín; Burgstaller, Christoph; Pukánszky, Béla

    2013-09-01

    Recycled polypropylene (rPP) was recovered from an industrial shredder and composites were prepared with a relatively wide range of wood content and with two coupling agents, a maleated PP (MAPP) and a maleated ethylene-propylene-diene elastomer (MAEPDM). The mechanical properties of the composites showed that the coupling agents change structure only slightly, but interfacial adhesion quite drastically. The durability of the materials was determined by exposing them to a range of fungi and, ecotoxicity was studied on the aquatic organism Vibrio fischeri. The composites generally exhibit low acute toxicity, with values below the levels considered to have direct ecotoxic effect on aquatic ecosystems (<2 toxic units). Their toxicity to V. fischeri depended on the presence of the coupling agents with larger E50 values in 24-h aqueous extracts from composites containing MAPP or MAEPDM in comparison to composites without any coupling agent. Evaluation of resistance against fungal colonization and deterioration proved that wood facilitates fungal colonization. Fungi caused slight mass loss (below 3%) but it was not correlated with substantial deterioration in material properties. MAPP seems to be beneficial in the retention of mechanical properties during fungal attack. rPP/wood composites can be considered non-ecotoxic and quite durable, but the influence of wood content on resistance to fungal attack must be taken into account for materials intended for applications requiring long-term outdoor exposure. PMID:23769467

  2. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: a case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2015-02-01

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is widely applied in several industrial sectors to evaluate the environmental performance of processes, products and services. Recently, several reports and studies have emphasized the importance of LCA in the field of engineered nanomaterials. However, to date only a few LCA studies on nanotechnology have been carried out, and fewer still have assessed aspects relating to ecotoxicity. This is mainly due to the lack of knowledge in relation on human and environmental exposure and effect of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This bottleneck is continued when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO₂). The USEtox model has been selected as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO₂ in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC₅₀ values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO₂ was computed on the basis of the HC₅₀ value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox model and accounting for nano-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28 PAFdaym(3)kg(-1) is proposed.

  3. Ecotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: standardization of the dispersion methods and concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Marcaide, Arrate; Mendoza, Gemma

    2015-08-01

    There are currently a variety of applications for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), but considerable concerns exist regarding their release into the environment. Their potential accumulation by aquatic organisms could lead to transfer throughout food chains. Considering the divergences in experimental data published on the ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes, further research is required. The dispersion of MWCNTs in aqueous culturing media of organisms as well as the determination of concentrations are relevant aspects to obtain accurate ecotoxicity results. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy is one of the most reported techniques to analyze concentration quickly and economically, but the methodologies to prepare dispersions and selecting the wavelengths for ultraviolet-visible measurements have not yet been clearly defined. The present study demonstrates that dispersion procedures influence absorbance, and an approach to determine the most appropriate measurement wavelength is proposed. Ecotoxicity tests with MWCNTs were performed on Vibrio fischeri bacteria, and divergences in the results were observed with respect to those previously reported. The present study contributes to the attempt to overcome the lack of standardization in the environmental assessment of MWCNTs.

  4. Evaluation of acute ecotoxicity removal from industrial wastewater using a battery of rapid bioassays.

    PubMed

    Dries, Jan; Daens, Dominique; Geuens, Luc; Blust, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares conventional wastewater treatment technologies (coagulation-flocculation and activated sludge) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) treatment for the removal of acute ecotoxicity from wastewater generated by tank truck cleaning (TTC) processes. Ecotoxicity was assessed with a battery of four commercially available rapid biological toxicity testing systems, verified by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Chemical coagulation-flocculation of raw TTC wastewater had no impact on the inhibition of the bioluminescence by Vibrio fischeri (BioTox assay). Subsequent biological treatment with activated sludge without PAC resulted in BioTox inhibition-free effluent (<10% inhibition). In contrast, activated sludge treatment without PAC produced an effluent that significantly inhibited (>50%) (i) the bioluminescence by Photobacterium leiognathi (ToxScreen³ test kit), (ii) the photosynthesis by the green algae Chlorella vulgaris (LuminoTox SAPS test kit), and (iii) the particle ingestion by the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus (Rapidtoxkit test kit). The lowest inhibition was measured after activated sludge treatment with the highest PAC dose (400 mg/L), demonstrating the effectiveness of PAC treatment for ecotoxicity removal from TTC wastewater. In conclusion, the combination of bioassays applied in the present study represents a promising test battery for rapid ecotoxicty assessment in wastewater treatment. PMID:25521143

  5. Impact of ozonation on ecotoxicity and endocrine activity of tertiary treated wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Dominik; Schaar, Heidemarie; Bartel, Cordula; Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P; Miller, Ingrid; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Möstl, Erich; Grillitsch, Britta

    2012-07-01

    Tertiary wastewater treatment plant effluent before and after ozonation (0.6-1.1g O₃/g DOC) was tested for aquatic ecotoxicity in a battery of standardised microbioassays with green algae, daphnids, and zebrafish eggs. In addition, unconjugated estrogen and 17β-hydroxyandrogen immunoreactive substances were quantified by means of enzyme immunoassays, and endocrine effects were analysed in a 21-day fish screening assay with adult male and female medaka (Oryzias latipes). Ozonation decreased estrogen-immunoreactivity by 97.7±1.2% and, to a lesser extent, androgen-immunoreactivity by 56.3±16.5%. None of the short-term exposure ecotoxicity tests revealed any adverse effects of the tertiary effluent, neither before nor after the ozonation step. Similarly in the fish screening assay, reproductive fitness parameters showed no effects attributed to micropollutants, and no detrimental effects of the effluents were observed. Based on the presented screening, ozonation effectively reduced steroid hormone levels in the wastewater treatment plant effluent without increasing the effluent's ecotoxicity. PMID:22551818

  6. Aquatic ecotoxicity of the fungicide pyrimethanil: effect profile under optimal and thermal stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seeland, Anne; Oehlmann, Jörg; Müller, Ruth

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic ecotoxic profile of the fungicide pyrimethanil and its acute and chronic thermal dependence in two aquatic invertebrates Chironomus riparius and Daphnia magna were investigated. The ecotoxicity of pyrimethanil at optimal thermal conditions did not depend on the trophic level, but was species-specific. The acute pyrimethanil-toxicity on C. riparius increased with higher temperature. The chronic response of Daphnia magna to the NOEC of the fungicide was examined in a multigenerational experiment under three near-natural temperature regimes. A pyrimethanil-induced increase of total mortality was buffered by the strongly related increase of the general reproductive capacity, while population growth was stronger influenced by temperature than by the fungicide. At a LOEC, however, a second generation could not be established with D. magna at all thermal regimes. This clearly shows that thermal and multigenerational effects should be considered when appraising the ecotoxicity of pesticides and assessing their future risk for the environment. PMID:22622013

  7. Reduction in acute ecotoxicity of paper mill effluent by sequential application of xylanase and laccase.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Garg, Gaurav; Sharma, Jitender; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the ecotoxicity of paper mill, four different enzymatic pretreatment strategies were investigated in comparison to conventional chemical based processes. In strategy I, xylanase-aided pretreatment of pulp was carried out, and in strategy II, xylanase and laccase-mediator systems were used sequentially. Moreover, to compare the efficiency of Bacillus stearothermophilus xylanase and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora laccase in the reduction of ecotoxicity and pollution, parallel strategies (III and IV) were implemented using commercial enzymes. Conventional C(D)E(OP)D(1)D(2) (C(D), Cl(2) with ClO2; EOP, H2O2 extraction; D1 and D2, ClO2) and X/XLC(D)E(OP)D(1)D(2) (X, xylanase; L, laccase) sequences were employed with non-enzymatic and enzymatic strategies, respectively. Acute toxicity was determined by the extent of inhibition of bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri with different dilutions of the effluent. Two-fold increase was observed in EC50 values for strategy I compared to the control process. On the other hand, sequential application of commercial enzymes resulted in higher acute toxicity compared to lab enzymes. In comparison to the control process, strategy II was the most efficient and successfully reduced 60.1 and 25.8% of biological oxygen demand (BOD) and color of effluents, respectively. We report for the first time the comparative analysis of the ecotoxicity of industrial effluents. PMID:25058160

  8. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  9. 34 CFR 85.945 - Excluded or exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded or exclusion. 85.945 Section 85.945 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.945 Excluded or exclusion. Excluded or exclusion means— (a) That a person or commodity...

  10. 48 CFR 9.404 - Excluded Parties List System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded Parties List... ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 9.404 Excluded Parties List System. (a) The General Services Administration (GSA)— (1) Operates the web-based Excluded...

  11. 34 CFR 85.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...,” so long as published. (Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 85.950 Section 85.950... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means...

  12. 29 CFR 1471.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 1471.950 Section 1471.950... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means the list maintained and disseminated by the General...

  13. 34 CFR 85.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...,” so long as published. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 85.950 Section 85.950... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means...

  14. 46 CFR 78.10-1 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Persons excluded. 78.10-1 Section 78.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 78.10-1 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from...

  15. 46 CFR 78.10-1 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Persons excluded. 78.10-1 Section 78.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 78.10-1 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from...

  16. 46 CFR 35.01-60 - Person excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Person excluded. 35.01-60 Section 35.01-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS General Provisions; Special Operating Requirements § 35.01-60 Person excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from the pilothouse...

  17. 46 CFR 78.10-1 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Persons excluded. 78.10-1 Section 78.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 78.10-1 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from...

  18. 46 CFR 78.10-1 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons excluded. 78.10-1 Section 78.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 78.10-1 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from...

  19. 46 CFR 35.01-60 - Person excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Person excluded. 35.01-60 Section 35.01-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Special Operating Requirements § 35.01-60 Person excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from the pilothouse and navigation...

  20. 46 CFR 35.01-60 - Person excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Person excluded. 35.01-60 Section 35.01-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS General Provisions; Special Operating Requirements § 35.01-60 Person excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from the pilothouse...

  1. 46 CFR 35.01-60 - Person excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Person excluded. 35.01-60 Section 35.01-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS General Provisions; Special Operating Requirements § 35.01-60 Person excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from the pilothouse...

  2. 46 CFR 35.01-60 - Person excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Person excluded. 35.01-60 Section 35.01-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Special Operating Requirements § 35.01-60 Person excluded. Masters and pilots shall exclude from the pilothouse and navigation...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1012 - Work excluded from employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Work excluded from employment. 404.1012... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1012 Work excluded from employment. Certain kinds of work performed by...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1012 - Work excluded from employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Work excluded from employment. 404.1012... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1012 Work excluded from employment. Certain kinds of work performed by...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1012 - Work excluded from employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work excluded from employment. 404.1012... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1012 Work excluded from employment. Certain kinds of work performed by...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1209 - Mandatorily excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of fire, storm, snow, volcano, earthquake, flood or other similar emergency; and (e) Services other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandatorily excluded services. 404.1209... May Be Covered § 404.1209 Mandatorily excluded services. Some services are mandatorily excluded...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1209 - Mandatorily excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of fire, storm, snow, volcano, earthquake, flood or other similar emergency; and (e) Services other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandatorily excluded services. 404.1209... May Be Covered § 404.1209 Mandatorily excluded services. Some services are mandatorily excluded...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1209 - Mandatorily excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of fire, storm, snow, volcano, earthquake, flood or other similar emergency; and (e) Services other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandatorily excluded services. 404.1209... May Be Covered § 404.1209 Mandatorily excluded services. Some services are mandatorily excluded...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1209 - Mandatorily excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of fire, storm, snow, volcano, earthquake, flood or other similar emergency; and (e) Services other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandatorily excluded services. 404.1209... May Be Covered § 404.1209 Mandatorily excluded services. Some services are mandatorily excluded...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1209 - Mandatorily excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of fire, storm, snow, volcano, earthquake, flood or other similar emergency; and (e) Services other... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandatorily excluded services. 404.1209... May Be Covered § 404.1209 Mandatorily excluded services. Some services are mandatorily excluded...

  11. Influence of the organic compounds on the ecotoxicity in the treatment of foundry sludge and olive mill waste.

    PubMed

    Coz, Alberto; Mantzavinos, Dionisis; Karageorgos, Petros; Kalogerakis, Nikolas; Andrés, Ana; Viguri, Javier R; Irabien, Angel

    2006-01-01

    The study of the ecotoxicity in two industrial waste materials and the relationships with the organic parameters has been conducted. Foundry sludge and olive mill waste have been used as industrial waste materials with organic or mixed character. Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) and advanced oxidation (AOP) processes have been carried out in order to treat both foundry sludge and olive mill waste. Analysis of ecotoxicity, total organic carbon, COD and phenol index have been evaluated in the untreated waste and end-products. The results of the treated samples allow obtaining the best formulations in both processes. The best formulations in the immobilisation process have been obtained with Portland cement and black carbon, activated carbon or foundry sand ashes. In the AOP process, ozone concentrations above 35 mg/l and reaction times equal to 120 minutes have been the optimal variables. The relationships between the organic parameters and the ecotoxicity of the samples have been studied in this paper. Furthermore, the global organic parameters have been studied in relation to the phenolic compounds. Lineal and logarithmic expressions have been obtained between the total organic carbon and phenol index and the ecotoxicity of the samples related to the organic parameters, respectively. Ecotoxicity of the samples with Vibrio fischeri is recommended as a very promising biotest for the study of the characterisation and the evaluation of the treatment of organic and mixed character waste and total organic carbon is recommended as global organic parameter in the treatment of foundry sludge. PMID:17172203

  12. Assessing ecotoxicity and uptake of metals and metalloids in relation to two different earthworm species (Eiseina hortensis and Lumbricus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Leveque, Thibaut; Capowiez, Yvan; Schreck, Eva; Mazzia, Christophe; Auffan, Mélanie; Foucault, Yann; Austruy, Annabelle; Dumat, Camille

    2013-08-01

    Due to diffuse atmospheric fallouts of process particles enriched by metals and metalloids, polluted soils concern large areas at the global scale. Useful tools to assess ecotoxicity induced by these polluted soils are therefore needed. Earthworms are currently used as biotest, however the influence of specie and earthworm behaviour, soil characteristics are poorly highlighted. Our aim was therefore to assess the toxicity of various polluted soils with process particles enriches by metals and metalloids (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Sb) collected from a lead recycling facility on two earthworm species belonging to different ecological types and thus likely to have contrasted behavioural responses (Eiseina hortensis and Lumbricus terrestris). The combination of behavioural factors measurements (cast production and biomass) and physico-chemical parameters such as metal absorption, bioaccumulation by earthworms and their localization in invertebrate tissues provided a valuable indication of pollutant bioavailability and ecotoxicity. Soil characteristics influenced ecotoxicity and metal uptake by earthworms, as well as their soil bioturbation. PMID:23688736

  13. A strategy to reduce the numbers of fish used in acute ecotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Barrett, Sarah; Buzby, Mary; Constable, David; Hartmann, Andreas; Hayes, Eileen; Huggett, Duane; Laenge, Reinhard; Lillicrap, Adam D; Straub, Jürg Oliver; Thompson, Roy S

    2003-12-01

    The pharmaceutical industry gives high priority to animal welfare in the process of drug discovery and safety assessment. In the context of environmental assessments of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration and draft European regulations may require testing of APIs for acute ecotoxicity to algae, daphnids, and fish (base-set ecotoxicity data used to derive the predicted no-effect concentration [PNECwater] from the most sensitive of three species). Subject to regulatory approval, it is proposed that testing can be moved from fish median lethal concentration (LC50) testing (typically using > or = 42 fish/API) to acute threshold tests using fewer fish (typically 10 fish/API). To support this strategy, we have collated base-set ecotoxicity data from regulatory studies of 91 APIs (names coded for commercial reasons). For 73 of the 91 APIs, the algal median effect concentration (EC50) and daphnid EC50 values were lower than or equal to the fish LC50 data. Thus, for approximately 80% of these APIs, algal and daphnid acute EC50 data could have been used in the absence of fish LC50 data to derive PNECwater values. For the other 18 APIs, use of an acute threshold test with a step-down factor of 3.2 is predicted to give comparable PNECwater outcomes. Based on this preliminary scenario of 91 APIs, this approach is predicted to reduce the total number of fish used from 3,822 to 1,025 (approximately 73%). The present study, although preliminary, suggests that the current regulatory requirement for fish LC50 data regarding APIs should be succeeded by fish acute threshold (step-down) test data, thereby achieving significant animal welfare benefits with no loss of data for PNECwater estimates.

  14. Ecotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene assessed by soil microbial indicators.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinjin; Song, Jing; Ding, Changfeng; Li, Xiaogang; Wang, Xingxiang

    2014-09-01

    The ecotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) to soil microorganisms was evaluated using the following microbial indicators: soil microbial biomass, respiration, nitrification, and Shannon index. Two soil types, udic ferrosols and aquic cambisols, were amended with 0 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, or 1000 mg/kg BaP; incubated at 25 °C; and tested on days 28, 60, and 180. The Shannon index was extremely insensitive to BaP. Microbial biomass and respiration could not be classified as sensitive indicators because of their relatively high 10% effect concentration (EC10) values. Nitrification was the most sensitive indicator in both soils and could be the preferred microbial indicator for testing the ecotoxicity of BaP. Higher toxicity of BaP was exhibited in udic ferrosols than in aquic cambisols, and the ecotoxicity of BaP decreased with incubation time. Extending the 28-d incubation time, which is suggested in the International Organization for Standardization and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, to 60 d was recommended for future microbial toxicity tests of BaP. On day 28, the EC10 values for microbial biomass, respiration, and nitrification were 71 mg/kg, 43 mg/kg, and 3.4 mg/kg in aquic cambisols and 51 mg/kg, 22 mg/kg, and 1.3 mg/kg in udic ferrosols, respectively. On day 60, these values were 106 mg/kg, 59 mg/kg, and 19 mg/kg in aquic cambisols and 77 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, and 6.9 mg/kg in udic ferrosols. These values could be used in combination to derive ecotoxicological soil screening levels of BaP.

  15. Prediction of ecotoxicity of heavy crude oil: contribution of measured components.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Joong; Lee, So-Young; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A prediction model for estimating the ecotoxicity of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and water-soluble fraction (WSF) of heavy crude oil is proposed. Iranian heavy crude oil (IHC), one of the major components of the Hebei Spirit oil spill in Korea in 2007, was used as a model crude oil for the preparation of the WAF and the WSF. Luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri was chosen as the model ecotoxicity test for evaluating the baseline toxicity of aromatic hydrocarbons in the IHC. The measured concentration of each chemical species in WAF and WSF agreed well with the predicted soluble concentration calculated using Raoult's law from the measured amount in the IHC. This indicates that the toxic potential of an oil mixture can be evaluated from the dissolved concentration of each species, which in turn, may be predicted from the composition of the crude or weathered oils. In addition, the contribution of each species in the mixture to the apparent luminescence inhibition by the WAF and the WSF was assessed using a concentration-addition model. The relative contributions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and alkylated PAHs in luminescence inhibition were estimated to be 76%, 2%, and 21%, respectively. It was further identified that C3- and C4-naphthalenes were the most important aromatic hydrocarbons responsible for baseline toxicity. This indicates that alkylated PAHs would be the major components of oil-spill residue. Further research is needed to evaluate the fate and ecotoxicity of alkylated PAHs. PMID:24490901

  16. Integrated microfluidic technology for sub-lethal and behavioral marine ecotoxicity biotests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yushi; Reyes Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Persoone, Guido; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Changes in behavioral traits exhibited by small aquatic invertebrates are increasingly postulated as ethically acceptable and more sensitive endpoints for detection of water-born ecotoxicity than conventional mortality assays. Despite importance of such behavioral biotests, their implementation is profoundly limited by the lack of appropriate biocompatible automation, integrated optoelectronic sensors, and the associated electronics and analysis algorithms. This work outlines development of a proof-of-concept miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for rapid water toxicity tests based on changes in swimming patterns exhibited by Artemia franciscana (Artoxkit M™) nauplii. In contrast to conventionally performed end-point analysis based on counting numbers of dead/immobile specimens we performed a time-resolved video data analysis to dynamically assess impact of a reference toxicant on swimming pattern of A. franciscana. Our system design combined: (i) innovative microfluidic device keeping free swimming Artemia sp. nauplii under continuous microperfusion as a mean of toxin delivery; (ii) mechatronic interface for user-friendly fluidic actuation of the chip; and (iii) miniaturized video acquisition for movement analysis of test specimens. The system was capable of performing fully programmable time-lapse and video-microscopy of multiple samples for rapid ecotoxicity analysis. It enabled development of a user-friendly and inexpensive test protocol to dynamically detect sub-lethal behavioral end-points such as changes in speed of movement or distance traveled by each animal.

  17. Identification and Avoidance of Potential Artifacts and Misinterpretations in Nanomaterial Ecotoxicity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel physicochemistries of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) offer considerable commercial potential for new products and processes, but also the possibility of unforeseen and negative consequences upon ENM release into the environment. Investigations of ENM ecotoxicity have revealed that the unique properties of ENMs and a lack of appropriate test methods can lead to results that are inaccurate or not reproducible. The occurrence of spurious results or misinterpretations of results from ENM toxicity tests that are unique to investigations of ENMs (as opposed to traditional toxicants) have been reported, but have not yet been systemically reviewed. Our objective in this manuscript is to highlight artifacts and misinterpretations that can occur at each step of ecotoxicity testing: procurement or synthesis of the ENMs and assessment of potential toxic impurities such as metals or endotoxins, ENM storage, dispersion of the ENMs in the test medium, direct interference with assay reagents and unacknowledged indirect effects such as nutrient depletion during the assay, and assessment of the ENM biodistribution in organisms. We recommend thorough characterization of initial ENMs including measurement of impurities, implementation of steps to minimize changes to the ENMs during storage, inclusion of a set of experimental controls (e.g., to assess impacts of nutrient depletion, ENM specific effects, impurities in ENM formulation, desorbed surface coatings, the dispersion process, and direct interference of ENM with toxicity assays), and use of orthogonal measurement methods when available to assess ENMs fate and distribution in organisms. PMID:24617739

  18. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  19. A comparative study of the terrestrial ecotoxicity of selected protic and aprotic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Peric, Brezana; Sierra, Jordi; Martí, Esther; Cruañas, Robert; Garau, Maria Antonia

    2014-08-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a fairly new and very promising group of compounds with a vast variety of possible structures and uses. They are considered to be potentially "green", but their impact on the environment tends to be neglected or not studied enough, especially when it comes to terrestrial ecotoxicity, where there are very few studies performed to date. This work presents a comparative study of the terrestrial ecotoxicity of selected representatives of two ILs groups: a new family of protic ILs (derived from aliphatic amines and organic acids) and some frequently used aprotic ILs (substituted imidazolium and piridinium chlorides). Toxicity of the ILs towards three terrestrial plant species (Allium cepa, Lolium perenne and Raphanus sativus) and soil microorganisms involved in carbon and nitrogen transformation was analyzed. Protic ILs have shown no toxic effect in most of the tests performed. The EC50 values for aprotic ILs are various orders of magnitude lower than the ones for protic ILs in all of the tests. The most toxic ILs are the most complex ones in both of the analyzed groups. Protic ILs seem to have a potential for biodegradation in soil, while aprotic ILs exhibit inhibitory effects towards the carbon transforming microbiota. These findings indicate that protic ILs can be considered as less toxic and safer for the terrestrial environment than the aprotic ILs.

  20. Colloidal stability and ecotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Influence of select organic matters.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Uranga, Nerea; Mendoza, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, the release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the environment has raised serious concerns regarding their fate and potential impacts. Aquatic organisms constitute an important pathway for their entrance and transfer throughout the food web, and the current demand for standardization of methodologies to analyze the interactions of MWCNTs with them requires aquatic media that represent natural systems. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of MWCNTs and the substances present in natural waters may greatly affect their stability and bioavailability. The present study analyzes the influence of the most referenced synthetic and natural organic matters (Sigma-Aldrich humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter) in the agglomeration kinetics and ecotoxicity of MWCNTs, with the aim of determining their suitability to fulfill the current standardization requirements. Natural organic matter provides increased colloidal stability to the MWCNTs' dispersions, which results in higher adverse effects on the key invertebrate organism Daphnia magna. Furthermore, the results obtained with this type of organic matter allow for observation of the important role of the outer diameter and content impurities of MWCNTs in their stability and ecotoxicity on daphnids. Sigma-Aldrich humic acid appeared to alter the response of the organisms to carbon nanotubes compared with that observed in the presence of natural organic matter.

  1. Arsenate (As V) in water: quantitative sensitivity relationships among biomarker, ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valéria C; Almeida, Sônia M; Resgalla, Charrid; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Cotelle, Sylvie; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-06-01

    It is useful to test ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints in the environmental impact assessment. Here, we compare and discuss ecotoxicity and genotoxicity effects in organisms in response to exposure to arsenate (As V) in solution. Eco(geno)toxicity responses in Aliivibrio fischeri, Lytechinus variegatus, Daphnia magna, Skeletonema costatum and Vicia faba were analyzed by assessing different endpoints: biomass growth, peroxidase activity, mitotic index, micronucleus frequency, and lethality in accordance with the international protocols. Quantitative sensitivity relationships (QSR) between these endpoints were established in order to rank endpoint sensitivity. The results for the QSR values based on the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) ratios varied from 2 (for ratio of root peroxidase activity to leaf peroxidase activity) to 2286 (for ratio of higher plant biomass growth to root peroxidase activity). The QSR values allowed the following sensitivity ranking to be established: higher plant enzymatic activity>daphnids≈echinoderms>bacteria≈algae>higher plant biomass growth. The LOEC values for the mitotic index and micronucleus frequency (LOEC=0.25mgAsL(-1)) were similar to the lowest LOEC values observed in aquatic organisms. This approach to the QSR of different endpoints could form the basis for monitoring and predicting early effects of pollutants before they give rise to significant changes in natural community structures. PMID:23597676

  2. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    PubMed

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-01

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays. PMID:27348256

  3. Ozonation of ofloxacin in water: by-products, degradation pathway and ecotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kheng Soo; Madehi, Norfazrina

    2015-07-01

    Application of ozonation in water treatment involves complex oxidation pathways that could lead to the formation of various by-products, some of which may be harmful to living organisms. In this work, ozonation by-products of ofloxacin (OFX), a frequently detected pharmaceutical pollutant in the environment, were identified and their ecotoxicity was estimated using the Ecological Structure Activity Relationships (ECOSAR) computer program. In order to examine the role of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (∙OH) in the degradation of ofloxacin, ozonation was performed at pH2, 7 and 12. In this study, 12 new structures have been proposed for the ozonation by-products detected during the ozonation of ofloxacin. According to the identified ozonation by-products, O3 and ∙OH were found to react with ofloxacin during ozonation. The reaction between ofloxacin and O3 proceeded via hydroxylation and breakdown of heterocyclic ring with unsaturated double-bond. The reaction between ofloxacin and ·OH generated various by-products derived from the breakdown of heterocyclic ring. Ecotoxicity assessment indicated that ozonation of OFX could yield by-products of greater toxicity compared with parent compounds.

  4. Colloidal stability and ecotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Influence of select organic matters.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Uranga, Nerea; Mendoza, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, the release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the environment has raised serious concerns regarding their fate and potential impacts. Aquatic organisms constitute an important pathway for their entrance and transfer throughout the food web, and the current demand for standardization of methodologies to analyze the interactions of MWCNTs with them requires aquatic media that represent natural systems. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of MWCNTs and the substances present in natural waters may greatly affect their stability and bioavailability. The present study analyzes the influence of the most referenced synthetic and natural organic matters (Sigma-Aldrich humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter) in the agglomeration kinetics and ecotoxicity of MWCNTs, with the aim of determining their suitability to fulfill the current standardization requirements. Natural organic matter provides increased colloidal stability to the MWCNTs' dispersions, which results in higher adverse effects on the key invertebrate organism Daphnia magna. Furthermore, the results obtained with this type of organic matter allow for observation of the important role of the outer diameter and content impurities of MWCNTs in their stability and ecotoxicity on daphnids. Sigma-Aldrich humic acid appeared to alter the response of the organisms to carbon nanotubes compared with that observed in the presence of natural organic matter. PMID:26189503

  5. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    PubMed

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-01

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays.

  6. 34 CFR 85.1020 - Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. 85.1020 Section 85.1020 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.1020 Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. (a)...

  7. 32 CFR 220.6 - Certain payers excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or Medicaid programs (titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act) are not authorized. (b) Supplemental plans. CHAMPUS (see 32 CFR part 199) supplemental plans and income supplemental plans are excluded... documentation provided by the third party payer, that the policy or plan clearly excludes payment for...

  8. 19 CFR 148.106 - Excluded articles of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded articles of merchandise. 148.106 Section 148.106 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Limited Value § 148.106 Excluded articles of merchandise. The following articles of merchandise have...

  9. 19 CFR 148.106 - Excluded articles of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded articles of merchandise. 148.106 Section 148.106 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Limited Value § 148.106 Excluded articles of merchandise. The following articles of merchandise have...

  10. 19 CFR 148.106 - Excluded articles of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded articles of merchandise. 148.106 Section 148.106 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Limited Value § 148.106 Excluded articles of merchandise. The following articles of merchandise have...

  11. 19 CFR 148.106 - Excluded articles of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded articles of merchandise. 148.106 Section 148.106 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Limited Value § 148.106 Excluded articles of merchandise. The following articles of merchandise have...

  12. 19 CFR 148.106 - Excluded articles of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded articles of merchandise. 148.106 Section 148.106 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Limited Value § 148.106 Excluded articles of merchandise. The following articles of merchandise have...

  13. Early Intervention and Prevention for Children Excluded from Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panayiotopoulos, Christos; Kerfoot, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In the last 10 years, the problem of school exclusion in England has reached a crisis point. Figures on permanent exclusions from primary, secondary and special schools in England show that for 1996/97, 12 700 children were excluded. Among these, 12% were pupils permanently excluded from primary schools. When the present Labour Government came to…

  14. 42 CFR 412.25 - Excluded hospital units: Common requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospital units: Common requirements. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.25 Excluded hospital units: Common requirements. (a) Basis...

  15. 48 CFR 809.404 - Excluded Parties List System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excluded Parties List System. 809.404 Section 809.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS....404 Excluded Parties List System. Acquisition Resources Service, Office of Acquisition and...

  16. 48 CFR 609.404 - Excluded parties list system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded parties list system. 609.404 Section 609.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION... Excluded parties list system. A/OPE shall accomplish the agency responsibilities prescribed in FAR...

  17. 5 CFR 894.302 - What is an excluded position?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.302 What is an excluded position? Excluded positions are described in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)(i), (ii), (iii), and (iv) and 5 CFR....C., and 5 CFR part 430, subpart B; or (2) An employee serving under an interim...

  18. 5 CFR 894.302 - What is an excluded position?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.302 What is an excluded position? Excluded positions are described in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)(i), (ii), (iii), and (iv) and 5 CFR....C., and 5 CFR part 430, subpart B; or (2) An employee serving under an interim...

  19. 5 CFR 894.302 - What is an excluded position?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.302 What is an excluded position? Excluded positions are described in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)(i), (ii), (iii), and (iv) and 5 CFR....C., and 5 CFR part 430, subpart B; or (2) An employee serving under an interim...

  20. 5 CFR 894.302 - What is an excluded position?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.302 What is an excluded position? Excluded positions are described in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)(i), (ii), (iii), and (iv) and 5 CFR....C., and 5 CFR part 430, subpart B; or (2) An employee serving under an interim...

  1. 7 CFR 46.37 - Sundays and holidays excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sundays and holidays excluded. 46.37 Section 46.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.37 Sundays and holidays excluded. Sundays and holidays shall not be included in...

  2. 7 CFR 46.37 - Sundays and holidays excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sundays and holidays excluded. 46.37 Section 46.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.37 Sundays and holidays excluded. Sundays and holidays shall not be included in...

  3. 7 CFR 46.37 - Sundays and holidays excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sundays and holidays excluded. 46.37 Section 46.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.37 Sundays and holidays excluded. Sundays and holidays shall not be included in...

  4. 7 CFR 46.37 - Sundays and holidays excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sundays and holidays excluded. 46.37 Section 46.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.37 Sundays and holidays excluded. Sundays and holidays shall not be included in...

  5. 7 CFR 46.37 - Sundays and holidays excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sundays and holidays excluded. 46.37 Section 46.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.37 Sundays and holidays excluded. Sundays and holidays shall not be included in...

  6. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  7. 26 CFR 1.552-4 - Certain excluded banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certain excluded banks. 1.552-4 Section 1.552-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.552-4 Certain excluded banks. (a)...

  8. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  9. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  10. 46 CFR 97.10-5 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Persons excluded. 97.10-5 Section 97.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 97.10-5 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots...

  11. 46 CFR 97.10-5 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Persons excluded. 97.10-5 Section 97.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 97.10-5 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots...

  12. 46 CFR 97.10-5 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Persons excluded. 97.10-5 Section 97.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 97.10-5 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots...

  13. 46 CFR 97.10-5 - Persons excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons excluded. 97.10-5 Section 97.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS OPERATIONS Persons Allowed in Pilothouse and on Navigation Bridge § 97.10-5 Persons excluded. Masters and pilots...

  14. 26 CFR 1.552-4 - Certain excluded banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Certain excluded banks. 1.552-4 Section 1.552-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.552-4 Certain excluded banks. (a)...

  15. 26 CFR 1.552-4 - Certain excluded banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain excluded banks. 1.552-4 Section 1.552-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.552-4 Certain excluded banks. (a)...

  16. 26 CFR 1.552-4 - Certain excluded banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain excluded banks. 1.552-4 Section 1.552-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.552-4 Certain excluded banks. (a)...

  17. 17 CFR 204.31 - Excluded debts or claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded debts or claims. 204... RELATING TO DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 204.31 Excluded debts or claims. This regulation does not apply to: (a) Debts or claims arising under the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as amended (26 U.S.C. 1),...

  18. 17 CFR 204.31 - Excluded debts or claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded debts or claims. 204... RELATING TO DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 204.31 Excluded debts or claims. This regulation does not apply to: (a) Debts or claims arising under the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as amended (26 U.S.C. 1),...

  19. 41 CFR 105-56.002 - Excluded debts or claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HBI are covered under 5 CFR part 890, Subpart E. ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded debts or claims... General Services Administration Employees § 105-56.002 Excluded debts or claims. This subpart does...

  20. 26 CFR 1.552-4 - Certain excluded banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Certain excluded banks. 1.552-4 Section 1.552-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.552-4 Certain excluded banks. (a)...

  1. 32 CFR 220.6 - Certain payers excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.6 Certain...) Supplemental plans. CHAMPUS (see 32 CFR part 199) supplemental plans and income supplemental plans are excluded... documentation provided by the third party payer, that the policy or plan clearly excludes payment for...

  2. 32 CFR 220.6 - Certain payers excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.6 Certain...) Supplemental plans. CHAMPUS (see 32 CFR part 199) supplemental plans and income supplemental plans are excluded... documentation provided by the third party payer, that the policy or plan clearly excludes payment for...

  3. 32 CFR 220.6 - Certain payers excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.6 Certain...) Supplemental plans. CHAMPUS (see 32 CFR part 199) supplemental plans and income supplemental plans are excluded... documentation provided by the third party payer, that the policy or plan clearly excludes payment for...

  4. 32 CFR 220.6 - Certain payers excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.6 Certain...) Supplemental plans. CHAMPUS (see 32 CFR part 199) supplemental plans and income supplemental plans are excluded... documentation provided by the third party payer, that the policy or plan clearly excludes payment for...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the...

  10. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excluding certain additions to wages. 548.305 Section 548.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS AUTHORIZATION OF ESTABLISHED BASIC RATES FOR COMPUTING OVERTIME PAY Interpretations Authorized Basic Rates § 548.305 Excluding...

  11. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excluding certain additions to wages. 548.305 Section 548.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS AUTHORIZATION OF ESTABLISHED BASIC RATES FOR COMPUTING OVERTIME PAY Interpretations Authorized Basic Rates § 548.305 Excluding...

  12. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Excluding certain additions to wages. 548.305 Section 548.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS AUTHORIZATION OF ESTABLISHED BASIC RATES FOR COMPUTING OVERTIME PAY Interpretations Authorized Basic Rates § 548.305 Excluding...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1210 - Optionally excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... excluded if performed for a private employer; and (e) For modifications executed after 1994, services... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Optionally excluded services. 404.1210... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of...

  14. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63... FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Special Conditions § 2400.63 Excluded graduate study. James Madison Fellowships do not provide support for study toward doctoral degrees, for the degree of master...

  15. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63... FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Special Conditions § 2400.63 Excluded graduate study. James Madison Fellowships do not provide support for study toward doctoral degrees, for the degree of master...

  16. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63... FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Special Conditions § 2400.63 Excluded graduate study. James Madison Fellowships do not provide support for study toward doctoral degrees, for the degree of master...

  17. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63... FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Special Conditions § 2400.63 Excluded graduate study. James Madison Fellowships do not provide support for study toward doctoral degrees, for the degree of master...

  18. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse.

  19. Ecotoxicity quantitative structure-activity relationships for alcohol ethoxylate mixtures based on substance-specific toxicity predictions.

    PubMed

    Boeije, G M; Cano, M L; Marshall, S J; Belanger, S E; Van Compernolle, R; Dorn, P B; Gümbel, H; Toy, R; Wind, T

    2006-05-01

    Traditionally, ecotoxicity quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for alcohol ethoxylate (AE) surfactants have been developed by assigning the measured ecotoxicity for commercial products to the average structures (alkyl chain length and ethoxylate chain length) of these materials. Acute Daphnia magna toxicity tests for binary mixtures indicate that mixtures are more toxic than the individual AE substances corresponding with their average structures (due to the nonlinear relation of toxicity with structure). Consequently, the ecotoxicity value (expressed as effects concentration) attributed to the average structures that are used to develop the existing QSARs is expected to be too low. A new QSAR technique for complex substances, which interprets the mixture toxicity with regard to the "ethoxymers" distribution (i.e., the individual AE components) rather than the average structure, was developed. This new technique was then applied to develop new AE ecotoxicity QSARs for invertebrates, fish, and mesocosms. Despite the higher complexity, the fit and accuracy of the new QSARs are at least as good as those for the existing QSARs based on the same data set. As expected from typical ethoxymer distributions of commercial AEs, the new QSAR generally predicts less toxicity than the QSARs based on average structure. PMID:16256196

  20. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse. PMID:25999368

  1. Intramolecular relaxation of flexible dendrimers with excluded volume.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gobind Ji; Kumar, Amit; Biswas, Parbati

    2014-07-21

    The mechanical and dielectric relaxation moduli of dendrimers with the excluded volume interactions are theoretically investigated within the framework of Rouse-Zimm theory. The excluded volume interactions in dendrimers are expressed in terms of the effective co-volume between nearest non-bonded monomers, modeled through the delta function pseudopotential. These short range interactions play a decisive role in determining the mechanical moduli of dendrimers. The characteristic feature of excluded volume effect in the mechanical moduli is typically revealed in the intermediate frequency regime, where dendrimers with varied strengths of excluded volume interactions display power-law scaling relations with frequency. The value of the power-law scaling exponents for the mechanical moduli exactly matches with the earlier results for dendrimers in good solvent conditions. The mechanical moduli are dominated by the smaller eigenvalues in the low frequency region corresponding to the collective modes with smaller relaxation rates, which increase with the corresponding increase of the excluded volume interactions. The local modes are practically independent of excluded volume. A cross-over between the loss and storage moduli is observed at the intermediate frequency regime. The position of this cross-over shifts towards the low frequency region with the decrease in the strength of the excluded volume, which resembles the behavior of dendrimers with the variation of temperature as reported in an earlier experimental work. The structure of dendrimers show a conspicuous change as a function of the effective co-volume between the nearest non-bonded monomers. The real part of dielectric relaxation moduli remains unchanged by varying excluded volume parameters, while its imaginary part varies with the change in strength of excluded volumes for the entire range of frequency except in the high frequency regime. A comparison with the model semiflexible dendrimers show that in such

  2. Intramolecular relaxation of flexible dendrimers with excluded volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Gobind Ji; Kumar, Amit; Biswas, Parbati

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical and dielectric relaxation moduli of dendrimers with the excluded volume interactions are theoretically investigated within the framework of Rouse-Zimm theory. The excluded volume interactions in dendrimers are expressed in terms of the effective co-volume between nearest non-bonded monomers, modeled through the delta function pseudopotential. These short range interactions play a decisive role in determining the mechanical moduli of dendrimers. The characteristic feature of excluded volume effect in the mechanical moduli is typically revealed in the intermediate frequency regime, where dendrimers with varied strengths of excluded volume interactions display power-law scaling relations with frequency. The value of the power-law scaling exponents for the mechanical moduli exactly matches with the earlier results for dendrimers in good solvent conditions. The mechanical moduli are dominated by the smaller eigenvalues in the low frequency region corresponding to the collective modes with smaller relaxation rates, which increase with the corresponding increase of the excluded volume interactions. The local modes are practically independent of excluded volume. A cross-over between the loss and storage moduli is observed at the intermediate frequency regime. The position of this cross-over shifts towards the low frequency region with the decrease in the strength of the excluded volume, which resembles the behavior of dendrimers with the variation of temperature as reported in an earlier experimental work. The structure of dendrimers show a conspicuous change as a function of the effective co-volume between the nearest non-bonded monomers. The real part of dielectric relaxation moduli remains unchanged by varying excluded volume parameters, while its imaginary part varies with the change in strength of excluded volumes for the entire range of frequency except in the high frequency regime. A comparison with the model semiflexible dendrimers show that in such

  3. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, their metabolites/transformation products and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Česen, Marjeta; Eleršek, Tina; Novak, Matjaž; Žegura, Bojana; Kosjek, Tina; Filipič, Metka; Heath, Ester

    2016-03-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) are commonly used cytostatic drugs that repress cell division by interaction with DNA. The present study investigates the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of CP, IF, their human metabolites/transformation products (TPs) carboxy-cyclophosphamide (CPCOOH), keto-cyclophosphamide (ketoCP) and N-dechloroethyl-cyclophosphamide (NdCP) as individual compounds and as mixture. The two parent compounds (CP and IF), at concentrations up to 320 mg L(-1), were non-toxic towards the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and cyanobacterium Synecococcus leopoliensis. Further ecotoxicity studies of metabolites/TPs and a mixture of parent compounds and metabolites/TPs performed in cyanobacteria S. leopoliensis, showed that only CPCOOH (EC50 = 17.1 mg L(-1)) was toxic. The measured toxicity (EC50 = 11.5 mg L(-1)) of the mixture was lower from the toxicity predicted by concentration addition model (EC50 = 21.1 mg L(-1)) indicating potentiating effects of the CPCOOH toxicity. The SOS/umuC assay with Salmonella typhimurium revealed genotoxic activity of CP, CPCOOH and the mixture in the presence of S9 metabolic activation. Only CPCOOH was genotoxic also in the absence of metabolic activation indicating that this compound is a direct acting genotoxin. This finding is of particular importance as in the environment such compounds can directly affect DNA of non-target organisms and also explains toxicity of CPCOOH against cyanobacteria S. leopoliensis. The degradation study with UV irradiation of samples containing CP and IF showed efficient degradation of both compounds and remained non-toxic towards S. leopoliensis, suggesting that no stable TPs with adverse effects were formed. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of the commonly used cytostatics CP and IF, their known metabolites/TPs and their mixture. The results indicate the importance of toxicological evaluation and monitoring of

  4. Ecotoxicity analysis of cholinium-based ionic liquids to Vibrio fischeri marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Sónia P M; e Silva, Francisca A; Gonçalves, Ana M M; Pereira, Joana L; Gonçalves, Fernando; Coutinho, João A P

    2014-04-01

    Cholinium-based ionic liquids are quaternary ammonium salts with a wide range of potential industrial applications. Based on the fact that the cholinium is a complex B vitamin and widely used as food additive, the cholinium-based ionic liquids are generically regarded as environmentally "harmless" and thus, accepted as "non-toxic", although their ecotoxicological profile is poorly known. This work provides new ecotoxicological data for ten cholinium-based salts and ionic liquids, aiming to extend the surprisingly restricted body of knowledge about the ecotoxicity of this particular family and to gain insight on the toxicity mechanism of these compounds. The results reported here show that not all the cholinium tested can be considered harmless towards the test organism adopted. Moreover, the results suggest that the cholinium family exhibits a different mechanism of toxicity as compared to the imidazolium ionic liquids previously described in the literature.

  5. Ecotoxicity of uranium to Tubifex tubifex worms (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) exposed to contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Lagauzère, Sandra; Terrail, Raphaële; Bonzom, Jean-Marc

    2009-02-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, sediments act as an accumulation compartment for metallic pollutants as uranium. However, they are also the habitats of numerous benthic macroinvertebrates that directly influence the structure and functioning of such environments. Consequently, these organisms could be affected by uranium. This laboratory study aimed to assess the ecotoxicity of uranium on Tubifex tubifex through 12-day exposure to contaminated sediment (0-5980 microg U g(-1) dry wt). At high concentrations (>599 microg U g(-1) dry wt), malformations were observed, and survival, biomass and burrowing activity were all reduced. This relative high resistance in polluted environments can be explained mainly by the implementation of several processes as autotomy, regeneration ability, increased production of mucus, a hormetic effect on biomass and a probable strategy for avoiding the contaminated sediment. This study represents the first assessment of uranium impact on T. tubifex at realistic concentrations in sediments near mining sites. PMID:18555526

  6. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage... failure, (B) Placed at an adequate depth below grade to prevent frost damage, and (C) Constructed...

  7. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage... failure, (B) Placed at an adequate depth below grade to prevent frost damage, and (C) Constructed...

  8. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage... failure, (B) Placed at an adequate depth below grade to prevent frost damage, and (C) Constructed...

  9. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage... failure, (B) Placed at an adequate depth below grade to prevent frost damage, and (C) Constructed...

  10. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage... failure, (B) Placed at an adequate depth below grade to prevent frost damage, and (C) Constructed...

  11. 5 CFR 894.302 - What is an excluded position?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.302 What is an excluded position? Excluded positions are described in 5 U.S.C. 8901 (1)(I) and 5 CFR 890.102 (c), except... “part-time career employment,” as defined in section 3401 (2) of title 5, U.S.C., and 5 CFR part...

  12. Excretion and ecotoxicity of pharmaceutical and personal care products in the environment.

    PubMed

    Jjemba, Patrick K

    2006-01-01

    The presence and fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment is undergoing increasing scrutiny. The existing clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics data for 81 common compounds were examined for cues of ecotoxicity. Of these the proportions excreted were available for 60 compounds (i.e., 74%). The compounds had a low (< or =0.5%), a moderately low (6-39%), a relatively high (40-69%), or a high (> or =70%) proportion of the parent compound excreted. More than half of the compounds evaluated have low or moderately low proportions of the parent compound excreted. However, the proportions excreted were negatively but moderately correlated (r = -0.50; n = 13; P = 0.08) with the concentrations of the compounds in the aquatic environment, suggesting that the compounds that have low proportions excreted may also have inherently low degradability in the environment. Solubility, logK(ow), and pKa work well in predicting the behavior of PPCPs under clinical conditions and have been used in the environmental assessment of PPCPs prior to approval. However, these parameters did not correlate with the proportion of PPCPs excreted in the environment or their concentration in the environment, underscoring the need for research into the behavior of PPCPs in the environment. PPCPs occur in low concentrations in the environment and are unlikely to elicit acute toxicity. An ecotoxicity potential that is based on chronic toxicity, bioavailability, and duration of exposure to nontarget organisms is described as a guide in assessing the potency of these compounds in the environment.

  13. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  14. Extractability of metals and ecotoxicity of soils from two old wood impregnation sites in Finland.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eija; Joutti, Anneli; Räisänen, Marja-Liisa; Lintinen, Petri; Martikainen, Esko; Lehto, Olli

    2004-06-29

    Four metal-contaminated soil samples were classified using physical methods, extracted by selective extraction procedures and analyzed for chemical concentrations. De-ionized water, 0.01 mol/l barium chloride, 1 mol/l ammonium acetate and concentrated nitric acid were used as extraction solutions. Ecotoxicity of water extracts and soil samples was analyzed in order to describe the bioavailability of the contaminants. Samples from old wood impregnation plants contained high amounts of As, Cu, Cr and Zn, which originated from chromated copper arsenate, ammoniacal copper-zinc arsenate, and ammoniacal copper quaternary compound. Total As concentrations of the heavily contaminated samples varied from 752 to 4340 mg/kg, Cu concentrations from 339 to 2330 mg/kg, Cr concentrations from 367 to 2,140 mg/kg and Zn concentrations from 79 to 966 mg/kg. The extractabilities of metals differed according to soil type, extractant and element. Cu and Zn were proposed to cause the highest toxicity in the water extracts of the soils. Ecotoxicity tests displayed rather high differences in sensitivity both for water extracts and for solid soil samples. Reproduction of Enchytraeus sp. was the most sensitive and seed germination of Lactuca sativa the least sensitive and the other tests were in decreasing order of sensitivity: Folsomia candida>reverse electron transport>MetPLATE>Toxichromotest>Allium cepa root growth>Lemna sp. growth. As a conclusion, polluted soils rich in sand retain heavy metals with less firm bindings, particularly in the case of Cu and Zn, than soils rich in clay, indicating that chemical methods for measuring the bioavailability of metals need to be optimized taking into account the soil type, acidity, redox state and the individual contaminants. PMID:15142767

  15. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Bachmann, Till M.; Swirsky Gold, Lois; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Jolliet, Olivier; Juraske, Ronnie; Koehler, Annette; Larsen, Henrik F.; MacLeod, Matthew; Margni, Manuele; McKone, Thomas E.; Payet, Jerome; Schuhmacher, Marta; van de Meent, Dik; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2008-02-03

    Background, Aim and Scope. In 2005 a comprehensive comparison of LCIA toxicity characterisation models was initiated by the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, directly involving the model developers of CalTOX, IMPACT 2002, USES-LCA, BETR, EDIP, WATSON, and EcoSense. In this paper we describe this model-comparison process and its results--in particular the scientific consensus model developed by the model developers. The main objectives of this effort were (i) to identify specific sources of differences between the models' results and structure, (ii) to detect the indispensable model components, and (iii) to build a scientific consensus model from them, representing recommended practice. Methods. A chemical test set of 45 organics covering a wide range of property combinations was selected for this purpose. All models used this set. In three workshops, the model comparison participants identified key fate, exposure and effect issues via comparison of the final characterisation factors and selected intermediate outputs for fate, human exposure and toxic effects for the test set applied to all models. Results. Through this process, we were able to reduce inter-model variation from an initial range of up to 13 orders of magnitude down to no more than 2 orders of magnitude for any substance. This led to the development of USEtox, a scientific consensus model that contains only the most influential model elements. These were, for example, process formulations accounting for intermittent rain, defining a closed or open system environment, or nesting an urban box in a continental box. Discussion. The precision of the new characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-1000 for human health and 10-100 for freshwater ecotoxicity of all other models compared to 12 orders of magnitude variation between the CFs of each model respectively. The achieved reduction of inter-model variability by up to 11 orders of magnitude is a significant improvement.Conclusions. USEtox

  16. Evaluation of the Ecotoxicity of Sediments from Yangtze River Estuary and Contribution of Priority PAHs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants. PMID:25111307

  17. Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of sediments from Yangtze river estuary and contribution of priority PAHs to ah receptor--mediated activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants.

  18. Green manure plants for remediation of soils polluted by metals and metalloids: ecotoxicity and human bioavailability assessment.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Y; Lévêque, T; Xiong, T; Schreck, E; Austruy, A; Shahid, M; Dumat, C

    2013-10-01

    Borage, white mustard and phacelia, green manure plants currently used in agriculture to improve soil properties were cultivated for 10 wk on various polluted soils with metal(loid) concentrations representative of urban brownfields or polluted kitchen gardens. Metal(loid) bioavailability and ecotoxicity were measured in relation to soil characteristics before and after treatment. All the plants efficiently grow on the various polluted soils. But borage and mustard only are able to modify the soil characteristics and metal(loid) impact: soil respiration increased while ecotoxicity, bioaccessible lead and total metal(loid) quantities in soils can be decreased respectively by phytostabilization and phytoextraction mechanisms. These two plants could therefore be used for urban polluted soil refunctionalization. However, plant efficiency to improve soil quality strongly depends on soil characteristics. PMID:23968553

  19. Green manure plants for remediation of soils polluted by metals and metalloids: ecotoxicity and human bioavailability assessment.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Y; Lévêque, T; Xiong, T; Schreck, E; Austruy, A; Shahid, M; Dumat, C

    2013-10-01

    Borage, white mustard and phacelia, green manure plants currently used in agriculture to improve soil properties were cultivated for 10 wk on various polluted soils with metal(loid) concentrations representative of urban brownfields or polluted kitchen gardens. Metal(loid) bioavailability and ecotoxicity were measured in relation to soil characteristics before and after treatment. All the plants efficiently grow on the various polluted soils. But borage and mustard only are able to modify the soil characteristics and metal(loid) impact: soil respiration increased while ecotoxicity, bioaccessible lead and total metal(loid) quantities in soils can be decreased respectively by phytostabilization and phytoextraction mechanisms. These two plants could therefore be used for urban polluted soil refunctionalization. However, plant efficiency to improve soil quality strongly depends on soil characteristics.

  20. Influence of soil ageing on bioavailability and ecotoxicity of lead carried by process waste metallic ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Schreck, E; Foucault, Y; Geret, F; Pradere, P; Dumat, C

    2011-11-01

    Ultrafine particulate matters enriched with metals are emitted into the atmosphere by industrial activities and can impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study investigated the environmental effects of process particles from a lead-recycling facility after atmospheric deposition on soils and potential run-off to surface waters. The toxicity of lead-enriched PM for ecosystems was investigated on lettuce and bacteria by (i) germination tests, growth assays, lead transfer to plant tissues determination and (ii) Microtox analysis. The influence of ageing and soil properties on metal transfer and ecotoxicity was studied using three different soils and comparing various aged, spiked or historically long-term polluted soils. Finally, lead availability was assessed by 0.01 M CaCl(2) soil extraction. The results showed that process PM have a toxic effect on lettuce seedling growth and on Vibrio fischeri metabolism. Soil-PM interactions significantly influence PM ecotoxicity and bioavailability; the effect is complex and depends on the duration of ageing. Solubilisation or stabilisation processes with metal speciation changes could be involved. Finally, Microtox and phytotoxicity tests are sensitive and complementary tools for studying process PM ecotoxicity. PMID:21868052

  1. Use of ecotoxicity test and ecoscores to improve the management of polluted soils: case of a secondary lead smelter plant.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Yann; Durand, Marie-José; Tack, Karine; Schreck, Eva; Geret, Florence; Leveque, Thibaut; Pradere, Philippe; Goix, Sylvaine; Dumat, Camille

    2013-02-15

    With the rise of sustainable development, rehabilitation of brownfield sites located in urban areas has become a major concern. Management of contaminated soils in relation with environmental and sanitary risk concerns is therefore a strong aim needing the development of both useful tools for risk assessment and sustainable remediation techniques. For soils polluted by metals and metalloids (MTE), the criteria for landfilling are currently not based on ecotoxicological tests but on total MTE concentrations and leaching tests. In this study, the ecotoxicity of leachates from MTE polluted soils sampled from an industrial site recycling lead-acid batteries were evaluated by using both modified Escherichia coli strains with luminescence modulated by metals and normalized Daphnia magna and Alivibrio fischeri bioassays. The results were clearly related to the type of microorganisms (crustacean, different strains of bacteria) whose sensitivity varied. Ecotoxicity was also different according to sample location on the site, total concentrations and physico-chemical properties of each soil. For comparison, standard leaching tests were also performed. Potentially phytoavailable fraction of MTE in soils and physico-chemical measures were finally performed in order to highlight the mechanisms. The results demonstrated that the use of a panel of microorganisms is suitable for hazard classification of polluted soils. In addition, calculated eco-scores permit to rank the polluted soils according to their potentially of dangerousness. Influence of soil and MTE characteristics on MTE mobility and ecotoxicity was also highlighted.

  2. Influence of soil ageing on bioavailability and ecotoxicity of lead carried by process waste metallic ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Schreck, E; Foucault, Y; Geret, F; Pradere, P; Dumat, C

    2011-11-01

    Ultrafine particulate matters enriched with metals are emitted into the atmosphere by industrial activities and can impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study investigated the environmental effects of process particles from a lead-recycling facility after atmospheric deposition on soils and potential run-off to surface waters. The toxicity of lead-enriched PM for ecosystems was investigated on lettuce and bacteria by (i) germination tests, growth assays, lead transfer to plant tissues determination and (ii) Microtox analysis. The influence of ageing and soil properties on metal transfer and ecotoxicity was studied using three different soils and comparing various aged, spiked or historically long-term polluted soils. Finally, lead availability was assessed by 0.01 M CaCl(2) soil extraction. The results showed that process PM have a toxic effect on lettuce seedling growth and on Vibrio fischeri metabolism. Soil-PM interactions significantly influence PM ecotoxicity and bioavailability; the effect is complex and depends on the duration of ageing. Solubilisation or stabilisation processes with metal speciation changes could be involved. Finally, Microtox and phytotoxicity tests are sensitive and complementary tools for studying process PM ecotoxicity.

  3. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffnessmore » of its constituent branch.« less

  4. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  5. NanoE-Tox: New and in-depth database concerning ecotoxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ivask, Angela; Blinova, Irina; Mortimer, Monika; Kahru, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Summary The increasing production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inevitably results in their higher concentrations in the environment. This may lead to undesirable environmental effects and thus warrants risk assessment. The ecotoxicity testing of a wide variety of ENMs rapidly evolving in the market is costly but also ethically questionable when bioassays with vertebrates are conducted. Therefore, alternative methods, e.g., models for predicting toxicity mechanisms of ENMs based on their physico-chemical properties (e.g., quantitative (nano)structure-activity relationships, QSARs/QNARs), should be developed. While the development of such models relies on good-quality experimental toxicity data, most of the available data in the literature even for the same test species are highly variable. In order to map and analyse the state of the art of the existing nanoecotoxicological information suitable for QNARs, we created a database NanoE-Tox that is available as Supporting Information File 1. The database is based on existing literature on ecotoxicology of eight ENMs with different chemical composition: carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerenes, silver (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), cerium dioxide (CeO2), copper oxide (CuO), and iron oxide (FeOx; Fe2O3, Fe3O4). Altogether, NanoE-Tox database consolidates data from 224 articles and lists altogether 1,518 toxicity values (EC50/LC50/NOEC) with corresponding test conditions and physico-chemical parameters of the ENMs as well as reported toxicity mechanisms and uptake of ENMs in the organisms. 35% of the data in NanoE-Tox concerns ecotoxicity of Ag NPs, followed by TiO2 (22%), CeO2 (13%), and ZnO (10%). Most of the data originates from studies with crustaceans (26%), bacteria (17%), fish (13%), and algae (11%). Based on the median toxicity values of the most sensitive organism (data derived from three or more articles) the toxicity order was as follows: Ag > ZnO > CuO > CeO2 > CNTs > TiO2 > FeOx. We

  6. NanoE-Tox: New and in-depth database concerning ecotoxicity of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Juganson, Katre; Ivask, Angela; Blinova, Irina; Mortimer, Monika; Kahru, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The increasing production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inevitably results in their higher concentrations in the environment. This may lead to undesirable environmental effects and thus warrants risk assessment. The ecotoxicity testing of a wide variety of ENMs rapidly evolving in the market is costly but also ethically questionable when bioassays with vertebrates are conducted. Therefore, alternative methods, e.g., models for predicting toxicity mechanisms of ENMs based on their physico-chemical properties (e.g., quantitative (nano)structure-activity relationships, QSARs/QNARs), should be developed. While the development of such models relies on good-quality experimental toxicity data, most of the available data in the literature even for the same test species are highly variable. In order to map and analyse the state of the art of the existing nanoecotoxicological information suitable for QNARs, we created a database NanoE-Tox that is available as Supporting Information File 1. The database is based on existing literature on ecotoxicology of eight ENMs with different chemical composition: carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerenes, silver (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), cerium dioxide (CeO2), copper oxide (CuO), and iron oxide (FeO x ; Fe2O3, Fe3O4). Altogether, NanoE-Tox database consolidates data from 224 articles and lists altogether 1,518 toxicity values (EC50/LC50/NOEC) with corresponding test conditions and physico-chemical parameters of the ENMs as well as reported toxicity mechanisms and uptake of ENMs in the organisms. 35% of the data in NanoE-Tox concerns ecotoxicity of Ag NPs, followed by TiO2 (22%), CeO2 (13%), and ZnO (10%). Most of the data originates from studies with crustaceans (26%), bacteria (17%), fish (13%), and algae (11%). Based on the median toxicity values of the most sensitive organism (data derived from three or more articles) the toxicity order was as follows: Ag > ZnO > CuO > CeO2 > CNTs > TiO2 > FeO x . We

  7. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201...

  8. 42 CFR 412.23 - Excluded hospitals: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting § 412.23, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospitals: Classifications. 412.23 Section... MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1013 - Included-excluded rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... if— (1) Part of your work is covered by the Railroad Retirement Tax Act and part by the Social....1013 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Work Excluded...

  10. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal.... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section...

  11. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal.... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section...

  12. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal.... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section...

  13. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal.... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section...

  14. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal.... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1210 - Optionally excluded services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optionally excluded services. 404.1210 Section 404.1210 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... changes in wages in the economy. We will publish this adjustment of the $1000 base amount in the...

  16. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201...

  17. 42 CFR 412.23 - Excluded hospitals: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... diagnosis and treatment of mentally ill persons; and (3) Meet the conditions of participation for hospitals... hospital satellite facility as of October 1, 2011. (f) Cancer hospitals—(1) General rule. Except as... as a cancer hospital and is excluded from the prospective payment systems beginning with its...

  18. Excluding Students from Classroom: Teacher Techniques that Promote Student Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ramon; Romi, Shlomo; Roache, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Students who continuously misbehave are frequently excluded from class, allowing them time to reflect on their inappropriate behavior. This paper examines students' perceptions of the teacher's behavior toward them prior to, during, and after the exclusion, focusing on teachers' explanations, punishments, and follow-up conversations. The results…

  19. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201...

  20. 25 CFR 212.34 - Individual tribal assignments excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual tribal assignments excluded. 212.34 Section... ALLOTTED LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT How To Acquire Leases § 212.34 Individual tribal assignments... made pursuant to tribal constitutions or ordinances for the use of individual Indians and assignees...

  1. Children's and Adolescents' Reasons for Socially Excluding Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Holly E.; Brehl, Beverly A.; Wainryb, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate children's descriptions and evaluations of their reasons for leaving others out of a peer group. A total of 84 children (divided into 7-, 11-, and 17-year-old age groups) provided a narrative account of a time they excluded a peer and were subsequently asked to evaluate their reasons for exclusion. With…

  2. 42 CFR 412.23 - Excluded hospitals: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 412.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient Operating Costs and Inpatient Capital... affecting § 412.23, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  3. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of.... Every alien 14 years of age or older who is excluded from admission to the United States by an immigration judge shall be fingerprinted, unless during the preceding year he or she has been fingerprinted...

  4. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of.... Every alien 14 years of age or older who is excluded from admission to the United States by an immigration judge shall be fingerprinted, unless during the preceding year he or she has been fingerprinted...

  5. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of.... Every alien 14 years of age or older who is excluded from admission to the United States by an immigration judge shall be fingerprinted, unless during the preceding year he or she has been fingerprinted...

  6. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of.... Every alien 14 years of age or older who is excluded from admission to the United States by an immigration judge shall be fingerprinted, unless during the preceding year he or she has been fingerprinted...

  7. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of.... Every alien 14 years of age or older who is excluded from admission to the United States by an immigration judge shall be fingerprinted, unless during the preceding year he or she has been fingerprinted...

  8. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1985 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of information on benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of accidental death and dismemberment insurance,…

  9. University Benefits Survey. Part 1 (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1983 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy,…

  10. University Benefits Survey, Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    The results of a survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy, Ontario…

  11. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1984 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: questions on general benefits, such as insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, and maternity leave policy;…

  12. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1986 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self- administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of accidental death and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave…

  13. University Benefits Survey: Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Information on all benefits, excluding pensions, provided by 16 Ontario universities is presented. The following general questions concerning benefits are covered: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefit programs to employees, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, and maternity leave…

  14. 41 CFR 105-68.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 105-68.950 Section 105-68.950 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... General Services Administration (GSA) containing the names and other information about persons who...

  15. 2 CFR 180.945 - Excluded Parties List System (EPLS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded Parties List System (EPLS). 180.945 Section 180.945 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS... names and other information about persons who are ineligible....

  16. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 2634.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... Director of the Office of Government Ethics determines, in his sole discretion, that such exclusion...

  17. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 2634.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... Director of the Office of Government Ethics determines, in his sole discretion, that such exclusion...

  18. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 2634.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... Director of the Office of Government Ethics determines, in his sole discretion, that such exclusion...

  19. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 2634.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... Director of the Office of Government Ethics determines, in his sole discretion, that such exclusion...

  20. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 2634.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... Director of the Office of Government Ethics determines, in his sole discretion, that such exclusion...

  1. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., see 8 CFR 241.20 through 241.25. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., see 8 CFR 241.20 through 241.25. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., see 8 CFR 241.20 through 241.25. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., see 8 CFR 241.20 through 241.25. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., see 8 CFR 241.20 through 241.25. ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... arts in public affairs or public administration. The Foundation may at its discretion, upon request of... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL...

  7. 18 CFR 380.4 - Projects or actions categorically excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Projects or actions categorically excluded. 380.4 Section 380.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... and classification of United States lands as water power sites and other actions under section 24...

  8. 18 CFR 380.4 - Projects or actions categorically excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Projects or actions categorically excluded. 380.4 Section 380.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... and classification of United States lands as water power sites and other actions under section 24...

  9. 18 CFR 380.4 - Projects or actions categorically excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Projects or actions categorically excluded. 380.4 Section 380.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... and classification of United States lands as water power sites and other actions under section 24...

  10. 18 CFR 380.4 - Projects or actions categorically excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Projects or actions categorically excluded. 380.4 Section 380.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... and classification of United States lands as water power sites and other actions under section 24...

  11. 18 CFR 380.4 - Projects or actions categorically excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Projects or actions categorically excluded. 380.4 Section 380.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... and classification of United States lands as water power sites and other actions under section 24...

  12. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... business. It may also include such things as payment by the employer of the employee's social security tax...-of-living bonus of $260 each calendar quarter, or $20 per week. The employee works overtime in only 2... 2 overtime weeks, this cost-of-living bonus would not be excluded from the overtime...

  13. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... business. It may also include such things as payment by the employer of the employee's social security tax...-of-living bonus of $260 each calendar quarter, or $20 per week. The employee works overtime in only 2... 2 overtime weeks, this cost-of-living bonus would not be excluded from the overtime...

  14. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201...

  15. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201...

  16. Aquatic ecotoxicity of lanthanum - A review and an attempt to derive water and sediment quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Henning; Nolde, Jürgen; Berger, Svend; Heise, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) used to be taken as tracers of geological origin for fluvial transport. Nowadays their increased applications in innovative environmental-friendly technology (e.g. in catalysts, superconductors, lasers, batteries) and medical applications (e.g. MRI contrast agent) lead to man-made, elevated levels in the environment. So far, no regulatory thresholds for REE concentrations and emissions to the environment have been set because information on risks from REE is scarce. However, evidence gathers that REE have to be acknowledged as new, emerging contaminants with manifold ways of entry into the environment, e.g. through waste water from hospitals or through industrial effluents. This paper reviews existing information on bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of lanthanum in the aquatic environment. Lanthanum is of specific interest as one of the major lanthanides in industrial effluents. This review focuses on the freshwater and the marine environment, and tackles the water column and sediments. From these data, methods to derive quality criteria for sediment and water are discussed and preliminary suggestions are made.

  17. Evaluation of an eventual ecotoxicity induced by textile effluents using a battery of biotests.

    PubMed

    Bedoui, Ahmed; Tigini, Valeria; Ghedira, Kamel; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Chekir Ghedira, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Textile industry is considered as one of the important factors of the economic growth in Tunisia. However, this prominent role has certainly some drawbacks mainly represented by the huge amounts of textile wastewaters generated that become a real menace to nature. Many previous studies showed the purifying potential of some activated sludge and bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) to decolourize textile effluents. However, in many cases, decolourization of wastewaters is not necessary associated with detoxification, generating a real risk for the ecosystem in general. We evaluated in this work the induced toxicity of a textile effluent before and after its treatment with activated sludge followed by P. putida, using a battery of biotests. This study proved the detoxifying power of the activated sludge according to most of ecotoxicity tests. The treatment with P. putida did not improve the quality of the effluent; on the contrary, it could increase its toxicity. Daphnia magna and Raphidocelis subcapitata appear to be the most sensitive organisms in assessing eventual toxicity caused by this kind of wastewaters.

  18. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Overholt, Will A; Marks, Kala P; Romero, Isabel C; Hollander, David J; Snell, Terry W; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-11-06

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration.

  19. Aquatic ecotoxicity of lanthanum - A review and an attempt to derive water and sediment quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Henning; Nolde, Jürgen; Berger, Svend; Heise, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) used to be taken as tracers of geological origin for fluvial transport. Nowadays their increased applications in innovative environmental-friendly technology (e.g. in catalysts, superconductors, lasers, batteries) and medical applications (e.g. MRI contrast agent) lead to man-made, elevated levels in the environment. So far, no regulatory thresholds for REE concentrations and emissions to the environment have been set because information on risks from REE is scarce. However, evidence gathers that REE have to be acknowledged as new, emerging contaminants with manifold ways of entry into the environment, e.g. through waste water from hospitals or through industrial effluents. This paper reviews existing information on bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of lanthanum in the aquatic environment. Lanthanum is of specific interest as one of the major lanthanides in industrial effluents. This review focuses on the freshwater and the marine environment, and tackles the water column and sediments. From these data, methods to derive quality criteria for sediment and water are discussed and preliminary suggestions are made. PMID:26528910

  20. Acute and chronic ecotoxicity of carbaryl with a battery of aquatic bioassays.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hela; Burga-Perez, Karen F; Ferard, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The ecotoxic effects of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) were investigated with a battery of four aquatic bioassays. The nominal effective concentrations immobilizing 50% of Daphnia magna (EC50) after 24 and 48 h were 12.76 and 7.47 µg L(-1), respectively. After 21 days of exposure of D. magna, LOECs (lowest observed effect concentrations) for cumulative molts and the number of neonates per surviving adult were observed at carbaryl concentration of 0.4 µg L(-1). An increase of embryo deformities (curved or unextended shell spines) was observed at 1.8 and 3.7 µg L(-1), revealing that carbaryl could act as an endocrine disruptor in D. magna. Other bioassays of the tested battery were less sensitive: the IC50-72h and IC10-72h of the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were 5.96 and 2.87 mg L(-1), respectively. The LC50-6d of the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens was 4.84 mg L(-1). A growth inhibition of H. incongruens was registered after carbaryl exposure and the IC20-6d was 1.29 mg L(-1). Our results suggest that the daphnid test sensitivity was better than other used tests. Moreover, carbaryl has harmful and toxic effects on tested species because it acts at low concentrations on diverse life history traits of species and induce embryo deformities in crustaceans. PMID:26549316

  1. Monitoring ecotoxicity of disperse red 1 dye during photo-Fenton degradation.

    PubMed

    da Silva Leite, Laís; de Souza Maselli, Bianca; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Pupo Nogueira, Raquel F

    2016-04-01

    The present work assessed the ecotoxicity of the commercially available form of the azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) and the main degradation products generated during photo-Fenton degradation. The acute toxicity tests with the microcrustacean Daphnia similis showed that toxicity increased after 10 min of treatment, when 35% of the original concentration of the dye has been degraded but without decrease in total organic carbon concentration (TOC). The increase of toxicity was a consequence of generation of degradation products of higher toxicity than DR1, which achieved maximum concentration after 10 min reaction. The structures identified using LC/MS indicated that most of the intermediates were formed after addition of hydroxyl radical to benzenic ring but the cleavage of azo bond was also observed. The intermediates were further degraded and toxicity was then reduced to non toxic levels after 45 min experiment, when 98% of the initial concentration of DR1 was degraded and mineralization achieved 55%. The results of this study showed that the textile dye DR1 can be degraded by photo-Fenton process with removal of acute toxicity to D. similis even with incomplete mineralization.

  2. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of a binary combination of triclosan and carbendazim to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Rita R; Cardoso, Diogo N; Cruz, Andreia; Lourenço, Joana; Mendo, Sónia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-05-01

    In the environment, chemical substances appear as complex mixtures and consequently organisms are exposed to a variety of chemicals from different sources (e.g. wastewater treatment plants, agriculture runoffs). When studying chemical mixtures, there are two conceptual models usually used to predict toxicity: the Independent Action (IA) and Concentration Addition (CA) models. However, deviations from these reference models can occur as synergism or antagonism, dose ratio or dose level dependency. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of triclosan and carbendazim, and their binary mixture to Daphnia magna. With this purpose, immobilisation, feeding inhibition, and reproduction were assessed as main ecotoxicity endpoints. In addition, in vivo genotoxicity of both chemicals was investigated using the comet assay. In the single exposure, carbendazim was more toxic to D. magna than triclosan. When daphnids were exposed to both single compounds, DNA damage was observed. Concerning mixture exposures, different endpoints followed different patterns of response, from additivity: IA model (feeding inhibition and reproduction data), to deviations that indicate interaction between chemicals inside the organism: dose level dependency (immobilisation data) and dose ratio dependency (DNA damage). This study showed that additivity does not rule the dose-effect relation in chemical mixtures of carbendazim and triclosan and interactions between both chemicals might induce generally higher toxicity than predicted based on single chemical exposures.

  3. Ecotoxicity by the biodegradation of alkylphenol polyethoxylates depends on the effect of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Yudai; Hosoda, Akifumi; Sano, Fumihiko; Wakayama, Manabu; Niwa, Katsuki; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2010-01-27

    The bacteria Sphingomonas sp. strain BSN22, isolated from bean fields, degraded octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEO(n)) to octylphenol (OP) under aerobic conditions. This biodegradation mechanism proceeded by the following two-step degradation process: (1) degradation of OPEO(n) to octylphenol triethoxylate (OPEO(3)), (2) degradation from OPEO(3) to OP via octylphenoxy acetic acid (OPEC(1)). The chemical structure of OPEC(1) was confirmed by analysis using (18)O-labeled water. Quantitative studies revealed that magnesium (Mg(2+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) ions were essential for the biodegradation of OPEO(n). Furthermore, the rate of biodegradation was especially accelerated by ferric ions (Fe(3+)), and the accumulated amounts of endocrine active chemicals, such as OP, OPEO(1), and OPEC(1), significantly increased to the concentration of 22.8, 221.7, and 961.1 microM in the presence of 37.0 microM Fe(3+), respectively. This suggests that environmental elements significantly influence the resultant ecotoxicity as well as the rate of their biodegradation in the environment. This study on the mechanism of OPEO(n) biodegradation may play an important role in understanding and managing environmental safety, including drinking water safety. PMID:20025273

  4. Evaluation of an eventual ecotoxicity induced by textile effluents using a battery of biotests.

    PubMed

    Bedoui, Ahmed; Tigini, Valeria; Ghedira, Kamel; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Chekir Ghedira, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Textile industry is considered as one of the important factors of the economic growth in Tunisia. However, this prominent role has certainly some drawbacks mainly represented by the huge amounts of textile wastewaters generated that become a real menace to nature. Many previous studies showed the purifying potential of some activated sludge and bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) to decolourize textile effluents. However, in many cases, decolourization of wastewaters is not necessary associated with detoxification, generating a real risk for the ecosystem in general. We evaluated in this work the induced toxicity of a textile effluent before and after its treatment with activated sludge followed by P. putida, using a battery of biotests. This study proved the detoxifying power of the activated sludge according to most of ecotoxicity tests. The treatment with P. putida did not improve the quality of the effluent; on the contrary, it could increase its toxicity. Daphnia magna and Raphidocelis subcapitata appear to be the most sensitive organisms in assessing eventual toxicity caused by this kind of wastewaters. PMID:26087930

  5. Formation and Ecotoxicity of N-Heterocyclic Compounds on Ammoxidation of Mono- and Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ammoxidation of technical lignins under mild conditions is a suitable approach to artificial humic substances. However, carbohydrates as common minor constituents of technical lignins have been demonstrated to be a potential source of N-heterocyclic ecotoxic compounds. Ethyl acetate extracts of ammoxidation mixtures of the monosaccharides glucose and xylose exhibited considerable growth inhibiting activity in the OECD 201 test, with 4-methyl-1H-imidazole, 4-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-imidazole, and 3-hydroxypyridine being the most active compounds. The amount of N-heterocyclic compounds formed at moderate ammoxidation conditions (70 °C, 0.2 MPa O2, 3 h) was significantly lower for the polysaccharides cellulose and xylan (16–30 μg/g of educt) compared to glucose (15.4 mg). Ammoxidation at higher temperature is not recommendable for carbohydrate-rich materials as much higher amounts of N-heterocyclic compounds were formed from both monosaccharides (100 °C: 122.4–160.5 mg/g of educt) and polysaccharides (140 °C: 5.52–16.03 mg/g of educt). PMID:23967874

  6. Violacein/poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/chitosan nanoparticles against bovine mastistis: Antibacterial and ecotoxicity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, E.; Marcato, P. D.; Nakazato, G.; Kobayashi, R. K. T.; Vacchi, F. I.; Umbuzeiro, G. A.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    The nanocarrier was synthesized by nanoprecipitation, using poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) as polymer, Tween 80 as surfactant and the biopolymer chitosan (CS) as a charge modification agent. Charge, size and morphology were analyzed by zeta potential, photo correlation spectroscopy (PCS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Bactericidal assays were carried out using a resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus, and the acute ecotoxicity tests were performed with Daphnia similis. The nanoparticle without CS (PCLnp) exhibited an average size of 200 nm and zeta potential of -4.28 mV, while the nanoparticle with 0.04% (w/v) of CS (CS_PCLnp) had 250 nm and +21.3 mV. Both were stables for at least 30 days. 200 μg mL-1 violacein was encapsulated in CS_PCLnp, which was dissolved in the polymer matrix, a shown by DSC analysis. The minimal inhibitory concentration against S. aureus of CS_PCLnp-vio was 25 μmol L-1, while for free violacein it was > 25 μmol L-1. Nanoparticles exhibited an EC50 between 0.3 - 1.1 μmol L-1 with Daphnia, while free violacein was around 3.3 - 5.0 μmol L-1. Thus, it was possible to control the charge of the nanoparticles, without extreme changes in size and that it is possible also to encapsulate a powerful antibactericidal compound such as violacein in nanoparticle.

  7. Assessment of the ecotoxic potential of soil contaminants by using a soil-algae test.

    PubMed

    Hammel, W; Steubing, L; Debus, R

    1998-01-01

    To assess the ecotoxic potential of soil contaminants, a test with the soil alga Chlorococcum infusionum has been developed, enabling investigations of soil pollutions with soluble and fairly soluble chemicals. Three soil types artificially contaminated with Sb compounds and five soils from a historical mining area, which were highly polluted with Sb, As, Hg, and Cu, were used as test soils. For antimony, EC50 values from 125 mg/kg up to > 1000 mg/kg, depending on soil type, were determined. Two of five soils from the mining area caused toxic effects. Additionally, aqueous extracts of all soils were exposed in established tests (daphnid, alga, bacterium). In contrast with the soil-algae test, no toxic effects were found. Aquatic tests with SbO/K tartrate were performed to point out the toxicity of antimony. The following EC50 values in milligrams of Sb per liter were determined: Scenedesmus subspicatus, 59 mg/liter; Chlorococcum infusionum, 43 mg/liter; Daphnia magna, 8 mg/liter; and Vibrio fisheri, 7 mg/liter.

  8. Is digestate safe? A study on its ecotoxicity and environmental risk on a pig manure.

    PubMed

    Tigini, Valeria; Franchino, Marta; Bona, Francesca; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Digestate represents a precious by-product in particular in agriculture, however its impact on the environment and human health is still unexplored. In this work, the toxicity of a pig slurry digestate was assessed through 7 ecotoxicity tests and considering 10 different endpoints. Besides, a synthetic index was applied to the outputs of the battery of tests for the environmental risk assessment, in order to evaluate the opportunity to use directly this kind of digestate in agriculture or to introduce an additional treatment. All the organisms were sensitive to digestate toxicity (EC50 ranged from 14.22% for Cucumissativus to 0.77% for Raphidocelis subcapitata). The physical-chemical features at the base of this toxicity seem to be the high content of ammonium, salinity, COD, phosphate and colour. The synthetic index showed that the digestate was very toxic and associated to an extremely high environmental risk. Thus, a pre-treatment is needed to reduce its toxicity and environmental impact, whatever could be its exploitation. PMID:26874769

  9. 22 CFR 208.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 208.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) to determine whether a person is excluded. The General Services...

  10. 22 CFR 208.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 208.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) to determine whether a person is excluded. The General Services...

  11. Somatic treatments excluding psychopharmacology in obsessive- compulsive disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad

    2013-06-01

    Somatic treatments other than psychotropic drugs are increasingly used in the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), however there has been little systematic review of them. Therefore, the present review deals with a variety of somatic treatment methods excluding psychotropic drugs. A literature search was performed on the PubMed database from the beginning of 1980, to September 2012, for published English, Turkish and French-language articles of somatic treatment approaches (excluding psychopharmacological agents) in the treatment of OCD. The search was carried out by using some terms in detail. Afterwards, the obtained investigations on electroconvusive therapy (ECT), deep brain stimulation (DBS), neurosurgical methods and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were presented. Although psychopharmacological treatment and psychotherapeutic approaches are primary treatment modalities in the management of OCD, other somatic treatment options seem to be used as alternatives, especially for patients with treatmentresistant OCD. PMID:24032546

  12. Somatic treatments excluding psychopharmacology in obsessive- compulsive disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad

    2013-06-01

    Somatic treatments other than psychotropic drugs are increasingly used in the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), however there has been little systematic review of them. Therefore, the present review deals with a variety of somatic treatment methods excluding psychotropic drugs. A literature search was performed on the PubMed database from the beginning of 1980, to September 2012, for published English, Turkish and French-language articles of somatic treatment approaches (excluding psychopharmacological agents) in the treatment of OCD. The search was carried out by using some terms in detail. Afterwards, the obtained investigations on electroconvusive therapy (ECT), deep brain stimulation (DBS), neurosurgical methods and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were presented. Although psychopharmacological treatment and psychotherapeutic approaches are primary treatment modalities in the management of OCD, other somatic treatment options seem to be used as alternatives, especially for patients with treatmentresistant OCD.

  13. Terrestrial and aquatic ecotoxicity assessment of Cr(VI) by the ReCiPe method calculation (LCIA): application on an old industrial contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Adam, Véronique; Quaranta, Gaétana; Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie

    2013-05-01

    The most stable forms of chromium in the environment are chromium (III) and chromium (VI), the former being relatively immobile and necessary for organisms, and the latter being highly soluble and toxic. It is thus important to characterise ecotoxicological impacts of Cr(VI). However, there are still some important uncertainties in the calculation of ecotoxicological impacts of heavy metals in the LCIA global approach. The aim of this paper is to understand how the spatial and dynamic characterization of life cycle inventory (LCI) data can be exploited in life cycle impact assessment and particularly for the evaluation of the aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity of Cr(VI). To quantify these impacts, we studied an industrial waste landfill in the North of France that was contaminated with chromium. On the polluted area, the aquatic contamination is due to the slag heap as well as to chromium spots in soil. The soil contamination is mainly due to infiltration of chromium from the infill. The concentration of Cr(VI) in soil and water varies according to seasonal climatic variations and groundwater level. These variations have an effect on the Cr(VI) fate factor, in particular on transfer and residence time of the substance. This study underlines the spatial distribution of aquatic ecotoxicity and the temporal variation of freshwater ecotoxicity. We analysed the correlation between precipitation, temperature, concentration and ecotoxicity impact. With regards to the terrestrial ecotoxicity, the study focused on the vertical variation of the ecotoxicity and the major role of the soil layer composition into terrestrial pollution.

  14. Ecotoxicity evaluation of an amended soil contaminated with uranium and radium using sensitive plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, M. M.; Lopes, J.; Magalhães, M. C. F.; Santos, E.

    2012-04-01

    In the centre-north granitic regions of Portugal, during the twenty century radium and uranium were exploited from approximately 60 mines. The closure of all uranium mines, in 2001, raised concerns regarding the possible chemical and radiological effects on the inhabitants health around the mine areas. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of organic amendments and organic hydroxiapatite in the ecotoxicity reduction of agricultural soils contaminated with uranium and radium, by germination and growth tests of two sensitive plants (Lactuca sativa L. and Zea mays L.). Pot experiments, under controlled conditions, were undertaken during two months of incubation at 70% of the soil water-holding capacity. Fluvisol from Urgeiriça region containing large concentration of Utotal (635 mg/kg) and 226Ra (2310 Bq/kg) was used. The soil available fraction, extracted with ammonium acetate, corresponds to 90% and 25% of total concentration of Utotal and 226Ra, respectively. Fine ground bone (FB) and sheep manure (OM) single or mixtures were used as amendments. Four treatments, plus control were carried out in triplicate: (A) soil+40 Mg/ha of FB; (B) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM; (C) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM+40 Mg/ha of FB; (D) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM+20 Mg/ha of FB. After the incubation moist soils were kept at 4-5 °C and subsamples were used for leachates extraction following DIN 38414-S4 method. Maize and lettuce seeds were sown in filter paper moistened with the leachates aqueous solutions and in the moist soil for germination and growth tests. Seedlings after three days of germination were used for growth tests in hydroponic, during seven days, using the leachates. Five seeds per replicate were used. Soil presented: pH(H2O)=5.15, EC=7.3 µS/cm; and Corgnic=12.5 g/kg. After two months of incubation soil pH increased to a maximum of 6.53 in amended samples, and EC showed a dramatic increase when compared to the control (0.398 dS/m), from 1.5 dS/m (treatment-A) to 4.7 d

  15. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David J.; Snell, Terry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  16. NAPL migration and ecotoxicity of conventional and renewable fuels in accidental spill scenarios.

    PubMed

    Malk, Vuokko; Barreto Tejera, Eduardo; Simpanen, Suvi; Dahl, Mari; Mäkelä, Riikka; Häkkinen, Jani; Kiiski, Anna; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Fuels derived from non-petroleum renewable resources have raised interest due to their potential in replacing petroleum-based fuels, but information on their fate and effects in the terrestrial and aquatic environments in accidental spill scenario is limited. In this study, migration of four fuels (conventional diesel, conventional gasoline, renewable diesel NExBTL, and ethanol-blended gasoline RE85 containing maximum 85% ethanol) as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. Ecotoxicity data was produced for the same fuels. There was no significant difference in migration of conventional and renewable diesel, but gasoline migrated 1.5 times deeper and 7-9 times faster in sand than diesel. RE85 spread horizontally wider but not as deep (p < 0.05) as conventional gasoline. Conventional gasoline was the most toxic (lethal concentration [LC50] 20 mg/kg total hydrocarbon content [THC]) among the studied fuels in soil toxicity test with earthworm Eisenia fetida followed by ethanol-blended gasoline (LC50 1,643 mg/kg THC) and conventional diesel (LC50 2,432 mg/kg THC), although gasoline evaporated fast from soil. For comparison, the toxicity of the water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of the fuels was tested with water flea Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, also demonstrating groundwater toxicity. The WAF of conventional gasoline and RE85 showed almost similar toxicity to both the aquatic test species. EC50 values of 1:10 (by volume) WAF were 9.9 %WAF (gasoline) and 9.3 %WAF (RE85) to D. magna and 9.3 %WAF (gasoline) and 12.3 %WAF (RE85) to V. fischeri. Low solubility decreased toxicity potential of conventional diesel in aquatic environment, but direct physical effects of oil phase pose a threat to organisms in nature. Renewable diesel NExBTL did not show clear toxicity to any test species.

  17. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Overholt, Will A; Marks, Kala P; Romero, Isabel C; Hollander, David J; Snell, Terry W; Kostka, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  18. Multilevel ecotoxicity assessment of polycyclic musk in the earthworm Eisenia fetida using traditional and molecular endpoints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Xue, Shengguo; Zhou, Qixing; Xie, Xiujie

    2011-11-01

    The ecotoxicity assessment of galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) was investigated in the earthworm Eisenia fetida using traditional and novel molecular endpoints. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) for 7-day and 14-day exposures was 573.2 and 436.3 μg g(-1) for AHTN, and 489.0 and 392.4 μg g(-1) for HHCB, respectively. There was no observed significant effect on the growth rate of E. fetida after a 28-day exposure except that at the highest concentration (100 μg g(-1)) of AHTN and HHCB, whereas a significant decrease of cocoon production was found in earthworms exposed to 50 and 100 μg g(-1). To assess molecular-level effect, the expression of encoding antioxidant enzymes and stress protein genes were investigated upon sublethal exposures using the quantitative real time PCR assay. The expression level of SOD, CAT and calreticulin genes was up-regulated significantly, while the level of annetocin (ANN) and Hsp70 gene expression was down-regulated in E. fetida. Importantly, the level of ANN expression had a significant positive correlation with the reproduction rate of earthworms. Furthermore, the lowest observed effect concentration (LOECs) of ANN expression level was 3 μg g(-1) for AHTN and 10 μg g(-1) for HHCB, suggesting that ANN gene expression can serve as a more sensitive indicator of exposure to AHTN and HHCB than traditional endpoints such as cocoon production. The transcriptional responses of these genes may provide early warning molecular biomarkers for identifying contaminant exposure, and the data obtained from this study will contribute to better understand the toxicological effect of AHTN and HHCB.

  19. How reliable are data for the ecotoxicity of trivalent chromium to Daphnia magna?

    PubMed

    Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Dossi, Carlo; Vignati, Davide Anselmo Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Risk assessments from the European Union and the World Health Organization report values for acute and chronic toxicity of Cr(III) to Daphnia magna in the range of 0.6 mg/L to 111 mg/L and 0.047 mg/L to 3.4 mg/L, respectively. To understand whether factors other than the use of different test media and data reporting contribute to this variability, the authors tested the acute (48-h) and chronic (21-d) toxicities of Cr(III) to D. magna according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) methods. Filterable (0.45-µm) chromium concentrations were measured at 0 h, 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h, the latter value corresponding to the total duration of the acute tests and to the interval between medium renewals in chronic tests. In highly alkaline media (4.9 meq/L), Cr concentrations decreased rapidly below the analytical detection limit, and no toxicity was observed. In less alkaline media (approximately 0.8 meq/L), the decrease in filterable Cr concentrations was inversely proportional to the quantity of added Cr(III). The authors concluded that existing data likely underestimate the ecotoxicity of Cr(III) to D. magna. A reliable assessment of the hazard of Cr(III) to D. magna must consider that exposure concentrations can decrease markedly from the beginning to the end of a test and that medium alkalinity strongly influences the outcome of laboratory toxicity tests.

  20. Ecotoxicity of silica nanoparticles to the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata: importance of surface area.

    PubMed

    Van Hoecke, Karen; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Van der Meeren, Paul; Lucas, Stéphane; Janssen, Colin R

    2008-09-01

    To date, (eco)toxicological information on industrial nanoparticles is very limited. In the present study, the hypothesis that the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) is related to their surface area and not to their mass was tested using a freshwater green algal species. Particle diameter and morphology were assessed using light scattering and electron microscopy techniques. To assess the toxicity of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, the growth inhibition of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata when exposed to stable silica suspensions was monitored. Commercial LUDOX suspensions of nanoparticles with 12.5 and 27.0 nm diameter were found to be toxic, with 72-h 20% effect concentrations for growth rate (E(r)C20) values +/- standard deviation (n = 5) of 20.0 +/- 5.0 and 28.8 +/- 3.2 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity was attributable to the solid nanospheres, because no aggregation was observed and dissolution of the nanoparticles was negligible. When expressing the concentration as a surface area, the difference in toxicity was not significant. In the latter case, 72-h E(r)C20 values +/- standard deviation (n = 5) were 4.7 +/- 1.2 and 3.9 +/- 0.4 m2/L. Silica bulk material was found to be nontoxic up to 1 g/L. In an additional experiment with 100 mg/L of 12.5 and 27.0 nm SiO2 NPs, the interaction between the nanoparticles and algal cells was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Although the particles clearly adhered to the outer cell surface, no evidence was found for particle uptake. PMID:19086319

  1. NAPL migration and ecotoxicity of conventional and renewable fuels in accidental spill scenarios.

    PubMed

    Malk, Vuokko; Barreto Tejera, Eduardo; Simpanen, Suvi; Dahl, Mari; Mäkelä, Riikka; Häkkinen, Jani; Kiiski, Anna; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Fuels derived from non-petroleum renewable resources have raised interest due to their potential in replacing petroleum-based fuels, but information on their fate and effects in the terrestrial and aquatic environments in accidental spill scenario is limited. In this study, migration of four fuels (conventional diesel, conventional gasoline, renewable diesel NExBTL, and ethanol-blended gasoline RE85 containing maximum 85% ethanol) as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. Ecotoxicity data was produced for the same fuels. There was no significant difference in migration of conventional and renewable diesel, but gasoline migrated 1.5 times deeper and 7-9 times faster in sand than diesel. RE85 spread horizontally wider but not as deep (p < 0.05) as conventional gasoline. Conventional gasoline was the most toxic (lethal concentration [LC50] 20 mg/kg total hydrocarbon content [THC]) among the studied fuels in soil toxicity test with earthworm Eisenia fetida followed by ethanol-blended gasoline (LC50 1,643 mg/kg THC) and conventional diesel (LC50 2,432 mg/kg THC), although gasoline evaporated fast from soil. For comparison, the toxicity of the water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of the fuels was tested with water flea Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, also demonstrating groundwater toxicity. The WAF of conventional gasoline and RE85 showed almost similar toxicity to both the aquatic test species. EC50 values of 1:10 (by volume) WAF were 9.9 %WAF (gasoline) and 9.3 %WAF (RE85) to D. magna and 9.3 %WAF (gasoline) and 12.3 %WAF (RE85) to V. fischeri. Low solubility decreased toxicity potential of conventional diesel in aquatic environment, but direct physical effects of oil phase pose a threat to organisms in nature. Renewable diesel NExBTL did not show clear toxicity to any test species. PMID:24764004

  2. Terrestrial ecotoxicity and effect factors of metals in life cycle assessment (LCA).

    PubMed

    Haye, Sébastien; Slaveykova, Vera I; Payet, Jérôme

    2007-07-01

    Life cycle impact assessment aims to translate the amounts of substance emitted during the life cycle of a product into a potential impact on the environment, which includes terrestrial ecosystems. This work suggests some possible improvements in assessing the toxicity of metals on soil ecosystems in life cycle assessment (LCA). The current available data on soil ecotoxicity allow one to calculate the chronic terrestrial HC50(EC50) (hazardous concentration affecting 50% of the species at their EC50 level, i.e. the level where 50% of the individuals of the species are affected) of nine metals and metalloids (As(III) or (V), Be(II), Cr(III) or (VI), Sb(III) or (V), Pb(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II)). Contrarily to what is generally advised in LCIA, the terrestrial HC50 of metals shall not be extrapolated from the aquatic HC50, using the Equilibrium Partitioning method since the partition coefficient (K(d)) of metals is highly variable. The experimental ecotoxicology generally uses metallic salts to contaminate artificial soils but the comparison of the EC50 or NOEC obtained for the same metal with different salts reveals that the kind of salt used insignificantly influences these values. In contrast, depending on the metallic fraction of concern, the EC50 may vary, as for cadmium: the EC50 of Folsomia candida, expressed as free Cd in pore water is almost 2.5 orders of magnitude lower than that expressed as total metal. A similar result is obtained with Eisenia fetida, confirming the importance of metals speciation in assessing their impact on soils. By ranking the metals according to the difference between their terrestrial and aquatic HC50 values, two groups are distinguished, which match the hard soft acids and bases (HSAB) concept. This allows to estimate their affinity for soil components and potential toxicity according to their chemical characteristics.

  3. Mercury fractionation, bioavailability, and ecotoxicity in highly contaminated soils from chlor-alkali plants.

    PubMed

    Zagury, Gerald J; Neculita, Carmen-Mihaela; Bastien, Christian; Deschênes, Louise

    2006-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) fractionation, speciation, bioavailability, and ecotoxicity were investigated in three highly contaminated soils from chlor-alkali plants. Single extractions and a validated four-step sequential extraction scheme were used. Total, volatile, and methyl-Hg concentrations were determined. Mercury was then separated in fractions defined as water-soluble (F1), exchangeable (F2), organic (F3), and residual (F4). Germination and growth inhibition of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and mortality of earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were assessed, and tissue-Hg concentrations of exposed organisms were determined. Results revealed highly (295 +/- 18-11,500 +/- 500 microg Hg/g) contaminated soils, but extracted fractions indicated relatively low mobility of Hg. Nevertheless, the water-soluble and the CaCl2-extractable fractions represented significant Hg concentrations (299 +/- 18 microg/g in soil 3, 67.4 +/- 2.3 microg/g in soil 1, and 9.5 +/- 0.3 microg/g in soil 2), and volatile Hg ranged between 14 and 98% of total Hg. Overall, Hg concentrations reached 6,560 +/- 240 microg/g in roots, 4,200 +/- 1,070 microg/g in aerial plants, and 1,410 +/- 120 microg/g in E. andrei. Earthworm mortality was 100% after exposure to the soil with the highest concentration of mobile Hg. In the latter soil, earthworm fragmentation and chlorotic plants were observed. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were higher in barley compared to earthworms, but BCFs yielded misleading values after exposure to the extremely contaminated soil. This study shows that Hg accumulated primarily in the roots, but results also indicate uptake of gaseous Hg by the aerial plants of barley. Tissue-Hg concentrations of both exposed organisms were correlated with water-soluble and CaCl2-extractable Hg, and growth inhibition was in agreement with Hg fractionation.

  4. Ecotoxicity of fluvial sediments downstream of the Ajka red mud spill, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Klebercz, Orsolya; Mayes, William M; Ánton, Aron Dániel; Feigl, Viktória; Jarvis, Adam P; Gruiz, Katalin

    2012-08-01

    An integrated assessment of biological activity and ecotoxicity of fluvial sediments in the Marcal river catchment (3078 km(2)), western Hungary, is presented following the accidental spill of bauxite processing residue (red mud) in Ajka. Red mud contaminated sediments are characterised by elevated pH, elevated trace element concentrations (e.g. As, Co, Cr, V), high exchangeable Na, and induce an adverse effect on test species across a range of trophic levels. While background contamination of the river system is highlighted by adverse effects on some test species at sites unaffected by red mud, the most pronounced toxic effects apparent in Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition, Lemna minor bioassay and Sinapis alba root and shoot growth occur at red mud depositional hotspots in the lower Torna Creek and upper Marcal. Heterocypris incongruens bioassays show no clear patterns, although the most red mud-rich sites do exert an adverse effect. Red mud does however appear to induce an increase in the density of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial communities when compared with unaffected sediments and reference sites. Given the volume of material released in the spill, it is encouraging that the signal of the red mud on aquatic biota is visible at a relatively small number of sites. Gypsum-affected samples appear to induce an adverse effect in some bioassays (Sinapis alba and Heterocypris incongruens), which may be a feature of fine grain size, limited nutrient supply and greater availability of trace contaminants in the channel reaches that are subject to intense gypsum dosing. Implications for monitoring and management of the spill are discussed. PMID:22772744

  5. Assessment of four calculation methods proposed by the EC for waste hazardous property HP 14 'Ecotoxic'.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Pierre; Humez, Nicolas; Conche, Isabelle; Bishop, Ian; Rebischung, Flore

    2016-02-01

    established as well, that is when the waste is classified "H" in the LoW and "NH" by calculation (i.e. an under-estimation of the hazard). For Data Set #1, Method 2 with extended M-factors matches best with the LoW (80% concordant H and non-H by LoW, and 13% discordant for H waste by LoW). This method more correctly classifies wastes containing substances with high ecotoxicity. Methods 1 and 3 have nearly as good matches (76% and 72% concordant H and non-H by LoW, and 13% and 6% respectively discordant for H waste by LoW). Method 2 with extended M-factors, but limited to the M-factors published in the CLP has insufficient concordance (64% concordant H and non-H by LoW, and 50% discordant for H waste by LoW). As the same method with extended M-factors gives the best performance, the lower performance is due to the limited set of M-factors in the CLP. Method 4 is divergent (60% concordant H and non-H by LoW, and 56% discordant for H waste by LoW). For Data Set #2, Methods 2 and 4 do not correctly classify 24 air pollution control residues from incineration 19 01 07(∗) (3/24 and 2/24 respectively), and should not be used, while Methods 3, 1 and 2 with extended M-factors successfully classify 100% of them as hazardous. From the two sets of data, Method 2 with extended M-factors (corresponding more closely to the CLP methods used for products) matches best with the LoW when the LoW code is safely known, and Method 3 and 1 will deviate from the LoW if the samples contain substances with high ecotoxicity (in particular PAHs). Methods 2 and 4 are not recommended. Formally, this conclusion depends on the waste streams that are used for the comparison of methods and the relevancy of the classification as hazardous for ecotoxicity in the LoW. Since the set is large (120 waste streams) and no selection has been made here in the available data, the conclusion should be robust.

  6. Can initial clinical assessment exclude thoracolumbar vertebral injury?

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Dinendra Singh; Mitra, Biswadev; Reeves, Fairleigh; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Liew, Susan; Varma, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that all blunt trauma patients, presenting with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score of 15, without intoxication or neurological deficit, and no pain or tenderness on log-roll can have any thoracolumbar fracture excluded without imaging. Materials and Methods All patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture presenting to the emergency department of a major trauma centre and having an initial GCS score of 15 were included in the study. Variables collected included type of fracture, mechanism of injury, the presence of pain or tenderness on log-roll, ethanol levels and prehospital opioid analgesia. Results There were 536 patients with thoracolumbar fractures, of which 508 (94.8%) patients had either pain, tenderness or had received prehospital opioid analgesia. A small subgroup of 28 (5.2%) patients who received no prehospital opioid analgesia, did not complain of pain and had no tenderness to the thoracolumbar spine elicited on log-roll. This subgroup was significantly older (p=0.033) and a high proportion of patients (64.3%) had a concurrent fracture of the cervical spine. Within this subgroup, a clinically significant unstable thoracic fracture was present in three patients, with all three patients exhibiting symptoms and signs of neurological injury or having a concurrent cervical vertebral fracture. Conclusions In this population of blunt trauma patients with a GCS score of 15, not under the influence of alcohol or prehospital morphine administration, the absence of pain or tenderness on log-roll can exclude a clinically significant lumbar vertebral fracture, but does not exclude a thoracic fracture. PMID:22915226

  7. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2014-06-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states.

  8. {phi}{sup 4} inflation is not excluded

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Erandy; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2009-07-15

    We present counterexamples to the claim that the {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} inflaton potential is excluded by recent cosmological data. Finding counterexamples requires that the actually observed primordial fluctuations are generated at the onset of the slow-roll regime of inflation. This setup for the initial conditions is therefore different from the usual scenario of chaotic inflation where inflation starts long before the observed fluctuations are created. The primordial power spectrum of 'just enough' chaotic inflation violates scale invariance in a way consistent with observations.

  9. Missouri casino self-excluders: distributions across time and space.

    PubMed

    LaBrie, Richard A; Nelson, Sarah E; LaPlante, Debi A; Peller, Allyson J; Caro, Gabriel; Shaffer, Howard J

    2007-06-01

    According to public health research, exposure to casinos is a risk factor for disordered gambling. Consequently, casino self-exclusion programs, which provide gamblers with the opportunity to voluntarily seek limits on their access to gambling venues, can serve as a barometer of the concentration of disordered gambling in an area. This study reports on the distribution, both temporally and geographically, of 6,599 people who applied to exclude themselves from Missouri casinos between November, 1996 and February, 2004. Analyses used Microsoft MapPoint to plot the location of casinos and self-excluders (SEs) across Missouri and its constituent counties. These regional exposure analyses showed that the Western region around Kansas City is an epicenter of disordered gambling as, to a lesser extent, is the Eastern region around St. Louis. The annual number of SE enrollments increased during the first few years of the Missouri self-exclusion program and then leveled off during the later years. These findings have important implications for public health and the development of public health interventions for disordered gamblers.

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) prediction of (eco)toxicity of short aliphatic protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Peric, Brezana; Sierra, Jordi; Martí, Esther; Cruañas, Robert; Garau, Maria Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as a group of very promising compounds due to their excellent properties (practical non-volatility, high thermal stability and very good and diverse solving capacity). The ILs have a good prospect of replacing traditional organic solvents in vast variety of applications. However, the complete information on their environmental impact is still not available. There is also an enormous number of possible combinations of anions and cations which can form ILs, the fact that requires a method allowing the prediction of toxicity of existing and potential ILs. In this study, a group contribution QSAR model has been used in order to predict the (eco)toxicity of protic and aprotic ILs for five tests (Microtox®, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Lemna minor growth inhibition test, and Acetylcholinestherase inhibition and Cell viability assay with IPC-81 cells). The predicted and experimental toxicity are well correlated. A prediction of EC50 for these (eco)toxicity tests has also been made for eight representatives of the new family of short aliphatic protic ILs, whose toxicity has not been determined experimentally to date. The QSAR model applied in this study can allow the selection of potentially less toxic ILs amongst the existing ones (e.g. in the case of aprotic ILs), but it can also be very helpful in directing the synthesis efforts toward developing new "greener" ILs respectful with the environment (e.g. short aliphatic protic ILs). PMID:25728357

  11. Sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment of dye-containing wastewaters: colour and COD removals, and ecotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcos Erick Rodrigues da; Firmino, Paulo Igor Milen; Sousa, Márcia Rodrigues de; Santos, André Bezerra Dos

    2012-02-01

    Colour and COD removals of the azo dyes Congo Red (CR) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) were individually evaluated in a sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment system. Additionally, dye toxicity was assessed by using acute ecotoxicity tests with Daphnia magna as the indicator-organism. The anaerobic reactor was operated at approximately 27 °C and with hydraulic retention times of 12 and 24 h. The aerobic reactor was operated in batch mode with a total cycle of 24 h. During anaerobic step, high colour removals were obtained, 96.3% for CR (400 mg/L) and 75% for RB5 (200 mg/L). During the aerobic phase, COD effluent was considerably reduced, with an average removal efficiency of 52% for CR and 85% for RB5, which resulted in an overall COD removal of 88% for both dyes. Ecotoxicity tests with CR revealed that the anaerobic effluent presented a higher toxicity compared with the influent, and an aerobic post-treatment was not efficient in reducing toxicity. However, the results with RB5 showed that both anaerobic and aerobic steps could decrease dye toxicity, especially the aerobic phase, which removed completely the toxicity in D. magna. Therefore, the anaerobic/aerobic treatment is not always effective in detoxifying dye-containing wastewaters, sometimes even increasing dye toxicity. PMID:22238010

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) prediction of (eco)toxicity of short aliphatic protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Peric, Brezana; Sierra, Jordi; Martí, Esther; Cruañas, Robert; Garau, Maria Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as a group of very promising compounds due to their excellent properties (practical non-volatility, high thermal stability and very good and diverse solving capacity). The ILs have a good prospect of replacing traditional organic solvents in vast variety of applications. However, the complete information on their environmental impact is still not available. There is also an enormous number of possible combinations of anions and cations which can form ILs, the fact that requires a method allowing the prediction of toxicity of existing and potential ILs. In this study, a group contribution QSAR model has been used in order to predict the (eco)toxicity of protic and aprotic ILs for five tests (Microtox®, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Lemna minor growth inhibition test, and Acetylcholinestherase inhibition and Cell viability assay with IPC-81 cells). The predicted and experimental toxicity are well correlated. A prediction of EC50 for these (eco)toxicity tests has also been made for eight representatives of the new family of short aliphatic protic ILs, whose toxicity has not been determined experimentally to date. The QSAR model applied in this study can allow the selection of potentially less toxic ILs amongst the existing ones (e.g. in the case of aprotic ILs), but it can also be very helpful in directing the synthesis efforts toward developing new "greener" ILs respectful with the environment (e.g. short aliphatic protic ILs).

  13. Interspecies quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for eco-toxicity screening of chemicals: the role of physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, A; Hasunuma, K; Aoki, Y

    2015-01-01

    In addition to molecular structure profiles, descriptors based on physicochemical properties are useful for explaining the eco-toxicities of chemicals. In a previous study we reported that a criterion based on the difference between the partition coefficient (log POW) and distribution coefficient (log D) values of chemicals enabled us to identify aromatic amines and phenols for which interspecies relationships with strong correlations could be developed for fish-daphnid and algal-daphnid toxicities. The chemicals that met the log D-based criterion were expected to have similar toxicity mechanisms (related to membrane penetration). Here, we investigated the applicability of log D-based criteria to the eco-toxicity of other kinds of chemicals, including aliphatic compounds. At pH 10, use of a log POW - log D > 0 criterion and omission of outliers resulted in the selection of more than 100 chemicals whose acute fish toxicities or algal growth inhibition toxicities were almost equal to their acute daphnid toxicities. The advantage of log D-based criteria is that they allow for simple, rapid screening and prioritizing of chemicals. However, inorganic molecules and chemicals containing certain structural elements cannot be evaluated, because calculated log D values are unavailable.

  14. Including ecotoxic impacts on warm-blooded predators in life cycle impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Golsteijn, Laura; van Zelm, Rosalie; Veltman, Karin; Musters, Gijs; Hendriks, A Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2012-04-01

    In current life cycle impact assessment, the focus of ecotoxicity is on cold-blooded species. We developed a method to calculate characterization factors (CFs) for the impact assessment of chemical emissions on warm-blooded predators in freshwater food chains. The method was applied to 329 organic chemicals. The CF for these predators was defined as a multiplication of the fate factor (FF), exposure factor (XF), bioaccumulation factor (BF), and effect factor (EF). Fate factors and XFs were calculated with the model USES-LCA 2.0. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated with the model OMEGA, for chemical uptake via freshwater, food, and air. Effect factors were calculated based on experimental, median lethal doses (LD50). The concentration buildup (CB) of the chemicals (i.e., FF, XF, and BF over the 3 routes of exposure) showed a range of 7 to 9 orders of magnitude, depending on the emission compartment. Effect factors displayed a range of 7 orders of magnitude. Characterization factors ranged 9 orders of magnitude. After emissions to freshwater, the relative contribution of the uptake routes to CB were 1% (90% confidence interval [CI]: 0%-2%) for uptake from air, 43% (11%-50%) for uptake from water, and 56% (50%-87%) for uptake from food. After an emission to agricultural soil, the contribution was 11% (0%-80%) for uptake from air, 39% (5%-50%) for uptake from water, and 50% (11%-83%) for uptake from food. Uptake from air was mainly relevant for emissions to air (on average 42%, 90% CI: 5%-98%). Characterization factors for cold-blooded species were typically 4 orders of magnitude higher than CFs for warm-blooded predators. The correlation between both types of CFs was low, which means that a high relative impact on cold-blooded species does not necessarily indicate a high relative impact on warm-blooded predators. Depending on the weighing method to be considered, the inclusion of impacts on warm-blooded predators can change the relative ranking of toxic chemicals

  15. Alternative approaches for vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    EPA Science Inventory

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessing chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate or...

  16. Scattering from Colloid-Polymer Conjugates with Excluded Volume Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2015-01-13

    This work presents scattering functions of conjugates consisting of a colloid particle and a self-avoiding polymer chain as a model for protein-polymer conjugates and nanoparticle-polymer conjugates in solution. The model is directly derived from the two-point correlation function with the inclusion of excluded volume effects. The dependence of the calculated scattering function on the geometric shape of the colloid and polymer stiffness is investigated. The model is able to describe the experimental scattering signature of the solutions of suspending hard particle-polymer conjugates and provide additional conformational information. This model explicitly elucidates the link between the global conformation of a conjugate and the microstructure of its constituent components.

  17. Scattering from Colloid-Polymer Conjugates with Excluded Volume Effect

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xin; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2015-01-13

    This work presents scattering functions of conjugates consisting of a colloid particle and a self-avoiding polymer chain as a model for protein-polymer conjugates and nanoparticle-polymer conjugates in solution. The model is directly derived from the two-point correlation function with the inclusion of excluded volume effects. The dependence of the calculated scattering function on the geometric shape of the colloid and polymer stiffness is investigated. The model is able to describe the experimental scattering signature of the solutions of suspending hard particle-polymer conjugates and provide additional conformational information. This model explicitly elucidates the link between the global conformation of a conjugatemore » and the microstructure of its constituent components.« less

  18. Management of thrombocytopenia in the ICU (pregnancy excluded).

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Thierry; Souweine, Bertrand; Dupic, Laurent; Soufir, Lilia; Meyer, Pascal

    2012-08-28

    Thrombocytopenia is a very frequent disorder in the intensive care unit. Many etiologies should be searched, and therapeutic approaches differ according to these different causes. However, no guideline exists regarding optimum practices for these situations in critically ill patients. We present recommendations for the management of thrombocytopenia in intensive care unit, excluding pregnancy, developed by an expert group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP) and of the Haemostasis and Thrombosis Study Group (GEHT) of the French Society of Haematology (SFH). The recommendations cover six fields of application: definition, epidemiology, and prognosis; diagnostic approach; therapeutic aspects; thrombocytopenia and sepsis; iatrogenic thrombocytopenia, with a special focus on heparin-induced thrombocytopenia; and thrombotic microangiopathy.

  19. Management of thrombocytopenia in the ICU (pregnancy excluded)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a very frequent disorder in the intensive care unit. Many etiologies should be searched, and therapeutic approaches differ according to these different causes. However, no guideline exists regarding optimum practices for these situations in critically ill patients. We present recommendations for the management of thrombocytopenia in intensive care unit, excluding pregnancy, developed by an expert group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP) and of the Haemostasis and Thrombosis Study Group (GEHT) of the French Society of Haematology (SFH). The recommendations cover six fields of application: definition, epidemiology, and prognosis; diagnostic approach; therapeutic aspects; thrombocytopenia and sepsis; iatrogenic thrombocytopenia, with a special focus on heparin-induced thrombocytopenia; and thrombotic microangiopathy. PMID:22929300

  20. Explicit excluded volume of cylindrically symmetric convex bodies.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G

    2015-06-01

    We represent explicitly the excluded volume V(e){B(1),B(2)} of two generic cylindrically symmetric, convex rigid bodies, B(1) and B(2), in terms of a family of shape functionals evaluated separately on B(1) and B(2). We show that V(e){B(1),B(2)} fails systematically to feature a dipolar component, thus making illusory the assignment of any shape dipole to a tapered body in this class. The method proposed here is applied to cones and validated by a shape-reconstruction algorithm. It is further applied to spheroids (ellipsoids of revolution), for which it shows how some analytic estimates already regarded as classics should indeed be emended. PMID:26172727

  1. Computational tool for risk assessment of nanomaterials: novel QSTR-perturbation model for simultaneous prediction of ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity of uncoated and coated nanoparticles under multiple experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-12-16

    Nanomaterials have revolutionized modern science and technology due to their multiple applications in engineering, physics, chemistry, and biomedicine. Nevertheless, the use and manipulation of nanoparticles (NPs) can bring serious damages to living organisms and their ecosystems. For this reason, ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays are of special interest in order to determine the potential harmful effects of NPs. Processes based on ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity tests can significantly consume time and financial resources. In this sense, alternative approaches such as quantitative structure-activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) modeling have provided important insights for the better understanding of the biological behavior of NPs that may be responsible for causing toxicity. Until now, QSAR/QSTR models have predicted ecotoxicity or cytotoxicity separately against only one organism (bioindicator species or cell line) and have not reported information regarding the quantitative influence of characteristics other than composition or size. In this work, we developed a unified QSTR-perturbation model to simultaneously probe ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity of NPs under different experimental conditions, including diverse measures of toxicities, multiple biological targets, compositions, sizes and conditions to measure those sizes, shapes, times during which the biological targets were exposed to NPs, and coating agents. The model was created from 36488 cases (NP-NP pairs) and exhibited accuracies higher than 98% in both training and prediction sets. The model was used to predict toxicities of several NPs that were not included in the original data set. The results of the predictions suggest that the present QSTR-perturbation model can be employed as a highly promising tool for the fast and efficient assessment of ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity of NPs.

  2. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  3. Connectivity and Excluded Volume Effects in Polymeric Complex Coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles; Radhakrishna, Mithun

    Oppositely-charged polyelectrolytes in salt solutions can undergo phase separation to form complex coacervates. This charge-driven phase behavior is the basis for emerging motifs in self-assembly. Traditional uses for coacervates are in food and personal care products, while applications in technologies for drug delivery and sensory materials are being developed. One of the primary theories driving understanding of complex coacervates is the Voorn-Overbeek (V-O) theory, which is a precursor to more sophisticated field theories. We present both theory and simulation that provides an alternate picture of coacervates, specifically addressing the limitations of V-O. Our theoretical approach is based on PRISM, which is a liquid-state theory that specifically accounts for connectivity. This is compared with Monte Carlo-based simulations, which likewise provide a molecular picture of coacervation. We demonstrate that a combination of connectivity-based correlations and excluded volume has a profound effect on coacervation phase behavior, suggesting that favorable comparison of V-O to experiment benefits from a cancellation of errors. The influence of connectivity on coacervate phase behavior hints at new opportunities for molecular-based design in electrostatically-driven self-assembly.

  4. Reconfigurable multi-scale colloidal assembly on excluded volume patterns

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara D.; Yang, Yuguang; Everett, W. Neil; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies with unique properties is important to emerging applications. Dynamically manipulating colloidal structures via tunable kT-scale attraction can provide the opportunity to create particle-based nano- and microstructured materials that are reconfigurable. Here, we report a novel tactic to obtain reconfigurable, multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies by combining thermoresponsive depletant particles and patterned topographical features that, together, reversibly mediate local kT-scale depletion interactions. This method is demonstrated in optical microscopy experiments to produce colloidal microstructures that reconfigure between well-defined ordered structures and disordered fluid states as a function of temperature and pattern feature depth. These results are well described by Monte Carlo simulations using theoretical depletion potentials that include patterned excluded volume. Ultimately, the approach reported here can be extended to control the size, shape, orientation, and microstructure of colloidal assemblies on multiple lengths scales and on arbitrary pre-defined pattern templates. PMID:26330058

  5. Transference to the analyst as an excluded observer.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John

    2008-02-01

    In this paper I briefly review some significant points in the development of ideas on transference which owe so much to the discoveries of Freud. I then discuss some of the subsequent developments which were based on Freud 's work and which have personally impressed me. In particular I mention Melanie Klein's elaboration of an internal world peopled by internal object and her description of the mechanisms of splitting and projective identification, both of which profoundly affect our understanding of transference. Using some clinical material I try to illustrate an important transference situation which I do not think has been sufficiently emphasized although it is part of the 'total situation' outlined by Klein. In this kind of transference the analyst finds himself in an observing position and is no longer the primary object to whom love and hate are directed. Instead he is put in a position of an excluded figure who can easily enact rather than understand the role he has been put in. In this situation he may try to regain the position as the patient's primary object in the transference or avoid the transference altogether and make extra-transference interpretations and in this way enact the role of a judgemental and critical super-ego. If he can tolerate the loss of a central role and understand the transference position he has been put in, the analyst can sometimes reduce enactments and release feelings to do with mourning and loss in both himself and his patient.

  6. The politics of corruption, inequality, and the socially excluded.

    PubMed

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the production of knowledge in the context of socially excluded people exposed to inequality, oppression, and exploitation is problematized. The analysis follows Enrique Dussel's philosophical exegesis of the politics of power and corruption and his vision of a critical transformation of the social political order. The argument is also informed by the work of critical educator Paulo Freire, who elucidates the conditions of oppression and marginalization and highlights the importance of conscientization to develop a critical awareness of these conditions. Hannah Arendt's work on the politics of understanding totalitarianism also assists in the elucidation of the machinery that operates behind oppression to sustain power and inequality. The article emphasizes the need to recognize the inequality of conditions that exists between the producer of knowledge and those who live through inequality and oppression in their lived corporality. A critical transformation of the process of production of knowledge is needed to both acknowledge the conditions that sustain this endeavour in the first place and avoid the corruption of knowledge. A work of conscientization is also necessary among knowledge producers to undertake a critical analysis of inequality that exposes the corruption of power. This analysis needs to examine and unmask the hidden mechanisms that perpetuate inequality and oppression and serve only the interests of a few. The abysmal gaps between the wealthy and the poor within and among countries bespeak a degree of human indifference that reflects a most serious and complex phenomenon that perverts something profoundly human in our societies.

  7. Determinants of Prosocial Behavior in Included Versus Excluded Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, Esther; Tabernero, Carmen; Steinel, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Prosocial behavior (PSB) is increasingly becoming necessary as more and more individuals experience exclusion. In this context it is important to understand the motivational determinants of PSB. Here we report two experiments which analyzed the influence of dispositional (prosocialness; rejection sensitivity) and motivational variables (prosocial self-efficacy; prosocial collective efficacy; trust; anger; social affiliation motivation) on PSB under neutral contexts (Study 1), and once under inclusion or exclusion conditions (Study 2). Both studies provided evidence for the predicted mediation of PSB. Results in both neutral and inclusion and exclusion conditions supported our predictive model of PSB. In the model dispositional variables predicted motivational variables, which in turn predicted PSB. We showed that the investigated variables predicted PSB; this suggests that to promote PSB one could (1) foster prosocialness, prosocial self and collective efficacy, trust in others and affiliation motivation and (2) try to reduce negative feelings and the tendency to dread rejection in an attempt to reduce the negative impact that these variables have on PSB. Moreover, the few differences that emerged in the model between the inclusion and exclusion contexts suggested that in interventions with excluded individuals special care emphasis should be placed on addressing rejection sensitivity and lack of trust. PMID:26779103

  8. Counter pumping debris excluder and separator. [gas turbine shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A dirt separator and excluder for removing entrained debris from gas turbine shaft seals is described. A helical groove pattern is constructed on the rotating shaft with the pumping pattern such that it tends to pump seal pressurizing gas toward the gas turbine seal. A second helical groove pattern is provided on the stationary housing or counter rotating member coaxial with the shaft, and this pattern is designed to provide pumping in the direction opposite from that of the groove pattern on the shaft. Gas with entrained debris entering this grooved area will be subjected to high centrifugal forces due to the swirl motion induced by the groove pattern and the rotation of the shaft. This debris is centrifuged outwardly into the outer groove pattern on the housing or counter rotating member. Because the outer groove pattern has a pumping direction opposite from that of the seal, dirt is pumped away from the seal and can be collected in a suitable debris trap remote from the seal location.

  9. Nucleosome positioning by genomic excluding-energy barriers

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Pascale; Chevereau, Guillaume; Vaillant, Cédric; Audit, Benjamin; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Marilley, Monique; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide nucleosome mappings along with bioinformatics studies have confirmed that the DNA sequence plays a more important role in the collective organization of nucleosomes in vivo than previously thought. Yet in living cells, this organization also results from the action of various external factors like DNA-binding proteins and chromatin remodelers. To decipher the code for intrinsic chromatin organization, there is thus a need for in vitro experiments to bridge the gap between computational models of nucleosome sequence preferences and in vivo nucleosome occupancy data. Here we combine atomic force microscopy in liquid and theoretical modeling to demonstrate that a major sequence signaling in vivo are high-energy barriers that locally inhibit nucleosome formation rather than favorable positioning motifs. We show that these genomic excluding-energy barriers condition the collective assembly of neighboring nucleosomes consistently with equilibrium statistical ordering principles. The analysis of two gene promoter regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human genome indicates that these genomic barriers direct the intrinsic nucleosome occupancy of regulatory sites, thereby contributing to gene expression regulation. PMID:20018700

  10. Excluding a psychoactive substance use disorder in forensic psychiatric evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lacoursiere, R B

    1989-01-01

    The forensic psychiatrist is sometimes asked to exclude that a person has a psychoactive substance use disorder, for example, in a security worker who has access to weapons, in a health care professional who may be alcohol/drug impaired, or in a parent, in a deprived child or custody hearing matter. After examining the data that are leading to the evaluation, these evaluations require corroborated background information to look for developmental and genetic antecedents that might be consistent with substance abuse and dependence; inquiry into the history of substance use; and an examination of areas, in which problems from substance use can occur, namely in family and other social relationships, at work, in legal settings, in physical health, and in personal and psychiatric reactions, for example, in suicidal behavior. Then a physical exam and laboratory evaluation are conducted to look for medical evidence of substance use and complications therefrom, and a mental status exam is performed and psychological testing is obtained as required, for example, a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) or neuropsychological testing. When such an evaluation is essentially negative, the examiner can say, within the limits of the evaluation, that a psychoactive substance use disorder does not exist.

  11. Health care institutions should not exclude smokers from employment.

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S; Kertesz, Stefan G; Nash, Ryan R

    2014-06-01

    Some health care institutions, including academic health centers, have adopted policies excluding smokers from employment. Claims advanced on behalf of these policies include financial savings from reduced health costs and absenteeism as well as advantages consonant with their message of healthy living. The authors suggest that the institutional savings from these policies are speculative and unproven. Also, in settings where large medical schools operate, it is likely to be the poor, including members of minority groups, who, under an employee smoker ban, will lose the opportunity to work for an employer that offers health insurance and other benefits. In response to the incentives created by such bans, some will quit smoking, but most will not. Thus, at the community level, employee smoker bans are more likely to be harmful than beneficial.Although private businesses may rightly choose not to hire smokers in the 19 states where such policies are legal, health care institutions, including academic health centers, should consider hiring choices in light of the values they profess. The traditional values of medicine include service to all persons in need, even when illness results from addiction or unsafe behavior. Secular academic communities require a shared dedication to discovery without requiring strict conformity of private behavior or belief. The authors conclude that for health care institutions, policies of hiring smokers and helping them to quit are both prudent and expressive of the norms of medical care, such as inclusion, compassion, and fellowship, that academic health professionals seek to honor.

  12. Transference to the analyst as an excluded observer.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John

    2008-02-01

    In this paper I briefly review some significant points in the development of ideas on transference which owe so much to the discoveries of Freud. I then discuss some of the subsequent developments which were based on Freud 's work and which have personally impressed me. In particular I mention Melanie Klein's elaboration of an internal world peopled by internal object and her description of the mechanisms of splitting and projective identification, both of which profoundly affect our understanding of transference. Using some clinical material I try to illustrate an important transference situation which I do not think has been sufficiently emphasized although it is part of the 'total situation' outlined by Klein. In this kind of transference the analyst finds himself in an observing position and is no longer the primary object to whom love and hate are directed. Instead he is put in a position of an excluded figure who can easily enact rather than understand the role he has been put in. In this situation he may try to regain the position as the patient's primary object in the transference or avoid the transference altogether and make extra-transference interpretations and in this way enact the role of a judgemental and critical super-ego. If he can tolerate the loss of a central role and understand the transference position he has been put in, the analyst can sometimes reduce enactments and release feelings to do with mourning and loss in both himself and his patient. PMID:18290790

  13. Neutral red cytotoxicity assays for assessing in vivo carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in mussels--Comparing microscope and microplate methods.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Bankier, C; Al-Shaeri, M A M; Hartl, M G J

    2015-12-30

    The purpose of the present study was to compare two neutral red retention methods, the more established but very labour-intensive microscope method (NRR) against the more recently developed microplate method (NRU). The intention was to explore whether the sample volume throughput could be increased and potential operator bias avoided. Mussels Mytilus sp. were exposed in vivo to 50, 250 and 500 μg L(-1) single (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Using the NRR method, SWCNTs and MWCNTs caused concentration dependent decreases in neutral red retention time. However, a concentration dependent decrease in optical density was not observed using the NRU method. We conclude that the NRU method is not sensitive enough to assess carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in vivo in environmentally relevant media, and recommend using the NRR method. PMID:26549297

  14. Environmental properties and aquatic hazard assessment of anionic surfactants: physico-chemical, environmental fate and ecotoxicity properties.

    PubMed

    Könnecker, Gustav; Regelmann, Jürgen; Belanger, Scott; Gamon, Konrad; Sedlak, Richard

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes the environmental hazard assessment of physicochemical properties, environmental fate and behavior and the ecotoxicity of a category of 61 anionic surfactants (ANS), comprised of alkyl sulfates (AS), primary alkane sulfonates (PAS) and alpha-olefin sulfonates (AOS) under the High Production Volume Chemicals Program of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The most important common structural feature of the category members examined here is the presence of a predominantly linear aliphatic hydrocarbon chain with a polar sulfate or sulfonate group, neutralized with a counter-ion. The hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain (with a length between C(8) and C(18)) and the polar sulfate or sulfonate groups confer surfactant properties and enable the commercial use of these substances as anionic surfactants. The close structural similarities lead to physico-chemical properties and environmental fate characteristics which follow a regular pattern and justify the applied read-across within a category approach. Common physical and/or biological properties result in structurally similar breakdown products and are, together with the surfactant properties, responsible for similar environmental behavior. The structural similarities result in the same mode of ecotoxic action. Within each of the three sub-categories of ANS the most important parameter influencing ecotoxicity is the varying length of the alkyl chain. Although the counter-ion may also influence the physico-chemical properties, there is no indication that it significantly affects chemical reactivity, environmental fate and behavior or ecotoxicity of these chemicals. Deduced from physico-chemical and surfactancy properties, the main target compartment for the substances of the ANS category is the hydrosphere. They are quantitatively removed in waste water treatment plants, mainly by biodegradation. Quantitative removal in biological treatment plants is reflected by low AS

  15. Neutral red cytotoxicity assays for assessing in vivo carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in mussels--Comparing microscope and microplate methods.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Bankier, C; Al-Shaeri, M A M; Hartl, M G J

    2015-12-30

    The purpose of the present study was to compare two neutral red retention methods, the more established but very labour-intensive microscope method (NRR) against the more recently developed microplate method (NRU). The intention was to explore whether the sample volume throughput could be increased and potential operator bias avoided. Mussels Mytilus sp. were exposed in vivo to 50, 250 and 500 μg L(-1) single (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Using the NRR method, SWCNTs and MWCNTs caused concentration dependent decreases in neutral red retention time. However, a concentration dependent decrease in optical density was not observed using the NRU method. We conclude that the NRU method is not sensitive enough to assess carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in vivo in environmentally relevant media, and recommend using the NRR method.

  16. Ecotoxicity of mercury to Folsomia candida and Proisotoma minuta (Collembola: Isotomidae) in tropical soils: Baseline for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Niemeyer, Júlia Carina; Fernandes Correia, Maria Elizabeth; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2016-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic nonessential trace metal. Despite its natural occurrence in the Earth's Crust, its concentrations have been steadily increasing in the environment due to anthropogenic sources. Recent studies have showed great concern about soil fauna, once the potential adverse effects of mercury concentrations in the environment of these invertebrates are still poorly understood, especially when linked to forest soils and tropical biota. Different collembolan species can show distinct toxicity effects to the contaminants, impairing its developing lifelong and affecting its diversity and abundance in the environment. Laboratory studies were performed to evaluate the ecotoxicity of Hg(II) to collembolan species collected in Brazil, Proisotoma minuta (autochthonous) and Folsomia candida (allochthonous), as a tool to predict effects in ecological risk assessment of tropical regions. Behavioral, acute and chronic tests were carried under temperatures of 20°C and 24°C using two test soils, natural and artificial, spiked with increasing mercury concentrations. F. candida was more sensitive to mercury contamination than P. minuta, presenting the most restrictive values of EC50 and LC50. Reproduction was a considerably more sensitive endpoint than avoidance and mortality. The 28-day lower EC50 values were found in chronic tests for F. candida in natural soil to 24°C (3.32mgHgkg(-1)), while for P. minuta was in tropical artificial soil to 20°C (4.43mgHgkg(-1)). There were similarity for each collembolan species to respond at the Hg(II) effects when exposed at 20°C and 24°C. F. candida can be suitable as a bioindicator species to mercury ecotoxicity tests in tropical forest soils. PMID:26796529

  17. Agro-industrial wastes as effective amendments for ecotoxicity reduction and soil health improvement in aided phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Galende, María A; Becerril, José M; Gómez-Sagasti, María T; Barrutia, Oihana; Garbisu, Carlos; Hernández, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Aided phytostabilization is a technology that uses metal tolerant plants and organic and/or inorganic amendments to reduce soil metal bioavailability, while improving soil health. Our objective was to determine the effects of the application of amendments [sheep manure (SHEEP), poultry litter (POULTRY), cow slurry (COW), and paper mill sludge mixed with poultry litter (PAPER)], together with the growth of a metallicolous Festuca rubra L. population, on (i) chemical and microbial indicators of soil health and (ii) soil ecotoxicity, during the aided phytostabilization of a Zn/Pb contaminated mine soil. Amendment application led to an increase in soil pH, organic matter content, and inorganic salts, resulting in a decrease in Pb and Zn CaCl2-extractable concentrations in soil, which, in turn, contributed to lower ecotoxicity and a stimulation of plant growth and soil microbial communities. The factor most affecting the metal extractability was probably soil pH. POULTRY was the best amendment in terms of increasing plant growth, chlorophylls content, and soil microbial biomass and activity, but resulted in higher levels of phytoavailable Pb and Zn. SHEEP and PAPER were more effective at reducing metal CaCl2-extractability and, consequently, led to lower values of metal accumulation in plant tissues, thereby reducing the risk of metals entering into the food chain. When combined with the application of organic amendments, the metallicolous F. rubra population studied here appears an excellent candidate for aided phytostabilization. Our results indicate that the application of organic amendments is essential for the short-term recovery of highly contaminated metalliferous soils during aided phytostabilization. PMID:24870283

  18. Influence of pH, light cycle, and temperature on ecotoxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides towards Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke T; Cedergreen, Nina; Baun, Anders; Kusk, K Ole

    2013-01-01

    In chemical regulation, e.g. the EU Water Framework Directive, REACH, or the Pesticide Directive, standardized ecotoxicological tests are applied to evaluate and rank the hazard of compounds and for deriving environmental quality standards (EQS). Standardized test methods prescribe fixed testing conditions e.g. specific temperature, pH, light intensity etc. However, environmental conditions under which the organisms live are rarely identical to the standard conditions. Thus, the ecotoxicity of compounds found in standard test is not only a function of the compounds inherent physico-chemical properties but is also affected by test conditions. It is therefore important to study the effect of changes in test conditions in order to get reliable input ecotoxicity data for assessing the potential risk posed by a compound. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications of changing test conditions on the toxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides (SUs). The toxicity of the four SUs towards Lemna gibba was investigated at three pH levels (6, 7.5 and 9), at two temperatures (15 and 24 °C) and two light regimes (continuous and 12:12 h light:dark cycle) The EC50 increased twofold to tenfold for the four SUs when pH was increased from 6 to 9. Decreasing the temperature from 24 to 15 °C or introducing a dark:light cycle did not cause any trends in changes in toxicity. The results show that test conditions can have an effect on the toxicity and this should be considered when the standard test results are used for derivation of EQS. PMID:23010867

  19. Agro-industrial wastes as effective amendments for ecotoxicity reduction and soil health improvement in aided phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Galende, María A; Becerril, José M; Gómez-Sagasti, María T; Barrutia, Oihana; Garbisu, Carlos; Hernández, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Aided phytostabilization is a technology that uses metal tolerant plants and organic and/or inorganic amendments to reduce soil metal bioavailability, while improving soil health. Our objective was to determine the effects of the application of amendments [sheep manure (SHEEP), poultry litter (POULTRY), cow slurry (COW), and paper mill sludge mixed with poultry litter (PAPER)], together with the growth of a metallicolous Festuca rubra L. population, on (i) chemical and microbial indicators of soil health and (ii) soil ecotoxicity, during the aided phytostabilization of a Zn/Pb contaminated mine soil. Amendment application led to an increase in soil pH, organic matter content, and inorganic salts, resulting in a decrease in Pb and Zn CaCl2-extractable concentrations in soil, which, in turn, contributed to lower ecotoxicity and a stimulation of plant growth and soil microbial communities. The factor most affecting the metal extractability was probably soil pH. POULTRY was the best amendment in terms of increasing plant growth, chlorophylls content, and soil microbial biomass and activity, but resulted in higher levels of phytoavailable Pb and Zn. SHEEP and PAPER were more effective at reducing metal CaCl2-extractability and, consequently, led to lower values of metal accumulation in plant tissues, thereby reducing the risk of metals entering into the food chain. When combined with the application of organic amendments, the metallicolous F. rubra population studied here appears an excellent candidate for aided phytostabilization. Our results indicate that the application of organic amendments is essential for the short-term recovery of highly contaminated metalliferous soils during aided phytostabilization.

  20. 29 CFR 98.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I know if a person is excluded? 98.140 Section 98.140 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 98.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)...

  1. 22 CFR 1006.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true How do I know if a person is excluded? 1006.140 Section 1006.140 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1006.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the Excluded Parties List...

  2. 22 CFR 1508.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true How do I know if a person is excluded? 1508.140 Section 1508.140 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1508.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the Excluded Parties List...

  3. 29 CFR 794.110 - Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. 794... âenterpriseâ § 794.110 Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. The circumstances under which certain activities will be excluded from the “enterprise” referred to in the Act are made clear by...

  4. 29 CFR 794.110 - Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. 794... âenterpriseâ § 794.110 Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. The circumstances under which certain activities will be excluded from the “enterprise” referred to in the Act are made clear by...

  5. 29 CFR 794.110 - Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. 794... âenterpriseâ § 794.110 Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. The circumstances under which certain activities will be excluded from the “enterprise” referred to in the Act are made clear by...

  6. 29 CFR 794.110 - Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. 794... âenterpriseâ § 794.110 Activities excluded from the enterprise by the statute. The circumstances under which certain activities will be excluded from the “enterprise” referred to in the Act are made clear by...

  7. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  8. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  9. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  10. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  11. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  12. 26 CFR 1.552-5 - United States shareholder of excluded bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true United States shareholder of excluded bank. 1.552... States shareholder of excluded bank. A copy of the certification issued to an excluded bank under section... year of each United States shareholder of such foreign corporation, if he has been a shareholder...

  13. Alternative approaches to vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillicrap, Adam; Belanger, Scott; Burden, Natalie; Du Pasquier, David; Embry, Michelle; Halder, Marlies; Lampi, Mark; Lee, Lucy; Norberg-King, Teresa J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Schirmer, Kristin; Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessment of chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimized wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organisms for environmental risk assessments has been banned; in other situations, the number of organisms tested has been dramatically reduced or the severity of the procedure refined. However, there is still a long way to go to achieve a complete replacement of vertebrate organisms to generate environmental hazard data. The development of animal alternatives is based not just on ethical considerations but also on reducing the cost of performing vertebrate ecotoxicity tests and in some cases on providing better information aimed at improving environmental risk assessments. The present Focus article provides an overview of the considerable advances that have been made toward alternative approaches for ecotoxicity assessments over the last few decades.

  14. Excluding the poor from accessing biomedical literature: a rights violation that impedes global health.

    PubMed

    Yamey, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    Most biomedical journals charge readers a hefty access toll to read the full text version of a published research article. These tolls bring enormous profits to the traditional corporate publishing industry, but they make it impossible for most people worldwide--particularly in low and middle income countries--to access the biomedical literature. Traditional publishers also insist on owning the copyright on these articles, making it illegal for readers to freely distribute and photocopy papers, translate them, or create derivative educational works. This article argues that excluding the poor from accessing and freely using the biomedical research literature is harming global public health. Health care workers, for example, are prevented from accessing the information they need to practice effective medicine, while policymakers are prevented from accessing the essential knowledge they require to build better health care systems. The author proposes that the biomedical literature should be considered a global public good, basing his arguments upon longstanding and recent international declarations that enshrine access to scientific and medical knowledge as a human right. He presents an emerging alternative publishing model, called open access, and argues that this model is a more socially responsive and equitable approach to knowledge dissemination.

  15. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... subpart? (a) Farms are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. (b) Restaurants are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. A restaurant/retail facility is excluded from all of...

  16. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... subpart? (a) Farms are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. (b) Restaurants are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. A restaurant/retail facility is excluded from all of...

  17. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... subpart? (a) Farms are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. (b) Restaurants are excluded from all of the requirements in this subpart. A restaurant/retail facility is excluded from all of...

  18. Multilaboratory evaluation of 15 bioassays for (eco)toxicity screening and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials: FP7 project NANOVALID.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olesja M; Heinlaan, Margit; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Joonas, Elise; Jemec, Anita; Mannerström, Marika; Heinonen, Tuula; Rekulapelly, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Zou, Jing; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Drobne, Damjana; Kahru, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Within EU FP7 project NANOVALID, the (eco)toxicity of 7 well-characterized engineered nanomaterials (NMs) was evaluated by 15 bioassays in 4 laboratories. The highest tested nominal concentration of NMs was 100 mg/l. The panel of the bioassays yielded the following toxicity order: Ag > ZnO > CuO > TiO2 > MWCNTs > SiO2 > Au. Ag, ZnO and CuO proved very toxic in the majority of assays, assumingly due to dissolution. The latter was supported by the parallel analysis of the toxicity of respective soluble metal salts. The most sensitive tests/species were Daphnia magna (towards Ag NMs, 24-h EC50 = 0.003 mg Ag/l), algae Raphidocelis subcapitata (ZnO and CuO, 72-h EC50 = 0.14 mg Zn/l and 0.7 mg Cu/l, respectively) and murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 (CuO, 48-h EC50 = 0.7 mg Cu/l). MWCNTs showed toxicity only towards rat alveolar macrophages (EC50 = 15.3 mg/l) assumingly due to high aspect ratio and TiO2 towards R. subcapitata (EC50 = 6.8 mg Ti/l) due to agglomeration of TiO2 and entrapment of algal cells. Finally, we constructed a decision tree to select the bioassays for hazard ranking of NMs. For NM testing, we recommend a multitrophic suite of 4 in vitro (eco)toxicity assays: 48-h D. magna immobilization (OECD202), 72-h R. subcapitata growth inhibition (OECD201), 30-min Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (ISO2010) and 48-h murine fibroblast BALB/3T3 neutral red uptake in vitro (OECD129) representing crustaceans, algae, bacteria and mammalian cells, respectively. Notably, our results showed that these assays, standardized for toxicity evaluation of "regular" chemicals, proved efficient also for shortlisting of hazardous NMs. Additional assays are recommended for immunotoxicity evaluation of high aspect ratio NMs (such as MWCNTs). PMID:27259032

  19. Multilaboratory evaluation of 15 bioassays for (eco)toxicity screening and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials: FP7 project NANOVALID

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja M.; Heinlaan, Margit; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Joonas, Elise; Jemec, Anita; Mannerström, Marika; Heinonen, Tuula; Rekulapelly, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Zou, Jing; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Drobne, Damjana; Kahru, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Within EU FP7 project NANOVALID, the (eco)toxicity of 7 well-characterized engineered nanomaterials (NMs) was evaluated by 15 bioassays in 4 laboratories. The highest tested nominal concentration of NMs was 100 mg/l. The panel of the bioassays yielded the following toxicity order: Ag > ZnO > CuO > TiO2 > MWCNTs > SiO2 > Au. Ag, ZnO and CuO proved very toxic in the majority of assays, assumingly due to dissolution. The latter was supported by the parallel analysis of the toxicity of respective soluble metal salts. The most sensitive tests/species were Daphnia magna (towards Ag NMs, 24-h EC50 = 0.003 mg Ag/l), algae Raphidocelis subcapitata (ZnO and CuO, 72-h EC50 = 0.14 mg Zn/l and 0.7 mg Cu/l, respectively) and murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 (CuO, 48-h EC50 = 0.7 mg Cu/l). MWCNTs showed toxicity only towards rat alveolar macrophages (EC50 = 15.3 mg/l) assumingly due to high aspect ratio and TiO2 towards R. subcapitata (EC50 = 6.8 mg Ti/l) due to agglomeration of TiO2 and entrapment of algal cells. Finally, we constructed a decision tree to select the bioassays for hazard ranking of NMs. For NM testing, we recommend a multitrophic suite of 4 in vitro (eco)toxicity assays: 48-h D. magna immobilization (OECD202), 72-h R. subcapitata growth inhibition (OECD201), 30-min Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (ISO2010) and 48-h murine fibroblast BALB/3T3 neutral red uptake in vitro (OECD129) representing crustaceans, algae, bacteria and mammalian cells, respectively. Notably, our results showed that these assays, standardized for toxicity evaluation of “regular” chemicals, proved efficient also for shortlisting of hazardous NMs. Additional assays are recommended for immunotoxicity evaluation of high aspect ratio NMs (such as MWCNTs). PMID:27259032

  20. Ecotoxicity of quinoline and hydroxylated derivatives and their occurrence in groundwater of a tar-contaminated field site.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Reineke, Anne-Kirsten; Hollender, Juliane; Eisentraeger, Adolf

    2009-03-01

    In the groundwater of a timber impregnation site higher concentrations of hydroxylated quinolines compared to their parent compounds quinoline and isoquinoline were found. Studying the toxicity of parent compounds and metabolites, genotoxicity was found with metabolic activation in the SOS-Chromotest and Ames fluctuation test only for quinoline. An adverse effect on algae was observed only for the parent compounds quinoline and isoquinoline, while in the Daphnia magna immobilization assay most hydroxylated quinoline derivatives showed toxicity. The highest ecotoxic potential was observed in the Vibrio fischeri luminescence-inhibition assay. Comparing experimental EC50-values with QSAR predicted ones, for all compounds apart from isoquinoline and 2(1H)-quinolinone in the V. fischeri test baseline toxicity or polar nacrosis is indicated. In conclusion, the hydroxylation of quinoline leads to a detoxification of the genotoxic potential, while taken additive mixture toxicity and a safety factor into account parent compounds and metabolites are found of ecotoxicological relevance in the groundwater. PMID:18550163

  1. Quantifying the adsorption of ionic silver and functionalized nanoparticles during ecotoxicity testing: Test container effects and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ryo; Khurana, Kanupriya; Vasilev, Krasimir; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used in a wide variety of products, prompting concerns regarding their potential environmental impacts. To accurately determine the toxicity of Ag-NPs it is necessary to differentiate between the toxicity of the nanoparticles themselves and the toxicity of ionic silver (Ag) released from them. This is not a trivial task given the reactive nature of Ag in solution, and its propensity for both adsorption and photoreduction. In the experiments reported here, we quantified the loss of silver from test solutions during standard ecotoxicity testing conducted using a variety of different test container materials and geometries. This sensitive (110m)Ag isotope tracing method revealed a substantial underestimation of the toxicity of dissolved Ag to the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata when calculated only on the basis of the initial test concentrations. Furthermore, experiments with surface-functionalized Ag-NPs under standard algal growth inhibition test conditions also demonstrated extensive losses of Ag-NPs from the solution due to adsorption to the container walls, and the extent of loss was dependent on Ag-NP surface-functionality. These results hold important messages for researchers engaged in both environmental and human nanotoxicology testing, not only for Ag-NPs but also for other NPs with various tailored surface chemistries, where these phenomena are recognized but are also frequently disregarded in the experimental design and reporting.

  2. An integrated study on antimicrobial activity and ecotoxicity of quantum dots and quantum dots coated with the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Emilia; Siciliano, Antonietta; Maselli, Valeria; Gesuele, Renato; Guida, Marco; Fulgione, Domenico; Galdiero, Stefania; Lombardi, Lucia; Falanga, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and the ecotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) alone and coated with indolicidin. To meet this objective, we tested the level of antimicrobial activity on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and we designed an ecotoxicological battery of test systems and indicators able to detect different effects using a variety of end points. The antibacterial activity was analyzed against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 1025), Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 10031), and the results showed an improved germicidal action of QDs-Ind. Toxicity studies on Daphnia magna indicated a decrease in toxicity for QDs-Ind compared to QDs alone, lack of bioluminescence inhibition on Vibrio fisheri, and no mutations in Salmonella typhimurium TA 100. The comet assay and oxidative stress experiments performed on D. magna showed a genotoxic and an oxidative damage with a dose–response trend. Indolicidin retained its activity when bound to QDs. We observed an enhanced activity for QDs-Ind. The presence of indolicidin on the surface of QDs was able to decrease its QDs toxicity. PMID:27616887

  3. Assessment of sediment quality and pore water ecotoxicity in Kebir Rhumel basin (NE-Algeria): a combined approach.

    PubMed

    Sahli, Leila; Afri-Mehennaoui, Fatima-Zohra; El Hadef El Okki, Mohamed; Férard, Jean François; Mehennaoui, Smail

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to use different approaches to assess the current pollution status in the wadis of the Kebir Rhumel basin. First, sediment trace metal contents were measured by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Then, sediment quality was assessed on the basis of contamination assessment indexes such as: Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo), Contamination factor (C(f)), Contamination degree (C(d)), Sediment Pollution Index (SPI) and SEQ guidelines (Consensus Sediment Quality Guidelines). In addition, several toxicity tests (Daphnia magna mobility inhibition acute test-48 h, Aliivibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition acute test - 15/30 mn and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth inhibition chronic test - 72 h) were conducted to assess sediment pore water ecotoxicity. Trace metal concentrations followed the order: Mn > Zn > Pb > Cr > Cu > Ni > Co > Cd. Indexes used indicate varying degrees of sediment quality. Igeo, C(f), C(d) and SPI reveal a polymetallic contamination dominated by two or more elements in which Cd, Cu and Pb are of greatest concern. SEQ guidelines showed that biological effects on fauna would likely be observed occasionally and/or frequently for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn contents. Test organisms exposed to sediment pore water showed that the algal P. subcapitata test was more sensitive than the D. magna and A. fischeri tests. Hence, algal growth inhibition proved to be the most sensitive response to contaminants present in sediment extracts but a significant relationship with trace metal contents was not demonstrated. PMID:22233919

  4. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants.

  5. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants. PMID:27521931

  6. An integrated study on antimicrobial activity and ecotoxicity of quantum dots and quantum dots coated with the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Emilia; Siciliano, Antonietta; Maselli, Valeria; Gesuele, Renato; Guida, Marco; Fulgione, Domenico; Galdiero, Stefania; Lombardi, Lucia; Falanga, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and the ecotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) alone and coated with indolicidin. To meet this objective, we tested the level of antimicrobial activity on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and we designed an ecotoxicological battery of test systems and indicators able to detect different effects using a variety of end points. The antibacterial activity was analyzed against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 1025), Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 10031), and the results showed an improved germicidal action of QDs-Ind. Toxicity studies on Daphnia magna indicated a decrease in toxicity for QDs-Ind compared to QDs alone, lack of bioluminescence inhibition on Vibrio fisheri, and no mutations in Salmonella typhimurium TA 100. The comet assay and oxidative stress experiments performed on D. magna showed a genotoxic and an oxidative damage with a dose–response trend. Indolicidin retained its activity when bound to QDs. We observed an enhanced activity for QDs-Ind. The presence of indolicidin on the surface of QDs was able to decrease its QDs toxicity.

  7. An integrated study on antimicrobial activity and ecotoxicity of quantum dots and quantum dots coated with the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Emilia; Siciliano, Antonietta; Maselli, Valeria; Gesuele, Renato; Guida, Marco; Fulgione, Domenico; Galdiero, Stefania; Lombardi, Lucia; Falanga, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and the ecotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) alone and coated with indolicidin. To meet this objective, we tested the level of antimicrobial activity on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and we designed an ecotoxicological battery of test systems and indicators able to detect different effects using a variety of end points. The antibacterial activity was analyzed against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 1025), Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 10031), and the results showed an improved germicidal action of QDs-Ind. Toxicity studies on Daphnia magna indicated a decrease in toxicity for QDs-Ind compared to QDs alone, lack of bioluminescence inhibition on Vibrio fisheri, and no mutations in Salmonella typhimurium TA 100. The comet assay and oxidative stress experiments performed on D. magna showed a genotoxic and an oxidative damage with a dose-response trend. Indolicidin retained its activity when bound to QDs. We observed an enhanced activity for QDs-Ind. The presence of indolicidin on the surface of QDs was able to decrease its QDs toxicity. PMID:27616887

  8. A Spectral-SAR Model for the Anionic-Cationic Interaction in Ionic Liquids: Application to Vibrio fischeri Ecotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lacrămă, Ana-Maria; Putz, Mihai V.; Ostafe, Vasile

    2007-01-01

    Within the recently launched the spectral-structure activity relationship (S-SAR) analysis, the vectorial anionic-cationic model of a generic ionic liquid is proposed, along with the associated algebraic correlation factor in terms of the measured and predicted activity norms. The reliability of the present scheme is tested by assessing the Hansch factors, i.e. lipophylicity, polarizability and total energy, to predict the ecotoxicity endpoints of wide types of ionic liquids with ammonium, pyridinium, phosphonium, choline and imidazolium cations on the aquatic bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The results, while confirming the cationic dominant influence when only lipophylicity is considered, demonstrate that the anionic effect dominates all other more specific interactions. It was also proved that the S-SAR vectorial model predicts considerably higher activity for the ionic liquids than for its anionic and cationic subsystems separately, in all considered cases. Moreover, through applying the least norm-correlation path principle, the complete toxicological hierarchies are presented, unfolding the ecological rules of combined cationic and anionic influences in ionic liquid toxicity.

  9. 18 CFR 11.3 - Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., excluding pumped storage projects. 11.3 Section 11.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT ANNUAL CHARGES... Government Lands, and Use of Government Dams § 11.3 Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage...

  10. 18 CFR 11.3 - Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., excluding pumped storage projects. 11.3 Section 11.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT ANNUAL CHARGES... Government Lands, and Use of Government Dams § 11.3 Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage...

  11. Preventing Inclusion? Inclusive Early Childhood Education and the Option to Exclude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cologon, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    While there is increasing international commitment to inclusive education, as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), many children remain excluded at school. One marginalised and frequently excluded group of people are people who experience disability. In the recently released first report on…

  12. 19 CFR 148.105 - Procedure for excluding articles from flat rate of duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure for excluding articles from flat rate of... Importations of Limited Value § 148.105 Procedure for excluding articles from flat rate of duty. (a) Generally.... 1202), and this subpart which adversely affects the economic interest of the United States...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1182 - When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. 416.1182 Section 416.1182 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Individuals Achieve Self-Support § 416.1182 When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. We...

  14. 20 CFR 416.1182 - When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. 416.1182 Section 416.1182 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Individuals Achieve Self-Support § 416.1182 When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. We...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1182 - When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. 416.1182 Section 416.1182 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Individuals Achieve Self-Support § 416.1182 When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. We...

  16. 20 CFR 416.1182 - When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. 416.1182 Section 416.1182 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Individuals Achieve Self-Support § 416.1182 When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. We...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1182 - When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. 416.1182 Section 416.1182 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Individuals Achieve Self-Support § 416.1182 When we begin to count the income excluded under the plan. We...

  18. 40 CFR 1048.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... is excluded under § 1048.1(c) as a stationary engine and is not required by 40 CFR part 60, subpart... engine power. (4) State: “THIS ENGINE IS EXCLUDED FROM THE REQUIREMENTS OF 40 CFR PART 1048 AS A “STATIONARY ENGINE” AND THE OWNER/OPERATOR MUST COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF 40 CFR PART 60. INSTALLING...

  19. 32 CFR 644.450 - Items excluded from usual restoration obligation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Items excluded from usual restoration obligation... § 644.450 Items excluded from usual restoration obligation. Damage to the following items will not... should be included in the restoration if they have not been maintained adequately by the Government...

  20. 32 CFR 644.450 - Items excluded from usual restoration obligation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Items excluded from usual restoration obligation... § 644.450 Items excluded from usual restoration obligation. Damage to the following items will not... should be included in the restoration if they have not been maintained adequately by the Government...

  1. 40 CFR 1048.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... is excluded under § 1048.1(c) as a stationary engine and is not required by 40 CFR part 60, subpart... engine power. (4) State: “THIS ENGINE IS EXCLUDED FROM THE REQUIREMENTS OF 40 CFR PART 1048 AS A “STATIONARY ENGINE” AND THE OWNER/OPERATOR MUST COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF 40 CFR PART 60. INSTALLING...

  2. 21 CFR 1404.140 - How do I know if a person is excluded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I know if a person is excluded? 1404.140 Section 1404.140 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1404.140 How do I know if a person is excluded? Check the...

  3. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  4. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  5. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  6. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings...

  7. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings...

  8. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  9. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings...

  10. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  11. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings...

  12. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United States during the post-World War II period if, for example, you were in the— (a)...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United States during the post-World War II period if, for example, you were in the— (a)...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United States during the post-World War II period if, for example, you were in the— (a)...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United States during the post-World War II period if, for example, you were in the— (a)...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United States during the post-World War II period if, for example, you were in the— (a)...

  18. Psychiatric Disorder or Impairing Psychology in Children Who Have Been Excluded from School: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whear, Rebecca; Marlow, Ruth; Boddy, Kate; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Parker, Claire; Ford, Tamsin; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Stein, Ken

    2014-01-01

    When children with special educational needs are excluded from school, it should raise the concern that these children are not receiving adequate help and support. This systematic review aims to identify the prevalence of psychiatric disorder or impairing psychopathology among children who are excluded from school compared to children who are not…

  19. Octupolar approximation for the excluded volume of axially symmetric convex bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a simply computable formula for the excluded volume of convex, axially symmetric bodies, based on the classical Brunn-Minkoski theory for convex bodies, which is briefly outlined in an Appendix written in a modern mathematical language. This formula is applied to cones and spherocones, which are regularized cones; a shape-reconstruction algorithm is able to generate the region in space inaccessible to them and to compute their excluded volume, which is found to be in good agreement with our approximate analytical formula. Finally, for spherocones with an appropriately tuned amplitude, we predict the occurrence of a relative deep minimum of the excluded volume in a configuration lying between the parallel alignment (where the excluded volume is maximum) and the antiparallel alignment (where the excluded volume is minimum).

  20. [Effects of aging time on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in typical China soils].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Chen, Shi-Bao; Liu, Ji-Fang; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2013-07-01

    Six typical China soils with different properties were selected and added with seven concentrations of ZnCl2 to study the effects of different aging time (14, 90, 180, 360, and 540 days) on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in the soils, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results indicated that with the increase of aging time, the fraction of 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2-extracted Zn in the soils decreased sharply initially, then slowed down, and reached the dynamic balance after 540 d incubation. The eco-toxicity thresholds (ECx, x = 10, 50) of Zn to bok choy increased significantly with aging time (P < 0.05), which implied the marked decrease of the phyto-toxicity of Zn. The measured aging factors AF10 and AF50 of Zn ranged from 1.077-1.743 and 1.174-1.441, respectively, and increased with aging time. The balanced concentration of Zn in the soils was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, CEC, and organic carbon (Org-C) content, and soil pH was the most important controlling factor, followed by CEC and Org-C. It took shorter time to reach Zn balance in the soils with higher pH. The prediction model of the ECx of Zn was developed based on the aging factors and the main soil properties, and could be well validated by the measured ECx under field condition. This study would provide theoretical basis for the normalization of the eco-toxicity thresholds of added Zn in different soils and the formulation of the environmental criterion of Zn in China soils.

  1. [Effects of aging time on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in typical China soils].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Chen, Shi-Bao; Liu, Ji-Fang; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2013-07-01

    Six typical China soils with different properties were selected and added with seven concentrations of ZnCl2 to study the effects of different aging time (14, 90, 180, 360, and 540 days) on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in the soils, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results indicated that with the increase of aging time, the fraction of 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2-extracted Zn in the soils decreased sharply initially, then slowed down, and reached the dynamic balance after 540 d incubation. The eco-toxicity thresholds (ECx, x = 10, 50) of Zn to bok choy increased significantly with aging time (P < 0.05), which implied the marked decrease of the phyto-toxicity of Zn. The measured aging factors AF10 and AF50 of Zn ranged from 1.077-1.743 and 1.174-1.441, respectively, and increased with aging time. The balanced concentration of Zn in the soils was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, CEC, and organic carbon (Org-C) content, and soil pH was the most important controlling factor, followed by CEC and Org-C. It took shorter time to reach Zn balance in the soils with higher pH. The prediction model of the ECx of Zn was developed based on the aging factors and the main soil properties, and could be well validated by the measured ECx under field condition. This study would provide theoretical basis for the normalization of the eco-toxicity thresholds of added Zn in different soils and the formulation of the environmental criterion of Zn in China soils. PMID:24175536

  2. Factors predictive of persistent or recurrent Crohn's disease in excluded rectal segments.

    PubMed

    Guillem, J G; Roberts, P L; Murray, J J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C; Schoetz, D J

    1992-08-01

    The fate of the excluded rectal segment after surgery for Crohn's colitis remains poorly defined. To determine prognostic factors relating to the fate of the rectal segment, records of 47 patients who underwent creation of an excluded rectal segment were studied. Disease developed in 33 patients (70 percent) in the excluded rectal segment by five years; 24 patients (51 percent) had completion proctectomy by 2.4 years; and 9 patients (19 percent) retained a rectum with disease at a median follow-up period of five years (range, 2-13 years). At a median follow-up time of six years (range, 2-21 years), 14 patients were without clinical disease. The three groups were equivalent with respect to sex, duration of preoperative disease, indication for operation, distribution of disease, and histologic involvement of the proximal rectal margin. The median age of patients in the proctectomy group at diagnosis tended to be younger than that of patients with a retained excluded rectal segment (22, 30, and 31 years for patients having proctectomy, patients with a diseased excluded rectal segment, and patients with a normal excluded rectal segment, respectively). Neither initial involvement of the terminal ileum nor endoscopic inflammatory changes seen in the rectum predicted eventual disease of the excluded rectal segment. However, initial perianal disease complicating Crohn's colitis was predictive of persistent excluded rectal segment disease and often required proctectomy. Therefore, because the presence of perianal disease and Crohn's colitis predicts persistent or recurrent excluded rectal segment disease, primary total proctocolectomy or early completion proctectomy may be indicated in this subgroup of patients.

  3. Ecotoxicological effects of carbofuran and oxidised multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the freshwater fish Nile tilapia: nanotubes enhance pesticide ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Campos-Garcia, Janaína; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T; Alves, Oswaldo L; Leonardo, Antônio Fernando Gervásio; Barbieri, Edison

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of carbon nanotubes with pesticides, such as carbofuran, classical contaminants (e.g., pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and dyes) and emerging contaminants, including endocrine disruptors, are critical components of the environmental risks of this important class of carbon-based nanomaterials. In this work, we studied the modulation of acute carbofuran toxicity to the freshwater fish Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by nitric acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes, termed HNO3-MWCNT. Nitric acid oxidation is a common chemical method employed for the purification, functionalisation and aqueous dispersion of carbon nanotubes. HNO3-MWCNT were not toxic to Nile tilapia at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L for exposure times of up to 96 h. After 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, the LC50 values of carbofuran were 4.0, 3.2, 3.0 and 2.4 mg/mL, respectively. To evaluate the influence of carbofuran-nanotube interactions on ecotoxicity, we exposed the Nile tilapia to different concentrations of carbofuran mixed together with a non-toxic concentration of HNO3-MWCNT (1.0 mg/L). After 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of exposure, the LC50 values of carbofuran plus nanotubes were 3.7, 1.6, 0.7 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. These results demonstrate that HNO3-MWCNT potentiate the acute toxicity of carbofuran, leading to a more than five-fold increase in the LC50 values. Furthermore, the exposure of Nile tilapia to carbofuran plus nanotubes led to decreases in both oxygen consumption and swimming capacity compared to the control. These findings indicate that carbon nanotubes could act as pesticide carriers affecting fish survival, metabolism and behaviour.

  4. Ecotoxicity of silver nanomaterials in the aquatic environment: a review of literature and gaps in nano-toxicological research.

    PubMed

    Walters, Chavon R; Pool, Edmund J; Somerset, Vernon S

    2014-01-01

    There has been extensive growth in nanoscale technology in the last few decades to such a degree that nanomaterials (NMs) have become a constituent in a wide range of commercial and domestic products. With NMs already in use in several consumer products, concerns have emerged regarding their potential adverse environmental impacts. Although research has been undertaken in order to minimise the gaps in our understanding of NMs in the environment, little is known about their bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Nano-toxicology is defined as the study of the toxicity of nanomaterials. Nano-toxicology studies remain poorly and unevenly distributed. To date most of the research undertaken has been restricted to a narrow range of test species such as daphnids. Crabs are bio-indicators that can be used for toxicological research on NMs since they occupy a significant position in the aquatic food chain. In addition, they are often used in conventional ecotoxicological studies due to their high sensitivity to environmental stressors and are abundantly available. Because they are benthic organisms they are prone to contaminant uptake and bioaccumulation. To our knowledge the crab has never been used in nano-toxicological studies. In this context, an extensive review on published scientific literature on the ecotoxicity of silver NPs (AgNPs) on aquatic organisms was conducted. Some of the most common biomarkers used in ecotoxicological studies are described. Emphasis is placed on the use of biomarker responses in crabs as monitoring tools, as well as on its limitations. Additionally, the gaps in nano-toxicological research and recommendations for future research initiatives are addressed.

  5. Biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelghani, A.; Pramar, Y.; Mandal, T.

    1996-05-02

    This project assesses the levels of xenobiotics in Devils Swamp and studies their biological fate, transport, ecotoxicity, and potential toxicity to man. This article reports on the following studies: assessment of the acute toxicity of individual xenobiotics and toxicity of organic compounds hexachlorobutadience (HCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCBD) on juvenile crayfish; determination of the biotic influence of temperature, salinity, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, and sediment composition on the migration of xenobiotics; development of a pharmacokinetics model for xenobiotic absorption and storage, distribution and excretion by fish and crayfish.

  6. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and... excluded operation as a certified organic operation, or (2) Be represented as a certified organic...

  7. 40 CFR 59.605 - What portable fuel containers are excluded from this subpart's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS... consistent with the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.150 through 1926.152 are excluded. Such cans generally have...

  8. 40 CFR 59.605 - What portable fuel containers are excluded from this subpart's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS... consistent with the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.150 through 1926.152 are excluded. Such cans generally have...

  9. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value...

  10. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value...

  11. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value...

  12. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value...

  13. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value...

  14. Thermodynamics of the low-density excluded-volume hadron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redlich, Krzysztof; Zalewski, Kacper

    2016-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamics of excluded-volume particles at finite temperature and chemical potential in the low-density approximation. We assume Boltzmann statistics and study the influence of the excluded volume on an ideal gas thermodynamics at the same temperature, pressure, and number of particles. We show that considering the change of the free enthalpy due to the excluded volume, and using the Maxwell identities, one can derive relevant thermodynamic functions and parameters of multicomponent gases. The derivation is quite general, because particles may have different sizes and shapes which can also depend on their momenta. Besides its simplicity and generality, our approach has the advantage of eliminating the transcendental equations occurring in earlier studies. A representative example of the excluded-volume thermodynamics is the single-component gas of hard spheres. For this case, using a virial expansion, the validity limits of the low-density approximation are also discussed.

  15. 37 CFR 42.64 - Objection; motion to exclude; motion in limine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be served within ten business days of the institution of the trial. Once a trial has been instituted... supplemental evidence within ten business days of service of the objection. (c) Motion to exclude. A motion...

  16. Excluded volume effects on the kinetic assembling of a structural motif for RNA catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-09-01

    We establish the role of excluded volume effects on the loss of conformational entropy due to pseudoknot formation in RNA. This pseudoknot appears to be the structural motif responsible for shaping the splicing site of certain noncoding RNA transcriptional products. Focusing on the illustrative example of the YC4 intron, we show that the emergence of this motif is kinetically driven and prevails over competing catalytically inert secondary structure due to excluded volume effects which favor the correlation of interacting intramolecular loops.

  17. Effect of excluding shredders on leaf litter decomposition in two streams

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.R.; McArthur, J.V.; Cushing, C.E.

    1986-04-30

    The effect of excluding shredders on leaf processing rates was studied in a Rocky Mountain stream in Utah and a cold desert stream in Washington. Experimentally excluding shredders significantly decreased the processing rate in both streams. Processing rates (k) were higher in the desert stream, and it is postulated that this is related to increased microbial activity due to the higher water temperatures. 21 references, 2 tables.

  18. Acting on social exclusion: neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of excluders.

    PubMed

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A; Güroğlu, Berna

    2015-02-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of initiators of social exclusion (i.e. 'excluders'). Participants divided money in a modified Dictator Game between themselves and people who previously either included or excluded them during a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Participants selectively punished the excluders by decreasing their outcomes; even when this required participants to give up monetary rewards. Punishment of excluders was associated with increased activation in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and bilateral anterior insula. Costly punishment was accompanied by higher activity in the pre-SMA compared with punishment that resulted in gains or was non-costly. Refraining from punishment (i.e. forgiveness) was associated with self-reported perspective-taking and increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junction, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings show that social exclusion can result in punishment as well as forgiveness of excluders and that separable neural networks implicated in social cognition and cognitive control are recruited when people choose either to punish or to forgive those who excluded them.

  19. Characterizing dose-responses of catalase to nitrofurazone exposure in model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for ecotoxicity assessment: enzyme activity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Zhou, Liang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-02-01

    In environmental studies, some biological responses, known as biomarkers, have been used as a powerful bioassay tool for more than four decades. Disparity between enzyme activity and mRNA abundance leads to correlation equivocality, which makes the application of biomarkers for environmental risk assessment more complicated. This study investigates this disparity in the case of catalase when used as a biomarker for detecting ecotoxicity induced by antibiotics in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, dose-responses for catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance were investigated in Euplotes vannus which were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations, and dose-response models were developed to characterize the dose-response dynamics. Significant differences were found in both catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance among the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone. Catalase activity showed a hormetic-like effect in terms of dose-response, characterized by a biphasic relationship which was more clearly evident after a longer exposure period, while mRNA expression abundance increased linearly with the exposure duration. Additionally, the correlation between catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance reversed along with the duration of exposure to nitrofurazone. Taken together, our results demonstrate that catalase mRNA expression offers a more straightforward dose-response model than enzyme activity. Our findings suggest that both catalase enzyme activity and mRNA expression abundance can be used jointly as bioassay tools for detecting ecotoxicity induced by nitrofurazone in aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Modeling potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts due to pesticide use in biofuel feedstock production: the cases of maize, rapeseed, salix, soybean, sugar cane, and wheat.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, Maria; Cederberg, Christel; Berndes, Göran

    2014-10-01

    The inclusion of ecotoxicity impacts of pesticides in environmental assessments of biobased products has long been hampered by methodological challenges. We expanded the pesticide database and the regional coverage of the pesticide emission model PestLCI v.2.0, combined it with the impact assessment model USEtox, and assessed potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts (PFEIs) of pesticide use in selected biofuel feedstock production cases, namely: maize (Iowa, US, two cases), rapeseed (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany), Salix (South Central Sweden), soybean (Mato Grosso, Brazil, two cases), sugar cane (São Paulo, Brazil), and wheat (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany). We found that PFEIs caused by pesticide use in feedstock production varied greatly, up to 3 orders of magnitude. Salix has the lowest PFEI per unit of energy output and per unit of cultivated area. Impacts per biofuel unit were 30, 750, and 1000 times greater, respectively, for the sugar cane, wheat and rapeseed cases than for Salix. For maize genetically engineered (GE) to resist glyphosate herbicides and to produce its own insecticidal toxin, maize GE to resist glyphosate, soybeans GE to resist glyphosate and conventional soybeans, the impacts were 110, 270, 305, and 310 times greater than for Salix, respectively. The significance of field and site-specific conditions are discussed, as well as options for reducing negative impacts in biofuel feedstock production.

  1. Assessing and monitoring the ecotoxicity of pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields using the polyurethane foam unit method based on monitoring protozoal communities.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cheng; Chen, Tianming; Li, Zhaoxia; Yan, Jinlong

    2015-05-01

    Using the standardized polyurethane foam unit (PFU) method, a preliminary investigation was carried out on the bioaccumulation and the ecotoxic effects of the pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields. Static ectoxicity test had shown protozoal communities were very sensitive to variations in toxin time and effective concentration (EC) of the pulp and paper wastewater. Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H) was a more suitable indicator of the extent of water pollution than Gleason and Margalef diversity index (d), Simpson's diversity index (D), and Pielou's index (J). The regression equation between S eq and EC was S eq  = - 0.118EC + 18.554. The relatively safe concentration and maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of the wastewater for the protozoal communities were about 20 % and 42 %, respectively. To safely use this wastewater for irrigation, more than 58 % of the toxins must be removed or diluted by further processing. Monitoring of the wastewater in representative irrigated reed fields showed that the regularity of the protozoal colonization process was similar to the static ectoxicity, indicating that the toxicity of the irrigating pulp and paper wastewater was not lethal to protozoal communities in the reed fields. This study demonstrated the applicability of the PFU method in monitoring the ecotoxic effects of pulp and paper wastewater on the level of microbial communities and may guide the supervision and control of pulp and paper wastewater irrigating within the reed fields ecological system (RFES).

  2. A critical review of frameworks used for evaluating reliability and relevance of (eco)toxicity data: Perspectives for an integrated eco-human decision-making framework.

    PubMed

    Roth, N; Ciffroy, P

    2016-10-01

    Considerable efforts have been invested so far to evaluate and rank the quality and relevance of (eco)toxicity data for their use in regulatory risk assessment to assess chemical hazards. Many frameworks have been developed to improve robustness and transparency in the evaluation of reliability and relevance of individual tests, but these frameworks typically focus on either environmental risk assessment (ERA) or human health risk assessment (HHRA), and there is little cross talk between them. There is a need to develop a common approach that would support a more consistent, transparent and robust evaluation and weighting of the evidence across ERA and HHRA. This paper explores the applicability of existing Data Quality Assessment (DQA) frameworks for integrating environmental toxicity hazard data into human health assessments and vice versa. We performed a comparative analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of eleven frameworks for evaluating reliability and/or relevance of toxicity and ecotoxicity hazard data. We found that a frequent shortcoming is the lack of a clear separation between reliability and relevance criteria. A further gaps and needs analysis revealed that none of the reviewed frameworks satisfy the needs of a common eco-human DQA system. Based on our analysis, some key characteristics, perspectives and recommendations are identified and discussed for building a common DQA system as part of a future integrated eco-human decision-making framework. This work lays the basis for developing a common DQA system to support the further development and promotion of Integrated Risk Assessment. PMID:27480485

  3. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics, mechanism and ecotoxicity assessment of tramadol metabolites in aqueous TiO2 suspensions.

    PubMed

    Αntonopoulou, Μ; Hela, D; Konstantinou, I

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated for the first time the photocatalytic degradation of three well-known transformation products (TPs) of pharmaceutical Tramadol, N-desmethyl-(N-DES), N,N-bidesmethyl (N,N-Bi-DES) and N-oxide-tramadol (N-OX-TRA) in two different aquatic matrices, ultrapure water and secondary treated wastewater, with high (10 mg L(-1)) and low (50 μg L(-1)) initial concentrations, respectively. Total disappearance of the parent compounds was attained in all experiments. For initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1), the target compounds were degraded within 30-40 min and a mineralization degree of more than 80% was achieved after 240 min of irradiation, while the contained organic nitrogen was released mainly as NH4(+) for N-DES, N,N-Bi-DES and NO3(-) for N-OX-TRA. The degradation rates of all the studied compounds were considerably decreased in the wastewater due to the presence of inorganic and organic constituents typically found in effluents and environmental matrices which may act as scavengers of the HO(•). The effect of pH (4, 6.7, 10) in the degradation rates was studied and for N-DES-TRA and N,N-Bi-DES-TRA, the optimum pH value was 6.7. In contrast, N-OX-TRA showed an increasing trend in the photocatalytic degradation kinetic in alkaline solutions (pH 10). The major transformation products were identified by high resolution accurate mass spectrometry coupled with liquid chromatography (HR-LC-MS). Scavenging experiments indicated for all studied compounds the important role of HO(•) in the photocatalytic degradation pathways that included mainly hydroxylation and further oxidation of the parent compounds. In addition, Microtox bioassay (Vibrio fischeri) was employed for evaluating the ecotoxicity of photocatalytically treated solutions. Results clearly demonstrate the progressive decrease of the toxicity and the efficiency of the photocatalytic process in the detoxification of the irradiated solutions.

  4. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Abrantes, Nelson; Caetano, Ana Luísa; Bouguerra, Sirine; Gonçalves, Fernando; Römbke, Jörg; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG - amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious

  5. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Abrantes, Nelson; Caetano, Ana Luísa; Bouguerra, Sirine; Gonçalves, Fernando; Römbke, Jörg; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG - amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious

  6. The coevolution of partner switching and strategy updating in non-excludable public goods game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixiao; Shen, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Spatial public goods game is a popular metaphor to model the dilemma of collective cooperation on graphs, yet the non-excludable property of public goods has seldom been considered in previous models. Based upon a coevolutionary model where agents play public goods games and adjust their partnerships, the present model incorporates the non-excludable property of public goods: agents are able to adjust their participation in the games hosted by others, whereas they cannot exclude others from their own games. In the coevolution, a directed and dynamical network which represents partnerships among autonomous agents is evolved. We find that non-excludable property counteracts the positive effect of partner switching, i.e., the equilibrium level of cooperation is lower than that in the situation of excludable public goods game. Therefore, we study the effect of individual punishment that cooperative agents pay a personal cost to decrease benefits of those defective neighbors who participate in their hosted games. It is found that the cooperation level in the whole population is heightened in the presence of such a costly behavior.

  7. Acting on social exclusion: neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of excluders

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Eveline A.; Güroğlu, Berna

    2015-01-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of initiators of social exclusion (i.e. ‘excluders’). Participants divided money in a modified Dictator Game between themselves and people who previously either included or excluded them during a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Participants selectively punished the excluders by decreasing their outcomes; even when this required participants to give up monetary rewards. Punishment of excluders was associated with increased activation in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and bilateral anterior insula. Costly punishment was accompanied by higher activity in the pre-SMA compared with punishment that resulted in gains or was non-costly. Refraining from punishment (i.e. forgiveness) was associated with self-reported perspective-taking and increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junction, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings show that social exclusion can result in punishment as well as forgiveness of excluders and that separable neural networks implicated in social cognition and cognitive control are recruited when people choose either to punish or to forgive those who excluded them. PMID:24652858

  8. Impact and Ethics of Excluding Sweetened Beverages From the SNAP Program

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The state of New York recently petitioned the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) for permission to conduct a demonstration project in which sweetened beverages would be excluded from the foods eligible to be purchased with Supplemental Assistance Nutrition Program (SNAP) benefits (i.e., food stamps) in New York City. The USDA and advocacy groups have raised objections to new SNAP restrictions such as the proposed exclusion of sweetened beverages. Some objections rest on empirical issues best resolved by demonstration projects or pilot studies of new exclusions. Other objections question the equity of excluding sweetened beverages from SNAP; these objections are important but not ethically decisive. The USDA should approve the proposed demonstration project and should encourage other pilot studies to assess the effects of excluding sweetened beverages from SNAP. PMID:21566025

  9. Experimental Evidence of Weak Excluded Volume Effects for Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Damini; Miller, Jeremy J.; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Mahshid, Sara; Reisner, Walter; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    In the classical de Gennes picture of weak polymer nanochannel confinement, the polymer contour is envisioned as divided into a series of isometric blobs. Strong excluded volume interactions are present both within a blob and between blobs. In contrast, for semiflexible polymers like DNA, excluded volume interactions are of borderline strength within a blob but appreciable between blobs, giving rise to a chain description consisting of a string of anisometric blobs. We present experimental validation of this subtle effect of excluded volume for DNA nanochannel confinement by performing measurements of variance in chain extension of T4 DNA molecules as a function of effective nanochannel size (305-453 nm). Additionally, we show an approach to systematically reduce the effect of molecular weight dispersity of DNA samples, a typical experimental artifact, by combining confinement spectroscopy with simulations.

  10. The decision to exclude agricultural and domestic workers from the 1935 Social Security Act.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Larry

    2010-01-01

    The Social Security Act of 1935 excluded from coverage about half the workers in the American economy. Among the excluded groups were agricultural and domestic workers-a large percentage of whom were African Americans. This has led some scholars to conclude that policymakers in 1935 deliberately excluded African Americans from the Social Security system because of prevailing racial biases during that period. This article examines both the logic of this thesis and the available empirical evidence on the origins of the coverage exclusions. The author concludes that the racial-bias thesis is both conceptually flawed and unsupported by the existing empirical evidence. The exclusion of agricultural and domestic workers from the early program was due to considerations of administrative feasibility involving tax-collection procedures. The author finds no evidence of any other policy motive involving racial bias.

  11. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E; Gehring, Niels H; Mouland, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. OPEN ACCESS Biomolecules 2015, 5 2809 We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking. PMID:26492277

  12. Endourologic management of stone-bearing excluded calices: contrasting case reports.

    PubMed

    Elashry, O M; Nakada, S Y; Pearle, M S; Clayman, R V

    1996-02-01

    Calculi in a noncommunicating or excluded calix may be associated with infection, pain, and focal renal damage. Some authors have recommended removal of these calculi and reestablishment of the pelvicaliceal communication, either by dilation of the infundibulum or creation of a neoinfundibulum, in order to prevent recurrent stone formation and infection. Herein, we report two patients with stones in a completely excluded calix, one after repeated courses of shockwave lithotripsy for a staghorn calculus and the other after recurrent pyelonephritis. The combined approach is especially helpful if the examiner is in doubt about the anatomy (true calix v caliceal diverticulum) or if a natural infundibulum cannot be identified by antegrade endoscopy.

  13. Opening a Side-Gate: Engaging the Excluded in Chilean Higher Education through Test-Blind Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koljatic, Mladen; Silva, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The article describes a test-blind admission initiative in a Chilean research university aimed at expanding the inclusion of talented, albeit educationally and socially disadvantaged, students. The outcomes of the test-blind admission cohort were compared with those of students admitted via the regular admission procedure to the same academic…

  14. 2 CFR 180.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... List System (EPLS)? 180.500 Section 180.500 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 180.500 What is the purpose of...

  15. 40 CFR 1039.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... excluded under § 1039.1(c) as a stationary engine and is not required by 40 CFR part 60, subpart IIII, to... the requirements applicable to nonroad or marine engines for the same model year. To meet labeling... under this section must have the following information: (1) Include the heading “EMISSION...

  16. 40 CFR 1039.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... excluded under § 1039.1(c) as a stationary engine and is not required by 40 CFR part 60, subpart IIII, to... the requirements applicable to nonroad or marine engines for the same model year. To meet labeling... under this section must have the following information: (1) Include the heading “EMISSION...

  17. 38 CFR 17.260 - Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.260 Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs. Grant funds for planning or implementing agreements for the exchange of medical information shall not be available for the payment of any hospital, medical, or other costs involving the care...

  18. 38 CFR 17.260 - Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.260 Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs. Grant funds for planning or implementing agreements for the exchange of medical information shall not be available for the payment of any hospital, medical, or other costs involving the care...

  19. 18 CFR 11.3 - Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects. 11.3 Section 11.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT ANNUAL CHARGES UNDER PART I OF THE FEDERAL POWER...

  20. 'To each according to his needs': public libraries and socially excluded people.

    PubMed

    Hicken, Mandy

    2004-09-01

    To deliver a comprehensive and efficient service to all the community, public libraries must first identify needs and allocate an appropriate level of resources. This article focuses on public libraries in England. It outlines: the Government's policy on social inclusion; the needs of the various socially excluded groups; partnerships and funding; staff training and motivation; and examples of good practice.

  1. 40 CFR 258.20 - Procedures for excluding the receipt of hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., regulated hazardous waste means a solid waste that is a hazardous waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.3, that is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b) or was not generated by a... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.20......

  2. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective payment system. 419.22 Section 419.22 Public Health CENTERS... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and...

  3. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 412.22, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL...

  4. Acting on Observed Social Exclusion: Developmental Perspectives on Punishment of Excluders and Compensation of Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A.; van den Bos, Wouter; Güroglu, Berna

    2013-01-01

    This study examined punishment of excluders and compensation of victims after observing an instance of social exclusion at various phases of adolescent development. Participants (n = 183; age 9 to 22 years) were first included in a virtual ball-tossing game, Cyberball, and then "observed" the exclusion of a peer. Subsequently, they…

  5. 26 CFR 1.911-3 - Determination of amount of foreign earned income to be excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States § 1.911-3 Determination of amount of foreign earned income to be excluded. (a) Definition... attributable to services performed in a foreign country or countries. (b) Definition of earned income—(1) In... in any medium other than cash. Earned income does not include any portion of an amount paid by...

  6. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-14 - Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from section 197.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from section 197. 1.167(a)-14 Section 1.167(a)-14 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations §...

  7. Excluding Ethical Issues from U.S. History Textbooks: 911 and the War on Terror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined nine secondary American history textbooks regarding their treatment of 9/11 and related events. The analysis centered on both the knowledge included and excluded from the discussion in each book. Particular attention was given to the moral and ethical issues relevant to 9/11. Findings show that textbooks vary in their…

  8. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this may impact outcomes. This was a two part study; the first analyzing databases of two ongoing large-scale multi-centred hip fracture trials and the second being a systematic review. The FAITH and HEALTH studies were analyzed for exclusion incidence directly related to dementia. The second part consisted of a systematic search of all relevant studies within the last 20 years. In the FAITH study, a total of 1690 subjects were excluded, 375 (22.2%) of which were due to dementia or cognitive impairment. In the HEALTH study, 575 were excluded with dementia/cognitive impairment representing 207 patients (36%). Following the systematic review, 251 articles were identified 17 of which were retained. The overall prevalence of dementia was 27.9% (range 2-51%). Only two studies compared demented and non-demented groups. In these studies significant increases in both mortality and complications were found. In summary, when investigating hip fractures, choosing appropriate objective endpoints is essential to ensure results are also applicable to patients with dementia.

  9. Play It Again: Neural Responses to Reunion with Excluders Predicted by Attachment Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lars O.; Wu, Jia; Borelli, Jessica L.; Mayes, Linda C.; Crowley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Reunion behavior following stressful separations from caregivers is often considered the single most sensitive clue to infant attachment patterns. Extending these ideas to middle childhood/early adolescence, we examined participants' neural responses to reunion with peers who had previously excluded them. We recorded event-related potentials…

  10. 40 CFR 258.20 - Procedures for excluding the receipt of hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., regulated hazardous waste means a solid waste that is a hazardous waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.3, that is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b) or was not generated by a... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.20...

  11. 18 CFR 11.3 - Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of government dams... Government Lands, and Use of Government Dams § 11.3 Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects. (a) General rule. (1) Any licensee whose non-Federal project uses a Government dam or other...

  12. 18 CFR 11.3 - Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of government dams... Government Lands, and Use of Government Dams § 11.3 Use of government dams, excluding pumped storage projects. (a) General rule. (1) Any licensee whose non-Federal project uses a Government dam or other...

  13. NGO Provision of Basic Education: Alternative or Complementary Service Delivery to Support Access to the Excluded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on approaches by non-government organisations (NGOs) to reach primary school-aged children excluded from access to the conventional state education system. It highlights recent shifts in international literature and agency priorities from the portrayal of NGO provision as a (non-formal) "alternative" to (formal) state schooling,…

  14. 31 CFR 359.32 - What definitive Series I savings bonds are excluded from the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What definitive Series I savings bonds... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.32 What definitive Series I savings bonds are excluded from the computation? In computing the purchases for...

  15. 31 CFR 359.32 - What definitive Series I savings bonds are excluded from the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitive Series I savings... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.32 What definitive Series I savings bonds are excluded from the computation? In computing the purchases for...

  16. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.910 Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. (a) A person who intends to manufacture, import, or process a...

  17. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.910 Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. (a) A person who intends to manufacture, import, or process a...

  18. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.910 Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. (a) A person who intends to manufacture, import, or process a...

  19. Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. 45 CFR 1150.4 - What types of claims are excluded from these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What types of claims are excluded from these regulations? 1150.4 Section 1150.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS COLLECTION OF CLAIMS...

  1. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to subgroups on grounds prohibited by WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37, including tribal... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA grantees...

  2. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... target services to subgroups on grounds prohibited by WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37, including... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... eligible population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA...

  3. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... target services to subgroups on grounds prohibited by WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37, including... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... eligible population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA...

  4. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... target services to subgroups on grounds prohibited by WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37, including... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... eligible population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA...

  5. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to subgroups on grounds prohibited by WIA section 188 and 29 CFR part 37, including tribal... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA grantees...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2993 - Are any combustion units excluded from my State plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Solid Waste Disposal Act. (2) The unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission...) Institutional boilers and process heaters. The unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart... debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2993 - Are any combustion units excluded from my State plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Solid Waste Disposal Act. (2) The unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission...) Institutional boilers and process heaters. The unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart... debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2993 - Are any combustion units excluded from my State plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Solid Waste Disposal Act. (2) The unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission...) Institutional boilers and process heaters. The unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart... debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2993 - Are any combustion units excluded from my State plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Solid Waste Disposal Act. (2) The unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission...) Institutional boilers and process heaters. The unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart... debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act...

  10. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this may impact outcomes. This was a two part study; the first analyzing databases of two ongoing large-scale multi-centred hip fracture trials and the second being a systematic review. The FAITH and HEALTH studies were analyzed for exclusion incidence directly related to dementia. The second part consisted of a systematic search of all relevant studies within the last 20 years. In the FAITH study, a total of 1690 subjects were excluded, 375 (22.2%) of which were due to dementia or cognitive impairment. In the HEALTH study, 575 were excluded with dementia/cognitive impairment representing 207 patients (36%). Following the systematic review, 251 articles were identified 17 of which were retained. The overall prevalence of dementia was 27.9% (range 2-51%). Only two studies compared demented and non-demented groups. In these studies significant increases in both mortality and complications were found. In summary, when investigating hip fractures, choosing appropriate objective endpoints is essential to ensure results are also applicable to patients with dementia. PMID:22999009

  11. Surveying the surveillance: surgical site infections excluded by the January 2013 updated surveillance definitions.

    PubMed

    Dicks, Kristen V; Lewis, Sarah S; Durkin, Michael J; Baker, Arthur W; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Anderson, Deverick J

    2014-05-01

    The updated 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Healthcare Safety Network definitions for surgical site infections (SSIs) reduced the duration of prolonged surveillance from 1 year to 90 days and defined which procedure types require prolonged surveillance. Applying the updated 2013 SSI definitions to cases analyzed using the pre-2013 surveillance definitions excluded 10% of previously identified SSIs.

  12. Excluded from School: Getting a Second Chance at a "Meaningful" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Glenda; Mills, Martin; te Riele, Kitty; Hayes, Debra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we draw upon the experiences of a group of young people who have been excluded from mainstream schools in two Australian states to provide an account of the ways in which they have found their way to education in educational sites that are variously referred to as "flexible learning centres", "second chance…

  13. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records...

  14. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records General Requirements § 1.362 What records are...

  15. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records...

  16. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records...

  17. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Establishment, Maintenance, and Availability of Records...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2993 - Are any combustion units excluded from my State plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Solid Waste Disposal Act. (2) The unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission...) Institutional boilers and process heaters. The unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart... under subparts AAAA, BBBB, Ea, Eb, or Cb, of this part or subparts FFF or JJJ of part 62 and is...

  19. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1987-88. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of the 1987-1988 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy, Ontario health…

  20. Ontario University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions). December 1, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a survey of benefits (excluding pensions) provided by Ontario universities are presented. Responses are presented by university concerning the following aspects of general benefits: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, and maternity…

  1. 42 CFR 412.30 - Exclusion of new rehabilitation units and expansion of units already excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rehabilitation units and expansion of units already excluded. (a) Bed capacity in units. A decrease in bed... number of beds can be added to the hospital's licensure and certification and considered “new” under... section, the regional office will review its records on the facility to determine whether any beds...

  2. 31 CFR 900.3 - Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Order 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Antitrust, fraud, and tax and...) SCOPE OF STANDARDS § 900.3 Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded. (a) The...

  3. 31 CFR 900.3 - Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Order 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Antitrust, fraud, and tax and...) SCOPE OF STANDARDS § 900.3 Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded. (a) The...

  4. 31 CFR 900.3 - Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Order 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Antitrust, fraud, and tax and...) SCOPE OF STANDARDS § 900.3 Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded. (a) The...

  5. 31 CFR 900.3 - Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Order 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Antitrust, fraud, and tax and...) SCOPE OF STANDARDS § 900.3 Antitrust, fraud, and tax and interagency claims excluded. (a) The...

  6. 40 CFR 1054.5 - Which nonroad engines are excluded from this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certified to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051 (for example, engines used in snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles). Engines that are otherwise subject to 40 CFR part 1051 but not required to be certified (such as engines exempted under 40 CFR part 1051) are also excluded from this part 1054, unless...

  7. 40 CFR 1054.5 - Which nonroad engines are excluded from this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certified to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051 (for example, engines used in snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles). Engines that are otherwise subject to 40 CFR part 1051 but not required to be certified (such as engines exempted under 40 CFR part 1051) are also excluded from this part 1054, unless...

  8. 40 CFR 1054.5 - Which nonroad engines are excluded from this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certified to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051 (for example, engines used in snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles). Engines that are otherwise subject to 40 CFR part 1051 but not required to be certified (such as engines exempted under 40 CFR part 1051) are also excluded from this part 1054, unless...

  9. 40 CFR 1054.5 - Which nonroad engines are excluded from this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certified to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051 (for example, engines used in snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles). Engines that are otherwise subject to 40 CFR part 1051 but not required to be certified (such as engines exempted under 40 CFR part 1051) are also excluded from this part 1054, unless...

  10. What Happens to Pupils Permanently Excluded from Special Schools and Pupil Referral Units in England?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne; Macleod, Gale; Cullen, Mairi Ann; McCluskey, Gillean

    2011-01-01

    There is widespread consensus in the research and policy-related literature over the last decade that young people who have been permanently excluded from school are at a far greater risk of a variety of negative outcomes than young people who have not had this experience. These negative outcomes include prolonged periods out of education and/or…

  11. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and... excluded operation as a certified organic operation, or (2) Be represented as a certified organic product or certified organic ingredient to any buyer. (b) An agricultural product organically produced...

  12. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation. 205.310 Section 205.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  13. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation. 205.310 Section 205.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  14. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.910 Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. (a) A person who intends to manufacture, import, or process a...

  15. 40 CFR 725.910 - Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.910 Persons excluded from reporting significant new uses. (a) A person who intends to manufacture, import, or process a...

  16. 45 CFR 1150.4 - What types of claims are excluded from these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What types of claims are excluded from these regulations? 1150.4 Section 1150.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS COLLECTION OF CLAIMS...

  17. 45 CFR 1150.4 - What types of claims are excluded from these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What types of claims are excluded from these regulations? 1150.4 Section 1150.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS COLLECTION OF CLAIMS...

  18. 45 CFR 1150.4 - What types of claims are excluded from these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What types of claims are excluded from these regulations? 1150.4 Section 1150.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS COLLECTION OF CLAIMS...

  19. ALTERNATIVE FORMULATIONS TO REDUCE CFC USE IN U.S. EXEMPTED AND EXCLUDED AEROSOL PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines products exempted and excluded from those affected by the 1978 ban on the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as aerosol propellants, the present consumption of CFCs still utilized for these products in the U.S., and alternative formulations which may be used to...

  20. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation. 205.310 Section 205.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...